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Sample records for determining micromechanical strain

  1. Determining Micromechanical Strain in Nitinol

    SciTech Connect

    Strasberg, Matthew; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Nitinol is a superelastic alloy made of equal parts nickel and titanium. Due to its unique shape memory properties, nitinol is used to make medical stents, lifesaving devices used to allow blood flow in occluded arteries. Micromechanical models and even nitinol-specific finite element analysis (FEA) software are insufficient for unerringly predicting fatigue and resultant failure. Due to the sensitive nature of its application, a better understanding of nitinol on a granular scale is being pursued through X-ray diffraction techniques at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Through analysis of powder diffraction patterns of nitinol under increasing tensile loads, localized strain can be calculated. We compare these results with micromechanical predictions in order to advance nitinol-relevant FEA tools. From this we hope to gain a greater understanding of how nitinol fatigues under multi-axial loads.

  2. Implementation of Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Zhu, Linfa; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear response of composite plates under large strain and high strain rate loading. A recently developed strain dependent micromechanics model is extended to account for the shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of shear deformation effects are investigated to improve the development strain rate dependent micromechanics model. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio is developed. The revised micromechanics model is implemented into higher order laminate theory. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate transverse shear effects during impact.

  3. Implementation of Fiber Substructuring Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were incorporated into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the micromechanics method is revised such that the composite unit cell is divided into a number of slices. Micromechanics equations are then developed for each slice, with laminate theory applied to determine the elastic properties, effective stresses and effective inelastic strains for the unit cell. Verification studies are conducted using two representative polymer matrix composites with a nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation response. The computed results compare well to experimentally obtained values.

  4. A micromechanical damage and fracture model for polymers based on fractional strain-gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, S.; Li, B.; Weinberg, K.; Conti, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a simple one-parameter macroscopic model of distributed damage and fracture of polymers that is amenable to a straightforward and efficient numerical implementation. We show that the macroscopic model can be rigorously derived, in the sense of optimal scaling, from a micromechanical model of chain elasticity and failure regularized by means of fractional strain-gradient elasticity. In particular, we derive optimal scaling laws that supply a link between the single parameter of the macroscopic model, namely, the critical energy-release rate of the material, and micromechanical parameters pertaining to the elasticity and strength of the polymer chains and to the strain-gradient elasticity regularization. We show how the critical energy-release rate of specific materials can be determined from test data. Finally, we demonstrate the scope and fidelity of the model by means of an example of application, namely, Taylor-impact experiments of polyurea 1000 rods.

  5. Strains at the myotendinous junction predicted by a micromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Bahar; Ames, Elizabeth G; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Blemker, Silvia S

    2011-11-10

    The goal of this work was to create a finite element micromechanical model of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) to examine how the structure and mechanics of the MTJ affect the local micro-scale strains experienced by muscle fibers. We validated the model through comparisons with histological longitudinal sections of muscles fixed in slack and stretched positions. The model predicted deformations of the A-bands within the fiber near the MTJ that were similar to those measured from the histological sections. We then used the model to predict the dependence of local fiber strains on activation and the mechanical properties of the endomysium. The model predicted that peak micro-scale strains increase with activation and as the compliance of the endomysium decreases. Analysis of the models revealed that, in passive stretch, local fiber strains are governed by the difference of the mechanical properties between the fibers and the endomysium. In active stretch, strain distributions are governed by the difference in cross-sectional area along the length of the tapered region of the fiber near the MTJ. The endomysium provides passive resistance that balances the active forces and prevents the tapered region of the fiber from undergoing excessive strain. These model predictions lead to the following hypotheses: (i) the increased likelihood of injury during active lengthening of muscle fibers may be due to the increase in peak strain with activation and (ii) endomysium may play a role in protecting fibers from injury by reducing the strains within the fiber at the MTJ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Micromechanics based permeability evolution in brittle materials at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, T.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    We develop a micro-mechanics based permeability evolution model for brittle materials that are strain rate sensitive. Extending the mechanical constitutive description of brittle solids, whose constitutive response is governed by micro-cracks, developed by Bhat et al. (2012) we now relate the damage related strains (plastic strains) to calculate the evolution of micro-crack aperture. We then use the permeability model developed by Gueguen and Dienes (1989) and Simpson et al. (2001) to evaluate the permeability evolution. Permeability evolution computed using this model is shown to be in very good agreement with experimental results. Pore pressure evolution in a damaged medium, due to waste water injection for example, is then computed and we show that spatially variable permeability plays a major role in determining the pore pressure excess in the surrounding medium.

  7. Implementation of Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were implemented into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the computation of the effective inelastic strain in the micromechanics model was modified to fully incorporate the Poisson effect. The micromechanics equations were also combined with classical laminate theory to enable the analysis of symmetric multilayered laminates subject to in-plane loading. A quasi-incremental trapezoidal integration method was implemented to integrate the constitutive equations within the laminate theory. Verification studies were conducted using an AS4/PEEK composite using a variety of laminate configurations and strain rates. The predicted results compared well with experimentally obtained values.

  8. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  9. Micromechanics-Based Permeability Evolution in Brittle Materials at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, Thibaut; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a micromechanics-based permeability evolution model for brittle materials at high strain rates (≥ 100 s^{-1}). Extending for undrained deformation the mechanical constitutive description of brittle solids, whose constitutive response is governed by micro-cracks, we now relate the damage-induced strains to micro-crack aperture. We then use an existing permeability model to evaluate the permeability evolution. This model predicts both the percolative and connected regime of permeability evolution of Westerly Granite during triaxial loading at high strain rate. This model can simulate pore pressure history during earthquake coseismic dynamic ruptures under undrained conditions.

  10. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance.

  11. Micromechanical modelling of the elastoplastic behaviour of metallic material under strain-path changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajoui, Jamal; Gloaguen, David; Courant, Bruno; Guillén, Ronald

    2009-07-01

    A two-level homogenization approach is applied for the micromechanical modelling of the elastoplastic material behaviour during various strain-path changes. A mechanical description of the grain is developed through a micro-meso transition based on a modified elastoplastic self-consistent approach which takes into account the dislocation evolution. Next, a meso-macro transition using a self-consistent model is used to deduce the macroscopic behaviour of the polycrystal. A correct agreement is observed between the simulations and the experimental results at the mesoscopic and macroscopic levels.

  12. Incorporation of Mean Stress Effects into the Micromechanical Analysis of the High Strain Rate Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2002-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program, to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. A micromechanics approach is employed in this work, in which state variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified to model the deformation of the polymer matrix, and a strength of materials based micromechanics method is used to predict the effective response of the composite. In the analysis of the inelastic deformation of the polymer matrix, the definitions of the effective stress and effective inelastic strain have been modified in order to account for the effect of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers. Two representative polymers, a toughened epoxy and a brittle epoxy, are characterized through the use of data from tensile and shear tests across a variety of strain rates. Results computed by using the developed constitutive equations correlate well with data generated via experiments. The procedure used to incorporate the constitutive equations within a micromechanics method is presented, and sample calculations of the deformation response of a composite for various fiber orientations and strain rates are discussed.

  13. Micromechanical Model for Deformation in Solids with Universal Predictions for Stress-Strain Curves and Slip Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Karin A.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Uhl, Jonathan T.

    2009-05-01

    A basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only one tuning parameter (weakening {epsilon}) is introduced. The model can reproduce observed stress-strain curves, acoustic emissions and related power spectra, event statistics, and geometrical properties of slip, with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Exact universal predictions are extracted using mean field theory and renormalization group tools. The results agree with recent experimental observations and simulations of related models for dislocation dynamics, material damage, and earthquake statistics.

  14. Micromechanical model for deformation in solids with universal predictions for stress-strain curves and slip avalanches.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Karin A; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Uhl, Jonathan T

    2009-05-01

    A basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only one tuning parameter (weakening epsilon) is introduced. The model can reproduce observed stress-strain curves, acoustic emissions and related power spectra, event statistics, and geometrical properties of slip, with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Exact universal predictions are extracted using mean field theory and renormalization group tools. The results agree with recent experimental observations and simulations of related models for dislocation dynamics, material damage, and earthquake statistics.

  15. The influence of void ratio on small strain shear modulus of granular materials: A micromechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaomin; Cheng, Yipik; Ling, Dongsheng

    2013-06-01

    The small strain shear modulus Gmax of granular materials is highly dependent on their current void ratio and stress state, generally expressed as the famous Hardin and Richart equation. Various forms of void ratio functions have been proposed, either based on experimental or theoretical research. It is noted that each of them can be applied for a certain soil within a limited void ratio range. Micromechanical studies on the influence of void ratio on Gmax are conducted in this paper, using Discrete Element Method. After each sample being isotropically consolidated, shear wave velocity is measured by applying a velocity pulse to the transmitter in a certain direction, and monitoring the corresponding average velocity of the receiver. The capabilities of various existing void ratio functions are examined, together with the relationship between coordination number and void ratio, distribution of coordination number, as well as the contact force network. The void ratio effect on Gmax is further explained in terms of the wave travel length and the travel time for different contact connectivity networks.

  16. Foam Micromechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  17. Coronary stent strut size dependent stress-strain response investigated using micromechanical finite element models.

    PubMed

    Savage, P; O'Donnell, B P; McHugh, P E; Murphy, B P; Quinn, D F

    2004-02-01

    Cardiovascular stents are metal scaffolds that are used in the treatment of atherosclerosis. These devices are typically composed of very thin struts (< or = 100 microm thickness, for coronary applications). At this size-scale the question arises as to the suitability of using bulk material properties in stent design. This paper investigates the use of finite element analysis to predict the mechanical failure of stent struts, typical of the strut size used in coronary stents. 316 L stainless steel in uniaxial loading was considered. To accurately represent the constitutive behavior of the material at this size-scale, a computational micromechanics approach was taken involving an explicit representation of the grain structure in the steel struts, and the use of crystal plasticity theory to represent the constitutive behavior of the individual grains. The development of the finite element models is discussed and results are presented for the predictions of tensile mechanical behavior as a function of strut thickness. The results showed that using this modelling approach, a size effect, already seen experimentally, is produced. This has significant implications for stent design, especially in the context of the desire to produce smaller stents for small bore neurovascular and peripheral artery applications.

  18. On consistent micromechanical estimation of macroscopic elastic energy, coherence energy and phase transformation strains for SMA materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus of micromechanics is used to isolate the key ingredients entering macroscopic Gibbs free energy function of a shape memory alloy (SMA) material. A new self-equilibrated eigenstrains influence moduli (SEIM) method is developed for consistent estimation of effective (macroscopic) thermostatic properties of solid materials, which in microscale can be regarded as amalgams of n-phase linear thermoelastic component materials with eigenstrains. The SEIM satisfy the self-consistency conditions, following from elastic reciprocity (Betti) theorem. The method allowed expressing macroscopic coherency energy and elastic complementary energy terms present in the general form of macroscopic Gibbs free energy of SMA materials in the form of semilinear and semiquadratic functions of the phase composition. Consistent SEIM estimates of elastic complementary energy, coherency energy and phase transformation strains corresponding to classical Reuss and Voigt conjectures are explicitly specified. The Voigt explicit relations served as inspiration for working out an original engineering practice-oriented semiexperimental SEIM estimates. They are especially conveniently applicable for an isotropic aggregate (composite) composed of a mixture of n isotropic phases. Using experimental data for NiTi alloy and adopting conjecture that it can be treated as an isotropic aggregate of two isotropic phases, it is shown that the NiTi coherency energy and macroscopic phase strain are practically not influenced by the difference in values of austenite and martensite elastic constants. It is shown that existence of nonzero fluctuating part of phase microeigenstrains field is responsible for building up of so-called stored energy of coherency, which is accumulated in pure martensitic phase after full completion of phase transition. Experimental data for NiTi alloy show that the stored coherency energy cannot be neglected as it considerably influences the characteristic phase transition

  19. Comparative Analysis of Zones of Plastic Strain, Dynamic Crack Resistance, Structure and Micromechanisms of Crack Propagation in Structural Steels 09G2S, 25 and 40 in High-Toughness Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, M. Yu.; Georgiev, M. N.; Shaimanov, G. S.; Simonov, Yu. N.; Zaporozhan, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Comparative analysis of zones of plastic strain, dynamic crack resistance, structure, and micromechanisms of crack propagation in structural steels 09G2S, 25 and 40 in high-toughness condition is performed. The structure, the micromechanisms of crack growth, and the dynamic crack resistance of steels 09G2S, 25 and 40 are studied. Complete zones of plastic stain (CPSZ) under fracture surfaces are plotted after quenching and high tempering at 650°C. The levels of microhardness in the CPSZ are mapped for specially-designed specimens with additional 1-mm-deep side notches and relative crack length of 0.4 - 0.5. The sizes of the zones of plastic strain in the starting region are determined. Special features of the distribution of microhardness in local volumes of the CPSZ are determined. The structure under fracture surfaces of steels 09G2S, 25 and 40 is studied over the whole of the path of propagation of a dynamic crack.

  20. Strain Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite Utilizing a Micromechanics Approach. Degree awarded by Cincinnati Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    Potential gas turbine applications will expose polymer matrix composites to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under extreme conditions. Specifically, analytical methods designed for these applications must have the capability of properly capturing the strain rate sensitivities and nonlinearities that are present in the material response. The Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive equations, originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals, have been modified to simulate the nonlinear deformation response of ductile, crystalline polymers. The constitutive model is characterized and correlated for two representative ductile polymers. Fiberite 977-2 and PEEK, and the computed results correlate well with experimental values. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented in a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics model to predict the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of a composite ply. Uniform stress and uniform strain assumptions are applied to compute the effective stresses of a composite unit cell from the applied strains. The micromechanics equations are successfully verified for two polymer matrix composites. IM7/977-2 and AS4/PEEK. The ultimate strength of a composite ply is predicted with the Hashin failure criteria that were implemented in the composite micromechanics model. The failure stresses of the two composite material systems are accurately predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The composite deformation model is implemented in LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic explicit finite element code. The matrix constitutive equations are converted into an incremental form, and the model is implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of a user defined material subroutine. The deformation response of a bulk polymer and a polymer matrix composite are predicted by finite element analyses. The results

  1. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-28

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 10(3) to 10(4) s(-1) using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  2. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  3. Micromechanical constitutive model for low-temperature constant strain rate deformation of limestones in the brittle and semi-brittle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Deformation and failure of rocks are important for a better understanding of many crustal geological phenomena such as faulting and compaction. In carbonate rocks among others, low-temperature deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, having implications for porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. Hence, a thorough understanding of all the micromechanisms responsible for deformation is of great interest. In this study, a constitutive model for the low-temperature deformation of low-porosity (<20 per cent) carbonate rocks is derived from the micromechanisms identified in previous studies. The micromechanical model is based on (1) brittle crack propagation, (2) a plasticity law (interpreted in terms of dislocation glide without possibility to climb) for porous media with hardening and (3) crack nucleation due to dislocation pile-ups. The model predicts stress-strain relations and the evolution of damage during deformation. The model adequately predicts brittle behaviour at low confining pressures, which switches to a semi-brittle behaviour characterized by inelastic compaction followed by dilatancy at higher confining pressures. Model predictions are compared to experimental results from previous studies and are found to be in close agreement with experimental results. This suggests that microphysical phenomena responsible for the deformation are sufficiently well captured by the model although twinning, recovery and cataclasis are not considered. The porosity range of applicability and limits of the model are discussed.

  4. Computational micromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M.

    1996-09-01

    Selected issues in computational micromechanics are reviewed, with particular emphasis on multiple-scale problems and micromechanical models of material behavior. Examples considered include: the bridging of atomistic and continuum scales, with application to nanoindentation and the brittle-to-ductile transition; the development of dislocation-based constitutive relations for pure metallic crystals and intermetallic compounds, with applications to fracture of single crystals and bicrystals; the simulation of non-planar three-dimensional crack growth at the microscale, with application to mixed mode I III effective behavior and crack trapping and bridging in fiber-reinforced composites; and the direct micromechanical simulation of fragmentation of brittle solids and subsequent flow of the comminuted phase.

  5. Molecularly imprinted polymer based micromechanical cantilever sensor system for the selective determination of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Okan, Meltem; Sari, Esma; Duman, Memed

    2017-02-15

    The main objective of this study is to develop molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based micromechanical cantilever sensor system that has high specificity, fast response time and is easily applicable by user for the detection of ciprofloxacin (CPX) molecule in water resources. Highly specific CPX imprinted nanoparticles were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization technique. The average size of the synthesized nanoparticles was measured about 160nm with high monodispersivity. Covalent and monolayer binding of the MIP nanoparticles on cantilevers was provided by EDC/NHS activation. Validation of the developed cantilever nanosensor was performed in air with dip-and-dry technique by employing the dynamic sensing mode. According to the results obtained, micromechanical cantilever sensor system worked linearly for the concentration range of 1.5-150.9μM. This concentration range resulted with 18.4-48.9pg mass load on the MIP modified cantilever. The sensitivity of the developed sensor was calculated as 2.6Hz/pg. To control the specificity of MIPs, a different antibiotic enrofloxacin (ENF), with a similar physical and chemical structure with CPX, was used, which showed 7 folds low binding affinity. The developed highly specific microcantilever sensor has a response time of approximately 2min and is reusable up to 4 times. The results indicate that the MIP based AFM nanosensor has high sensitivity for the CPX molecule. This combination of MIP nanoparticles with micromechanical sensors is one of the pioneer studies in the mass sensing applications. This fast, low cost and highly sensitive CPX specific MIP nanoparticle based nanosensor developed in this research have the potential to pave the way for further studies.

  6. Micromechanical thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, R.; Lang, H. P.; Gerber, Ch.; Gimzewski, J. K.; Fabian, J. H.; Scandella, L.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    1998-09-01

    We demonstrate a new method for thermal analysis of nanogram quantities of material using a micromechanical thermogravimetric technique. The cantilever-type device uses an integrated piezoresistor to sense bending and simultaneously to ramp the temperature and control temperature cycles. It has a mass resolution in the picogram range. A quantitative analysis of the dehydration of copper-sulfate-pentahydrate (CuSO 4·5H 2O) is presented. The technique outperforms current thermogravimetric approaches by five orders of magnitude.

  7. Mineral and water content of A. gigas scales determine local micromechanical properties and energy dissipation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso, Omar P.; Gigos, Florian; Torres, Fernando G.

    2017-03-01

    Arapaima gigas scales are natural laminated composite materials made of individual layers with different degrees of mineralization, accompanied of varying mechanical properties. This natural design provides scales with hardness and flexibility, and can serve as a source of inspiration for the development of new layered composites with a hard surface and flexible base. In this paper, we have carried out cyclic micro-indentation tests on both; the internal and the highly mineralized external surface of air dried and wet scales, in order to assess the variation of their local micromechanical properties with regard to the mineral and water content. The load-penetration (P-h) curves showed that creep takes place throughout the application of a constant force during the micro-indentation tests, confirming the time dependent response of A. gigas scales. A model that accounted for the elastic, plastic and viscous responses of the samples was used to fit the experimental results. The penetration depth during loading and creep, as well as the energy dissipated are dependent on the water content. The used model suggests that the viscous response of the internal layer increases with the water content.

  8. Micromechanical Oscillating Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A micromechanical oscillating mass balance and method adapted for measuring minute quantities of material deposited at a selected location, such as during a vapor deposition process. The invention comprises a vibratory composite beam which includes a dielectric layer sandwiched between two conductive layers. The beam is positioned in a magnetic field. An alternating current passes through one conductive layers, the beam oscillates, inducing an output current in the second conductive layer, which is analyzed to determine the resonant frequency of the beam. As material is deposited on the beam, the mass of the beam increases and the resonant frequency of the beam shifts, and the mass added is determined.

  9. Micromechanical Study of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velikov, P. A.; Stchapov, N. P.; Lorenz, W. F.

    1945-01-01

    The Institut Scientifique Experimental des Transports at Moscow established toward the end of 1925 had since its inception included in its program the study of the mechanism of plastic deformation and the problems associated with it with reference to the materials of the means of transport. Before the program thus determined upon could be carried out, it was necessary to adopt a method of research, or, more exactly, a system of such methods. Because of the modest equipment of the laboratory of the recently established institute, the choice of any particular method was determined not only by the advantages it offered but also by the resources available. As a result of a series of studies and investigations, a method was determined upon which in this paper will be denoted as the micromechanical method. The underlying basis of this method is already known. As will be seen from the description that follows, the micromechanical method is merely a combination of the micrographic study of plastic deformations with mechanical tests on small specimens. It is a well-known fact that a number of investigators have largely employed and still are employing these two procedures and have thereby obtained good results. The authors of the present paper have found it useful to combine the two methods, by making the two studies simultaneously on the sane specimen.

  10. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  11. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  12. A micromechanical model of the viscoplastic behaviour of titanium accounting for its anisotropic and strain-rate-dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doquet, V.; Barkia, B.

    2015-05-01

    The viscoplastic behaviour of two batches of commercially pure titanium with different oxygen contents was characterized at room temperature through tension, creep, relaxation, and strain-rate jump tests along the rolling and transverse directions. Depending on the applied stress, creep saturated, or the primary creep stage was followed by secondary and even tertiary creep leading to fracture within a few hours. 33 % to 40 % of the flow stress was relaxed within 20 hours. The strain-rate sensitivity was found to increase with the oxygen content and when the strain rate decreased. It was up to 25 % higher along the transverse direction than along the rolling direction. The experimental data were used to identify a simple mean field crystal viscoplasticity model. Assuming different viscosities on prismatic and nonprismatic slip systems, the anisotropy and strain-rate dependence of the strain-rate sensitivity were captured. As a consequence of these different viscosities, the relative contributions of each type of slip system to the overall deformation are predicted to vary with the strain rate, in accordance with some data from the literature.

  13. Strain Determination Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.; Graff, A.; Altmann, F.

    2010-11-24

    In the present paper we demonstrate the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for high resolution elastic strain determination. Here, we focus on analysis methods based on determination of small shifts in EBSD pattern with respect to a reference pattern using cross-correlation algorithms. Additionally we highlight the excellent spatial and depth resolution of EBSD and introduce the use of simulated diffraction patterns based on dynamical diffraction theory for sensitivity estimation. Moreover the potential of EBSD for strain analysis of strained thin films with particular emphasis on appropriate target preparation which respect to occurring lattice defects is demonstrated.

  14. Micromechanical damage and fracture in elastomeric polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, Stefanie

    This thesis aims at a simple one-parameter macroscopic model of distributed damage and fracture of polymers that is amenable to a straightforward and efficient numerical implementation. The failure model is motivated by post-mortem fractographic observations of void nucleation, growth and coalescence in polyurea stretched to failure, and accounts for the specific fracture energy per unit area attendant to rupture of the material. Furthermore, it is shown that the macroscopic model can be rigorously derived, in the sense of optimal scaling, from a micromechanical model of chain elasticity and failure regularized by means of fractional strain-gradient elasticity. Optimal scaling laws that supply a link between the single parameter of the macroscopic model, namely the critical energy-release rate of the material, and micromechanical parameters pertaining to the elasticity and strength of the polymer chains, and to the strain-gradient elasticity regularization, are derived. Based on optimal scaling laws, it is shown how the critical energy-release rate of specific materials can be determined from test data. In addition, the scope and fidelity of the model is demonstrated by means of an example of application, namely Taylor-impact experiments of polyurea rods. Hereby, optimal transportation meshfree approximation schemes using maximum-entropy interpolation functions are employed. Finally, a different crazing model using full derivatives of the deformation gradient and a core cut-off is presented, along with a numerical non-local regularization model. The numerical model takes into account higher-order deformation gradients in a finite element framework. It is shown how the introduction of non-locality into the model stabilizes the effect of strain localization to small volumes in materials undergoing softening. From an investigation of craze formation in the limit of large deformations, convergence studies verifying scaling properties of both local- and non-local energy

  15. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  16. Micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Cibula, Matthew; Feng, Jingchen; Krnacik, Emma A.; McIntyre, David H.; Levine, Herbert; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Collagen gels are widely used in experiments on cell mechanics because they mimic the extracellular matrix in physiological conditions. Collagen gels are often characterized by their bulk rheology; however, variations in the collagen fiber microstructure and cell adhesion forces cause the mechanical properties to be inhomogeneous at the cellular scale. We study the mechanics of type I collagen on the scale of tens to hundreds of microns by using holographic optical tweezers to apply pN forces to microparticles embedded in the collagen fiber network. We find that in response to optical forces, particle displacements are inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and asymmetric. Gels prepared at 21 °C and 37 °C show qualitative difference in their micromechanical characteristics. We also demonstrate that contracting cells remodel the micromechanics of their surrounding extracellular matrix in a strain- and distance-dependent manner. To further understand the micromechanics of cellularized extracellular matrix, we have constructed a computational model which reproduces the main experiment findings. PMID:26324923

  17. Micromechanisms with floating pivot

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-03-06

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use floating pivot structures to relieve some of the problems encountered in the use of solid flexible pivots.

  18. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Dario; Zanette, Damián H.; López, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical oscillators are present in almost every electronic device. They mainly consist of a resonating element providing an oscillating output with a specific frequency. Their ability to maintain a determined frequency in a specified period of time is the most important parameter limiting their implementation. Historically, quartz crystals have almost exclusively been used as the resonating element, but micromechanical resonators are increasingly being considered to replace them. These resonators are easier to miniaturize and allow for monolithic integration with electronics. However, as their dimensions shrink to the microscale, most mechanical resonators exhibit nonlinearities that considerably degrade the frequency stability of the oscillator. Here we demonstrate that, by coupling two different vibrational modes through an internal resonance, it is possible to stabilize the oscillation frequency of nonlinear self-sustaining micromechanical resonators. Our findings provide a new strategy for engineering low-frequency noise oscillators capitalizing on the intrinsic nonlinear phenomena of micromechanical resonators.

  19. Delamination micromechanics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Mahishi, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element analysis was developed which includes elastoplastic, orthotropic material response, and fracture initiation and propagation. Energy absorption due to physical failure processes characteristic of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of composite materials is modeled. A local energy release rate in the presence of plasticity was defined and used as a criterion to predict the onset and growth of cracks in both micromechanics and macromechanics analyses. This crack growth simulation technique is based upon a virtual crack extension method. A three-dimensional finite element micromechanics model is used to study the effects of broken fibers, cracked matrix and fiber-matrix debond on the fracture toughness of the unidirectional composite. The energy release rates at the onset of unstable crack growth in the micromechanics analyses are used as critical energy release rates in the macromechanics analysis. This integrated micromechanical and macromechanical fracture criterion is shown to be very effective in predicting the onset and growth of cracks in general multilayered composite laminates by applying the criterion to a single-edge notched graphite/epoxy laminate subjected to implane tension normal to the notch.

  20. Probabilistic composite micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, T. A.; Bellini, P. X.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material properties at the micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predicted and response variables in the study.

  1. Probabilistic composite micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, T. A.; Bellini, P. X.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material properties at the micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predicted and response variables in the study.

  2. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  3. Neural Networks and Micromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussul, Ernst; Baidyk, Tatiana; Wunsch, Donald C.

    The title of the book, "Neural Networks and Micromechanics," seems artificial. However, the scientific and technological developments in recent decades demonstrate a very close connection between the two different areas of neural networks and micromechanics. The purpose of this book is to demonstrate this connection. Some artificial intelligence (AI) methods, including neural networks, could be used to improve automation system performance in manufacturing processes. However, the implementation of these AI methods within industry is rather slow because of the high cost of conducting experiments using conventional manufacturing and AI systems. To lower the cost, we have developed special micromechanical equipment that is similar to conventional mechanical equipment but of much smaller size and therefore of lower cost. This equipment could be used to evaluate different AI methods in an easy and inexpensive way. The proved methods could be transferred to industry through appropriate scaling. In this book, we describe the prototypes of low cost microequipment for manufacturing processes and the implementation of some AI methods to increase precision, such as computer vision systems based on neural networks for microdevice assembly and genetic algorithms for microequipment characterization and the increase of microequipment precision.

  4. Determination of Dynamic Recrystallization Process by Equivalent Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaomei; Deng, Wei

    Based on Tpнoвckiй's displacement field, equivalent strain expression was derived. And according to the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) critical strain, DRX process was determined by equivalent strain. It was found that equivalent strain distribution in deformed specimen is inhomogeneous, and it increases with increasing true strain. Under a certain true strain, equivalent strains at the center, demisemi radius or on tangential plane just below the surface of the specimen are higher than the true strain. Thus, micrographs at those positions can not exactly reflect the true microstructures under the certain true strain. With increasing strain rate, the initial and finish time of DRX decrease. The frozen microstructures of 20Mn23AlV steel with the experimental condition validate the feasibility of predicting DRX process by equivalent strain.

  5. Concentration independent modulation of local micromechanics in a fibrin gel.

    PubMed

    Kotlarchyk, Maxwell A; Shreim, Samir G; Alvarez-Elizondo, Martha B; Estrada, Laura C; Singh, Rahul; Valdevit, Lorenzo; Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Gratton, Enrico; Putnam, Andrew J; Botvinick, Elliot L

    2011-01-01

    Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers based active microrheology (AMR). Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present the device in the context of fibrin hydrogels. First AMR is used to directly measure local micromechanics in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrin concentration. Changes in stiffness are then mapped within our device, where fibrin concentration is held constant. Fluorescence confocal imaging and orbital particle tracking are used to quantify structural changes in fibrin on the micro and nano levels respectively. The micromechanical strain stiffening measured by microrheology is not accompanied by ECM microstructural changes under our applied loads, as measured by confocal microscopy. However, super-resolution orbital tracking reveals nanostructural straightening, lengthening, and reduced movement of fibrin fibers. Furthermore, we show that aortic smooth muscle cells cultured within our device are morphologically sensitive to the induced mechanical gradient. Our results demonstrate a powerful cell culture tool that can be used in the study of mechanical effects on cellular physiology in naturally derived 3D ECM tissues.

  6. Concentration Independent Modulation of Local Micromechanics in a Fibrin Gel

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Elizondo, Martha B.; Estrada, Laura C.; Singh, Rahul; Valdevit, Lorenzo; Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Gratton, Enrico; Putnam, Andrew J.; Botvinick, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers based active microrheology (AMR). Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present the device in the context of fibrin hydrogels. First AMR is used to directly measure local micromechanics in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrin concentration. Changes in stiffness are then mapped within our device, where fibrin concentration is held constant. Fluorescence confocal imaging and orbital particle tracking are used to quantify structural changes in fibrin on the micro and nano levels respectively. The micromechanical strain stiffening measured by microrheology is not accompanied by ECM microstructural changes under our applied loads, as measured by confocal microscopy. However, super-resolution orbital tracking reveals nanostructural straightening, lengthening, and reduced movement of fibrin fibers. Furthermore, we show that aortic smooth muscle cells cultured within our device are morphologically sensitive to the induced mechanical gradient. Our results demonstrate a powerful cell culture tool that can be used in the study of mechanical effects on cellular physiology in naturally derived 3D ECM tissues. PMID:21629793

  7. Micromechanics of hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The following summarizes the key points addressed during a tutorial session on the Micromechanics of Hearing that took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. The tutorial was intended to present an overview of basic ideas and to address topics of current interest relevant to the Workshop. The session was recorded, and the audio file and accompanying visual content of the presentation can be found in the Mechanics of Hearing Digital Library (www.mechanicsofhearing.org).

  8. Micromechanics of ice friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammonds, P. R.; Bailey, E.; Lishman, B.; Scourfield, S.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional mechanics are controlled by the ice micro-structure - surface asperities and flaws - but also the ice fabric and permeability network structure of the contacting blocks. Ice properties are dependent upon the temperature of the bulk ice, on the normal stress and on the sliding velocity and acceleration. This means the shear stress required for sliding is likewise dependent on sliding velocity, acceleration, and temperature. We aim to describe the micro-physics of the contacting surface. We review micro-mechanical models of friction: the elastic and ductile deformation of asperities under normal loads and their shear failure by ductile flow, brittle fracture, or melting and hydrodynamic lubrication. Combinations of these give a total of six rheological models of friction. We present experimental results in ice mechanics and physics from laboratory experiments to understand the mechanical models. We then examine the scaling relations of the slip of ice, to examine how the micro-mechanics of ice friction can be captured simple reduced-parameter models, describing the mechanical state and slip rate of the floes. We aim to capture key elements that they may be incorporated into mid and ocean-basin scale modelling.

  9. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  10. Composite micromechanical modeling using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of the boundary element method for analyzing composite micromechanical behavior is demonstrated. Stress-strain, heat conduction, and thermal expansion analyses are conducted using the boundary element computer code BEST-CMS, and the results obtained are compared to experimental observations, analytical calculations, and finite element analyses. For each of the analysis types, the boundary element results agree reasonably well with the results from the other methodologies, with explainable discrepancies. Overall, the boundary element method shows promise in providing an alternative method to analyze composite micromechanical behavior.

  11. Micromechanics of fracturing in nanoceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ovid'ko, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    An overview of key experimental data and theoretical representations on fracture processes in nanoceramics is presented. The focuses are placed on crack growth in nanoceramics and their toughening micromechanics. Conventional toughening micromechanisms are discussed which effectively operate in both microcrystalline-matrix ceramics containing nanoinclusions and nanocrystalline-matrix ceramics. Particular attention is devoted to description of special (new) toughening micromechanisms related to nanoscale deformation occurring near crack tips in nanocrystalline-matrix ceramics. In addition, a new strategy for pronounced improvement of fracture toughness of ceramic materials through fabrication of ceramic–graphene nanocomposites is considered. Toughening micromechanisms are discussed which operate in such nanocomposites containing graphene platelets and/or few-layer sheets. PMID:25713442

  12. Micromechanics of fracturing in nanoceramics.

    PubMed

    Ovid'ko, I A

    2015-03-28

    An overview of key experimental data and theoretical representations on fracture processes in nanoceramics is presented. The focuses are placed on crack growth in nanoceramics and their toughening micromechanics. Conventional toughening micromechanisms are discussed which effectively operate in both microcrystalline-matrix ceramics containing nanoinclusions and nanocrystalline-matrix ceramics. Particular attention is devoted to description of special (new) toughening micromechanisms related to nanoscale deformation occurring near crack tips in nanocrystalline-matrix ceramics. In addition, a new strategy for pronounced improvement of fracture toughness of ceramic materials through fabrication of ceramic-graphene nanocomposites is considered. Toughening micromechanisms are discussed which operate in such nanocomposites containing graphene platelets and/or few-layer sheets.

  13. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  14. Micromechanical poroelastic finite element and shear-lag models of tendon predict large strain dependent Poisson's ratios and fluid expulsion under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Freedman, Benjamin R; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-08-01

    As tendons are loaded, they reduce in volume and exude fluid to the surrounding medium. Experimental studies have shown that tendon stretching results in a Poisson's ratio greater than 0.5, with a maximum value at small strains followed by a nonlinear decay. Here we present a computational model that attributes this macroscopic observation to the microscopic mechanism of the load transfer between fibrils under stretch. We develop a finite element model based on the mechanical role of the interfibrillar-linking elements, such as thin fibrils that bridge the aligned fibrils or macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interfibrillar sliding and verify it with a theoretical shear-lag model. We showed the existence of a previously unappreciated structure-function mechanism whereby the Poisson's ratio in tendon is affected by the strain applied and interfibrillar-linker properties, and together these features predict tendon volume shrinkage under tensile loading. During loading, the interfibrillar-linkers pulled fibrils toward each other and squeezed the matrix, leading to the Poisson's ratio larger than 0.5 and fluid expulsion. In addition, the rotation of the interfibrillar-linkers with respect to the fibrils at large strains caused a reduction in the volume shrinkage and eventual nonlinear decay in Poisson's ratio at large strains. Our model also predicts a fluid flow that has a radial pattern toward the surrounding medium, with the larger fluid velocities in proportion to the interfibrillar sliding. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Micromechanical INS/GPS System for Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbour, N.; Brand, T.; Haley, R.; Socha, M.; Stoll, J.; Ward, P.; Weinberg, M.

    1995-01-01

    The cost and complexity of large satellite space missions continue to escalate. To reduce costs, more attention is being directed toward small lightweight satellites where future demand is expected to grow dramatically. Specifically, micromechanical inertial systems and microstrip global positioning system (GPS) antennas incorporating flip-chip bonding, application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) and MCM technologies will be required. Traditional microsatellite pointing systems do not employ active control. Many systems allow the satellite to point coarsely using gravity gradient, then attempt to maintain the image on the focal plane with fast-steering mirrors. Draper's approach is to actively control the line of sight pointing by utilizing on-board attitude determination with micromechanical inertial sensors and reaction wheel control actuators. Draper has developed commercial and tactical-grade micromechanical inertial sensors, The small size, low weight, and low cost of these gyroscopes and accelerometers enable systems previously impractical because of size and cost. Evolving micromechanical inertial sensors can be applied to closed-loop, active control of small satellites for micro-radian precision-pointing missions. An inertial reference feedback control loop can be used to determine attitude and line of sight jitter to provide error information to the controller for correction. At low frequencies, the error signal is provided by GPS. At higher frequencies, feedback is provided by the micromechanical gyros. This blending of sensors provides wide-band sensing from dc to operational frequencies. First order simulation has shown that the performance of existing micromechanical gyros, with integrated GPS, is feasible for a pointing mission of 10 micro-radians of jitter stability and approximately 1 milli-radian absolute error, for a satellite with 1 meter antenna separation. Improved performance micromechanical sensors currently under development will be

  16. A numerical method for determining the strain rate intensity factor under plane strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the classical model of rigid perfectly plastic solids, the strain rate intensity factor has been previously introduced as the coefficient of the leading singular term in a series expansion of the equivalent strain rate in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces. Since then, many strain rate intensity factors have been determined by means of analytical and semi-analytical solutions. However, no attempt has been made to develop a numerical method for calculating the strain rate intensity factor. This paper presents such a method for planar flow. The method is based on the theory of characteristics. First, the strain rate intensity factor is derived in characteristic coordinates. Then, a standard numerical slip-line technique is supplemented with a procedure to calculate the strain rate intensity factor. The distribution of the strain rate intensity factor along the friction surface in compression of a layer between two parallel plates is determined. A high accuracy of this numerical solution for the strain rate intensity factor is confirmed by comparison with an analytic solution. It is shown that the distribution of the strain rate intensity factor is in general discontinuous.

  17. Micromechanics of Drosophila Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2003-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the auditory micromechanics of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this animal, the distal part of the antenna constitutes a resonantly tuned sound receiver, the vibrations of which are transduced by a chordotonal sense organ in the antenna's base. Analyzing the mechanical behavior of the antennal receiver by means of microscanning laser Doppler vibrometry, we show that the auditory system of wild-type flies exhibits a hardening stiffness nonlinearity and spontaneously generates oscillations in the absence of external stimuli. According to the deprivation of these mechanical properties in mechanosensory mutants, the receiver's nonlinearity and oscillation activity are introduced by chordotonal auditory neurons. Requiring the mechanoreceptor-specific extracellular linker protein No-mechanoreceptor-potential-A (NompA), NompC mechanosensory transduction channels, Beethoven (Btv), and Touch-insensitive-larva-B (TilB), nonlinearity and oscillation activity of the fly's antennal receiver depend on prominent components of the auditory transduction machinery and seem to originate from motility of auditory receptor cilia.

  18. Micromechanics of soil responses in cyclic simple shear tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liang; Bhattacharya, Subhamoy; Nikitas, George

    2017-06-01

    Offshore wind turbine (OWT) foundations are subjected to a combination of cyclic and dynamic loading arising from wind, wave, rotor and blade shadowing. Under cyclic loading, most soils change their characteristics including stiffness, which may cause the system natural frequency to approach the loading frequency and lead to unplanned resonance and system damage or even collapse. To investigate such changes and the underlying micromechanics, a series of cyclic simple shear tests were performed on the RedHill 110 sand with different shear strain amplitudes, vertical stresses and initial relative densities of soil. The test results showed that: (a) Vertical accumulated strain is proportional to the shear strain amplitude but inversely proportional to relative density of soil; (b) Shear modulus increases rapidly in the initial loading cycles and then the rate of increase diminishes and the shear modulus remains below an asymptote; (c) Shear modulus increases with increasing vertical stress and relative density, but decreasing with increasing strain amplitude. Coupled DEM simulations were performed using PFC2D to analyse the micromechanics underlying the cyclic behaviour of soils. Micromechanical parameters (e.g. fabric tensor, coordination number) were examined to explore the reasons for the various cyclic responses to different shear strain amplitudes or vertical stresses. Both coordination number and magnitude of fabric anisotropy contribute to the increasing shear modulus.

  19. Micromechanics for ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The fiber substructuring concepts and the micromechanics equations that are embedded in the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer (CEMCAN) computer code are described as well as the code itself, its current features and capabilities, and some examples to demonstrate the code's versatility. The methodology is equally applicable to metal matrix and polymer matrix composites. The prediction of ply mechanical and thermal properties agree very well with the existing models in the Integrated Composite Analyzer and the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer, lending credence to the fiber substructuring approach. Fiber substructuring can capture greater local detail than conventional unit-cell-based micromechanical theories. It offers promise in simulating complex aspects of micromechanics in ceramic matrix composites.

  20. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Micromechanical Behavior in a Friction Stir Welded AA7475-T761

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. P.; Lin Peng, R.; Hofmann, M.; Johansson, S.; Wang, Y. D.

    2011-01-01

    An in-situ neutron diffraction technique was used to investigate the lattice strain distributions and micromechanical behavior in a friction stir welded (FSW) sheet of AA7475-T761. The neutron diffraction experiments were performed on the spectrometer for material research, STRESS-SPEC, at FRM II (Garching, Germany). The lattice strain profiles around the weld center were measured as a function of the applied strain during the tensile loading and unloading. The anisotropic elastic and plastic properties of the FSW aluminum alloy were simulated by elasto-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) model to predict the anisotropic deformation behaviors involving the grain-to-grain interactions. Material parameters used for describing the constitutive laws of each test position were determined from the measured lattice strain distributions for different diffraction hkl planes as well as the macroscopic stress-strain curve of the FSW aluminum alloy. A good agreement between experimental results and numerical simulations was obtained. The present investigations provided a reliable prediction of the anisotropic micromechanical behavior of the FSW aluminum alloy during tensile deformation.

  1. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  2. Micromechanics of Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    recalled. Application of the derived tools to Apha-Two- Titanium Aluminide Aliov is made with a first series of strain controlled fatigue tests the locally...accumulation, and, multiaxial fatigue. In section 6, application is performed on the Alpha-Two- Titanium Alum:Aide Alloy.With a first serie of strain controlled ...tests needed for the identification of the model are described in the following figures. Test n’l is a classical tensile test strain controlled 1 = 0

  3. Micromechanics Analysis Code (MAC). User Guide: Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.; Arnold, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict the thermomechanical deformation response of advanced composite materials continues to play an important role in the development of these strategic materials. Analytical models that predict the effective behavior of composites are used not only by engineers performing structural analysis of large-scale composite components but also by material scientists in developing new material systems. For an analytical model to fulfill these two distinct functions it must be based on a micromechanics approach which utilizes physically based deformation and life constitutive models and allows one to generate the average (macro) response of a composite material given the properties of the individual constituents and their geometric arrangement. Here the user guide for the recently developed, computationally efficient and comprehensive micromechanics analysis code's (MAC) who's predictive capability rests entirely upon the fully analytical generalized method of cells (GMC), micromechanics model is described. MAC is a versatile form of research software that 'drives' the double or triply periodic micromechanics constitutive models based upon GMC. MAC enhances the basic capabilities of GMC by providing a modular framework wherein (1) various thermal, mechanical (stress or strain control) and thermomechanical load histories can be imposed, (2) different integration algorithms may be selected, (3) a variety of constituent constitutive models may be utilized and/or implemented, and (4) a variety of fiber and laminate architectures may be easily accessed through their corresponding representative volume elements.

  4. Micromechanics Analysis Code (MAC) User Guide: Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.; Arnold, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict the thermomechanical deformation response of advanced composite materials continues to play an important role in the development of these strategic materials. Analytical models that predict the effective behavior of composites are used not only by engineers performing structural analysis of large-scale composite components but also by material scientists in developing new material systems. For an analytical model to fulfill these two distinct functions it must be based on a micromechanics approach which utilizes physically based deformation and life constitutive models and allows one to generate the average (macro) response of a composite material given the properties of the individual constituents and their geometric arrangement. Here the user guide for the recently developed, computationally efficient and comprehensive micromechanics analysis code, MAC, who's predictive capability rests entirely upon the fully analytical generalized method of cells, GMC, micromechanics model is described. MAC is a versatile form of research software that 'drives' the double or triple ply periodic micromechanics constitutive models based upon GMC. MAC enhances the basic capabilities of GMC by providing a modular framework wherein (1) various thermal, mechanical (stress or strain control), and thermomechanical load histories can be imposed; (2) different integration algorithms may be selected; (3) a variety of constituent constitutive models may be utilized and/or implemented; and (4) a variety of fiber architectures may be easily accessed through their corresponding representative volume elements.

  5. The microstructure and micromechanics of the tendon-bone insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, L.; Kuntz, L. A.; Kunold, E.; Schock, J.; Müller, K. W.; Grabmayr, H.; Stolberg-Stolberg, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sieber, S. A.; Burgkart, R.; Bausch, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    The exceptional mechanical properties of the load-bearing connection of tendon to bone rely on an intricate interplay of its biomolecular composition, microstructure and micromechanics. Here we identify that the Achilles tendon-bone insertion is characterized by an interface region of ~500 μm with a distinct fibre organization and biomolecular composition. Within this region, we identify a heterogeneous mechanical response by micromechanical testing coupled with multiscale confocal microscopy. This leads to localized strains that can be larger than the remotely applied strain. The subset of fibres that sustain the majority of loading in the interface area changes with the angle of force application. Proteomic analysis detects enrichment of 22 proteins in the interfacial region that are predominantly involved in cartilage and skeletal development as well as proteoglycan metabolism. The presented mechanisms mark a guideline for further biomimetic strategies to rationally design hard-soft interfaces.

  6. In-situ scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy Young's modulus determination of indium oxide microrods for micromechanical resonator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier; Hidalgo, Pedro; Maestre, David; Cremades, Ana Piqueras, Javier

    2014-04-21

    Electric field induced mechanical resonances of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods are studied by in-situ measurements in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Young's moduli of rods with different cross-sectional shapes are calculated from the resonance frequency, and a range of values between 131 and 152 GPa are obtained. A quality factor of 1180–3780 is measured from the amplitude-frequency curves, revealing the suitability of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods as micromechanical resonators. The Young's modulus, E, of one of the rods is also measured from the elastic response in the force-displacement curve recorded in an atomic force microscope. E values obtained by in-situ scanning electron microscopy and by atomic force microscopy are found to differ in about 8%. The results provide data on Young's modulus of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and confirm the suitability of in-situ scanning electron microscopy mechanical resonance measurements to investigate the elastic behavior of semiconductor microrods.

  7. Micromechanics of brittle creep in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses well below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress (“brittle creep”). Here we provide a micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990), and the crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non linear, and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt rock samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as an inflexion between those two end-member phases. The minimum strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term strain rate as a function of depth in the upper crust due to the action of the applied stresses: in this way, sub-critical cracking reduces the failure stress in a manner equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. We also investigate the competition with pressure solution in porous rocks, and show that the transition from sub

  8. Determination of Tensile Properties of Polymers at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, M.; Major, Z.

    2010-06-01

    In the field of high rate testing of polymers the measured properties are highly dependent on the applied methodology. Hence, the test setup as whole but in particular also the geometrical type of specimen plays a decisive role. The widely used standard for the determination of tensile properties of polymers (ISO527-2) was extended by a novel standard (ISO18872:2007), which is targeted on the determination of tensile properties at high strain rates. In this standard also a novel specimen shape is proposed. Hand in hand with the introduction of new specimen geometry the question of comparability arises. To point out the differences in stress-strain response of the ISO18872 specimen and the ISO527-2 multipurpose specimen tensile tests over a wide loading rate range were conducted in this paper. A digital image correlation system in combination with a high speed camera was used to characterize the local material behaviour. Different parameters like nominal stress, true stress, nominal strain, true strain as well as volumetric strain were determined and used to compare the two specimen geometries.

  9. A micromechanical theory of grain-size dependence in metal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, G. J.

    T HE EFFECT of grain-size on the elastoplastic behavior of metals is investigated from the micromechanics standpoint. First, based on the observations that dislocation pile-ups, formation of cell structures, and other inelastic activities influenced by the presence of grain boundary actually take place transcrystallinely, a grain-size dependent constitutive equation is proposed for the slip deformation of slip systems. By means of a modified Hill's self-consistent relation the local stress of a grain is calculated, and used in conjunction with this constitutive equation to evaluate the plastic strain of each constituent grain. The grain-size effect on the plastic flow of polycrystals then can be determined by an averaging process. To check the validity of the proposed theory it was finally applied to predict the stress-strain curves and flow stresses of a copper at various grain-sizes. The obtained results were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. Micromechanics Analysis Code (MAC) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict the thermomechanical deformation response of advanced composite materials continues to play an important role in the development of these strategic materials. Analytical models that predict the effective behavior of composites are used not only by engineers in performing structural analysis of large-scale composite components but also by material scientists in developing new material systems. For an analytical model to fulfill these two distinct functions, it must be based on a micromechanics approach that uses physically based deformation and life constitutive models, and it must allow one to generate the average (macro) response of a composite material given the properties of the individual constituents and their geometric arrangement. Only then can such a model be used by a material scientist to investigate the effect of different deformation mechanisms on the overall response of the composite and, thereby, identify the appropriate constituents for a given application. However, if a micromechanical model is to be used in a large-scale structural analysis it must be (1) computationally efficient, (2) able to generate accurate displacement and stress fields at both the macro and micro level, and (3) compatible with the finite element method. In addition, new advancements in processing and fabrication techniques now make it possible to engineer the architectures of these advanced composite systems. Full utilization of these emerging manufacturing capabilities require the development of a computationally efficient micromechanics analysis tool that can accurately predict the effect of microstructural details on the internal and macroscopic behavior of composites. Computational efficiency is required because (1) a large number of parameters must be varied in the course of engineering (or designing) composite materials and (2) the optimization of a material's microstructure requires that the micromechanics model be integrated with

  11. Micromechanical Analyses of Sturzstroms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, Bernd; Laue, Jan; Springman, Sarah M.

    2010-05-01

    have been made observable and reproducible within a physical and a distinct element numerical modelling environment (DEM). As link between field evidence gained from the deposits of natural sturzstroms, the physical model within the ETH Geotechnical Drum Centrifuge (Springman et al., 2001) and the numerical model PFC-3D (Cundall and Strack, 1979; Itasca, 2005), serves a deterministic fractal analytical comminution model (Sammis et al., 1987; Steacy and Sammis, 1991). This approach allowed studying the effects of dynamic fragmentation within sturzstroms at true (macro) scale within the distinct element model, by allowing for a micro-mechanical, distinct particle based, and cyclic description of fragmentation at the same time, without losing significant computational efficiency. Theses experiments indicate rock mass and boundary conditions, which allow an alternating fragmenting and dilating dispersive regime to evolve and to be sustained long enough to replicate the spreading and run out of sturzstroms. The fragmenting spreading model supported here is able to explain the run out of a dry granular flow, beyond the travel distance predicted by a Coulomb frictional sliding model, without resorting to explanations by mechanics that can only be valid for certain, specific of the boundary conditions. The implications derived suggest that a sturzstrom, because of its strong relation to internal fractal fragmentation and other inertial effects, constitutes a landslide category of its own. Its mechanics differ significantly from all other gravity driven mass flows. This proposition does not exclude the possible appearance of frictionites, Toma hills or suspension flows etc., but it considers them as secondary features. The application of a fractal comminution model to describe natural and experimental sturzstrom deposits turned out to be a useful tool for sturzstrom research. Implemented within the DEM, it allows simulating the key features of sturzstrom successfully and

  12. Experimental determination of plastic strain in the extrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronsteiner, J.; Horwatitsch, D.; Hinterer, A.; Gusenbauer, C.; Zeman, K.

    2016-10-01

    Simulating strain requires experimental validation. In this work, a method for the non-destructive determination of plastic strain in an extruded tube profile is presented. A copper coating, which deforms with the billet material, was used in the developed non-destructive method and was detected by computed tomography (CT) to analyze the deformation. The pattern was applied on cast billet halves (in the longitudinal direction) by a plasma coating technology. It was thus possible to determine the deformation of the pattern during the extrusion process in the billet as well as in the final profile without disassembling the extruded parts. A comparison of specimen using two different patterns shows the superiority of the simpler pattern consisting of only cross markers.

  13. Microscale Rock mechanics: Determination with finite strain analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Lempp, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    Analysis of the mechanics of rocks and rock masses play a fundamental role in the crucial risk assessment with respect to destruction of e.g. installations, tunnels, bridge constructions geothermal boreholes and cables. To constrain the mechanics of the rocks and rock masses under compressive and extensional stress regimes, finite strain analysis techniques are used to quantitatively estimate the amount of deformation. This method is an uncommon but powerful tool for strain determination even if marker particles are rarely in mechanical contrast to the matrix. The deformation of such markers is related to shearing, rotation and flattening during compaction, extension or reloading of the rocks. The deformation and rotation of the corresponding strain ellipse (R-value: ratio sigma1/sigma3) indicates the degree of the rock alteration during compaction, erosion or other deformation processes. Information about the orientation of the long axis of the strain ellipse relative to bedding direction or core axis could be given (phi-values). We present first results of laboratory compression tests on core samples of limestone, sandstone and conglomerate according to different matrix types and with varying grain sizes. Under varying applied pressures (from 5 MN/m2 to 52 MN/m2) strain analyses were used to estimate the amount of deformation. Limestone samples show an increase of deformation grades with an increase of the applied pressure (e.g. R=1.26-1.35), while in the sandstone and conglomerate samples the degree of deformation decrease with increasing applied pressures (e.g. Sandstone: R=1.43-1.38, Conglomerate: R=1.09-1.07). In addition, the conglomerate samples are characterised by a strong variability high phi-values (78° to 110°), while the phi-values of the limestone and the sandstone samples are constant around at 87° to 90°. Both high phi-values strain may indicate a high rotation of sigma1 related to one-dimensional compression.

  14. Adhesion, friction and micromechanical properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ceramics, both in monolithic and coating form, are reviewed. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials, and metals. For the simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. The first part discusses the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces. The role of chemical bonding in adhesion and friction, and the effects of surface contaminant films and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are discussed. The second part deals with abrasion of ceramics. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of ceramic deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  15. Micromechanics Modeling of Fracture in Nanocrystalline Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Piascik, R. S.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals have very high theoretical strength, but suffer from a lack of ductility and toughness. Therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of deformation and fracture of these materials before their full potential can be achieved. Because classical fracture mechanics is based on the comparison of computed fracture parameters, such as stress intlmsity factors, to their empirically determined critical values, it does not adequately describe the fundamental physics of fracture required to predict the behavior of nanocrystalline metals. Thus, micromechanics-based techniques must be considered to quanti@ the physical processes of deformation and fracture within nanocrystalline metals. This paper discusses hndamental physicsbased modeling strategies that may be useful for the prediction Iof deformation, crack formation and crack growth within nanocrystalline metals.

  16. Micromechanical Modeling Study of Mechanical Inhibition of Enzymatic Degradation of Collagen Tissues.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Theresa K; Ruberti, Jeffrey W; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-12-15

    This study investigates how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. We developed a micromechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation based on two central hypotheses. The collagen fibers are crimped in the undeformed configuration. Enzymatic degradation is an energy activated process and the activation energy is increased by the axial strain energy density of the fiber. We determined the intrinsic degradation rate and characteristic energy for mechanical inhibition from fibril-level degradation experiments and applied the parameters to predict the effect of the crimped fiber structure and fiber properties on the degradation of bovine cornea and pericardium tissues under controlled tension. We then applied the model to examine the effect of the tissue stress state on the rate of tissue degradation and the anisotropic fiber structures that developed from enzymatic degradation. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Description of microstructural intragranular heterogeneities in a Ti-IF steel using a micromechanical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wauthier, A.; Brenner, R.; Bacroix, B.; Regle, H.

    2007-04-07

    A classical problem in metallurgical research is to control the recrystallisation texture which forms during the last annealing process and which determine the mechanical behaviour of the final products. It is now widely admitted that the local deformed state and the substructural heterogeneities within the polycrystal are key parameters to understand the recrystallisation mechanisms.In this work, we present a micromechanical approach based on the use of the affine extension of the self-consistent scheme for viscoplastic behaviours and a phenomenological description of dislocation patterning using a hardening model recently developed for two-stage strain paths. These two ingredients allow to compare the model with experimental crystallographic texture after rolling as well as experimental observations of the intragranular substructure using orientation imaging by Electron Back-Scattered Diffaction. It is shown that the rolling texture is correctly simulated and successful predictions of the orientation of dislocation sheets are obtained.

