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Sample records for deuterium-tritium dt fueled

  1. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis Of Plastic Capsule Materials Exposed To Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J R; Steckle, Jr., W P; Elliot, N; Ebey, P S; Nobile, A; Nikroo, A; Cook, R C; Letts, S A

    2005-06-16

    Planar samples of varying thicknesses of both CH and CD glow discharge polymer have been measured with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy before and after exposure to deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure. Planar samples of polyimide films made from both hydrogenated and deuterated precursors have also been examined by FTIR before and after DT exposure. The post-exposure FTIR spectra demonstrated no measurable exchange of hydrogen with deuterium or tritium for either polymer. Evidence for oxidation of the glow discharge polymer due to atmospheric oxygen was the only chemical change indicated by the FTIR data.

  3. On the core deuterium-tritium fuel ratio and temperature measurements in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiptily, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Comparing with ITER, the experimental fusion machine under construction, the next-step test fusion power plant, DEMO will be characterized by a very long pulse/steady-state operation and much higher plasma volume and fusion power. The substantially increased level of neutron and gamma fluxes will require reducing the physical access to the plant. It means some conventional diagnostics for the fusion plasma control will not be suitable in DEMO. Development of diagnostics along with the machine design is a primary task for the test plant. The deuterium-tritium fuel ratio and temperature are among important parameters, which should be under control. In this paper, a novel technique for the core fuel ratio and temperature diagnostics is proposed. It is based on measurements and comparison of the rates T(p, γ)4He and D(T, γ)5He nuclear reactions that take place in the hot deuterium-tritium plasma. Based on detection of high-energy gamma-rays, this diagnostic is robust, efficient and does not require direct access to the plasma. It could be included in the loop of the burning plasma control system. A feasibility of the diagnostic in experiments on JET and ITER is also discussed.

  4. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility.

  5. Cryogenic Implosion Performance Using High-Purity Deuterium-Tritium Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Earley, R.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J., III; Michel, D. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence between symmetric implosions on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility ignition designs will require a number of facility enhancements that include dynamic bandwidth reduction, a set of higher-order super-Gaussian phase plates, high-spatial-resolution gated-core imaging, high-bandwidth neutron burnwidth measurements, improved power balance, and contaminant-free deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The historic DT fuel supply was contaminated with ~6 atm% of 1H, leading to significant fractionation of the fuel during the layering process (the triple points of H:D and H:T are significantly colder than DD, DT, and TT). The fractionation leads to a drop in the potential yield because the D and T number densities are lower in the void than they would be with a pure-DT mixture). An isotope separation system has been developed to remove the 1H from the DT fuel supply. This talk will discuss the first results with the purified fuel, conclusions from recent implosions to test cross-beam energy transfer mitigation, and the status of the remaining facility enhancements. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. Measurements of collective fuel velocities in deuterium-tritium exploding pusher and cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C.-K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ashabranner, R.; Bionta, R.; LePape, S.; McKernan, M.; Mackinnon, A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2013-04-15

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of collective fuel velocities in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility are reported. Velocities along the line-of-sight (LOS) of the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS), positioned close to the equator (73 Degree-Sign -324 Degree-Sign ), were inferred from the measured mean energy of the deuterium-tritium (DT)-primary neutron peak. Substantial mean energy shifts up to 113 {+-} 16 keV were observed in DT gas-filled exploding-pusher implosions, driven in a polar-direct drive configuration, which corresponds to bulk fuel velocities up to 210 {+-} 30 km/s. In contrast, only marginal bulk fuel velocities along the MRS LOS were observed in cryogenically layered DT implosions. Integrated analysis of data from a large number of cryogenically layered implosions has recently identified a deficit in achieved hot-spot energy of {approx}3 kJ for these implosions [C. Cerjan et al., Phys. Plasmas (2013)]. One hypothesis that could explain this missing energy is a collective, directional fuel velocity of {approx}190 km/s. As only marginal bulk fuel velocities are observed in the MRS data, this might indicate that turbulent or radial flows would be a likely explanation for the missing energy. However, a directional velocity close to perpendicular to the MRS LOS cannot be ruled out.

  7. Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Formation for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B. J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J. D.; Chernov, A. A.; Moody, J. D.; Lugten, J. B.; Johnson, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires very smooth and uniform solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) point design calls for a 65- to 75-m-thick D-T fuel layer inside of a 2-mm-diam spherical ablator shell to be 1.5 K below the D-T melting temperature (Tm) of 19.79 K. We also find that the layer quality depends on the initial crystal seeding, with the best layers grown from a single seed. The low modes of the layer are controlled by thermal shimming of the hohlraum and meet the NIF requirement with beryllium shells and nearly meet the requirement with plastic shells. The remaining roughness is localized in grain-boundary grooves and is minimal for a single crystal layer. Once formed, the layers need to be cooled to Tm - 1.5 K. Here, we studied dependence of the roughness on the cooling rate and found that cooling at rates of 0.03 to 0.5 K/s is able to preserve the layer structure for a few seconds after reaching the desired temperature. The entire fuel layer remains in contact with the shell during this rapid cooling. Therefore, rapid cooling of the layers is able to satisfy the NIF ignition requirements.

  8. Evaluation of polarized fuels in a commercial deuterium/tritium tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Mattas, R.F.; Baker, C.C.

    1985-12-01

    The use of polarized fuels in commercial deuterium-tritium tokamak fusion reactors has been assessed. Some of the advantages cited for this fueling modification have been evaluated. Although the advantages are real, their magnitude is such that polarized fuels do not appear to be a significant reactor in increasing the attractiveness of commercial reactor designs. 17 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Measurements of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Fractionation from Kinetic Effects in Ignition-Relevant Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of DT and DD reaction yields have been studied using ignition-relevant, cryogenically cooled deuterium-tritium gas-filled cryogenic DT targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In these experiments, carried out at the Omega Laser Facility, highresolution time-of-flight spectroscopy was used to measure the primary neutron peak distribution required to infer the DT and DD reaction yields. From these measurements, it will be shown that the yield ratio has a χ2/per degree of freedom of 0.67 as compared with the measured fraction of the target fuel composition. This observation indicates that kinetic effects leading to species separation are insignificant in ICF ignition-relevant DT implosions on OMEGA. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Investigation of Workplace-like Calibration Fields via a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) Neutron Generator.

    PubMed

    Mozhayev, Andrey V; Piper, Roman K; Rathbone, Bruce A; McDonald, Joseph C

    2017-04-01

    Radiation survey meters and personal dosimeters are typically calibrated in reference neutron fields based on conventional radionuclide sources, such as americium-beryllium (Am-Be) or californium-252 (Cf), either unmodified or heavy-water moderated. However, these calibration neutron fields differ significantly from the workplace fields in which most of these survey meters and dosimeters are being used. Although some detectors are designed to yield an approximately dose-equivalent response over a particular neutron energy range, the response of other detectors is highly dependent upon neutron energy. This, in turn, can result in significant over- or underestimation of the intensity of neutron radiation and/or personal dose equivalent determined in the work environment. The use of simulated workplace neutron calibration fields that more closely match those present at the workplace could improve the accuracy of worker, and workplace, neutron dose assessment. This work provides an overview of the neutron fields found around nuclear power reactors and interim spent fuel storage installations based on available data. The feasibility of producing workplace-like calibration fields in an existing calibration facility has been investigated via Monte Carlo simulations. Several moderating assembly configurations, paired with a neutron generator using the deuterium tritium (D-T) fusion reaction, were explored.

  11. Assembly of high-areal-density deuterium-tritium fuel from indirectly driven cryogenic implosions.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, A J; Kline, J L; Dixit, S N; Glenzer, S H; Edwards, M J; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Haan, S W; Kilkenny, J D; Döppner, T; Farley, D R; Moody, J D; Ralph, J E; MacGowan, B J; Landen, O L; Robey, H F; Boehly, T R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Krauter, K; Frieders, G; Ross, G F; Hicks, D G; Olson, R E; Weber, S V; Spears, B K; Salmonsen, J D; Michel, P; Divol, L; Hammel, B; Thomas, C A; Clark, D S; Jones, O S; Springer, P T; Cerjan, C J; Collins, G W; Glebov, V Y; Knauer, J P; Sangster, C; Stoeckl, C; McKenty, P; McNaney, J M; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A G; Chandler, G G A; Hahn, K D; Moran, M J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Bionta, R M; Hartouni, E P; LePape, S; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Fittinghoff, D N; Guler, N; Drury, O; Wilson, D C; Herrmann, H W; Stoeffl, W; Casey, D T; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Zylestra, A; Rinderknecht, H; Kalantar, D H; Dzenitis, J M; Di Nicola, P; Eder, D C; Courdin, W H; Gururangan, G; Burkhart, S C; Friedrich, S; Blueuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Eckart, M J; Munro, D H; Hatchett, S P; Macphee, A G; Edgell, D H; Bradley, D K; Bell, P M; Glenn, S M; Simanovskaia, N; Barrios, M A; Benedetti, R; Kyrala, G A; Town, R P J; Dewald, E L; Milovich, J L; Widmann, K; Moore, A S; LaCaille, G; Regan, S P; Suter, L J; Felker, B; Ashabranner, R C; Jackson, M C; Prasad, R; Richardson, M J; Kohut, T R; Datte, P S; Krauter, G W; Klingman, J J; Burr, R F; Land, T A; Hermann, M R; Latray, D A; Saunders, R L; Weaver, S; Cohen, S J; Berzins, L; Brass, S G; Palma, E S; Lowe-Webb, R R; McHalle, G N; Arnold, P A; Lagin, L J; Marshall, C D; Brunton, G K; Mathisen, D G; Wood, R D; Cox, J R; Ehrlich, R B; Knittel, K M; Bowers, M W; Zacharias, R A; Young, B K; Holder, J P; Kimbrough, J R; Ma, T; La Fortune, K N; Widmayer, C C; Shaw, M J; Erbert, G V; Jancaitis, K S; DiNicola, J M; Orth, C; Heestand, G; Kirkwood, R; Haynam, C; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P K; Hamza, A; Dzenitis, E G; Wallace, R J; Bhandarkar, S D; Parham, T G; Dylla-Spears, R; Mapoles, E R; Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Fair, J; Nikroo, A; Giraldez, E; Moreno, K; Vanwonterghem, B; Kauffman, R L; Batha, S; Larson, D W; Fortner, R J; Schneider, D H; Lindl, J D; Patterson, R W; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I

    2012-05-25

    The National Ignition Facility has been used to compress deuterium-tritium to an average areal density of ~1.0±0.1 g cm(-2), which is 67% of the ignition requirement. These conditions were obtained using 192 laser beams with total energy of 1-1.6 MJ and peak power up to 420 TW to create a hohlraum drive with a shaped power profile, peaking at a soft x-ray radiation temperature of 275-300 eV. This pulse delivered a series of shocks that compressed a capsule containing cryogenic deuterium-tritium to a radius of 25-35 μm. Neutron images of the implosion were used to estimate a fuel density of 500-800 g cm(-3).