  18. Micromechanical Modeling Study of Mechanical Inhibition of Enzymatic Degradation of Collagen Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tonge, Theresa K.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. We developed a micromechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation based on two central hypotheses. The collagen fibers are crimped in the undeformed configuration. Enzymatic degradation is an energy activated process and the activation energy is increased by the axial strain energy density of the fiber. We determined the intrinsic degradation rate and characteristic energy for mechanical inhibition from fibril-level degradation experiments and applied the parameters to predict the effect of the crimped fiber structure and fiber properties on the degradation of bovine cornea and pericardium tissues under controlled tension. We then applied the model to examine the effect of the tissue stress state on the rate of tissue degradation and the anisotropic fiber structures that developed from enzymatic degradation. PMID:26682825

  19. Strain Gage Measurement System to Determine Cryogenic Propellant Tank Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; St.Cyr, William W.; VanDyke, David; McVay, Greg; Mitchell, Mark; Langford, Lester

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of tank level, particularly for cryogenic propellants, has proven to be a difficult proposition. Current methods based on differential pressure, capacitance sensors, temperature sensors, etc.; do not provide sufficiently accurate or robust measurements, especially at run time. This paper describes a simple, but effective method to determine propellant volume by measuring very small deformations of the structure supporting the tank. Results of a laboratory study to validate the method, and experimental data from a deployed system are presented. A comparison with an existing differential pressure sensor shows that the strain gage system provides a very good quality signal even during pressurization.

  20. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-06-16

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface. 3 figs.

  1. Quantification of damage evolution for a micromechanical model of ductile fracture in spallation of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.; Tonks, D.L.; Hixon, R.; Addessio, F.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present quantification of micromechanical features such as voids that comprise the ductile fracture obtained under uniaxial strain condition in a spall test of commercial purity tantalum. Two evolutionary parameters of ductile fracture void formation are quantified: (i) the void volume fraction (porosity) and its distribution with respect to the distance from the main spall fracture plane, and (ii) void diameter distribution. The results complement the discussion of the implications of void clustering and linking for micromechanical modeling of ductile fracture as presented in a paper by D. L. Tonks et al. in this volume.

  2. An anisotropic micromechanics model for predicting the rafting direction in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang-Yu; Wu, Wen-Ping; Chen, Ming-Xiang

    2016-02-01

    An anisotropic micromechanics model based on the equivalent inclusion method is developed to investigate the rafting direction of Ni-based single crystal superalloys. The micromechanical model considers actual cubic structure and orthogonal anisotropy properties. The von Mises stress, elastic strain energy density, and hydrostatic pressure in different inclusions of micromechanical model are calculated when applying a tensile or compressive loading along the [001] direction. The calculated results can successfully predict the rafting direction for alloys exhibiting a positive or a negative mismatch, which are in agreement with pervious experimental and theoretical studies. Moreover, the elastic constant differences and mismatch degree of the matrix and precipitate phases and their influences on the rafting direction are carefully discussed.

  3. Micromechanical studies of composites by BEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, P. K.; Henry, D. P., Jr.; Dargush, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last five years BEM has been developed into a very effective tool for micromechanical studies of composites. The analyses developed range from static elastic analysis, steady state heat transfer, steady state and transient thermoelastic analysis, periodic and transient dynamic analysis. Currently some of these analyses are being extended to nonlinear micromechanical analyses involving viscoplasticity, elastoplasticity, combined plasticity fracture and creep. The paper describes some of the results for elastic analysis, heat transfer and thermoelastic analyses.

  4. Micromechanisms of thermomechanical fatigue: A comparison with isothermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Thermomechanical Fatigue (TMF) experiments were conducted on Mar-M 200, B-1900, and PWA-1480 (single crystals) over temperature ranges representative of gas turbine airfoil environments. The results were examined from both a phenomenological basis and a micromechanical basis. Depending on constituents present in the superalloy system, certain micromechanisms dominated the crack initiation process and significantly influenced the TMF lives as well as sensitivity of the material to the type TMF cycle imposed. For instance, high temperature cracking around grain boundary carbides in Mar-M 200 resulted in short in-phase TMF lives compared to either out-of-phase or isothermal lives. In single crystal PWA-1480, the type of coating applied was seen to be the controlling factor in determining sensitivity to the type of TMF cycle imposed. Micromechanisms of deformation were observed over the temperature range of interest to the TMF cycles, and provided some insight as to the differences between TMF damage mechanisms and isothermal damage mechanisms. Finally, the applicability of various life prediction models to TMF results was reviewed. Current life prediction models based on isothermal data must be modified before being generally applied to TMF.

  5. Bio-Inspired Micromechanical Directional Acoustic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, William; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    Conventional directional sound sensors employ an array of spatially separated microphones and the direction is determined using arrival times and amplitudes. In nature, insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly can determine the direction of sound using a hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are mechanically coupled, only separated by about 1 mm, and have remarkable directional sensitivity. A micromechanical sensor based on the fly's hearing system was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two 1 mm2 wings connected using a bridge and to the substrate using two torsional legs. The dimensions of the sensor and material stiffness determine the frequency response of the sensor. The vibration of the wings in response to incident sound at the bending resonance was measured using a laser vibrometer and found to be about 1 μm/Pa. The electronic response of the sensor to sound was measured using integrated comb finger capacitors and found to be about 25 V/Pa. The fabricated sensors showed good directional sensitivity. In this talk, the design, fabrication and characteristics of the directional sound sensor will be described. Supported by ONR and TDSI.

  6. Micromechanics of TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Bulota, Mindaugas; Tanpichai, Supachok; Hughes, Mark; Eichhorn, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Composites of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) reinforced with TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose (TOFC) were prepared to 15, 20, 25, and 30% fiber weight fractions. To aid dispersion and to improve stress transfer, we acetylated the TOFC prior to the fabrication of TOFC-PLA composite films. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the deformation micromechanics in these systems. Microtensile specimens were prepared from the films and deformed in tension with Raman spectra being collected simultaneously during deformation. A shift in a Raman peak initially located at ~1095 cm(-1), assigned to C-O-C stretching of the cellulose backbone, was observed upon deformation, indicating stress transfer from the matrix to the TOFC reinforcement. The highest band shift rate, with respect to strain, was observed in composites having a 30% weight fraction of TOFC. These composites also displayed a significantly higher strain to failure compared to pure acetylated TOFC film, and to the composites having lower weight fractions of TOFC. The stress-transfer processes that occur in microfibrillated cellulose composites are discussed with reference to the micromechanical data presented. It is shown that these TOFC-based composite materials are progressively dominated by the mechanics of the networks, and a shear-lag type stress transfer between fibers. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Elongated Tetrakaidecahedron Micromechanics Model for Space Shuttle External Tank Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Baker, Eric H.

    2009-01-01

    The results of microstructural characterization studies and physical and mechanical testing of BX-265 and NCFI24-124 foams are reported. A micromechanics model developed previously by the authors is reviewed, and the resulting equations for the elastic constants, the relative density, and the strength of the foam in the principal material directions are presented. The micromechanics model is also used to derive equations to predict the effect of vacuum on the tensile strength and the strains induced by exposure to vacuum. Using a combination of microstructural dimensions and physical and mechanical measurements as input, the equations for the elastic constants and the relative density are applied and the remaining microstructural dimensions are predicted. The predicted microstructural dimensions are in close agreement with the average measured values for both BX-265 and NCFI24-124. With the microstructural dimensions, the model predicts the ratio of the strengths in the principal material directions for both foams. The model is also used to predict the Poisson s ratios, the vacuum-induced strains, and the effect of vacuum on the tensile strengths. However, the comparison of these predicted values with the measured values is not as favorable.

  8. Micromechanical Modeling for Tensile Behaviour of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The stress-strain curves of fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) exhibit obvious non-linear behaviour under tensile loading. The occurrence of multiple damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers fracture, is the mainly reason for the non-linear characteristic. The micromechanics approach has been developed to predict the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and woven CMCs. The shear-lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite. The damage models were used to determine the evolution of micro damage parameters, i.e., matrix crack spacing, interface debonded length and broken fibers fraction. By combining the shear-lag model with damage models and considering the effect of transverse multicracking in the 90° plies or transverse yarns in cross-ply or woven CMCs, the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven CMCs have been predicted. The results agreed with experimental data.

  9. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  10. Micromechanics of Spray-On Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the thermo-mechanical response of the Space Shuttle External Tank spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) material is critical, to NASA's Return to Flight effort. This closed-cell rigid polymeric foam is used to insulate the metallic Space Shuttle External Tank, which is at cryogenic temperatures immediately prior to and during lift off. The shedding of the SOFI during ascent led to the loss of the Columbia, and eliminating/minimizing foam lass from the tank has become a priority for NASA as it seeks to resume scheduled space shuttle missions. Determining the nature of the SOFI material behavior in response to both thermal and mechanical loading plays an important role as any structural modeling of the shedding phenomenon k predicated on knowledge of the constitutive behavior of the foam. In this paper, the SOFI material has been analyzed using the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells (HFGMC) micromechanics model, which has recently been extended to admit a triply-periodic 3-D repeating unit cell (RUC). Additional theoretical extensions that mere made in order to enable modeling of the closed-cell-foam material include the ability to represent internal boundaries within the RUC (to simulated internal pores) and the ability to impose an internal pressure within the simulated pores. This latter extension is crucial as two sources contribute to significant internal pressure changes within the SOFI pores. First, gas trapped in the pores during the spray process will expand or contract due to temperature changes. Second, the pore pressure will increase due to outgassing of water and other species present in the foam skeleton polymer material. With HFGMC's new pore pressure modeling capabilities, a nonlinear pressure change within the simulated pore can be imposed that accounts for both of these sources, in addition to stmdar&-thermal and mechanical loading; The triply-periodic HFGMC micromechanics model described above was implemented within NASA GRC's MAC

  11. Micromechanics of deformation in particle-toughened polyamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzika, P. A.; Boyce, M. C.; Parks, D. M.

    2000-09-01

    It is now well appreciated that a number of semicrystalline polymers can be effectively toughened by the addition of a well-dispersed secondary phase, when the average interparticle matrix ligament thickness, Λ, of the blend is reduced below a critical length parameter, Λc. This critical parameter is a specific material characteristic of the base polymer and can be achieved by various combinations of filler particle volume fraction and particle size. Recently, the significant improvements in toughness achieved when Λ≤ Λc were attributed to a morphological transition taking place when interface-induced crystallization of characteristic thickness Λc/2 successfully percolates through the primary phase. These transcrystallized layers are highly anisotropic in their mechanical response and, as a result, change the preferred modes of plastic deformation in the material, enabling the large plastic strains, which provide the high toughness. This study aims to elucidate the micromechanics and micromechanisms responsible for the high toughness exhibited by these morphologically altered heterogeneous systems via a series of micromechanical models. The case of polyamide-6 modified with cavitating spherical elastomeric particles treated as voids is modeled. It is found that the mechanical response and local modes of plastic deformation of these systems depend strongly on the morphology of the primary phase, the volume fraction of filler particles and the level of applied stress triaxiality. In particular, when Λ< Λc and highly textured material percolates through the matrix, the material is found to deform by multiple shear banding along crystallographic planes of low shear resistance in the matrix ligaments diagonally bridging particles. This mode of plastic deformation is found to be robust to increases in triaxiality and, indeed, the textured material acts to resist void growth while promoting shear along the preferentially oriented crystallographic planes.

  12. Method of Manufacturing a Micromechanical Oscillating Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A micromechanical oscillating mass balance and method adapted for measuring minute quantities of material deposited at a selected location, such as during a vapor deposition process. The invention comprises a vibratory composite beam which includes a dielectric layer sandwiched between two conductive layers.The beam is positioned in a magnetic field. An alternating current passes through one conductive layers, the beam oscillates, inducing an output current in the second conductive layer, which is analyzed to determine the resonant frequency of the beam. As material is deposited on the beam, the mass of the beam increases and the resonant frequency of the beam shifts, and the mass added is determined.

  13. Using micromechanical resonators to measure rheological properties and alcohol content of model solutions and commercial beverages.

    PubMed

    Paxman, Rosemary; Stinson, Jake; Dejardin, Anna; McKendry, Rachel A; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2012-01-01

    Micromechanic resonators provide a small-volume and potentially high-throughput method to determine rheological properties of fluids. Here we explore the accuracy in measuring mass density and viscosity of ethanol-water and glycerol-water model solutions, using a simple and easily implemented model to deduce the hydrodynamic effects on resonating cantilevers of various length-to-width aspect ratios. We next show that these measurements can be extended to determine the alcohol percentage of both model solutions and commercial beverages such as beer, wine and liquor. This demonstrates how micromechanical resonators can be used for quality control of every-day drinks.

  14. Qubit thermometry for micromechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunelli, Matteo; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2011-09-15

    We address estimation of temperature for a micromechanical oscillator lying arbitrarily close to its quantum ground state. Motivated by recent experiments, we assume that the oscillator is coupled to a probe qubit via Jaynes-Cummings interaction and that the estimation of its effective temperature is achieved via quantum-limited measurements on the qubit. We first consider the ideal unitary evolution in a noiseless environment and then take into account the noise due to nondissipative decoherence. We exploit local quantum estimation theory to assess and optimize the precision of estimation procedures based on the measurement of qubit population and to compare their performances with the ultimate limit posed by quantum mechanics. In particular, we evaluate the Fisher information (FI) for population measurement, maximize its value over the possible qubit preparations and interaction times, and compare its behavior with that of the quantum Fisher information (QFI). We found that the FI for population measurement is equal to the QFI, i.e., population measurement is optimal, for a suitable initial preparation of the qubit and a predictable interaction time. The same configuration also corresponds to the maximum of the QFI itself. Our results indicate that the achievement of the ultimate bound to precision allowed by quantum mechanics is in the capabilities of the current technology.

  15. Micromechanical models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Marrey, Ramesh V.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical and analytical micromechanical models are presented to predict the thermoelastic behavior of a textile composite. In the numerical model, the unit-cell is discretized with finite elements, and periodic boundary conditions are imposed between opposite faces of the unit-cell. For a thin textile composite, stress gradients effects through the thickness are demonstrated. The consequent difference in the stiffness and strength behavior of thick and thin composites are discussed. The numerical model is implemented to predict 3-D thermo-elastic constants for a thick textile composite, and the plate thermo-mechanical properties for a thin textile composite. The numerical model is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses due to processing to predict the composite failure envelopes. An analytical model - Selective Averaging Method (SAM) - is proposed, which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging to estimate the 3-D elastic constants. Both the models are tested and verified for several examples by comparing the stiffness properties with elasticity solutions and available results.

  16. Determination of Predominance of Influenza Virus Strains in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Garten, Rebecca J; Palekar, Rakhee; Cerpa, Mauricio; Mirza, Sara; Ropero, Alba Maria; Palomeque, Francisco S; Moen, Ann; Bresee, Joseph; Shaw, Michael; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-07-01

    During 2001-2014, predominant influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) strains in South America predominated in all or most subsequent influenza seasons in Central and North America. Predominant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) strains in North America predominated in most subsequent seasons in Central and South America. Sharing data between these subregions may improve influenza season preparedness.

  17. Determination of Predominance of Influenza Virus Strains in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Garten, Rebecca J.; Palekar, Rakhee; Cerpa, Mauricio; Mirza, Sara; Ropero, Alba Maria; Palomeque, Francisco S.; Moen, Ann; Bresee, Joseph; Shaw, Michael; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    During 2001–2014, predominant influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) strains in South America predominated in all or most subsequent influenza seasons in Central and North America. Predominant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) strains in North America predominated in most subsequent seasons in Central and South America. Sharing data between these subregions may improve influenza season preparedness. PMID:26079140

  18. Computational micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element of bituminous composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Hasan; Ghauch, Ziad G.; Dhasmana, Heena; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-08-01

    Micromechanical computational modeling is used in this study to determine the smallest domain, or Representative Volume Element (RVE), that can be used to characterize the effective properties of composite materials such as Asphalt Concrete (AC). Computational Finite Element (FE) micromechanical modeling was coupled with digital image analysis of surface scans of AC specimens. Three mixtures with varying Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size (NMAS) of 4.75 mm, 12.5 mm, and 25 mm, were prepared for digital image analysis and computational micromechanical modeling. The effects of window size and phase modulus mismatch on the apparent viscoelastic response of the composite were numerically examined. A good agreement was observed in the RVE size predictions based on micromechanical computational modeling and image analysis. Micromechanical results indicated that a degradation in the matrix stiffness increases the corresponding RVE size. Statistical homogeneity was observed for window sizes equal to two to three times the NMAS. A model was presented for relating the degree of statistical homogeneity associated with each window size for materials with varying inclusion dimensions.

  19. Micromechanical study of concrete materials with interfacial transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambheera, Ramesh

    This thesis describes analytical and finite element micromechanical studies for investigating the mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A concrete material is treated as a three phase composite consisting of aggregate, bulk paste and an interfacial transition zone around the aggregate. Experimental work on the microstructure of concrete has demonstrated the existence of interfacial transition zone and that this is the weakest link in the composite system of concrete material. Hence, the main focus of this thesis is to understand the role of the interfacial transition zone on the overall mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A four phase composite model consisting of aggregate, ITZ, bulk paste and an equivalent homogeneous medium is proposed to represent the concrete material. Analytical solutions are derived for the overall elastic moduli of the four phase composite model. The effects of volume fraction and the elastic moduli of the transition zone on the overall elastic moduli are investigated. The results obtained using the analytical model are in good agreement with those obtained from experiments. Analytical stress solutions are also derived for the four phase composite model subjected to uniaxial compression in two and three dimensions. The stress concentration and the tensile stress development in the interfacial transition zone are investigated. The effect of imperfect shear interfacial bond on the overall elastic moduli and on the stresses in the transition zone is also investigated. Basic concepts of damage mechanics are applied to model the damage in the transition zone. The effect of local damage in the transition zone on the overall damage in a concrete material is illustrated. For the specific case of uniaxial compression, the pre-peak stress-strain curves are generated. Computational analysis of micromechanical models of concrete materials requires efficient finite elements. This thesis proposes the use of hybrid finite elements for the

  20. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains determined by disk diffusion].

    PubMed

    Llanes Caballero, R; Acosta Giraldo, J C; Sosa Puente, J; Guzmán Hernández, D; Gutiérrez González, O; Llop Hernández, A

    1999-01-01

    The Gonoccocus Laboratory of "Pedro Kourí" Tropical Medicine Institute carried out a study of in vitro susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to penicillin, tetracycline, cefuroxime ceftriaxone, cefotaxine and ciprofoxacin by means of a disk diffusion method with the culture medium agar base GC plus supplement. In the first phase, the method was standardized and the reference N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226 strain was used whereas in the second phase, 50 gonococcal strains isolated in 8 provinces during 1995 and 1996 were examined. The results of such standardization confirmed that the antimicrobial susceptibility values were within the allowable limits. 52 and 34% of strains were resistant to penicillin and tetracycline respectively and all of them showed susceptibility to the rest of evaluated antimicrobial drugs. We recommend the use of the disk diffusion method for surveillance of gonococci resistance to these drugs in our country.

  1. Micromechanics and constitutive modeling of connective soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a micromechanical model for connective soft tissues based on the available histological evidences is developed. The proposed model constituents i.e. collagen fibers and ground matrix are considered as hyperelastic materials. The matrix material is assumed to be isotropic Neo-Hookean while the collagen fibers are considered to be transversely isotropic hyperelastic. In order to take into account the effects of tissue structure in lower scales on the macroscopic behavior of tissue, a strain energy density function (SEDF) is developed for collagen fibers based on tissue hierarchical structure. Macroscopic response and properties of tissue are obtained using the numerical homogenization method with the help of ABAQUS software. The periodic boundary conditions and the proposed constitutive models are implemented into ABAQUS using the DISP and the UMAT subroutines, respectively. The existence of the solution and stable material behavior of proposed constitutive model for collagen fibers are investigated based on the poly-convexity condition. Results of the presented micromechanics model for connective tissues are compared and validated with available experimental data. Effects of geometrical and material parameters variation at microscale on macroscopic mechanical behavior of tissues are investigated. The results show that decrease in collagen content of the connective tissues like the tendon due to diseases leads 20% more stretch than healthy tissue under the same load which can results in connective tissue malfunction and hypermobility in joints.

  2. Micromechanics of Brittle Creep Under Triaxial Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time-dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail (i) at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and (ii) even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we provide a micromechanical model and experimental results describing time-dependent brittle creep of water-saturated granite under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of microcracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing-crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strain and strain rates are then computed from the change in energy potential due to microcrack growth. They are non-linear, and compare well with complementary experimental results obtained on granite samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decreasing crack growth rate , due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as merely an inflexion between the two end-member phases.

  3. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-07

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

  4. Strain background determines lymphoma incidence in Atm knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Genik, Paula C; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Liu, Xianan; Story, Michael D; Ding, Lianghao; Bush, Jamie M; Fallgren, Christina M; Weil, Michael M

    2014-02-01

    About 10% to 30% of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) develop leukemias or lymphomas. There is considerable interpatient variation in the age of onset and leukemia/lymphoma type. The incomplete penetrance and variable age of onset may be attributable to several factors. These include competing mortality from other A-T-associated pathologies, particularly neurodegeneration and interstitial lung disease, allele-specific effects of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mutations. There is also limited evidence from clinical observations and studies using Atm knockout mice that modifier genes may account for some variation in leukemia/lymphoma susceptibility. We have introgressed the Atm(tm1Awb) knockout allele (Atm(-)) onto several inbred murine strains and observed differences in thymic lymphoma incidence and latency between Atm(-/-) mice on the different strain backgrounds and between their F1 hybrids. The lymphomas that arose in these mice had a pattern of sequence gains and losses that were similar to those previously described by others. These results provide further evidence for the existence of modifier genes controlling lymphomagenesis in individuals carrying defective copies of Atm, at least in mice, the characterized Atm(-) congenic strain set provides a resource with which to identify these genes. In addition, we found that fewer than expected Atm(-/-) pups were weaned on two strain backgrounds and that there was no correlation between body weight of young Atm-/- mice and lymphoma incidence or latency. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Strain Background Determines Lymphoma Incidence in Atm Knockout Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Genik, Paula C; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Liu, Xianan; Story, Michael D; Ding, Lianghao; Bush, Jamie M; Fallgren, Christina M; Weil, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    About 10% to 30% of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) develop leukemias or lymphomas. There is considerable interpatient variation in the age of onset and leukemia/lymphoma type. The incomplete penetrance and variable age of onset may be attributable to several factors. These include competing mortality from other A-T-associated pathologies, particularly neurodegeneration and interstitial lung disease, and allele-specific effects of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mutations. There is also limited evidence from clinical observations and studies using Atm knockout mice that modifier genes may account for some variation in leukemia/lymphoma susceptibility. We have introgressed the Atmtm1Awb knockout allele (Atm-) onto several inbred murine strains and observed differences in thymic lymphoma incidence and latency between Atm-/- mice on the different strain backgrounds and between their F1 hybrids. The lymphomas that arose in these mice had a pattern of sequence gains and losses that were similar to those previously described by others. These results provide further evidence for the existence of modifier genes controlling lymphomagenesis in individuals carrying defective copies of Atm, at least in mice, and the characterized Atm- congenic strain set provides a resource with which to identify these genes. In addition, we found that fewer than expected Atm-/- pups were weaned on two strain backgrounds and that there was no correlation between body weight of young Atm-/- mice and lymphoma incidence or latency. PMID:24709420

  6. A micromechanical approach to elastic and viscoelastic properties of fiber reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pasa Dutra, V.F.; Maghous, S. Campos Filho, A.; Pacheco, A.R.

    2010-03-15

    Some aspects of the constitutive behavior of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are investigated within a micromechanical framework. Special emphasis is put on the prediction of creep of such materials. The linear elastic behavior is first examined by implementation of a Mori-Tanaka homogenization scheme. The micromechanical predictions for the overall stiffness prove to be very close to finite element solutions obtained from the numerical analysis of a representative elementary volume of FRC modeled as a randomly heterogeneous medium. The validation of the micromechanical concepts based on comparison with a set of experiments, shows remarkable predictive capabilities of the micromechanical representation. The second part of the paper is devoted to non-ageing viscoelasticity of FRC. Adopting a Zener model for the behavior of the concrete matrix and making use of the correspondence principle, the homogenized relaxation moduli are derived analytically. The validity of the model is established by mean of comparison with available experiment measurements of creep strain of steel fiber reinforced concrete under compressive load. Finally, the model predictions are compared to those derived from analytical models formulated within a one-dimensional setting.

  7. The Relationship Between Constraint and Ductile Fracture Initiation as Defined by Micromechanical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, Tina L.; Sheppard, Sheri D.

    1994-01-01

    initiation loads and to calculate the associated (critical) global fracture parameters. The loads are verified experimentally, and microscopy is used to measure pre-crack length, crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and the amount of stable crack growth. Results for A516-70 steel indicate that the constraint-modified, critical strain criterion with a critical length approximately equal to the grain size (0.0025 inch) provides accurate predictions of crack initiation. The critical void growth criterion is shown to considerably underpredict crack initiation loads with the same critical length. The relationship between the critical value of the J-integral for ductile crack initiation and crack depth for SECT and SECB specimens has been determined using the constraint-modified, critical strain criterion, demonstrating that this micromechanical model can be used to correct in-plane constraint effects due to crack depth and bending vs. tension loading. Finally, the relationship developed for the SECT specimens is used to predict the behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe specimens.

  8. The Relationship Between Constraint and Ductile Fracture Initiation as Defined by Micromechanical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, Tina L.; Sheppard, Sheri D.

    1994-01-01

    initiation loads and to calculate the associated (critical) global fracture parameters. The loads are verified experimentally, and microscopy is used to measure pre-crack length, crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and the amount of stable crack growth. Results for A516-70 steel indicate that the constraint-modified, critical strain criterion with a critical length approximately equal to the grain size (0.0025 inch) provides accurate predictions of crack initiation. The critical void growth criterion is shown to considerably underpredict crack initiation loads with the same critical length. The relationship between the critical value of the J-integral for ductile crack initiation and crack depth for SECT and SECB specimens has been determined using the constraint-modified, critical strain criterion, demonstrating that this micromechanical model can be used to correct in-plane constraint effects due to crack depth and bending vs. tension loading. Finally, the relationship developed for the SECT specimens is used to predict the behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe specimens.

  9. Determination of low-strain interfaces via geometric matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelver, Line; Larsen, Peter Mahler; Stradi, Daniele; Stokbro, Kurt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2017-08-01

    We present a general method for combining two crystals into an interface. The method finds all possible interfaces between the crystals with small coincidence cells and identifies the strain and area of the corresponding two-dimensional cells of the two crystal surfaces. We apply the method to the two semiconductor alloys InAs1 -xSbx and GaxIn1 -xAs combined with a selection of pure metals or with NbTiN to create semiconductor/superconductor interfaces. The lattice constant of the alloy can be tuned by composition and we can extract the alloy lattice parameters corresponding to zero strain in both the metal and the alloy. The results can be used to suggest new epitaxially matched interfaces between two materials.

  10. A micromechanical device that monitors arterial pressure during general anesthesia and in intensive care units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, A. V.; Luchinin, V. V.; Kuzmina, K. A.; Klyavinek, A. S.; Karelov, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A vibroacoustic fiber optic system that consists of micromechanical components designated for use in medicine and biology is reviewed. A theoretical analysis of a fiber optic microphone is done and its optimal construction parameters are determined. The possibility of using the developed system with magnetic resonance tomography to noninvasively measure man's arterial pressure is specified.

  11. Key micromechanics issues in integrated material design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennoura, M.; Aboutajeddine, A.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays the acceleration of material discovery is essential more than ever to hold the fast evolving requirements of innovative products. This acceleration depends on our ability to set up a material design process for tailoring materials from targeted engineering performances. One of the important building block passages, in the material design journey, is the bridging of micro-scale to meso-scale through micromechanical models. Unfortunately, these models include a lot of uncertainties resulting from their inbuilt ad-hoc assumptions, which inevitably impacts the material design process performance. In the present paper, robust design methods are reviewed and subsequently applied to quantify uncertainty in micromechanical models and mitigate its impact on material design performances. This includes examining principles for evaluating the level degree of uncertainty on material design process, and their use in micromechanical models. Also, developing robust design approaches to alleviate uncertainty effects and improve the quality of the design performance. Ultimately, the limitations of these approaches are discussed and the research opportunities, to overcome the shortness of actual approaches in respect to micromechanical models, are clarified.

  12. A probabilistic approach to composite micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, T. A.; Bellini, P. X.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material properties at the micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predicted and response variables in the study.

  13. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  15. Micromechanical Evidences on Interfibre Failure of Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    París, Federico; Correa, Elena; Mantič, Vladislav

    Micromechanics has been widely used in the link in between an actual non-homogeneous composite ply involving fibre and matrix and an equivalent homogeneous ply with non-isotropic behaviour, connecting stiffness and strength properties of the equivalent lamina with the properties of fibre and matrix. The authors believe that beyond this, Micromechanics is the key tool to understand the behaviour of composites, to be able, among many other things, to propose physically based failure criteria that obviously are established at meso- or macro-level of a composite. Thus, the role of Micromechanics in the understanding of the interfibre failure mechanisms of composites is presented in this chapter. Different loading conditions (single tension, single compression, bidirectional loads and fatigue) are studied based on a simple single fibre model. The role of residual curing stresses at micromechanical level in the strength of a ply in the direction normal to the fibres is also studied. Finally, more refined models cover two questions of interest as the effect of a nearby fibre in the debonding of a primary fibre, and the scale effect in composites at micromechanical level, considering the debonding between fibre and matrix. In all cases the approach is to develop a BEM model and apply the tools derived from Interfacial Fracture Mechanics to deal with the debonds between fibre and matrix and Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics to deal with cracks running into the matrix. It is noticeable that no material or fitting parameters are used in the developments carried out. In all cases studied, experimental evidences are presented to support numerical predictions.

  16. Determination of three-dimensional strain state in crystals using self-interfered split HOLZ lines.

    PubMed

    Herring, Rodney; Norouzpour, Mana; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2015-09-01

    An experimental method to measure the strain through the thickness of a crystal is demonstrated. This enables the full three-dimensional stress-strain state of a crystal at the nanoscale to be determined taking the current practice from two-dimensional strain state determination. Knowing the 3D strain state is desired by crystal growers in order to improve their crystal's quality. This method involves combining electron diffraction with electron interferometry in a transmission electron microscope. The electron diffraction uses a split higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) line and the electron interferometry uses an electron biprism.

  17. Shear ligament phenomena in Fe3Al intermetallics and micromechanics of shear ligament toughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H.; Mao, X.

    1996-12-01

    The environment-assisted cracking behavior of a Fe3Al intermetallic in an air moisture environment was studied. At room temperature, tensile ductility was found to be increased with strain rate, from 10.1 pct at 1×10-6 s-1 to 14.3 pct at 2 × 10-3 s-1. When tensile tests were done in heat-treated mineral oil on specimens that have been heated in the oil for 4 hours at 200°C, ductility was found to be recovered. These results suggest the existence of hydrogen embrittlement. Shear ligaments, which are ligament-like structures connected between microcracks, were observed on the tensile specimens. They undergo ductile fracture by shearing and enhance fracture toughness. This toughness enhancement (represented by J l ) was estimated by a micromechanical model. The values of the unknown parameters, which are the average ligament lengthbar l, the area fraction V l , and the work-to-fracture τ 1 γ 1, were obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The total fracture toughness K c and J l were reduced toward a slower strain rate. The experimental fracture toughness, K Q , was found to be increased with strain rate, from 35 MPasqrt m at 2.54×10-5 mm·s-1 to 47 MPasqrt m at 2.54×10-2 mm·s-1. The fact that strain rate has a similar effect on K Q and K c verifies the importance of shear ligament in determining fracture toughness of the alloy. With the presence of hydrogen, length and work-to-fracture of the shear ligament were reduced. The toughening effect caused by shear ligament was reduced, and the alloy would behave in a brittle manner.

  18. An engineering model of woven composites based on micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. C.; Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Morris, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    Composites with three-dimensional woven architectures exhibit large strains to failure when compared to composites made up of the same materials but not with three-dimensional interlocking tows. The fracture mechanics of such three-dimensional architectures is a subject requiring substantial investigation and experimental testing. Classical fracture mechanics concepts (for instance, an isolated defect in a homogeneous body) will not be applicable to the woven fracture test specimen. The use of an isolated singularity to characterize an entire specimen is inadequate when the density of defects is considerable and the material is heterogeneous. Modelling of such a complex system requires a great deal of insight and consideration as well as prudent choices of model sizes to make numerical schemes feasible. The purpose of this manuscript is to review our recently acquired knowledge of damage accumulation in woven composites and to describe a practicable model of the macroscopic behavior in these and other complex composite architectures based on such knowledge. In this manuscript, discussion will be limited to uniaxial compressive loading; considerations of general loading (monotonic and cyclic) will appear in a subsequent manuscript. Our modelling efforts may be briefly described as follows: the composite is subdivided into microstructural elements (microelements) in which the micromechanical modelling is either understood rigorously or can be represented adequately by statistical parameters. There can be microstructural elements for many different types of composite components, such as the various types of warp and weft and matrix for three-dimensional woven composites. The physical dimensions of microelements are made as large as possible while the response within the element can still be represented by a single micromechatlical calculation. The various elements are linked together(sometimes by associating distinct corners and edges, sometimes by superposition) in a

  19. Experimental determination of the strain and strain rate dependence of the fraction of plastic work converted to heat

    SciTech Connect

    Hodowany, J.; Ravichandran, G.; Rosakis, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    When metals are deformed dynamically, there is insufficient time for heat generated by plastic deformation to be conducted to the surroundings. Thus, the conversion of plastic work into heat at high strain rates can result in significant temperature increases, which contribute to thermal softening, thereby altering a material`s constitutive response. The fraction of plastic work converted to heat represents the strength of the coupling term between temperature and mechanical fields in thermalmechanical problems involving plastic flow. The experimental determination of this constitutive function is important since it is an integral part of the formulation of coupled thermomechanical field equations. This fraction also plays an important role in failure mode characterization for metals deforming at high rates of strain, such as the formation of adiabatic shear bands. This investigation systematically examines the rate of conversion of plastic work to heat in metals under dynamic loading. Temperature was measured in-situ using an array of high speed In-Sb infrared detectors. The plastic work rate and the heat generation rate were determined directly from experimental data. The ratio of heat generation rate to plastic work rate, i.e., the relative rate at which plastic work is converted to heat, was calculated from this data. The functional dependence of this quantity upon strain and strain rate is reported for 1020 steel, 2024 aluminum, Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, and C300 maraging steel.

  20. Cyclic stress-strain curve determination for D6AC steel by three methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    The room temperature cyclic stress-strain was determined for D6AC low alloy steel by three different methods. The method that involves the use of a single specimen monotonic tension test after cyclic straining provided the best agreement with the accepted basic method which requires a number of companion specimen tests. The single specimen test is also the simplest to conduct.

  1. Echinococcus granulosus: DNA extraction from germinal layers allows strain determination in fertile and nonfertile hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Kamenetzky, L; Canova, S G; Guarnera, E A; Rosenzvit, M C

    2000-06-01

    A method for the isolation of Echinococcus granulosus DNA from germinal layers of hydatid cysts is described. The method includes a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide/chloroform extraction and an adsorption to diatomaceous earth suspension. DNA suitable for polymerase chain reaction was obtained and used for parasite strain determination by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing. Fertile and nonfertile cyst isolates from sheep, cattle, pigs, and humans were characterized. Hitherto, no direct parasite strain characterization has been made on nonfertile hydatid cysts, whereas here we report that nonfertile hydatid cysts were produced by sheep strain (G1 genotype) in sheep, cattle, and humans and by pig strain (G7 genotype) in pigs.

  2. Simultaneous strain measurement with determination of a zero strain reference for the medial and lateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Satoru; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Yamakoshi, Kenichi; Yamanoi, Takahiro

    2002-09-01

    The strain changes of the central part of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TCL) were measured simultaneously for a full range of ankle motion. Twelve fresh frozen amputated ankles were used. To measure the strain changes of the ligaments, a Galium-Indium-filled silastic strain transducer was implanted in the center of each ligament. The zero strain reference was determined immediately after the measurement of strain changes in five of the 12 ankles by tensile testing of each bone-ligament-bone preparation. The maximum strain change of the ATFL, the PTFL, the CFL and the TFL were 7.9%, 5.9%, 5.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The ATFL was elongated in plantar flexion and shortened in dorsiflexion. The PTFL and the CFL were shortened in plantar flexion and elongated in dorsiflexion. The TCL was the longest around the neutral position and became shorter in planter flexion and dorsiflexion. The results showed that the ATFL was taut in plantar flexion over 16.2 degrees, the PTFL and the CFL were taut in dorsiflexion over 18 degrees and 17.8 degrees respectively, and the TCL was taut between 9.5 degrees of dorsiflexion and 9.5 degrees of plantar flexion. The length change pattern was different among the ankle ligaments, although there was only a slight difference between that of the PTFL and the CFL. This study provides fundamental data useful in studying ankle ligament reconstruction.

  3. Stress-Transfer Micromechanics For Fiber Length with a Photocure Vinyl Ester Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Lemons, Jack E.; McCracken, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to test how increasing fiber length above the critical length would influence mechanical properties and fracture crack propagation. Micromechanics considering fiber/matrix stress-transfer was used to evaluate the results in addition to a shear debonding volume percent correction term necessary for the final analysis. Fiber lengths of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mm with 9 μm diameters were added into a photocure vinyl ester particulate-filled composite at a uniform 28.2 vol%. Mechanical flexural testing was performed using four-point fully articulated fixtures for samples measuring 2 × 2 × 50 mm3 across a 40 mm span. Fiber length correlated with improved mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, strain, work of fracture, and strain energy release, p < 0.001. In addition, sample fracture depth significantly decreased with increasing fiber lengths, p < 0.00001. All mechanical properties correlated significantly as predictors for fracture failure, p < 0.000001, and as estimators for each other, p < 0.0001. The stress-transfer micromechanics for fiber length were improved upon for strength by including a simple correction factor to account for loss of fiber volume percent related to cracks deflecting around debonded fiber ends. In turn, the elastic property of modulus was shown to exhibit a tendency to follow stress-transfer micromechanics. PMID:25382894

  4. Casimir Forces On A Silicon Micromechanical Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, J.; Marset, zsolt; Rodriguez, A.W.; Reid, M. T.H.; McCauley, A. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Bao, Y.; Johnson, S. G.; Chan, Ho Bun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations give rise to van der Waals and Casimir forces that dominate the interaction between electrically neutral objects at sub-micron separations. Under the trend of miniaturization, such quantum electrodynamical effects are expected to play an important role in micro- and nano-mechanical devices. Nevertheless, so far the Casimir force has been experimentally observed only in situations involving an external object manually positioned close to a micromechanical element on a silicon chip. Here, we demonstrate the Casimir effect between two silicon components on the same substrate. In addition to providing an integrated and compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens the possibility of tailoring the Casimir force using lithographically defined components of non-conventional shapes on a single micromechanical chip.

  5. Probabilistic micromechanics for high-temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    The three-year program of research had the following technical objectives: the development of probabilistic methods for micromechanics-based constitutive and failure models, application of the probabilistic methodology in the evaluation of various composite materials and simulation of expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties, and influence of the uncertainties in composite properties on the structural response. The first year of research was devoted to the development of probabilistic methodology for micromechanics models. The second year of research focused on the evaluation of the Chamis-Hopkins constitutive model and Aboudi constitutive model using the methodology developed in the first year of research. The third year of research was devoted to the development of probabilistic finite element analysis procedures for laminated composite plate and shell structures.

  6. Micromechanics-Based Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Laminates Using Different Constituent Failure Theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncada, Albert M.; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting failure in a composite can be done with ply level mechanisms and/or micro level mechanisms. This paper uses the Generalized Method of Cells and High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells micromechanics theories, coupled with classical lamination theory, as implemented within NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells. The code is able to implement different failure theories on the level of both the fiber and the matrix constituents within a laminate. A comparison is made among maximum stress, maximum strain, Tsai-Hill, and Tsai-Wu failure theories. To verify the failure theories the Worldwide Failure Exercise (WWFE) experiments have been used. The WWFE is a comprehensive study that covers a wide range of polymer matrix composite laminates. The numerical results indicate good correlation with the experimental results for most of the composite layups, but also point to the need for more accurate resin damage progression models.

  7. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  8. Micromechanical Modeling of R-Curve Behaviors in Human Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Nicolella, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The risk of bone fracture increases with age because of a variety of factors that include, among others, decreasing bone quantity and quality due to increasing porosity and crack density with age. Experimental evidence has indicated that changes in bone microstructure and trace mineralization with age can result in different crack-tip strain field and fracture response, leading to different fracture mechanisms and R-curve behaviors. In this paper, a micromechanical modeling approach is developed to predict the R-curve response of bone tissue by delineating fracture mechanisms that lead to microdamage and ligament bridging by incorporating the influence of increasing porosity and crack density with age. The effects of age on fracture of human femur cortical bone due to porosity (bone quantity) and bone quality (crack density) with age are then examined via the micromechanical model. PMID:23158217

  9. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  10. Micromechanical modeling of R-curve behaviors in human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwai S; Nicolella, Daniel P

    2012-12-01

    The risk of bone fracture increases with age because of a variety of factors that include, among others, decreasing bone quantity and quality due to increasing porosity and crack density with age. Experimental evidence has indicated that changes in bone microstructure and trace mineralization with age can result in different crack-tip strain field and fracture response, leading to different fracture mechanisms and R-curve behaviors. In this paper, a micromechanical modeling approach is developed to predict the R-curve response of bone tissue by delineating fracture mechanisms that lead to microdamage and ligament bridging by incorporating the influence of increasing porosity and crack density with age. The effects of age on fracture of human femur cortical bone due to porosity (bone quantity) and bone quality (crack density) with age are then examined via the micromechanical model.

  11. Micromechanical apparatus for measurement of forces

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Danelle Mary; Allen, James Joe

    2004-05-25

    A new class of micromechanical dynamometers has been disclosed which are particularly suited to fabrication in parallel with other microelectromechanical apparatus. Forces in the microNewton regime and below can be measured with such dynamometers which are based on a high-compliance deflection element (e.g. a ring or annulus) suspended above a substrate for deflection by an applied force, and one or more distance scales for optically measuring the deflection.

  12. Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven A.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

  13. Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.A.

    1981-07-29

    The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

  14. Determination of Modulus of Elasticity and Shear Modulus by the Measurement of Relative Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labašová, Eva

    2016-12-01

    This contribution is focused on determining the material properties (Young modulus and shear modulus) of the testing samples. The theoretical basis for determining material properties are the knowledge of linear elasticity and strength. The starting points are dependencies among the modulus of elasticity, shear modulus, normal stress and relative strain. The relative strains of the testing samples were obtained by measuring predefined load conditions using a strain-gauge bridge and the universal measurement system Quantum X MX 840. The integration of these tasks into the teaching process enhances practical and intellectual skills of students at secondary level technical universities.

  15. Micromechanical Analysis of Inelastic Deformation of Unidirectional Fibrous Composites under Multiaxial and Shear Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoshkin, A. N.

    2003-09-01

    An algorithm is proposed for numerically solving nonlinear 3D problems of micromechanics of a unidirectionally reinforced composite with a regular structure. For the matrix, equations of the deformation theory of plasticity and relations of reduced rigidity in its failure zones are used, whereas the fibers are elastic and indestructible. According to the method of local approximation, fields of microstresses and microstrains are determined in a structural fragment containing nine periodic cells. Boundary conditions of the fragment correspond to an arbitrary combination of longitudinal, transverse, and shear microstresses occurring in the central part of the fragment. The solution to the nonlinear 3D problem is sought by the method of superposition with an iterational refinement based on the successive solution of an antiplane problem and a problem on a generalized plain strain state of the structural segment. Special features of the iteration procedure are considered. The calculated deformation diagrams and ultimate strengths of a unidirectional glass-epoxy composite are presented for several loading trajectories.

  16. Ex vivo determination of bone tissue strains for an in vivo mouse tibial loading model.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Abela, Lisa; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-07-18

    Previous studies introduced the digital image correlation (DIC) as a viable technique for measuring bone strain during loading. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of a DIC system in determining surface strains in a mouse tibia while loaded in compression through the knee joint. Specifically, we examined the effect of speckle distribution, facet size and overlap, initial vertical alignment of the bone into the loading cups, rotation with respect to cameras, and ex vivo loading configurations on the strain contour maps measured with a DIC system. We loaded tibiae of C57BL/6 mice (12 and 18 weeks old male) up to 12 N at 8 N/min. Images of speckles on the bone surface were recorded at 1N intervals and DIC was used to compute strains. Results showed that speckles must have the correct size and density with respect to the facet size of choice for the strain distribution to be computed and reproducible. Initial alignment of the bone within the loading cups does not influence the strain distribution measured during peak loading, but bones must be placed in front of the camera with the same orientation in order for strains to be comparable. Finally, the ex vivo loading configurations with the tibia attached to the entire mouse, or to the femur and foot, or only to the foot, showed different strain contour maps. This work provides a better understanding of parameters affecting full field strain measurements from DIC in ex vivo murine tibial loading tests.

  17. Computational micromechanics of woven composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Saigal, Sunil; Zeng, Xiaogang

    1991-01-01

    The bounds on the equivalent elastic material properties of a composite are presently addressed by a unified energy approach which is valid for both unidirectional and 2D and 3D woven composites. The unit cell considered is assumed to consist, first, of the actual composite arrangement of the fibers and matrix material, and then, of an equivalent pseudohomogeneous material. Equating the strain energies due to the two arrangements yields an estimate of the upper bound for the material equivalent properties; successive increases in the order of displacement field that is assumed in the composite arrangement will successively produce improved upper bound estimates.

  18. Micromechanics Modeling of Composites Subjected to Multiaxial Progressive Damage in the Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Amold, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The high-fidelity generalized method of cells composite micromechanics model is extended to include constituent-scale progressive damage via a proposed damage model. The damage model assumes that all material nonlinearity is due to damage in the form of reduced stiffness, and it uses six scalar damage variables (three for tension and three for compression) to track the damage. Damage strains are introduced that account for interaction among the strain components and that also allow the development of the damage evolution equations based on the constituent material uniaxial stress strain response. Local final-failure criteria are also proposed based on mode-specific strain energy release rates and total dissipated strain energy. The coupled micromechanics-damage model described herein is applied to a unidirectional E-glass/epoxy composite and a proprietary polymer matrix composite. Results illustrate the capability of the coupled model to capture the vastly different character of the monolithic (neat) resin matrix and the composite in response to far-field tension, compression, and shear loading.

  19. Wireless actuation of bulk acoustic modes in micromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Farrukh; Brown, Benjamin; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2016-08-01

    We report wireless actuation of a Lamb wave micromechanical resonator from a distance of over 1 m with an efficiency of over 15%. Wireless actuation of conventional micromechanical resonators can have broad impact in a number of applications from wireless communication and implantable biomedical devices to distributed sensor networks.

  20. Inverse problems of determining the shape of incompressible bodies under finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, B. A.

    2014-05-01

    Transformations preserving the volume under finite strains are given for some classes of two-dimensional problems. Several settings of nonlinear elasticity problems meant for determining the shape of mechanical rubber objects from a given configuration in a strained state are proposed on the basis of these transformations. Two axisymmetric problems are solved as an example. In the first problem, we determine the shape of a rubber bushing in a combined rubber-metal joint which has a prescribed configuration in the assembled state. In the second problem, we determine the shape of the rubber element of a cylindrical compression damper in working state.

  1. Wild Sex in Zebrafish: Loss of the Natural Sex Determinant in Domesticated Strains

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Catherine A.; High, Samantha K.; McCluskey, Braedan M.; Amores, Angel; Yan, Yi-lin; Titus, Tom A.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Batzel, Peter; Carvan, Michael J.; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination can be robustly genetic, strongly environmental, or genetic subject to environmental perturbation. The genetic basis of sex determination is unknown for zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model for development and human health. We used RAD-tag population genomics to identify sex-linked polymorphisms. After verifying this “RAD-sex” method on medaka (Oryzias latipes), we studied two domesticated zebrafish strains (AB and TU), two natural laboratory strains (WIK and EKW), and two recent isolates from nature (NA and CB). All four natural strains had a single sex-linked region at the right tip of chromosome 4, enabling sex genotyping by PCR. Genotypes for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with the strongest statistical association to sex suggested that wild zebrafish have WZ/ZZ sex chromosomes. In natural strains, “male genotypes” became males and some “female genotypes” also became males, suggesting that the environment or genetic background can cause female-to-male sex reversal. Surprisingly, TU and AB lacked detectable sex-linked loci. Phylogenomics rooted on D. nigrofasciatus verified that all strains are monophyletic. Because AB and TU branched as a monophyletic clade, we could not rule out shared loss of the wild sex locus in a common ancestor despite their independent domestication. Mitochondrial DNA sequences showed that investigated strains represent only one of the three identified zebrafish haplogroups. Results suggest that zebrafish in nature possess a WZ/ZZ sex-determination mechanism with a major determinant lying near the right telomere of chromosome 4 that was modified during domestication. Strains providing the zebrafish reference genome lack key components of the natural sex-determination system but may have evolved variant sex-determining mechanisms during two decades in laboratory culture. PMID:25233988

  2. Tectonic strain of a deformed conglomerate determined from a single pebble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1984-04-01

    Individual rounded pebbles of schist or foliated gneiss included in a conglomerate can each be used as strain markers when the conglomerate has been deformed subsequently. The shape, orientation and the attitude of the earlier schistosity within a single pebble allow one to determine the strain ratio assuming passive behaviour during deformation. The method may also be applicable to certain individual lava pillows containing paleo-horizontal "lava-level" markers.

  3. Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.

    1993-06-01

    Time-resolved shock-wave measurements and post-shock recovery have long been used for inferring the underlaying micromechanics controlling high-rate deformation of solids; this requires considerable subjective interpretation. In spite of this, progress has been made in experimentation and theoretical interpretation of the shock-compression/release cycle and some of the results are reviewed here for weak shocks. This cycle involves the elements of the elastic precursor, plastic loading wave, pulse duration, release wave, and post-mortem examination. Those topics are examined, with emphasis on the second and fourth elements. Cu and Ta results show how shock data can be used to determine the transition from deformation mechanism of thermal activation to that of dislocation drag. Release-wave studies indicate that the leading observable release disturbance in fcc metals may not be propagating with the ideal longitudinal elastic-wave speed. 5 figs, 18 refs.

  4. Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved shock-wave measurements and post-shock recovery have long been used for inferring the underlaying micromechanics controlling high-rate deformation of solids; this requires considerable subjective interpretation. In spite of this, progress has been made in experimentation and theoretical interpretation of the shock-compression/release cycle and some of the results are reviewed here for weak shocks. This cycle involves the elements of the elastic precursor, plastic loading wave, pulse duration, release wave, and post-mortem examination. Those topics are examined, with emphasis on the second and fourth elements. Cu and Ta results show how shock data can be used to determine the transition from deformation mechanism of thermal activation to that of dislocation drag. Release-wave studies indicate that the leading observable release disturbance in fcc metals may not be propagating with the ideal longitudinal elastic-wave speed. 5 figs, 18 refs.

  5. High-Fidelity Micromechanics Model Enhanced for Multiphase Particulate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    This 3-year effort involves the development of a comprehensive micromechanics model and a related computer code, capable of accurately estimating both the average response and the local stress and strain fields in the individual phases, assuming both elastic and inelastic behavior. During the first year (fiscal year 2001) of the investigation, a version of the model called the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells (HFGMC) was successfully completed for the thermo-inelastic response of continuously reinforced multiphased materials with arbitrary periodic microstructures (refs. 1 and 2). The model s excellent predictive capability for both the macroscopic response and the microlevel stress and strain fields was demonstrated through comparison with exact analytical and finite element solutions. This year, HFGMC was further extended in two technologically significant ways. The first enhancement entailed the incorporation of fiber/matrix debonding capability into the two-dimensional version of HFGMC for modeling the response of unidirectionally reinforced composites such as titanium matrix composites, which exhibit poor fiber/matrix bond. Comparison with experimental data validated the model s predictive capability. The second enhancement entailed further generalization of HFGMC to three dimensions to enable modeling the response of particulate-reinforced (discontinuous) composites in the elastic material behavior domain. Next year, the three-dimensional version will be generalized to encompass inelastic effects due to plasticity, viscoplasticity, and damage, as well as coupled electromagnetothermomechanical (including piezoelectric) effects.

  6. A micromechanics-based strength prediction methodology for notched metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical micromechanics based strength prediction methodology was developed to predict failure of notched metal matrix composites. The stress-strain behavior and notched strength of two metal matrix composites, boron/aluminum (B/Al) and silicon-carbide/titanium (SCS-6/Ti-15-3), were predicted. The prediction methodology combines analytical techniques ranging from a three dimensional finite element analysis of a notched specimen to a micromechanical model of a single fiber. In the B/Al laminates, a fiber failure criteria based on the axial and shear stress in the fiber accurately predicted laminate failure for a variety of layups and notch-length to specimen-width ratios with both circular holes and sharp notches when matrix plasticity was included in the analysis. For the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates, a fiber failure based on the axial stress in the fiber correlated well with experimental results for static and post fatigue residual strengths when fiber matrix debonding and matrix cracking were included in the analysis. The micromechanics based strength prediction methodology offers a direct approach to strength prediction by modeling behavior and damage on a constituent level, thus, explicitly including matrix nonlinearity, fiber matrix debonding, and matrix cracking.

  7. Time And Temperature Dependent Micromechanical Properties Of Solder Joints For 3D-Package Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roellig, Mike; Meier, Karsten; Metasch, Rene

    2010-11-01

    The recent development of 3D-integrated electronic packages is characterized by the need to increase the diversity of functions and to miniaturize. Currently many 3D-integration concepts are being developed and all of them demand new materials, new designs and new processing technologies. The combination of simulation and experimental investigation becomes increasingly accepted since simulations help to shorten the R&D cycle time and reduce costs. Numerical calculations like the Finite-Element-Method are strong tools to calculate stress conditions in electronic packages resulting from thermal strains due to the manufacturing process and environmental loads. It is essential for the application of numerical calculations that the material data is accurate and describes sufficiently the physical behaviour. The developed machine allows the measurement of time and temperature dependent micromechanical properties of solder joints. Solder joints, which are used to mechanically and electrically connect different packages, are physically measured as they leave the process. This allows accounting for process influences, which may change material properties. Additionally, joint sizes and metallurgical interactions between solder and under bump metallization can be respected by this particular measurement. The measurement allows the determination of material properties within a temperature range of 20° C-200° C. Further, the time dependent creep deformation can be measured within a strain-rate range of 10-31/s-10-81/s. Solder alloys based on Sn-Ag/Sn-Ag-Cu with additionally impurities and joint sizes down to O/ 200 μm were investigated. To finish the material characterization process the material model coefficient were extracted by FEM-Simulation to increase the accuracy of data.

  8. Micromechanics Analysis Code With Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC): User Guide. Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Bednarcyk, B. A.; Wilt, T. E.; Trowbridge, D.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict the thermomechanical deformation response of advanced composite materials continues to play an important role in the development of these strategic materials. Analytical models that predict the effective behavior of composites are used not only by engineers performing structural analysis of large-scale composite components but also by material scientists in developing new material systems. For an analytical model to fulfill these two distinct functions it must be based on a micromechanics approach which utilizes physically based deformation and life constitutive models and allows one to generate the average (macro) response of a composite material given the properties of the individual constituents and their geometric arrangement. Here the user guide for the recently developed, computationally efficient and comprehensive micromechanics analysis code, MAC, who's predictive capability rests entirely upon the fully analytical generalized method of cells, GMC, micromechanics model is described. MAC/ GMC is a versatile form of research software that "drives" the double or triply periodic micromechanics constitutive models based upon GMC. MAC/GMC enhances the basic capabilities of GMC by providing a modular framework wherein 1) various thermal, mechanical (stress or strain control) and thermomechanical load histories can be imposed, 2) different integration algorithms may be selected, 3) a variety of material constitutive models (both deformation and life) may be utilized and/or implemented, and 4) a variety of fiber architectures (both unidirectional, laminate and woven) may be easily accessed through their corresponding representative volume elements contained within the supplied library of RVEs or input directly by the user, and 5) graphical post processing of the macro and/or micro field quantities is made available.

  9. Force based displacement measurement in micromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    O {close_quote}Shea, S. J.; Ng, C. K.; Tan, Y. Y.; Xu, Y.; Tay, E. H.; Chua, B. L.; Tien, N. C.; Tang, X. S.; Chen, W. T.

    2001-06-18

    We demonstrate how force detection methods based on atomic force microscopy can be used to measure displacement in micromechanical devices. We show the operation of a simple microfabricated accelerometer, the proof mass of which incorporates a tip which can be moved towards an opposing surface. Both noncontact operation using long range electrostatic forces and tapping mode operation are demonstrated. The displacement sensitivity of the present device using feedback to control the tip-surface separation is approximately 1 nm. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Approximate Micromechanics Treatise of Composite Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    A formalism is described for micromechanic impact of composites. The formalism consists of numerous equations which describe all aspects of impact from impactor and composite conditions to impact contact, damage progression, and penetration or containment. The formalism is based on through-the-thickness displacement increments simulation which makes it convenient to track local damage in terms of microfailure modes and their respective characteristics. A flow chart is provided to cast the formalism (numerous equations) into a computer code for embedment in composite mechanic codes and/or finite element composite structural analysis.

  11. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this annual progress report is to summarize the work effort and results accomplished from July 1987 through July 1988 on NASA Research Grant NAG1-659 entitled Micromechanics of Composite Laminate Compressive Failure. The report contains: (1) the objective of the proposed research, (2) the summary of accomplishments, (3) a more extensive review of compression literature, (4) the planned material (and corresponding properties) received to date, (5) the results for three possible specimen geometries, experimental procedures planned, and current status of the experiments, and (6) the work planned for the next contract year.

  12. Micromechanical Origin of Particle Size Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, L.; Kwok, C. Y.; Leung, Y. F.

    2017-03-01

    We computationally study the micromechanics of shear-induced size segregation and propose distinct migration mechanisms for individual large and small particles. While small particles percolate through voids without enduring contacts, large particles climb under shear through their crowded neighborhoods with anisotropic contact network. Particle rotation associated with shear is necessary for the upward migration of large particles. Segregation of large particles can be suppressed with inadequate friction, or with no rotation; increasing interparticle friction promotes the migration of large particles, but has little effect on the percolation of small particles.

  13. Cochlear Micromechanics (Part I): A moderated discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Stephen T.

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "Cochlear Micromechanics". The discussion, moderated by the author, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  14. Cochlear Micromechanics (Part II): A moderated discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gummer, Anthony W.; Mountain, David C.

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "Cochlear Micromechanics". The discussion, moderated by the authors, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  15. Micromechanics of Dipolar Chains Using Optical Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furst, Eric M.; Gast, Alice P.

    1999-01-01

    Here we present our initial study of the micromechanical properties of dipolar chains and columns in a magnetorheological (MR) suspension. Using dual-trap optical tweezers, we are able to directly measure the deformation of the dipolar chains parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. We observe the field dependence of the mechanical properties such as resistance to deformation, chain reorganization, and rupturing of the chains. These forms of energy dissipation are important for understanding and tuning the yield stress and rheological behavior of an MR suspension.

  16. Simplified composite micromechanics for predicting microstresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    A unified set of composite micromechanics equations is summarized and described. This unified set is for predicting the ply microstresses when the ply stresses are known. The set consists of equations of simple form for predicting three-dimensional stresses (six each) in the matrix, fiber, and interface. Several numerical examples are included to illustrate use and computational effectiveness of the equations in this unified set. Numerical results from these examples are discussed with respect to their significance on microcrack formation and, therefore, damage initiation in fiber composites.

  17. Micromechanics of plastic deformation and phase transformation in a three-phase TRIP-assisted advanced high strength steel: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ankit; Ghassemi-Armaki, Hassan; Sung, Hyokyung; Chen, Peng; Kumar, Sharvan; Bower, Allan F.

    2015-05-01

    The micromechanics of plastic deformation and phase transformation in a three-phase advanced high strength steel are analyzed both experimentally and by microstructure-based simulations. The steel examined is a three-phase (ferrite, martensite and retained austenite) quenched and partitioned sheet steel with a tensile strength of 980 MPa. The macroscopic flow behavior and the volume fraction of martensite resulting from the austenite-martensite transformation during deformation were measured. In addition, micropillar compression specimens were extracted from the individual ferrite grains and the martensite particles, and using a flat-punch nanoindenter, stress-strain curves were obtained. Finite element simulations idealize the microstructure as a composite that contains ferrite, martensite and retained austenite. All three phases are discretely modeled using appropriate crystal plasticity based constitutive relations. Material parameters for ferrite and martensite are determined by fitting numerical predictions to the micropillar data. The constitutive relation for retained austenite takes into account contributions to the strain rate from the austenite-martensite transformation, as well as slip in both the untransformed austenite and product martensite. Parameters for the retained austenite are then determined by fitting the predicted flow stress and transformed austenite volume fraction in a 3D microstructure to experimental measurements. Simulations are used to probe the role of the retained austenite in controlling the strain hardening behavior as well as internal stress and strain distributions in the microstructure.

  18. The determination of a continuum mechanics equivalent elastic strain from the analysis of multiple diffraction peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daymond, Mark R.

    2004-10-01

    Stress measurement by neutron or synchrotron x-ray diffraction is a nondestructive technique that provides insights into strain and/or stress fields deep within engineering components and structures. The technique is seeing increased use for the validation of finite element process models, however, present FE models predict a continuum elastic strain rather than diffraction strains. An expression is therefore derived for a physically realistic weighting of strains obtained from multiple single peak diffraction measurements of internal elastic strain in order to determine a macroscopic equivalent elastic strain, and hence stress. A practical approach to the use of the expression is suggested. A similar expression is derived for the equivalent weighting used in Rietveld refinements, for both polychromatic and monochromatic sources, which is applicable to both neutron and x-ray diffraction. The use of these expressions is illustrated for both textured and untextured, cubic (steel) and hexagonal (titanium) symmetry polycrystals. The physically realistic weighting is different from that used in the Rietveld refinement however both provide good estimates of the macroscopic equivalent elastic strain.

  19. Clinical determinants and prognostic significance of the electrocardiographic strain pattern in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Antonio C; Moraes, Aline A I; Cerutti, Virginia; França, Faustino; Quiroga, Borja; Amodeo, Celso; Picotti, Juliano C; Dutra, Lucas V; Rodrigues, Gabriel D; Amparo, Fernanda C; Lindholm, Bengt; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2014-05-01

    The electrocardiographic (ECG) strain pattern (Strain) is a marker of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) severity that provides additional prognostic information beyond echocardiography (ECHO) in the community level. We sought to evaluate its clinical determinants and prognostic usefulness in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We evaluated 284 non-dialysis-dependent patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (mean age, 61 years [interquartile range, 53-67 years]; 62% men). Patients were followed for 23 months (range, 13-32 months) for cardiovascular (CV) events and/or death. Strain patients (n = 37; 13%) were using more antihypertensive drugs, had higher prevalence of peripheral vascular disease and smoking, and higher levels of C-reactive protein, cardiac troponin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The independent predictors of Strain were: left ventricular mass index (LVMI), BNP, and smoking. During follow-up, there were 44 cardiovascular events (fatal and non-fatal) and 22 non-CV deaths; and Strain was associated with a worse prognosis independently of LVMI. Adding Strain to a prognostic model of LVMI improved in 15% the risk discrimination for the composite endpoint and in 12% for the CV events. Strain associates with CV risk factors and adds prognostic information over and above that of ECHO-assessed LVMI. Its routine screening may allow early identification of high risk CKD patients.

  20. Microplate technique to determine hemolytic activity for routine typing of Listeria strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez Rodriguez, L; Vazquez Boland, J A; Fernandez Garayzabal, J F; Echalecu Tranchant, P; Gomez-Lucia, E; Rodriguez Ferri, E F; Suarez Fernandez, G

    1986-01-01

    Because the hemolysis produced by Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria seeligeri on blood agar is frequently difficult to interpret, we developed a microplate technique for the routine determination of hemolytic activity with erythrocyte suspensions. This microtechnique is a simple and reliable test for distinguishing clearly between hemolytic and nonhemolytic strains and could be used instead of the CAMP (Christie-Atkins-Munch-Petersen) test with Staphylococcus aureus in the routine typing of Listeria strains. Furthermore, our results suggest that the quantitation of the hemolytic activity of the Listeria strains, along with the D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and alpha-methyl-D-mannoside acidification tests, allows the differentiation of L. monocytogenes, L. seeligeri, and Listeria ivanovii. We also observed that the treatment of erythrocytes with crude exosubstances of rhodococcus equi, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and S. aureus enhanced the hemolytic activity of all Listeria strains with this characteristic. PMID:3088037

  1. Determination of a Dynamic Feeding Strategy for Recombinant Pichia pastoris Strains

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Dietzsch, Christian; Herwig, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of certain strain specific parameters of recombinant P. pastoris strains is required to be able to set up a feeding regime for fed-batch cultivations. To date, these parameters are commonly determined either by time-consuming and labor-intensive continuous cultivations or by several, consecutive fed-batch cultivations. Here, we describe a fast method based on batch experiments with methanol pulses to extract certain strain characteristic parameters, which are required to set up a dynamic feeding strategy for P. pastoris strains based on specific substrate uptake rate (qs). We further describe in detail the course of actions which have to be taken to obtain the desired dynamics during feeding. PMID:24744034

  2. Determination of antibiotic resistance pattern and bacteriocin sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from different foods in turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study aimed to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and bacteriocin sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from animal derived foods. With disc diffusion assay, all fourteen L. monocytogenes strains were susceptible to the antibiotics, including penicillin G, vancomycin, ...

  3. Pattern recognition characterizations of micromechanical and morphological materials states via analytical quantitative ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    One potential approach to the quantitative acquisition of discriminatory information that can isolate a single structural state is pattern recognition. The pattern recognition characterizations of micromechanical and morphological materials states via analytical quantiative ultrasonics are outlined. The concepts, terminology, and techniques of statistical pattern recognition are reviewed. Feature extraction and classification and states of the structure can be determined via a program of ultrasonic data generation.

  4. Ex vivo determination of bone tissue strains for an in vivo mouse tibial loading model

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, Alessandra; Abela, Lisa; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies introduced the digital image correlation (DIC) as a viable technique for measuring bone strain during loading. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of a DIC system in determining surface strains in a mouse tibia while loaded in compression through the knee joint. Specifically, we examined the effect of speckle distribution, facet size and overlap, initial vertical alignment of the bone into the loading cups, rotation with respect to cameras, and ex vivo loading configurations on the strain contour maps measured with a DIC system. We loaded tibiae of C57BL/6 mice (12 and 18 weeks old male) up to 12 N at 8 N/min. Images of speckles on the bone surface were recorded at 1 N intervals and DIC was used to compute strains. Results showed that speckles must have the correct size and density with respect to the facet size of choice for the strain distribution to be computed and reproducible. Initial alignment of the bone within the loading cups does not influence the strain distribution measured during peak loading, but bones must be placed in front of the camera with the same orientation in order for strains to be comparable. Finally, the ex vivo loading configurations with the tibia attached to the entire mouse, or to the femur and foot, or only to the foot, showed different strain contour maps. This work provides a better understanding of parameters affecting full field strain measurements from DIC in ex vivo murine tibial loading tests. PMID:24835472

  5. Optical Measurement of Micromechanics and Structure in a 3D Fibrin Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarchyk, Maxwell Aaron

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanics to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed an optical tweezers-based microrheology system to investigate the fundamental role of ECM mechanical properties in determining cellular behavior. Further, this thesis outlines the development of a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local structure and mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers-based passive and active microrheology respectively. Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present microrheological studies in the context of fibrin hydrogels. Microrheology and confocal imaging were used to directly measure local changes in micromechanics and structure respectively in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrinogen concentration, as well as in our strain gradient device, in which the concentration of fibrinogen is held constant. Orbital particle tracking, and raster image correlation analysis are used to quantify changes in fibrin mechanics on the

  6. Method for forming suspended micromechanical structures

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    2000-01-01

    A micromachining method is disclosed for forming a suspended micromechanical structure from {111} crystalline silicon. The micromachining method is based on the use of anisotropic dry etching to define lateral features of the structure which are etched down into a {111}-silicon substrate to a first etch depth, thereby forming sidewalls of the structure. The sidewalls are then coated with a protection layer, and the substrate is dry etched to a second etch depth to define a spacing of the structure from the substrate. A selective anisotropic wet etchant (e.g. KOH, EDP, TMAH, NaOH or CsOH) is used to laterally undercut the structure between the first and second etch depths, thereby forming a substantially planar lower surface of the structure along a {111} crystal plane that is parallel to an upper surface of the structure. The lateral extent of undercutting by the wet etchant is controlled and effectively terminated by either timing the etching, by the location of angled {111}-silicon planes or by the locations of preformed etch-stops. This present method allows the formation of suspended micromechanical structures having large vertical dimensions and large masses while allowing for detailed lateral features which can be provided by dry etch definition. Additionally, the method of the present invention is compatible with the formation of electronic circuitry on the substrate.

  7. Simplified Micromechanics of Plain Weave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    A micromechanics based methodology to simulate the complete hygro-thermomechanical behavior of plain weave composites is developed. This methodology is based on micromechanics and the classical laminate theory. The methodology predicts a complete set of thermal, hygral and mechanical properties of plain woven composites, generates necessary data for use in a finite element structural analysis, and predicts stresses all the way from the laminate to the constituent level. This methodology is used in conjunction with a composite mechanics code to analyze and predict the properties/response of a generic graphite/epoxy woven textile composite and a plain weave ceramic composite. The fiber architecture, including the fiber waviness and fiber end distributions through the thickness, is properly accounted for. Predicted results compare reasonably well with those from detailed three-dimensional finite element analyses as well as available experimental data. However, the main advantage of the proposed methodology is its high computational efficiency as compared with three-dimensional finite element analyses.

  8. Application of neutron diffraction technology to the determination of residual strain in engineering composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1992-12-01

    Knowledge of fabrication induced residual stresses in the fiber and matrix of advanced engineering composites is important as these stresses can greatly influence the mechanical properties of these composites. In this paper, the application of neutron diffraction technology to the determination of thermal residual strains in the constituents of composites (from which stresses can be calculated) is discussed. Experimental determination of temperature dependent strain in the fiber and matrix of three composites compare favorably with the results of analytical and finite element methods used to predict strain. These composites (two ceramic matrix and one metal matrix) are materials of interest to a variety of industries. In this paper, the benefit of applying a National Laboratory developed technology to a problem of interest to industry, is shown.

  9. Application of neutron diffraction technology to the determination of residual strain in engineering composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowledge of fabrication induced residual stresses in the fiber and matrix of advanced engineering composites is important as these stresses can greatly influence the mechanical properties of these composites. In this paper, the application of neutron diffraction technology to the determination of thermal residual strains in the constituents of composites (from which stresses can be calculated) is discussed. Experimental determination of temperature dependent strain in the fiber and matrix of three composites compare favorably with the results of analytical and finite element methods used to predict strain. These composites (two ceramic matrix and one metal matrix) are materials of interest to a variety of industries. In this paper, the benefit of applying a National Laboratory developed technology to a problem of interest to industry, is shown.

  10. Micromechanical modeling of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.; Taylor, P.A.; Wise, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

    1994-04-01

    Funded as a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project, the work reported here focuses on the development of a computational methodology to determine the dynamic response of heterogeneous solids on the basis of their composition and microstructural morphology. Using the solid dynamics wavecode CTH, material response is simulated on a scale sufficiently fine to explicitly represent the material`s microstructure. Conducting {open_quotes}numerical experiments{close_quotes} on this scale, the authors explore the influence that the microstructure exerts on the material`s overall response. These results are used in the development of constitutive models that take into account the effects of microstructure without explicit representation of its features. Applying this methodology to a glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) composite, the authors examined the influence of various aspects of the composite`s microstructure on its response in a loading regime typical of impact and penetration. As a prerequisite to the microscale modeling effort, they conducted extensive materials testing on the constituents, S-2 glass and epoxy resin (UF-3283), obtaining the first Hugoniot and spall data for these materials. The results of this work are used in the development of constitutive models for GRP materials in transient-dynamics computer wavecodes.

  11. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  12. On the micromechanisms responsible for bilinearity in fatigue power-law relationships in aluminium-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, N.E.; Malakondaiah, G.; Kutumbarao, V.V.

    1997-09-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys, like many other aerospace structural alloys, exhibit bilinearity in power-law relationships between high strain, low cycle fatigue life (in terms of number of reversals to failure, 2N{sub f}) and plastic strain amplitude ({Delta}{epsilon}{sub p}/2) or average stress amplitude ({Delta}{sigma}/2) or average plastic strain energy per cycle ({Delta}W{sub p}). In the present paper the micromechanisms leading to bilinear fatigue power-law relationships, especially the Coffin-Manson (C-M) relationship, in aluminium-lithium alloys are compiled and discussed.

  13. Cervical strain determined by ultrasound elastography and its association with spontaneous preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Garcia, Maynor; Schwartz, Alyse G.; Yeo, Lami; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is an association between cervical strain, evaluated using ultrasound elastography, and spontaneous preterm delivery (sPTD) <37 weeks of gestation. Methods One hundred and eighty nine (189) women at 16–24 weeks of gestation were evaluated. Ultrasound elastography was used to estimate cervical strain in three anatomical planes: one mid-sagittal in the same plane used for cervical length measurement, and two cross sectional images: one at the level of the internal cervical os, and the other at the level of the external cervical os. In each plane, two regions of interest (endocervix and entire cervix) were examined; a total of six regions of interest were evaluated. Results The prevalence of sPTD was 11% (21/189). Strain values from each of the six cervical regions correlated weakly with cervical length (r= −0.24, p<0.001 to r= −0.03, p=0.69). Strain measurements obtained in a cross sectional view of the internal cervical os were significantly associated with sPTD. Women with strain values ≤25th centile in the endocervical canal (0.19) and in the entire cervix (0.14) were 80% less likely to have a sPTD than women with strain values >25th centile (endocervical: odds ratio [OR] 0.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03–0.96; entire cervix: OR 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03–0.9). Additional adjustment for gestational age, race, smoking status, parity, maternal age, pre-pregnancy body mass index and previous preterm delivery did not appreciably alter the magnitude or statistical significance of these associations. Strain values obtained from the external cervical os and from the sagittal view were not associated with sPTD. Conclusion Low strain values in the internal cervical os were associated with a significantly lower risk of spontaneous preterm delivery <37 weeks of gestation. PMID:24356388

  14. Micromechanics of intraply hybrid composites: Elastic and thermal properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Composite micromechanics are used to derive equations for predicting the elastic and thermal properties of unidirectional intraply hybrid composites. The results predicted using these equations are compared with those predicted using approximate equations based on the rule of mixtures, linear laminate theory, finite element analysis and limited experimental data. The comparisons for three different intraply hybrids indicate that all four methods predict approximately the same elastic properties and are in good agreement with measured data. The micromechanics equations and linear laminate theory predict about the same values for thermal expansion coefficients. The micromechanics equations predict through-the-thickness properties which are in good agreement with the finite element results.

  15. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1997-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule.

  16. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1997-04-15

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule. 6 figs.

  17. Micromechanical modeling and characterization of the effective properties in starch-based nano-biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chivrac, Frederic; Gueguen, Olivier; Pollet, Eric; Ahzi, Said; Makradi, Ahmed; Averous, Luc

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this work was to predict the effective elastic properties of starch-based nano-biocomposites. Experiments (materials elaboration, morphological characterization and determination of mechanical properties) were conducted on both the pristine matrix (plasticized starch) and the matrix filled with montmorillonite nanoclay. Aggregated/intercalated and exfoliated nano-biocomposites were produced and mechanically tested under uniaxial tension to understand the effect of montmorillonite morphology/dispersion on the stiffness properties of starch-based nano-biocomposites. Micromechanical models, based on the classical bounds and the Mori-Tanaka approaches, were developed taking into consideration the influence of the clay concentration, the exfoliation ratio, the relative humidity and the storage time (ageing). Predicted results are in a good agreement with our experiments and show that the micromechanical model can be used as an indirect characterization technique to quantify the exfoliation/aggregation degree in the plasticized starch/clay nano-biocomposites.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in a Pseudomonas putida Strain Isolated from a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  19. Characterization of mutant strains of Candida albicans deficient in expression of a surface determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Chaffin, W L; Collins, B; Marx, J N; Cole, G T; Morrow, K J

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17E4 reacts with a surface carbohydrate determinant and agglutinates cells of Candida albicans. Using this MAb, we have isolated N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced nonagglutinating mutants. Eleven of these were characterized for the presence and expression of the surface antigen recognized by MAb 17E4 by immunoblot analysis of whole cells and by fluorescence flow cytometry. Soluble cell wall extracts from five mutant strains were negative by immunoblot analysis. The reactivities of the strains with several other MAbs and commercial antisera (Candida Check; Iatron Laboratories, Tokyo, Japan) which also recognize carbohydrate determinants were examined by immunoblot analysis of whole cells. Mutant strains showed no or reduced expression of the MAb 17E4 antigen and could be placed into at least two distinct phenotypic classes. Recognition by the other MAbs tested showed a similar pattern, while recognition by the commercial antisera was unchanged in the mutant strains. 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of mannan prepared from the wild type and nonexpressing mutant-strain 4A showed that the spectra from the mutant strain were simpler than those of the wild type. Most of the beta-1,2 linkages and all of the C-1 phosphate linkages were absent in the 4A mannan spectra, which suggested that the mutant mannan lacked the phosphate-bound beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides. The effect of the surface defect on the ability of mutant strain 4A to adhere and to invade host tissue was examined in two murine models. In ex vivo binding assays, strain 4A showed reduced binding to the marginal zone and increased binding to the white pulp of splenic tissue, decreased binding to kidney tissue, and no change in binding to liver tissue compared with the wild type. In vivo, no difference was observed in translocation of the wild type or strain 4A to liver following immuno-compromising treatment of infant mice which had been

  20. Biofilm formation of Brazilian MRSA strains: Prevalence of biofilm determinants and clonal profiles.

    PubMed

    Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Campos, Paola Amaral de; Camilo, Nayara Caroline; Royer, Sabrina; Araujo, Bruna Fuga; Naves, Karinne Spirandelli Carvalho; Martins, Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Henriques, Mariana; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo P; Botelho, Cláudia; Oliveira, Rosário; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-02-09

    Biofilms plays an important role in medical device-related infections. This study aimed to determine the factors that influence adherence and biofilm production, as well as the relationship between strong biofilm production and genetic determinants in clinical isolates of MRSA. Fifteen strains carrying different chromosomal cassettes, recovered from patients hospitalized were selected: five SCCmecII, five SCCmecIII and five SCCmecIV. The SCCmec type, agr group and the presence of the virulence genes (bbp, clfA, icaA, icaD, fnbB, bap, sasC and IS256) were assessed by PCR. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) techniques also were performed. The initial adhesion and biofilm formation were examined by quantitative assays. The surface tension and hydrophobicity of the strains were measured by contact angle technique to evaluate the association between these parameters and adhesion ability. SCCmecIII and IV strains were less hydrophilic, with a high value for the electron acceptor parameter and higher adhesion in comparison with SCCmecII strains. Only SCCmecIII strains could be characterized as strong biofilm producers. The PFGE showed five major pulsotypes (A-E) however, biofilm production was related to the dissemination of one specific PFGE clone (C) belonging to MLST ST239 (BECC, Brazilian epidemic clonal complex). The genes agrI, fnbB and IS256 in SCCmecIII strains, were considered as genetic determinants associated with strong biofilm-formation by an ica-independent biofilm pathway. This study contributes to the understanding of biofilm production as an aggravating factor potentially involved in the persistence and severity of infections caused by multidrug-resistant MRSA belonging to this genotype.

  1. Fibrous tissues growth and remodeling: Evolutionary micro-mechanical theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanir, Yoram

    2017-10-01

    Living fibrous tissues are composite materials having the unique ability to adapt their size, shape, structure and mechanical properties in response to external loading. This adaptation, termed growth and remodeling (G&R), occurs throughout life and is achieved via cell-induced turnover of tissue constituents where some are degraded and new ones are produced. Realistic mathematical modeling of G&R provides insight into the basic processes, allows for hypotheses testing, and constitutes an essential tool for establishing clinical thresholds of pathological remodeling and for the production of tissue substitutes aimed to achieve target structure and properties. In this study, a general 3D micro-mechanical multi-scale theory of G&R in fibrous tissue was developed which connects between the evolution of the tissue structure and properties, and the underlying mechano-biological turnover events of its constituents. This structural approach circumvents a fundamental obstacle in modeling growth mechanics since the growth motion is not bijective. The model was realized for a flat tissue under two biaxial external loadings using data-based parameter values. The predictions show close similarity to characteristics of remodeled adult tissue including its structure, anisotropic and non-linear mechanical properties, and the onset of in situ pre-strain and pre-stress. The results suggest that these important features of living fibrous tissues evolve as they grow.

  2. Micromechanics of intergranular creep failure under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Giessen, E. van der; Tvergaard, V.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is concerned with a micromechanical investigation of intergranular creep failure caused by grain boundary cavitation under strain-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Numerical unit cell analyses are carried out for a planar polycrystal model in which the grain material and the grain boundaries are modeled individually. The model incorporates power-law creep of the grains, viscous grain boundary sliding between grains as well as the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities until they coalesce and form microcracks. Study of a limiting case with a facet-size microcrack reveals a relatively simple phenomenology under either balanced loading, slow-fast loading or balanced loading with a hold period at constant tensile stress. Next, a (non-dimensionalized) parametric study is carried out which focuses on the effect of the diffusive cavity growth rate relative to the overall creep rate, and the effects of cavity nucleation and grain boundary sliding. The model takes account of the build up of residual stresses during cycling, and it turns out that this, in general, gives rise to a rather complex phenomenology, but some cases are identified which approach the simple microcrack behavior. The analyses provide some new understanding that helps to explain the sometimes peculiar behavior under balanced cyclic creep.

  3. Micromechanics-Based Inelastic Finite Element Analysis Accomplished Via Seamless Integration of MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Trowbridge, D.

    2001-01-01

    A critical issue in the micromechanics-based analysis of composite structures becomes the availability of a computationally efficient homogenization technique: one that is 1) Capable of handling the sophisticated, physically based, viscoelastoplastic constitutive and life models for each constituent; 2) Able to generate accurate displacement and stress fields at both the macro and the micro levels; 3) Compatible with the finite element method. The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC) developed by Paley and Aboudi is one such micromechanical model that has been shown to predict accurately the overall macro behavior of various types of composites given the required constituent properties. Specifically, the method provides "closed-form" expressions for the macroscopic composite response in terms of the properties, size, shape, distribution, and response of the individual constituents or phases that make up the material. Furthermore, expressions relating the internal stress and strain fields in the individual constituents in terms of the macroscopically applied stresses and strains are available through strain or stress concentration matrices. These expressions make possible the investigation of failure processes at the microscopic level at each step of an applied load history.

  4. Grain tracing and strain determination in a Be compact tension specimen using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R.; Green, R.; Garcia, M.D.; Satyam, P.V.; Yun, W.B.; Maser, J.; Kai, Z.; Lai, B.; Sinha, S.K.

    1999-04-19

    X-ray synchrotron radiation of high (11 KeV) energy and high flux (10{sup 10} photons per square centimeter per second) has been used to measure strains and polycrystallinity in 6-mm thick polycrystalline beryllium compact tension (CT) specimens at and around the crack tip (for fatigue-precracked sample) or at chevron notch point under load or no-load conditions. The authors demonstrated the feasibility strain field mapping as well as determining the polycrystallinity at or near the points of maximum load in beryllium CT specimens. The experimental techniques and results will be discussed.

  5. Determining a Prony Series for a Viscoelastic Material From Time Varying Strain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzikang, Chen

    2000-01-01

    In this study a method of determining the coefficients in a Prony series representation of a viscoelastic modulus from rate dependent data is presented. Load versus time test data for a sequence of different rate loading segments is least-squares fitted to a Prony series hereditary integral model of the material tested. A nonlinear least squares regression algorithm is employed. The measured data includes ramp loading, relaxation, and unloading stress-strain data. The resulting Prony series which captures strain rate loading and unloading effects, produces an excellent fit to the complex loading sequence.

  6. Micromechanical Modeling of Metal Forming Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Tung Phan; Jöchen, Katja; Böhlke, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a ferritic stainless steel (DC04) is investigated in the following three steps. First, we use micropillar compression test data for the identification of a large strain single crystal plasticity model. In the second step the model is verified based on Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) measurements in a small specimen subjected to a large strain uniaxial tensile test. The two-dimensional EBSD data have been discretized by finite elements and subjected to homogeneous displacement boundary conditions for the second step. Finally, we apply a two-scale Taylor type model at the integration points of the finite elements to simulate the deep drawing process based on initial texture data. The texture data required for the specification of the two-scale model is determined based on the aforementioned EBSD data and by using a texture component method simultaneously to improve the computation time. The finite element simulations were performed with differently textured sheet metals and compared with experiment.

  7. Micromechanics-based strength and lifetime prediction of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandorawalla, Tozer Jamshed

    With the increasing use of composite materials for diverse applications ranging from civil infrastructure to offshore oil exploration, the durability of these materials is an important issue. Practical and accurate models for lifetime will enable engineers to push the boundaries of design and make the most efficient use of composite materials, while at the same time maintaining the utmost standards of safety. The work described in this dissertation is an effort to predict the strength and rupture lifetime of a unidirectional carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite using micromechanical techniques. Sources of material variability are incorporated into these models to predict probabilistic distributions for strength and lifetime. This approach is best suited to calculate material reliability for a desired lifetime under a given set of external conditions. A systematic procedure, with experimental verification at each important step, is followed to develop the predictive models in this dissertation. The work begins with an experimental and theoretical understanding of micromechanical stress redistribution due to fiber fractures in unidirectional composite materials. In-situ measurements of fiber stress redistribution are made in macromodel composites where the fibers are large enough that strain gauges can be mounted directly onto the fibers. The measurements are used to justify and develop a new form of load sharing where the load of the broken fiber is redistributed only onto the nearest adjacent neighbors. The experimentally verified quasi-static load sharing is incorporated into a Monte Carlo simulation for tensile strength modeling. Very good agreement is shown between the predicted and experimental strength distribution of a unidirectional composite. For the stress-rupture models a time and temperature dependent load-sharing analysis is developed to compute stresses due to an arbitrary sequence of fiber fractures. The load sharing is incorporated into a simulation

  8. Viscous anisotropy of textured olivine aggregates: 2. Micromechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Lars N.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Boneh, Yuval; Skemer, Philip; Warren, Jessica M.; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2016-10-01

    The significant viscous anisotropy that results from crystallographic alignment (texture) of olivine grains in deformed upper mantle rocks strongly influences a large variety of geodynamic processes. Our ability to explore the effects of anisotropic viscosity in simulations of these processes requires a mechanical model that can predict the magnitude of anisotropy and its evolution. Unfortunately, existing models of olivine textural evolution and viscous anisotropy are calibrated for relatively small deformations and simple strain paths, making them less general than desired for many large-scale geodynamic scenarios. Here we develop a new set of micromechanical models to describe the mechanical behavior and textural evolution of olivine through a large range of strains and complex strain histories. For the mechanical behavior, we explore two extreme scenarios, one in which each grain experiences the same stress tensor (Sachs model) and one in which each grain undergoes a strain rate as close as possible to the macroscopic strain rate (pseudo-Taylor model). For the textural evolution, we develop a new model in which the director method is used to control the rate of grain rotation and the available slip systems in olivine are used to control the axis of rotation. Only recently has enough laboratory data on the deformation of olivine become available to calibrate these models. We use these new data to conduct inversions for the best parameters to characterize both the mechanical and textural evolution models. These inversions demonstrate that the calibrated pseudo-Taylor model best reproduces the mechanical observations. Additionally, the pseudo-Taylor textural evolution model can reasonably reproduce the observed texture strength, shape, and orientation after large and complex deformations. A quantitative comparison between our calibrated models and previously published models reveals that our new models excel in predicting the magnitude of viscous anisotropy and

  9. Probing the micro-mechanical behavior of bone via high-energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Almer, J.; Stock, S. R.; X-Ray Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2006-01-01

    Bone is a highly-adaptive, particulate-reinforced composite which, through a complex hierarchical structure, achieves excellent mechanical performance. The composite preserves, to a large degree, the desirable properties of the individual components: high toughness of the bone matrix, collagen fibrils stabilized by water, and high stiffness of the reinforcing phase, nano-sized crystallites of carbonated apatite. Understanding bone fragility (osteoporosis) requires quantifying mechanical input to bone and identifying 'weak-link' microstructures. This mechanical input has been quantified in vivo with strain gages attached to cortical bone, but attached strain gages do not probe subsurface mechanical response. We addressed this shortcoming recently by appling wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering to canine fibula sections, to study the micro-mechanical response of bone on different length scales. These data provide a unique view of load partition between the constituent phases of bone, and here we extend these measurements to an entire rat tibia, where strain gradients due to bending are anticipated. Tibiae of 14 week old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied. A 3D microCT rendering of the sample and definitions of the loading (y) and transverse (x) directions appear in Fig.1, with the y-axis approximately parallel to the bone's longitudinal axis. Due to the curved shape of the tibia, significant sample bending in the x-direction was anticipated even under uniaxial compression, similar to that expected in vivo (there was little curvature in the y-z plane). The sample cross-section at y=0 was determined by microCT to be approximately 4 mm{sup 2}. The sample was potted in epoxy and compressed in a load frame designed for in situ x-ray scattering studies. Loading was in displacement control, at a rate of 0.06 {micro}m/sec. The aggregate macroscopic response was followed using a load cell combined with strain gages located on both the 'convex' (-x) and 'concave' (+x) sides of

  10. Determining horizontal displacement and strains due to subsidence. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tandanand, S.; Powell, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    Horizontal displacements and ground strains induced by mine subsidence are significant information needed for calculating damage and developing precautions against subsidence effects on surface structures. To devise a simple method for determining the surface horizontal displacements and strains simultaneously with the subsidence prediction, the U.S. Bureau of Mines examined the significance of the tilt number, which is the proportionality constant in the relationship between the horizontal displacement and the slope of the subsidence profile. The ratio of the tilt number to the critical radius of the subsidence trough is identical to the ratio of the maximum possible horizontal displacement to the full subsidence, which is found to be constant in most European coalfields. If this ratio is known for a particular minesite in the United States, then horizontal displacement and ground strains can be readily obtained from the primary subsidence data.

  11. Determination and Finite Element Validation of the WYPIWYG Strain Energy of Superficial Fascia from Experimental Data.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Marcos; Peña, Estefanía; Montáns, Francisco J

    2017-03-01

    What-You-Prescribe-Is-What-You-Get (WYPIWYG) procedures are a novel and general phenomenological approach to modelling the behavior of soft materials, applicable to biological tissues in particular. For the hyperelastic case, these procedures solve numerically the nonlinear elastic material determination problem. In this paper we show that they can be applied to determine the stored energy density of superficial fascia. In contrast to the usual approach, in such determination no user-prescribed material parameters and no optimization algorithms are employed. The strain energy densities are computed solving the equilibrium equations of the set of experiments. For the case of superficial fascia it is shown that the mechanical behavior derived from such strain energies is capable of reproducing simultaneously the measured load-displacement curves of three experiments to a high accuracy.

  12. Mechanical strain determines the axis of planar polarity in ciliated epithelia.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Keller, Ray; Kintner, Chris; Shook, David R

    2015-11-02

    Epithelia containing multiciliated cells align beating cilia along a common planar axis specified by the conserved planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Specification of the planar axis is also thought to require a long-range cue to align the axis globally, but the nature of this cue in ciliated and other epithelia remains poorly understood. We examined this issue using the Xenopus larval skin, where ciliary flow aligns to the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis. We first show that a planar axis initially arises in the developing skin during gastrulation, based on the appearance of polarized apical microtubules and cell junctions with increased levels of stable PCP components. This axis also arises in severely ventralized embryos, despite their deficient embryonic patterning. Because ventralized embryos still gastrulate, producing a mechanical force that strains the developing skin along the A-P axis, we asked whether this strain alone drives global planar patterning. Isolated skin explanted before gastrulation lacks strain and fails to acquire a global planar axis but responds to exogenous strain by undergoing cell elongation, forming polarized apical microtubules, and aligning stable components of the PCP pathway orthogonal to the axis of strain. The planar axis in embryos can be redirected by applying exogenous strain during a critical period around gastrulation. Finally, we provide evidence that apical microtubules and the PCP pathway interact to align the planar axis. These results indicate that oriented tissue strain generated by the gastrulating mesoderm plays a major role in determining the global axis of planar polarity of the developing skin.

  13. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A.; Vegge, Christina S.; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages. PMID:25585385

  14. Mechanical strain determines the axis of planar polarity in ciliated epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Keller, Ray; Kintner, Chris; Shook, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelia containing multiciliated cells align beating cilia along a common planar axis specified by the conserved planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Specification of the planar axis is also thought to require a long-range cue to align the axis globally, but the nature of this cue in ciliated and other epithelia remains poorly understood. We examined this issue using the Xenopus larval skin where ciliary flow aligns to the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis. We first show that a planar axis initially arises in the developing skin during gastrulation, based on the appearance of polarized apical microtubules and cell junctions with increased levels of stable PCP components. This axis also arises in severely ventralized embryos despite their deficient embryonic patterning. Since ventralized embryos still gastrulate, producing a mechanical force that strains the developing skin along the A-P axis, we asked whether this strain alone drives global planar patterning. Isolated skin explanted before gastrulation lacks strain, fails to acquire a global planar axis, but responds to exogenous strain by undergoing cell elongation, forming polarized apical microtubules, and aligning stable components of the PCP pathway orthogonal to the axis of strain. The planar axis in embryos can be redirected by applying exogenous strain during a critical period around gastrulation. Finally, we provide evidence that apical microtubules and the PCP pathway interact to align the planar axis. These results indicate that oriented tissue strain generated by the gastrulating mesoderm plays a major role in determining the global axis of planar polarity of the developing skin. PMID:26441348

  15. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Martine C Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A; Vegge, Christina S; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages.

  16. Apparatus for raising or tilting a micromechanical structure

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2008-09-09

    An active hinge apparatus is disclosed which can be used to raise a micromechanical structure (e.g. a plate or micromirror) on a substrate. The active hinge apparatus utilizes one or more of teeth protruding outward from an axle which also supports the micromechanical structure on one end thereof. A rack is used to engage the teeth and rotate the axle to raise the micromechanical structure and tilt the structure at an angle to the substrate. Motion of the rack is provided by an actuator which can be a mechanically-powered actuator, or alternately an electrostatic comb actuator or a thermal actuator. A latch can be optionally provided in the active hinge apparatus to lock the micromechanical structure in an "erected" position.

  17. Haploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine survival during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Nesbit, Jacqueline; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; D'Elia, Riccardo; Muse, Kenneth E.; Hammond, Jeffrey; Freeman, Jake; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2007-02-01

    This study identifies genes that determine survival during a space flight, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Select strains of a haploid yeast deletion series grew during storage in distilled water in space, but not in ground based static or clinorotation controls. The survival advantages in space in distilled water include a 133-fold advantage for the deletion of PEX19, a chaperone and import receptor for newly- synthesized class I peroxisomal membrane proteins, to 77-40 fold for deletion strains lacking elements of aerobic respiration, isocitrate metabolism, and mitochondrial electron transport. Following automated addition of rich growth media, the space flight was associated with a marked survival advantage of strains with deletions in catalytically active genes including hydrolases, oxidoreductases and transferases. When compared to static controls, space flight was associated with a marked survival disadvantage of deletion strains lacking transporter, antioxidant and catalytic activity. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with a survival advantage during storage in distilled water and space flight, and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for survival in space.

  18. Future technologies. I - Microelectronics, micrometrology, and micromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, H.

    1986-04-01

    Recent developments in microelectronics design and manufacturing are reviewed, with an emphasis on the activity of West German research institutes and industry. The history of semiconductor development since 1948 is summarized; current efforts to produce submicron VHSICs with throughput 10 to the 13th Hz/sq cm at clock frequency 50 MHz are described; and consideration is given to emitter-coupled-logic gate arrays and GaAs devices. The use of optical measurement techniques or digital analysis of SEM images in fabricating or customizing microelectronic structure is examined, and Si-based sensors for a number of micromechanical applications (pressure sensors, CCD cameras, gas chromatographs, and temperature sensors) are discussed along with the anisotropic etching processes used to fabricate them.

  19. Coupling a Bose condensate to micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Chandler; Fox, Eli; Flanz, Scott; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2011-05-01

    We describe the construction of a compact apparatus to investigate the interaction of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate and a micromechanical oscillator. The apparatus uses a double magneto-optical trap, Raman sideband cooling, and evaporative cooling to rapidly produce a 87Rb BEC in close proximity to a high Q membrane. The micromotion of the membrane results in small Zeeman shifts at the location of the BEC due to a magnetic domain attached to the oscillator. Detection of this micromotion by the condensate results in a backaction on the membrane. We investigate prospects of using this backaction to generate nonclassical states of the mechanical oscillator. This work was funded by the DARPA ORCHID program.

  20. Micromechanical model for fibrous ceramic bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. J.; Lange, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    A micromechanical model is presented to relate the mechanical properties of low-density fibrous ceramic bodies to their microstructures and the properties of the fibers. It is found that properties such as the elastic moduli, fracture toughness, and strength depend on the fiber spacing. In particular, it is shown that the critical stress intensity (Kc) depends on the density of the body with respect to the fiber density, the degree of preferred orientation, the fiber strength, and the fiber radius, suggesting ways of increasing K(c). Furthermore, it is predicted that K(c) will be related to the sonic velocity in the material, reflecting variations in the degree of preferred orientation. The model is found to be consistent with the experimental observations on a silica-based fibrous ceramic, which is being used in the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle.

  1. Micromechanical Modeling Efforts for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Over the past two decades, NASA Lewis Research Center's in-house efforts in analytical modeling for advanced composites have yielded several computational predictive tools. These are, in general, based on simplified micromechanics equations. During the last 3 years, our efforts have been directed primarily toward developing prediction tools for high temperature ceramic matrix composite (CMC's) materials. These materials are being considered for High Speed Research program applications, specifically for combustor liners. In comparison to conventional materials, CMC's offer several advantages: high specific stiffness and strength, and higher toughness and nonbrittle failure in comparison to monolithic ceramics, as well as environmental stability and wear resistance for both roomtemperature and elevated-temperature applications. Under the sponsorship of the High Temperature Engine Materials Program (HITEMP), CMC analytical modeling has resulted in the computational tool Ceramic Matrix Composites Analyzer (CEMCAN).

  2. Micromechanical models for textile structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrey, Ramesh V.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop micromechanical models for predicting the stiffness and strength properties of textile composite materials. Two models are presented to predict the homogeneous elastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of a textile composite. The first model is based on rigorous finite element analysis of the textile composite unit-cell. Periodic boundary conditions are enforced between opposite faces of the unit-cell to simulate deformations accurately. The second model implements the selective averaging method (SAM), which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging. For thin textile composites, both models can predict the plate stiffness coefficients and plate thermal coefficients. The finite element procedure is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses, and to estimate the initial failure envelope for textile composites.

  3. Method for forming suspended micromechanical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.

    2000-02-01

    A micromachining method is disclosed for forming a suspended micromechanical structure from {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace} crystalline silicon. The micromachining method is based on the use of anisotropic dry etching to define lateral features of the structure which are etched down into a {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}-silicon substrate to a first etch depth, thereby forming sidewalls of the structure. The sidewalls are then coated with a protection layer, and the substrate is dry etched to a second etch depth to define a spacing of the structure from the substrate. A selective anisotropic wet etchant (e.g., KOH, EDP, TMAH, NaOH or CsOH) is used to laterally undercut the structure between the first and second etch depths, thereby forming a substantially planar lower surface of the structure along a {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace} crystal plane that is parallel to an upper surface of the structure. The lateral extent of undercutting by the wet etchant is controlled and effectively terminated by either timing the etching, by the location of angled {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}-silicon planes or by the locations of preformed etch-stops. This present method allows the formation of suspended micromechanical structures having large vertical dimensions and large masses while allowing for detailed lateral features which can be provided by dry etch definition. Additionally, the method of the present invention is compatible with the formation of electronic circuitry on the substrate.

  4. Influence of ceramic thickness and type on micromechanical properties of light-cured adhesive bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Elif; Bolay, Sükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical properties of different adhesive bonding agents when polymerized through ceramics. Sixty sound extracted human third molars were selected and the crowns were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis in order to obtain dentin slices to be bonded with one of the following adhesives: Syntac/Heliobond (Ivoclar-Vivadent) or Adper-Scotchbond-1XT (3M-ESPE). The adhesives were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS-e.max-Press, Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS-Empress®CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0 mm, 0.75 mm, 2 mm). Thirty groups were included, each containing 60 measurements. Micromechanical properties (Hardness, HV; indentation modulus, E; and creep, Cr) of the adhesives were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). Data were statistically analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, as well as a multivariate analysis to test the influence of the study parameters (SPSS 18.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the adhesives (p < 0.05). The ceramic type showed the highest effect on HV (Partial-eta squared (η(2)) = 0.109) of the tested adhesives, while E (η(2) = 0.275) and Cr (η(2) = 0.194) were stronger influenced by the adhesive type. Ceramic thickness showed no effect on the E and Cr of the adhesives. The adhesive bonding agents used in this study performed well by curing through different thicknesses of ceramics. The micromechanical properties of the adhesives were determined by the adhesive type and were less influenced by ceramic type and curing time.

  5. Straining GOR tolerance determinations are a measure of G-duration not G-level tolerance.

    PubMed

    Burton, R R

    1999-03-01

    Straining gradual G onset rate (GOR) tolerances are considered by physiologists as a measure of G-level tolerance. Using recently developed G-level and G-duration mathematical models, it was found that straining GOR tolerances may well be a measure of tolerance to G-duration. G-duration tolerance was determined to be limited with the onset of fatigue and not cardiovascular insufficiency. G-level tolerances that were predicted using a mathematical model were higher than determined using straining GOR tolerance measurements of subjects on a centrifuge. Also the G-duration tolerance mathematical model showed that those centrifuge subjects had not expended all of their "energy reserve" during their sustained G exposure most probably because of the onset of fatigue. Even if they were able to use all of their potential energy reserve, their G-duration tolerance would not have allowed them to reach the maximum G-level predicted with the G-level tolerance model. It is therefore concluded that the straining GOR tolerance profile, with G onset rates of 0.1G/s, is not a measure of G-level tolerance, as has been assumed, but is a measure of G-duration tolerance. These findings have significant safety implications world-wide since this straining GOR profile is commonly used as a G-level tolerance fighter-pilot-selection determination; i.e. pilot selection standards for G-level tolerance are not a measure of G-level tolerance. In testing equipment design changes, the proper G tolerance profiles must be used to correctly measure its impact on G tolerance.

  6. Material Properties Test to Determine Ultimate Strain and True Stress-True Strain Curves for High Yield Steels

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-01

    This testing was undertaken to develop material true stress-true strain curves for elastic-plastic material behavior for use in performing transient analysis. Based on the conclusions of this test, the true stress-true strain curves derived herein are valid for use in elastic-plastic finite element analysis for structures fabricated from these materials. In addition, for the materials tested herein, the ultimate strain values are greater than those values cited as the limits for the elastic-plastic strain acceptance criteria for transient analysis.

  7. Micromechanical modelling of partially molten and sand reinforced polycrystalline ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnau, O.; Duval, P.

    2009-12-01

    The viscoplastic behaviour of polycrystalline ice is strongly affected by the very strong anisotropy of ice crystals. Indeed, in the dislocations creep regime relevant for ice sheet flow, dislocation glide on the basal plane of ice single crystals leads to strain-rates ~6 order of magnitude larger than strain-rates that might be obtain if only non-basal glide is activated. At the polycrystal scale, this behaviour is responsible for a strong mechanical interaction between grains in the secondary (stationary) creep regime, and strain-rate is essentially partitioned between soft grains well-oriented for basal glide and hard grains exhibiting an unfavourable orientation for basal slip. As a consequence, the macroscopic flow stress at the polycrystal scale essentially depends on the resistance of the hardest slip systems or on the associated accommodation processes such as climb of basal dislocation on non-basal planes. Creep experiments performed on polycrystalline ices containing a small amount (less than 10% volume fraction) of liquid water show a dramatic increase of strain-rate, by more than one order of magnitude, compared to solid ice when deformed under similar thermo-mechanical conditions. Similarly, a strong hardening is observed when polycrystalline ice is reinforced by sand (which can be considered as a rigid phase here). This behaviour can be explained by micromechanical models, which aims at estimating the mechanical interactions between grains. For example, the presence of water releases stress concentrations at grain boundaries and therefore favours the inactivation of non-basal systems. To estimate such effect and to reach quantitative comparison with experimental data, we make use of the recent Second-Order homogenization mean-field approach of Ponte-Castaneda, based on self-consistent scheme. The advantage of this approach, which has been shown to provide excellent results when applied to many different non-linear composite materials, comes from the

  8. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  9. Strain-Based Damage Determination Using Finite Element Analysis for Structural Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagaraja; Aguilo, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    A damage determination method is presented that relies on in-service strain sensor measurements. The method employs a gradient-based optimization procedure combined with the finite element method for solution to the forward problem. It is demonstrated that strains, measured at a limited number of sensors, can be used to accurately determine the location, size, and orientation of damage. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the general procedure. This work is motivated by the need to provide structural health management systems with a real-time damage characterization. The damage cases investigated herein are characteristic of point-source damage, which can attain critical size during flight. The procedure described can be used to provide prognosis tools with the current damage configuration.

  10. Determination of the ductile-brittle transition temperature from the microplastic-strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. K.; Solntsev, Yu. P.

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the determination of the tendency of cast and deformed steels to brittle fracture using the temperature dependence of the small-plastic-strain rate is studied. The temperature corresponding to the maximum in this curve is found to indicate an abrupt decrease in the steel plasticity, which makes it possible to interpret it as the ductile-brittle transition temperature depending only on the structure of a material.

  11. Time dependent micromechanics in continuous graphite fiber/epoxy composites with fiber breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao Hui

    Time dependent micromechanics in graphite fiber/epoxy composites around fiber breaks was investigated with micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and two shear-lag based composite models, a multi-fiber model (VBI) and a single fiber model (SFM), which aim at predicting the strain/stress evolutions in the composite from the matrix creep behavior and fiber strength statistics. This work is motivated by the need to understand the micromechanics and predict the creep-rupture of the composites. Creep of the unfilled epoxy was characterized under different stress levels and at temperatures up to 80°C, with two power law functions, which provided the modeling parameters used as input for the composite models. Both the VBI and the SFM models showed good agreement with the experimental data obtained with MRS, when inelasticity (interfacial debonding and/or matrix yielding) was not significant. The maximum shear stress near a fiber break relaxed at t-alpha/2 (or as (1+ talpha)-1/2) and the load recovery length increased at talpha/2(or (1+ talpha)1/2) following the model predictions. When the inelastic zone became non-negligible, the viscoelastic VBI model lost its competence, while the SFM with inelasticity showed good agreement with the MRS measurements. Instead of using the real fiber spacing, an effective fiber spacing was used in model predictions, taking into account of the radial decay of the interfacial shear stress from the fiber surface. The comparisons between MRS data and the SFM showed that inelastic zone would initiate when the shear strain at the fiber end exceeds a critical value gammac which was determined to be 5% for this composite system at room temperature and possibly a smaller value at elevated temperatures. The stress concentrations in neighboring intact fibers played important roles in the subsequent fiber failure and damage growth. The VBI model predicts a constant stress concentration factor, 1.33, for the 1st nearest intact fiber, which is in good

  12. Micromechanical definition of an entropy for quasi-static deformation of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenburg, L.; Kruyt, N. P.

    2009-03-01

    A micromechanical theory is formulated for quasi-static deformation of granular materials, which is based on information theory. A reasoning is presented that leads to the definition of an information entropy that is appropriate for quasi-static deformation of granular materials. This definition is based on the hypothesis that relative displacements at contacts with similar orientations are independent realisations of a random variable. This hypothesis is made plausible based on the results of Discrete Element simulations. The developed theory is then used to predict the elastic behaviour of granular materials in terms of micromechanical quantities. The case considered is that of two-dimensional assemblies consisting of non-rotating particles with an elastic contact constitutive relation. Applications of this case are the initial elastic (small-strain) deformation of granular materials. Theoretical results for the elastic moduli, relative displacements, energy distribution and probability density functions are compared with results obtained from the Discrete Element simulations for isotropic assemblies with various average numbers of contacts per particle and various ratios of tangential to normal contact stiffness. This comparison shows that the developed information theory is valid for loose systems, while a theory based on the uniform-strain assumption is appropriate for dense systems.

  13. Micromechanical evaluation of bone microstructures under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralph; Boesch, Tobias; Jarak, Drazen; Stauber, Martin; Nazarian, Ara; Tantillo, Michelle; Boyd, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Many bones within the axial and appendicular skeleton are subjected to repetitive, cyclic loading during the course of ordinary daily activities. If this repetitive loading is of sufficient magnitude or duration, fatigue failure of the bone tissue may result. In clinical orthopedics, trabecular fatigue fractures are observed as compressive stress fractures in the proximal femur, vertebrae, calcaneus and tibia, and are often preceded by buckling and bending of microstructural elements. However, the relative importance of bone density and architecture in the aetiology of these fractures is poorly understood. The aim of the study was to investigate failure mechanisms of 3D trabecular bone using micro-computed tomography (mCT). Because of its nondestructive nature, mCT represents an ideal approach for performing not only static measurements of bone architecture but also dynamic measurements of failure initiation and propagation as well as damage accumulation. For the purpose of the study, a novel micro-compression device was devised to measure loaded trabecular bone specimens directly in a micro-tomographic system. A 3D snapshot of the structure under load was taken for each load step in the mCT providing 34 mm nominal resolution. An integrated mini-button load cell in the compression device combined with the displacement computed directly from the mCT scout view was used to record the load-displacement curve. From the series of 3D images, failure of the trabecular architecture could be observed, and in a rod-like type of architecture it could be described by an initial buckling and bending of structural elements followed by a collapse of the overloaded trabeculae. A computational method was developed to quantify individual trabecular strains during failure. The four main steps of the algorithm were (i) sequential image alignment, (ii) identification of landmarks (trabecular nodes), (iii) determine nodal connectivity, and (iv) to compute the nodal displacements and

  14. Strain Rate Effects on the Mechanical Response of Polypropylene-Based Composites Deformed at Small Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Pessey, D.; Bahlouli, N.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    The mechanical properties and response of two composites based polypropylene (PP) have been determined for small strains and for a range of strain rates in the quasi static domain. These two materials are the talc-filled and non-filled high impact PP. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed at different strain rates in order to characterize the mechanical response and the strain rate effect. Experimental results showed that both unfilled and talc-filled high impact polypropylene were sensitive to strain rate and have a non linear behavior even at relatively low strains. SEM analysis has been conducted to obtain a better comprehension of deformation mechanisms involved during loading by observations of the microstructure evolution. For each of these two materials, two existing modeling approaches are proposed. The first one is a three-parameter nonlinear constitutive model based on the experimental results. The second is a micromechanically-based approach for the elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the composite materials. The stress-strain curves predicted by these models are in fairly good agreement with our experimental results.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Edmir Geraldo; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4μg/mL and 2μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil.

  16. Stress distributions and material properties determined in articular cartilage from MRI-based finite strains.

    PubMed

    Butz, Kent D; Chan, Deva D; Nauman, Eric A; Neu, Corey P

    2011-10-13

    The noninvasive measurement of finite strains in biomaterials and tissues by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables mathematical estimates of stress distributions and material properties. Such methods allow for non-contact and patient-specific modeling in a manner not possible with traditional mechanical testing or finite element techniques. Here, we employed three constitutive (i.e. linear Hookean, and nonlinear Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin) relations with known loading conditions and MRI-based finite strains to estimate stress patterns and material properties in the articular cartilage of tibiofemoral joints. Displacement-encoded MRI was used to determine two-dimensional finite strains in juvenile porcine joints, and an iterative technique estimated stress distributions and material properties with defined constitutive relations. Stress distributions were consistent across all relations, although the stress magnitudes varied. Material properties for femoral and tibial cartilage were found to be consistent with those reported in literature. Further, the stress estimates from Hookean and Neo-Hookean, but not Mooney-Rivlin, relations agreed with finite element-based simulations. A nonlinear Neo-Hookean relation provided the most appropriate model for the characterization of complex and spatially dependent stresses using two-dimensional MRI-based finite strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a new and computationally efficient technique incorporating MRI-based deformation with mathematical modeling to non-invasively evaluate the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biofilm formation as a virulence determinant of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr+ strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piatek, Beata M; Wilkanowicz, Sabina I; Piatek, Rafał J; Kur, Józef W

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common health problem affecting millions of people each year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are the major factor causing lower and upper urinary tract infections. UPEC produce several virulence factors among which are surface exposed adhesive organelldes (pili/fimbriae) responsible for colonization, invasion and amplification within uroepithelial cells. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr IH11128 is associated with Dr fimbriae belonging to the Dr family of adhesins (associated with diarrhea and urinary tract infections) and a DraD protein capping the linear fiber at the bacterial cell surface. In this study we revealed that biofilm development can be another urovirulence determinant allowing pathogenic E. coli Dr+ to survive within the urinary tract. E. coli strains were grown in rich or minimal media, allowed to adhere to abiotic surfaces and analyzed microscopically by staining of cells with cristal violet. We found that both Dr fimbriae and DraD, exposed at the cell surface in two forms, fimbria-associated or fimbria non-associated, (DraE+/DraD+, DraE+/DraD- or DraE-/DraD+ E. coli strains) are required for biofilm formation. Additionally, we demonstrated the biofilm formation capacity of E. coli strains deficient in the surface secretion or production of the DraE adhesin.