  12. Fuel provision for nonbreeding deuterium-tritium fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Katsurai, M.

    1980-01-01

    Nonbreeding D-T reactors have decisive advantages in minimum size, unit cost, variety of applications, and ease of heat removal over reactors using any other fusion cycle, and significant advantages in environmental and safety characteristics over breeding D-T reactors. Considerations of relative energy production demonstrate that the most favorable source of tritium for a widely deployed system of nonbreeding D-T reactors is the very large (approx. 10 GW thermal) semi-catalyzed-deuterium (SCD), or sub-SCD reactor, where none of the escaping /sup 3/He (> 95%) or tritium (< 25%) is reinjected for burn-up. Feasibility of the ignited SCD tokamak reactor requires spatially averaged betas of 15 to 20% with a magnetic field at the TF coils of 12 to 13 Tesla.

  13. Diagnosing fuel {rho}R and {rho}R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged-particle spectrometry at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2009-04-15

    Determining fuel areal density ({rho}R) in moderate-{rho}R (100-200 mg/cm{sup 2}) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions is challenging as it requires new spectrometry techniques and analysis methods to be developed. In this paper, we describe a new method for analyzing the spectrum of knock-on deuterons (KO-Ds), elastically scattered by primary DT neutrons, from which a fuel {rho}R can be inferred for values up to {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2}. This new analysis method, which uses Monte Carlo modeling of a cryogenic DT implosion, improves significantly the previous analysis method in two fundamental ways. First, it is not affected by significant spatial-yield variations, which degrade the diagnosis of the fuel {rho}R (spatial yield variations of about {+-}20% are typically observed), and second, it does not break down when the fuel {rho}R exceeds {approx}70 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  15. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  16. First-principles studies on the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) and polystyrene (CH) for inertial confinement fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles (FP) methods, we have performed ab initio compute for the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) in a wide range of densities and temperatures for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. These systematic investigations have recently been expanded to accurately compute the plasma properties of CH ablators under extreme conditions. In particular, the first-principles EOS and thermal-conductivity tables of CH are self-consistently built from such FP calculations, which are benchmarked by experimental measurements. When compared with the traditional models used for these plasma properties in hydrocodes, significant differences have been identified in the warm dense plasma regime. When these FP-calculated properties of DT and CH were used in our hydrodynamic simulations of ICF implosions, we found that the target performance in terms of neutron yield and energy gain can vary by a factor of 2 to 3, relative to traditional model simulations.

  17. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  18. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  19. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  20. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Bose, A; Boehly, T R; Bonino, M J; Campbell, E M; Cao, D; Collins, T J B; Craxton, R S; Davis, A K; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J A; Froula, D H; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hohenberger, M; Hu, S X; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Janezic, R; Karasik, M; Keck, R L; Kelly, J H; Kessler, T J; Knauer, J P; Kosc, T Z; Loucks, S J; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Obenschain, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Rice, B; Rosenberg, M J; Schmitt, A J; Schmitt, M J; Seka, W; Shmayda, W T; Shoup, M J; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Ulreich, J; Wittman, M D; Woo, K M; Yaakobi, B; Zuegel, J D

    2016-07-08

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure P_{hs}=56±7  Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ∼60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 011201(R) (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  1. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  2. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  3. Single Crystal Growth and Formation of Defects in Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, A A; Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Atherton, L J; Johnson, M A; Hamza, A V; Kucheyev, S O; Lugten, J B; Mapoles, E A; Moody, J D; Salmonson, J D; Sater, J D

    2008-09-05

    We identify vapor-etched grain boundary grooves on the solid-vapor interface as the main source of surface roughness in the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel layers which are solidified and then cooled. Current inertial confinement fusion target designs impose stringent limits to the cross sectional area and total volume of these grooves. Formation of these grain boundaries occurs over timescales of hours as the dislocation network anneals, and is inevitable in a plastically deformed material. Therefore, either cooling on a much shorter time scale or a technique that requires no cooling after solidification should be used to minimize the fuel layer surface roughness.

  4. Diagnostic study of steady state advanced fuel (deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium) fusion in an IEC device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Krupakar Murali

    The ionized fusion fuels (D-D & D-3He) have been accelerated to fusion velocities using two concentric grids maintained at a high potential difference in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device. Though the gridded IEC device currently has a low efficiency (Q ≡ fusion power/input power ˜10-5), the energetic protons and neutrons generated within this device can be used for many near-term applications, such as medical isotope production, landmine detection, neutron activation analysis, etc. The present work is centered upon understanding the operation of the device and finding new ways to increase the overall efficiency. The steady state fusion of D-3He fuel in an IEC device was successfully studied. At a pressure of ˜2 mtorr the source of such reactions was identified to be principally beam-target reactions and was theoretically explained using the Monte Carlo - Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. The first simultaneous measurement of DD and D-3He protons was accomplished during the present thesis work that confirmed that D- 3He fusion reactions indeed occur in an IEC device. A new pressure independent diagnostic was invented to measure the average ion energy. That diagnostic uses the D-D proton energy spectra from a single loop cathode grid and the SRIM code predictions. A second diagnostic called the eclipse disc was co-invented to characterize the various fusion regimes in an IEC device. This diagnostic verified that a converged core fusion source exists for the DD reactions but the D-3He reactions that are principally embedded source reactions. A third diagnostic called the chordwire was invented to study the effects of various sources of electrons---thermionic, photo and field emission electrons, that decrease the efficiency of the device. This diagnostic also helped map the ion flux into the cathode in 2D, besides helping identify the high performance grid materials (W-25%Re and pure Re). Understanding the electron current

  5. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  6. Measurement of High-Pressure Shock Waves in Cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layered Capsule Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Moody, J. D.; Celliers, P. M.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Parham, T.; Sater, J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G.; Bowers, M. W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Dzenitis, B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Young, B.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Boehly, T. R.

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  7. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  8. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  9. Experience with deuterium-tritium plasmas heated by high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Stevenson, T.; Von Halle, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has operated since November of 1993 with a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture for selected discharges. The majority of the tritium has been introduced as energetic neutral atoms of up to 120 keV injected by the neutral beam systems, with some of the twelve ion sources run on pure tritium and some on deuterium to optimize the fuel mixture in the core plasma. A maximum beam power of 39.6 megawatts has been injected, and deuterium-tritium fusion power production has reached 10.7 megawatts, achieving central fusion power densities comparable to or greater than those expected for the International Thermonuclear Reactor, and allowing the first studies of fusion-produced alpha particle behavior in reactor grade plasmas. Energy confinement in deuterium-tritium plasmas is better than in similar deuterium plasmas for most plasma regimes. Innovative techniques to manipulate the plasma current and pressure profiles are permitting studies of enhanced confinement regimes.

  10. First measurements of deuterium-tritium and deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction yields in ignition-scalable direct-drive implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Knauer, J. P.; ...

    2017-03-03

    In this study, the deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium neutron yield ratio in cryogenic inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments is used to examine multifluid effects, traditionally not included in ICF modeling. This ratio has been measured for ignition-scalable direct-drive cryogenic DT implosions at the Omega Laser Facility using a high-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. The experimentally inferred yield ratio is consistent with both the calculated values of the nuclear reaction rates and the measured preshot target-fuel composition. These observations indicate that the physical mechanisms that have been proposed to alter the fuel composition, such as species separation of the hydrogen isotopes, aremore » not significant during the period of peak neutron production in ignition-scalable cryogenic direct-drive DT implosions.« less

  11. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to {approx}9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS {approx}6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored.

  12. Effects of nonequilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Michta, David; Graziani, Frank; Luu, Thomas; Pruet, Jason

    2010-01-15

    The effects of nonequilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas are investigated using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, bremsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and light-ion fusion. For inertial confinement fusion environments, it is found that deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  13. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  14. Compression of a spherically symmetric deuterium-tritium plasma liner onto a magnetized deuterium-tritium target

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J. F.

    2012-07-15

    Converging plasma jets may be able to reach the regime of high energy density plasmas (HEDP). The successful application of plasma jets to magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) would heat the plasma by fusion products and should increase the plasma energy density. This paper reports the results of using the University of Wisconsin's 1-D Lagrangian, radiation-hydrodynamics, fusion code BUCKY to investigate two MIF converging plasma jet test cases originally analyzed by Samulyak et al.[Physics of Plasmas 17, 092702 (2010)]. In these cases, 15 cm or 5 cm radially thick deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma jets merge at 60 cm from the origin and converge radially onto a DT target magnetized to 2 T and of radius 5 cm. The BUCKY calculations reported here model these cases, starting from the time of initial contact of the jets and target. Compared to the one-temperature Samulyak et al. calculations, the one-temperature BUCKY results show similar behavior, except that the plasma radius remains about twice as long near maximum compression. One-temperature and two-temperature BUCKY results differ, reflecting the sensitivity of the calculations to timing and plasma parameter details, with the two-temperature case giving a more sustained compression.

  15. Applications of deuterium-tritium equation of state based on density functional theory in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; He, Xian-Tu; Ye, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Ping; Fan, Zheng-Feng

    2015-06-15

    An accurate equation of state for deuterium-tritium mixture is of crucial importance in inertial confinement fusion. The equation of state can determine the compressibility of the imploding target and the energy deposited into the fusion fuel. In the present work, a new deuterium-tritium equation of state, which is calculated according to quantum molecular dynamic and orbital free molecular dynamic simulations, has been used to study the target implosion hydrodynamics. The results indicate that the peak density predicted by the new equation of state is ∼10% higher than the quotidian equation of state data. During the implosion, the areal density and neutron yield are also discussed.

  16. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40% lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  17. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40% lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  18. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; ...

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40%more » lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.« less

  19. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  20. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; ...

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  1. Direct measurement of the effect of early time hot electron preheat on a deuterium-tritium cryogenic ice layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, James; Robey, Harry; Moody, John; Celliers, Peter; Divol, Laurent; Berzak-Hopkins, Laura; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hohenberger, Matthias; Ralph, Joe; Landen, Otto; Edwards, John

    2014-10-01

    The direct effect of early time supra-thermal electron preheat on a deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic ice layer has been measured for the first time in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility. Controlled changes in the early-time laser power are used to vary the hot electron (E > 170 keV) energy over the range of <1 J to 27 J. At the 27 J energy level the DT ice layer was measured to expand from the initial thickness of 71.5 μm to a thickness of 82.4 μm prior to the breakout of the first laser generated shock using the layered keyhole platform. There was no measurable expansion of the DT ice layer when the hot electron level was 5 J or less. Hot electron levels >5 J increase the entropy of the fuel and can significantly degrade the quality of the implosion. The experimental results are compared to post shot simulations.

  2. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  3. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet{sup {trademark}} system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of {approximately} 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of {alpha}-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined {alpha}-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  4. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  5. Electrochemically induced deuterium-tritium fusion power reactor; Preliminary design of a reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Kondo, S. . Faculty of Engineering )

    1989-09-01

    Conceptual design of an electrochemically induced deuterium-tritium fusion power reactor has been carried out. A double-tube-type fuel cell is proposed for efficient electrolysis and to provide a large cathode area. The fuel cell tubes are assembled like a pressurized water reactor (PWR) control rod cluster. The tritium fuel is continuously fed through the cluster rod to the cell. The voltage for the electrolysis is supplied through the rod. The tritium breeding Li/sub 2/O is contained in a hexagonal blanket through which coolant tubes penetrate. The fuel cell tube is inserted in the coolant tube and the water coolant flows through the annuli.