  18. Screening of Lignocellulose-Degrading Superior Mushroom Strains and Determination of Their CMCase and Laccase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fen, Li; Xuwei, Zhu; Nanyi, Li; Puyu, Zhang; Shuang, Zhang; Xue, Zhao; Pengju, Li; Qichao, Zhu; Haiping, Lin

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen lignocellulose-degrading superior mushroom strains ten strains of mushrooms (Lentinus edodes939, Pholiota nameko, Lentinus edodes868, Coprinus comatus, Macrolepiota procera, Auricularia auricula, Hericium erinaceus, Grifola frondosa, Pleurotus nebrodensis, and Shiraia bambusicola) were inoculated onto carboxymethylcellulose agar-Congo red plates to evaluate their ability to produce carbomethyl cellulase (CMCase). The results showed that the ratio of transparent circle to mycelium circle of Hericium erinaceus was 8.16 (P < 0.01) higher than other strains. The filter paper culture screening test showed that Hericium erinaceus and Macrolepiota procera grew well and showed extreme decomposition of the filter paper. When cultivated in guaiacol culture medium to detect their abilities to secrete laccase, Hericium erinaceus showed the highest ability with the largest reddish brown circles of 4.330 cm. CMCase activity determination indicated that Coprinus comatus and Hericium erinaceus had the ability to produce CMCase with 33.92 U/L on the 9th day and 22.58 U/L on the 10th day, respectively, while Coprinus comatus and Pleurotus nebrodensis had the ability to produce laccase with 496.67 U/L and 489.17 U/L on the 16th day and 18th day. Based on the results, Coprinus comatus might be the most promising lignocellulose-degrading strain to produce both CMCase and laccase at high levels. PMID:24693246

  19. Screening of lignocellulose-degrading superior mushroom strains and determination of their CMCase and laccase activity.

    PubMed

    Fen, Li; Xuwei, Zhu; Nanyi, Li; Puyu, Zhang; Shuang, Zhang; Xue, Zhao; Pengju, Li; Qichao, Zhu; Haiping, Lin

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen lignocellulose-degrading superior mushroom strains ten strains of mushrooms (Lentinus edodes939, Pholiota nameko, Lentinus edodes868, Coprinus comatus, Macrolepiota procera, Auricularia auricula, Hericium erinaceus, Grifola frondosa, Pleurotus nebrodensis, and Shiraia bambusicola) were inoculated onto carboxymethylcellulose agar-Congo red plates to evaluate their ability to produce carbomethyl cellulase (CMCase). The results showed that the ratio of transparent circle to mycelium circle of Hericium erinaceus was 8.16 (P < 0.01) higher than other strains. The filter paper culture screening test showed that Hericium erinaceus and Macrolepiota procera grew well and showed extreme decomposition of the filter paper. When cultivated in guaiacol culture medium to detect their abilities to secrete laccase, Hericium erinaceus showed the highest ability with the largest reddish brown circles of 4.330 cm. CMCase activity determination indicated that Coprinus comatus and Hericium erinaceus had the ability to produce CMCase with 33.92 U/L on the 9th day and 22.58 U/L on the 10th day, respectively, while Coprinus comatus and Pleurotus nebrodensis had the ability to produce laccase with 496.67 U/L and 489.17 U/L on the 16th day and 18th day. Based on the results, Coprinus comatus might be the most promising lignocellulose-degrading strain to produce both CMCase and laccase at high levels.

  20. Surface strain-field determination of tympanic membrane using 3D-digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Montes, María del S.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Muñoz, Silvino; Perez, Carlos; de la Torre, Manuel; Flores, Mauricio; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-08-01

    In order to increase the understanding of soft tissues mechanical properties, 3D Digital Holographic Interferometry (3D-DHI) was used to quantify the strain-field on a cat tympanic membrane (TM) surface. The experiments were carried out applying a constant sound-stimuli pressure of 90 dB SPL (0.632 Pa) on the TM at 1.2 kHz. The technique allows the accurate acquisition of the micro-displacement data along the x, y and z directions, which is a must for a full characterization of the tissue mechanical behavior under load, and for the calculation of the strain-field in situ. The displacements repeatability in z direction shows a standard deviation of 0.062 μm at 95% confidence level. In order to realize the full 3D characterization correctly the contour of the TM surface was measured employing the optically non-contact two-illumination positions contouring method. The x, y and z displacements combined with the TM contour data allow the evaluation its strain-field by spatially differentiating the u(m,n), v(m,n), and w(m,n) deformation components. The accurate and correct determination of the TM strain-field leads to describing its elasticity, which is an important parameter needed to improve ear biomechanics studies, audition processes and TM mobility in both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis of ear functionality and its modeling.

  1. Atomic force microscopy reveals regional variations in the micromechanical properties of the pericellular and extracellular matrices of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Wilusz, Rebecca E; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-08-01

    Regional variations in the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and pericellular matrix (PCM) of the knee meniscus play important roles in determining the local mechanical environment of meniscus cells. In this study, atomic force microscopy was used to spatially map the mechanical properties of matched ECM and perlecan-labeled PCM sites within the outer, middle, and inner porcine medial meniscus, and to evaluate the properties of the proximal surface of each region. The elastic modulus of the PCM was significantly higher in the outer region (151.4 ± 38.2 kPa) than the inner region (27.5 ± 8.8 kPa), and ECM moduli were consistently higher than region-matched PCM sites in both the outer (320.8 ± 92.5 kPa) and inner (66.1 ± 31.4 kPa) regions. These differences were associated with a higher proportion of aligned collagen fibers and lower glycosaminoglycan content in the outer region. Regional variations in the elastic moduli and some viscoelastic properties were observed on the proximal surface of the meniscus, with the inner region exhibiting the highest moduli overall. These results indicate that matrix architecture and composition play an important role in the regional micromechanical properties of the meniscus, suggesting that the local stress-strain environment of meniscal cells may vary significantly among the different regions.

  2. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Micro-mechanical Behavior of Quenched Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinkai; Li, Fuguo; Li, Jinghui; Cao, Jun; Li, Pan; Dong, Junzhe

    2015-10-01

    To determine the influence of the solution treatment temperature and holding time on the microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloys, micro-indentation experiments were conducted at maximum loads of 3000, 3500, 4500, 4600, 4700, 4800, and 4900 mN. A microstructure examination was also performed with an optical microscope. Based on the test data, the micro-hardness H, Young's modulus E, yield strength σy, ultimate tensile strength σ b , and strain-hardening exponent n were obtained by the Oliver-Pharr method. It was found that the solution treatment temperature and holding time had a significant influence on the morphology, size, and volume fraction of the α and β phases. The equiaxed microstructure (obtained at 950 °C) exhibits a higher H, E, and σb. In contrast, σy shows a downward trend over the entire range of solution treatment temperatures. The influences of holding time on H, E, σb, and σy were also significant.

  3. Transcriptome structure variability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains determined with a newly developed assembly software.

    PubMed

    Sardu, Alessandro; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    RNA-seq studies have an important role for both large-scale analysis of gene expression and for transcriptome reconstruction. However, the lack of software specifically developed for the analysis of the transcriptome structure in lower eukaryotes, has so far limited the comparative studies among different species and strains. In order to fill this gap, an innovative software called ORA (Overlapped Reads Assembler) was developed. This software allows a simple and reliable analysis of the transcriptome structure in organisms with a low number of introns. It can also determine the size and the position of the untranslated regions (UTR) and of polycistronic transcripts. As a case study, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of six S. cerevisiae strains in two different key steps of the fermentation process. This comparative analysis revealed differences in the UTR regions of transcripts. By extending the transcriptome analysis to yeast species belonging to the Saccharomyces genus, it was possible to examine the conservation level of unknown non-coding RNAs and their putative functional role. By comparing the results obtained using ORA with previous studies and with the transcriptome structure determined with other software, it was proven that ORA has a remarkable reliability. The results obtained from the training set made it possible to detect the presence of transcripts with variable UTRs between S. cerevisiae strains. Finally, we propose a regulatory role for some non-coding transcripts conserved within the Saccharomyces genus and localized in the antisense strand to genes involved in meiosis and cell wall biosynthesis.

  4. Micromechanics of Seismic Wave Propagation in Granular Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihei, Kurt Toshimi

    1992-09-01

    This thesis investigates the details of seismic wave propagation in granular rocks by examining the micromechanical processes which take place at the grain level. Grain contacts are identified as the primary sites of attenuation in dry and fluid-saturated rocks. In many sedimentary rocks such as sandstones and limestones, the process of diagenesis leaves the grains only partially cemented together. When viewed at the micron scale, grain contacts are non-welded interfaces similar in nature to large scale joints and faults. Using a lumped properties approximation, the macroscopic properties of partially cemented grain contacts are modeled using a displacement-discontinuity boundary condition. This model is used to estimate the magnitude and the frequency dependence of the grain contact scattering attenuation for an idealized grain packing geometry. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave group velocity and attenuation measurements on sintered glass beads, alundum, and Berea sandstones were performed to determine the effects of stress, frequency, and pore fluid properties in granular materials with sintered and partially sintered grain contacts. P - and S-wave attenuation displayed the same overall trends for tests with n-decane, water, silicone oil, and glycerol. The magnitudes of the attenuation coefficients were, in general, higher for S-waves. The experimental measurements reveal that viscosity-dependent attenuation dominates in material with sintered grain contacts. Viscosity-dependent attenuation is also observed in Berea sandstone but only at hydrostatic stresses in excess of 15 MPa where the grain contacts are highly stiffened. Fluid surface chemistry-related attenuation was observed in Berea sandstone loaded uniaxially. These measurements suggest that attenuation in fluid-saturated rocks with partially cemented grain contacts is dependent on both the fluid properties and the state of stress at the grain contacts. A numerical method for simulating seismic wave propagation in

  5. [Determination of beta-lactamase production in strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the milk of cows].

    PubMed

    Mazura, F

    1990-05-01

    Determination of sensitivity to penicillin G by a standard disk assay diffusion method was compared with a iodometric method of test papers to determine beta-lactamase production after Jorgensen in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cow's milk from different farms. Out of 179 test strains, 32 strains 17.8%) were found to be well sensitive in the diffusion test; eight of these strains (25.0%) were demonstrated to produce beta-lactamase. 54 strains (30.2%) were sensitive. 27 strains (50%) of this group produced beta-lactamase. 93 strains (51.9%) were resistant to penicillin G in the diffusion test. 86 strains (92.5%) were found to produce beta-lactamase and seven strains were negative in this test. Using the diffusion test of sensitivity in these cultures, 86 strains were sensitive (48.1%) and 93 strains were resistant (51.9%). Beta-lactamase was produced by 121 strains (67.6%) and no beta-lactamase production was recorded in 58 strains (32.4%). Differences in the results of both tests were manifest mainly in the set of strains qualified as sensitive (inhibition zone diameter 24 to 16 mm) and well sensitive (inhibition zone diameter larger than 25 mm). The results indicate that the currently performed diffusion test of sensitivity to penicillin G should be accompanied by an assay of beta-lactamase production. The iodometric method of test papers is simple, rapid and cheap and can be made in any bacteriological laboratory. The high resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains to penicillin G documents that this antibiotic is little efficient in the treatment of mastitis of this etiology in the given region.

  6. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  7. The kinematics of northern South Island, New Zealand, determined from geologic strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, William E.; Haines, A. J.

    1995-09-01

    Relative motions within the distributed plate boundary zone of northern South Island, New Zealand, are determined through an inversion of geologic strain rate estimates. The Quaternary fault slip rate estimates define the shear strain rates, and rock uplift rates provide information on the horizontal divergence rates. An erosion rate to rock uplift rate ratio along with a crustal compensation factor is estimated in order to convert rock uplift rates to horizontal divergence rates. Because of the uncertainty in erosion rates, horizontal divergence rates σ˙ are given a large standard error of ± σ˙. The three horizontal strain rate components obtained from these data completely define the horizontal velocity gradient tensor. Strain rate distributions are matched with spline polynomial functions, which can be constrained to behave rigidly within specified regions, such as the Pacific or Australian plates. Inversion of the strain rate distribution, assuming uniform erosion rates across the northern South Island, yields a velocity field that has small differences in both magnitude (10% larger) and direction with the NUVEL-1A plate motion model between Pacific and Australian plates. A revised strain rate data set, obtained from a variable erosion model in which erosion rates are a linear function of the log of the average annual rainfall magnitudes, yields a velocity field with expected directions that are indistinguishable from the NUVEL-1A plate motion model between Pacific and Australian plates, but velocity magnitudes are still 10-15% higher than the plate motion model. Therefore the average values of slip rate on strike-slip faults in Marlborough, required by the NUVEL-1A plate motion model, are typically close to the low end of the published range of slip values for those structures. The major strike-slip structures within the Marlborough region are accommodating 80-100% of the total plate motion between Australia and Pacific plates on northern South Island; as

  8. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modelling of Anisotropic Slates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Wei, Kai; Liu, Wu; Hu, Shao-Hua; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory tests were performed in this study to examine the anisotropic physical and mechanical properties of the well-foliated Jiujiang slate. The P-wave velocity and the apparent Young's modulus were found to increase remarkably with the foliation angle θ, and the compressive strength at any confining pressure varies in a typical U-shaped trend, with the maximum strength consistently attained at θ = 90° and the minimum strength at θ = 45°. The slate samples failed in three typical patterns relevant to the foliation angle, i.e. shear failure across foliation planes for θ ≤ 15°, sliding along foliation planes for 30° ≤ θ ≤ 60° and axial splitting along foliation planes for θ = 90°. The stress-strain curves at any given foliation angle and confining pressure display an initial nonlinear phase, a linear elastic phase, a crack initiation and growth phase, as well as a rapid stress drop phase and a residual stress phase. Based on the experimental evidences, a micromechanical damage-friction model was proposed for the foliated slate by simply modelling the foliation planes as a family of elastic interfaces and by characterizing the interaction between the foliation planes and the rock matrix with a nonlinear damage evolution law associated with the inclination angle. The proposed model was applied to predict the deformational and strength behaviours of the foliated slate under triaxial compressive conditions using the material parameters calibrated with the uniaxial and/or triaxial test data, with good agreement between the model predictions and the laboratory measurements.

  9. Failure Criterion for Brick Masonry: A Micro-Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawa, Marek

    2015-02-01

    The paper deals with the formulation of failure criterion for an in-plane loaded masonry. Using micro-mechanics approach the strength estimation for masonry microstructure with constituents obeying the Drucker-Prager criterion is determined numerically. The procedure invokes lower bound analysis: for assumed stress fields constructed within masonry periodic cell critical load is obtained as a solution of constrained optimization problem. The analysis is carried out for many different loading conditions at different orientations of bed joints. The performance of the approach is verified against solutions obtained for corresponding layered and block microstructures, which provides the upper and lower strength bounds for masonry microstructure, respectively. Subsequently, a phenomenological anisotropic strength criterion for masonry microstructure is proposed. The criterion has a form of conjunction of Jaeger critical plane condition and Tsai-Wu criterion. The model proposed is identified based on the fitting of numerical results obtained from the microstructural analysis. Identified criterion is then verified against results obtained for different loading orientations. It appears that strength of masonry microstructure can be satisfactorily described by the criterion proposed.

  10. Advanced micromechanisms in a multilevel polysilicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Miller, Samuel L.; Craig Barron, Carole; McWhorter, Paul J.

    1997-09-01

    Quad-level polysilicon surface micromachining technology, comprising three mechanical levels plus an electrical interconnect layer, is giving rise to a new generation of micro-electromechanical devices and assemblies. Enhanced components can now be produced through greater flexibility in fabrication and design. New levels of design complexity that include multi-level gears, single-attempt locks, and optical elements have recently been realized. Extensive utilization of the fourth layer of polysilicon differentiates these latter generation devices from their predecessors. This level of poly enables the fabrication of pin joints, linkage arms, hinges on moveable plates, and multi-level gear assemblies. The mechanical design aspects of these latest micromachines will be discussed with particular emphasis on a number of design modifications that improve the power, reliability, and smoothness of operation of the microengine. The microengine is the primary actuation mechanism that is being used to drive mirrors out of plane and rotate 1600-micrometers diameter gears. Also discussed is our most advanced micromechanical system to date, a complex proof-of-concept batch-fabricated assembly that, upon transmitting the proper electrical code to a mechanical lock, permits the operation of a micro-optical shutter.

  11. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qalandar, K. R.; Strachan, B. S.; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Shaw, S. W.; Turner, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2N. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2j at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  12. Multiwell micromechanical cantilever array reader for biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Best, A.; Berger, R.; Cherian, S.; Lorenzoni, S.; Macis, E.; Raiteri, R.; Cain, R.

    2007-08-01

    We use a multiwell micromechanical cantilever sensor (MCS) device to measure surface stress changes induced by specific adsorption of molecules. A multiplexed assay format facilitates the monitoring of the bending of 16 MCSs in parallel. The 16 MCSs are grouped within four separate wells. Each well can be addressed independently by different analyte liquids. This enables functionalization of MCS separately by flowing different solutions through each well. In addition, each well contains a fixed reference mirror which allows measuring the absolute bending of MCS. In addition, the mirror can be used to follow refractive index changes upon mixing of different solutions. The effect of the flow rate on the MCS bending change was found to be dependent on the absolute bending value of MCS. Experiments and finite element simulations of solution exchange in wells were performed. Both revealed that one solution can be exchanged by another one after 200μl volume has flown through. Using this device, the adsorption of thiolated DNA molecules and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol on gold surfaces was performed to test the nanomechanical response of MCS.

  13. Casimir forces on a silicon micromechanical chip.

    PubMed

    Zou, J; Marcet, Z; Rodriguez, A W; Reid, M T H; McCauley, A P; Kravchenko, I I; Lu, T; Bao, Y; Johnson, S G; Chan, H B

    2013-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations give rise to van der Waals and Casimir forces that dominate the interaction between electrically neutral objects at sub-micron separations. Under the trend of miniaturization, such quantum electrodynamical effects are expected to play an important role in micro- and nano-mechanical devices. Nevertheless, utilization of Casimir forces on the chip level remains a major challenge because all experiments so far require an external object to be manually positioned close to the mechanical element. Here by integrating a force-sensing micromechanical beam and an electrostatic actuator on a single chip, we demonstrate the Casimir effect between two micromachined silicon components on the same substrate. A high degree of parallelism between the two near-planar interacting surfaces can be achieved because they are defined in a single lithographic step. Apart from providing a compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens the possibility of tailoring the Casimir force using lithographically defined components of non-conventional shapes.

  14. Micromechanical structures and microelectronics for acceleration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Brady R.; Montague, Stephen; Smith, James H.; Lemkin, Mark

    1997-09-01

    MEMS is an enabling technology that may provide low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. This paper describes work in MEMS accelerometer development at Sandia National Laboratories. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. The design and test results of an integrated MEMS high-g accelerometer will be detailed. Additionally a design for a high-g fuse component (low-G or approximately equals 25 G accelerometer) will be discussed in the paper (where 1 G approximately equals 9.81 m/s). In particular, a design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a new micromachined silicon accelerometer which would be capable of surviving and measuring high-g shocks. Such a sensor is designed to be cheaper and more reliable than currently available sensors. A promising design for a suspended plate mass sensor was developed and the details of that design along with test data will be documented in the paper. Future development in this area at Sandia will focus on implementing accelerometers capable of measuring 200 kilo-g accelerations. Accelerometer development at Sandia will also focus on multi-axis acceleration measurement with integrated microelectronics.

  15. Micromechanics of osteonal cortical bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Guo, X E; Liang, L C; Goldstein, S A

    1998-02-01

    Microcracks have been associated with age-related bone tissue fragility and fractures. The objective of this study was to develop a simple osteonal cortical bone model and apply linear elastic fracture mechanics theory to understand the micromechanics of the fracture process in osteonal cortical bone and its dependence on material properties. The linear fracture mechanics of our composite model of cortical bone, consisting of an osteon and interstitial bone tissue, was characterized in terms of a stress intensity factor (SIF) near the tip of a microcrack. The interaction between a microcrack and an osteon was studied for different types of osteons and various spacing between the crack and the osteon. The results of the analysis indicate that the fracture mechanics of osteonal cortical bone is dominated by the modulus ratio between the osteon and interstitial bone tissue: A soft osteon promotes microcrack propagation toward the osteon (and cement line) while a stiff one repels the microcrack from the osteon (and cement line). These findings suggest that newly formed, low-stiffness osteons may toughen cortical bone tissue by promoting crack propagation toward osteons. A relatively accurate empirical formula also was obtained to provide an easy estimation of the influence of osteons on the stress intensity factor.

  16. Single coil bistable, bidirectional micromechanical actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Tabat, Ned; Guckel, Henry

    1998-09-15

    Micromechanical actuators capable of bidirectional and bistable operation can be formed on substrates using lithographic processing techniques. Bistable operation of the microactuator is obtained using a single coil and a magnetic core with a gap. A plunger having two magnetic heads is supported for back and forth linear movement with respect to the gap in the magnetic core, and is spring biased to a neutral position in which the two heads are on each side of the gap in the core. The single electrical coil is coupled to the core and is provided with electrical current to attract one of the heads toward the core by reluctance action to drive the plunger to a limit of travel in one direction. The current is then cut off and the plunger returns by spring action toward the gap, whereafter the current is reapplied to the coil to attract the other head of the plunger by reluctance action to drive the plunger to its other limit of travel. This process can be repeated at a time when switching of the actuator is required.

  17. Micromechanical Modeling of Concrete at Early Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleubekov, Kairat

    The focus of this research is a micromechanical characterization of Portland cement concrete at early age (less than 28 days). Concrete's viscoelastic properties change significantly at early age due to solidification of its matrix component. Bazant's solidification theory models concrete as a material solidifying in time. This approach is generalized to a three-dimensional characterization of a composite material with a solidifying matrix and elastic inclusions. An integral constitutive relationship was obtained using a generalized correspondence principle and homogenization techniques for elastic composite materials. In light of this approach, effective creep properties of composite spherical assemblage with an aging matrix are obtained. In addition, the elastic Hashin-Monteiro model is generalized to account for the effect of the interfacial transition zone properties on concrete creep. An effective computational platform was developed to evaluate operator expressions in order to obtain relaxation and creep functions numerically. Through numerical examples, it is shown that triaxial generalization of Bazant's solidification model enables robust and computationally efficient prediction of creep deformations in Portland cement concrete.

  18. Micromechanical structures and microelectronics for acceleration sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Lemkin, M.

    1997-08-01

    MEMS is an enabling technology that may provide low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. This paper describes work in MEMS accelerometer development at Sandia National Laboratories. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronis circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. The design and test results of an integrated MEMS high-g accelerometer will be detailed. Additionally a design for a high-g fuse component (low-G or {approx} 25 G accelerometer) will be discussed in the paper (where 1 G {approx} 9.81 m/s). In particular, a design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a new micromachined silicon accelerometer which would be capable of surviving and measuring high-g shocks. Such a sensor is designed to be cheaper and more reliable than currently available sensors. A promising design for a suspended plate mass sensor was developed and the details of that design along with test data will be documented in the paper. Future development in this area at Sandia will focus on implementing accelerometers capable of measuring 200 kilo-g accelerations. Accelerometer development at Sandia will also focus on multi-axis acceleration measurement with integrated microelectronics.

  19. Ultralow-Dissipation Superfluid Micromechanical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souris, F.; Rojas, X.; Kim, P. H.; Davis, J. P.

    2017-04-01

    Micro- and nanomechanical resonators with ultralow dissipation have great potential as useful quantum resources. The superfluid micromechanical resonators presented here possess several advantageous characteristics: straightforward thermalization, dissipationless flow, and in situ tunability. We identify and quantitatively model the various dissipation mechanisms in two resonators, one fabricated from borosilicate glass and one from single-crystal quartz. As the resonators are cryogenically cooled into the superfluid state, the damping from thermal effects and from the normal-fluid component are strongly suppressed. At our lowest temperatures, damping is limited solely by internal dissipation in the substrate materials, and the resonators reach quality factors of up to 913 000 at 13 mK. By lifting this limitation through substrate-material choice and resonator design, modeling suggests that the resonators could reach quality factors as high as 108 at 100 mK, putting this architecture in an ideal position to harness mechanical quantum effects and to facilitate the study of superfluids in confined geometries.

  20. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, Stacey Leigh

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  1. A new approach to determine ligament strain using polydimethylsiloxane strain gauges: exemplary measurements of the anterolateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Zens, Martin; Ruhhammer, Johannes; Goldschmidtboeing, Frank; Woias, Peter; Feucht, Matthias J; Mayr, Herrmann O; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2014-12-01

    A thorough understanding of ligament strains and behavior is necessary to create biomechanical models, comprehend trauma mechanisms, and surgically reconstruct those ligaments in a manner that restores a physiological performance. Measurement techniques and sensors are needed to conduct this data with high accuracy in an in vitro environment. In this work, we present a novel sensor device that is capable of continuously recording ligament strains with high resolution. The sensor principle of this biocompatible strain gauge may be used for in vitro measurements and can easily be applied to any ligament in the human body. The recently rediscovered anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee joint was chosen to display the capability of this novel sensor system. Three cadaver knees were tested to successfully demonstrate the concept of the sensor device and display first results regarding the elongation of the ALL during flexion/extension of the knee.

  2. Homozygous diploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine lag phase and dehydration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Elia, Riccardo; Allen, Patricia L.; Johanson, Kelly; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    This study identifies genes that determine length of lag phase, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report growth of a yeast deletion series following variations in the lag phase induced by variable storage times after drying-down yeast on filters. Using a homozygous diploid deletion pool, lag times ranging from 0 h to 90 h were associated with increased drop-out of mitochondrial genes and increased survival of nuclear genes. Simple linear regression (R2 analysis) shows that there are over 500 genes for which > 70% of the variation can be explained by lag alone. In the genes with a positive correlation, such that the gene abundance increases with lag and hence the deletion strain is suitable for survival during prolonged storage, there is a strong predominance of nucleonic genes. In the genes with a negative correlation, such that the gene abundance decreases with lag and hence the strain may be critical for getting yeast out of the lag phase, there is a strong predominance of glycoproteins and transmembrane proteins. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with survival advantage on prolonged storage and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for getting out of the lag phase.

  3. Complete genome sequence of a novel Plum pox virus strain W isolate determined by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Speranskaya, Anna; Belenikin, Maxim; Melnikova, Natalia; Chirkov, Sergei

    2013-10-01

    The near-complete (99.7 %) genome sequence of a novel Russian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate Pk, belonging to the strain Winona (W), has been determined by 454 pyrosequencing with the exception of the thirty-one 5'-terminal nucleotides. This region was amplified using 5'RACE kit and sequenced by the Sanger method. Genomic RNA released from immunocaptured PPV particles was employed for generation of cDNA library using TransPlex Whole transcriptome amplification kit (WTA2, Sigma-Aldrich). The entire Pk genome has identity level of 92.8-94.5 % when compared to the complete nucleotide sequences of other PPV-W isolates (W3174, LV-141pl, LV-145bt, and UKR 44189), confirming a high degree of variability within the PPV-W strain. The isolates Pk and LV-141pl are most closely related. The Pk has been found in a wild plum (Prunus domestica) in a new region of Russia indicating widespread dissemination of the PPV-W strain in the European part of the former USSR.

  4. Absolute SILAC-Compatible Expression Strain Allows Sumo-2 Copy Number Determination in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a vital tool in modern life science research. In contrast to the popularity of approaches for relative protein quantitation, the widespread use of absolute quantitation has been hampered by inefficient and expensive production of labeled protein standards. To optimize production of isotopically labeled standards, we genetically modified a commonly employed protein expression Escherichia coli strain, BL21 (DE3), to construct an auxotroph for arginine and lysine. This bacterial strain allows low-cost, high-level expression of fully labeled proteins with no conversion of labeled arginine to proline. In combination with a fluorescence-based quantitation of standards and nontargeted LC–MS/MS analysis of unfractionated total cell lysates, this strain was used to determine the copy number of a post-translational modifier, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO-2), in HeLa, human sperm, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. By streamlining and improving the generation of labeled standards, this production system increases the breadth of absolute quantitation by mass spectrometry and will facilitate a far wider uptake of this important technique than previously possible. PMID:21830832

  5. Homozygous diploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine lag phase and dehydration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Elia, Riccardo; Allen, Patricia L.; Johanson, Kelly; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    This study identifies genes that determine length of lag phase, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report growth of a yeast deletion series following variations in the lag phase induced by variable storage times after drying-down yeast on filters. Using a homozygous diploid deletion pool, lag times ranging from 0 h to 90 h were associated with increased drop-out of mitochondrial genes and increased survival of nuclear genes. Simple linear regression (R2 analysis) shows that there are over 500 genes for which > 70% of the variation can be explained by lag alone. In the genes with a positive correlation, such that the gene abundance increases with lag and hence the deletion strain is suitable for survival during prolonged storage, there is a strong predominance of nucleonic genes. In the genes with a negative correlation, such that the gene abundance decreases with lag and hence the strain may be critical for getting yeast out of the lag phase, there is a strong predominance of glycoproteins and transmembrane proteins. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with survival advantage on prolonged storage and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for getting out of the lag phase.

  6. Pilot Screening to Determine Antimicrobial Synergies in a Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strain Library

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Chulmin; Chun, Hye-Sun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, there has been increasing interest in combinations of ≥2 antimicrobial agents with synergistic effects. We established an MDR bacterial strain library to screen for in vitro antimicrobial synergy by using a broth microdilution checkerboard method and high-throughput luciferase-based bacterial cell viability assay. In total, 39 MDR bacterial strains, including 23 carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 9 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus, and 7 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, were used to screen for potential antimicrobial synergies. Synergies were more frequently identified with combinations of imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the library. To verify this finding, we tested 34 A. baumannii clinical isolates resistant to both imipenem and trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole by the checkerboard method. The imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole combination showed synergy in the treatment of 21 (62%) of the clinical isolates. The results indicate that pilot screening for antimicrobial synergy in the MDR bacterial strain library could be valuable in the selection of combination therapeutic regimens to treat MDR bacterial infections. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this screening system can be useful to screen for the combined effects of conventional antimicrobials and new-generation antimicrobials or nonantimicrobials. PMID:26974861

  7. Deflection determination of concrete structures considering nonlinearity based on long-gauge strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wan; Lv, Kui; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yuchen; Hu, Xiamin; Qu, Qizhong

    2017-10-01

    Deflection determination of concrete structures using distributed long-gauge strain sensors is investigated in this paper. Firstly, the relationship between deflection and distributed long-gauge strain of concrete beams is presented, and the method is independent of external load and takes account of structural nonlinearity. The deflection distribution along the span of a beam-like structure can be predicted from strain response for the whole process of loading (elastic stage, concrete cracking stage and steel yielding stage). Secondly, experiment of a reinforced concrete beam has been conducted to verify the accuracy of the method. Experimental results show that the relative error between the estimated and actual deflection can be controlled within about 5% while the error can reach up to about 70% if structural nonlinearity is not considered. Finally, the influence of error of material parameters and sensor gauge length on deflection estimation has been analyzed. The error of concrete compression strength has a limited influence on deflection prediction while the contribution of tensile concrete should be considered before concrete cracking. The error of area of tensile bars will affect the deflection accuracy after concrete cracking.

  8. areABC Genes Determine the Catabolism of Aryl Esters in Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M.; Collier, Lauren S.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Williams, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is able to grow on a range of esters of aromatic alcohols, converting them to the corresponding aromatic carboxylic acids by the sequential action of three inducible enzymes: an areA-encoded esterase, an areB-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and an areC-encoded benzaldehyde dehydrogenase. The are genes, adjacent to each other on the chromosome and transcribed in the order areCBA, were located 3.5 kbp upstream of benK. benK, encoding a permease implicated in benzoate uptake, is at one end of the ben-cat supraoperonic cluster for benzoate catabolism by the β-ketoadipate pathway. Two open reading frames which may encode a transcriptional regulator, areR, and a porin, benP, separate benK from areC. Each are gene was individually expressed to high specific activity in Escherichia coli. The relative activities against different substrates of the cloned enzymes were, within experimental error, identical to that of wild-type Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 grown on either benzyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, or 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol as the carbon source. The substrate preferences of all three enzymes were broad, encompassing a range of substituted aromatic compounds and in the case of the AreA esterase, different carboxylic acids. The areA, areB, and areC genes were individually disrupted on the chromosome by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette, and the rates at which the resultant strains utilized substrates of the aryl ester catabolic pathway were severely reduced as determined by growth competitions between the mutant and wild-type strains. PMID:10419955

  9. Metal matrix composite micromechanics: In-situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent efforts in computational mechanics methods for simulating the nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites have culminated in the implementation of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer code. In METCAN material nonlinearity is treated at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level where the current material model describes a time-temperature-stress dependency of the constituent properties in a material behavior space. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by virtue of composite micromechanics and macromechanics models. The behavior of metal matrix composites depends on fabrication process variables, in situ fiber and matrix properties, bonding between the fiber and matrix, and/or the properties of an interphase between the fiber and matrix. Specifically, the influence of in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation on the unidirectional composite stress-strain behavior is examined. These types of studies provide insight into micromechanical behavior that may be helpful in resolving discrepancies between experimentally observed composite behavior and predicted response.

  10. Nano- and micromechanical properties of dentine: investigation of differences with tooth side

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Delia S.; Hilton, Joan F.; Marshall, Grayson W.; Marshall, Sally J.

    2011-01-01

    The soft zone in dentine beneath the dentino-enamel junction is thought to play an important role in tooth function, strain distribution and fracture resistance during mastication. Recently reported asymmetry in mechanical properties with tooth side may point at a basic property of tooth function. The aim of our study was to test if this asymmetry was reflected in the nano- and micromechanical properties of dentine. We investigated the mechanical properties of dentine on the buccal and lingual side of nine extracted human teeth using nano- and microindentation. Properties were analysed on the natural log scale, using maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters. Two-sided 0.05-level likelihood ratio tests were used to assess the influences of surface (buccal versus lingual) and dentine depth, measured from the DEJ in crown dentine and from the CDJ in root dentine. Results showed the well known gradual increase in mechanical properties with increasing distance from the DEJ. Coronal dentine showed higher elastic modulus and hardness on the lingual side of teeth for all measurements, while root dentine was harder on the buccal side. Due to the subtlety of these effects and the small number of teeth studied, results failed to reach statistical significance. Results suggest that dentine nano- and micromechanical properties vary with tooth side in agreement with recent literature using macroscopic methods. They also reveal that buccal-lingual ratios of hardness are in opposite directions in crown and root dentine, suggesting compensatory functions. PMID:21440894

  11. Genetic Diversity and Virulence Determinants of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Patients with Crohn's Disease in Spain and Chile.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Sandra; Saitz, Waleska; Del Canto, Felipe; De la Fuente, Marjorie; Quera, Rodrigo; Hermoso, Marcela; Muñoz, Rául; Ginard, Daniel; Khorrami, Sam; Girón, Jorge; Assar, Rodrigo; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Vidal, Roberto M

    2017-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains are genetically variable and virulence factors for AIEC are non-specific. FimH is the most studied pathogenicity-related protein, and there have been few studies on other proteins, such as Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriacea (SPATEs). The goal of this study is to characterize E. coli strains isolated from patients with Crohn's disease (CD) in Chile and Spain, and identify genetic differences between strains associated with virulence markers and clonality. We characterized virulence factors and genetic variability by pulse field electrophoresis (PFGE) in 50 E. coli strains isolated from Chilean and Spanish patients with CD, and also determined which of these strains presented an AIEC phenotype. Twenty-six E. coli strains from control patients were also included. PFGE patterns were heterogeneous and we also observed a highly diverse profile of virulence genes among all E. coli strains obtained from patients with CD, including those strains defined as AIEC. Two iron transporter genes chuA, and irp2, were detected in various combinations in 68-84% of CD strains. We found that the most significant individual E. coli genetic marker associated with CD E. coli strains was chuA. In addition, patho-adaptative fimH mutations were absent in some of the highly adherent and invasive strains. The fimH adhesin, the iron transporter irp2, and Class-2 SPATEs did not show a significant association with CD strains. The V27A fimH mutation was detected in the most CD strains. This study highlights the genetic variability of E. coli CD strains from two distinct geographic origins, most of them affiliated with the B2 or D E. coli phylogroups and also reveals that nearly 40% of Chilean and Spanish CD patients are colonized with E.coli with a characteristic AIEC phenotype.

  12. Optimum growth temperature determination for GaInSb/InAs strained layer superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.L.; Wagner, R.J.; Waterman, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    To determine the optimum growth temperature for GaInSb/InAs strained layer superlattices (SLS) a series of SLS was grown over the temperature range 357-433 {degrees}C. Temperatures were estimated by determining the absorption spectrum of the GaAs substrate, hence its band gap, and thus its temperature. SLS were evaluated by single crystal x-ray diffraction and interband magnetoabsorption (IMA) measurements. X-ray spectra showed as many as eight peaks due to the superlattice. The quality of the superlattices as indicated by the x-ray data had a well defined maximum between 390 and 410 {degrees}C. IMA measurements indicated band gaps from 85 to 154 meV. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  14. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  15. Micromechanical simulation of damage progression in carbon phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon/phenolic composites are used extensively as ablative insulating materials in the nozzle region of solid rocket motors. The current solid rocket motor (RSRM) on the space shuttle is fabricated from woven rayon cloth which is carbonized and then impregnated with the phenolic resin. These plies are layed up in the desired configuration and cured to form the finished part. During firing, the surface of the carbon/phenolic insulation is exposed to 5000 F gases from the rocket exhaust. The resin pyrolizes and the material chars to a depth which progresses with time. The rate of charring and erosion are generally predictable, and the insulation depth is designed to allow adequate safety margins over the firing time of the motor. However, anomalies in the properties and response of the carbon/phenolic materials can lead to severe material damage which may decrease safety margins to unacceptable levels. Three macro damage modes which were observed in fired nozzles are: ply lift, 'wedge out', and pocketing erosion. Ply lift occurs in materials with plies oriented nearly parallel to the surface. The damage occurs in a region below the charred material where material temperatures are relatively low - about 500 F. Wedge out occurs at the intersection of nozzle components whose plies are oriented at about 45 deg. The corner of the block of material breaks off along a ply interface. Pocketing erosion occurs in material with plies oriented normal to the surface. Thermal expansion is restrained in two directions resulting in large tensile strains and material failure normal to the surface. When a large section of material is removed as a result of damage, the insulation thickness is reduced which may lead to failure of the nozzle due to excessive heating of critical components. If these damage events cannot be prevented with certainty, the designer must increase the thickness of the insulator thus adding to both weight and cost. One of the difficulties in developing a full

  16. Effects of fiber/matrix interactions on the interfacial deformation micromechanics of cellulose-fiber/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tze, William Tai-Yin

    The overall objective of this dissertation was to gain an understanding of the relationship between interfacial chemistry and the micromechanics of the cellulose-fiber/polymer composites. Regenerated cellulose (lyocell) fibers were treated with amine-, phenylamine-, phenyl-, and octadecyl-silanes, and also styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer. Inverse gas chromatography was conducted to evaluate the modified surfaces and to examine the adsorption behavior of ethylbenzene, a model compound for polystyrene, onto the fibers. Micro-composites were formed by depositing micro-droplets of polystyrene onto single fibers. The fiber was subjected to a tensile strain, and Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine the point-to-point variation of the strain- and stress-sensitive 895 cm-1 band of cellulose along the embedded region. Inverse gas chromatography studies reveal that the Ia-b values, calculated by matching the Lewis acid parameter ( KA) and basic parameter (KB) between polystyrene and different fibers, were closely correlated to the acid-base adsorption enthalpies of ethylbenzene onto the corresponding fibers. Hence, Ia-b was subsequently used as a convenient indicator for fiber/matrix acid-base interaction. The Raman micro-spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the interfacial tensile strain and stress are highest at the edge of the droplet, and these values decline from the edge region to the middle region of the embedment. The maximum of these local strains corresponds to a strain-control fracture of the matrix polymer. The minimum of the local tensile stress corresponds to the extent of fiber-to-matrix load transfer. The slope of the tensile stress profile allows for an estimation of the maximum interfacial shear stress, which is indicative of fiber/polymer (practical) adhesion. As such, a novel micro-Raman tensile technique was established for evaluating the ductile-fiber/brittle-polymer system in this study. The micro-Raman tensile technique provided maximum

  17. Induction of Type I Interferon Signaling Determines the Relative Pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Planet, Paul J.; Soong, Grace; Narechania, Apurva; Prince, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The tremendous success of S. aureus as a human pathogen has been explained primarily by its array of virulence factors that enable the organism to evade host immunity. Perhaps equally important, but less well understood, is the importance of the intensity of the host response in determining the extent of pathology induced by S. aureus infection, particularly in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We compared the pathogenesis of infection caused by two phylogenetically and epidemiologically distinct strains of S. aureus whose behavior in humans has been well characterized. Induction of the type I IFN cascade by strain 502A, due to a NOD2-IRF5 pathway, was the major factor in causing severe pneumonia and death in a murine model of pneumonia and was associated with autolysis and release of peptidogylcan. In contrast to USA300, 502A was readily eliminated from epithelial surfaces in vitro. Nonetheless, 502A caused significantly increased tissue damage due to the organisms that were able to invade systemically and trigger type I IFN responses, and this was ameliorated in Ifnar -/- mice. The success of USA300 to cause invasive infection appears to depend upon its resistance to eradication from epithelial surfaces, but not production of specific toxins. Our studies illustrate the important and highly variable role of type I IFN signaling within a species and suggest that targeted immunomodulation of specific innate immune signaling cascades may be useful to prevent the excessive morbidity associated with S. aureus pneumonia. PMID:24586160

  18. wzi Gene Sequencing, a Rapid Method for Determination of Capsular Type for Klebsiella Strains

    PubMed Central

    Passet, Virginie; Haugaard, Anita Björk; Babosan, Anamaria; Kassis-Chikhani, Najiby; Struve, Carsten; Decré, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens of the genus Klebsiella have been classified into distinct capsular (K) types for nearly a century. K typing of Klebsiella species still has important applications in epidemiology and clinical microbiology, but the serological method has strong practical limitations. Our objective was to evaluate the sequencing of wzi, a gene conserved in all capsular types of Klebsiella pneumoniae that codes for an outer membrane protein involved in capsule attachment to the cell surface, as a simple and rapid method for the prediction of K type. The sequencing of a 447-nucleotide region of wzi distinguished the K-type reference strains with only nine exceptions. A reference wzi sequence database was created by the inclusion of multiple strains representing K types associated with high virulence and multidrug resistance. A collection of 119 prospective clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were then analyzed in parallel by wzi sequencing and classical K typing. Whereas K typing achieved typeability for 81% and discrimination for 94.4% of the isolates, these figures were 98.1% and 98.3%, respectively, for wzi sequencing. The prediction of K type once the wzi allele was known was 94%. wzi sequencing is a rapid and simple method for the determination of the K types of most K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:24088853

  19. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Tayabali, Azam F.; Coleman, Gordon; Nguyen, Kathy C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa), P.fluorescens (Pf), P.putida (Pp), P.stutzeri (Ps)) were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications. PMID:26619347

  20. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Tayabali, Azam F; Coleman, Gordon; Nguyen, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa), P.fluorescens (Pf), P.putida (Pp), P.stutzeri (Ps)) were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications.

  1. [Biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from clinical Bacteroides fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with limulus amoebocyte lysate].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Alicja; Górska, Paulina; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Łuczak, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from clinical Bacterioides fragilis strains isolated in Poland by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides were extracted from nine clinical B. fragilis strains by the procedure of Westphal and Jann (1965). Crude LPS preparations were purified with ultracentrifugation. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit). Tests were performed according to the recommendations of the producer (Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). E. coli O55:B5 LPS and LPS preparations from reference B. fragilis strains were applied to compare the results of examinations. Activities of endotoxins from clinical B. fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Among endotoxins of clinical B. fragilis strains the most active was the preparation from strain cultured in the case of pancreatic ulcer (B. fragilis 80/81 LPS). Lipopolysaccharides of examined B. fragilis strains were less active in BET test than E. coli O55:B5 LPS.

  2. Design and Implementation of a Micromechanical Silicon Resonant Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C. PMID:24256978

  3. Experimental Micromechanics Study of Lamellar TiA1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-15

    of the 2005 SEM Annual Conference & Exposition, Portland, OR USA, June 7-9, 2005 "Brazilian Tests in Lamellar TiAr ", F.P. Chiang, Y. Ding, A.Ho, A.H...Experimental Mechanics, July 1-6, Alexandroupolis, Greece, 2007 "Experimental Micromechanics Study of Lamellar TiAr ", Fu-pen Chiang, Gunes Uzer, Andrew H

  4. Design and implementation of a micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-11-19

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C.

  5. Single crystal micromechanical resonator and fabrication methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Homeijer, Sara Jensen; Wiwi, Michael; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Clark, Blythe; Bauer, Todd; Van Deusen, Stuart B.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a single crystal micromechanical resonator. In particular, the resonator includes a lithium niobate or lithium tantalate suspended plate. Also provided are improved microfabrication methods of making resonators, which does not rely on complicated wafer bonding, layer fracturing, and mechanical polishing steps. Rather, the methods allow the resonator and its components to be formed from a single crystal.

  6. Micromechanical Aspects of Hydraulic Fracturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S. A.; Behraftar, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the hydraulic fracturing process. The model comprises two key components. Firstly, the solid matrix, assumed as a rock mass with pre-fabricated cracks, is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Element Model (DEM)[1]. The interaction is ruled by the spheropolyhedra method, which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to realistically represent many of the features found in fracturing and communition processes. The second component is the fluid, which is modelled by the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). It was recently coupled with the spheropolyhedra by the authors and validated. An advantage of this coupled LBM-DEM model is the control of many of the parameters of the fracturing fluid, such as its viscosity and the injection rate. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first application of such a coupled scheme for studying hydraulic fracturing[2]. In this first implementation, results are presented for a two-dimensional situation. Fig. 1 shows one snapshot of the LBM-DEM coupled simulation for the hydraulic fracturing where the elements with broken bonds can be identified and the fracture geometry quantified. The simulation involves a variation of the underground stress, particularly the difference between the two principal components of the stress tensor, to explore the effect on the fracture path. A second study focuses on the fluid viscosity to examine the effect of the time scales of different injection plans on the fracture geometry. The developed tool and the presented results have important implications for future studies of the hydraulic fracturing process and technology. references 1. Galindo-Torres, S.A., et al., Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes. Computer Physics Communications, 2012. 183(2): p. 266-277. 2. Galindo-Torres, S.A., A coupled Discrete Element Lattice Boltzmann Method for the

  7. Characterization, thermomechanical behavior and micromechanical-based constitutive model of shape-memory Cu-Zn-Al single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lexcellent, C.; Goo, B.C.; Sun, Q.P.; Bernardini, J.

    1996-09-01

    Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloys are grown as single crystals by the Bridgman technique with a final shape directly suitable for thermomechanical tests (cylinders with tapered heads: 25 mm gauge length, 4 mm in diameter). The four classical transformation temperatures are checked by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and resistivity. The orientation of crystal structure is investigated by X-ray diffraction. Isothermal pseudoelastic tensile tests show that the width of the hysteresis loops and the slope of the stress-strain curves during phase transformation increase as the applied stress rate increases. A micromechanical-based constitutive model allows the authors to describe this single crystal behavior.

  8. Identification of microstructural characteristics in lightweight aggregate concretes by micromechanical modelling including the interfacial transition zone (ITZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Y.; Ortola, S.; Beaucour, A.L.; Dumontet, H.

    2010-11-15

    An approach which combines both experimental techniques and micromechanical modelling is developed in order to characterise the elastic behaviour of lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC). More than three hundred LWAC specimens with various lightweight aggregate types (5) of several volume ratios and three different mortar matrices (normal, HP, VHP) are tested. The modelling is based on iterative homogenisation process and includes the ITZ specificities experimentally observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In agreement with experimental measurements, the effects of mix design parameters as well as of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on concrete mechanical performances are quantitatively analysed. Confrontations with experimental results allow identifying the elastic moduli of LWA which are difficult to determine experimentally. Whereas the traditional empirical formulas are not sufficiently precise, predictions of LWAC elastic behaviours computed with the micromechanical models appear in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. [Determination of the profiles of secondary metabolites characteristic of Alternaria strains isolated from tomato].

    PubMed

    Benavidez Rozo, Martha Elizabeth; Patriarca, Andrea; Cabrera, Gabriela; Fernández Pinto, Virginia E

    2014-01-01

    Many Alternaria species have been studied for their ability to produce bioactive secondary metabolites, such as tentoxin (TEN), some of which have toxic properties. The main food contaminant toxins are tenuazonic acid, alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), altenuene, and altertoxins i, ii and iii. To determine the profiles of secondary metabolites characteristic of Alternaria strains isolated from tomato for their chemotaxonomic classification. The profiles of secondary metabolites were determined by HPLC MS. The Alternaria isolates obtained from spoiled tomatoes belong, according to their morphological characteristics, to the species groups Alternaria alternata, Alternaria tenuissima and Alternaria arborescens, with A. tenuissima being the most frequent. The most frequent profiles of secondary metabolites belonging to the species groups A. alternata (AOH, AME, TEN), A. tenuissima (AOH, AME, TEN, tenuazonic acid) and A. arborescens (AOH, AME, TEN, tenuazonic acid) were determined, with some isolates of the latter being able to synthesize AAL toxins. Secondary metabolite profiles are a useful tool for the differentiation of small spored Alternaria isolates not easily identifiable by their morphological characteristics. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative determination of strain fields around Ni{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} precipitates in NiTi

    SciTech Connect

    Tirry, W. . E-mail: wim.tirry@ua.ac.be; Schryvers, D.

    2005-02-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and image-processing techniques are used to measure the strain fields surrounding coherent Ni{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} precipitates in an austenitic Ni{sub 51}Ti{sub 49} matrix. Images are recorded in the [111-bar ]{sub B2} and the [101-bar ]{sub B2} zones, and the (110){sub B2} interplanar spacings are used to determine the strain induced by both small (50 nm diameter) and large (300 nm diameter) precipitates. From these observations, the maximum strain in the surrounding matrix is mapped and identified as compressive or tensile. Interactions between strain fields of different precipitates are also investigated. A simple model for the observed strain is proposed and compared to the classical Eshelby solution for an ellipsoidal inclusion.

  11. Simulation of micromechanical behavior of polycrystals: finite elements versus fast Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A.; Lebensohn, R. A.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, we compare finite element and fast Fourier transform approaches for the prediction of the micromechanical behavior of polycrystals. Both approaches are full-field approaches and use the same visco-plastic single crystal constitutive law. We investigate the texture and the heterogeneity of the inter- and intragranular stress and strain fields obtained from the two models. Additionally, we also look into their computational performance. Two cases—rolling of aluminum and wire drawing of tungsten—are used to evaluate the predictions of the two models. Results from both the models are similar, when large grain distortions do not occur in the polycrystal. The finite element simulations were found to be highly computationally intensive, in comparison with the fast Fourier transform simulations. Figure 9 was corrected in this article on the 25 August 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  12. Simulation of micromechanical behavior of polycrystals: finite elements vs. fast Fourier transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Prakash, Arun

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we compare finite element and fast Fourier transform approaches for the prediction of micromechanical behavior of polycrystals. Both approaches are full-field approaches and use the same visco-plastic single crystal constitutive law. We investigate the texture and the heterogeneity of the inter- and intragranular, stress and strain fields obtained from the two models. Additionally, we also look into their computational performance. Two cases - rolling of aluminium and wire drawing of tungsten - are used to evaluate the predictions of the two mode1s. Results from both the models are similar, when large grain distortions do not occur in the polycrystal. The finite element simulations were found to be highly computationally intensive, in comparison to the fast Fourier transform simulations.

  13. Analysis and testing of dynamic micromechanical behavior of composite materials at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, R.H.; Gibson, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the use of a recently developed high temperature impulse-frequency response apparatus to directly measure dynamic modulus and internal damping of high temperature composite materials, matrix materials, and reinforcing fibers as a function of temperature. An extensional vibration test was used for determination of the complex Young`s modulus of fiber specimens as a function of temperature. A flexural vibration test was used for determination of the complex flexural modulus of matrix and unidirectional composite specimens (0 and 90 deg fiber orientations) as a function of temperature. These results were obtained from tests done on two different fiber reinforced composite materials: boron/epoxy (B/E) and Silicon Carbide/Ti-6Al-4V (SiC/Ti). The results from these tests were then used to assess the validity of micromechanics predictions of composite properties at elevated temperatures. Micromechanics predictions of composite moduli and damping at elevated temperatures show good agreement with measured values for the 0 deg case (longitudinal) but only fair agreement for the 90 deg case (transverse). In both cases, the predictions indicate the correct trends in the properties.

  14. Intrinsic Energy Dissipation Limits in Nano and Micromechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth Subramanian

    Resonant microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have enabled miniaturization of high-performance inertial sensors, radio-frequency filters, timing references and mass-based chemical sensors. Despite the increasing prevalence of MEMS resonators for these applications, the energy dissipation in these structures is not well-understood. Accurate prediction of the energy loss and the resulting quality factor (Q) has significant design implications because it is directly related to device performance metrics including sensitivity for resonant sensors, bandwidth for radio-frequency filters and phase-noise for timing references. In order to assess the future potential for MEMS resonators it is critically important to evaluate the energy dissipation limits, which will dictate the ultimate performance resonant MEMS devices can achieve. This work focuses on the derivation and evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal nano and micromechanical resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction and polarization dependent mode-Gruneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. Evaluation of the quality factor limit reveals that Akhiezer damping, previously thought to depend only on material properties, has a strong dependence on crystal orientation and resonant mode shape. The robust model provides a dissipation limit for all resonant modes including shear-mode vibrations, which have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to volume-preserving phonon branches, indicating that Lame or wine-glass mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, the analytical dissipation model is integrated with commercial finite element software in order to

  15. Raman determination of layer stresses and strains for heterostructures and its application to the cubic SiC/Si system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Choyke, W. J.; Powell, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A set of formulas for a generalized axial stress in diamond and zinc-blende semiconductors under axial stress is derived to calculate stress-related Raman shifts. By analyzing known Raman data on cubic SiC under hydrostatic pressures, one of the Raman-stress coefficients was obtained, and the existing elastic stiffness constants of cubic SiC were optimized. A method for calculating the stress and strain in SiC films on (100) Si is proposed. It is suggested that the stress and strain expressions and the method of the stress and strain determinations in heterostructures are quite general and may be used for other systems.

  16. Determination of shear stress-strain curve from torsion tests for loading-unloading and cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.C.; Xu, Z.; Wang, P.T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses a method, based on Nadai`s solution, which can be used to determine the true (Cauchy) shear stress-strain curve of a material by means of torsion test of a solid shaft. The method is shown to be applicable to loading, unloading and cyclic loading. It is also applicable to fixed-end torsion of a solid shaft in the large shear strain range. A modified method has also been derived for the case of free-end torsion of a tubular specimen in the large strain range.

  17. Determination of remodeling parameters for a strain-adaptive finite element model of the distal ulna.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Mark A C; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-09-01

    Strain energy-based adaptive material models are used to predict bone resorption resulting from stress shielding induced by prosthetic joint implants. Generally, such models are governed by two key parameters: a homeostatic strain-energy state (K) and a threshold deviation from this state required to initiate bone reformation (s). A refinement procedure has been performed to estimate these parameters in the femur and glenoid; this study investigates the specific influences of these parameters on resulting density distributions in the distal ulna. A finite element model of a human ulna was created using micro-computed tomography (µCT) data, initialized to a homogeneous density distribution, and subjected to approximate in vivo loading. Values for K and s were tested, and the resulting steady-state density distribution compared with values derived from µCT images. The sensitivity of these parameters to initial conditions was examined by altering the initial homogeneous density value. The refined model parameters selected were then applied to six additional human ulnae to determine their performance across individuals. Model accuracy using the refined parameters was found to be comparable with that found in previous studies of the glenoid and femur, and gross bone structures, such as the cortical shell and medullary canal, were reproduced. The model was found to be insensitive to initial conditions; however, a fair degree of variation was observed between the six specimens. This work represents an important contribution to the study of changes in load transfer in the distal ulna following the implementation of commercial orthopedic implants.