  6. Cryogenic distillation: a fuel enrichment system for near-term tokamak-type D-T fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.; Davis, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The successful operation and economic viability of deuterium-tritium- (D-T-) fueled tokamak-type commercial power fusion reactors will depend to a large extent on the development of reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. Of the many operating steps in the fuel recycle scheme, separation or enrichment of the isotropic species of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation is one of the most important. A parametric investigation was carried out to study the effects of the various operating conditions and the composition of the spent fuel on the degree of separation. A computer program was developed for the design and analysis of a system of interconnected distillation columns for isotopic separation such that the requirements of near-term D-T-fueled reactors are met. The analytical results show that a distillation cascade consisting of four columns is capable of reprocessing spent fuel varying over a wide range of compositions to yield reinjection-grade fuel with essentially unlimited D/T ratio.

  7. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  8. Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generator using a novel field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L. Falabella, S.; Sanchez, J.; Tang, V.; Wang, H.

    2014-11-21

    Active interrogation using neutrons is an effective method for detecting shielded nuclear material. A lightweight, lunch-box-sized, battery-operated neutron source would enable new concepts of operation in the field. We have developed at-scale components for a highly portable, completely self-contained, pulsed Deuterium-Tritium (DT) neutron source producing 14 MeV neutrons with average yields of 10{sup 7} n/s. A gated, field ionization ion source using etched electrodes has been developed that produces pulsed ion currents up to 500 nA. A compact Cockcroft-Walton high voltage source is used to accelerate deuterons into a metal hydride target for neutron production. The results of full scale DT tests using the field ionization source are presented.

  9. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  10. First Measurements of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Deuterium Fusion Reaction Yields in Ignition-Scalable Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Shmayda, W. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-03-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium neutron yield ratio in cryogenic inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments is used to examine multifluid effects, traditionally not included in ICF modeling. This ratio has been measured for ignition-scalable direct-drive cryogenic DT implosions at the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997), 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] using a high-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. The experimentally inferred yield ratio is consistent with both the calculated values of the nuclear reaction rates and the measured preshot target-fuel composition. These observations indicate that the physical mechanisms that have been proposed to alter the fuel composition, such as species separation of the hydrogen isotopes [D. T. Casey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 075002 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.075002], are not significant during the period of peak neutron production in ignition-scalable cryogenic direct-drive DT implosions.

  11. Cross calibration of neutron detectors for deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; Barnes, Cris W.; Duong, H. H.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Jassby, D. L.; Loughlin, M. J.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Strachan, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    During the initial deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR, neutron emission was measured with 235U and 238U fission chambers, silicon surface barrier diodes, spatially collimated 4He proportional counters and ZnS scintillators, and a variety of elemental activation foils. The activation foils, 4He counters, and silicon diodes can discriminate between 14 and 2.5 MeV neutrons. The other detectors respond to both DD and DT neutrons but are more sensitive to the latter. The proportional counters, scintillators, and some of the fission chambers were calibrated absolutely, using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at numerous locations inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. Although the directly calibrated systems were saturated during the highest-power deuterium-tritium operation, they allowed cross calibration of less sensitive fission chambers and silicon diodes. The estimated absolute accuracy of the uncertainty-weighted mean of these cross calibrations, combined with an independent calibration derived from activation foil determinations of total neutron yield, is ±7%.

  12. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  13. Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-09-22

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  14. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q{sub DT} = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l{sub i}.

  15. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  16. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  17. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B. Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  18. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  19. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; Church, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Miller, E. Kirk; Glebov, V. Yu; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-06-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) γ-to-neutron branching ratio [3H(d,γ)5He/3H(d,n)4He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the center-of-mass energy of 14-24 keV is lower than that in previous accelerator-based experiments. A D-T branching ratio value of (4.2 ± 2.0) × 10-5 was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T γ-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors, and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the D-3He γ-to-proton branching ratio [3He(d,γ)5Li/3He(d,p)4He]. Neutron-induced backgrounds were significantly reduced as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov γ-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. These measurements of the D-T branching ratio in an ICF environment test several theoretical assumptions about the nature of A = 5 systems, including the dominance of the 3/2+ resonance at low energies, the presence of the broad first excited state of 5He in the spectra, and the charge-symmetric nature of the capture processes in the mirror systems 5He and 5Li.

  20. Laser ``M'egajoule'' cryogenic target program: from target fabrication to conformation of the deuterium-tritium ice layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Rémy; Durut, Frédéric; Reneaume, Benoît; Chicane, Cédric; Théobald, Marc; Breton, Olivier; Martin, Michel; Fleury, Emmanuel; Vincent-Viry, Olivier; Bachelet, Franck; Jeannot, Laurent; Geoffray, Isabelle; Botrel, Ronan; Dauteuil, Christophe; Hermerel, Cyril; Choux, Alexandre; Bednarczyk, Sophie; Legaie, Olivier

    2008-11-01

    For the French inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the LMJ program are manufactured and filled at CEA Valduc (Dijon) in the cryogenic targets filling station (IRCC). They will be moved at about 20 K into a transport cryostat for cryogenic targets and will be driven from CEA/Valduc to CEA/CESTA (Bordeaux). Cryogenic targets will then be transferred by several cryogenic grippers on the cryogenic target positioner before shots. The CTA has to meet severe specifications and involves a lot of challenging tasks for its manufacture. To fill CTAs by permeation with deuterium-tritium (DT), the IRCC need to meet strict thermal, mechanical and dimensional specifications. To obtain a good combustion yield, a very homogenous DT ice layer and very smooth roughness at 1.5 K below the DT triple point are also required. This paper deals with the up to date main issues in the different fields of the LMJ cryogenic target program.

  1. Effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Michta, D; Graziani, F; Pruet, J; Luu, T

    2009-08-18

    We investigate the effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, Brehmsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and thermal-nuclear burning. We find that in inertial confinement fusion environments, deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  2. TFTR DT preparation project status

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, E.D.; Dudek, L.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) research program is preparing to commence the first high power Deuterium-Tritium (DT) experiments of the US Fusion Program. Hardware upgrades to TFTR required for DT operations have been completed. This paper discusses these hardware preparations.

  3. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  4. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, C; Boni, R; Ehrne, F; Forrest, C J; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Lonobile, D J; Magoon, J; Regan, S P; Shoup, M J; Sorce, A; Sorce, C; Sangster, T C; Weiner, D

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments-a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  5. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for α particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-10-15

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for α particles at very high temperatures (T = 5 keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the α particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the α particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of α particles, than that of a lower Z plasma.

  6. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  7. Transport properties of dense deuterium-tritium plasmas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Long, Yao; He, Xian-Tu; Wu, Jun-Feng; Ye, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Ping

    2013-07-01

    Consistent descriptions of the equation of states and information about the transport coefficients of the deuterium-tritium mixture are demonstrated through quantum molecular dynamic (QMD) simulations (up to a density of 600 g/cm(3) and a temperature of 10(4) eV). Diffusion coefficients and viscosity are compared to the one-component plasma model in different regimes from the strong coupled to the kinetic one. Electronic and radiative transport coefficients, which are compared to models currently used in hydrodynamic simulations of inertial confinement fusion, are evaluated up to 800 eV. The Lorentz number is discussed from the highly degenerate to the intermediate region. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation results indicate that different temperature and density distributions are observed during the target implosion process by using the Spitzer model and ab initio transport coefficients.

  8. Exposure Of NIF Relevant Polymeric Samples To Deuterium-Tritium Gas At Elevated Temperature And Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ebey, P S; Dole, J M; Nobile, A; Schoonover, J R; Burmann, J; Cook, B; Letts, S; Sanchez, J; Nikroo, A

    2005-06-24

    The purpose of the experiments described in this paper was to expose samples of polymeric materials to a mixture of deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure to investigate the effects (i.e. damage) on the materials. The materials and exposure parameters were chosen with to be relevant to proposed uses of similar materials in inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Two types of samples were exposed and tested. The first type consisted of 10 4-lead ribbon cables of fine manganin wire insulated with polyimide. Wires of this type are proposed for use in thermal shimming of hohlraums and the goal of this experiment was to measure the change in electrical resistance of the insulation due to tritium exposure. The second type of sample consisted of 20 planar polymer samples that may be used as ignition capsule materials. The exposure was at 34.5 GPa (5010 psia) and 70 C for 48 hours. The change in electrical resistance of the wire insulation will be presented. The results for capsule materials will be presented in a separate paper in this issue.

  9. Viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium mixtures in the warm-dense-matter regime.

    PubMed

    Kress, J D; Cohen, James S; Horner, D A; Lambert, F; Collins, L A

    2010-09-01

    We have calculated viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium (DT) in the warm, dense matter regime for densities from 5 to 20 g/cm{3} and temperatures from 2 to 10 eV, using both finite-temperature Kohn-Sham density-functional theory molecular dynamics (QMD) and orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD). The OFMD simulations are in generally good agreement with the benchmark QMD results, and we conclude that the simpler OFMD method can be used with confidence in this regime. For low temperatures (3 eV and below), one-component plasma (OCP) model simulations for diffusion agree with the QMD and OFMD calculations, but deviate by 30% at 10 eV. In comparison with the QMD and OFMD results, the OCP viscosities are not as good as for diffusion, especially for 5 g/cm{3} where the temperature dependence is significantly different. The QMD and OFMD reduced diffusion and viscosity coefficients are found to depend largely, though not completely, only on the Coulomb coupling parameter Γ , with a minimum in the reduced viscosity at Γ≈25 , approximately the same position found in the OCP simulations. The QMD and OFMD equations of state (pressure) are also compared with the hydrogen two-component plasma model.

  10. Deuterium-Tritium Beta-Layering Within a National Ignition Facility Scale Polymer Target in the LANL Cryogenic Pressure Loader

    SciTech Connect

    Ebey, Peter S.; Dole, James M.; Geller, Drew A.; Hoffer, James K.; Nobile, Arthur; Sheliak, John D.

    2005-11-15

    Beta-layering, the process of beta-decay heat-driven mass redistribution, has been demonstrated in a deuterium-tritium (D-T)-filled polymer sphere of the type required for fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. This is the first report, to the best of the authors' knowledge, of a D-T layer formed in a permeation-filled sphere. The 2-mm-diam sphere was filled with D-T by permeation; cooled to cryogenic temperatures while in the high-pressure permeation vessel; and, while cold, removed to an optical axis where the D-T was frozen, melted, and beta-layered in a series of experiments over several weeks' time. This work was performed in the Los Alamos National Laboratory cryogenic pressure loader system. The beta-layering time constant was 24.0 {+-} 2.5 min, less than the theoretical value of 26.8 min, and not showing the significant increase due to build-up of {sup 3}He often observed in beta-layered samples. Supercooling of the liquid D-T was observed. Neither the polymer target nor its tenting material showed visual signs of degradation after 5 weeks of exposure to D-T. Small external thermal gradients were used to shift the D-T material back and forth within the sphere.

  11. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Bretz, N.L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium beating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%-40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Energy confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority {sup 3}He (n{sub 3He}/n{sub e} = 15% - 30%). By changing the {sup 3}He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation indicated that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Analysis of heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated target plasma in TFTR.

  12. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bush, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium heating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%--40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority {sup 3}He (n{sub {sup 3}He}/n{sub e} > 10%). By changing the {sup 3}He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation showed that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated (OH) target plasma in TFIR.