  18. An Efficient Implementation of the GMC Micromechanics Model for Multi-Phased Materials with Complex Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient implementation of the generalized method of cells micromechanics model is presented that allows analysis of periodic unidirectional composites characterized by repeating unit cells containing thousands of subcells. The original formulation, given in terms of Hill's strain concentration matrices that relate average subcell strains to the macroscopic strains, is reformulated in terms of the interfacial subcell tractions as the basic unknowns. This is accomplished by expressing the displacement continuity equations in terms of the stresses and then imposing the traction continuity conditions directly. The result is a mixed formulation wherein the unknown interfacial subcell traction components are related to the macroscopic strain components. Because the stress field throughout the repeating unit cell is piece-wise uniform, the imposition of traction continuity conditions directly in the displacement continuity equations, expressed in terms of stresses, substantially reduces the number of unknown subcell traction (and stress) components, and thus the size of the system of equations that must be solved. Further reduction in the size of the system of continuity equations is obtained by separating the normal and shear traction equations in those instances where the individual subcells are, at most, orthotropic. The reformulated version facilitates detailed analysis of the impact of the fiber cross-section geometry and arrangement on the response of multi-phased unidirectional composites with and without evolving damage. Comparison of execution times obtained with the original and reformulated versions of the generalized method of cells demonstrates the new version's efficiency.

  19. Micro-mechanisms of Surface Defects Induced on Aluminum Alloys during Plastic Deformation at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali, Olufisayo A.

    Near-surface deformed layers developed on aluminum alloys significantly influence the corrosion and tribological behavior as well as reduce the surface quality of the rolled aluminum. The evolution of the near-surface microstructures induced on magnesium containing aluminum alloys during thermomechanical processing has been investigated with the aim generating an understanding of the influence of individual forming parameters on its evolution and examine the microstructure of the roll coating induced on the mating steel roll through material transfer during rolling. The micro-mechanisms related to the various features of near-surface microstructure developed during tribological conditions of the simulated hot rolling process were identified. Thermomechanical processing experiments were performed with the aid of hot rolling (operating temperature: 550 to 460 °C, 4, 10 and 20 rolling pass schedules) and hot forming (operating temperature: 350 to 545 °C, strain rate: 4 x 10-2 s-1) tribo-simulators. The surface, near-surface features and material transfer induced during the elevated temperature plastic deformation were examined and characterized employing optical interferometry, SEM/EDS, FIB and TEM. Near-surface features characterized on the rolled aluminum alloys included; cracks, fractured intermetallic particles, aluminum nano-particles, oxide decorated grain boundaries, rolled-in oxides, shingles and blisters. These features were related to various individual rolling parameters which included, the work roll roughness, which induced the formation of shingles, rolling marks and were responsible for the redistribution of surface oxide and the enhancements of the depth of the near-surface damage. The enhanced stresses and strains experienced during rolling were related to the formation and propagation of cracks, the nanocrystalline structure of the near-surface layers and aluminum nano-particles. The mechanism of the evolution of the near-surface microstructure were

  20. Micromechanical properties of veneer luting resins after curing through ceramics.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Elif; Hickel, Reinhard; Bolay, Sükran; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of light-cured luting resin after curing under the ceramic restoration in comparison to dual-cured luting resin, by evaluating the micromechanical properties. Two hundred seventy thin luting composite films of ca. 170 μm in thickness were prepared by using two light-cured luting resins (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent; RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE) and a dual-cured luting resin (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent). The composites were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10, 20, and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent; IPS Empress® CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0, 0.75, and 2 mm). Forty-five groups were included, each containing six thin films. The samples were stored after curing for 24 h at 37°C by maintaining moisture conditions with distilled water. Micromechanical properties of the composites were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). For each sample, ten indentations were made, thus totalizing 60 measurements per group. Micromechanical properties of the luting resins were statistically analyzed (SPSS 17.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the luting resins (p < 0.05). Variolink II showed the highest values in modulus of elasticity (E = 11 ± 0.5)* and Vickers hardness (HV = 48.2 ± 3.2)* and the lowest values in creep (Cr = 4.3 ± 0.1)* and elastic-plastic deformation (We/Wtot = 38.6 ± 0.7)* followed by RelyX Veneer (E = 6.9 ± 0.3, HV = 33 ± 2.5, Cr = 4.6 ± 0.2, We/Wtot = 41.8 ± 1.0)* and Variolink Veneer (E = 4.4 ± 0.4, HV = 20.1 ± 2.6, Cr = 5 ± 0.2, We/Wtot = 43.7 ± 1.3)*. Dual-cured luting resin expressed higher values in the micro-mechanical properties compared to the light-cured luting resins. The effect of luting resin type on the micromechanical properties of the luting resins was higher than the effect of

  1. Micromechanical properties of intercalated compounds of graphite oxide with dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, A. A.; Saldin, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    The micromechanical properties (Young's modulus, deformation, and adhesion) of the intercalated compound of graphite oxide with dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid were studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy and compared with the same characteristics of the starting graphite oxide. The significant difference in the micromechanical properties of the materials under study is dictated by differences in the topography and properties of their film surface, which, in turn, can be determined by their chemical composition. The introduction of dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid in the interplanar space of graphite oxide affects the structuring of the latter. A considerable increase in the adhesion of the intercalated compound relative to that of oxide graphite is explained by high adhesive properties of the introduced acid, the Young's modulus of graphite oxide being higher than that of the intercalated compound. This was attributed to the high hydrophilicity of dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid and the difficulty of water removal from the interplanar space; water plasticizes the material, which becomes softer than graphite oxide. The difference in the structure of the coating of the intercalated compounds and the starting graphite oxide was found to be also reflected by their Raman spectra, namely, by the increased intensity of the D line with the preserved position of the G line, which points to the impurity nature of the intercalate and the unchanged hexagonal lattice of graphite.

  2. Finite element simulation of cement-bone interface micromechanics; a comparison to experimental results

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2009-01-01

    Recently, experiments have been performed to determine the micromechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface under tension-compression loading conditions. These experiments were simulated using finite element analysis (FEA) to test whether the micromechanical response of the cement-bone interface could be captured in micro-models. Cement-bone interface models were created of experimental specimens based upon micro-computed tomography data, including the complex interdigitated bone-cement morphology and simulated frictional contact at the interface. The models were subjected to a fully reversible tension-compression load, mimicking the experimental protocol. Similar to what was found experimentally, the simulated interface was stiffer in compression than in tension and the majority of displacement localized to the cement-bone interface. There was a weak correlation between the FEA predicted stiffness and the stiffness found experimentally, with average errors of 8.3 and 29.8% in tension and compression, respectively. The hysteresis behavior found experimentally was partially reproduced in the simulation by including friction at the cement-bone interface. Furthermore, stress analysis suggested that cement was more at risk of fatigue failure than bone, concurring with the experimental observation that more cracks were formed in the cement than in the bone. The current study provides information that may help to better understand the load transfer mechanisms taking place at the cement-bone interface. PMID:19340877

  3. Phylogenomics of Xanthomonas field strains infecting pepper and tomato reveals diversity in effector repertoires and identifies determinants of host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Potnis, Neha; Timilsina, Sujan; Wilson, Mark; Patané, José; Martins, Joaquim; Minsavage, Gerald V.; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Akhunova, Alina; Almeida, Nalvo; Vallad, Gary E.; Barak, Jeri D.; White, Frank F.; Miller, Sally A.; Ritchie, David; Goss, Erica; Bart, Rebecca S.; Setubal, João C.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spot disease of pepper and tomato is caused by four distinct Xanthomonas species and is a severely limiting factor on fruit yield in these crops. The genetic diversity and the type III effector repertoires of a large sampling of field strains for this disease have yet to be explored on a genomic scale, limiting our understanding of pathogen evolution in an agricultural setting. Genomes of 67 Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xe), Xanthomonas perforans (Xp), and Xanthomonas gardneri (Xg) strains isolated from diseased pepper and tomato fields in the southeastern and midwestern United States were sequenced in order to determine the genetic diversity in field strains. Type III effector repertoires were computationally predicted for each strain, and multiple methods of constructing phylogenies were employed to understand better the genetic relationship of strains in the collection. A division in the Xp population was detected based on core genome phylogeny, supporting a model whereby the host-range expansion of Xp field strains on pepper is due, in part, to a loss of the effector AvrBsT. Xp-host compatibility was further studied with the observation that a double deletion of AvrBsT and XopQ allows a host range expansion for Nicotiana benthamiana. Extensive sampling of field strains and an improved understanding of effector content will aid in efforts to design disease resistance strategies targeted against highly conserved core effectors. PMID:26089818

  4. Diversity of mercury resistance determinants among Bacillus strains isolated from sediment of Minamata Bay.

    PubMed

    Narita, Masaru; Chiba, Kazuyuki; Nishizawa, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidenori; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro; Silver, Simon; Endo, Ginro

    2003-06-06

    Thirty mercury-resistant (Hg R) Bacillus strains were isolated from mercury-polluted sediment of Minamata Bay, Japan. Mercury resistance phenotypes were classified into broad-spectrum (resistant to inorganic Hg(2+) and organomercurials) and narrow-spectrum (resistant to inorganic Hg(2+) and sensitive to organomercurials) groups. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product sizes and the restriction nuclease site maps of mer operon regions from all broad-spectrum Hg R Bacillus were identical to that of Bacillus megaterium MB1. On the other hand, the PCR products of the targeted merP (extracellular mercury-binding protein gene) and merA (intracellular mercury reductase protein gene) regions from the narrow-spectrum Hg R Bacillus were generally smaller than those of the B. megaterium MB1 mer determinant. Diversity of gene structure configurations was also observed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles of the merA PCR products from the narrow-spectrum Hg R Bacillus. The genetic diversity of narrow-spectrum mer operons was greater than that of broad-spectrum ones.

  5. Antigenic relatedness of two strains of hepatitis A virus determined by cross-neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, S M; Binn, L N

    1983-01-01

    Cell culture-adapted HM-175 (Australia) and PA-21 (Panama) strains of hepatitis A virus were compared in a cross-neutralization radioimmunofocus inhibition assay. The ratio of antibody titers achieved with two sera against the two viruses differed by less than twofold, indicating a high degree of antigenic relatedness between epidemiologically disparate strains of virus. PMID:6194118

  6. Key determinants affecting sheep wool biodegradation directed by a keratinase-producing Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Taha I; Embaby, Amira M; Elmahdy, Ahmed R

    2011-02-01

    OVAT (one variable at a time) approach was applied in this study to screen the most important physicochemical key determinants involved in the process of sheep wool biodegradation. The process was directed by a keratinase-producing Bacillus subtilis DB 100 (p5.2) recombinant strain. Data indicate that, sheep wool could be degraded efficiently in cultures incubated at 30°C, with initial pH of 7 with agitation at 150 rpm. Two times autoclaved alkali treated and undefatted chopped sheep wool is more accessible to biodegradation. B. subtilis recombinant cells could utilize sheep wool as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Sheep wool-based modified basal medium II, lacking NH₄Cl and yeast extract, could greatly support the growth of these bacterial cells. Sheep wool biodegradation was conducted efficiently in the absence of kanamycin consequently; high stability of the recombinant plasmid (p5.2) represents a great challenge upon scaling up this process. Three key determinants (sheep wool concentration, incubation time and inoculum size) imposing considerable constraints on the process are highlighted. Sheep wool-based tap water medium and sheep wool-based distilled water medium were formulated in this study. High levels of released end products, produced from sheep wool biodegradation are achieved upon using these two sheep wool-based water media. Data indicate that, sheep wool hydrolysate is rich in some amino acids, such as tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, proline, isoleucine, leucine, valine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid. Moreover, the resulting sheep wool hydrolysate contains soluble proteins of high and intermediate molecular weights. The present study demonstrates a feasible, cheap, reproducible, efficient and rapid biotechnological approach towards utilization of raw sheep wool waste through a recombinant bacterium.

  7. Computational methods for coupling microstructural and micromechanical materials response simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HOLM,ELIZABETH A.; BATTAILE,CORBETT C.; BUCHHEIT,THOMAS E.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT; RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL; VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; KNOROVSKY,GERALD A.; NEILSEN,MICHAEL K.; WELLMAN,GERALD W.; SULSKY,DEBORAH; SHEN,YU-LIN; SCHREYER,H. BUCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational materials simulations have traditionally focused on individual phenomena: grain growth, crack propagation, plastic flow, etc. However, real materials behavior results from a complex interplay between phenomena. In this project, the authors explored methods for coupling mesoscale simulations of microstructural evolution and micromechanical response. In one case, massively parallel (MP) simulations for grain evolution and microcracking in alumina stronglink materials were dynamically coupled. In the other, codes for domain coarsening and plastic deformation in CuSi braze alloys were iteratively linked. this program provided the first comparison of two promising ways to integrate mesoscale computer codes. Coupled microstructural/micromechanical codes were applied to experimentally observed microstructures for the first time. In addition to the coupled codes, this project developed a suite of new computational capabilities (PARGRAIN, GLAD, OOF, MPM, polycrystal plasticity, front tracking). The problem of plasticity length scale in continuum calculations was recognized and a solution strategy was developed. The simulations were experimentally validated on stockpile materials.

  8. Thermally induced micromechanical stresses in ceramic/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhuang ); Bradt, R.C. . Mackay School of Mines)

    1992-11-01

    The internal micromechanical stresses which develop in ceramic-ceramic composites as a consequence of temperature changes and thermoelastic property differences between the reinforcing and matrix phases are addressed by the Eshelby method. Results for two whisker reinforced ceramic matrix composites and for quartz particles in porcelain are discussed. It is concluded that the stresses which develop in the second phase reinforcing inclusions are quite substantial (GPa-levels) and may be highly anisotropic in character. These stresses are additive to the macroscopic thermal stresses from temperature gradients which are encountered during heating and cooling, and also to externally apphed mechanical stresses (loads). These micromechanical stresses are expected to be highly significant for thermal cycling fatigue and other failure processes.

  9. Thermally induced micromechanical stresses in ceramic/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhuang; Bradt, R.C.

    1992-11-01

    The internal micromechanical stresses which develop in ceramic-ceramic composites as a consequence of temperature changes and thermoelastic property differences between the reinforcing and matrix phases are addressed by the Eshelby method. Results for two whisker reinforced ceramic matrix composites and for quartz particles in porcelain are discussed. It is concluded that the stresses which develop in the second phase reinforcing inclusions are quite substantial (GPa-levels) and may be highly anisotropic in character. These stresses are additive to the macroscopic thermal stresses from temperature gradients which are encountered during heating and cooling, and also to externally apphed mechanical stresses (loads). These micromechanical stresses are expected to be highly significant for thermal cycling fatigue and other failure processes.

  10. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Frequency stability improvement for piezoresistive micromechanical oscillators via synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Dong; Huan, Ronghua; Wei, Xueyong

    2017-03-01

    Synchronization phenomenon first discovered in Huygens' clock shows that the rhythms of oscillating objects can be adjusted via an interaction. Here we show that the frequency stability of a piezoresistive micromechanical oscillator can be enhanced via synchronization. The micromechanical clamped-clamped beam oscillator is built up using the electrostatic driving and piezoresistive sensing technique and the synchronization phenomenon is observed after coupling it to an external oscillator. An enhancement of frequency stability is obtained in the synchronization state. The influences of the synchronizing perturbation intensity and frequency detuning applied on the oscillator are studied experimentally. A theoretical analysis of phase noise leads to an analytical formula for predicting Allan deviation of the frequency output of the piezoresistive oscillator, which successfully explains the experimental observations and the mechanism of frequency stability enhancement via synchronization.

  12. Unified micromechanics of damping for unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated micromechanics methodology for the prediction of damping capacity in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix unidirectional composites has been developed. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are presented relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and volume fraction. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from thermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites due to temperature and moisture variations is also modeled. The damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix are incorporated. Finally, the temperature rise in continuously vibrating composite plies is estimated. Application examples illustrate the significance of various parameters on the damping performance of unidirectional and off-axis fiber reinforced composites.

  13. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  14. Design of a fully compliant bistable micromechanism for switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsin-An; Tsay, Jinni; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2001-11-01

    This paper proposes a design of a bistable micromechanism for the application of switching devices. The topology of a fully compliant four-bar mechanism is adopted herein. The central mass of the mechanism is employed as a carriage to carry switching components, such as mirror, electrical contact, etc. The equations that predict the existence of bistable states, the extreme positions of the motion range and the maximum stress states of members were derived. MUMPs provided by Cronos Integrated Microsystems fabricated the proposed micromechanisms for the purpose of verifying the theoretical predictions. Finally, an experimental rig was established. The bistable mechanisms were switched either by the probe or actuators to push the central mass. The experimental results demonstrated that the motions observed approximately met the predicted values.

  15. Micromechanics of Composite Materials Governed by Vector Constitutive Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    The high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics theory has been extended for the prediction of the effective property tensor and the corresponding local field distributions for composites whose constituents are governed by vector constitutive laws. As shown, the shear analogy, which can predict effective transverse properties, is not valid in the general three-dimensional case. Consequently, a general derivation is presented that is applicable to both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites with arbitrary vector constitutive laws and periodic microstructures. Results are given for thermal and electric problems, effective properties and local field distributions, ordered and random microstructures, as well as complex geometries including woven composites. Comparisons of the theory's predictions are made to test data, numerical analysis, and classical expressions from the literature. Further, classical methods cannot provide the local field distributions in the composite, and it is demonstrated that, as the percolation threshold is approached, their predictions are increasingly unreliable. XXXX It has been observed that the bonding between the fibers and matrix in composite materials can be imperfect. In the context of thermal conductivity, such imperfect interfaces have been investigated in micromechanical models by Dunn and Taya (1993), Duan and Karihaloo (2007), Nan et al. (1997) and Hashin (2001). The present HFGMC micromechanical method, derived for perfectly bonded composite materials governed by vector constitutive laws, can be easily generalized to include the effects of weak bonding between the constituents. Such generalizations, in the context of the mechanical micromechanics problem, involve introduction of a traction-separation law at the fiber/matrix interface and have been presented by Aboudi (1987), Bednarcyk and Arnold (2002), Bednarcyk et al. (2004) and Aboudi et al. (2013) and will be addressed in the future.

  16. Micromechanical microphone using sideband modulation of nonlinear resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boales, Joseph A.; Mateen, Farrukh; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2017-08-01

    We report successful detection of an audio signal via sideband modulation of a nonlinear piezoelectric micromechanical resonator. The 270 × 96-μm resonator was shown to be reliable in audio detection for sound intensity levels as low as ambient room noise and to have an unamplified sensitivity of 23.9 μV/Pa. Such an approach may be adapted in acoustic sensors and microphones for consumer electronics or medical equipment such as hearing aids.

  17. Micromechanics of deformation and fracture in low symmetry layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, B.K.; Dao, M.; Asaro, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Deformation microstructures in {gamma}-TiAl + {alpha}{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}Al based low symmetry layered materials, with fully lamellar (FL) microstructures, have been simulated using micro-mechanical methods. In this particular effort the authors embed the specific contributions of scale and temperature dependent plastic anisotropies of individual colonies of Poly Synthetically Twinned (PST) lamellar TiAl and demonstrate their effect on overall deformation and fracture response.

  18. Third-Order Intermodulation in a Micromechanical Thermal Mixer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    rier frequency. A variant of the Duffing oscillator model and finite element modeling are used to analyze the origin of nonlinearities in the...micromechanical system. [1503] Index Terms—Bandpass filter, Duffing oscillator , intermediate frequency, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), mixer, non...input intercept point of +30 dBm for interferers spaced at a 50-kHz offset from the carrier frequency. A variant of the Duffing oscillator model and

  19. EDITORIAL: The 18th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 18th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 07), which took place at the University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal from 16-18 September 2007. Since the first workshop at the University of Twente in 1989 the field of micromechanics has grown substantially and new fields have been added: optics, RF, biomedical, chemistry, and in recent years the emergence of nanotechnology. This year an extensive programme was scheduled with contributions from new materials research to new manufacturing techniques. In addition, the invited speakers presented a review of the state-of-the-art in several main trends in current research, with the focus on micro/nanosystems in the ICT Work Programme in EC FP7. As ever, the two day workshop was attended by delegates from all over Europe, the USA, Brazil, Egypt, Japan and Canada. A total of 96 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. The workshop provides a forum for young researchers to learn about new experimental methods and to enhance their knowledge of the field. This special issue presents a selection of 17 of the best papers from the workshop. The papers highlight fluidic and optical devices, energy scavenging microsystems, neural probe arrays and microtechnology fabrication techniques. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing, and I am grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers and to Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process. My thanks also go to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I believe that this special issue will provide a good overview of the topics presented at the workshop and I hope you enjoy reading it.

  20. Microstructural and micromechanical characterization of IN718 theta shaped specimens built with electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, Ercan; Kirka, Michael M.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Cooper, Ryan C.; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Wu, Wei; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-02-23

    Theta-shaped specimens were additively manufactured out of Inconel 718 powders using an electron beam melting technique, as a model complex load bearing structure. We employed two different build strategies; producing two sets of specimens. Microstructural and micro-mechanical characterizations were performed using electron back-scatter, synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction techniques. In particular, the cross-members of the specimens were the focus of the synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The build strategies employed resulted in the formation of distinct microstructures and crystallographic textures, signifying the importance of build-parameter manipulation for microstructural optimization. Large strain anisotropy of the different lattice planes was observed during in-situ loading. Texture was concluded to have a distinct effect upon both the axial and transverse strain responses of the cross-members. In particular, the (200), (220) and (420) transverse lattice strains all showed unexpected overlapping trends in both builds. This was related to the strong {200} textures along the build/loading direction, providing agreement between the experimental and calculated results.

  1. Microstructural and micromechanical characterization of IN718 theta shaped specimens built with electron beam melting

    DOE PAGES

    Cakmak, Ercan; Kirka, Michael M.; Watkins, Thomas R.; ...

    2016-02-23

    Theta-shaped specimens were additively manufactured out of Inconel 718 powders using an electron beam melting technique, as a model complex load bearing structure. We employed two different build strategies; producing two sets of specimens. Microstructural and micro-mechanical characterizations were performed using electron back-scatter, synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction techniques. In particular, the cross-members of the specimens were the focus of the synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The build strategies employed resulted in the formation of distinct microstructures and crystallographic textures, signifying the importance of build-parameter manipulation for microstructural optimization. Large strain anisotropy of the different lattice planesmore » was observed during in-situ loading. Texture was concluded to have a distinct effect upon both the axial and transverse strain responses of the cross-members. In particular, the (200), (220) and (420) transverse lattice strains all showed unexpected overlapping trends in both builds. This was related to the strong {200} textures along the build/loading direction, providing agreement between the experimental and calculated results.« less

  2. Nonlinear Visco-Elastic Response of Composites via Micro-Mechanical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Sridharan, Srinivasan

    2005-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for a study of nonlinear visco-elastic response of composite laminae are developed and their performance compared. A single integral constitutive law proposed by Schapery and subsequently generalized to multi-axial states of stress is utilized in the study for the matrix material. This is used in conjunction with a computationally facile scheme in which hereditary strains are computed using a recursive relation suggested by Henriksen. Composite response is studied using two competing micro-models, viz. a simplified Square Cell Model (SSCM) and a Finite Element based self-consistent Cylindrical Model (FECM). The algorithm is developed assuming that the material response computations are carried out in a module attached to a general purpose finite element program used for composite structural analysis. It is shown that the SSCM as used in investigations of material nonlinearity can involve significant errors in the prediction of transverse Young's modulus and shear modulus. The errors in the elastic strains thus predicted are of the same order of magnitude as the creep strains accruing due to visco-elasticity. The FECM on the other hand does appear to perform better both in the prediction of elastic constants and the study of creep response.

  3. [Determination of genetic bases of auxotrophy in Yersinia pestis ssp. caucasica strains].

    PubMed

    Odinokov, G N; Eroshenko, G A; Kukleva, L M; Shavina, N Iu; Krasnov, Ia M; Kutyrev, V V

    2012-04-01

    Based on the results of computer analysis of nucleotide sequences in strains Yersinia pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis recorded in the files of NCBI GenBank database, differences between genes argA, aroG, aroF, thiH, and thiG of strain Pestoides F (subspecies caucasica) were found, compared to other strains of plaque agent and pseudotuberculosis microbe. Using PCR with calculated primers and the method of sequence analysis, the structure of variable regions of these genes was studied in 96 natural Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains. It was shown that all examined strains of subspecies caucasica, unlike strains of plague-causing agent of other subspecies and pseudotubercolosis microbe, had identical mutations in genes argA (integration of the insertion sequence IS100), aroG (insertion of ten nucleotides), aroF (inserion of IS100), thiH (insertion of nucleotide T), and thiG (deletion of 13 nucleotides). These mutations are the reason for the absence in strains belonging to this subspecies of the ability to synthesize arginine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and vitamin B1 (thiamine), and cause their auxotrophy for these growth factors.

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains from cystic fibrosis patients: genomic variability and molecular characterization of some virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Mauro; Iacobino, Angelo; Prosseda, Gianni; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; Zarrilli, Raffaele; De Carolis, Elena; Petrucca, Andrea; Nencioni, Lucia; Colonna, Bianca; Casalino, Mariassunta

    2011-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of 52 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains, collected from various environmental and clinical sources, including cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, as well as the presence and the expression of some virulence-associated genes were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis identified 47 profiles and three clusters of isolates with an identical PFGE pattern considered to be indistinguishable strains. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the gyrB gene grouped the 52 strains into nine different profiles. Most CF clinical isolates (29 out of 41) showed profile 1, while the analysis of the hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene revealed five distinct allelic variations, with the majority of CF isolates (23 out of 41) belonging to sequence group 1. Furthermore, the strains were characterized for motility and expression of virulence-associated genes, including genes encoding type-1 fimbriae, proteases (StmPr1 and StmPr2) and esterase. All S. maltophilia strains exhibited a very broad range of swimming and twitching motility, while none showed swarming motility. A complete smf-1 gene was PCR-amplified only from clinically derived S. maltophilia strains. Finally, the virulence of representative S. maltophilia strains impaired in the expression of proteases and esterase activities was evaluated by infecting larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella. The results obtained strongly indicate that the major extracellular protease StmPr1 may be a relevant virulence factor of S. maltophilia.

  5. Comprehensive Micromechanics-Analysis Code - Version 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Bednarcyk, B. A.

    2005-01-01

    Version 4.0 of the Micromechanics Analysis Code With Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) has been developed as an improved means of computational simulation of advanced composite materials. The previous version of MAC/GMC was described in "Comprehensive Micromechanics-Analysis Code" (LEW-16870), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 24, No. 6 (June 2000), page 38. To recapitulate: MAC/GMC is a computer program that predicts the elastic and inelastic thermomechanical responses of continuous and discontinuous composite materials with arbitrary internal microstructures and reinforcement shapes. The predictive capability of MAC/GMC rests on a model known as the generalized method of cells (GMC) - a continuum-based model of micromechanics that provides closed-form expressions for the macroscopic response of a composite material in terms of the properties, sizes, shapes, and responses of the individual constituents or phases that make up the material. Enhancements in version 4.0 include a capability for modeling thermomechanically and electromagnetically coupled ("smart") materials; a more-accurate (high-fidelity) version of the GMC; a capability to simulate discontinuous plies within a laminate; additional constitutive models of materials; expanded yield-surface-analysis capabilities; and expanded failure-analysis and life-prediction capabilities on both the microscopic and macroscopic scales.

  6. Optical anisotropy in micromechanically rolled carbon nanotube forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razib, Mohd Asyraf bin Mohd; Rana, Masud; Saleh, Tanveer; Fan, Harrison; Koch, Andrew; Nojeh, Alireza; Takahata, Kenichi; Muthalif, Asan Gani Bin Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The bulk appearance of arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT arrays or CNT forests) is dark as they absorb most of the incident light. In this paper, two postprocessing techniques have been described where the CNT forest can be patterned by selective bending of the tips of the nanotubes using a rigid cylindrical tool. A tungsten tool was used to bend the vertical structure of CNTs with predefined parameters in two different ways as stated above: bending using the bottom surface of the tool (micromechanical bending (M2B)) and rolling using the side of the tool (micromechanical rolling (M2R)). The processed zone was investigated using a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) and optical setup to reveal the surface morphology and optical characteristics of the patterned CNTs on the substrate. Interestingly, the polarized optical reflection from the micromechanical rolled (M2R) sample was found to be significantly influenced by the rotation of the sample. It was observed that, if the polarization of the light is parallel to the alignment of the CNTs, the reflectance is at least 2 x higher than for the perpendicular direction. Furthermore, the reflectance varied almost linearly with good repeatability ( 10%) as the processed CNT forest sample was rotated from 0° to 90°. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Modeling and Manufacturing of Micromechanical RF Switch with Inductors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Chen, Ying-Liang

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the simulation, fabrication and characterization of micromechanical radio frequency (RF) switch with micro inductors. The inductors are employed to enhance the characteristic of the RF switch. An equivalent circuit model is developed to simulate the performance of the RF switch. The behaviors of the micromechanical RF switch are simulated by the finite element method software, CoventorWare. The micromechanical RF switch is fabricated using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and a post-process. The post-process employs a wet etching to etch the sacrificial layer, and to release the suspended structures of the RF switch. The structure of the RF switch contains a coplanar waveguide (CPW), a suspended membrane, eight springs and two inductors in series. Experimental results reveal that the insertion loss and isolation of the switch are 1.7 dB at 21 GHz and 19 dB at 21 GHz, respectively. The driving voltage of the switch is about 13 V.

  8. Micromechanics and Piezo Enhancements of HyperSizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip; Collier, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The commercial HyperSizer aerospace-composite-material-structure-sizing software has been enhanced by incorporating capabilities for representing coupled thermal, piezoelectric, and piezomagnetic effects on the levels of plies, laminates, and stiffened panels. This enhancement is based on a formulation similar to that of the pre-existing HyperSizer capability for representing thermal effects. As a result of this enhancement, the electric and/or magnetic response of a material or structure to a mechanical or thermal load, or its mechanical response to an applied electric or magnetic field can be predicted. In another major enhancement, a capability for representing micromechanical effects has been added by establishment of a linkage between HyperSizer and Glenn Research Center s Micromechanics Analysis Code With Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) computer program, which was described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. The linkage enables Hyper- Sizer to localize to the fiber and matrix level rather than only to the ply level, making it possible to predict local failures and to predict properties of plies from those of the component fiber and matrix materials. Advanced graphical user interfaces and database structures have been developed to support the new HyperSizer micromechanics capabilities.

  9. Micromechanical characterization tools for highly-filled polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S; DeTeresa, S; Cunningham, B; Ciarlo, D; Allen, D; Clayton, K; Yoon, C

    2000-02-16

    We are attempting to characterize and model the micromechanical response of highly-filled polymers. In this class of materials, the continuous plastic binder used to bond the highly-filled material dominates the observed viscoelastic response. As a result, realistic lifetime analysis of these materials will require a thorough understanding of the contribution of the plastic binder. Laboratory applications of these materials include plastic bonded explosives, propellants, a variety of specialized filled organic materials for stockpile systems, and highly filled epoxy dielectric materials for the National Ignition Facility. We have explored numerous techniques to characterize the local microstructure of plastic bonded explosives. However, insufficient funding was obtained to bring these technologies to maturity, nevertheless our present tool set is significantly better than 2 years ago. We have also made some progress in developing an appropriate micromechanical constitutive modeling framework, based on a finite element method incorporating a cohesive zone model to represent the binder contribution within a Voronoi tesselation mesh structure for the PBX grains. A second modeling approach was used to incorporate analytical micromechanics (generalized self-consistent schemes). However, preliminary theoretical analysis strongly suggested that this approach would be invalid for such extremely high-filled systems like PBX.

  10. Determination of the strain rate dependent thermal softening behavior of thermoplastic materials for crash simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Christian; Klein, Jan; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Thermoplastic materials are increasingly used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in automotive applications. Typical examples are frontends and bumpers. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in a crash situation. A high rate of loading causes a high strain rate in the material which has a major impact on the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials. The stiffness as well as the rigidity of polymers increases to higher strain rates. The increase of the mechanical properties is superimposed at higher rates of loading by another effect which works reducing on stiffness and rigidity, the increase of temperature caused by plastic deformation. The mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is influenced by temperature opposing to strain rate. The stiffness and rigidity are decreased to higher values of temperature. The effect of thermal softening on thermoplastic materials is investigated at IKV. For this purpose high-speed tensile tests are performed on a blend, consisting of Polybutylenterephthalate (PBT) and Polycarbonate (PC). In preliminary investigations the effects of strain rate on the thermomechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials was studied by different authors. Tensile impact as well as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted in combination with high-speed temperature measurement, though, the authors struggled especially with temperature measurement. This paper presents an approach which uses high-speed strain measurement to transpire the link between strain, strain rate and thermal softening as well as the interdependency between strain hardening and thermal softening. The results show a superimposition of strain hardening and thermal softening, which is consistent to preliminary investigations. The advantage of the presented research is that the results can be used to calibrate damage and material models to perform mechanical simulations using Finite Element Analysis.

  11. Determining displacement and strain maps immune from aliasing effect with the grid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Frédéric; Blaysat, Benoît; Grédiac, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Spatial aliasing may affect methods based on grid image processing to retrieve displacement and strain maps in experimental mechanics. Such methods aim at estimating these maps on the surface of a specimen subjected to a loading test. Aliasing, which is often not noticeable to the naked eye in the grid images, may give spurious fringes in the strain maps. This paper presents an analysis of aliasing in this context and provides the reader with simple guidelines to minimize the effect of aliasing on strain maps extracted from grid images.

  12. Vibrio cholerae O1 Strain TSI-4 Produces the Exopolysaccharide Materials That Determine Colony Morphology, Stress Resistance, and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Sun Nyunt; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Takade, Akemi; Kawabata, Shun-Ichiro; Yoshida, Shin-Ichi

    1998-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 (El Tor, Ogawa) can shift to a rugose colony morphology from its normal translucent colony morphology in response to nutrient starvation. We have investigated differences between the rugose and translucent forms of V. cholerae O1 strain TSI-4. Electron microscopic examination of the rugose form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/R) revealed thick, electron-dense exopolysaccharide materials surrounding polycationic ferritin-stained cells, while the ferritin-stained material was absent around the translucent form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/T). The exopolysaccharide produced by V. cholerae TSI-4/R was found to have a composition of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, d-mannose, 6-deoxy-d-galactose, and d-galactose (7.4:10.2:2.4:3.0). The expression of an amorphous exopolysaccharide promotes biofilm development under static culture conditions. Biofilm formation by the rugose strain was determined by scanning electron microscopy, and most of the surface of the film was colonized by actively dividing rod cells. The corresponding rugose and translucent strains were compared for stress resistance. By having exopolysaccharide materials, the rugose strains acquired resistance to osmotic and oxidative stress. Our data indicated that an exopolysaccharide material on the surface of the rugose strain promoted biofilm formation and resistance to the effects of two stressing agents. PMID:9758780

  13. Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 produces the exopolysaccharide materials that determine colony morphology, stress resistance, and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wai, S N; Mizunoe, Y; Takade, A; Kawabata, S I; Yoshida, S I

    1998-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 (El Tor, Ogawa) can shift to a rugose colony morphology from its normal translucent colony morphology in response to nutrient starvation. We have investigated differences between the rugose and translucent forms of V. cholerae O1 strain TSI-4. Electron microscopic examination of the rugose form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/R) revealed thick, electron-dense exopolysaccharide materials surrounding polycationic ferritin-stained cells, while the ferritin-stained material was absent around the translucent form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/T). The exopolysaccharide produced by V. cholerae TSI-4/R was found to have a composition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-mannose, 6-deoxy-D-galactose, and D-galactose (7.4:10.2:2.4:3.0). The expression of an amorphous exopolysaccharide promotes biofilm development under static culture conditions. Biofilm formation by the rugose strain was determined by scanning electron microscopy, and most of the surface of the film was colonized by actively dividing rod cells. The corresponding rugose and translucent strains were compared for stress resistance. By having exopolysaccharide materials, the rugose strains acquired resistance to osmotic and oxidative stress. Our data indicated that an exopolysaccharide material on the surface of the rugose strain promoted biofilm formation and resistance to the effects of two stressing agents.

  14. The nano-epsilon dot method for strain rate viscoelastic characterisation of soft biomaterials by spherical nano-indentation.

    PubMed

    Mattei, G; Gruca, G; Rijnveld, N; Ahluwalia, A

    2015-10-01

    Nano-indentation is widely used for probing the micromechanical properties of materials. Based on the indentation of surfaces using probes with a well-defined geometry, the elastic and viscoelastic constants of materials can be determined by relating indenter geometry and measured load and displacement to parameters which represent stress and deformation. Here we describe a method to derive the viscoelastic properties of soft hydrated materials at the micro-scale using constant strain rates and stress-free initial conditions. Using a new self-consistent definition of indentation stress and strain and corresponding unique depth-independent expression for indentation strain rate, the epsilon dot method, which is suitable for bulk compression testing, is transformed to nano-indentation. We demonstrate how two materials can be tested with a displacement controlled commercial nano-indentor using the nano-espilon dot method (nano-ε̇M) to give values of instantaneous and equilibrium elastic moduli and time constants with high precision. As samples are tested in stress-free initial conditions, the nano-ε̇M could be useful for characterising the micro-mechanical behaviour of soft materials such as hydrogels and biological tissues at cell length scales.

  15. Identification of Cj1051c as a Major Determinant for the Restriction Barrier of Campylobacter jejuni Strain NCTC11168

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Jeffrey P.; Grant, Andrew J.; Coward, Christopher; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human diarrheal illness in the world, and research on it has benefitted greatly by the completion of several genome sequences and the development of molecular biology tools. However, many hurdles remain for a full understanding of this unique bacterial pathogen. One of the most commonly used strains for genetic work with C. jejuni is NCTC11168. While this strain is readily transformable with DNA for genomic recombination, transformation with plasmids is problematic. In this study, we have identified a determinant of this to be cj1051c, predicted to encode a restriction-modification type IIG enzyme. Knockout mutagenesis of this gene resulted in a strain with a 1,000-fold-enhanced transformation efficiency with a plasmid purified from a C. jejuni host. Additionally, this mutation conferred the ability to be transformed by plasmids isolated from an Escherichia coli host. Sequence analysis suggested a high level of variability of the specificity domain between strains and that this gene may be subject to phase variation. We provide evidence that cj1051c is active in NCTC11168 and behaves as expected for a type IIG enzyme. The identification of this determinant provides a greater understanding of the molecular biology of C. jejuni as well as a tool for plasmid work with strain NCTC11168. PMID:22923403

  16. Structure determination of the exopolysaccharide produced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains RW-9595M and R.

    PubMed Central

    Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Bégin, André; Roy, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) were isolated and purified from Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains RW-9595M, which has been shown to possess cytokine-stimulating activity, and R grown under various fermentation conditions (carbon source, incubation temperature and duration). Identical (1)H NMR spectra were obtained in all cases. Molecular masses were determined by gel permeation chromatography. The primary structure was elucidated using chemical and spectroscopic techniques. Organic acid, monosaccharide and absolute configuration analyses gave the following composition: pyruvate, 1; D-glucose, 2; D-galactose, 1; and l-rhamnose, 4. Methylation analysis indicated the presence of three residues of 3-linked rhamnose, and one residue each of 2,3-linked rhamnose, 2-linked glucose, 3-linked glucose and 4,6-linked galactose. The EPS was submitted to periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction. Monosaccharide analysis of the resulting polysaccharide gave the new composition: rhamnose, 4; and glucose, 1. Methylation analysis confirmed the loss of the 2-linked glucose and 4,6-linked galactose residues. On the basis of one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR data, the structure of the native EPS was consistent with the following heptasaccharide repeating unit: [3Rha alpha-3Glc beta-3[Gal4,6(R)Py alpha-2]Rha alpha-3Rha alpha-3Rha alpha-2Glc alpha-](n) where Rha corresponds to rhamnose (6-deoxymannose) and Py corresponds to pyruvate acetal. Complete (1)H and (13)C assignments are reported for the native and the corresponding pyruvate-hydrolysed polysaccharide. Electrospray MS and MS/MS data are given for the oligosaccharide produced by Smith degradation. PMID:11903041

  17. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  18. Smart materials: strain sensing and stress determination by means of nanotube sensing systems, composites, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Nagarajaiah, Satish (Inventor); Dharap, Prasad (Inventor); Zhiling, Li (Inventor); Kim, Jong Dae (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward devices comprising carbon nanotubes that are capable of detecting displacement, impact, stress, and/or strain in materials, methods of making such devices, methods for sensing/detecting/monitoring displacement, impact, stress, and/or strain via carbon nanotubes, and various applications for such methods and devices. The devices and methods of the present invention all rely on mechanically-induced electronic perturbations within the carbon nanotubes to detect and quantify such stress/strain. Such detection and quantification can rely on techniques which include, but are not limited to, electrical conductivity/conductance and/or resistivity/resistance detection/measurements, thermal conductivity detection/measurements, electroluminescence detection/measurements, photoluminescence detection/measurements, and combinations thereof. All such techniques rely on an understanding of how such properties change in response to mechanical stress and/or strain.

  19. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  20. Bulk strain solitons as a tool for determination of the third order elastic moduli of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Garbuzov, F. E.; Samsonov, A. M.; Semenov, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an alternative approach to determination of the third order elastic moduli of materials based on registration of nonlinear bulk strain waves in three basic structural waveguides (rod, plate and shell) and further calculation of the Murnaghan moduli from the recorded wave parameters via simple algebra. These elastic moduli are available in literature for a limited number of materials and are measured with considerable errors, that evidences a demand in novel approaches to their determination.

  1. Gene Clusters Located on Two Large Plasmids Determine Spore Crystal Association (SCA) in Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. finitimus Strain YBT-020

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yiguang; Ji, Fang; Shang, Hui; Zhu, Qian; Wang, Pengxia; Xu, Chengchen; Deng, Yun; Peng, Donghai; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Crystals in Bacillus thuringiensis are usually formed in the mother cell compartment during sporulation and are separated from the spores after mother cell lysis. In a few strains, crystals are produced inside the exosporium and are associated with the spores after sporulation. This special phenotype, named ‘spore crystal association’ (SCA), typically occurs in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus. Our aim was to identify genes determining the SCA phenotype in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain YBT-020. Plasmid conjugation experiments indicated that the SCA phenotype in this strain was tightly linked with two large plasmids (pBMB26 and pBMB28). A shuttle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of strain YBT-020 was constructed. Six fragments from BAC clones were screened from this library and discovered to cover the full length of pBMB26; four others were found to cover pBMB28. Using fragment complementation testing, two fragments, each of approximately 35 kb and located on pBMB26 and pBMB28, were observed to recover the SCA phenotype in an acrystalliferous mutant, B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. Furthermore, deletion analysis indicated that the crystal protein gene cry26Aa from pBMB26, along with five genes from pBMB28, were indispensable to the SCA phenotype. Gene disruption and frame-shift mutation analyses revealed that two of the five genes from pBMB28, which showed low similarity to crystal proteins, determined the location of crystals inside the exosporium. Gene disruption revealed that the three remaining genes, similar to spore germination genes, contributed to the stability of the SCA phenotype in strain YBT-020. Our results thus identified the genes determining the SCA phenotype in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus. PMID:22076131

  2. Host Determinants of Prion Strain Diversity Independent of Prion Protein Genotype.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Jenna; Hughson, Andrew; Caughey, Byron; Bessen, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic diversity in prion diseases can be specified by prion strains in which biological traits are propagated through an epigenetic mechanism mediated by distinct PrP(Sc) conformations. We investigated the role of host-dependent factors on phenotypic diversity of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in different host species that express the same prion protein gene (Prnp). Two CWD strains that have distinct biological, biochemical, and pathological features were identified in transgenic mice that express the Syrian golden hamster (SGH) Prnp. The CKY strain of CWD had a shorter incubation period than the WST strain of CWD, but after transmission to SGH, the incubation period of CKY CWD was ∼150 days longer than WST CWD. Limited proteinase K digestion revealed strain-specific PrP(Sc) polypeptide patterns that were maintained in both hosts, but the solubility and conformational stability of PrP(Sc) differed for the CWD strains in a host-dependent manner. WST CWD produced PrP(Sc) amyloid plaques in the brain of the SGH that were partially insoluble and stable at a high concentration of protein denaturant. However, in transgenic mice, PrP(Sc) from WST CWD did not assemble into plaques, was highly soluble, and had low conformational stability. Similar studies using the HY and DY strains of transmissible mink encephalopathy resulted in minor differences in prion biological and PrP(Sc) properties between transgenic mice and SGH. These findings indicate that host-specific pathways that are independent of Prnp can alter the PrP(Sc) conformation of certain prion strains, leading to changes in the biophysical properties of PrP(Sc), neuropathology, and clinical prion disease. Prions are misfolded pathogenic proteins that cause neurodegeneration in humans and animals. Transmissible prion diseases exhibit a spectrum of disease phenotypes and the basis of this diversity is encoded in the structure of the pathogenic prion protein and propagated by an epigenetic mechanism. In the

  3. Diversity of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Strains, Determined by a Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nevas, Mari; Lindström, Miia; Hielm, Sebastian; Björkroth, K. Johanna; Peck, Michael W.; Korkeala, Hannu

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied to the study of the similarity of 55 strains of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum (C. botulinum group I) types A, AB, B, and F. Rare-cutting restriction enzymes ApaI, AscI, MluI, NruI, PmeI, RsrII, SacII, SmaI, and XhoI were tested for their suitability for the cleavage of DNA of five proteolytic C. botulinum strains. Of these enzymes, SacII, followed by SmaI and XhoI, produced the most convenient number of fragments for genetic typing and were selected for analysis of the 55 strains. The proteolytic C. botulinum species was found to be heterogeneous. In the majority of cases, PFGE enabled discrimination between individual strains of proteolytic C. botulinum types A and B. The different toxin types were discriminated at an 86% similarity level with both SacII and SmaI and at an 83% similarity level with XhoI. Despite the high heterogeneity, three clusters at a 95% similarity level consisting of more than three strains of different origin were noted. The strains of types A and B showed higher diversity than the type F organisms which formed a single cluster. According to this survey, PFGE is to be considered a useful tool for molecular epidemiological analysis of proteolytic C. botulinum types A and B. However, epidemiological conclusions based on PFGE data only should be made with discretion, since highly similar PFGE patterns were noticed, especially within the type B strains. PMID:15746333

  4. Diversity of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum strains, determined by a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis approach.

    PubMed

    Nevas, Mari; Lindström, Miia; Hielm, Sebastian; Björkroth, K Johanna; Peck, Michael W; Korkeala, Hannu

    2005-03-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied to the study of the similarity of 55 strains of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum (C. botulinum group I) types A, AB, B, and F. Rare-cutting restriction enzymes ApaI, AscI, MluI, NruI, PmeI, RsrII, SacII, SmaI, and XhoI were tested for their suitability for the cleavage of DNA of five proteolytic C. botulinum strains. Of these enzymes, SacII, followed by SmaI and XhoI, produced the most convenient number of fragments for genetic typing and were selected for analysis of the 55 strains. The proteolytic C. botulinum species was found to be heterogeneous. In the majority of cases, PFGE enabled discrimination between individual strains of proteolytic C. botulinum types A and B. The different toxin types were discriminated at an 86% similarity level with both SacII and SmaI and at an 83% similarity level with XhoI. Despite the high heterogeneity, three clusters at a 95% similarity level consisting of more than three strains of different origin were noted. The strains of types A and B showed higher diversity than the type F organisms which formed a single cluster. According to this survey, PFGE is to be considered a useful tool for molecular epidemiological analysis of proteolytic C. botulinum types A and B. However, epidemiological conclusions based on PFGE data only should be made with discretion, since highly similar PFGE patterns were noticed, especially within the type B strains.

  5. Determination of reference genes for circadian studies in different tissues and mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Circadian rhythms have a profound effect on human health. Their disruption can lead to serious pathologies, such as cancer and obesity. Gene expression studies in these pathologies are often studied in different mouse strains by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Selection of reference genes is a crucial step of qPCR experiments. Recent studies show that reference gene stability can vary between species and tissues, but none has taken circadian experiments into consideration. Results In the present study the expression of ten candidate reference genes (Actb, Eif2a, Gapdh, Hmbs, Hprt1, Ppib, Rn18s, Rplp0, Tbcc and Utp6c) was measured in 131 liver and 97 adrenal gland samples taken from three mouse strains (C57BL/6JOlaHsd, 129Pas plus C57BL/6J and Crem KO on 129Pas plus C57BL/6J background) every 4 h in a 24 h period. Expression stability was evaluated by geNorm and NormFinder programs. Differences in ranking of the most stable reference genes were observed both between individual mouse strains as well as between tissues within each mouse strain. We show that selection of reference gene (Actb) that is often used for analyses in individual mouse strains leads to errors if used for normalization when different mouse strains are compared. We identified alternative reference genes that are stable in these comparisons. Conclusions Genetic background and circadian time influence the expression stability of reference genes. Differences between mouse strains and tissues should be taken into consideration to avoid false interpretations. We show that the use of a single reference gene can lead to false biological conclusions. This manuscript provides a useful reference point for researchers that search for stable reference genes in the field of circadian biology. PMID:20712867

  6. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentrup, Martin; Hatui, Nirupam; Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Kneissl, Michael

    2013-12-01

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances dhkl is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112¯2) AlκGa1-κN epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  7. Micromechanically-based formulation of the cooperative model for the yield behavior of starch-based nano-biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chivrac, F; Gueguen, O; Pollet, E; Averous, L; Ahzi, S; Belouettar, S

    2010-04-01

    The tensile yield stress of plasticized starch filled with montmorillonite has been studied as a function of the temperature and the strain rate and has been compared to the yield behavior of the original matrix. Aggregated/intercalated and exfoliated nano-biocomposites, obtained from different nanofillers, have been produced and tested under uniaxial tension (tensile test). To model the nanocomposite tensile yield stress behavior, a preexisting micro-mechanically based cooperative model, which describes properly the yield of semi-crystalline polymers has been modified. According to our development, the yield behavior of nano-biocomposites is strongly dependant on the clay concentration and exfoliation ratio. Based on the thermodynamics properties, an effective activation volume and effective activation energy are computed through the Takayanagi homogenization model. The predicted results for the yield stress at low strain rates and at different temperatures are in agreement with our experimental results.

  8. Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, P.; Ramamurty, U.; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of strain accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic strain in the presence of a shear strain promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic strain is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.

  9. A chromosomal chloramphenicol acetyltransferase determinant from a probiotic strain of Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Galopin, Sébastien; Cattoir, Vincent; Leclercq, Roland

    2009-06-01

    The mechanism of resistance to chloramphenicol was studied in four strains of Bacillus clausii included in a probiotic mixture, which is administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic therapy. By cloning experiments, a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, cat(Bcl), coding for a putative 228-amino acid CAT protein was identified in B. clausii SIN. The deduced amino acid sequence displayed from 31% to 85% identity with 56 CAT proteins from other Gram-positive bacterial strains. The cat(Bcl) gene was also detected by PCR in the three other B. clausii strains resistant to chloramphenicol, whereas it was absent in the three control strains susceptible to chloramphenicol. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI followed by hybridization with a cat-specific probe as well as unsuccessful repeated attempts of in vitro transfer of chloramphenicol resistance to various recipient cells indicated that cat(Bcl) was chromosomally located in all four resistant B. clausii strains.

  10. A method for determining local elastoplastic stress and strain in metallurgically bonded notched laminates subjected to a loading cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A semianalytical method was developed for determining elastoplastic cyclic stresses and strains at notch roots in metallurgically bonded metal laminates. The method is based on the Neuber equation, which was used with an effective stress-strain curve for the laminate. It was applied to laminates containing a circular hole which were subjected to one cycle of reversed loading. The laminates consisted of two elasto-perfectly-plastic materials with different yield strengths and with either equal or different Young's moduli. A laminate of high-strength titanium alloy with alternate layers of commercially pure titanium was also analyzed. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by comparing the stresses and strains with those calculated from a finite-element analysis. The results estimated by the simple method based on the Neuber equation agreed closely with the results computed from the more elaborate finite-element analysis.

  11. [Bactericidal activity determination of Biseptine, combination of chlorhexidine, benzalkonium chloride and benzylic alcohol, on 124 hospital bacterial strains].

    PubMed

    Reverdy, M E; Martra, A; Fleurette, J

    1997-04-01

    Biseptine is an antiseptic composed of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), benzalkonium chloride (BC) and benzylic alcohol. Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations (MBCs) of Biseptine were determined on 124 clinical strains: 76 Enterobacteriaceae, 16 other Gram negative bacilli, (Pseudomonas spp, Aeromonas spp, Haemophilus spp) and 32 Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus spp, Streptococcus spp, Listeria spp, Bacillus cereus), using microdilution method, in comparison with Hibitane Champ. Modal MBC of Biseptine was 25 mg/l of CHX/2.5 mg/l BC (1/100 dilution). Proteus (MBC: 133 mg/l CHX/ 13 mg/l CB) and B. cepacia (MBC: 100 mg/l CHX/ 10 mg/l CB) were the most resistant strains, as expected with cationic antiseptics. 4/5 Bacillus cereus, strains were weakly susceptible to Biseptine and Hibitane Champ. In Biseptine, the association of CHX and CB showed a synergic activity, MBCs are usually 2 fold lower that Hibitane Champ MBCs.

  12. Micromechanical cohesion force between gas hydrate particles measured under high pressure and low temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-04-07

    To prevent hydrate plugging conditions in the transportation of oil/gas in multiphase flowlines, one of the key processes to control is the agglomeration/deposition of hydrate particles, which are determined by the cohesive/adhesive forces. Previous studies reporting measurements of the cohesive/adhesive force between hydrate particles used cyclopentane hydrate particles in a low-pressure micromechanical force apparatus. In this study, we report the cohesive forces of particles measured in a new high-pressure micromechanical force (MMF) apparatus for ice particles, mixed (methane/ethane, 74.7:25.3) hydrate particles (Structure II), and carbon dioxide hydrate particles (Structure I). The cohesive forces are measured as a function of the contact time, contact force, temperature, and pressure, and determined from pull-off measurements. For the measurements performed of the gas hydrate particles in the gas phase, the determined cohesive force is about 30-35 mN/m, about 8 times higher than the cohesive force of CyC5 hydrates in the liquid CyC5, which is about 4.3 mN/m. We show from our results that the hydrate structure (sI with CO2 hydrates and sII with CH4/C2H6 hydrates) has no influence on the cohesive force. These results are important in the deposition of a gas-dominated system, where the hydrate particles formed in the liquid phase can then stick to the hydrate deposited in the wall exposed to the gas phase.

  13. Determination of elastic strain fields and geometrically necessary dislocation distributions near nanoindents using electron back scatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Angus J.; Randman, David

    2010-03-01

    The deformation around a 500-nm deep Berkovich indent in a large grained Fe sample has been studied using high resolution electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). EBSD patterns were obtained in a two-dimensional map around the indent on the free surface. A cross-correlation-based analysis of small shifts in many sub-regions of the EBSD patterns was used to determine the variation of elastic strain and lattice rotations across the map at a sensitivity of ∼±10-4. Elastic strains were smaller than lattice rotations, with radial strains found to be compressive and hoop strains tensile as expected. Several analyses based on Nye's dislocation tensor were used to estimate the distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) around the indent. The results obtained using different assumed dislocation geometries, optimisation routines and different contributions from the measured lattice rotation and strain fields are compared. Our favoured approach is to seek a combination of GND types which support the six measurable (of a possible nine) gradients of the lattice rotations after correction for the 10 measurable elastic strain gradients, and minimise the total GND line energy using an L1 optimisation method. A lower bound estimate for the noise on the GND density determination is ∼±1012 m-2 for a 200-nm step size, and near the indent densities as high as 1015 m-2 were measured. For comparison, a Hough-based analysis of the EBSD patterns has a much higher noise level of ∼±1014m-2 for the GND density.

  14. Strain determination in bone sections with simultaneous 3D digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Araceli Sánchez; De la Torre Ibarra, Manuel H.; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza; Anaya, Tonatiuh-Saucedo

    2014-06-01

    A 3D digital holographic interferometer was used to measure the surface strain components in two different bovine's bone sections. The applied force on the sample was induced by a precisely controlled lateral micro compression. The simultaneous acquisition capability of the system helps to record a fast sequence of images, each one containing three independent holograms that result in three orthogonal displacement components u, v and w from which the surface strain components ɛx, ɛy and γxy over the bone's field of view were calculated. This research study was carried out in two different bone sections: the cortical bone and the medullary cavity/yellow marrow section. The resulting strain concentrators are of great importance to better understand the mechanical response of complex biological structures such as this bovine femoral bone.