  13. Experimental results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with adiabat-shaped drives at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Chen, K.-C.; Goyon, C.; Grim, G.; Dixit, S. N.; Eckart, M. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Farrell, M.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J. P.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Mauldin, M.; Merrill, F. E.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Sayre, D. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Turnbull, D. P.; Velikovich, A. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Weber, C. R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions were carried out using 3-shock and 4-shock "adiabat-shaped" drives and plastic ablators on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The purpose of these shots was to gain further understanding on the relative performance of the low-foot implosions of the National Ignition Campaign [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] versus the subsequent high-foot implosions [T. Döppner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055001 (2015)]. The neutron yield performance in the experiment with the 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive was improved by factors ˜3 to ˜10, compared to five companion low-foot shots despite large low-mode asymmetries of DT fuel, while measured compression was similar to its low-foot companions. This indicated that the dominant degradation source for low-foot implosions was ablation-front instability growth, since adiabat shaping significantly stabilized this growth. For the experiment with the low-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, the DT fuel compression was significantly increased, by ˜25% to ˜36%, compared to its companion high-foot implosions. The neutron yield increased by ˜20%, lower than the increase of ˜50% estimated from one-dimensional scaling, suggesting the importance of residual instabilities and asymmetries. For the experiment with the high-power, 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, the DT fuel compression was slightly increased by ˜14% compared to its companion high-foot experiments. However, the compression was reduced compared to the lower-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, correlated with the increase of hot electrons that hypothetically can be responsible for reduced compression in high-power adiabat-shaped experiments as well as in high-foot experiments. The total neutron yield in the high-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped shot N150416 was 8.5 × 1015 ± 0.2 × 1015, with the fuel areal density of 0.90 ± 0.07 g/cm2

  14. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ∼105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  15. A Comparison Between the Burn Condition of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Helium-3 Reaction and Stability Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear reaction of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion by the usual magnetic or inertial confinement suffers from a number of difficulties and problems caused by tritium handling, neutron damage to materials and neutron-induced radioactivity, etc. The study of the nuclear synthesis reaction of deuterium-helium-3 (D-3He) at low collision energies (below 1 keV) is of interest for its applications in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Spherical tokamak (ST) reactors have a low aspect ratio and can confine plasma with β≈1. These capabilities of ST reactors are due to the use of the alternative D-3He reaction. In this work, the burn condition of D-3He reaction was calculated by using zero-dimensional particles and power equations, and, with the use of the parameters of the ST reactor, the stability limit of D-3He reaction was calculated and then the results were compared with those of D-T reaction. The obtained results show that the burn conditions of D-3He reaction required a higher temperature and had a much more limited temperature range in comparison to those of D-T reaction.

  16. First-principles studies on the equation-of-state, thermal-conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium and polystyrene (CH) for inertial confinement fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Suxing; Collins, Lee A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, Joel David; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2016-05-26

    Using first-principles (FP) methods, we have performed ab initio compute for the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) in a wide range of densities and temperatures for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. These systematic investigations have recently been expanded to accurately compute the plasma properties of CH ablators under extreme conditions. In particular, the first-principles EOS and thermal-conductivity tables of CH are self-consistently built from such FP calculations, which are benchmarked by experimental measurements. When compared with the traditional models used for these plasma properties in hydrocodes, significant differences have been identified in the warm dense plasma regime. When these FP-calculated properties of DT and CH were used in our hydrodynamic simulations of ICF implosions, we found that the target performance in terms of neutron yield and energy gain can vary by a factor of 2 to 3, relative to traditional model simulations.

  17. High fusion performance from deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhacker, M.; Gibson, A.; Gormezano, C.; Lomas, P. J.; Thomas, P. R.; Watkins, M. L.; Andrew, P.; Balet, B.; Borba, D.; Challis, C. D.; Coffey, I.; Cottrell, G. A.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Deliyanakis, N.; Fasoli, A.; Gowers, C. W.; Guo, H. Y.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Jones, T. T. C.; Kerner, W.; König, R. W. T.; Loughlin, M. J.; Maas, A.; Marcus, F. B.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F. G.; Sadler, G. J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Sips, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Taroni, A.; Tubbing, B. J. D.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Ward, D. J.; JET Team

    1999-02-01

    High fusion power experiments using DT mixtures in ELM-free H mode and optimized shear regimes in JET are reported. A fusion power of 16.1 MW has been produced in an ELM-free H mode at 4.2 MA/3.6 T. The transient value of the fusion amplification factor was 0.95+/-0.17, consistent with the high value of nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0) = 8.7 × 1020+/-20% m-3 s keV, and was maintained for about half an energy confinement time until excessive edge pressure gradients resulted in discharge termination by MHD instabilities. The ratio of DD to DT fusion powers (from separate but otherwise similar discharges) showed the expected factor of 210, validating DD projections of DT performance for similar pressure profiles and good plasma mixture control, which was achieved by loading the vessel walls with the appropriate DT mix. Magnetic fluctuation spectra showed no evidence of Alfvénic instabilities driven by alpha particles, in agreement with theoretical model calculations. Alpha particle heating has been unambiguously observed, its effect being separated successfully from possible isotope effects on energy confinement by varying the tritium concentration in otherwise similar discharges. The scan showed that there was no, or at most a very weak, isotope effect on the energy confinement time. The highest electron temperature was clearly correlated with the maximum alpha particle heating power and the optimum DT mixture; the maximum increase was 1.3+/-0.23 keV with 1.3 MW of alpha particle heating power, consistent with classical expectations for alpha particle confinement and heating. In the optimized shear regime, clear internal transport barriers were established for the first time in DT, with a power similar to that required in DD. The ion thermal conductivity in the plasma core approached neoclassical levels. Real time power control maintained the plasma core close to limits set by pressure gradient driven MHD instabilities, allowing 8.2 MW of DT fusion power with nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0

  18. High performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    Plasmas composed of nominally equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium (DT) have been created in TFTR with the goals of producing significant levels of fusion power and of examining the effects of DT fusion alpha particles. Conditioning of the limiter by the injection of lithium pellets has led to an approximate doubling of the energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, in supershot plasmas at high plasma current (I{sub p} {le} 2.5 MA) and high heating power (P{sub b} {le} 33 MW). Operation with DT typically results in an additional 20% increase in {tau}{sub E}. In the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR, confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.5 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasmas, exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Confinement of alpha particles appears to be classical and losses due to collective effects have not been observed. While small fluctuations in fusion product loss were observed during ELMs, no large loss was detected in DT plasmas.

  19. Nuclear spin polarization of solid deuterium-tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Fearon, E.M.; Mapoles, E.R.; Gaines, J.R.; Sater, J.D.; Fedders, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    It appears that parallel alignment of deuteron and triton magnetic moments increases the cross section of the nuclear reaction T(d,n) He/sup 4/ by 50%, thereby promising a laser driver of perhaps half the original energy. Both ''brute-force'' and dynamic nuclear polarization are considered, and the many potential problems of the latter are considered. High nuclear polarization by the dynamic technique requires a small nucleus-to-unpaired electron ratio, a long longitudinal nuclear relaxation time and a short longitudinal electron relaxation time. Normal D-T is shown to be inadequate, and enriched and possibly very pure molecular DT will be required. The key variable is the nuclear relaxation time, which can either depend on the interaction with rotationally excited impurity molecules or on paramagnetic defects formed by the tritium radiation. Radiation-induced DT decomposition and rotational catalysis will combat one another to affect the DT purity. The expected atom density and fractionation effects are considered. There exists one frequency at which both D and T atoms can be pumped.

  20. Nuclear spin polarization of solid deuterium-tritium. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Fearon, E.M.; Mapoles, E.R.; Gaines, J.R.; Sater, J.D.; Fedders, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    It appears that parallel alignment of deuteron and triton magnetic moments increases the cross section of the nuclear reaction T(d,n) He/sup 4/ by 50%, thereby promising a laser driver of perhaps half the original energy. Both ''brute-force'' and dynamic nuclear polarization are considered, and the many potential problems of the latter are considered. High nuclear polarization by the dynamic technique requires a small nucleus-to-unpaired electron ratio, a long longitudinal nuclear relaxation time and a short longitudinal electron relaxation time. Normal D-T is shown to be inadequate, and enriched and possibly very pure molecular DT will be required. The key variable is the nuclear relaxation time, which can either depend on the interaction with rotationally excited impurity molecules or on paramagnetic defects formed by the tritium radiation. Radiation-induced DT decomposition and rotational catalysis will combat one another to affect the DT purity. The expected atom density and fractionation effects are considered. There exists one frequency at which both D and T atoms can be pumped.

  1. Effects of preheat and mix on the fuel adiabat of an imploding capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Yi, S. A.; Batha, S. H.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the effect of preheat, hydrodynamic mix and vorticity on the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. We show that the adiabat of the DT fuel increases resulting from hydrodynamic mixing due to the phenomenon of entropy of mixture. An upper limit of mix, Mclean/MDT ≥ 0.98, is found necessary to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat. We demonstrate in this study that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of 3D effects and mix in capsule implosion. Furthermore, we can infer from our physics model and the observed neutron images the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and the amount of mix produced on the hot spot.

  2. Response Of A CVD Diamond Detector To ''Typical'' Deuterium-Tritium NIF Implosions For Areal Density Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W

    2005-04-11

    CVD diamond detector signals from Deuterium-Tritium implosions have been simulated in order to study the feasibility of measuring areal density using the ratio of downscattered to primary neutrons during the ignition campaign at the NIF. Simulated neutron spectra for three ''typical'' DT implosions were weighted with the CVD diamond sensitivity to obtain an estimated signal at several distances from the target chamber center. The 14 MeV peak was found to have an amplitude about three orders of magnitude larger than the down-scattered signal for the three spectra. At a target to detector distance of 17 m (just outside the target bay wall) and for a 1 cm{sup 2} wafer, signals are large enough to be recorded, well above any background and electronic noise. The uncertainty in the areal density measurement comes mainly from the uncertainty in the CVD diamond energy dependent sensitivity, the accuracy of the background simulation, and the effect of the saturation of both detector and electronics after the large 14 MeV peak. Nevertheless, the results found in this study are encouraging, and the remaining sources of uncertainty should now be addressed.

  3. A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy based on deuterium-tritium neutron generators.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido; Abrahantes, Arian

    2004-05-01

    A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy using deuterium-tritium accelerator based neutrons source is developed. Calculations based on a simple geometry model for the radiation transport are initially performed to estimate the assembly materials and their linear dimensions. Afterward, the assembly geometry is produced, optimized and verified. In order to perform these calculations the general-purpose MCNP code is used. Irradiation time and therapeutic gain are utilized as beam assessment parameters. Metallic uranium and manganese are successfully tested for fast-to-epithermal neutron moderation. In the present beam-shaping assembly proposal, the therapeutic gain is improved by 23% and the accelerator current required for a fixed irradiation period is reduced by six times compared to previous proposals based on the same D-T reaction.

  4. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  5. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  6. Influence of the tritium beta(-) decay on low-temperature thermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures

    PubMed

    Frolov

    2000-09-01

    Low-temperature (Tdeuterium-tritium mixtures with various deuterium-tritium-helium-3 ratios is considered. The general dependence is studied for the critical burn-up parameter x(c)=rhor(c) upon the initial temperature T, density rho(0), and tritium molar concentration y for the [D]:y[T]:(1-y)[3He] mixture. In particular, it is shown that, if the tritium concentration y decreases, then the critical burn-up parameter x(c)(T,rho(0),y) grows very quickly (at fixed T and rho(0)). This means that tritium beta(-) decay significantly complicates thermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures.

  7. Concept of DT fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, S.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Kuteev, B.V.; Cherkez, D.I.; Shirnin, P.N.; Kazakovsky, N.T.

    2015-03-15

    A concept of DT-fusion neutron source (FNS) with the neutron yield higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons per second is under design in Russia. Such a FNS is of interest for many applications: 1) basic and applied research (neutron scattering, etc); 2) testing the structural materials for fusion reactors; 3) control of sub-critical nuclear systems and 4) nuclear waste processing (including transmutation of minor actinides). This paper describes the fuel cycle concept of a compact fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ∼0.5 and ∼0.3 m, magnetic field ∼1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The system provides the fuel mixture with equal fractions of D and T (D:T = 1:1) for all FNS technology systems. (authors)

  8. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Leeper, R J; Chandler, G A; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M; McWatters, B R; Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Knittel, K M; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Styron, J D

    2012-10-01

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β(+)) and (65)Cu(n,2n)( 64) Cu(β(+)), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI γ-γ coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel ρR to uncertainties as low as 5%.

  9. Isotopic enrichment of fuels for D-T fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.; Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Isotopic enrichment scenarios using cryogenic distillation were developed for a near-term D-T burning fusion-reactor design (ETF) as well as for a commercial fusion-reactor design (STARFIRE). The analytical results of studies of spent-fuel reprocessing for ETF show that isotopic enrichment can be carried out to meet fuel-purity requirements by a system consisting of a 5-column distillation cascade and two chemical equilibrators. For STARFIRE, the analytical results show that, for a fixed number of columns and chemical equilibrators in a reprocessing syste, the compositions of the recycle streams depend strongly on whether the two fuel streams (plasma exhaust and blanket) are processed separately or mixed and then processed as a single stream.

  10. First-principles studies on the equation-of-state, thermal-conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium and polystyrene (CH) for inertial confinement fusion applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Suxing; Collins, Lee A.; Goncharov, V. N.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Using first-principles (FP) methods, we have performed ab initio compute for the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) in a wide range of densities and temperatures for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. These systematic investigations have recently been expanded to accurately compute the plasma properties of CH ablators under extreme conditions. In particular, the first-principles EOS and thermal-conductivity tables of CH are self-consistently built from such FP calculations, which are benchmarked by experimental measurements. When compared with the traditional models used for these plasma properties in hydrocodes, significant differences have been identified in the warmmore » dense plasma regime. When these FP-calculated properties of DT and CH were used in our hydrodynamic simulations of ICF implosions, we found that the target performance in terms of neutron yield and energy gain can vary by a factor of 2 to 3, relative to traditional model simulations.« less

  11. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  12. Demonstration of the highest deuterium-tritium areal density using multiple-picket cryogenic designs on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Boehly, T R; Hu, S X; Igumenshchev, I V; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Radha, P B; Seka, W; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D

    2010-04-23

    The performance of triple-picket deuterium-tritium cryogenic target designs on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reported. These designs facilitate control of shock heating in low-adiabat inertial confinement fusion targets. Areal densities up to 300 mg/cm2 (the highest ever measured in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions) are inferred in the experiments with an implosion velocity approximately 3x10(7) cm/s driven at peak laser intensities of 8x10(14) W/cm2. Extension of these designs to ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] is presented.

  13. Specific features of X-ray generation by plasma focus chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Krapiva, P. S.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moskalenko, I. N.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The process of hard X-ray (HXR) generation in plasma focus (PF) chambers was studied experimentally. The radiation was recorded using scintillation detectors with a high time resolution and thermoluminescent detectors in combination with the method of absorbing filters. Time-resolved analysis of the processes of neutron and X-ray generation in PFs is performed. The spectra of HXR emission from PF chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings are determined. In experiments with PF chambers filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture, in addition to the HXR pulse with photon energies of up to 200-300 keV, a γ-ray pulse with photon energies of up to 2.5-3.0 MeV is recorded, and a mechanism of its generation is proposed.

  14. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium-tritium micro-implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-01

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ˜40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 102 or 103 g/cm3 densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm3), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  15. Synthesis and stability of liquid molecular DT

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Fearon, E.M.; Garza, R.G.; Griffith, C.M.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Mapoles, E.R.; Tsurgawa, R.T.; Sater, J.D.; Collins, G.W.; Gaines, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Regular equimolar deuterium-tritium is a mixture of 25 mol% T/sub 2/-50% DT-25% D/sub 2/. We have synthesized molecular DT of greater purity by the reaction LiT + CH/sub 3/OD ..-->.. DT + LiOCH/sub 3/, run at 243/degree/K. With both the alcohol and reactor-to-cryostat transfer lines at room temperature, we obtain 88 mol% DT purity. By cooling the alcohol and holding the transfer lines at 80/degree/K, the yield rose to 95% DT. The DT disproportionated to D/sub 2/ and T/sub 2/ with a le-time constant of about 100 hours in the liquid at 20.5/degree/K. Nuclear magnetic resonance data showed that the eventual T/sub 2/-DT-D/sub 2/ equilibrium is probably a /open quotes/hot-atom/close quotes/ one.

  16. Synthesis and stability of liquid molecular DT

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Fearon, E.M.; Garza, R.G.; Friffith, C.M.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Mapoles, E.R.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Sater, J.D.; Collins, G.W.; Gaines, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Regular equimolar deuterium-tritium is a mixture of 25 mol% T/sub 2/-50% DT-25% D/sub 2/. We have synthesized molecular DT of greater purity by the reaction LiT + CH/sub 3/OD ..-->.. DT + LiOCH/sub 3/, run at 243/degree/K. With both the alcohol and reactor-to-cryostat transfer lines at room temperature, we obtain 88 mol% DT purity. By cooling the alcohol and holding the transfer lines at 80/degree/K, the yield rose to 95% DT. The DT disproportionated to D/sub 2/ and T/sub 2/ with a 1e time constant of about 100 h in the liquid at 20.5/degree/K. Nuclear magnetic resonance data showed that the eventual T/sub 2/-DT-D/sub 2/ equilibrium is probably a /open quotes/hot-atom/close quotes/ one. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Hydrodynamic instability measurements in DT-layered ICF capsules using the layered-HGR platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Sater, J.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF implosion are reported. Previous instability measurements on the National Ignition Facility have used plastic capsules to measure ablation front Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Hydro.-Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. These capsules substituted an additional thickness of plastic ablator material in place of the cryogenic layer of Deuterium- Tritium (DT) fuel. The present experiments are the first to include a DT ice layer, which enables measurements of the instability growth occurring at the fuel-ablator interface. Instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface is seeded differently in two independent NIF experiments. In the first case, a perturbation on the outside of the capsule feeds through and grows on the interface. Comparisons to an implosion without a fuel layer produce a measure of the fuel's modulation. In the second case, a modulation was directly machined on the inner ablator before the fuel layer was added. The measurement of growth in these two scenarios are compared to 2D rad-hydro modeling.

  18. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  19. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, C; Nocente, M; Rebai, M; Tardocchi, M; Calvani, P; Croci, G; Giacomelli, L; Girolami, M; Griesmayer, E; Grosso, G; Pillon, M; Trucchi, D M; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction occurring between neutrons and (12)C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  20. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Griesmayer, E.; Pillon, M.

    2014-11-15

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction occurring between neutrons and {sup 12}C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  2. Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

    2011-10-25

    For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  3. Detailed implosion modeling of deuterium-tritium layered experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Eder, D. C.; Jones, O. S.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Suter, L. J.; Town, R. P. J.

    2013-05-15

    More than two dozen inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments with cryogenic deuterium-tritium layers have now been performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Each of these yields a wealth of data including neutron yield, neutron down-scatter fraction, burn-averaged ion temperature, x-ray image shape and size, primary and down-scattered neutron image shape and size, etc. Compared to 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations modeling both the hohlraum and the capsule implosion, however, the measured capsule yield is usually lower by a factor of 5 to 10, and the ion temperature varies from simulations, while most other observables are well matched between experiment and simulation. In an effort to understand this discrepancy, we perform detailed post-shot simulations of a subset of NIF implosion experiments. Using two-dimensional HYDRA simulations [M. M. Marinak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001).] of the capsule only, these simulations represent as accurately as possible the conditions of a given experiment, including the as-shot capsule metrology, capsule surface roughness, and ice layer defects as seeds for the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The radiation drive used in these capsule-only simulations can be tuned to reproduce quite well the measured implosion timing, kinematics, and low-mode asymmetry. In order to simulate the experiments as accurately as possible, a limited number of fully three-dimensional implosion simulations are also being performed. Despite detailed efforts to incorporate all of the effects known and believed to be important in determining implosion performance, substantial yield discrepancies remain between experiment and simulation. Some possible alternate scenarios and effects that could resolve this discrepancy are discussed.

  4. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Doppner, T.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurricane, O.; Kritcher, A.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Patel, P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Springer, P. T.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  5. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropicmore » source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.« less

  6. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Doppner, T.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurricane, O.; Kritcher, A.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Patel, P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Springer, P. T.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  7. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Knauer, J P; Cerjan, C J; Eckart, M J; Grim, G P; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Kilkenny, J D; Munro, D H; Sayre, D B; Spears, B K; Bionta, R M; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Callahan, D; Casey, D T; Döppner, T; Frenje, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Hurricane, O; Kritcher, A; LePape, S; Ma, T; Mackinnon, A; Meezan, N; Patel, P; Petrasso, R D; Ralph, J E; Springer, P T; Yeamans, C B

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures T_{ion} are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD T_{ion} are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT T_{ion}. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT T_{ion} are small, ∼150eV, indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed T_{ion}. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT T_{ion} greater than the DD T_{ion}, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  8. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Döppner, T.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurricane, O.; Kritcher, A.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Patel, P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Springer, P. T.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ˜150 eV , indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  9. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Kaveney, G.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-04-15

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  10. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, C; Sundén, E Andersson; Binda, F; Croci, G; Ericsson, G; Giacomelli, L; Gorini, G; Griesmayer, E; Grosso, G; Kaveney, G; Nocente, M; Perelli Cippo, E; Rebai, M; Syme, B; Tardocchi, M

    2014-04-01

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  11. Alpha Particle-Driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas: Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Nazikian, R.

    1998-07-09

    The toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [K. Young, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 11 (1984)]deuterium-tritium plasmas are analyzed using the NOVA-K code [C.Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1 (1992)]. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements in detail. In most cases, the theory agrees with the observations in terms of mode frequency, mode structure, and mode stability. However, one mode with toroidal mode number n = 2 is observed to be poloidally localized on the high field side of the magnetic axis with a mode frequency substantially below the TAE frequency.

  12. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-27

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ~34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  13. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  14. Isotope dilution spaces of mice injected simultaneously with deuterium, tritium and oxygen-18.