  15. Micromechanics and advanced designs for curved photodetector arrays in hemispherical electronic-eye cameras.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gunchul; Jung, Inhwa; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Song, Jizhou; Wang, Shuodao; Ko, Heung Cho; Huang, Yonggang; Ha, Jeong Sook; Rogers, John A

    2010-04-09

    The fabrication of a hemispherical electronic-eye camera with optimized designs based upon micromechanical analysis is reported. The photodetector arrays combine layouts with multidevice tiles and extended, non-coplanar interconnects to improve the fill factor and deformability, respectively. Quantitative comparison to micromechanics analysis reveals the key features of these designs. Color images collected with working cameras demonstrate the utility of these approaches.

  16. Research of mechanical stresses in micromechanical structures based on silicon carbide films produced by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, O. N.; Korlyakov, A. V.; Lagosh, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Investigations of the effect of residual atmosphere in the magnetron chamber on the mechanical stresses and the shape of micromechanical structure based on SiC film are discussed. Measurements of the curvature radius of SiC micromechanical structure deflection are presented.

  17. Micromechanical Prediction of the Effective Coefficients of Thermo-Piezoelectric Multiphase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    The micromechanical generalized method of cells model is employed for the prediction of the effective elastic, piezoelectric, dielectric, pyroelectric and thermal-expansion constants of multiphase composites with embedded piezoelectric materials. The predicted effective constants are compared with other micromechanical methods available in the literature and good agreements are obtained.

  18. Micromechanics Solution for the Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Yu Jia; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yu; Guang, Jia Lian; Ming, Liu

    2014-09-01

    The overall elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are investigated by employing the theory of micromechanics. A method based on the Mori-Tanaka theory and triple inhomogeneities is found to provide a sufficiently accurate evaluation of the average elastic properties of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials. The inhomogeneities of the materials are divided into three groups: a fine aggregate, a coarse aggregate, and fibers (steel or polymer). The elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are determined as functions of the physical properties and volume fraction of sand, gravel, fibers (steel or polymer), and cement paste as a matrix. The theoretical results obtained are compared with published experimental data. The parameters affecting the elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete are discussed in detail.

  19. Probing Micromechanical Properties of the Extracellular Matrix of Soft Tissues by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Ignasi; Uriarte, Juan J; Campillo, Noelia; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) determines 3D tissue architecture and provides structural support and chemical and mechanical cues to the cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has unique capabilities to measure ECM mechanics at the scale at which cells probe the mechanical features of their microenvironment. Moreover, AFM measurements can be readily combined with bright field and fluorescence microscopy. Performing reliable mechanical measurements with AFM requires accurate calibration of the device and correct computation of the mechanical parameters. A suitable approach to isolate ECM mechanics from cell contribution is removing the cells by means of an effective decellularization process that preserves the composition, structure and mechanical properties of the ECM. AFM measurement of ECM micromechanics provides important insights into organ biofabrication, cell-matrix mechanical crosstalk and disease-induced tissue stiffness alterations. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 19-26, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Analytical and numerical analyses of the micromechanics of soft fibrous connective tissues.

    PubMed

    deBotton, Gal; Oren, Tal

    2013-01-01

    State of the art research and treatment of biological tissues require accurate and efficient methods for describing their mechanical properties. Indeed, micromechanics-motivated approaches provide a systematic method for elevating relevant data from the microscopic level to the macroscopic one. In this work, the mechanical responses of hyperelastic tissues with one and two families of collagen fibers are analyzed by application of a new variational estimate accounting for their histology and the behaviors of their constituents. The resulting close-form expressions are used to determine the overall response of the wall of a healthy human coronary artery. To demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method, these predictions are compared with corresponding 3D finite element simulations of a periodic unit cell of the tissue with two families of fibers. Throughout, the analytical predictions for the highly nonlinear and anisotropic tissue are in agreement with the numerical simulations.

  1. Genetically determined inflammatory-response related cytokine and chemokine transcript profiles between mammary carcinoma resistant and susceptible rat strains

    PubMed Central

    Devapatla, Bharat; Sanders, Jennifer; Samuelson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple human breast and rat mammary carcinoma susceptibility (Mcs) alleles have been identified. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats are resistant to developing mammary carcinomas, while Wistar Furth (WF) females are susceptible. Gene transcripts at Mcs5a1, Mcs5a2, and Mcs5c are differentially expressed between resistant WKY and susceptible WF alleles in immune-system tissues. We hypothesized that immune-related gene transcript profiles are genetically determined in mammary carcinoma resistant and susceptible mammary glands. Low-density QPCR arrays were used to compare inflammation related genes between mammary carcinoma resistant WKY and susceptible WF females. Mammary gland gene transcript levels predicted to be different based on arrays were tested in independent samples. In total, twenty females per strain were exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to induce mammary carcinogenesis. Twelve age-matched controls per strain without DMBA were included to determine main effects of DMBA-exposure. Significant (ANOVA P ≤ 0.01) effects of strain on mammary gland transcript level were observed for Cx3cl1, Il11ra, Il4, C3, Ccl20, Ccl11, Itgb2, Cxcl12, and Cxcr7. Significant effects of DMBA-exposure were observed for Cx3cl1, Il11ra, Cxcr4, Il4ra, and Il4. Strain and DMBA-exposure interaction effects were significant for Cx3cl1. Transcript levels of Cxcr7 relative to Cxcr4 were modified differently by DMBA in mammary carcinoma resistant and susceptible strains. In conclusion, several genetically-determined differences in cytokine, chemokine, and receptor gene transcript levels were identified between mammary carcinoma susceptible and resistant mammary glands, which may be indicative of cell populations and activities that suppress mammary carcinogenesis in resistant genotypes. PMID:22609213

  2. Phenotypic and Molecular Antibiotic Resistance Determination of Airborne Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus spp. Strains from Healthcare Facilities in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Lenart-Boroń, Anna; Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna; Stec, Joanna; Kasprowic, Andrzej

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed the antimicrobial resistance of airborne Staphylococcus spp. strains isolated from healthcare facilities in southern Poland. A total of 55 isolates, belonging to 10 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) species, isolated from 10 healthcare facilities (including hospitals and outpatient units) were included in the analysis. The most frequently identified species were Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Staphylococcus warneri, which belong to normal human skin flora, but can also be the cause of common and even severe nosocomial infections. Disk diffusion tests showed that the bacterial strains were most frequently resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline and only 18% of strains were susceptible to all tested antimicrobials. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific gene regions was used to determine the presence of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance mechanisms in CoNS. The molecular analysis, conducted using specific primer pairs, identified the msrA1 gene, encoding active efflux pumps in bacterial cells, as the most frequent resistance gene. As many as seven antibiotic resistance genes were found in one isolate, whereas the most common number of resistance genes per isolate was five (n = 17). It may be concluded that drug resistance was widely spread among the tested strains, but the resulting antimicrobial resistance profile indicates that in the case of infection, the use of antibiotics from the basic antibiogram group will be effective in therapy. However, before administering treatment, determination of the specific antimicrobial resistance should be conducted, particularly in the case of hospitalized patients.

  3. Transient yield in reversible colloidal gels: a micro-mechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lilian; Landrum, Benjamin; Zia, Roseanna

    2015-11-01

    We study the nonlinear rheology of colloidal gels via large-scale dynamic simulation, with a view toward understanding the micro-mechanical origins of the transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior during flow startup, and post-cessation relaxation, and its connection to energy storage and viscous dissipation. Such materials often exhibit an overshoot in the stress during startup, but the underlying microstructural origins of this behavior remain unclear. To understand this behavior, a fixed strain rate is imposed on a reversible colloidal gel, where thermal fluctuations enable quiescent gel aging. It has been suggested flow occurs only after clusters first break free from the network and then disintegrate, leading to two stress peaks that vary with age, flow strength, volume fraction, bond strength, and pre-strain history. However, our detailed studies of the microstructural evolution during startup challenge this view. We present a new model of stress development, relaxation, and microstructural evolution in reversible colloidal gels in which the ongoing age-coarsening process plays a central role.

  4. Micro-mechanical model for the tension-stabilized enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thao; Ruberti, Jeffery

    We present a study of how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. Experiments of collagen fibrils and tissues show that mechanical tension can slow and halt enzymatic degradation. Tissue-level experiments also show that degradation rate is minimum at a stretch level coincident with the onset of strain-stiffening in the stress response. To understand these phenomena, we developed a micro-mechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation. Collagen fibers are described as sinusoidal elastica beams, and the tissue is described as a distribution of fibers. We assumed that the degradation reaction is inhibited by the axial strain energy of the crimped collagen fibers. The degradation rate law was calibrated to experiments on isolated single fibrils from bovine sclera. The fiber crimp and properties were fit to uniaxial tension tests of tissue strips. The fibril-level kinetic and tissue-level structural parameters were used to predict tissue-level degradation-induced creep rate under a constant applied force. We showed that we could accurately predict the degradation-induce creep rate of the pericardium and cornea once we accounted for differences in the fiber crimp structure and properties.

  5. Transient yield in reversible colloidal gels: a micro-mechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lilian; Landrum, Benjamin; Russel, William; Zia, Roseanna

    2015-03-01

    We study the nonlinear response rheology of colloidal gels via large-scale dynamic simulation, with a view toward understanding the micro-mechanical origins of the transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior during flow startup, and post-cessation relaxation. Such materials often exhibit an overshoot in the stress response during startup, but the underlying microstructural origin of this behavior remains unclear. The gels studied here comprise Brownian particles interacting via hard-sphere repulsion and short-range attraction of strength of O(kT) that leads to formation of a bi-continuous network. The relatively weak bonds allow the network to restructure over time; our recent work defines the structural evolution and dynamics of such coarsening, and its impact on linear-response rheology. Here we investigate the role of particle attractions and evolving structure on the nonlinear response of the gel. Upon startup of an imposed strain rate, the transition from rest to steady flow is characterized by one or more ``overshoots'' in the shear stress. Experimental studies, in which the overshoots depend on gel age, strain rate, volume fraction, and attraction strength, suggest that the underlying microstructural origin is a two-step process of cage breaking and bond breaking. However, our detailed studies of the microstructural evolution during startup challenge this view. We present a new model of stress development, relaxation, and memory in reversible colloidal gels in which the ongoing age-coarsening process plays a qualitatively new role.

  6. Genetic relationships among reptilian and mammalian Campylobacter fetus strains determined by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Kate E; Blaser, Martin J; Tu, Zheng-Chao; Pruckler, Janet; Fitzgerald, Collette; van Bergen, Marcel A P; Lawson, Andrew J; Owen, Robert J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2010-03-01

    Reptile Campylobacter fetus isolates and closely related strains causing human disease were characterized by multilocus sequence typing. They shared approximately 90% nucleotide sequence identity with classical mammalian C. fetus, and there was evidence of recombination among members of these two groups. The reptile group represents a possible separate genomospecies capable of infecting humans.

  7. Spontaneous deletions and flanking regions of the chromosomally inherited hemolysin determinant of an Escherichia coli O6 strain.

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, J; Knapp, S; Goebel, W

    1983-01-01

    The hemolytic Escherichia coli strain 536 (O6) propagates spontaneous hemolysin-negative mutants at relatively high rates (10(-3) to 10(-4)). One type of mutant (type I) lacks both secreted (external) and periplasmic (internal) hemolysin activity (Hlyex-/Hlyin-) and in addition shows no mannose-resistant hemagglutination (Mrh-), whereas the other type (type II) is Hlyex-/Hlyin+ and Mrh+. The genetic determinants for hemolysin production (hly) and for mannose-resistant hemagglutination (mrh) of this strain are located on the chromosome. Hybridization experiments with DNA probes specific for various parts of the hly determinant reveal that mutants of type I have lost the total hly determinant, whereas those of type II lack only part of the hlyB that is essential for transport of hemolysin across the outer membrane. Using a probe that contains the end sequence of the plasmid pHly152-encoded hly determinant (adjacent to hlyB), we determined that a related sequence flanks also the hlyB-distal end of the chromosomal hly determinant of E. coli 536. In addition several other similar or even identical sequences are found in the vicinity of the hlyC- and the hlyB-distal ends of both the chromosomal and the plasmid hly determinants. Images PMID:6343344

  8. Non-linear micromechanics of soft tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Zhao, Xuefeng; Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan

    2013-01-01

    Microstructure-based constitutive models have been adopted in recent studies of non-linear mechanical properties of biological soft tissues. These models provide more accurate predictions of the overall mechanical responses of tissues than phenomenological approaches. Based on standard approximations in non-linear mechanics, we classified the microstructural models into three categories: (1) uniform-field models with solid-like matrix, (2) uniform-field models with fluid-like matrix, and (3) second-order estimate models. The first two categories assume affine deformation field where the deformation of microstructure is the same as that of the tissue, regardless of material heterogeneities; i.e., they represent the upper bounds of the exact effective strain energy and stress of soft tissues. In addition, the first type is not purely structurally motivated and hence cannot accurately predict the microscopic mechanical behaviors of soft tissues. The third category considers realistic geometrical features, material properties of microstructure and interactions among them and allows for flexible deformation in each constituent. The uniform-field model with fluid-like matrix and the second-order estimate model are microstructure-based, and can be applied to different tissues based on micro-structural features. PMID:24817769

  9. Localised micro-mechanical stiffening in the ageing aorta

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Akhtar, Riaz; Kridiotis, Constantinos; Derby, Brian; Kundu, Tribikram; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related loss of tissue elasticity is a common cause of human morbidity and arteriosclerosis (vascular stiffening) is associated with the development of both fatal strokes and heart failure. However, in the absence of appropriate micro-mechanical testing methodologies, multiple structural remodelling events have been proposed as the cause of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, using a model of ageing in female sheep aorta (young: <18 months, old: >8 years) we: (i) quantified age-related macro-mechanical stiffness, (ii) localised in situ micro-metre scale changes in acoustic wave speed (a measure of tissue stiffness) and (iii) characterised collagen and elastic fibre remodelling. With age, there was an increase in both macro-mechanical stiffness and mean microscopic wave speed (and hence stiffness; young wave speed: 1701 ± 1 m s−1, old wave speed: 1710 ± 1 m s−1, p < 0.001) which was localized to collagen fibril-rich regions located between large elastic lamellae. These micro-mechanical changes were associated with increases in both collagen and elastic fibre content (collagen tissue area, young: 31 ± 2%, old: 40 ± 4%, p < 0.05; elastic fibre tissue area, young: 55 ± 3%, old: 69 ± 4%, p < 0.001). Localised collagen fibrosis may therefore play a key role in mediating age-related arteriosclerosis. Furthermore, high frequency scanning acoustic microscopy is capable of co-localising micro-mechanical and micro-structural changes in ageing tissues. PMID:21777602

  10. Rheology of Arc Dacite Lavas: Experimental Determination at Low Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avard, G.; Whittington, A. G.

    2010-12-01

    Andesitic-dacitic volcanoes exhibit a large variety of eruption styles, including explosive eruptions, endogenous and exogenous dome growth, and km-long lava flows. The rheology of these lavas can be investigated through field observations of flow and dome morphology, but this approach integrates the properties of lava over a wide range of temperatures. Another approach is through laboratory experiments, however previous studies have used higher shear stresses and strain rates than are appropriate to lava flows. We measured the apparent viscosity of several lavas from Santiaguito and Bezymianny by uniaxial compression, between 1153 and 1313 K, at low shear stress (0.085 to 0.42 MPa), low strain rate (between 1.1●10-8 and 1.9●10-5 s-1), and up to 43.7 % total deformation. The results show a strong variability of the apparent viscosity between different samples, which can be ascribed to differences in initial porosity and crystallinity. Our experiments yield apparent viscosities more than 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted by models based on experiments at higher strain rates. At lava flow conditions, no evidence of a yield strength is observed and the apparent viscosity is best approached by a strain rate- and temperature-dependent power law equation. The best fit for data from juvenile Santiaguito lava, for temperatures between ~890 and ~950○C, and strain rates lower than ~1.8●10-4 s-1, is log ηapp = -0.738+9.24●103/T(K)-0.654●log dɛ/dt, where ηapp is apparent viscosity and dɛ/dt is strain rate. This equation also reproduced 45 data for a juvenile sample from Bezymianny with a root mean square deviation of 0.19 log unit Pa.s. Applying the rheological model to lava flow conditions at Santiaguito yields calculated apparent viscosities that are in reasonable agreement with field observations, and suggests that internal shear heating may be significant ongoing heat source within these flows, enabling highly viscous lava to travel long distances.

  11. Rheology of arc dacite lavas: experimental determination at low strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avard, Geoffroy; Whittington, Alan G.

    2012-07-01

    Andesitic-dacitic volcanoes exhibit a large variety of eruption styles, including explosive eruptions, endogenous and exogenous dome growth, and kilometer-long lava flows. The rheology of these lavas can be investigated through field observations of flow and dome morphology, but this approach integrates the properties of lava over a wide range of temperatures. Another approach is through laboratory experiments; however, previous studies have used higher shear stresses and strain rates than are appropriate to lava flows. We measured the apparent viscosity of several lavas from Santiaguito and Bezymianny volcanoes by uniaxial compression, between 1,109 and 1,315 K, at low shear stress (0.085 to 0.42 MPa), low strain rate (between 1.1 × 10-8 and 1.9 × 10-5 s-1), and up to 43.7 % total deformation. The results show a strong variability of the apparent viscosity between different samples, which can be ascribed to differences in initial porosity and crystallinity. Deformation occurs primarily by compaction, with some cracking and/or vesicle coalescence. Our experiments yield apparent viscosities more than 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted by models based on experiments at higher strain rates. At lava flow conditions, no evidence of a yield strength is observed, and the apparent viscosity is best approached by a strain rate- and temperature-dependent power law equation. The best fit for Santiaguito lava, for temperatures between 1,164 and 1,226 K and strain rates lower than 1.8 × 10-4 s-1, is log {η_{{app}}} = - 0.738 + 9.24 × {10^3}{/}T(K) - 0.654 \\cdot log dot{\\varepsilon } where η app is apparent viscosity and dot{\\varepsilon } is strain rate. This equation also reproduced 45 data for a sample from Bezymianny with a root mean square deviation of 0.19 log unit Pa s. Applying the rheological model to lava flow conditions at Santiaguito yields calculated apparent viscosities that are in reasonable agreement with field observations and suggests that

  12. Micromechanical mass sensors for biomolecular detection in a physiological environment.

    PubMed

    Braun, Thomas; Barwich, Viola; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Bredekamp, Adriaan H; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter

    2005-09-01

    Micromechanical cantilever arrays are used to measure time-resolved adsorption of tiny masses based on protein-ligand interactions. Here, streptavidin-biotin interactions are investigated in a physiological environment. A measurement method is introduced using higher flexural modes of a silicon cantilever in order to enhance the sensitivity of mass detection. Modeling the cantilever vibration in liquid allows the measurement of absolute mass changes. We show time-resolved mass adsorption of final 7+/-0.7 ng biotinylated latex beads. The sensitivity obtained is about 2.5 pg/Hz measuring at a center frequency of 750 kHz.

  13. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  14. Micromechanisms of Thermomechanical Fatigue-A Comparison With Isothermal Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-11

    BUREAU Of STANDARDS 1%j A A- USAAVSCOtA ~5 ~ m ~sU~aW 7~W~ . Ted~ ROMsi %-C-7 -.Micromechanisms’ of Thernomechanical Fatigue-A Comparisoni With ~~4f so...eraFatigue I RobeetC.BI PropuLsion Directe m U.S. AM Aviation Rewoar* and TechnooV Activk$AVSCOM Lewis Researoh Centr CevWland, Ohio hqearu for t n...4SUMMARY 14i Thermomechanical Fatigue (TMF) experiments were conducted on Mar- M 200, B-1900, and PWA-1480 (single crystal) over temperature ranges

  15. Simple micromechanical model of protein crystals for their mechanical characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, G.; Eom, K.; Na, S.

    2010-06-01

    Proteins have been known to perform the excellent mechanical functions and exhibit the remarkable mechanical properties such as high fracture toughness in spider silk protein [1]. This indicates that the mechanical characterization of protein molecules and/or crystals is very essential to understand such remarkable mechanical function of protein molecules. In this study, for gaining insight into mechanical behavior of protein crystals, we developed the micromechanical model by using the empirical potential field prescribed to alpha carbon atoms of a protein crystal in a unit cell. We consider the simple protein crystals for their mechanical behavior under tensile loading to be compared with full atomic models

  16. Interfacial Micromechanics in Fibrous Composites: Design, Evaluation, and Models

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  17. PREFACE: 14th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME'03)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2004-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 14th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME'03), which was held at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands on 2-4 November 2003. Papers have been selected from this workshop for presentation in this special issue. After a careful review by the MME'03 programme committee, 53 submissions were selected for poster presentation at the workshop in addition to 6 invited presentations. These covered the many aspects of our exciting field: technology, simulation, system design, fabrication and characterization in a wide range of applications. These contributions confirm a trend from technology-driven towards application-driven technological research. This trend has become possible because of the availability of mature fabrication technologies for micromechanical structures and is reflected by the presentations of some of the invited speakers. There were invited lectures about applications in the medical field, automotive and copiers, which provide evidence of the relevance of our work in society. Nevertheless, development of technologies rightfully remains a core activity of this workshop. This applies to both the introduction of new technologies, as was reflected by invited presentations on new trends in RIE and nanotechnology, and the addressing of manufacturing issues using available techniques, which will be demonstrated to be crucial in automotive applications. Out of these 59 papers 21 have been selected for presentation in this special issue. Since the scope of the workshop is somewhat wider than that of the journal, selection was based not only on the quality of the work, but also on suitability for presentation in the journal. Moreover, at the workshop, student presentation of research at an early stage was strongly encouraged, whereas publication of work in this journal requires a more advanced level. I would like to express my appreciation for the outstanding efforts

  18. Interfacial micromechanics in fibrous composites: design, evaluation, and models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given.

  19. Micromechanical properties of hydrogels measured with MEMS resonant sensors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Elise A; Millet, Larry J; Pikul, James H; Johnson, Curtis L; Georgiadis, John G; King, William P; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogels have gained wide usage in a range of biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility and the ability to finely tune their properties, including viscoelasticity. The use of hydrogels on the microscale is increasingly important for the development of drug delivery techniques and cellular microenvironments, though the ability to accurately characterize their micromechanical properties is limited. Here we demonstrate the use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors to estimate the properties of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) microstructures over a range of concentrations. These microstructures are integrated on the sensors by deposition using electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Estimated properties agree well with independent measurements made using indentation with atomic force microscopy.

  20. Prediction of Composite Laminate Fracture: Micromechanics and Progressive Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an investigation to predict first-ply failure and final fracture in selected composite laminates subjected to inplane loads. The laminates were composed of glass fiber and graphite fibers in epoxy matrices. Failure envelopes based on first-ply failure and laminate fracture were generated for combined loading of these laminates. Predictions were evaluated by micromechanics-based theory and progressive fracture. The results show that, for most cases, combined tensile loading significantly enhanced the laminate fracture stress in comparison to the uniaxial loading.

  1. A Micromechanical Contribution to Cochlear Tuning and Tonotopic Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holton, Thomas; Hudspeth, A. J.

    1983-11-01

    The response properties of hair cells and nerve fibers in the alligator lizard cochlea are frequency selective and tonotopically organized with longitudinal position in the organ. The lengths of the hair-cell hair bundles also vary monotonically with longitudinal position. In this study, quantitative measurements were made of the motion of individual hair bundles in an excised preparation of the cochlea stimulated at auditory frequencies. The angular displacement of hair bundles is frequency selective and tonotopically organized, demonstrating the existence of a micromechanical tuning mechanism.

  2. Perturbation analysis of entrainment in a micromechanical limit cycle oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj; Rand, Richard; Zehnder, Alan

    2007-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a thermo-mechanical model for a forced disc shaped, micromechanical limit cycle oscillator. The forcing can be accomplished either parametrically, by modulating the laser beam incident on the oscillator, or non-parametrically, using inertial driving. The system exhibits both 2:1 and 1:1 resonances, as well as quasiperiodic motions and hysteresis. A perturbation method is used to derive slow flow equations, which are then studied using the software packages AUTO and pplane7. Results show that the model agrees well with experiments. Details of the slow flow behavior explain how and where transitions into and out of entrainment occur.

  3. Micromechanical Switches on GaAs for Microwave Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, John N.; Goldsmith, Chuck; Denniston, David; Lin, Tsen-Hwang

    1995-01-01

    In this presentation, we describe the fabrication of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices, in particular, of low-frequency multi-element electrical switches using SiO2 cantilevers. The switches discussed are related to micromechanical membrane structures used to perform switching of optical signals on silicon substrates. These switches use a thin metal membrane which is actuated by an electrostatic potential, causing the switch to make or break contact. The advantages include: superior isolation, high power handling capabilities, high radiation hardening, very low power operations, and the ability to integrate onto GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chips.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of Plane Strain Toughness for 7085 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabin, M. E.; Barlat, F.; Shuey, R. T.

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the constitutive model for 7085-T7X (overaged) aluminum alloy plate samples with controlled microstructures was developed. Different lengths of 2nd step aging times produced samples with similar microstructure but different stress-strain curves ( i.e., different nanostructure). A conventional phenomenological strain-hardening law with no strain gradient effects was proposed to capture the peculiar hardening behavior of the material samples investigated in this work. The classical Gurson-Tvergaard potential, which includes the influence of void volume fraction (VVF) on the plastic flow behavior, as well as an extension proposed by Leblond et al.,[3] were considered. Unlike the former, the latter is able to account for the influence of strain hardening on the VVF growth. All the constitutive coefficients used in this work were based on experimental stress-strain curves obtained in uniaxial tension and on micromechanical modeling results of a void embedded in a matrix. These material models were used in finite element (FE) simulations of a compact tension (CT) specimen. An engineering criterion based on the instability of plastic flow at a crack tip was used for the determination of plane strain toughness K Ic . The influence of the microstructure was lumped into a single state variable, the initial void volume fraction. The simulation results showed that the strain-hardening behavior has a significant influence on K Ic .

  5. Determination of the State of Strain of Large Floating Covers Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Aided Photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wern Hann; Chiu, Wing Kong; Kuen, Thomas; Kodikara, Jayantha

    2017-07-28

    Floating covers used in waste water treatment plants are one of the many structures formed with membrane materials. These structures are usually large and can spread over an area measuring 470 m × 170 m. The aim of this paper is to describe recent work to develop an innovative and effective approach for structural health monitoring (SHM) of such large membrane-like infrastructure. This paper will propose a potentially cost-effective non-contact approach for full-field strain and stress mapping using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mounted with a digital camera and a global positioning system (GPS) tracker. The aim is to use the images acquired by the UAV to define the geometry of the floating cover using photogrammetry. In this manner, any changes in the geometry of the floating cover due to forces acting beneath resulting from its deployment and usage can be determined. The time-scale for these changes is in terms of weeks and months. The change in the geometry can be implemented as input conditions to a finite element model (FEM) for stress prediction. This will facilitate the determination of the state of distress of the floating cover. This paper investigates the possibility of using data recorded from a UAV to predict the strain level and assess the health of such structures. An investigation was first conducted on a laboratory sized membrane structure instrumented with strain gauges for comparison against strains, which were computed from 3D scans of the membrane geometry. Upon validating the technique in the laboratory, it was applied to a more realistic scenario: an outdoor test membrane structure and capable UAV were constructed to see if the shape of the membrane could be computed. The membrane displacements were then used to calculate the membrane stress and strain, state demonstrating a new way to perform structural health monitoring on membrane structures.

  6. Determination of the State of Strain of Large Floating Covers Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Aided Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Wern Hann; Chiu, Wing Kong; Kuen, Thomas; Kodikara, Jayantha

    2017-01-01

    Floating covers used in waste water treatment plants are one of the many structures formed with membrane materials. These structures are usually large and can spread over an area measuring 470 m × 170 m. The aim of this paper is to describe recent work to develop an innovative and effective approach for structural health monitoring (SHM) of such large membrane-like infrastructure. This paper will propose a potentially cost-effective non-contact approach for full-field strain and stress mapping using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mounted with a digital camera and a global positioning system (GPS) tracker. The aim is to use the images acquired by the UAV to define the geometry of the floating cover using photogrammetry. In this manner, any changes in the geometry of the floating cover due to forces acting beneath resulting from its deployment and usage can be determined. The time-scale for these changes is in terms of weeks and months. The change in the geometry can be implemented as input conditions to a finite element model (FEM) for stress prediction. This will facilitate the determination of the state of distress of the floating cover. This paper investigates the possibility of using data recorded from a UAV to predict the strain level and assess the health of such structures. An investigation was first conducted on a laboratory sized membrane structure instrumented with strain gauges for comparison against strains, which were computed from 3D scans of the membrane geometry. Upon validating the technique in the laboratory, it was applied to a more realistic scenario: an outdoor test membrane structure and capable UAV were constructed to see if the shape of the membrane could be computed. The membrane displacements were then used to calculate the membrane stress and strain, state demonstrating a new way to perform structural health monitoring on membrane structures. PMID:28788081

  7. A musculoskeletal model of the equine forelimb for determining surface stresses and strains in the humerus-part II. Experimental testing and model validation.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Sarah; Stover, Susan M; Hull, M L; Galuppo, Larry D

    2008-08-01

    The first objective of this study was to experimentally determine surface bone strain magnitudes and directions at the donor site for bone grafts, the site predisposed to stress fracture, the medial and cranial aspects of the transverse cross section corresponding to the stress fracture site, and the middle of the diaphysis of the humerus of a simplified in vitro laboratory preparation. The second objective was to determine whether computing strains solely in the direction of the longitudinal axis of the humerus in the mathematical model was inherently limited by comparing the strains measured along the longitudinal axis of the bone to the principal strain magnitudes and directions. The final objective was to determine whether the mathematical model formulated in Part I [Pollock et al., 2008, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 130, p. 041006] is valid for determining the bone surface strains at the various locations on the humerus where experimentally measured longitudinal strains are comparable to principal strains. Triple rosette strain gauges were applied at four locations circumferentially on each of two cross sections of interest using a simplified in vitro laboratory preparation. The muscles included the biceps brachii muscle in addition to loaded shoulder muscles that were predicted active by the mathematical model. Strains from the middle grid of each rosette, aligned along the longitudinal axis of the humerus, were compared with calculated principal strain magnitudes and directions. The results indicated that calculating strains solely in the direction of the longitudinal axis is appropriate at six of eight locations. At the cranial and medial aspects of the middle of the diaphysis, the average minimum principal strain was not comparable to the average experimental longitudinal strain. Further analysis at the remaining six locations indicated that the mathematical model formulated in Part I predicts strains within +/-2 standard deviations of experimental strains at

  8. Virulence determinants, antimicrobial susceptibility, and molecular profiles of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Longsheng; Wang, Xiangru; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the epidemiology, serotype, antibiotic sensitivity, and clonal structure of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains in China. Forty-eight strains were collected from seven provinces during the period from 2012 to 2013. Pulse-field electrophoresis identified 32 different patterns which were classified into clonal groups A–D. Most pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were observed in clonal complex A and B, suggesting high diversity of genetic characterization in these two predominant clonal complexes. Antibiotic sensitivity test shows that all the stains were susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, and cefotaxime, and resistant to kanamycin, cefazolin, sulfadiazine, and amikacin. Erythromycin and ampicillin are recommended as first-line antibiotics for treatment of E. rhusiopathiae in China. The high variation in PFGE pattern among the main clonal groups shows that the E. rhusiopathiae in China may originate from different lineages and sources instead of from expansion of a single clonal lineage across different regions.

  9. Virulence determinants, antimicrobial susceptibility, and molecular profiles of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Longsheng; Wang, Xiangru; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the epidemiology, serotype, antibiotic sensitivity, and clonal structure of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains in China. Forty-eight strains were collected from seven provinces during the period from 2012 to 2013. Pulse-field electrophoresis identified 32 different patterns which were classified into clonal groups A–D. Most pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were observed in clonal complex A and B, suggesting high diversity of genetic characterization in these two predominant clonal complexes. Antibiotic sensitivity test shows that all the stains were susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, and cefotaxime, and resistant to kanamycin, cefazolin, sulfadiazine, and amikacin. Erythromycin and ampicillin are recommended as first-line antibiotics for treatment of E. rhusiopathiae in China. The high variation in PFGE pattern among the main clonal groups shows that the E. rhusiopathiae in China may originate from different lineages and sources instead of from expansion of a single clonal lineage across different regions. PMID:26975059

  10. Determination of molecular phylogenetics of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Romero, Jaime; Espejo, Romilio T; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; DePaola, Angelo

    2008-04-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. There is a growing public health concern due to the emergence of a pandemic strain causing severe outbreaks worldwide. Many questions remain unanswered regarding the evolution and population structure of V. parahaemolyticus. In this work, we describe a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for V. parahaemolyticus based on the internal fragment sequences of seven housekeeping genes. This MLST scheme was applied to 100 V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from geographically diverse clinical (n = 37) and environmental (n = 63) sources. The sequences obtained from this work were deposited and are available in a public database (http://pubmlst.org/vparahaemolyticus). Sixty-two unique sequence types were identified, and most (50) were represented by a single isolate, suggesting a high level of genetic diversity. Three major clonal complexes were identified by eBURST analysis. Separate clonal complexes were observed for V. parahaemolyticus isolates originating from the Pacific and Gulf coasts of the United States, while a third clonal complex consisted of strains belonging to the pandemic clonal complex with worldwide distribution. The data reported in this study indicate that V. parahaemolyticus is genetically diverse with a semiclonal population structure and an epidemic structure similar to that of Vibrio cholerae. Genetic diversity in V. parahaemolyticus appears to be driven primarily by frequent recombination rather than mutation, with recombination ratios estimated at 2.5:1 and 8.8:1 by allele and site, respectively. Application of this MLST scheme to more V. parahaemolyticus strains and by different laboratories will facilitate production of a global picture of the epidemiology and evolution of this pathogen.

  11. Rapid and simple determination of ciprofloxacin resistance in clinical strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Santiso, Rebeca; Tamayo, María; Fernández, José Luis; del Carmen Fernández, María; Molina, Francisca; Villanueva, Rosa; Gosálvez, Jaime; Bou, Germán

    2009-08-01

    We recently reported a simple new in situ diffusion assay, developed as a kit, to visualize DNA fragmentation in single bacterial cells. Use of this assay in a collection of 95 genetically unrelated Escherichia coli clinical strains resulted in correct identification of all of the isolates as resistant or susceptible to ciprofloxacin, consistent with the MIC results. This relevant information is obtained in 80 min.

  12. Determination of hysteresis loops in thermo-mechanical fatigue using isothermal stress-strain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, R. P.

    1994-04-01

    Thermo-mechanical fatigue stress-strain data on ferritic/austenitic steels and superalloys from a variety of sources are analyzed with regard to hysteresis loop stress asymmetry. This arises from a decoupling of the thermal and mechanical strain signals in the test technique so that many tension-compression load combinations are possible. Data from simplified isothermal and bithermal tests are also examined. Taking a typical example of an 'out-of-phase' thermo-mechanical loop on a 1/2CrMoV steel cycled between 200 and 550 C, isothermal stress-strain data were generated at 50 C intervals on material from the same cast and, used in conjunction with the elastic characteristics of the apparatus, an attempt was made to re-create this loop. The methods employed were: (1) a graphical construction between appropriate isothermal yield contours; (2) a tangent modulus calculation; and (3) a secant modulus calculation. Method (1) appeared to give the closest agreement in the present case.

  13. Final report on LDRD Project: In situ determination of composition and strain during MBE

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Floro, J.A.; Reno, J.; Klem, J.

    1997-02-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) of semiconductor heterostructures for advanced electronic and opto-electronic devices requires precise control of the surface composition and strain. The development of advanced in situ diagnostics for real-time monitoring and process control of strain and composition would enhance the yield, reliability and process flexibility of material grown by MBE and benefit leading-edge programs in microelectronics and photonics. The authors have developed a real-time laser-based technique to measure the evolution of stress in epitaxial films during growth by monitoring the change in the wafer curvature. Research has focused on the evolution of stress during the epitaxial growth of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1{minus}x} alloys on Si(001) substrates. Initial studies have observed the onset and kinetics of strain relaxation during the growth of heteroepitaxial layers. The technique has also been used to measure the segregation of Ge to the surface during alloy growth with monolayer sensitivity, an order of magnitude better resolution than post-growth characterization. In addition, creation of a 2-dimensional array of parallel beams allows rapid surface profiling of the film stress that can be used to monitor process uniformity.

  14. The Role of Viscoelasticity on the Fatigue of Angle-ply Polymer Matrix Composites at High and Room Temperatures- A Micromechanical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyidmousavi, Alireza; Bougherara, Habiba; Fawaz, Zouheir

    2015-06-01

    A micromechanical approach is adopted to study the role of viscoelasticity on the fatigue behavior of polymer matrix composites. In particular, the study examines the interaction of fatigue and creep in angle ply carbon/epoxy at 25 and 114 °C. The matrix phase is modeled as a vicoelastic material using Schapery's single integral constitutive equation. Taking viscoelsticity into account allows the study of creep strain evolution during the fatigue loading. The fatigue failure criterion is expressed in terms of the fatigue failure functions of the constituent materials. The micromechanical model is also used to calculate these fatigue failure functions from the knowledge of the S-N diagrams of the composite material in longitudinal, transverse and shear loadings thus eliminating the need for any further experimentation. Unlike the previous works, the present study can distinguish between the strain evolution due to fatigue and creep. The results can clearly show the contribution made by the effect of viscoelasticity to the total strain evolution during the fatigue life of the specimen. Although the effect of viscoelsticity is found to increase with temperature, its contribution to strain development during fatigue is compromised by the shorter life of the specimen when compared to lower temperatures.

  15. Strain dyssynchrony index determined by three-dimensional speckle area tracking can predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously reported strain dyssynchrony index assessed by two-dimensional speckle tracking strain, and a marker of both dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility, can predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). A newly developed three-dimensional (3-D) speckle tracking system can quantify endocardial area change ratio (area strain), which coupled with the factors of both longitudinal and circumferential strain, from all 16 standard left ventricular (LV) segments using complete 3-D pyramidal datasets. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that strain dyssynchrony index using area tracking (ASDI) can quantify dyssynchrony and predict response to CRT. Methods We studied 14 heart failure patients with ejection fraction of 27 ± 7% (all≤35%) and QRS duration of 172 ± 30 ms (all≥120 ms) who underwent CRT. Echocardiography was performed before and 6-month after CRT. ASDI was calculated as the average difference between peak and end-systolic area strain of LV endocardium obtained from 3-D speckle tracking imaging using 16 segments. Conventional dyssynchrony measures were assessed by interventricular mechanical delay, Yu Index, and two-dimensional radial dyssynchrony by speckle-tracking strain. Response was defined as a ≥15% decrease in LV end-systolic volume 6-month after CRT. Results ASDI ≥ 3.8% was the best predictor of response to CRT with a sensitivity of 78%, specificity of 100% and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.93 (p < 0.001). Two-dimensional radial dyssynchrony determined by speckle-tracking strain was also predictive of response to CRT with an AUC of 0.82 (p < 0.005). Interestingly, ASDI ≥ 3.8% was associated with the highest incidence of echocardiographic improvement after CRT with a response rate of 100% (7/7), and baseline ASDI correlated with reduction of LV end-systolic volume following CRT (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Conclusions ASDI can predict responders and LV reverse remodeling following CRT. This

  16. Strain determination in silicon microstructures by combined convergent beam electron diffraction, process simulation, and micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senez, Vincent; Armigliato, Aldo; De Wolf, Ingrid; Carnevale, Gianpietro; Balboni, Roberto; Frabboni, Stefano; Benedetti, Alessandro

    2003-11-01

    Test structures consisting of shallow trench isolation (STI) structures are fabricated using advanced silicon (Si) technology. Different process parameters and geometrical features are implemented to investigate the residual mechanical stress in the structures. A technology computer aided design homemade tool, IMPACT, is upgraded and optimized to yield strain fields in deep submicron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. Residual strain in the silicon substrate is measured with micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and/or convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) for large (25 μm) and medium size (2 μm), while only CBED is used for deep submicron STI (0.22 μm). We propose a methodology combining CBED and technology computer aided design (TCAD) with μ-RS to assess the accuracy of the CBED measurements and TCAD calculations on the widest structures. The method is extended to measure (by CBED) and calculate (by TCAD) the strain tensor in the smallest structures, out of the reach of the μ-RS technique. The capability of determining, by both measurement and calculation, the strain field distribution in the active regions of deep submicron devices is demonstrated. In particular, it is found that for these structures an elastoplastic model for Si relaxation must be assumed.

  17. Micromechanics of brittle creep and implications for the strength of the upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-04-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water or other aqueous solutions promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we present a new micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modelled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' power law description of stress corrosion crack growth. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non-linear and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain rate) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain rate as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep, with apparently constant strain rate, arises as merely an inflexion between these two end-member phases. The strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature conditions, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term differential stress as a function of depth in the upper crust for tectonic loading rates: sub-critical cracking induces an offset of the rock strength, which is equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. For porous rocks, the competition between sub

  18. Micromechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction, morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element models of a cement-bone interface specimen were created from micro-computed tomography data of a physical specimen that was sectioned from an in vitro cemented total hip arthroplasty. In five models the friction coefficient was varied (μ= 0.0; 0.3; 0.7; 1.0 and 3.0), while in one model an ideally bonded interface was assumed. In two models cement interface gaps and an optimal cement penetration were simulated. Finally, the effect of bone cement stiffness variations was simulated (2.0 and 2.5 GPa, relative to the default 3.0 GPa). All models were loaded for a cycle of fully reversible tension-compression. From the simulated stress-displacement curves the interface deformation, stiffness and hysteresis were calculated. The results indicate that in the current model the mechanical properties of the cement-bone interface were caused by frictional phenomena at the shape-closed interlock rather than by adhesive properties of the cement. Our findings furthermore show that in our model maximizing cement penetration improved the micromechanical response of the cement-bone interface stiffness, while interface gaps had a detrimental effect. Relative to the frictional and morphological variations, variations in the cement stiffness had only a modest effect on the micromechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface. The current study provides information that may help to better understand the load transfer mechanisms taking place at the cement-bone interface. PMID:18848699

  19. Effect of High-Irradiance Light-Curing on Micromechanical Properties of Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of light-curing at high irradiances on micromechanical properties of resin cements. Three dual-curing resin cements and a light-curing flowable resin composite were light-cured with an LED curing unit in Standard mode (SM), High Power mode (HPM), or Xtra Power mode (XPM). Maximum irradiances were determined using a MARC PS radiometer, and exposure duration was varied to obtain two or three levels of radiant exposure (SM: 13.2 and 27.2 J/cm2; HPM: 15.0 and 30.4 J/cm2; XPM: 9.5, 19.3, and 29.7 J/cm2) (n = 17). Vickers hardness (HV) and indentation modulus (EIT) were measured at 15 min and 1 week. Data were analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and Spearman correlation analyses (α = 0.05). Irradiation protocol, resin-based material, and storage time and all interactions influenced HV and EIT significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). Statistically significant correlations between radiant exposure and HV or EIT were found, indicating that high-irradiance light-curing has no detrimental effect on the polymerization of resin-based materials (p ≤ 0.0021). However, one resin cement was sensitive to the combination of irradiance and exposure duration, with high-irradiance light-curing resulting in a 20% drop in micromechanical properties. The results highlight the importance of manufacturers issuing specific recommendations for the light-curing procedure of each resin cement. PMID:28044129

  20. Effect of High-Irradiance Light-Curing on Micromechanical Properties of Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of light-curing at high irradiances on micromechanical properties of resin cements. Three dual-curing resin cements and a light-curing flowable resin composite were light-cured with an LED curing unit in Standard mode (SM), High Power mode (HPM), or Xtra Power mode (XPM). Maximum irradiances were determined using a MARC PS radiometer, and exposure duration was varied to obtain two or three levels of radiant exposure (SM: 13.2 and 27.2 J/cm(2); HPM: 15.0 and 30.4 J/cm(2); XPM: 9.5, 19.3, and 29.7 J/cm(2)) (n = 17). Vickers hardness (HV ) and indentation modulus (EIT) were measured at 15 min and 1 week. Data were analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and Spearman correlation analyses (α = 0.05). Irradiation protocol, resin-based material, and storage time and all interactions influenced HV and EIT significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). Statistically significant correlations between radiant exposure and HV or EIT were found, indicating that high-irradiance light-curing has no detrimental effect on the polymerization of resin-based materials (p ≤ 0.0021). However, one resin cement was sensitive to the combination of irradiance and exposure duration, with high-irradiance light-curing resulting in a 20% drop in micromechanical properties. The results highlight the importance of manufacturers issuing specific recommendations for the light-curing procedure of each resin cement.

  1. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frentrup, Martin Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Kneissl, Michael; Hatui, Nirupam; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2013-12-07

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances d{sub hkl} is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112{sup ¯}2) Al{sub κ}Ga{sub 1−κ}N epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  2. In situ determination of alveolar septal strain, stress and effective Young's modulus: an experimental/computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar septa, which have often been modeled as linear elements, may distend due to inflation-induced reduction in slack or increase in tissue stretch. The distended septum supports tissue elastic and interfacial forces. An effective Young's modulus, describing the inflation-induced relative displacement of septal end points, has not been determined in situ for lack of a means of determining the forces supported by septa in situ. Here we determine such forces indirectly according to Mead, Takishima, and Leith's classic lung mechanics analysis (J Appl Physiol 28: 596–608, 1970), which demonstrates that septal connections transmit the transpulmonary pressure, PTP, from the pleural surface to interior regions. We combine experimental septal strain determination and computational stress determination, according to Mead et al., to calculate effective Young's modulus. In the isolated, perfused rat lung, we label the perfusate with fluorescence to visualize the alveolar septa. At eight PTP values around a ventilation loop between 4 and 25 cmH2O, and upon total deflation, we image the same region by confocal microscopy. Within an analysis region, we measure septal lengths. Normalizing by unstressed lengths at total deflation, we calculate septal strains for all PTP > 0 cmH2O. For the static imaging conditions, we computationally model application of PTP to the boundary of the analysis region and solve for septal stresses by least squares fit of an overdetermined system. From group septal strain and stress values, we find effective septal Young's modulus to range from 1.2 × 105 dyn/cm2 at low PTP to 1.4 × 106 dyn/cm2 at high PTP. PMID:24951778

  3. In situ determination of alveolar septal strain, stress and effective Young's modulus: an experimental/computational approach.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Carrie E; Wu, You

    2014-08-15

    Alveolar septa, which have often been modeled as linear elements, may distend due to inflation-induced reduction in slack or increase in tissue stretch. The distended septum supports tissue elastic and interfacial forces. An effective Young's modulus, describing the inflation-induced relative displacement of septal end points, has not been determined in situ for lack of a means of determining the forces supported by septa in situ. Here we determine such forces indirectly according to Mead, Takishima, and Leith's classic lung mechanics analysis (J Appl Physiol 28: 596-608, 1970), which demonstrates that septal connections transmit the transpulmonary pressure, PTP, from the pleural surface to interior regions. We combine experimental septal strain determination and computational stress determination, according to Mead et al., to calculate effective Young's modulus. In the isolated, perfused rat lung, we label the perfusate with fluorescence to visualize the alveolar septa. At eight PTP values around a ventilation loop between 4 and 25 cmH2O, and upon total deflation, we image the same region by confocal microscopy. Within an analysis region, we measure septal lengths. Normalizing by unstressed lengths at total deflation, we calculate septal strains for all PTP > 0 cmH2O. For the static imaging conditions, we computationally model application of PTP to the boundary of the analysis region and solve for septal stresses by least squares fit of an overdetermined system. From group septal strain and stress values, we find effective septal Young's modulus to range from 1.2 × 10(5) dyn/cm(2) at low P(TP) to 1.4 × 10(6) dyn/cm(2) at high P(TP).

  4. Insights into the micromechanical properties of the metaphase spindle

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Maeda, Yusuke T.; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Libchaber, Albert J.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The microtubule-based metaphase spindle is subjected to forces that act in diverse orientations and over a wide-range of timescales. Currently, we cannot explain how this dynamic structure generates and responds to forces while maintaining overall stability, as we have a poor understanding of its micromechanical properties. Here we combine the use of force-calibrated needles, high-resolution microscopy, and biochemical perturbations to analyze the vertebrate metaphase spindle's timescale- and orientation-dependent viscoelastic properties. We find that spindle viscosity depends on microtubule crosslinking and density. Spindle elasticity can be linked to kinetochore and non-kinetochore microtubule rigidity, and also to spindle pole organization by kinesin-5 and dynein. These data suggest a quantitative model for the micromechanics of this cytoskeletal architecture and provide insight into how structural and functional stability is maintained in the face of forces, such as those that control spindle size and position, and can result from deformations associated with chromosome movement. PMID:21703450

  5. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-12-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  6. Micromechanics of Ultrafine Particle Adhesion—Contact Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    Ultrafine, dry, cohesive and compressible powders (particle diameter d<10 μm) show a wide variety of flow problems that cause insufficient apparatus and system reliability of processing plants. Thus, the understanding of the micromechanics of particle adhesion is essential to assess the product quality and to improve the process performance in particle technology. Comprehensive models are shown that describe the elastic-plastic force-displacement and frictional moment-angle behavior of adhesive contacts of isotropic smooth spheres. By the model stiff particles with soft contacts, a sphere-sphere interaction of van der Waals forces without any contact deformation describes the stiff attractive term. But, the soft micro-contact response generates a flattened contact, i.e. plate-plate interaction, and increasing adhesion. These increasing adhesion forces between particles directly depend on this frozen irreversible deformation. Thus, the adhesion force is found to be load dependent. It contributes to the tangential forces in an elastic-plastic frictional contact with partially sticking and micro-slip within the contact plane. The load dependent rolling resistance and torque of mobilized frictional contact rotation (spin around its principal axis) are also shown. This reasonable combination of particle contact micromechanics and powder continuum mechanics is used to model analytically the macroscopic friction limits of incipient powder consolidation, yield and cohesive steady-state shear flow on physical basis.

  7. Virtual mass effect in dynamic micromechanical mass sensing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiker, P.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-06-01

    Weighing individual micro- or nanoscale particles in solution using dynamic micromechanical sensors is quite challenging: viscous losses dramatically degrade the sensor's performance by both broadening the resonance peak and increasing the effective total mass of the resonator by the dragged liquid. While the virtual mass of the resonator was discussed frequently, little attention has been paid to the virtual mass of particles attached to the resonator's surface and its impact on the accuracy of mass sensing. By means of the in situ detection of a polystyrene microbead in water using a bridge-based microresonator, we demonstrate that the virtual mass of the bead significantly affects the observed frequency shift. In fact, 55 % of the frequency shift was caused by the virtual mass of the adsorbed bead, predicted by Stoke's theory. Based on the observed shift in the resonator's quality factor during particle adsorption, we confirm this significant effect of the virtual mass. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the mass of a single adsorbed particle is strongly diminished if dynamic micromechanical sensors are operated in a liquid environment.

  8. The stabilization system of primary oscillation for a micromechanical gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Pavel; Nesterenko, Tamara; Tsimbalist, Edvard; Vtorushin, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    The mode of primary oscillations of a micromechanical gyroscope (MMG) sensor is provided by an electrostatic comb-drive actuator in which the interaction between the micromechanical structures and electronics occurs by means of a single or differential capacitive sensor. Two pairs of capacitive sensors are traditionally used for frequency stabilization of MMG primary oscillations. The first pair of capacitive sensors excites primary oscillations, while the second measures the amplitude of primary oscillations. The stabilization system provides a continuous frequency tuning of primary oscillations that increases the duration of transition processes, the time of operational readiness, and the instability of the output signal from the secondary oscillation channel of the MMGs. This paper presents a new approach to the primary oscillation control system of the two-component MMG. The method of calculating the natural resonant frequency is based on measurements of the total current passing through the comb-driver actuator capacitances, and a lock-in detection is suggested. This paper consists of the results of the numerical analysis, the description of the proposed approach to the frequency control of the primary MMG oscillations, and the Simulink model of the behaviour of the MMG stabilization system, depending on its mechanical-and-physical properties with regard to a 2% shift of the natural resonant frequency. The frequency control of the primary oscillations at 2% frequency detuning is performed within 0.11 s.

  9. Flow Curve Determination at Large Plastic Strain Levels to Accurately Constitutive Equations of AHSS in Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, X.; Sriram, S.; Kergen, R.

    2011-05-01

    ArcelorMittal continuously develops new steel grades (AHSS) with high performance for the automotive industry to improve the weight reduction and the passive safety. The wide market introduction of AHSS raises a new challenge for manufacturers in terms of material models in the prediction of forming—especially formability and springback. The relatively low uniform elongation, the high UTS and the low forming limit curve of these AHSS may cause difficulties in forming simulations. One of these difficulties is the consequence of the relatively low uniform elongation on the parameters identification of isotropic hardening model. Different experimental tests allow to reach large plastic strain levels (hydraulic bulge test, stack compression test, shear test…). After a description on how to determine the flow curve in these experimental tests, a comparison of the different flow curves is made for different steel grades. The ArcelorMittal identification protocol for hardening models is only based on stress-strain curves determined in uniaxial tension. Experimental tests where large plastic strain levels are reached are used to validate our identification protocol and to recommend some hardening models. Finally, the influence of isotropic hardening models and yield loci in forming prediction for AHSS steels will be presented.

  10. Comparison of screening methods for high-throughput determination of oil yields in micro-algal biofuel strains.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Stephen P; Zhang, Qianyi; Black, Kenneth D; Day, John G; Stanley, Michele S

    2013-08-01

    The phenotypic and phylogenetic diversity of micro-algae capable of accumulating triacylglycerols provides a challenge for the accurate determination of biotechnological potential. High-yielding strains are needed to improve economic viability and their compositional information is required for optimizing biodiesel properties. To facilitate a high-throughput screening programme, a very rapid direct-derivatization procedure capable of extracting lyophilized material for GC analysis was compared with a scaled-down Folch-based method. This was carried out on ten micro-algal strains from 6 phyla where the more rapid direct-derivatization approach was found to provide a more reliable measure of yield. The modified Folch-based procedure was found to substantially underestimate oil yield in one Chlorella species (P < 0.01). In terms of fatty acid composition however, the Folch procedure proved to be slightly better in recovering polyunsaturated fatty acids, in six out of the ten strains. Therefore, direct-derivatization is recommended for rapid determination of yields in screening approaches but can provide slightly less compositional accuracy than solvent-based extraction methods.

  11. Determination of the Shear Buckling Load of a Large Polymer Composite I-Section Using Strain and Displacement Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Y.; Lee, Jeong Wan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method and procedure of sensing and determining critical shear buckling load and corresponding deformations of a comparably large composite I-section using strain rosettes and displacement sensors. The tested specimen was a pultruded composite beam made of vinyl ester resin, E-glass and carbon fibers. Various coupon tests were performed before the shear buckling test to obtain fundamental material properties of the I-section. In order to sensitively detect shear buckling of the tested I-section, twenty strain rosettes and eight displacement sensors were applied and attached on the web and flange surfaces. An asymmetric four-point bending loading scheme was utilized for the test. The loading scheme resulted a high shear and almost zero moment condition at the center of the web panel. The web shear buckling load was determined after analyzing the obtained test data from strain rosettes and displacement sensors. Finite element analysis was also performed to verify the experimental results and to support the discussed experimental approach. PMID:23443364

  12. A micromechanics-based nonlocal constitutive equation incorporating three-point statistics for random linear elastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drugan, W. J.; Willis, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    A variational formulation employing the minimum potential and complementary energy principles is used to derive a micromechanics-based nonlocal constitutive equation for random linear elastic composite materials, relating ensemble averages of stress and strain in the most general situation when mean fields vary spatially. All information contained in the energy principles is retained; we employ stress polarization trial fields utilizing one-point statistics so that the resulting nonlocal constitutive equation incorporates up through three-point statistics. The variational structure is developed first for arbitrary heterogeneous linear elastic materials, then for randomly inhomogeneous materials, then for general n-phase composite materials, and finally for two-phase composite materials, in which case explicit variational upper and lower bounds on the nonlocal effective modulus tensor operator are derived. For statistically uniform infinite-body composites, these bounds are determined even more explicitly in Fourier transform space. We evaluate these in detail in an example case: longitudinal shear of an aligned fiber or void composite. We determine the full permissible ranges of the terms involving two- and three-point statistics in these bounds, and thereby exhibit explicit results that encompass arbitrary isotropic in-plane phase distributions; we also develop a nonlocal "Milton parameter", the variation of whose eigenvalues throughout the interval [0, 1] describes the full permissible range of the three-point term. Example plots of the new bounds show them to provide substantial improvement over the (two-point) Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on the nonlocal operator tensor, for all permissible values of the two- and three-point parameters. We next discuss further applications of the general nonlocal operator bounds: to any three-dimensional scalar transport problem e.g. conductivity, for which explicit results are given encompassing the full permissible ranges of the

  13. Self-Determination as a Moderator of Demands and Control: Implications for Employee Strain and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Stacey L.; Jimmieson, Nerina L.; Amiot, Catherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Does job control act as a stress-buffer when employees' type and level of work self-determination is taken into account? It was anticipated that job control would only be stress-buffering for employees high in self-determined and low in non-self-determined work motivation. In contrast, job control would be stress-exacerbating for employees who…

  14. Self-Determination as a Moderator of Demands and Control: Implications for Employee Strain and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Stacey L.; Jimmieson, Nerina L.; Amiot, Catherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Does job control act as a stress-buffer when employees' type and level of work self-determination is taken into account? It was anticipated that job control would only be stress-buffering for employees high in self-determined and low in non-self-determined work motivation. In contrast, job control would be stress-exacerbating for employees who…

  15. Host species and strain combination determine growth reduction of spruce and birch seedlings colonized by root-associated dark septate endophytes.