    PubMed

    Król, E; Speakman, J R

    1999-10-01

    The isotope dilution technique for measuring total body water (TBW), and the doubly labelled water (DLW) method for measuring energy expenditure, are both sensitive to small variations in the ratio of the hydrogen to oxygen-18 dilution space. Since the dilution space ratio varies between individuals, there has been much recent debate over what causes this variability (i.e. physiological differences between individuals or analytical error in the isotope determinations), and thus which values (individual or a population mean dilution space ratio) should be employed for TBW and DLW calculations. To distinguish between physiological and analytical variability, we injected 15 non-reproductive and 12 lactating mice (Mus musculus, outbred MF1) simultaneously with deuterium, tritium and oxygen-18. The two hydrogen labels were administered and analysed independently, therefore we expected a strong correlation between dilution space ratios based on deuterium and tritium if most of the variation in dilution spaces was physiological, but only a weak correlation if most of the variation was analytical. Dilution spaces were significantly influenced by reproductive status. Dilution spaces expressed as a percentage of body mass averaged 15.7 % greater in lactating mice than in non-reproductive mice. In addition, the hydrogen tracer employed had a significant effect (deuterium spaces were 2.0 % larger than tritium spaces). Deuterium and tritium dilution spaces, expressed as a percentage of body mass, were highly correlated. Dilution space ratios ranged from 0.952 to 1. 146 when using deuterium, and from 0.930 to 1.103 when using tritium. Dilution space ratios based on deuterium and tritium were also highly correlated. Comparison of standard deviations of the dilution space ratio based on deuterium in vivo and in vitro indicated that only 4.5 % of the variation in the dilution space ratios observed in the mice could be accounted for by analytical variation in the deuterium and

  15. Distortion of bulk-ion distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering and its effect on T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction rate coefficient in neutral-beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2007-05-15

    An effect of nuclear elastic scattering on the rate coefficient of fusion reaction between field deuteron and triton in the presence of neutral beam injection heating is studied. Without assuming a Maxwellian for bulk-ion distribution function, the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) equations for field (bulk) deuteron, field (bulk) triton, {alpha}-particle, and beam deuteron are simultaneously solved in an ITER-like deuterium-tritium thermonuclear plasma [R. Aymar, Fusion Eng. Des. 55, 107 (2001)]. The BFP calculation shows that enhancement of the reaction rate coefficient due to knock-on tail formation in fuel-ion distribution functions becomes appreciable, especially in the case of low-density operations.

  16. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C. Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  17. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, C.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the 198Au/196Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  18. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, C; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Gharibyan, N; Gostic, J M; Wooddy, P T; Torretto, P C; Bandong, B B; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C J; Bernstein, L A; Caggiano, J A; Herrmann, H W; Knauer, J P; Sayre, D B; Schneider, D H; Henry, E A; Fortner, R J

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the (198)Au/(196)Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  19. Shock timing measurements in DT ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Ross, J. S.; Lepape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely conducted using the keyhole target geometry, in which the strength and timing of multiple shocks are measured in a liquid-deuterium (D2) filled capsule interior. These targets have recently been modified to improve the surrogacy to ignition implosions by replacing the standard, continuous liquid D2 capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with a central DT gas fill. These experiments remove any possible material surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporating the physics of multiple shock release and recompression events from an ice layer of finite thickness, an effect that is absent in the liquid-filled targets. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. The Equation-of-State Dependence of Nonuniformity Growth in Cryogenic-DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Skupsky, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-11-01

    This work reports on the analysis of low-adiabat, cryogenic deuterium--tritium (DT), high-compression implosion experimentsootnotetext V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010). performed on OMEGA using 2-D DRACO simulations.ootnotetext S. X. Hu et al., ``Two-Dimensional Simulations of the Neutron-Yield in Cryogenic-DT Implosions on OMEGA,'' submitted to Phys. Plasmas. The growth of various target and laser perturbations has been investigated using 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with different fuel equation-of-states (EOS) such as the SESAME-EOS, the Thomas--Fermi model, as well as the FPEOS tableootnotetext S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010). recently created by the path-integral Monte Carlo method. It has been shown that uniform 1-D hydro simulations using the FPEOS table predicted ˜20% lower neutron yield than the SESAME-EOS case.^3 In this work, we will present the dependence of RT growth and neutron-yield reduction on these different equation of states from 2-D hydro simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  1. Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Langenbrunner, James R; Mack, Joseph M; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Douglas C; Evans, Scott C; Sedillo, Tom J; Kyrala, George A; Caldwell, Stephen E; Young, Carlton A; Nobile, Arthur; Wermer, Joseph R; Paglieri, Stephen N; Mcevoy, Aaron M; Kim, Yong Ho; Batha, Steven H; Horsfield, Colin J; Drew, Dave; Garbett, Warren; Rubery, Michael; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Roberts, Samuel; Frenje, Johan A

    2008-01-01

    Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

  2. Temperature derivatives for fusion reactivity of D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, James R.; Makaruk, Hanna Ewa

    2016-11-29

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rates are observable using leakage gamma flux. A direct measurement of γ-rays with equipment that exhibits fast temporal response could be used to infer temperature, if the detector signal is amenable for taking the logarithmic time-derivative, alpha. We consider the temperature dependence for fusion cross section reactivity.

  3. Modeling and analysis of tritium dynamics in a DT fusion fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, William

    1998-11-01

    A number of crucial design issues have a profound effect on the dynamics of the tritium fuel cycle in a DT fusion reactor, where the development of appropriate solutions to these issues is of particular importance to the introduction of fusion as a commercial system. Such tritium-related issues can be classified according to their operational, safety, and economic impact to the operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Given such key design issues inherent in next generation fusion devices using the DT fuel cycle development of appropriate models can then lead to optimized designs of the fusion fuel cycle for different types of DT fusion reactors. In this work, two different types of modeling approaches are developed and their application to solving key tritium issues presented. For the first approach, time-dependent inventories, concentrations, and flow rates characterizing the main subsystems of the fuel cycle are simulated with a new dynamic modular model of a fusion reactor's fuel cycle, named X-TRUFFLES (X-Windows TRitiUm Fusion Fuel cycLE dynamic Simulation). The complex dynamic behavior of the recycled fuel within each of the modeled subsystems is investigated using this new integrated model for different reactor scenarios and design approaches. Results for a proposed fuel cycle design taking into account current technologies are presented, including sensitivity studies. Ways to minimize the tritium inventory are also assessed by examining various design options that could be used to minimize local and global tritium inventories. The second modeling approach involves an analytical model to be used for the calculation of the required tritium breeding ratio, i.e., a primary design issue which relates directly to the feasibility and economics of DT fusion systems. A time-integrated global tritium balance scheme is developed and appropriate analytical expressions are derived for tritium self-sufficiency relevant parameters. The easy exploration of the large

  4. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; ...

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  5. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  6. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  7. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J. C.; Bemabei, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson the TFTR Team, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  8. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei

    1999-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

  9. SPECIAL TOPIC: Ion cyclotron emission measurements during JET deuterium-tritium experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, G. A.; Bhatnagar, V. P.; Da Costa, O.; Dendy, R. O.; Jacquinot, J.; McClements, K. G.; McCune, D. C.; Nave, M. F. F.; Smeulders, P.; Start, D. F. H.

    1993-09-01

    In the course of the Preliminary Tritium Experiment in JET, where combined deuterium and tritium neutral beam injection generated a DT fusion power of 1.7 MW, ion cyclotron emission (ICE) was measured in the frequency range v <= 180 MHz. The ICE spectra contain superthermal, narrow, equally spaced emission lines, which correspond to successive cyclotron harmonics of deuterons or alpha particles at the outer midplane, close to tile last closed flux surface at major radius R approximately 4.0 m. Above about 100 MHz the lines merge into a relatively intense continuum. The ICE signal fluctuates rapidly in time, and is extinguished whenever a large amplitude edge localized mode (ELM) occurs. In pure deuterium and mixed DT discharges ICE spectra are similar in form, but on changing from pure D to mixed D+T neutral beam injection at constant power, the intensity of the ICE rises in proportion to the increased neutron flux: this indicates that fusion alpha particles-and not beam ions-provide the free energy to generate ICE. The JET ICE database, which now extends over a range of six decades in signal intensity, shows that the time averaged ICE power increases almost linearly with total neutron flux. The rise and fall of the neutron flux during a single discharge is closely followed by that of the ICE signal, which is delayed by a time of the order of the fusion product slowing down time. This feature is well modelled by a TRANSP code simulation of the density of deeply trapped fusion products reaching the plasma edge. Calculations reveal a class of fusion products, born in the core, which make orbital excursions of sufficient size to reach the outer midplane edge. There, the velocity distribution has a ring structure, which is found to be linearly unstable to relaxation to obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven-ion Bernstein branch at all ion cyclotron harmonics. The paper shows how ICE provides a unique diagnostic for fusion alpha particles

  10. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-01

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures ⟨Ti⟩ is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of ˜5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with ⟨ρR⟩=200-300 mg/cm2) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 μm and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  11. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of {approx}5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with <{rho}R>=200-300 mg/cm{sup 2}) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 {mu}m and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  12. Systematic analysis of advanced fusion fuel in inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    1997-04-01

    Aneutronic fusion reactions can be considered as the cleanest way to exploit nuclear energy. However, these reactions present in general two main drawbacks.—very high temperatures are needed to reach relevant values of their cross sections—Moderate (and even low) energy yield per reaction. This value is still lower if measured in relation to the Z number of the reacting particles. It is already known that bremsstrahlung overruns the plasma reheating by fusion born charged-particles in most of the advanced fuels. This is for instance the case for proton-boron-11 fusion in a stoichiometric plasma and is also so in lithium isotopes fusion reactions. In this paper, the use of deuterium-tritium seeding is suggested to allow to reach higher burnup fractions of advanced fuels, starting at a lower ignition temperature. Of course, neutron production increases as DT contents does. Nevertheless, the ratio of neutron production to energy generation is much lower in DT-advanced fuel mixtures than in pure DT plasmas. One of the main findings of this work is that some natural resources (as D and Li-7) can be burned-up in a catalytic regime for tritium. In this case, neither external tritium breeding nor tritium storage are needed, because the tritium inventory after the fusion burst is the same as before it. The fusion reactor can thus operate on a pure recycling of a small tritium inventory.

  13. Challenges in the extrapolation from DD to DT plasmas: experimental analysis and theory based predictions for JET-DT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Challis, C.; Gallart, D.; Garzotti, L.; Görler, T.; King, D.; Mantsinen, M.; contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    A strong modelling program has been started in support of the future JET-DT campaign with the aim of guiding experiments in deuterium (D) towards maximizing fusion energy production in Deuterium-Tritium (DT). Some of the key elements have been identified by using several of the most updated and sophisticated models for predicting heat and particle transport, pedestal pressure and heating sources in an integrated modelling framework. For the high beta and low gas operational regime, the density plays a critical role and a trend towards higher fusion power is obtained at lower densities. Additionally, turbulence stabilization by E  ×  B flow shear is shown to generate an isotope effect leading to higher confinement for DT than DD and therefore plasmas with high torque are suitable for maximizing fusion performance. Future JET campaigns will benefit from this modelling activity by defining clear priorities on their scientific program.

  14. Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported DT Fuel for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and for Reactor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Darwin; Clark, Dan; Salmonson, Jay; Lindl, John; Haan, Steve; Amendt, Peter

    2011-10-01

    For high rep-rate reactor applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel (``foam-filled'') can have much reduced fill time compared to β-layering. The liquid DT vapor pressure is lowered once liquid DT is imbedded in a foam matrix, and the gas density is consequently closer to the desired density. We present NIF-scale foam-filled capsules in both 1-D and 2-D simulations. For foam density at 0.02 g/cm3, there is a 9% degradation in the clean 1-D yield if we include 2-D roughness up to a Legendre mode number of 60. This degradation in yield can be partially recovered if the capsule aspect ratio is increased. Optimal configuration is obtained when aspect ratio is increased until the clean fuel fraction is about 70 - 75% at peak velocity. Herrmann scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) will be presented. We will also present a statistical assessment of the capsule reliability to all expected manufacturing and physics uncertainties between capsules with clean DT fuel and with liquid DT in a foam. The performance of larger foam-filled capsules will also be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  15. JET, the largest tokamak on the eve of DT operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, L. D.