    PubMed

    Reininger, Vanessa; Grünig, Christoph R; Sieber, Thomas N

    2012-04-01

    Interactions of Betula pendula and Picea abies with dark septate endophytes of the Phialocephala fortinii-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) were studied. PAC are ubiquitous fungal root symbionts of many woody plant species but their ecological role is largely unknown. Sterile birch and spruce seedlings in monoculture and mixed culture were exposed to four PAC strains, added either singularly or paired in all possible combinations at 18°C and 23°C. Plant and fungal biomass was determined after 4 months. The most significant factors were strain and host combination. One of the strains significantly reduced biomass gain of spruce but not of birch. Plant biomass was negatively correlated with total endophytic fungal biomass in half of the strain - plant combinations. Endophytic PAC biomass was four times higher in spruce (≈ 40 mg g(-1) drw) than in birch (≈ 10 mg g(-1) drw). Competition between strains was strain-dependent with some strains significantly reducing colonization density of other strains, and, thus, attenuating adverse effects of 'pathogenic' strains on plant growth in some strain - plant combinations. Biomass gain of spruce but not of birch was significantly reduced at higher temperature. In conclusion, host, fungal genotype, colonization density and presence of a competing PAC strain were the main determining factors for plant growth.

  16. Characterization of a micromechanical spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozewski, Kirk J.; Wang, Chih-Yu; Wetsel, Grover C., Jr.; Boysel, R. M.; Florence, James M.

    1993-06-01

    The optical-beam-control dynamics of torsion-beam deformable-mirror-device spatial light modulators was characterized to determine properties important to their operation. The responses of individual picture elements to steady-state, transient, and harmonic excitation were measured using optical-beam-deflection sensors. The steady-state angular deflection is characterized by a stable, reversible regime for applied voltages less than a critical value, Vc (about 16 VDC), an unstable transition to stable maximal deflection at Vc, and hysteresis as the applied voltage is reduced to zero. Representative devices with 50 micron x 50 micron pixels exhibit full-deflection rise times of tens of microseconds and small-deflection resonant frequencies of the order of 10 kHz.

  17. Conduction band offset determination between strained CdSe and ZnSe layers using DLTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2013-12-04

    The conduction band offset between strained CdSe layers embedded in unintentionally n-type doped ZnSe is measured and reported. Two samples, consisting of thirty Ultra Thin Quantum Wells (UTQWs) of CdSe embedded in ZnSe, grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy, are used for this study. The thicknesses of the UTQWs are one and three monolayers (MLs) in each sample, respectively. As expected, the sample with one ML UTQWs does not show any energy level in the UTQWs due to the small thickness of the UTQWs, while the thickness of the sample with 3 ML UTQWs is large enough to form an energy level inside the UTQWs. This energy level appears as a majority trap with an activation energy of 223.58 ± 9.54 meV. This corresponds to UTQWs with barrier heights (the conduction band offset) between 742 meV and 784 meV. These values suggest that the band gap misfit between strained CdSe and ZnSe is around 70.5 to 74 % in the conduction band.

  18. Conduction band offset determination between strained CdSe and ZnSe layers using DLTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2013-12-01

    The conduction band offset between strained CdSe layers embedded in unintentionally n-type doped ZnSe is measured and reported. Two samples, consisting of thirty Ultra Thin Quantum Wells (UTQWs) of CdSe embedded in ZnSe, grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy, are used for this study. The thicknesses of the UTQWs are one and three monolayers (MLs) in each sample, respectively. As expected, the sample with one ML UTQWs does not show any energy level in the UTQWs due to the small thickness of the UTQWs, while the thickness of the sample with 3 ML UTQWs is large enough to form an energy level inside the UTQWs. This energy level appears as a majority trap with an activation energy of 223.58 ± 9.54 meV. This corresponds to UTQWs with barrier heights (the conduction band offset) between 742 meV and 784 meV. These values suggest that the band gap misfit between strained CdSe and ZnSe is around 70.5 to 74 % in the conduction band.

  19. Determination of strain fields in porous shape memory alloys using micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Therese; Friess, Sebastian; de Wild, Michael; Schumacher, Ralf; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) belong to 'intelligent' materials since the metal alloy can change its macroscopic shape as the result of the temperature-induced, reversible martensite-austenite phase transition. SMAs are often applied for medical applications such as stents, hinge-less instruments, artificial muscles, and dental braces. Rapid prototyping techniques, including selective laser melting (SLM), allow fabricating complex porous SMA microstructures. In the present study, the macroscopic shape changes of the SMA test structures fabricated by SLM have been investigated by means of micro computed tomography (μCT). For this purpose, the SMA structures are placed into the heating stage of the μCT system SkyScan 1172™ (SkyScan, Kontich, Belgium) to acquire three-dimensional datasets above and below the transition temperature, i.e. at room temperature and at about 80°C, respectively. The two datasets were registered on the basis of an affine registration algorithm with nine independent parameters - three for the translation, three for the rotation and three for the scaling in orthogonal directions. Essentially, the scaling parameters characterize the macroscopic deformation of the SMA structure of interest. Furthermore, applying the non-rigid registration algorithm, the three-dimensional strain field of the SMA structure on the micrometer scale comes to light. The strain fields obtained will serve for the optimization of the SLM-process and, more important, of the design of the complex shaped SMA structures for tissue engineering and medical implants.

  20. The Sigma B operon is a determinant of fitness for a Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b strain in soil.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Duhé, Jessica M; Flaherty, Denise

    2011-06-01

    In nature the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes lives as a saprophyte where it can contaminate preharvest produce. This environment can present many stresses such as ultraviolet light, variations in temperature and humidity, and oxidative stress from growing plant matter in the soil. The alternative sigma factor Sigma B, encoded by sigB, controls the response to most stresses in L. monocytogenes. Fitness in soil and on radishes sown and grown in contaminated soil was measured in a wild-type and an isogenic sigB operon mutant strain to determine if the sigma factor was necessary for life in these niches. Levels of wild-type and mutant strains were monitored in contaminated soil over the course of radish gestation from seed to mature tuber, and levels on mature radishes were determined. The wild-type strain was able to survive in soil over the 4 weeks of the experiment at levels of 4-7 log CFU/g soil, and the levels of the sigB mutant were reduced by 1-2 log from the wild type. The mutant showed reduced levels in soil by 6 h after inoculation, which was partially recovered when the mutant was complemented, and stayed at a reduced level over the next 4 weeks. Upon harvest, 3-4 log CFU/g of wild-type L. monocytogenes was detected on radish surfaces, and the bacteria could not be washed off under running water. On mature radishes populations of the mutant strain were 1-2 log CFU/g lower than the wild type. The levels on mature radishes reflected the levels in the soil at 4 weeks. The conclusions are that the Sigma B operon is necessary for initial adaptation to the soil environment, and plays a role in maintaining the population, but does not play a role in attachment or colonization of the radish.

  1. The structure and micromechanics of elastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Green, Ellen M; Mansfield, Jessica C; Bell, James S; Winlove, C Peter

    2014-04-06

    Elastin is a major component of tissues such as lung and blood vessels, and endows them with the long-range elasticity necessary for their physiological functions. Recent research has revealed the complexity of these elastin structures and drawn attention to the existence of extensive networks of fine elastin fibres in tissues such as articular cartilage and the intervertebral disc. Nonlinear microscopy, allowing the visualization of these structures in living tissues, is informing analysis of their mechanical properties. Elastic fibres are complex in composition and structure containing, in addition to elastin, an array of microfibrillar proteins, principally fibrillin. Raman microspectrometry and X-ray scattering have provided new insights into the mechanisms of elasticity of the individual component proteins at the molecular and fibrillar levels, but more remains to be done in understanding their mechanical interactions in composite matrices. Elastic tissue is one of the most stable components of the extracellular matrix, but impaired mechanical function is associated with ageing and diseases such as atherosclerosis and diabetes. Efforts to understand these associations through studying the effects of processes such as calcium and lipid binding and glycation on the mechanical properties of elastin preparations in vitro have produced a confusing picture, and further efforts are required to determine the molecular basis of such effects.

  2. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  3. A micromechanics constitutive model for pure dilatant martensitic transformation of ZrO2-containing ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingping, Sun; Shouwen, Yu; Kehchih, Hwang

    1990-05-01

    A new micromechanics constitutive model for pure dilatant transformation plasticity of structure ceramics is proposed in this paper. Based on the thermodynamics, micromechanics and microscale t→m transformation mechanism analysis of the TZP and PSZ ZrO2-containing ceramics, an analytic expressions of the Helmholtz and complementary free energy of the constitutive element for the case of pure dilatant transformation is derived for the first time in a self-consistent manner. By the analysis of energy dissipation in the forward and reverse transformations, the micromechanics constitutive law is derived in the framework of Hill-Rice's internal variable constitutive theory.

  4. Probabilistic micromechanics of woven ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Marlana

    Woven ceramic matrix composites are a special class of composite materials that are of current interest for harsh thermo-structural conditions such as those encountered by hypersonic vehicle systems and turbine engine components. Testing of the materials is expensive, especially as materials are constantly redesigned. Randomness in the tow architecture, as well as the randomly shaped and spaced voids that are produced as a result of the manufacturing process, are features that contribute to variability in stiffness and strength. The goal of the research is to lay a foundation in which characteristics of the geometry can be translated into material properties. The research first includes quantifying the architectural variability based on 2D micrographs of a 5 harness satin CVI (Chemical Vapor Infiltration) SiC/SiC composite. The architectural variability is applied to a 2D representative volume element (RVE) in order to evaluate which aspects of the architecture are important to model in order to capture the variability found in the cross sections. Tow width, tow spacing, and tow volume fraction were found to have some effect on the variability, but voids were found to have a large influence on transverse stiffness, and a separate study was conducted to determine which characteristics of the voids are most critical to model. It was found that the projected area of the void perpendicular to the transverse direction and the number of voids modeled had a significant influence on the stiffness. The effect of varying architecture on the variability of in-plane tensile strength was also studied using the Brittle Cracking Model for Concrete in the commercial finite element software, Abaqus. A maximum stress criterion is used to evaluate failure, and the stiffness of failed elements is gradually degraded such that the energy required to open a crack (fracture energy) is dissipated during this degradation process. While the varying architecture did not create variability in

  5. Micro-scale testing and micromechanical modelling for high cycle fatigue of CoCr stent material.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, C A; O'Brien, B; Dunne, F P E; McHugh, P E; Leen, S B

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a framework of experimental testing and crystal plasticity micromechanics for high cycle fatigue (HCF) of micro-scale L605 CoCr stent material. Micro-scale specimens, representative of stent struts, are manufactured via laser micro-machining and electro-polishing from biomedical grade CoCr alloy foil. Crystal plasticity models of the micro-specimens are developed using a length scale-dependent, strain-gradient constitutive model and a phenomenological (power-law) constitutive model, calibrated from monotonic and cyclic plasticity test data. Experimental microstructural characterisation of the grain morphology and precipitate distributions is used as input for the polycrystalline finite element (FE) morphologies. Two microstructure-sensitive fatigue indicator parameters are applied, using local and non-local (grain-averaged) implementations, for the phenomenological and length scale-dependent models, respectively, to predict fatigue crack initiation (FCI) in the HCF experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Strain-specific innate immune signaling pathways determine malaria parasitemia dynamics and host mortality.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Tian, Linjie; Yu, Xiao; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wang, Mingjun; Yu, Weishi; Qi, Yanwei; Zeituni, Amir E; Nair, Sethu C; Crampton, Steve P; Orandle, Marlene S; Bolland, Silvia M; Qi, Chen-Feng; Long, Carole A; Myers, Timothy G; Coligan, John E; Wang, Rongfu; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-28

    Malaria infection triggers vigorous host immune responses; however, the parasite ligands, host receptors, and the signaling pathways responsible for these reactions remain unknown or controversial. Malaria parasites primarily reside within RBCs, thereby hiding themselves from direct contact and recognition by host immune cells. Host responses to malaria infection are very different from those elicited by bacterial and viral infections and the host receptors recognizing parasite ligands have been elusive. Here we investigated mouse genome-wide transcriptional responses to infections with two strains of Plasmodium yoelii (N67 and N67C) and discovered differences in innate response pathways corresponding to strain-specific disease phenotypes. Using in vitro RNAi-based gene knockdown and KO mice, we demonstrated that a strong type I IFN (IFN-I) response triggered by RNA polymerase III and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5, not Toll-like receptors (TLRs), binding of parasite DNA/RNA contributed to a decline of parasitemia in N67-infected mice. We showed that conventional dendritic cells were the major sources of early IFN-I, and that surface expression of phosphatidylserine on infected RBCs might promote their phagocytic uptake, leading to the release of parasite ligands and the IFN-I response in N67 infection. In contrast, an elevated inflammatory response mediated by CD14/TLR and p38 signaling played a role in disease severity and early host death in N67C-infected mice. In addition to identifying cytosolic DNA/RNA sensors and signaling pathways previously unrecognized in malaria infection, our study demonstrates the importance of parasite genetic backgrounds in malaria pathology and provides important information for studying human malaria pathogenesis.

  7. Micromechanics Based Multiscale Modeling of the Inelastic Response and Failure of Complex Architecture Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang

    Advanced composites are being widely used in aerospace applications due to their high stiffness, strength and energy absorption capabilities. However, the assurance of structural reliability is a critical issue because a damage event will compromise the integrity of composite structures and lead to ultimate failure. In this dissertation a novel homogenization based multiscale modeling framework using semi-analytical micromechanics is presented to simulate the response of textile composites. The novelty of this approach lies in the three scale homogenization/localization framework bridging between the constituent (micro), the fiber tow scale (meso), weave scale (macro), and the global response. The multiscale framework, named Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC), continuously bridges between the micro to the global scale as opposed to approaches that are top-down and bottom-up. This framework is fully generalized and capable of modeling several different weave and braids without reformulation. Particular emphasis in this dissertation is placed on modeling the nonlinearity and failure of both polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites. Results are presented for the cases of plain, twill, satin, and triaxially braided composites. Inelastic, failure, strain rate and damage effects are included at the microscale and propagated to the global scale. MSGMC was successfully used to predict the in-plane material response plain and five harness satin woven polymer composites, triaxially braided polymer composite and both the in-plane and out-of-plane response of silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites.

  8. Micromechanical analysis on tensile modulus of structured magneto-rheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. W.; Li, R.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X. J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposed a micromechanical model to investigate the tensile modulus of structured magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) to understand its anisotropic properties. A three parameter representative volume element (RVE) model was presented to describe the microscopic structure, where particles could be organized in layer-like or chain-like structure. And the tensile modulus is defined as a ratio of stress to strain in the stretched direction. We then applied effective medium theory to derive a theoretical model for the modulus of MRE in the absence of magnetic field, considering the influence of particles configuration and volume fraction. In addition, the effect of magnetic field on magneto-induced stress inside MRE is evaluated to further establish a multi-scale model which explains the magneto-rheological effect of structured MRE. The proposed model was then compared with finite element analysis and ‘free energy’ model. It demonstrated that the proposed model match better with the finite element solutions than that of ‘free energy’ method. The advantage of the proposed model is that it couples the magnetic field and displacement field, and considers the influence of both particles spatial energy and the relative position on magneto-rheological effect. The stiffer or softer of MREs induced by an applied magnetic field under tensile stress is predicted that is conformed to previous studies.

  9. Characterizing the lung tissue mechanical properties using a micromechanical model of alveolar sac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Elham; Seify, Behzad; Moghadas, Hadi; Sabsalinejad, Masoomeh; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    According to statistics, lung disease is among the leading causes of death worldwide. As such, many research groups are developing powerful tools for understanding, diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. Recently, biomechanical modeling has emerged as an effective tool for better understanding of human physiology, disease diagnosis and computer assisted medical intervention. Mechanical properties of lung tissue are important requirements for methods developed for lung disease diagnosis and medical intervention. As such, the main objective of this study is to develop an effective tool for estimating the mechanical properties of normal and pathological lung parenchyma tissue based on its microstructure. For this purpose, a micromechanical model of the lung tissue was developed using finite element (FE) method, and the model was demonstrated to have application in estimating the mechanical properties of lung alveolar wall. The proposed model was developed by assembling truncated octahedron tissue units resembling the alveoli. A compression test was simulated using finite element method on the created geometry and the hyper-elastic parameters of the alveoli wall were calculated using reported alveolar wall stress-strain data and an inverse optimization framework. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed model can be potentially used to reconstruct microstructural images of lung tissue using macro-scale tissue response for normal and different pathological conditions. Such images can be used for effective diagnosis of lung diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

  10. Micromechanical and macroscopic models of ductile fracture in particle reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Jie; Ghosh, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    This paper is aimed at developing two modules contributing to the overall framework of multi-scale modelling of ductile fracture of particle reinforced metallic materials. The first module is for detailed micromechanical analysis of particle fragmentation and matrix cracking of heterogeneous microstructures. The Voronoi cell FEM for particle fragmentation is extended in this paper to incorporate ductile failure through matrix cracking in the form of void growth and coalescence using a non-local Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. In the resulting enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (VCFEM) or E-VCFEM, the assumed stress-based hybrid VCFEM formulation is overlaid with narrow bands of displacement based elements to accommodate strain softening in the constitutive behaviour. The second module develops an anisotropic plasticity-damage model in the form of the GTN model for macroscopic analysis in the multi-scale material model. Parameters in this model are calibrated from results of homogenization of microstructural variables obtained by E-VCFEM analysis of microstructural representative volume element. Numerical examples conducted yield satisfactory results.

  11. Comparison of regional and local horizontal strain field on the area of Central Europe determined from GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, B.

    2012-04-01

    Permanent GPS observations on EPN stations are being continued already about 15 years and so velocities of horizontal and vertical movements of the sites are determined with the great credibility. However density of the EPN sites on the area of Central Europe allow to determine only a very general model of deformation field. For determining the local strain field epoch-making GPS observations in local research networks can be used. As en example the GEOSUD GPS Network located in the area of the Sudeten mountains in South-West Poland were used. Velocities of GPS points were estimated from observations of annually repeated two-day measuring campaigns, connected to the EPN stations. On the basis of these velocities local velocity field and local strain field were estimated. The toolbox grid_strain (Teza, Pesci and Galgaro, 2008) was used. Areas of the maximum compressions and extensions were outlined as well as they were confronted with the tectonic structure of area. In the picture of the deformation field clearly four principal zones of deformations are standing out. The presence of the Sudetic Marginal Fault is becoming scratched slightly in south-eastern his parts. Values of deformations in the vicinity of fault zone are generally smaller than in more distant area. It is proving the hypothesis on interseismic character of changes and the weak tectonic activity of the fault. Such an image of horizontal deformations in which extensions are perpendicular to main direction of the fault line, is matching with the hypothesis on normal character of the SMF. On the entire research area however compression deformations are dominating.

  12. Growth differences and competition between Listeria monocytogenes strains determine their predominance on ham slices and lead to bias during selective enrichment with the ISO protocol.

    PubMed

    Zilelidou, Evangelia; Manthou, Evanthia; Skandamis, Panagiotis

    2016-10-17

    Listeria monocytogenes strains are widespread in the environment where they live well mixed, often resulting in multiple strains contaminating a single food sample. The occurrence of different strains in the same food might trigger strain competition, contributing to uneven growth of strains in food and to bias during selective procedures. We tested the growth of seven L. monocytogenes strains (C5, 6179, ScottA, PL24, PL25, PL26, PL27) on ham slices and on nutrient-rich agar at 10°C, singly and in combinations. Strains were made resistant to different antibiotics for their selective enumeration. In addition, growth of single strains (axenic culture) and competition between strains in xenic cultures of two strains was evaluated in enrichment broth and on selective agar. According to ISO 11290-1:1996/Amd 1:2004 standard protocol for detection of L. monocytogenes, two enrichment steps both followed by streaking on ALOA were performed. Strain cultures were directly added in the enrichment broth or used to inoculate minced beef and sliced hams which were then mixed with enrichment broth. 180-360 colonies were used to determine the relative percentage of each strain recovered on plates per enrichment step. The data showed a significant impact of co-cultivation on the growth of six out of seven strains on ham and a bias towards certain strains during selective enrichment. Competition was manifested by: (i) cessation of growth for the outcompeted strain when the dominant strain reached stationary phase, (ii) reduction of growth rates or (iii) total suppression of growth (both on ham and in enrichment broth or ALOA). Outgrowth of strains by their competitors on ALOA resulted in limited to no recovery, with the outcompeting strain accounting for up to 100% of the total recovered colonies. The observed bias was associated with the enrichment conditions (i.e. food type added to the enrichment broth) and the strain-combination. The outcome of growth competition on food or

  13. Exopolysaccharide Production and Ropy Phenotype Are Determined by Two Gene Clusters in Putative Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11

    PubMed Central

    Zivkovic, Milica; Miljkovic, Marija; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Strahinic, Ivana; Tolinacki, Maja; Golic, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11, a putative probiotic strain isolated from a soft, white, artisanal cheese, produces a high-molecular-weight heteropolysaccharide, exopolysaccharide (EPS)-CG11, responsible for the ropy phenotype and immunomodulatory activity of the strain. In this study, a 26.4-kb region originating from the pCG1 plasmid, previously shown to be responsible for the production of EPS-CG11 and a ropy phenotype, was cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized. In this region 16 putative open reading frames (ORFs), encoding enzymes for the production of EPS-CG11, were organized in specific loci involved in the biosynthesis of the repeat unit, polymerization, export, regulation, and chain length determination. Interestingly, downstream of the eps gene cluster, a putative transposase gene was identified, followed by an additional rfb gene cluster containing the rfbACBD genes, the ones most probably responsible for dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis. The functional analysis showed that the production of the high-molecular-weight fraction of EPS-CG11 was absent in two knockout mutants, one in the eps and the other in the rfb gene cluster, as confirmed by size exclusion chromatography analysis. Therefore, both eps and rfb genes clusters are prerequisites for the production of high-molecular-weight EPS-CG11 and for the ropy phenotype of strain L. paraplantarum BGCG11. PMID:25527533

  14. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in dialysis patients assessed by novel speckle tracking strain rate analysis: prevalence and determinants.

    PubMed

    de Bie, Mihály K; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Gaasbeek, André; Bax, Jeroen J; Groeneveld, Marc; Gabreels, Bas A; Delgado, Victoria; Rabelink, Ton J; Schalij, Martin J; Jukema, J Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Background. Diastolic dysfunction is common among dialysis patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Novel echocardiographic speckle tracking strain analysis permits accurate assessment of left ventricular diastolic function, independent of loading conditions and taking all myocardial segments into account. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in chronic dialysis patients using this novel technique, and to identify its determinants among clinical and echocardiographic variables. Methods. Patients currently enrolled in the ICD2 study protocol were included for this analysis. Next to conventional echo measurements diastolic function was also assessed by global diastolic strain rate during isovolumic relaxation (SRIVR). Results. A total of 77 patients were included (age 67 ± 8 years, 74% male). When defined as E/SRIVR ≥236, the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was higher compared to more conventional measurements (48% versus 39%). Left ventricular mass (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.04, P = 0.014) and pulse wave velocity (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.07-1.68, P = 0.01) were independent determinants of diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion. Diastolic dysfunction is highly prevalent among dialysis patients and might be underestimated using conventional measurements. Left ventricular mass and pulse wave velocity were the only determinants of diastolic dysfunction in these patients.

  15. Determination of strains of Helicobacter pylori and of polymorphism in the interleukin-8 gene in patients with stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Corvelo, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira; Arnaud, Vanda Catão; Leite, Ana Claudia Klautau; Barile, Katarine Antonia Dos Santos; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2011-01-01

    Gastric neoplasia is the second most common cause of death by cancer in the world and H. pylori is classified as a type I human carcinogen by the World Health Organization. However, despite the high prevalence of infection by H. pylori around the world, less than 3% of individuals carrying the bacteria develop gastric neoplasias. Such a fact indicates that evolution towards malignancy may be associated with bacterial factors in the host and the environment. To investigate the association between polymorphism in the region promoting the IL-8 (-251) gene and the H. pylori genotype, based on the vacA alleles and the presence of the cagA gene, using clinical and histopathological data. In a prospective study, a total of 102 patients with stomach cancer and 103 healthy volunteers were analysed. Polymorphism in interleukin 8 (-251) was determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism reaction and sequencing. PCR was used for genotyping the vacA alleles and the cagA in the bacterial strains PCR. Gastric biopsies were histologically assessed. The H. pylori serology was positive for 101 (99%) of all patients analysed, and 98 (97%) of them were colonized by only one strain. In patients with monoinfection, 82 (84%) of the bacterial strains observed had the s1b/m1 genotype. The cagA gene was detected in 74 (73%) of patients infected by H. pylori. The presence of the cagA gene was demonstrated as associated with the presence of the s1b/m1 genotype of the vacA gene (P = 0.002). As for polymorphism in the interleukin 8 (-251) gene we observed that the AA (P = 0.026) and AT (P = 0.005) genotypes were most frequent in the group of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. By comparing the different types of isolated bacterial strains with the interleukin -8 (-251) and the histopathological data we observed that carriers of the A allele (AT and AA) infected by virulent strains (m1s1 cagA+) demonstrated a greater risk of presenting a degree of inflammation (OR = 24.75 CI 95

  16. EDITORIAL: 16th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoksson, Professor Peter

    2006-06-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 16th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 2005), which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, at the Chalmers Conference Centre on the premises of Chalmers University of Technology, 4-6 September 2005. Göteborg is the second largest city in Sweden and is situated on the beautiful south-west coast. With its relaxed and friendly atmosphere Göteborg proudly lives up to its reputation of having the charm of a small town with all the opportunities of a big city. The MME workshop is a well recognized and established European event for creating microsensors and microactuators in the field of micromachining, microengineering and technology. The very first workshop was held at Twente University, The Netherlands, in 1989. Scientists and people from industry who are interested in the field gather annually for this event. The goals are stimulation and improvement of know-how in the field, as well as establishing cooperation and friendship between delegates. Thus MME is arranged so that people can meet in a friendly and informal atmosphere. That is why the accent is on mutual discussions around poster presentations rather than on formal oral presentations. The contributions, which came from 21 countries, were presented in four sessions and five keynote presentations. I am proud to present 24 high-quality papers from MME 2005 selected for their novelty and relevance to Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. Each paper passed a rigorous peer review process. May I take this opportunity to thank those authors who contributed their research to this special issue, which I hope gives an excellent overview of topics discussed at the workshop. I would also like to express my gratitude to Professor Robert Puers for advising on the selection of papers and to Dr Anke Sanz-Velasco for helping to coordinate the special issue with the Institute of Physics Publishing office at the start. I hope you

  17. Semi-quantitative Strain Ratio Determined Using Different Measurement Methods: Comparison of Strain Ratio Values and Diagnostic Performance Using One- versus Two-Region-of-Interest Measurement.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Song, Mi Kyung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2017-02-24

    We evaluated the agreement and diagnostic performance of strain ratio values using measurements made with one and two user-defined regions of interest (ROIs) on breast elastography. Two hundred forty-three breast masses of 226 women (mean age: 48.2 y) were included. Ultrasonography (US) and elastography images of the masses were recorded. Strain ratio was measured twice on the same elastography image; strain ratio 1, applying one ROI at the target mass for measurement, and strain ratio 2, applying one ROI at the target mass and another ROI as reference strain. The two strain ratio measurements were in substantial agreement, with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.655 (95% confidence interval: 0.577-0.722). Specificity, positive predictive value and accuracy (cutoffs: 2.66 and 2.35) were significantly improved for US combined with the two strain ratio measurements (all p values < 0.05). Strain ratios measured using one or two user-defined ROIs were in substantial agreement, both contributing to the improved diagnostic performance of breast US.

  18. Differential strain patterns of the human Achilles tendon determined in vivo with freehand three-dimensional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Trewartha, Grant; McGuigan, M Polly; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2013-02-15

    The human Achilles tendon (AT) has often been considered to act as a single elastic structure in series with the muscles of the triceps surae. As such it has been commonly modelled as a Hookean spring of uniform stiffness. However, the free AT and the proximal AT have distinctly different structures that lend themselves to different elastic properties. This study aimed to use three-dimensional freehand ultrasound imaging to determine whether the proximal AT and the free AT exhibit different elastic behaviour during sub-maximal, fixed-end contractions of the triceps surae. Six male and five female participants (mean ± s.d. age=27 ± 5 years) performed fixed position contractions of the plantar-flexors on an isokinetic dynamometer at 50% of their maximum voluntary contraction in this position. Freehand three-dimensional ultrasound imaging was used to reconstruct the free-tendon and proximal AT at rest and during contraction. The free-tendon exhibited significantly (P=0.03) greater longitudinal strain (5.2 ± 1.7%) than the proximal AT (2.6 ± 2.0%). The lesser longitudinal strain of the proximal AT was linked to the fact that it exhibited considerable transverse (orthogonal to the longitudinal direction) strains (5.0 ± 4%). The transverse strain of the proximal AT is likely due to the triceps surae muscles bulging upon contraction, and thus the level of bulging may influence the elastic behaviour of the proximal AT. This might have implications for the understanding of triceps surae muscle-tendon interaction during locomotion, tendon injury mechanics and previous measurements of AT elastic properties.

  19. Three-dimensional speckle tracking longitudinal strain is related to myocardial fibrosis determined by late-gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Spartera, Marco; Damascelli, Anna; Mozes, Ferenc; De Cobelli, Francesco; La Canna, Giovanni

    2017-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a reliable clinical tool for accurate measurements of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF). In this prospective study, we sought to identify an association between 3DSTE longitudinal strain abnormalities and areas of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). In 50 patients (52 ± 18.5 years old) referred to our hospital for clinically indicated CMR, 3D full-volume trans-thoracic acquisitions on apical views were performed within 1 h of CMR, in order to obtain LV volumes and ejection fraction as well as global and segmental peak systolic longitudinal strain. Relative amount of fibrosis was defined based on LGE CMR with grey-scale threshold of 5 standard deviations above the mean signal intensity of the normal remote myocardium. We found a moderate positive correlation between global longitudinal strain (GLS) by 3DSTE and LGE proportion (r = 0.465, p = 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.79. In addition, abnormal GLS could detect LGE-determined myocardial fibrosis with a sensitivity of 84.6%, a specificity of 84.8%, a positive predictive value of 69% and negative predictive value of 93%, considering an optimal GLS cut-off value of - 15.25%. Regarding 3DSTE capacity of localizing segmental LGE involvement, about 70% of LGE-positive segments presented a concomitant longitudinal strain reduction. This prospective study shows that 3DSTE longitudinal deformation is moderately associated with the extent of myocardial fibrosis, with a promising potential role in ruling out prognostically relevant fibrosis as detected by LGE.

  20. In-Situ Micromechanical Testing in Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupinacci, Amanda Sofia

    In order to design engineering applications that can withstand extreme environments, we must first understand the underlying deformation mechanisms that can hinder material performance. It is not enough to characterize the mechanical properties alone, we must also characterize the microstructural changes as well so that we can understand the origin of material degradation. This dissertation focuses on two different extreme environments. The first environment is the cryogenic environment, where we focus on the deformation behavior of solder below the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The second environment is the irradiated environment, where we focus on the effects that ion beam irradiation has on both the mechanical properties and microstructure of 304 stainless steel. Both classes of materials and testing environments utilize novel in situ micromechanical testing techniques inside a scanning electron microscope which enhances our ability to link the observed deformation behavior with its associated mechanical response. Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the DBTT is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at -142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity while at -142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (100) orientation and a non-symmetric (45¯1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations. This approach was also extended to a more complex solder alloy that is commonly used in industry, Sn96. In the case of the solder alloy more complex geometries

  1. Negative strain rate sensitivity in bulk metallic glass and its similarities with the dynamic strain aging effect during deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalla Torre, Florian H.; Dubach, Alban; Siegrist, Marco E.; Loeffler, Joerg F.

    2006-08-28

    Detailed investigations were carried out on the deformation behavior of Zr-based monolithic bulk metallic glass and bulk metallic glass matrix composites. The latter, due to splitting and multiplication of shear bands, exhibits larger compressive strains than the former, without significant loss of strength. Serrated flow in conjunction with a negative strain rate sensitivity was observed in both materials. This observation, together with an increase in stress drops with increasing strain and their decrease with increasing strain rate, indicates phenomenologically close similarities with the dynamic strain aging deformation mechanism known for crystalline solids. The micromechanical mechanism of a shear event is discussed in light of these results.

  2. Job Strain and Determinants in Staff Working in Institutions for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: A Test of the Job Demand-Control-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the job strain of staff working in disability institutions. This study investigated the staff's job strain profile and its determinants which included the worker characteristics and the psychosocial working environments in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study survey was carried out among 1243 workers by means of a self-answered…

  3. Composite tube and plate manufacturing repeatability as determined by precision measurements of thermal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Lenn A.; Tucker, James R.; Bluth, A. Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Composite materials often carry the reputation of demonstrating high variability in critical material properties. The JWST telescope metering structure is fabricated of several thousand separate composite piece parts. The stringent dimensional stability requirements on the metering structure require the critical thermal strain response of every composite piece be verified either at the billet or piece part level. JWST is a unique composite space structure in that it has required the manufacturing of several hundred composite billets that cover many lots of prepreg and many years of fabrication. The flight billet thermal expansion acceptance criteria limits the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to a tolerance ranging between +/-0.014 ppm/K to +/-0.04 ppm/K around a prescribed nominal when measured from 293 K down to 40 K. The different tolerance values represent different material forms including flat plates and different tube cross-section dimensions. A precision measurement facility was developed that could measure at the required accuracy and at a pace that supported the composite part fabrication rate. The test method and facility is discussed and the results of a statistical process analysis of the flight composite billets are surveyed.

  4. Determination of high temperature strains using a PC based vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneill, Stephen R.; Sutton, Michael A.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1992-01-01

    With the widespread availability of video digitizers and cheap personal computers, the use of computer vision as an experimental tool is becoming common place. These systems are being used to make a wide variety of measurements that range from simple surface characterization to velocity profiles. The Sub-Pixel Digital Image Correlation technique has been developed to measure full field displacement and gradients of the surface of an object subjected to a driving force. The technique has shown its utility by measuring the deformation and movement of objects that range from simple translation to fluid velocity profiles to crack tip deformation of solid rocket fuel. This technique has recently been improved and used to measure the surface displacement field of an object at high temperature. The development of a PC based Sub-Pixel Digital Image Correlation system has yielded an accurate and easy to use system for measuring surface displacements and gradients. Experiments have been performed to show the system is viable for measuring thermal strain.

  5. Micromechanical Behavior of Solid-Solution-Strengthened Mg-1wt.%Al Alloy Investigated by In-Situ Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sooyeol; Woo, Wanchuck; Gharghouri, Michael; Yoon, Cheol; An, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In-situ neutron-diffraction experiments were employed to investigate the micromechanical behavior of solid-solution-strengthened Mg-1wt.%Al alloy. Two starting textures were used: 1) as-extruded then solutionized texture, T1, in which the basal poles of most grains are tilted around 70~85 from the extrusion axis, and 2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal poles of most grains are tilted around 10~20 from the extrusion axis. Lattice strains and diffraction peak intensity variations were measured in situ during loading-unloading cycles in uniaxial tension. Twinning activities and stress states for various grain orientations were revealed. The results show that the soft grain orientations, favorably oriented for either extension twinning or basal slip, exhibit the stress relaxation, resulting in the compressive residual strain after unloading. On the other hand, the hard grain orientations, unfavorably oriented for both extension twinning and basal slip, carry more applied load, leading to much higher lattice strains during loading followed by tensile residual strains upon unloading.

  6. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes and Antigenic Determinant Genes in Bordetella pertussis Strains Isolated in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang-Oun; Moon, Yu Mi; Kim, So-Hyeon; Sung, Hwa Young; Kwon, Seung-Jik; Kang, Yeon Ho; Yu, Jae Yon

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To confirm genotype diversities of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis and to evaluate the risk of pertussis outbreak in Korea. Methods Seven housekeeping genes and 10 antigenic determinant genes from clinical B. pertussis isolates were analyzed by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Results More variant pattern was observed in antigenic determinant genes. Especially, PtxS1 gene was the most variant gene; five genotypes were observed from eight global genotypes. In the bacterial type, the number of observed sequence types in the isolates was seven and the most frequent form was type 1 (79.6%). This major sequence type also showed a time-dependent transition pattern. Older isolates (1968 and 1975) showed type 1 and 6 in housekeeping genes and antigenic determinant genes, respectively. However, these were changed to type 2 and 1 in isolates 1999–2008. This transition was mainly attributed to genotype change of PtxS1 and Fim3 gene; the tendency of genotype change was to avoid vaccine-derived genotype. In addition, there was second transition in 2009. In this period, only the sequence type of antigenic determinant genes was changed to type 2. Based Upon Related Sequence Types (BURST) analysis confirmed that there were two clonal complexes (ACCI and ACCII) in the Korean isolates. Moreover, the recently increased sequence type was revealed as AST2 derived from AST 3 in ACCI. Conclusions Genotype changes in Korean distributing strains are still progressing and there was a specific driving force in antigenic determinant genes. Therefore continuous surveillance of genotype change of the distributing strains should be performed to confirm interrelationship of genotype change with vaccine immunity. PMID:24159461

  7. Micromechanics thermal stress analysis of composites for space structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents results from a finite element micromechanics analysis of thermally induced stresses in composites at cryogenic temperatures typical of spacecraft operating environments. The influence of microstructural geometry, constituent and interphase properties, and laminate orientation were investigated. Stress field results indicated that significant matrix stresses occur in composites exposed to typical spacecraft thermal excursions; these stresses varied with laminate orientation and circumferential position around the fiber. The major difference in the predicted response of unidirectional and multidirectional laminates was the presence of tensile radial stresses, at the fiber/matrix interface, in multidirectional laminates with off-axis ply angles greater than 15 deg. The predicted damage initiation temperatures and modes were in good agreement with experimental data for both low (207 GPa) and high (517 GPa) modulus carbon fiber/epoxy composites.

  8. EDITORIAL: 15th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puers, Bob

    2005-07-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is entirely devoted to the fifteenth European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME), which was held in Leuven, at the Faculty Club, 5-7 September 2004. In this issue you will find a selection of papers presented at this workshop. The MME Workshop is organized every year to gather mostly European scientists and people from industry to discuss topics related to micromachining and microengineering in an informal manner. The first workshop was held at Twente University, the Netherlands, in 1989. The success of that event inaugurated a series of workshops traveling all over Europe. Looking back on the fifteen years of micromachining it is evident that the field has become more mature. More application driven research is now replacing the basic pure technology driven research we once got so excited about. Yet, half of the contributions still cover problems related to fabrication, production and reliability. Traditionally, the workshop aims to bring together young scientists in the field, with emphasis on discussions and communications in a friendly and informal atmosphere. The goal is to stimulate and to improve knowledge in the field, as well as to promote friendships between researchers. This edition of the workshop was no different. More than 70 papers were contributed, and it was decided to widen the scope with contributions also covering non-silicon technologies. This trend had already been informally introduced some years ago. After the third edition, it was decided to open up a selection of the contributed papers to a broader public by publishing them in a special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, and this has continued to the present day. Since the purpose of the workshop clearly is to stimulate younger scientists to enter the field, even immature research is presented there. The selection in this issue, however, aims to bring to you the more advanced level research work. Even

  9. Micromechanics-Based Computational Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mutal, Subodh K.; Duff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Advanced high-temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aerospace propulsion system components and certain land-based applications. However, being relatively new materials, a reliable design properties database of sufficient fidelity does not yet exist. To characterize these materials solely by testing is cost and time prohibitive. Computational simulation then becomes very useful to limit the experimental effort and reduce the design cycle time, Authors have been involved for over a decade in developing micromechanics- based computational simulation techniques (computer codes) to simulate all aspects of CMC behavior including quantification of scatter that these materials exhibit. A brief summary/capability of these computer codes with typical examples along with their use in design/analysis of certain structural components is the subject matter of this presentation.

  10. Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, V.C.

    1992-12-01

    This special issues on Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior represents an outgrowth of presentations given at a symposium of the same title held at the 1991 ASME Applied Mechanics and Biomechanics Summer Conference at the Ohio State University. The symposium was organized to promote communication between researchers in three materials groups: rock, cementitious materials, ceramics and related composites. The enthusiastic response of both speakers and attendants at the ASME symposium convinced the organizer that it would be useful to put together a coherent volume which can reach a larger audience. It was decided that the papers individually and as a volume ought to provide a broader view, so that as much as possible, the work contained in each paper would be accessible to readers working in any of the three materials groups. Applied Mechanics Reviews presents an appropriate platform for achieving these objectives.

  11. Micromechanics of compaction in an analogue reservoir sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    DIGIOVANNI,ANTHONY A.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.; HOLCOMB,DAVID J.; OLSSON,WILLIAM A.

    2000-02-28

    Energy production, deformation, and fluid transport in reservoirs are linked closely. Recent field, laboratory, and theoretical studies suggest that, under certain stress conditions, compaction of porous rocks may be accommodated by narrow zones of localized compressive deformation oriented perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress. Triaxial compression experiments were performed on Castlegate, an analogue reservoir sandstone, that included acoustic emission detection and location. Initially, acoustic emissions were focused in horizontal bands that initiated at the sample ends (perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress), but with continued loading progressed axially towards the center. This paper describes microscopy studies that were performed to elucidate the micromechanics of compaction during the experiments. The microscopy revealed that compaction of this weakly-cemented sandstone proceeded in two phases: an initial stage of porosity decrease accomplished by breakage of grain contacts and grain rotation, and a second stage of further reduction accommodated by intense grain breakage and rotation.

  12. Micromechanical Simulations of Plastic-Bonded Explosives Containing HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, Edward M.; Menikoff, Ralph S.

    1997-07-01

    The heterogeneous nature of plastic-bonded explosives, explosive crystals embedded in a rubbery binder, has long been recognized as an important factor in their initiation. In response to weak impacts, low pressure compaction waves are formed and lead to the localization of energy in the form of ``hot spots''. In order to understand the mechanism generating the hot spots and their resulting distribution, we have performed micromechanical simulations using the FLIP code of Brackbill, et al., which is based on the ``particle in a cell'' algorithm. These simulations have a distribution of HMX crystal sizes representative of a PBX. The crystals are modeled as either a pure elastic or elastic/plastic material with a linear Us/Up equation of state. The binder is represented as a viscoelastic material. The fluctuations in the local stress and temperature arising from low velocity plate impacts ( 100 m/s) are described.

  13. Micromechanical modeling of the epimysium of the skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingxin; Waas, Anthony M; Faulkner, John A; Kostrominova, Tatiana Y; Wineman, Alan S

    2008-01-01

    A micromechanical model has been developed to investigate the mechanical properties of the epimysium. In the present model, the collagen fibers in the epimysium are embedded randomly in the ground substance. Two parallel wavy collagen fibers and the surrounding ground substance are used as the repeat unit (unit cell), and the epimysium is considered as an aggregate of unit cells. Each unit cell is distributed in the epimysium with some different angle to the muscle fiber direction. The model allows the progressive straightening of the collagen fiber as well as the effects of fiber reorientation. The predictions of the model compare favorably against experiment. The effects of the collagen fiber volume fraction, collagen fiber waviness at the rest length and the mechanical properties of the collagen fibers and the ground substance are analyzed. This model allows the analysis of mechanical behavior of most soft tissues if appropriate experimental data are available.

  14. Pin joints, gears, springs, cranks, and other novel micromechanical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Long-Sheng; Tai, Yu-Chong; Muller, R.S.

    1987-08-01

    We report here the first fabrication of micrometer-scaled pin joints, gears, springs, cranks, and sliders made with silicon planar technology. These micromechanical structures are batch-fabricated in an IC-compatible process using polysilicon deposited by chemical vapor deposition from silane and the sacrificial-layer technique first described by Howe and Muller. An important feature of this new technology makes use of the high surface mobility of polysilicon during CVD growth to refill undercut regions in order to form restraining flanges. The movable mechanical elements are built on layers that are later removed to free them so that translation and rotation can take place. Although this initial demonstration of the technique for making these structures has employed polysilicon as the structural material and phosphosilicate glass (PSG) for the sacrificial layer, other materials compatible with the IC process can be substituted as appropriate.

  15. Position control system for use with micromechanical actuators

    DOEpatents

    Guckel, Henry; Stiers, Eric W.

    2000-01-01

    A positioning system adapted for use with micromechanical actuators provides feedback control of the position of the movable element of the actuator utilizing a low Q sensing coil. The effective inductance of the sensing coil changes with position of the movable element to change the frequency of oscillation of a variable oscillator. The output of the variable oscillator is compared in a phase detector to a reference oscillator signal. The phase detector provides a pulsed output having a pulse duty cycle related to the phase or frequency difference between the oscillator signals. The output of the phase detector is provided to a drive coil which applies a magnetic force to the movable element which balances the force of a spring. The movable element can be displaced to a new position by changing the frequency of the reference oscillator.

  16. Characterization and modeling of electrostatically actuated polysilicon micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edward Keat Leem

    Sensors, actuators, transducers, microsystems and MEMS (MicroElertroMechanical Systems) are some of the terms describing technologies that interface information processing systems with the physical world. Electrostatically actuated micromechanical devices are important building blocks in many of these technologies. Arrays of these devices are used in video projection displays, fluid pumping systems, optical communications systems, tunable lasers and microwave circuits. Well-calibrated simulation tools are essential for propelling ideas from the drawing board into production. This work characterizes a fabrication process---the widely-used polysilicon MUMPs process---to facilitate the design of electrostatically actuated micromechanical devices. The operating principles of a representative device---a capacitive microwave switch---are characterized using a wide range of electrical and optical measurements of test structures along with detailed electromechanical simulations. Consistency in the extraction of material properties from measurements of both pull-in voltage and buckling amplitude is demonstrated. Gold is identified as an area-dependent source of nonuniformity in polysilicon thicknesses and stress. Effects of stress gradients, substrate curvature, and film coverage are examined quantitatively. Using well-characterized beams as in-situ surface probes, capacitance-voltage and surface profile measurements reveal that compressible surface residue modifies the effective electrical gap when the movable electrode contacts an underlying silicon nitride layer. A compressible contact surface model used in simulations improves the fit to measurements. In addition, the electric field across the nitride causes charge to build up in the nitride, increasing the measured capacitance over time. The rate of charging corresponds to charge injection through direct tunneling. A novel actuator that can travel stably beyond one-third of the initial gap (a trademark limitation of

  17. Nanoindentation analysis of the micromechanical anisotropy in mouse cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Michele; Balmelli, Anna; Carnelli, Davide; Courty, Diana; Schneider, Philipp; Müller, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Studies investigating micromechanical properties in mouse cortical bone often solely focus on the mechanical behaviour along the long axis of the bone. Therefore, data on the anisotropy of mouse cortical bone is scarce. The aim of this study is the first-time evaluation of the anisotropy ratio between the longitudinal and transverse directions of reduced modulus and hardness in mouse femurs by using the nanoindentation technique. For this purpose, nine 22-week-old mice (C57BL/6) were sacrificed and all femurs extracted. A total of 648 indentations were performed with a Berkovich tip in the proximal (P), central (C) and distal (D) regions of the femoral shaft in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Higher values for reduced modulus are obtained for indentations in the longitudinal direction, with anisotropy ratios of 1.72 ± 0.40 (P), 1.75 ± 0.69 (C) and 1.34 ± 0.30 (D). Hardness is also higher in the longitudinal direction, with anisotropic ratios of 1.35 ± 0.27 (P), 1.35 ± 0.47 (C) and 1.17 ± 0.19 (D). We observed a significant anisotropy in the micromechanical properties of the mouse femur, but the correlation for reduced modulus and hardness between the two directions is low (r(2) < 0.3) and not significant. Therefore, we highly recommend performing independent indentation testing in both the longitudinal and transverse directions when knowledge of the tissue mechanical behaviour along multiple directions is required.

  18. Nanoindentation analysis of the micromechanical anisotropy in mouse cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Balmelli, Anna; Carnelli, Davide; Courty, Diana; Müller, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating micromechanical properties in mouse cortical bone often solely focus on the mechanical behaviour along the long axis of the bone. Therefore, data on the anisotropy of mouse cortical bone is scarce. The aim of this study is the first-time evaluation of the anisotropy ratio between the longitudinal and transverse directions of reduced modulus and hardness in mouse femurs by using the nanoindentation technique. For this purpose, nine 22-week-old mice (C57BL/6) were sacrificed and all femurs extracted. A total of 648 indentations were performed with a Berkovich tip in the proximal (P), central (C) and distal (D) regions of the femoral shaft in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Higher values for reduced modulus are obtained for indentations in the longitudinal direction, with anisotropy ratios of 1.72 ± 0.40 (P), 1.75 ± 0.69 (C) and 1.34 ± 0.30 (D). Hardness is also higher in the longitudinal direction, with anisotropic ratios of 1.35 ± 0.27 (P), 1.35 ± 0.47 (C) and 1.17 ± 0.19 (D). We observed a significant anisotropy in the micromechanical properties of the mouse femur, but the correlation for reduced modulus and hardness between the two directions is low (r2 < 0.3) and not significant. Therefore, we highly recommend performing independent indentation testing in both the longitudinal and transverse directions when knowledge of the tissue mechanical behaviour along multiple directions is required. PMID:28386450

  19. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: A revised scope for Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering A revised scope for Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is well known for publishing excellent work in highly competitive timescales. The journal's coverage has consistently evolved to reflect the current state of the field, and from May 2010 it will revisit its scope once again. The aims of the journal remain unchanged, however: to be the first choice of authors and readers in MEMS and micro-scale research. The new scope continues to focus on highlighting the link between fabrication technologies and their capacity to create novel devices. This link will be considered paramount in the journal, and both prospective authors and readers should let it serve as an inspiration to them. The burgeoning fields of NEMS and nano-scale engineering are more explicitly supported in the new scope. Research which ten years ago would have been considered science fiction has, through the tireless efforts of the community, become reality. The Editorial Board feel it is important to reflect the growing significance of this work in the scope. The new scope, drafted by Editor-in-Chief Professor Mark Allen, and approved by the Editorial Board, is as follows: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering covers all aspects of microelectromechanical structures, devices, and systems, as well as micromechanics and micromechatronics. The journal focuses on original work in fabrication and integration technologies, on the micro- and nano-scale. The journal aims to highlight the link between new fabrication technologies and their capacity to create novel devices. Original work in microengineering and nanoengineering is also reported. Such work is defined as applications of these fabrication and integration technologies to structures in which key attributes of the devices or systems depend on specific micro- or nano-scale features. Such applications span the physical, chemical, electrical and biological realms. New fabrication and integration techniques for both silicon and non-silicon materials are

  20. The Relationship Between Crack-Tip Strain and Subcritical Cracking Thresholds for Steels in High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibur, Kevin A.; Somerday, Brian P.; Marchi, Chris San; Foulk, James W.; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Sofronis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. Thresholds for crack extension under rising displacement, K THi, for crack extension under constant displacement, K_{{THi}}^{*} , and for crack arrest under constant displacement K THa, were identified. These values were not found to be equivalent, i.e. K THi < K THa < K_{{THi}}^{*} . The hydrogen assisted fracture mechanism was determined to be strain controlled for all of the alloys in this study, and the micromechanics of strain controlled fracture are used to explain the observed disparities between the different threshold measurements. K THa and K THi differ because the strain singularity of a stationary crack is stronger than that of a propagating crack; K THa must be larger than K THi to achieve equivalent crack tip strain at the same distance from the crack tip. Hydrogen interacts with deformation mechanisms, enhancing strain localization and consequently altering both the nucleation and growth stages of strain controlled fracture mechanisms. The timing of load application and hydrogen exposure, i.e., sequential for constant displacement tests and concurrent for rising displacement tests, leads to differences in the strain history relative to the environmental exposure history and promotes the disparity between K_{{THi}}^{*} and K THi. K THi is the only conservative measurement of fracture threshold among the methods presented here.

  1. Apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation using electron photoemission in a micromechanical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskou, Irene C.; Egert, Charles M.

    2002-01-01

    A micromechanical sensor and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation involve producing photoelectrons from a metal surface in contact with a semiconductor. The photoelectrons are extracted into the semiconductor, which causes photo-induced bending. The resulting bending is measured, and a signal corresponding to the measured bending is generated and processed. A plurality of individual micromechanical sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional matrix for imaging applications.

  2. Superelement methods applications to micromechanics of high temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptation of the superelement finite-element method for micromechanics of continuous fiber high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) is described. The method is used to predict the thermomechanical behavior of P100-graphite/copper composites using MSC/NASTRAN and it is also used to validate those predicted by using an in-house computer program designed to perform micromechanics for HT-MMC. Typical results presented in the paper include unidirectional composite thermal properties, mechanical properties, and microstresses.

  3. Model GW determination of band gaps and electronic properties of strained layer InAsSb/InAs superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannstadt, W.; Asahi, R.; Freeman, A. J.; Picozzi, S.; Continenza, A.

    1998-03-01

    A strong interest is still devoted to the InAs_1-xSb_x/InAs(111) system due to the opportunity to tune the band gap as a function of the growth conditions. Lattice mismatch, strain, alloy composition and layers thickness determine the electronic and transport properies of these systems. We investigated this system using our full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method for thin films (Wimmer,Krakauer,Weinert and A.J.Freeman, Phys.Rev.B24, 864 (1981)) and bulk solids, to study overlayers, sandwiches and superlattices. Our method includes atomic force and total energy determinations of the equilibrium structures, as well as the model GW approximation(F.Gygi and A.Baldereschi, Phys.Rev.Lett. 62, 2160 (1989)) to obtain accurate band gaps. This allows us to investigate the influence of strain, structural relaxation and alloying on the electronic structure and the band gap. Results for bulk InAs, InSb and InAs_1-xSb_x, at different x compositions and for ordered superlattices will be presented.

  4. Determination of the infectious titer and virulence of an original US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus PC22A strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinsheng; Lin, Chun-Ming; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Zhongyan; Esseili, Malak A; Jung, Kwonil; El-Tholoth, Mohamed; Saif, Linda J; Wang, Qiuhong

    2015-09-25

    The infectious dose of a virus pool of original US PEDV strain PC22A was determined in 4-day-old, cesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived (CDCD) piglets. The median pig diarrhea dose (PDD50) of the virus pool was determined as 7.35 log10 PDD50/mL, similar to the cell culture infectious titer, 7.75 log10 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL. 100 PDD50 caused watery diarrhea in all conventional suckling piglets (n = 12) derived from a PEDV-naive sow, whereas 1000 and 10 000 PDD50 did not cause diarrhea in piglets derived from two PEDV-field exposed-recovered sows. This information is important for future PEDV challenge studies and validation of PEDV vaccines.

  5. Dynamically forced cantilever system: A piezo-polymer characterization tool with possible application for micromechanical HF resonator devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schwoediauer, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    A cantilever system, driven to a dynamically forced oscillation by a small piezoelectric specimen is presented as a simple and accurate tool to determine the converse dynamic piezocoefficient up to several kHz. The piezoelectric sample is mounted on top of a reflective cantilever where it is free to oscillate without any mechanical constraint. A Nomarsky-interferometer detects the induced cantilever displacement. The presented technique is especially suited for a precise characterization of small and soft piezoelectric polymer-samples with rough surfaces. The capability of the dynamically forced cantilever principle is demonstrated with a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal and with a porous ferroelectretic polypropylene foam. Results from measurements between 400 Hz and 5 kHz were found to be in excellent agreement with published values. Additionally, the dynamically forced cantilever principle may possibly improve the sensitivity of some micromechanical cantilever-sensors and it could also be interesting for the design of enhanced micromechanical high frequency mixer filters. Some ideas about are briefly presented.