    2016-11-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) is the world's largest operating tokamak and the only such machine capable of operating with the fuel mixture (deuterium-tritium) foreseen for a fusion reactor. Since it came into operation in 1983, JET has explored fusion plasmas "in conditions and dimensions approaching those of a fusion reactor" [1]. JET has demonstrated world-record levels of fusion power and energy production, in conditions where the ratio of the fusion power generated to the input power to the plasma, Q, approaches unity.

  16. Fast ignition of precompressed DT fuel placed in an absolutely rigid heat-insulated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric problem on fast ignition of a cylindrical target of precompressed DT-mixture surrounded by a stationary heat-insulated shell is considered. The target end is ignited with a proton beam, the intensity of which is independent of the radial coordinate. Self-radiation of plasma and α-particles of the thermonuclear reaction freely escape out of the fuel through the lateral boundary of the shell. It is shown that the ignition energy threshold for the mixture density 22 and 110 g/cm3 about 10 times less than in the case of the known problem with the radius of the beam much less than the radius of fuel. Previously developed quasi-one-dimensional model underestimates the ignition energy threshold by the target radius about 4 times in comparison with the problem under consideration. Estimates for the magnetic field and the shell density at which the corresponding problems are in some sense close to the problem under consideration are presented.

  17. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  18. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-01

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  19. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2012-10-15

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  20. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  1. Feasibility of measuring 3He bubble diameter populations in deuterium-tritium ice layers using Mie scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N

    2007-01-22

    In this report, I assess the feasibility of using Mie scattering to quantify the diameter distribution of {sup 3}He bubbles in DT ice layers. Mie scattering methods are often used for He diameter m measurements of particulates in emulsions like pigments and ink products. These measurements suggests that similar techniques could be used to measure the distribution of {sup 3}He bubbles He in DT ice layers, which is important for NIF ICF capsules. To investigate the achievable performance of bubble diameter measurements using Mie scattering, I performed numerical modeling using exact analytical expressions.

  2. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M.; Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-01

    The fuel ion ratio nt/nd is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., nt/nd = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine nt/nd with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  3. Advanced Fuel Cycles for Fusion Reactors: Passive Safety and Zero-Waste Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo; Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is seen as a much ''cleaner'' energy source than fission. Most of the studies and experiments on nuclear fusion are currently devoted to the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) fuel cycle, since it is the easiest way to reach ignition. The recent stress on safety by the world's community has stimulated the research on other fuel cycles than the DT one, based on 'advanced' reactions, such as the Deuterium-Helium-3 (DHe) one. These reactions pose problems, such as the availability of 3He and the attainment of the higher plasma parameters that are required for burning. However, they have many advantages, like for instance the very low neutron activation, while it is unnecessary to breed and fuel tritium. The extrapolation of Ignitor technologies towards a larger and more powerful experiment using advanced fuel cycles (Candor) has been studied. Results show that Candor does reach the passive safety and zero-waste option. A fusion power reactor based on the DHe cycle could be the ultimate response to the environmental requirements for future nuclear power plants.

  4. Modeling down-scattered neutron images from cryogenic fuel implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Kumar; Casey, Dan; Callahan, Debra; Clark, Dan; Fittinghoff, David; Grim, Gary; Hatchett, Steve; Hinkel, Denise; Jones, Ogden; Kritcher, Andrea; Seek, Scott; Suter, Larry; Merrill, Frank; Wilson, Doug

    2016-10-01

    In experiments with cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layers at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an important technique for visualizing the stagnated fuel assembly is to image the 6-12 MeV neutrons created by scatters of the 14 MeV hotspot neutrons in the surrounding cold fuel. However, such down-scattered neutron images are difficult to interpret without a model of the fuel assembly, because of the nontrivial neutron kinematics involved in forming the images. For example, the dominant scattering modes are at angles other than forward scattering and the 14 MeV neutron fluence is not uniform. Therefore, the intensity patterns in these images usually do not correspond in a simple way to patterns in the fuel distribution, even for simple fuel distributions. We describe our efforts to model synthetic images from ICF design simulations with data from the National Ignition Campaign and after. We discuss the insight this gives, both to understand how well the models are predicting fuel asymmetries and to inform how to optimize the diagnostic for the types of fuel distributions being predicted. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Spent fuel and residue measurement instrumentation at the Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chesterman, A.S.; Clark, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Sellafield reprocessing plant receives and reprocesses several thousand tonnes of spent light water reactor (LWR), advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR) and natural uranium magnesium alloy clad (Magnox) fuels each year. The safety and cost effectiveness of these operations has been supported by the development and installation, at key points in the process, of a range of special purpose radiometric instrumentation. Systems in routine operational use verify the cooling time, burn-tip and initial and final U-235 equivalent enrichment of fuel assemblies in the storage and handling ponds. Other systems determine the radionuclide inventories of fuel residues in intermediate level waste arising from plant operations. The measurement techniques employed include high resolution gamma spectrometry, passive neutron counting and neutron interrogation by the use of a Cf-252 source and deuterium-tritium (D-T) pulsed neutron generators. Details of the instruments including mechanical installation arrangements and measurement data are presented in the paper along with a discussion of possible future uses of similar instruments for burn-up credit associated with fuel and residue storage, transportation and disposal.

  6. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    PubMed

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  7. LLE's High-Pressure DT-Fill Process Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Shmayda, W.T.; Janezic, R.; Loucks, S.J.; Reid, J.

    2008-07-18

    The OMEGA Laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) implodes fusion targets that contain cryogenic solid deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. These ICF targets are fabricated in a high-pressure DT-fill process. This paper describes the integration and control of this DT-fill process. The appropriate safety-control response during the DT-fill process depends on the location of the tritium inventory and where the containment alarm is detected. A control response that is deemed appropriate earlier in the fill process could be a dangerous action at a later point in the fill process. The control system must adapt as the DT inventory moves through the process train. This is achieved by defining eight "fill states" in the fill process. The control system transitions to the appropriate fill state as the DT fill progesses. The fill state reflects the tritium location, pressure, and temperature. Steps are taken to ensure that the tritium location and the fill state are in agreement. The control system monitors the containment system's integrity and will take the appropriate action, based on the tritium location and the type of containment failure. This approach not only ensures process safety, but also maximizes the productivity by executing process pauses (in lieu of aborts) when conditions allow.

  8. LLE'S high-pressure DT-fill process control system

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Shmayda, W. T.; Janezic, R.; Loucks, S. J.; Reid, J.

    2008-07-15

    The OMEGA laser at the Univ. of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) implodes fusion targets that contain cryogenic solid deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. These ICF targets are fabricated in a high-pressure DT-fill process. This paper describes the integration and control of this DT-fill process. The appropriate safety-control response during the DT-fill process depends on the location of the tritium inventory and where the containment alarm is detected. A control response that is deemed appropriate earlier in the fill process could be a dangerous action at a later point in the fill process. The control system must adapt as the DT inventory moves through the process train. This is achieved by defining eight 'fill states' in the fill process. The control system transitions to the appropriate fill state as the DT fill progresses. The fill state reflects the tritium location, pressure, and temperature. Steps are taken to ensure that the tritium location and the fill state are in agreement. The control system monitors the containment system's integrity and will take the appropriate action, based on the tritium location and the type of containment failure. This approach not only ensures process safety, but also maximizes the productivity by executing process pauses (in lieu of aborts) when conditions allow. (authors)

  9. Fission yield measurements from deuterium-tritium fusion produced neutrons using cyclic neutron activation analysis and gamma-gamma coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Bruce D.

    The work described in this dissertation used cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA) coupled with gamma-gamma coincidence counting with high-purity germanium detectors to measure the independent and cumulative fission yields of short-lived fission products from thorium-232, uranium-235, and uranium-238. Fission yields of short-lived fission products are needed to enhance the precision and expediency of pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics. The measurements presented in this work illustrate the large differences in the delayed gamma-ray response following a nuclear detonation. The work performed in this dissertation applied non-destructive CNAA using deuterium-tritium fusion produced neutrons to induce fission. Irradiated targets were shuttled from the irradiation position at the face of the neutron generator to a radiation detection system in less than 0.3 seconds using a pneumatic transfer system. Delayed gamma-rays emitted by fission progeny with half-lives on the order of seconds to several minutes were acquired using three high-purity germanium detectors operating in coincidence. Gamma emissions from this timescale exhibit the largest differences in intensity between individual actinides because of order-of-magnitude variations in independent fission yields for fission products at the wings and valley of the fission product distribution curve. Fission product decay data from the listed targets were evaluated to measure the fission yields of arsenic-84, selenium-86, bromine-88, krypton-90 and -92, rubidium-94, strontium-94, -95, and -96, yttrium-96m, zirconium-99, barium-143, and lanthanum-146. Time-dependent gamma-ray spectra were used to measure the fission yields of the listed radioisotopes along with: bromine-86 and -87, krypton-89, yttrium-97m and -99, tellurium-136, iodine-136 metastable and ground states, xenon-138, -139, and -140, cesium-140 and -142, and barium and lanthanum-144. All of the measured fission yields have yet to be experimentally

  10. Numerical Study on Effects of Fuel Mixture Fraction and Li-6 Enrichment on Neutronic Parameters of a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapııcıı, Hüseyin; Genç, Gamze; Demir, Nesrin

    2004-09-01

    This study presents the effects of mixture fractions of nuclear fuels (mixture of fissile-fertile fuels and mixture of two different fertile fuels) and 6Li enrichment on the neutronic parameters (the tritium breeding ratio, TBR, the fission rate, FR, the energy multiplication ratio, M, the fissile breeding rate, FBR, the neutron leakage out of blanket, L, and the peak-to-average fission power density ratio, Γ) of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron-driven hybrid blanket. Three different fertile fuels (232Th, 238U and 244Cm), and one fissile fuel (235U) were selected as the nuclear fuel. Two different coolants (pressurized helium and natural lithium) were used for the nuclear heat transfer out of the fuel zone (FZ). The Boltzmann transport equation was solved numerically for obtaining the neutronic parameters with the help of the neutron transport code XSDRNPM/SCALE4.4a. In addition, these calculations were performed by also using the MCNP4B code. The sub-limits of the mixture fractions and 6Li enrichment were determined for the tritium self-sufficiency. The considered hybrid reactor can be operated in a self-sufficiency mode in the cases with the fuel mixtures mixed with a fraction of equal to or greater than these sub-limits. Furthermore, the numerical results show that the fissile fuel breeding and fission potentials of the blankets with the helium coolant are higher than with the lithium coolant.

  11. Pulsed Laser-Based X-Ray Sources for Rapid-Cool DT Layer Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Izumi, N; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O; Siders, C

    2007-08-29

    Ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will contain a cryogenically cooled {approx} 75 {micro}m-thick deuterium/tritium (DT) ice layer surrounded by a {approx} 150 {micro}m-thick beryllium (Be) shell [1]. Ignition target design optimization depends sensitively on the achievable inner surface quality of the ice layer and on the pressure of the DT gas inside the ice, which is determined by the temperature of the ice. The inner ice layer surface is smoothest at temperatures just below the DT ice/liquid/gas triple point (3T), but current ignition target designs require central gas pressures of 0.3 mg/cm3, corresponding to an ice layer temperature 1.5 K below the triple point (3T-1.5). At these lower temperatures, the ice layer quality degrades due to the formation of cracks and other features.