  6. A Micromechanics Finite Element Model for Studying the Mechanical Behavior of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    A micromechanics model has been constructed to study the mechanical behavior of spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) for the external tank. The model was constructed using finite elements representing the fundamental repeating unit of the SOFI microstructure. The details of the micromechanics model were based on cell observations and measured average cell dimensions discerned from photomicrographs. The unit cell model is an elongated Kelvin model (fourteen-sided polyhedron with 8 hexagonal and six quadrilateral faces), which will pack to a 100% density. The cell faces and cell edges are modeled using three-dimensional 20-node brick elements. Only one-eighth of the cell is modeled due to symmetry. By exercising the model and correlating the results with the macro-mechanical foam behavior obtained through material characterization testing, the intrinsic stiffness and Poisson s Ratio of the polymeric cell walls and edges are determined as a function of temperature. The model is then exercised to study the unique and complex temperature-dependent mechanical behavior as well as the fracture initiation and propagation at the microscopic unit cell level.

  7. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Carbon/Copper Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pauly, Christopher C.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    The results of an extensive experimental characterization and a preliminary analytical modeling effort for the elastoplastic mechanical behavior of 8-harness satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites are presented. Previous experimental and modeling investigations of woven composites are discussed, as is the evolution of, and motivation for, the continuing research on C/Cu composites. Experimental results of monotonic and cyclic tension, compression, and Iosipescu shear tests, and combined tension-compression tests, are presented. With regard to the test results, emphasis is placed on the effect of strain gauge size and placement, the effect of alloying the copper matrix to improve fiber-matrix bonding, yield surface characterization, and failure mechanisms. The analytical methodology used in this investigation consists of an extension of the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) micromechanics model, developed by Aboudi (1994), to include inhomogeneity and plasticity effects on the subcell level. The extension of the model allows prediction of the elastoplastic mechanical response of woven composites, as represented by a true repeating unit cell for the woven composite. The model is used to examine the effects of refining the representative geometry of the composite, altering the composite overall fiber volume fraction, changing the size and placement of the strain gauge with respect to the composite's reinforcement weave, and including porosity within the infiltrated fiber yarns on the in-plane elastoplastic tensile, compressive, and shear response of 8-harness satin C/Cu. The model predictions are also compared with the appropriate monotonic experimental results.

  8. Micromechanical analysis of constitutive properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kenny; Dai, Qingli

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be very important in the application of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. The PSF is fabricated by coating the piezoceramic onto the silicon carbide core fiber with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process to overcome the fragile nature of the monolithic piezoelectric materials. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The PSF laminate transducer has electrical inputs/outputs that are delivered through a separate etched interdigital electrode layer. This study analyzed the electromechanical properties with the generalized dilute scheme for active PSF composite laminate by considering multiinclusions. The well-known Mori-Tanaka approach was used to evaluate the concentration tensor in the multi-inclusion micromechanics model. To accurately predict the transverse properties, the extended role of mixtures were applied by considering the inclusions' geometry and shape. The micromechanical finite element modeling was also conducted with representative volume element (RVE) to compare with the micromechanics analysis on the electromechanical properties. The micromechanics analysis and finite element micromechanical modeling were conducted with varied fiber geometry dimensions and volume fractions. These comparison studies indicate the combined micromechanics models with the generalized dilute scheme can effectively predict the electro-elastic properties of multi-inclusion PSF composites.

  9. Characterization of the embedded micromechanical device approach to the monolithic integration of MEMS with CMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Montague, S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Murray, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has developed in manufacturing processes that allow the monolithic integration of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) with driving, controlling, and signal processing electronics. This integration promises to improve the performance of micromechanical devices as well as lower the cost of manufacturing, packaging, and instrumenting these devices by combining the micromechanical devices with a electronic devices in the same manufacturing and packaging process. In order to maintain modularity and overcome some of the manufacturing challenges of the CMOS-first approach to integration, we have developed a MEMS-first process. This process places the micromechanical devices in a shallow trench, planarizes the wafer, and seals the micromechanical devices in the trench. Then, a high-temperature anneal is performed after the devices are embedded in the trench prior to microelectronics processing. This anneal stress-relieves the micromechanical polysilicon and ensures that the subsequent thermal processing associated with fabrication of the microelectronic processing does not adversely affect the mechanical properties of the polysilicon structures. These wafers with the completed, planarized micromechanical devices are then used as starting material for conventional CMOS processes. The circuit yield for the process has exceeded 98%. A description of the integration technology, the refinements to the technology, and wafer-scale parametric measurements of device characteristics is presented. Additionally, the performance of integrated sensing devices built using this technology is presented.

  10. Micromechanical processes of frictional aging and the affect of shear stress on fault healing: insights from material characterization and ultrasonic velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    During the seismic cycle, faults repeatedly fail and regain strength. The gradual strength recovery is often referred to as frictional healing, and existing works suggest that healing can play an important role in determining the mode of fault slip ranging from dynamic rupture to slow earthquakes. Laboratory studies can play an important role in identifying the processes of frictional healing and their evolution with shear strain during the seismic cycle. These studies also provide data for laboratory-derived friction constitutive laws, which can improve dynamic earthquake models. Previous work shows that frictional healing varies with shear stress on a fault during the interseismic period. Unfortunately, the micromechanical processes that cause shear stress dependent frictional healing are not well understood and cannot be incorporated into current earthquake models. In fault gouge, frictional healing involves compaction and particle rearrangement within sheared granular layers. Therefore, to address these issues, we investigate the role grain size reduction plays in frictional re-strengthening processes at different levels of shear stress. Sample material was preserved from biaxial deformation experiments on granular Westerly granite. The normal stress was held constant at 25 MPa and we performed several 100 second slide-hold-slide tests in each experiment. We conducted a series of 5 experiments each with a different value of normalized shear stress (ranging from 0 to 1), defined as the ratio of the pre-hold shear stress to the shear stress during the hold. The particle size distribution for each sample was analyzed. In addition, acoustic measurements were recorded throughout our experiments to investigate variations in ultrasonic velocity and signal amplitude that reflect changes in the elastic moduli of the layer. Acoustic monitoring provides information about healing mechanisms and can provide a link between laboratory studies and tectonic fault zones.

  11. A study of stress-induced phase transformation and micromechanical behavior of CuZr-based alloy by in-situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dongmei; Mu, Juan; Chen, Yan; ...

    2017-03-01

    The stress-induced phase transformation and micromechanical behavior of CuZr-based alloy were investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction. The pseudoelastic behavior with a pronounced strain-hardening effect is observed. The retained martensite nuclei and the residual stress obtained from the 1st cycle reduce the stress threshold for the martensitic transformation. A critical stress level is required for the reverse martensitic transformation from martensite to B2 phase. An increase of intensity for the B2 (110) plane in the 1st cycle is caused by the twinning along the {112}<111> twinning system. The convoluted stress partitioning influenced by the elastic and transformation anisotropy along with themore » newly formed martensite determines the microstress partitioning of the studied CuZr-based alloy. The reversible martensitic transformation is responsible for the pseudoelasticity. The macro mechanical behavior of the pure B2 phase can be divided into 3 stages, which are mediated by the evolvement of the martensitic transformation. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan).« less

  12. Resistance determinants and mobile genetic elements of an NDM-1-encoding Klebsiella pneumoniae strain.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Corey M; Bent, Zachary W; Meagher, Robert J; Williams, Kelly P

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are emerging as a serious infectious disease challenge. These strains can accumulate many antibiotic resistance genes though horizontal transfer of genetic elements, those for β-lactamases being of particular concern. Some β-lactamases are active on a broad spectrum of β-lactams including the last-resort carbapenems. The gene for the broad-spectrum and carbapenem-active metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1 is rapidly spreading. We present the complete genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, the first U.S. isolate found to encode NDM-1, and describe its repertoire of antibiotic-resistance genes and mutations, including genes for eight β-lactamases and 15 additional antibiotic-resistance enzymes. To elucidate the evolution of this rich repertoire, the mobile elements of the genome were characterized, including four plasmids with varying degrees of conservation and mosaicism and eleven chromosomal genomic islands. One island was identified by a novel phylogenomic approach, that further indicated the cps-lps polysaccharide synthesis locus, where operon translocation and fusion was noted. Unique plasmid segments and mosaic junctions were identified. Plasmid-borne blaCTX-M-15 was transposed recently to the chromosome by ISEcp1. None of the eleven full copies of IS26, the most frequent IS element in the genome, had the expected 8-bp direct repeat of the integration target sequence, suggesting that each copy underwent homologous recombination subsequent to its last transposition event. Comparative analysis likewise indicates IS26 as a frequent recombinational junction between plasmid ancestors, and also indicates a resolvase site. In one novel use of high-throughput sequencing, homologously recombinant subpopulations of the bacterial culture were detected. In a second novel use, circular transposition intermediates were detected for the novel insertion sequence ISKpn21 of the ISNCY family, suggesting that it uses the two

  13. Determination of biological and physicochemical parameters of Artemia franciscana strains in hypersaline environments for aquaculture in the Colombian Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, William N; Durán, Gabriel C; Rada, Orlando C; Hernández, Licet C; Linero, Juan-Carlos G; Muelle, Igor M; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background Artemia (Crustacea, Anostraca), also known as brine shrimp, are typical inhabitants of extreme environments. These hypersaline environments vary considerably in their physicochemical composition, and even their climatic conditions and elevation. Several thalassohaline (marine) environments along the Colombian Caribbean coast were surveyed in order to contribute to the knowledge of brine shrimp biotopes in South America by determining some vital biological and physicochemical parameters for Artemia survival. Additionally, cyst quality tests, biometrical and essential fatty acids analysis were performed to evaluate the economic viability of some of these strains for the aquaculture industry. Results In addition to the three locations (Galerazamba, Manaure, and Pozos Colorados) reported in the literature three decades ago in the Colombian Caribbean, six new locations were registered (Salina Cero, Kangaru, Tayrona, Bahía Hondita, Warrego and Pusheo). All habitats sampled showed that chloride was the prevailing anion, as expected, because of their thalassohaline origin. There were significant differences in cyst diameter grouping strains in the following manner according to this parameter: 1) San Francisco Bay (SFB-Control, USA), 2) Galerazamba and Tayrona, 3) Kangarú, 4) Manaure, and 5) Salina Cero and Pozos Colorados. Chorion thickness values were smaller in Tayrona, followed by Salina Cero, Galerazamba, Manaure, SFB, Kangarú and Pozos Colorados. There were significant differences in naupliar size, grouping strains as follows (smallest to largest): 1) Galerazamba, 2) Manaure, 3) SFB, Kangarú, and Salina Cero, 4) Pozos Colorados, and 5) Tayrona. Overall, cyst quality analysis conducted on samples from Manaure, Galerazamba, and Salina Cero revealed that all sites exhibited a relatively high number of cysts.g-1. Essential fatty acids (EFA) analysis performed on nauplii from cyst samples from Manaure, Galerazamba, Salina Cero and Tayrona revealed that cysts

  14. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric information (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.

  15. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; ...

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric informationmore » (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.« less

  16. Effect of transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation on short-term right ventricular function as determined by two-dimensional speckle tracking strain and strain rate imaging.

    PubMed

    Moiduddin, Nasser; Asoh, Kentaro; Slorach, Cameron; Benson, Leland N; Friedberg, Mark K

    2009-09-15

    Transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation (PVI) is an emerging therapy for right ventricular (RV) outflow dysfunction in congenital heart disease. We investigated, for the first time in children after surgery for congenital heart disease, the short-term effects of PVI on RV and left ventricular (LV) function using 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging. We hypothesized that the short-term RV and LV function would improve. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiograms and pulsed tissue Doppler images were obtained before and 1 to 2 days after PVI (18-mm Melody valve). The catheter right heart hemodynamics were recorded. The strain and strain rate of the basal lateral left ventricle, lateral right ventricle, and interventricular septum were measured by 2-dimensional speckle tracking echo, and the pre- and postprocedure values were compared. Of the 16 eligible patients (age 16 +/- 2 years), the scans of 10 had correct image format and adequate quality. PVI was performed for volume (n = 4) or combined pressure-volume (n = 6) loading. After PVI, the RV to pulmonary artery pressure gradient (33 +/- 22 to 12 +/- 4 mm Hg, p = 0.02), pulmonary regurgitation, and RV end-diastolic volume (3.2 +/- 0.8 to 2.8 +/- 0.6 cm, p = 0.02) decreased, and the septal systolic velocities (3.5 +/- 1.1 to 4.7 +/- 1.1 cm/s, p = 0.04), strain (-7.6 +/- 9.3% to -15.6% +/- 6.7%, p = 0.01) and strain rate (-0.3 +/- 1.1 to -1.1 +/- 0.5 1/s, p = 0.04) and RV free wall strain increased (-17.4 +/- 8.6% to -23.4% +/- 6.2%, p = 0.03). The LV tissue velocities, strain, and strain rate were unchanged. In conclusion, PVI leads to RV unloading and acutely improves RV and septal function.

  17. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: Acoustic emissions and electron channeling analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1990-06-01

    The objectives of this work are to: (i) Evaluate the initial stages of cleavage nucleation in single and polycrystalline samples; (ii) Determine the controlling event(s) which lead(s) to unstable cleavage (is it an unstable cluster'' of microcracks or a crack-tip opening displacement criterion for an array of ligaments surrounding these microcracks ); (iii) Determine how the process zone, which depends upon microstructure and processing history, affects the controlling event(s); (iv) Use selected area channeling patterns (SACP's) to assist in an independent measure of the cleavage fracture stress of grains cleaved at or just outside the elastic-plastic boundary; also, use it to evaluate static and dynamic strain distributions; and (v) Evaluate the effects of dislocation shielding and overload using combined methods of computational mechanics with discretized dislocation arrays and direct observations of dislocations using channeling, etch pit and birefringence methods. Accomplishments are discussed. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Influence of Copper Resistance Determinants on Gold Transformation by Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34

    PubMed Central

    Wiesemann, Nicole; Mohr, Juliane; Grosse, Cornelia; Herzberg, Martin; Hause, Gerd; Reith, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans is associated with gold grains and may be involved in their formation. Gold(III) complexes influence the transcriptome of C. metallidurans (F. Reith et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 106:17757–17762, 2009), leading to the upregulation of genes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and metal ions. In a systematic study, the involvement of these systems in gold transformation was investigated. Treatment of C. metallidurans cells with Au(I) complexes, which occur in this organism's natural environment, led to the upregulation of genes similar to those observed for treatment with Au(III) complexes. The two indigenous plasmids of C. metallidurans, which harbor several transition metal resistance determinants, were not involved in resistance to Au(I/III) complexes nor in their transformation to metallic nanoparticles. Upregulation of a cupA-lacZ fusion by the MerR-type regulator CupR with increasing Au(III) concentrations indicated the presence of gold ions in the cytoplasm. A hypothesis stating that the Gig system detoxifies gold complexes by the uptake and reduction of Au(III) to Au(I) or Au(0) reminiscent to detoxification of Hg(II) was disproven. ZupT and other secondary uptake systems for transition metal cations influenced Au(III) resistance but not the upregulation of the cupA-lacZ fusion. The two copper-exporting P-type ATPases CupA and CopF were also not essential for gold resistance. The copABCD determinant on chromosome 2, which encodes periplasmic proteins involved in copper resistance, was required for full gold resistance in C. metallidurans. In conclusion, biomineralization of gold particles via the reduction of mobile Au(I/III) complexes in C. metallidurans appears to primarily occur in the periplasmic space via copper-handling systems. PMID:23475973

  19. A method to determine the duration of the eclipse phase for in vitro infection with a highly pathogenic SHIV strain

    PubMed Central

    Kakizoe, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Shinji; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.; Morita, Satoru; Mori, Hiromi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Miura, Tomoyuki; Iwami, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The time elapsed between successful cell infection and the start of virus production is called the eclipse phase. Its duration is specific to each virus strain and, along with an effective virus production rate, plays a key role in infection kinetics. How the eclipse phase varies amongst cells infected with the same virus strain and therefore how best to mathematically represent its duration is not clear. Most mathematical models either neglect this phase or assume it is exponentially distributed, such that at least some if not all cells can produce virus immediately upon infection. Biologically, this is unrealistic (one must allow for the translation, transcription, export, etc. to take place), but could be appropriate if the duration of the eclipse phase is negligible on the time-scale of the infection. If it is not, however, ignoring this delay affects the accuracy of the mathematical model, its parameter estimates, and predictions. Here, we introduce a new approach, consisting in a carefully designed experiment and simple analytical expressions, to determine the duration and distribution of the eclipse phase in vitro. We find that the eclipse phase of SHIV-KS661 lasts on average one day and is consistent with an Erlang distribution. PMID:25996439

  20. An Inverse Interpolation Method Utilizing In-Flight Strain Measurements for Determining Loads and Structural Response of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shkarayev, S.; Krashantisa, R.; Tessler, A.

    2004-01-01

    An important and challenging technology aimed at the next generation of aerospace vehicles is that of structural health monitoring. The key problem is to determine accurately, reliably, and in real time the applied loads, stresses, and displacements experienced in flight, with such data establishing an information database for structural health monitoring. The present effort is aimed at developing a finite element-based methodology involving an inverse formulation that employs measured surface strains to recover the applied loads, stresses, and displacements in an aerospace vehicle in real time. The computational procedure uses a standard finite element model (i.e., "direct analysis") of a given airframe, with the subsequent application of the inverse interpolation approach. The inverse interpolation formulation is based on a parametric approximation of the loading and is further constructed through a least-squares minimization of calculated and measured strains. This procedure results in the governing system of linear algebraic equations, providing the unknown coefficients that accurately define the load approximation. Numerical simulations are carried out for problems involving various levels of structural approximation. These include plate-loading examples and an aircraft wing box. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed method are discussed in detail. The experimental validation of the methodology by way of structural testing of an aircraft wing is also discussed.

  1. A method to determine the duration of the eclipse phase for in vitro infection with a highly pathogenic SHIV strain.

    PubMed

    Kakizoe, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Shinji; Beauchemin, Catherine A A; Morita, Satoru; Mori, Hiromi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Miura, Tomoyuki; Iwami, Shingo

    2015-05-21

    The time elapsed between successful cell infection and the start of virus production is called the eclipse phase. Its duration is specific to each virus strain and, along with an effective virus production rate, plays a key role in infection kinetics. How the eclipse phase varies amongst cells infected with the same virus strain and therefore how best to mathematically represent its duration is not clear. Most mathematical models either neglect this phase or assume it is exponentially distributed, such that at least some if not all cells can produce virus immediately upon infection. Biologically, this is unrealistic (one must allow for the translation, transcription, export, etc. to take place), but could be appropriate if the duration of the eclipse phase is negligible on the time-scale of the infection. If it is not, however, ignoring this delay affects the accuracy of the mathematical model, its parameter estimates, and predictions. Here, we introduce a new approach, consisting in a carefully designed experiment and simple analytical expressions, to determine the duration and distribution of the eclipse phase in vitro. We find that the eclipse phase of SHIV-KS661 lasts on average one day and is consistent with an Erlang distribution.

  2. Diversity and Specificity of Frankia Strains in Nodules of Sympatric Myrica gale, Alnus incana, and Shepherdia canadensis Determined by rrs Gene Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Valerie; Batzli, Janet Mccray; Zimpfer, Jeff F.; Normand, Philippe; Dawson, Jeffrey O.; Fernandez, Maria P.

    2001-01-01

    The identity of Frankia strains from nodules of Myrica gale, Alnus incana subsp. rugosa, and Shepherdia canadensis was determined for a natural stand on a lake shore sand dune in Wisconsin, where the three actinorhizal plant species were growing in close proximity, and from two additional stands with M. gale as the sole actinorhizal component. Unisolated strains were compared by their 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction patterns using a direct PCR amplification protocol on nodules. Phylogenetic relationships among nodular Frankia strains were analyzed by comparing complete 16S rDNA sequences of study and reference strains. Where the three actinorhizal species occurred together, each host species was nodulated by a different phylogenetic group of Frankia strains. M. gale strains from all three sites belonged to an Alnus-Casuarina group, closely related to Frankia alni representative strains, and were low in diversity for a host genus considered promiscuous with respect to Frankia microsymbiont genotype. Frankia strains from A. incana nodules were also within the Alnus-Casuarina cluster, distinct from Frankia strains of M. gale nodules at the mixed actinorhizal site but not from Frankia strains from two M. gale nodules at a second site in Wisconsin. Frankia strains from nodules of S. canadensis belonged to a divergent subset of a cluster of Elaeagnaceae-infective strains and exhibited a high degree of diversity. The three closely related local Frankia populations in Myrica nodules could be distinguished from one another using our approach. In addition to geographic separation and host selectivity for Frankia microsymbionts, edaphic factors such as soil moisture and organic matter content, which varied among locales, may account for differences in Frankia populations found in Myrica nodules. PMID:11319089

  3. Digital image correlation and infrared measurements to determine the influence of a uniaxial pre-strain on fatigue properties of a dual phase steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, R.; Doudard, C.; Calloch, S.; Weber, B.

    2010-06-01

    The high cycle fatigue (HCF) is a major element for a great design of automotive parts. A wide part of the steel sheets for the automotive industry are stamped, sometimes deeply. During this operation, the steel is plastically strained in different directions, so that a good prediction of the fatigue behavior requires the determination of the fatigue properties of the pre-strained material. Nowadays, the evolution of HCF properties is often neglected, because of prohibitive time dedicated to traditional fatigue campaigns. To reduce the characterization time, self-heating measurements are used. This approach permits to identify the influence of homogeneous pre-strain on fatigue properties. The aim of this paper is to develop an original experimental test to identify this influence for a wide range of pre-strain with only one specimen. The study of a particular case of specimen with a constant gradient of pre-strain is presented. Digital image correlation is a way to determine the heterogeneity of the plastic pre-strain on the specimen and infrared measurements with a ”1D” approach allows the determination of the influence of a plastic pre-strain on the fatigue properties of the studied steel.

  4. Determining the Mechanical Constitutive Properties of Metals as Function of Strain Rate and temperature: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Robertson

    2007-04-28

    Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain-rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions. To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be integrated fully with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experiment is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models. One aspect of the program involves the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an

  5. [Investigation of pathogenic phenotypes and virulence determinants of food-borne Salmonella enterica strains in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model].

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Deniz; Şen, Ece

    2015-10-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars with the consumption of contaminated food, is one of the leading food-borne disease that makes microbial food safety an important public health issue. This study was performed in order to determine the antibiotic resistance, serotyping, plasmid profiles and pathogenicity potentials of food-borne Salmonella isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system in Edirne province, located at Thrace region of Turkey. In this study, 32 Salmonella isolates, of which 26 belonged to Infantis, four to Enteritidis, one to Telaviv and one to Kentucky serovars, isolated from chicken carcasses were used. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. A new C.elegans nematode animal model system was used to determine the pathogenicity potential of the isolates. The antibiotic resistance profiles revealed that one (3.1%) isolate was resistant to gentamicin, two (6.2%) to ciprofloxacin, three (9.4%) to ampicillin, 18 (56.3%) to kanamycin, 19 (60.8%) to neomycin, 25 (78.1%) to tetracycline, 25 (78.1%) to trimethoprim, 26 (81.25%) to nalidixic acid, 27 (84.4%) to streptomycin and 32 (100%) to sulfonamide. All of the 32 strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ampicillin/sulbactam. High levels of resistance to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, kanamycin and neomycin was determined. According to the plasmid analysis, six isolates (18.75%) harboured 1-3 plasmids with sizes between 1.2 and 42.4 kb. In C.elegans nematode animal model system, the time (in days) required to kill 50% (TD50) of nematodes was calculated for each experimental group. TD50 values of the nematode group fed with S.Typhimurium ATCC 14028 that was used as the positive control and another group fed with E.coli OP50 as the negative control were 4.2 ± 0.5 days and 8.0 ± 0.02 days, respectively. TD50 of the groups fed with Salmonella isolates ranged

  6. Significance of mechanical alterations in single ventricle patients on twisting and circumferential strain as determined by analysis of strain from gradient cine magnetic resonance imaging sequences.

    PubMed

    Truong, Uyen T; Li, Xiaokui; Broberg, Craig S; Houle, Helene; Schaal, Michael; Ashraf, Muhammad; Kilner, Philip; Sheehan, Florence H; Sable, Craig A; Ge, Shuping; Sahn, David J

    2010-05-15

    Preliminary speckle-tracking echocardiographic studies show that patients with single ventricles (SVs) have significantly decreased twisting and dyssynchrony of twisting. This could be related to abnormal cardiac looping, which leads to hearts that lack helical fiber patterns. The aim of this study was to analyze gradient cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Velocity Vector Imaging to assess cardiac mechanics. Subjects were 38 patients (aged 8 to 37 years) with SVs of left ventricular (n = 30) and indeterminate (n = 8) type who underwent cardiac MRI. Controls were 14 normal children and adults. Gradient cine MRI sequences close to the apex were subjected to a Velocity Vector Imaging analysis program adapted for MRI. In the control group, mean circumferential strain was -18.02 +/- 7.31%, mean dispersion of peak circumferential strain was 44.23 +/- 37.14 ms, and average rotation was -7.7 +/- 1.38 degrees . The rotation values were negative, or counterclockwise. In patients with SVs, mean circumferential strain was -8.87 +/- 7.30%, mean dispersion of peak circumferential strain was 181.55 +/- 76.07 ms, and average rotation was -2.6 +/- 1.24 degrees (p <0.001). Mean dispersion of the peak of rotation in the control group was 39.6 +/- 22.8 ms, compared to 166.5 +/- 72.4 ms in patients with SVs. In conclusion, this study showed a dramatic decrease in apical rotation and circumferential strain in the SV group compared to the control group. Strain and rotation mechanics at the apex in patients with SVs showed marked dyssynchrony. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards in situ determination of 3D strain and reorientation in the interpenetrating nanofibre networks of cuticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; De Falco, P; Wang, Y; Barbieri, E; Paris, O; Terrill, N J; Falkenberg, G; Pugno, N M; Gupta, H S

    2017-08-10

    Determining the in situ 3D nano- and microscale strain and reorientation fields in hierarchical nanocomposite materials is technically very challenging. Such a determination is important to understand the mechanisms enabling their functional optimization. An example of functional specialization to high dynamic mechanical resistance is the crustacean stomatopod cuticle. Here we develop a new 3D X-ray nanostrain reconstruction method combining analytical modelling of the diffraction signal, fibre-composite theory and in situ deformation, to determine the hitherto unknown nano- and microscale deformation mechanisms in stomatopod tergite cuticle. Stomatopod cuticle at the nanoscale consists of mineralized chitin fibres and calcified protein matrix, which form (at the microscale) plywood (Bouligand) layers with interpenetrating pore-canal fibres. We uncover anisotropic deformation patterns inside Bouligand lamellae, accompanied by load-induced fibre reorientation and pore-canal fibre compression. Lamination theory was used to decouple in-plane fibre reorientation from diffraction intensity changes induced by 3D lamellae tilting. Our method enables separation of deformation dynamics at multiple hierarchical levels, a critical consideration in the cooperative mechanics characteristic of biological and bioinspired materials. The nanostrain reconstruction technique is general, depending only on molecular-level fibre symmetry and can be applied to the in situ dynamics of advanced nanostructured materials with 3D hierarchical design.

  8. Functional interface micromechanics of 11 en-bloc retrieved cemented femoral hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark A; Verdonschot, Nico; Izant, Timothy H; Race, Amos

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Despite the longstanding use of micromotion as a measure of implant stability, direct measurement of the micromechanics of implant/bone interfaces from en bloc human retrievals has not been performed. The purpose of this study was to determine the stem-cement and cement-bone micromechanics of functionally loaded, en-bloc retrieved, cemented femoral hip components. Methods 11 fresh frozen proximal femurs with cemented implants were retrieved at autopsy. Specimens were sectioned transversely into 10-mm slabs and fixed to a loading device where functional torsional loads were applied to the stem. A digital image correlation technique was used to document micromotions at stem-cement and cement-bone interfaces during loading. Results There was a wide range of responses with stem-cement micromotions ranging from 0.0006 mm to 0.83 mm (mean 0.17 mm, SD 0.29) and cement-bone micromotions ranging from 0.0022 mm to 0.73 mm (mean 0.092 mm, SD 0.22). There was a strong (linear-log) inverse correlation between apposition fraction and micromotion at the stem-cement interface (r2 = 0.71, p < 0.001). There was a strong inverse log-log correlation between apposition fraction at the cement-bone interface and micromotion (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). Components that were radiographically well-fixed had a relatively narrow range of micromotions at the stem-cement (0.0006–0.057 mm) and cement-bone (0.0022–0.029 mm) interfaces. Interpretatation Minimizing gaps at the stem-cement interface and encouraging bony apposition at the cement-bone interface would be clinically desirable. The cement-bone interface does not act as a bonded interface in actual use, even in radiographically well-fixed components. Rather, the interface is quite compliant, with sliding and opening motions between the cement and bone surfaces. PMID:20367421

  9. Advances in Micromechanics Modeling of Composites Structures for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada, Albert

    Although high performance, light-weight composites are increasingly being used in applications ranging from aircraft, rotorcraft, weapon systems and ground vehicles, the assurance of structural reliability remains a critical issue. In composites, damage is absorbed through various fracture processes, including fiber failure, matrix cracking and delamination. An important element in achieving reliable composite systems is a strong capability of assessing and inspecting physical damage of critical structural components. Installation of a robust Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system would be very valuable in detecting the onset of composite failure. A number of major issues still require serious attention in connection with the research and development aspects of sensor-integrated reliable SHM systems for composite structures. In particular, the sensitivity of currently available sensor systems does not allow detection of micro level damage; this limits the capability of data driven SHM systems. As a fundamental layer in SHM, modeling can provide in-depth information on material and structural behavior for sensing and detection, as well as data for learning algorithms. This dissertation focuses on the development of a multiscale analysis framework, which is used to detect various forms of damage in complex composite structures. A generalized method of cells based micromechanics analysis, as implemented in NASA's MAC/GMC code, is used for the micro-level analysis. First, a baseline study of MAC/GMC is performed to determine the governing failure theories that best capture the damage progression. The deficiencies associated with various layups and loading conditions are addressed. In most micromechanics analysis, a representative unit cell (RUC) with a common fiber packing arrangement is used. The effect of variation in this arrangement within the RUC has been studied and results indicate this variation influences the macro-scale effective material properties and

  10. An integrated micromechanical large particle in flow sorter (MILPIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    At present, the major hurdle to widespread deployment of zebrafish embryo and larvae in large-scale drug development projects is lack of enabling high-throughput analytical platforms. In order to spearhead drug discovery with the use of zebrafish as a model, platforms need to integrate automated pre-test sorting of organisms (to ensure quality control and standardization) and their in-test positioning (suitable for high-content imaging) with modules for flexible drug delivery. The major obstacle hampering sorting of millimetre sized particles such as zebrafish embryos on chip-based devices is their substantial diameter (above one millimetre), mass (above one milligram), which both lead to rapid gravitational-induced sedimentation and high inertial forces. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present an innovative design of a micromechanical large particle in-flow sorter (MILPIS) capable of analysing, sorting and dispensing living zebrafish embryos for drug discovery applications. The system consisted of a microfluidic network, revolving micromechanical receptacle actuated by robotic servomotor and opto-electronic sensing module. The prototypes were fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. Elements of MILPIS were also fabricated in an optically transparent VisiJet resin using 3D stereolithography (SLA) processes (ProJet 7000HD, 3D Systems). The device operation was based on a rapidly revolving miniaturized mechanical receptacle. The latter function was to hold and position individual fish embryos for (i) interrogation, (ii) sorting decision-making and (iii) physical sorting..The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers embedded in the system

  11. Micromechanical modeling of the viscoplastic behavior of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnau, O.; Blackman, D. K.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Ponte CastañEda, P.

    2008-09-01

    Efforts to couple mantle flow models with rheological theories of mineral deformation typically ignore the effect of texture development on flow evolution. The fact that there are only three easy slip systems for dislocation glide in olivine crystals leads to strong mechanical interactions between the grains as the deformation proceeds, and subsequent development of large viscoplastic anisotropy in polycrystals exhibiting pronounced Lattice Preferred Orientations. Using full-field simulations for creep in dry polycrystalline olivine at high temperature and low pressure, it is shown that very large stress and strain rate intragranular heterogeneities can build up with deformation, which increase dramatically with the strength of the hard slip system (included for the purpose of enabling general deformations). Compared with earlier nonlinear extensions of the Self-Consistent mean-field theory to simulate polycrystal deformation, the "Second-Order" method is the only one capable of accurately describing the effect of intraphase stress heterogeneities on the macroscopic flow stress, as well as on the local stress- and strain rate fluctuations in the material. In particular, this approach correctly predicts that olivine polycrystals can deform with only four independent slip systems. The resistance of the fourth system (or accommodation mechanism), which is likely provided by dislocation climb or grain boundary processes as has been observed experimentally, may essentially determine the flow stress of olivine polycrystals. We further show that the "tangent" model, which had been used extensively in prior geophysical studies of the mantle, departs significantly from the full-field reference solutions.

  12. Determining the directional strain shift coefficients for tensile Ge: a combined x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzelstorfer, Tanja; Wyss, Andreas; Süess, Martin J.; Schlich, Franziska F.; Geiger, Richard; Frigerio, Jacopo; Stangl, Julian

    2017-02-01

    In this work the calibration of the directional Raman strain shift coefficient for tensile strained Ge microstructures is reported. The strain shift coefficient is retrieved from micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements in combination with absolute strain measurements from x-ray diffraction using focused synchrotron radiation. The results are used to fit the phonon deformation potentials. A linear dependence of the phonon deformation potentials p and q is revealed. The method can be extended to provide strain calibration of Raman experiments also in other material system.

  13. Determining Recoverable and Irrecoverable Contributions to Accumulated Strain in a NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy During Thermomechanical Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, J. A.; Karaman, I.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Bigelow, G.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S., II

    2011-01-01

    When Ni(29.5)Ti(50.5)Pd30 shape memory alloy is thermally cycled under stress, significant strain can accumulate due to elasticity, remnant oriented martensite and plasticity. The strain due to remnant martensite can be recovered by further thermal cycling under 0 MPa until the original transformation-induced volume change and martensite coefficient of thermal expansion are obtained. Using this technique, it was determined that the 8.15% total accumulated strain after cycling under 200 MPa consisted of 0.38%, 3.97% and 3.87% for elasticity, remnant oriented martensite and creep/plasticity, respectively.

  14. Determining Recoverable and Irrecoverable Contributions to Accumulated Strain in a NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy During Thermomechanical Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, J. A.; Karaman, I.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Bigelow, G.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S., II

    2011-01-01

    When Ni(29.5)Ti(50.5)Pd30 shape memory alloy is thermally cycled under stress, significant strain can accumulate due to elasticity, remnant oriented martensite and plasticity. The strain due to remnant martensite can be recovered by further thermal cycling under 0 MPa until the original transformation-induced volume change and martensite coefficient of thermal expansion are obtained. Using this technique, it was determined that the 8.15% total accumulated strain after cycling under 200 MPa consisted of 0.38%, 3.97% and 3.87% for elasticity, remnant oriented martensite and creep/plasticity, respectively.

  15. Determination of resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium strains isolated from poultry and their genotypic characterization by ADSRRS-fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, A; Ziólkowska, G; Troscianczyk, A; Zieba, P; Gnat, S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance of E. faecalis and E. faecium strains isolated from poultry and to carry out genotypic characterization thereof with the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method (amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites) and analysis of the genetic relatedness between the isolates with different resistance and virulence determinants. Samples were collected from 70 4-week-old chickens and tested for Enterococcus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of 11 antimicrobials were determined using the broth microdilution method. Detection of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes was performed using PCR, and molecular analysis was carried out using the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method. The highest percentage of strains was resistant to tetracycline (60.5%) and erythromycin (54.4%), and a large number exhibited high-level resistance to both kanamycin (42.1%) and streptomycin (34.2%). Among 8 genes encoding AME, the tested strains showed mainly the presence of [aph(3΄)-IIIa], [ant(6)-Ia], [aac(6΄)-Ie-aph(2΄΄)-Ia], and [ant(9)-Ia] genes. Phenotypic resistance to erythromycin was encoded in 98.4% strains by the ermB gene. Genotypic resistance to tetracycline in E. faecium was associated with the presence of tetM and tetL (respectively, in 95.5 and 57.7% of the isolates); in contrast, E. faecalis strains were characterized mainly by the presence of tetO (83.3%). The virulence profile was homogenous for all E. faecium strains and included only efaAfm and ccf genes. All E. faecalis strains exhibited efaAfs, gelE, and genes encoding sex pheromones. The strains tested exhibited 34 genotypic profiles. Comparative analysis of phenotypic and genotypic resistance and virulence profiles and confrontation thereof with the genotypes of the strains tested showed that strains assigned to a particular genotype have an identical phenotypic resistance profile and a panel of resistance and virulence genes. The results of this

  16. Constitutive Modelling for Granular Material under Finite Strains with Particle Slidings and Fabric Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-04

    Eartquake Engineering, Chang, C.S., Chang, Y. and Kabir, M.G. (1991b), "Micromechanics Modelling for the Stress-Strain-Strength Behavior of Granular Materials...Principal Stress on the Strength of Sand," Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Mexico

  17. Y4lO of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Is a Symbiotic Determinant Required for Symbiosome Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Juan; Cheng, Li-Li; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Wei-Jun; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Nan; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Type 3 (T3) effector proteins, secreted by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia with a bacterial T3 secretion system, affect the nodulation of certain host legumes. The open reading frame y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 encodes a protein with sequence similarities to T3 effectors from pathogenic bacteria (the YopJ effector family). Transcription studies showed that the promoter activity of y4lO depended on the transcriptional activator TtsI. Recombinant Y4lO protein expressed in Escherichia coli did not acetylate two representative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (human MKK6 and MKK1 from Medicago truncatula), indicating that YopJ-like proteins differ with respect to their substrate specificities. The y4lO gene was mutated in NGR234 (strain NGRΩy4lO) and in NGRΩnopL, a mutant that does not produce the T3 effector NopL (strain NGRΩnopLΩy4lO). When used as inoculants, the symbiotic properties of the mutants differed. Tephrosia vogelii, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Yudou No. 1, and Vigna unguiculata cv. Sui Qing Dou Jiao formed pink effective nodules with NGR234 and NGRΩnopLΩy4lO. Nodules induced by NGRΩy4lO were first pink but rapidly turned greenish (ineffective nodules), indicating premature senescence. An ultrastructural analysis of the nodules induced by NGRΩy4lO revealed abnormal formation of enlarged infection droplets in ineffective nodules, whereas symbiosomes harboring a single bacteroid were frequently observed in effective nodules induced by NGR234 or NGRΩnopLΩy4lO. It is concluded that Y4lO is a symbiotic determinant involved in the differentiation of symbiosomes. Y4lO mitigated senescence-inducing effects caused by the T3 effector NopL, suggesting synergistic effects for Y4lO and NopL in nitrogen-fixing nodules. PMID:19060155

  18. Y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a symbiotic determinant required for symbiosome differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Juan; Cheng, Li-Li; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Wei-Jun; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Nan; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2009-02-01

    Type 3 (T3) effector proteins, secreted by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia with a bacterial T3 secretion system, affect the nodulation of certain host legumes. The open reading frame y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 encodes a protein with sequence similarities to T3 effectors from pathogenic bacteria (the YopJ effector family). Transcription studies showed that the promoter activity of y4lO depended on the transcriptional activator TtsI. Recombinant Y4lO protein expressed in Escherichia coli did not acetylate two representative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (human MKK6 and MKK1 from Medicago truncatula), indicating that YopJ-like proteins differ with respect to their substrate specificities. The y4lO gene was mutated in NGR234 (strain NGROmegay4lO) and in NGR Omega nopL, a mutant that does not produce the T3 effector NopL (strain NGR Omega nopLOmegay4lO). When used as inoculants, the symbiotic properties of the mutants differed. Tephrosia vogelii, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Yudou No. 1, and Vigna unguiculata cv. Sui Qing Dou Jiao formed pink effective nodules with NGR234 and NGR Omega nopL Omega y4lO. Nodules induced by NGR Omega y4lO were first pink but rapidly turned greenish (ineffective nodules), indicating premature senescence. An ultrastructural analysis of the nodules induced by NGR Omega y4lO revealed abnormal formation of enlarged infection droplets in ineffective nodules, whereas symbiosomes harboring a single bacteroid were frequently observed in effective nodules induced by NGR234 or NGR Omega nopL Omega y4lO. It is concluded that Y4lO is a symbiotic determinant involved in the differentiation of symbiosomes. Y4lO mitigated senescence-inducing effects caused by the T3 effector NopL, suggesting synergistic effects for Y4lO and NopL in nitrogen-fixing nodules.

  19. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: STM, TEM and electron channeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The original thrust of this grant was to apply newly developed techniques in scanning tunneling and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of brittle fracture. This grant spun-off several new directions in that some of the findings on bulk structural materials could be utilized on thin films or intermetallic single crystals. Modeling and material evaluation efforts in this grant are represented in a figure. Out of this grant evolved the field the author has designated as Contact Fracture Mechanics. By appropriate modeling of stress and strain distribution fields around normal indentations or scratch tracks, various measures of thin film fracture or decohesion and brittle fracture of low ductility intermetallics is possible. These measures of fracture resistance in small volumes are still evolving and as such no standard technique or analysis has been uniformly accepted. For brittle ceramics and ceramic films, there are a number of acceptable analyses such as those published by Lawn, Evans and Hutchinson. For more dissipative systems involving metallic or polymeric films and/or substrates, there is still much to be accomplished as can be surmised from some of the findings in the present grant. In Section 2 the author reviews the funding history and accomplishments associated mostly with bulk brittle fracture. This is followed by Section 3 which covers more recent work on using novel techniques to evaluate fracture in low ductility single crystals or thin films using micromechanical probes. Basically Section 3 outlines how the recent work fits in with the goals of defining contact fracture mechanics and gives an overview of how the several examples in Section 4 (the Appendices) fit into this framework.

  20. Neutron diffraction measurements and micromechanical modelling of temperature-dependent variations in TATB lattice parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, John D.; Luscher, Darby J.; Vogel, Sven C.; ...

    2016-02-02

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. TATB-based explosives exhibit irreversible volume expansion (“ratchet growth”) when thermally cycled. A theoretical understanding of the relationship between anisotropy of the crystal, crystal orientation distribution (texture) of polycrystalline aggregates, and the intergranular interactions leading to this irreversible growth is necessary to accurately develop physics-based predictive models for TATB-based PBXs under various thermal environments. In this work, TATB lattice parameters were measured using neutron diffraction during thermal cycling of loose powder and a pressed pellet. The measured lattice parameters help clarify conflicting reports in the literaturemore » as these new results are more consistent with one set of previous results than another. The lattice parameters of pressed TATB were also measured as a function of temperature, showing some differences from the powder. This data is used along with anisotropic single-crystal stiffness moduli reported in the literature to model the nominal stresses associated with intergranular constraints during thermal expansion. The texture of both specimens were characterized and the pressed pellet exhibits preferential orientation of (001) poles along the pressing direction, whereas no preferred orientation was found for the loose powder. Lastly, thermal strains for single-crystal TATB computed from lattice parameter data for the powder is input to a self-consistent micromechanical model, which predicts the lattice parameters of the constrained TATB crystals within the pellet. The agreement of these model results with the diffraction data obtained from the pellet is discussed along with future directions of research.« less

  1. Data-driven stochastic models for spatial uncertainties in micromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwan, Aravind; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    Accurate uncertainty quantification in engineering systems requires the use of proper data-driven stochastic models that bear a good fidelity with respect to experimentally observed variations. This paper looks at a variety of modeling techniques to represent spatially varying uncertainties in a form that can be incorporated into numerical simulations. In the context of microelectromechanical systems, we consider spatial uncertainties at the device level in the form of surface roughness and at the wafer level in the form of non-uniformities that arise as a result of various microfabrication steps. We discuss methods to obtain roughness characterization data ranging from the use of a simple profilometer probe to imaging-based techniques for the extraction of digitized data from images. We model spatial uncertainties as second-order stochastic process and use Bayesian inference to estimate the model parameters from the input data. We apply the data-driven stochastic models generated from this process to micromechanical actuators and sensors in which these spatial uncertainties are likely to cause significant variation. These include an electrostatically-actuated torsion-spring micromirror, an electromechanical comb-drive actuator and a pressure sensor with a piezoresistive strain gauge. We show that the performance of these devices is sensitive to the presence of spatial uncertainties and a proper modeling of these uncertainties helps us make reliable predictions about the variation in device performance. Where data is available, we even show that the predicted variation can be validated against experimental observations, highlighting the significance of proper stochastic modeling in the analysis of such devices.

  2. On the micromechanics of fatigue damage accumulation in wood-pulp fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, W.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Wood-pulp fibers are recognized as concentrically-layered, laminated composite tubes of structural reinforcing material, the cellulose microfibrils, embedded in a cementing matrix of hemicellulose and lignin. When the single fibers are subjected to cyclic mechanical action, their morphological behavior is characterized by the fatigue growth of micro-voids and surface damage which individually and collectively give rise to stress concentration- and eventually crack development. This structural breakdown is believed to effect the fibrillation and flexibilization of the fibers. Insight is further gained into the micromechanisms of damage accumulation, matrix cracking and microfibrillar bridging. To explicate these morphological forms, one must essentially examine the causes of material damage accumulation at the level of crack formation, and where possible, in terms of the known atomic structure of the cellulosic microfibrils and characteristic interaction between the amorphous hemicellulose-and-lignin matrix, on the one hand, and the microfibrillar framework, on the other. Methodical treatment of the framework-matrix interaction necessitates adopting an appropriate theoretical approach, namely the law of mixtures: the matrix, the {open_quote}softer{close_quote} component of the composite, filamentary tube, serves to stop the propagation of inchoate microcracks and distributes stresses to the reinforcement. This can be accomplished by a plastic or elastic-plastic deformation of the matrix that causes a well-distributed elastic deformation in the hard phase (the cellulosic microfibrils) because of the adhesion of the two phases. Slip planes, micro-compressions, dislocations and (natural or induced) deformities, which we shall group together under the term strain bands, develop in the laminated fiber cell wall under periodic deformation; failure subsequently occurs along these bands.

  3. Neutron diffraction measurements and micromechanical modelling of temperature-dependent variations in TATB lattice parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, John D.; Luscher, Darby J.; Vogel, Sven C.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W.

    2016-02-02

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. TATB-based explosives exhibit irreversible volume expansion (“ratchet growth”) when thermally cycled. A theoretical understanding of the relationship between anisotropy of the crystal, crystal orientation distribution (texture) of polycrystalline aggregates, and the intergranular interactions leading to this irreversible growth is necessary to accurately develop physics-based predictive models for TATB-based PBXs under various thermal environments. In this work, TATB lattice parameters were measured using neutron diffraction during thermal cycling of loose powder and a pressed pellet. The measured lattice parameters help clarify conflicting reports in the literature as these new results are more consistent with one set of previous results than another. The lattice parameters of pressed TATB were also measured as a function of temperature, showing some differences from the powder. This data is used along with anisotropic single-crystal stiffness moduli reported in the literature to model the nominal stresses associated with intergranular constraints during thermal expansion. The texture of both specimens were characterized and the pressed pellet exhibits preferential orientation of (001) poles along the pressing direction, whereas no preferred orientation was found for the loose powder. Lastly, thermal strains for single-crystal TATB computed from lattice parameter data for the powder is input to a self-consistent micromechanical model, which predicts the lattice parameters of the constrained TATB crystals within the pellet. The agreement of these model results with the diffraction data obtained from the pellet is discussed along with future directions of research.

  4. Biocompatible Optically Transparent MEMS for Micromechanical Stimulation and Multimodal Imaging of Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Fior, Raffaella; Kwok, Jeanie; Malfatti, Francesca; Sbaizero, Orfeo; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-08-01

    Cells and tissues in our body are continuously subjected to mechanical stress. Mechanical stimuli, such as tensile and contractile forces, and shear stress, elicit cellular responses, including gene and protein alterations that determine key behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. Several tools and techniques have been developed to study these mechanobiological phenomena, including micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). MEMS provide a platform for nano-to-microscale mechanical stimulation of biological samples and quantitative analysis of their biomechanical responses. However, current devices are limited in their capability to perform single cell micromechanical stimulations as well as correlating their structural phenotype by imaging techniques simultaneously. In this study, a biocompatible and optically transparent MEMS for single cell mechanobiological studies is reported. A silicon nitride microfabricated device is designed to perform uniaxial tensile deformation of single cells and tissue. Optical transparency and open architecture of the device allows coupling of the MEMS to structural and biophysical assays, including optical microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate the design, fabrication, testing, biocompatibility and multimodal imaging with optical and AFM techniques, providing a proof-of-concept for a multimodal MEMS. The integrated multimodal system would allow simultaneous controlled mechanical stimulation of single cells and correlate cellular response.

  5. Effect of partially demineralized dentin beneath the hybrid layer on dentin-adhesive interface micromechanics.

    PubMed

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Luersen, Marco Antonio; Janal, Malvin; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-02-26

    To investigate the presence of non-infiltrated, partially demineralized dentin (PDD) beneath the hybrid layer for self-etch adhesive systems, and its effect on micromechanical behavior of dentin-adhesive interfaces (DAIs). This in-vitro laboratory and computer simulation study hypothesized that the presence of non-infiltrated PDD beneath the hybrid layer does not influence the mechanical behavior of the DAI of self-etch adhesive systems. Fifteen sound third molars were restored with composite resin using three adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Adper Promp L-Pop (APLP). The thickness and length of all DAIs were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, and used to generate three-dimensional finite element models. Elastic moduli of the hybrid layer, adhesive layer, intertubular dentin, peritubular dentin and resin tags were acquired using a nano-indenter. Finite element software was used to determine the maximum principal stress. Mixed models analysis of variance was used to verify statistical differences (P<0.05). Elastic moduli and morphology were found to differ between the adhesive systems, as well as the presence and extension of PDD. Both self-etch adhesive systems (APLP and CSEB) had PDD. The DAI stress levels were higher for the one-step self-etch adhesive system (APLP) compared with the etch-and-rinse adhesive system (SBMP) and the self-etch primer system (CSEB). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A FSI-based structural approach for micromechanical characterization of adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfi, Behzad; Sabzalinejad, Masoumeh; Haddad, Seyed M. H.; Fatouraee, Nasser; Samani, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a novel computational method for micromechanical modeling of adipose tissue. The model can be regarded as the first step for developing an inversion based framework that uses adipose stiffness data obtained from elastography to determine its microstructural alterations. Such information can be used as biomarkers for diseases associated with adipose tissue microstructure alteration (e.g. adipose tissue fibrosis and inflammation in obesity). In contrast to previous studies, the presented model follows a multiphase structure which accounts for both solid and fluid components as well as their mechanical interaction. In the model, the lipid droplets and extracellular matrix were considered as the fluid and solid phase, respectively. As such, the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problem was solved using finite element method. In order to gain insight into how microstructural characteristics influence the macro scale mechanical properties of the adipose tissue, a compression mechanical test was simulated using the FSI model and its results were fitted to corresponding experimental data. The simulation procedure was performed for adipocytes in healthy conditions while the stiffness of extracellular matrix in normal adipose tissue was found by varying it systematically within an optimization process until the simulation response agreed with experimental data. Results obtained in this study are encouraging and show the capability of the proposed model to capture adipose tissue macroscale mechanical behavior based on its microstructure under health and different pathological conditions.

  7. Micromechanical contact stiffness devices and application for calibrating contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Matthew R.; Chen, Sihan; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of micromechanical devices that can present an engineered contact stiffness to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip. These devices allow the contact stiffness between the AFM tip and a substrate to be easily and accurately measured, and can be used to calibrate the cantilever for subsequent mechanical property measurements. The contact stiffness devices are rigid copper disks of diameters 2-18 μm integrated onto a soft silicone substrate. Analytical modeling and finite element simulations predict the elastic response of the devices. Measurements of tip-sample interactions during quasi-static force measurements compare well with modeling simulation, confirming the expected elastic response of the devices, which are shown to have contact stiffness 32-156 N m-1. To demonstrate one application, we use the disk sample to calibrate three resonant modes of a U-shaped AFM cantilever actuated via Lorentz force, at approximately 220, 450, and 1200 kHz. We then use the calibrated cantilever to determine the contact stiffness and elastic modulus of three polymer samples at these modes. The overall approach allows cantilever calibration without prior knowledge of the cantilever geometry or its resonance modes, and could be broadly applied to both static and dynamic measurements that require AFM calibration against a known contact stiffness.

  8. Evaluation of several micromechanics models for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Birt, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic experimental evaluation of whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites was conducted to assess the variation in tensile properties with reinforcement type, volume fraction, and specimen thickness. Each material was evaluated in three thicknesses, 1.8, 3.18, and 6.35 mm, to determine the size, distribution, and orientation of the reinforcements. This information was used to evaluate several micromechanical models that predict composite moduli. The longitudinal and transverse moduli were predicted for reinforced aluminum. The Paul model, the Cox model and the Halpin-Tsai model were evaluated. The Paul model gave a good upper bound prediction for the particulate reinforced composites but under predicted whisker reinforced composite moduli. The Cox model gave good moduli predictions for the whisker reinforcement, but was too low for the particulate. The Halpin-Tsai model gave good results for both whisker and particulate reinforced composites. An approach using a trigonometric projection of whisker length to predict the fiber contribution to the modulus in the longitudinal and transverse directions was compared to the more conventional lamination theory approach.

  9. Biocompatible optically transparent MEMS for micromechanical stimulation and multimodal imaging of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Fior, Raffaella; Kwok, Jeanie; Malfatti, Francesca; Sbaizero, Orfeo; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-01-01

    Cells and tissues in our body are continuously subjected to mechanical stress. Mechanical stimuli, such as tensile and contractile forces, and shear stress, elicit cellular responses, including gene and protein alterations that determine key behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. Several tools and techniques have been developed to study these mechanobiological phenomena, including micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). MEMS provide a platform for nano-to-microscale mechanical stimulation of biological samples and quantitative analysis of their biomechanical responses. However, current devices are limited in their capability to perform single cell micromechanical stimulations as well as correlating their structural phenotype by imaging techniques simultaneously. In this study, a biocompatible and optically transparent MEMS for single cell mechanobiological studies is reported. A silicon nitride microfabricated device is designed to perform uniaxial tensile deformation of single cells and tissue. Optical transparency and open architecture of the device allows coupling of the MEMS to structural and biophysical assays, including optical microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate the design, fabrication, testing, biocompatibility and multimodal imaging with optical and AFM techniques, providing a proof-of-concept for a multimodal MEMS. The integrated multimodal system would allow simultaneous controlled mechanical stimulation of single cells and correlate cellular response. PMID:25549773

  10. Micromechanical anisotropy and heterogeneity of the meniscus extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Qu, Feini; Han, Biao; Wang, Chao; Li, Hao; Mauck, Robert L; Han, Lin

    2017-02-27

    To understand how the complex biomechanical functions of the meniscus are endowed by the nanostructure of its extracellular matrix (ECM), we studied the anisotropy and heterogeneity in the micromechanical properties of the meniscus ECM. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of juvenile bovine meniscus at deformation length scales corresponding to the diameters of collagen fibrils. At this scale, anisotropy in the elastic modulus of the circumferential fibers, the major ECM structural unit, can be attributed to differences in fibril deformation modes: uncrimping when normal to the fiber axis, and laterally constrained compression when parallel to the fiber axis. Heterogeneity among different structural units is mainly associated with their variations in microscale fiber orientation, while heterogeneity across anatomical zones is due to alterations in collagen fibril diameter and alignment at the nanoscale. Unlike the elastic modulus, the time-dependent properties are more homogeneous and isotropic throughout the ECM. These results enable a detailed understanding of the meniscus structure-mechanics at the nanoscale, and can serve as a benchmark for understanding meniscus biomechanical functions, documenting disease progression and designing tissue repair strategies.

  11. Microstructure and micromechanical elastic properties of weak layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köchle, Berna; Matzl, Margret; Proksch, Martin; Schneebeli, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Weak layers are the mechanically most important stratigraphic layer for avalanches. Yet, there is little known about their exact geometry and their micromechanical properties. To distinguish weak layers or interfaces is essential to assess stability. However, except by destructive mechanical tests, they cannot be easily identified and characterized in the field. We casted natural weak layers and their adjacent layers in the field during two winter seasons and scanned them non-destructively with X-ray computer tomography with a resolution between 10 - 20 µm. Reconstructed three-dimensional models of centimeter-sized layered samples allow for calculating the change of structural properties. We found that structural transitions cannot always by expressed by geometry like density or grain size. In addition, we calculated the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the individual layers with voxel-based finite element simulations. As any material has its characteristic elastic parameters, they may potentially differentiate individual layers, and therefore different microstructures. Our results show that Young's modulus correlates well with density but do not indicate snow's microstructure, in contrast to Poisson's ratio which tends to be lower for strongly anisotropic forms like cup crystals and facets.