  12. High performance detectors for upgraded gamma ray diagnostics for JET DT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zychor, I.; Boltruczyk, G.; Burakowska, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Fernandes, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Gierlik, M.; Gosk, M.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Kaveney, G.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Mianowski, S.; Moszynski, M.; Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Perseo, V.; Rigamonti, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sibczynski, P.; Santos, B.; Soare, S.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Szewinski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Urban, A.; Zoita, V. L.; contributors, JET

    2016-06-01

    In forthcoming deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on JET a significant population of alpha-particles will be produced. For operating alpha-particle diagnostics at high DT neutron fluxes, specific improvements have to be made. Proposed new detectors for gamma-ray measurements will be based on CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce scintillators. They are characterized by a good energy resolution, a relatively high detection efficiency for a few MeV gamma-rays and a fast response time. An overview of scintillator parameters is presented. A description of the properties of photodetectors is given to indicate optimal setups. Results of measurements, using gamma-ray sources with energies up to a few MeV, are discussed with relation to the DT campaign requirements.

  13. JET diagnostic enhancements in preparation for DT operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, J.; Murari, A.; Perez Von Thun, C.; Marocco, D.; Tardocchi, M.; Belli, F.; García Muñoz, M.; Silva, A.; Soare, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Santala, M.; Blanchard, P.; Balboa, I.; Hawkes, N.

    2016-11-01

    In order to complete the exploitation of the JET ITER-like Wall and to take full benefit from deuterium-tritium experiments on JET, a set of diagnostic system refurbishments or upgrades is in progress. These diagnostic enhancements focus mainly on neutron, gamma, fast ions, instabilities, and operations support. These efforts intend to provide better spatial, temporal, and energy resolution while increasing measurement coverage. Also previously non-existing capabilities, such as Doppler reflectometry is now available for scientific exploitation. Guaranteeing diagnostic reliability and consistency during the expected DT conditions is also a critical objective of the work and systems being implemented. An overview of status and scope of the ongoing projects is presented.

  14. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M. Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-15

    The fuel ion ratio n{sub t}/n{sub d} is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., n{sub t}/n{sub d} = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine n{sub t}/n{sub d} with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  15. Effect of fusion reaction products heating on the volume ignition of DT and D3He fuel pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoda-Bakhsh, R.

    1996-05-01

    Laser fusion simulations are carried out for the DT and D-3He pellets by using a hydrodynamic code including heating from all charged reaction products and neutron. It is shown that, the inclusion of the side reactions and heating from all reactions products in the fuel pellets has an appreciable affect on the plasma temperature, the ICF drive energy requirement, fusion gain and the ignition conditions. The total input energy is decreased, the burn efficiency and total gain are increased compared to the results of simple volume ignition calculations.

  16. Progress in obtaining an absolute calibration of a total deuterium-tritium neutron yield diagnostic based on copper activation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C L; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Fehl, D L; Hahn, K D; Leeper, R J; McWatters, B R; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Snow, C S; Torres, J A

    2012-10-01

    The 350-keV Cockroft-Walton accelerator at Sandia National laboratory's Ion Beam facility is being used to calibrate absolutely a total DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β+) reaction. These investigations have led to first-order uncertainties approaching 5% or better. The experiments employ the associated-particle technique. Deuterons at 175 keV impinge a 2.6 μm thick erbium tritide target producing 14.1 MeV neutrons from the T(d,n)(4)He reaction. The alpha particles emitted are measured at two angles relative to the beam direction and used to infer the neutron flux on a copper sample. The induced (62)Cu activity is then measured and related to the neutron flux. This method is known as the F-factor technique. Description of the associated-particle method, copper sample geometries employed, and the present estimates of the uncertainties to the F-factor obtained are given.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of a differential die-away instrument for determination of fissile content in spent fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehoon; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    The differential die-away (DDA) technique has been simulated by using the MCNPX code to quantify its capability to measure the fissile content in spent fuel assemblies, For 64 different spent fuel cases of various initial enrichment, burnup and cooling time, the count rate and signal to background ratios of the DDA system were obtained, where neutron backgrounds are mainly coming from the {sup 244}Cm of the spent fuel. To quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel, a concept of the effective {sup 239}Pu mass was introduced by weighting the relative contribution to the signal of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu compared to {sup 239}Pu and the calibration curves of DDA count rate vs. {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} were obtained by using the MCNPX code. With a deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator of 10{sup 9} n/s strength, signal to background ratios of sufficient magnitude are acquired for a DDA system with the spent fuel assembly in water.

  18. Change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon Using an Ab Initio Multiphase DT Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Caillabet, L.; Canaud, B.; Salin, G.; Mazevet, S.; Loubeyre, P.

    2011-09-09

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of moderator and reflector in coal analyzer based on a D-T neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qing; Chu, Shengnan; Jia, Wenbao

    2015-11-01

    Coal is one of the most popular fuels in the world. The use of coal not only produces carbon dioxide, but also contributes to the environmental pollution by heavy metals. In prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA)-based coal analyzer, the characteristic gamma rays of C and O are mainly induced by fast neutrons, whereas thermal neutrons can be used to induce the characteristic gamma rays of H, Si, and heavy metals. Therefore, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons are beneficial in improving the measurement accuracy of heavy metals, and ensure that the measurement accuracy of main elements meets the requirements of the industry. Once the required yield of the deuterium-tritium (d-T) neutron generator is determined, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons can be obtained by optimizing the neutron source term. In this article, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code and Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) database are used to optimize the neutron source term in PGNAA-based coal analyzer, including the material and shape of the moderator and neutron reflector. The optimized targets include two points: (1) the ratio of the thermal to fast neutron is 1:1 and (2) the total neutron flux from the optimized neutron source in the sample increases at least 100% when compared with the initial one. The simulation results show that, the total neutron flux in the sample increases 102%, 102%, 85%, 72%, and 62% with Pb, Bi, Nb, W, and Be reflectors, respectively. Maximum optimization of the targets is achieved when the moderator is a 3-cm-thick lead layer coupled with a 3-cm-thick high-density polyethylene (HDPE) layer, and the neutron reflector is a 27-cm-thick hemispherical lead layer.

  20. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  1. Hydrodynamic Mixing of Ablator Material into the Compressed Fuel and Hot Spot of Direct-Drive DT Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Luo, R. W.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic mixing of ablator material into the compressed fuel and hot spot of direct-drive DT cryogenic implosions is diagnosed using time-integrated, spatially resolved xray spectroscopy. The laser drive ablates most of the 8- μm-thick CH ablator, which is doped with trace amounts of Ge ( 0.5 at.) and surrounds the cryogenic DT layer. A small fraction of the ablator material is mixed into the compressed shell and the hot spot by the ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser imprint, the target mounting stalk, and surface debris. The amount of mix mass inferred from spectroscopic analysis of the Ge K-shell emission will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Thermal oscillation smoothing of DT solid layers for HAPL and NIF scale targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sheliak, John D; Geller, Drew A; Hoffer, James K

    2009-01-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) solid fuel layers must meet stringent roughness specifications for both the ICF and IFE laser fusion programs and native beta-layering alone is unable to provide sufficient solid layer smoothing to meet these specifications at 18.3 K or below. Consequently, several supplemental smoothing options have been proposed to resolve this issue, including a technique called 'Thermal Breathing'. This technique consists of oscillating the temperature of the solid D-T layer about its equilibration temperature for a period of one to several hours. Recently, thermal oscillations have been used to successfully smooth rough solid D{sub 2} in spherical targets. In order to study this particular smoothing technique, we examined the effects of thermal oscillations on equilibrated D-T solid layers, using both ICF and IFE scale layering cells and layer thicknesses. The D-T solid layers that were Subjected to thermal breathing in these studies were equilibrated at temperatures ranging from 16.0 K to 19.25 K, followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of temperature oscillations. During the HAPL scale experiments the amplitude and period of the oscillations were both varied to examine parametric effects of these variables on final layer roughness. In both sets of experiments, once the oscillations completed we allowed the layers to 'relax' at their initial equilibration temperature for another 1 to 2 hours, to observe any 'rebounding' or re-roughening that might occur. The rCF scale experiments were performed using a 2 mm beryllium torus, for which the layer was free from optical distortions that were observed in our IFE scale cell (a 4 mm dia. sapphire sphere-cylinder). Our results showed a temperature dependent smoothing effect ofthe DT solid layer ranging from 20% to 35% over the temperature range of 17.3 K to 19.0 K for the rCF-scale, 2-mm celL The final RMS roughness for layers grown in this 2-mm Be torus was on average less than 1 /lm for modes 7 and above. Results for the

  3. Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T

    2012-05-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

  4. Comparative study of the muon-catalyzed fusion in D-T and D-/sup 3/He systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-09-01

    The objective of this proposal is to carry out a comparative study of the muon-catalyzed reactions, D-T and D-/sup 3/He by measuring the number of neutrons/..mu.. and protons/..mu.. under equivalent experimental conditions. The comparison will be made as function of the T or /sup 3/He concentration in the systems, their densities and temperatures. Since some measurements of the D-T system are already available, the present study will concentrate on the D-/sup 3/He system and in that region of the parameter space (concentration-density-temperature) not covered by the existent neutron work, mainly, mixtures at very high pressures and temperatures. The experimental results will be compared with calculations of the neutron, and proton yields resulting from the mesomolecular processes taking place between the muon and the deuterium-tritium and deuterium-helium mixtures. 23 refs.

  5. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  6. Optimization of Beam-Shaping Assemblies for BNCS Using the High-Energy Neutron Sources D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-06-15

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy is a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in articulating joints. The treatment of knee joints is the focus of this work. A method was developed, as discussed previously, to predict the dose distribution in a knee joint from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method is validated and used to design moderators for the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron sources. Treatment times >2 h were obtained with the D-D reaction. They could potentially be reduced if the {sup 10}B concentration in the synovium was increased. For D-T neutrons, high therapeutic ratios and treatment times <5 min were obtained for neutron yields of 10{sup 14} s{sup -1}. This treatment time makes the D-T reaction attractive for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

  7. Fuel gain exceeding unity in an inertially confined fusion implosion.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Kline, J L; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R

    2014-02-20

    Ignition is needed to make fusion energy a viable alternative energy source, but has yet to be achieved. A key step on the way to ignition is to have the energy generated through fusion reactions in an inertially confined fusion plasma exceed the amount of energy deposited into the deuterium-tritium fusion fuel and hotspot during the implosion process, resulting in a fuel gain greater than unity. Here we report the achievement of fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the US National Ignition Facility using a 'high-foot' implosion method, which is a manipulation of the laser pulse shape in a way that reduces instability in the implosion. These experiments show an order-of-magnitude improvement in yield performance over past deuterium-tritium implosion experiments. We also see a significant contribution to the yield from α-particle self-heating and evidence for the 'bootstrapping' required to accelerate the deuterium-tritium fusion burn to eventually 'run away' and ignite.

  8. Impact of Resonance Treatment on Minor Actinide Incineration in a D-T Thorium Fusion Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem

    2009-12-01

    Resonance treatments have an essential role to reliable neutronic calculations with different neutronic parameters. In this study presents the effect of resonance treatment and various tritium breeder materials on the incineration of the nitride fuels containing minor actinide mixed thoria in the Deuterium-Tritium fusion driven hybrid reactor as time dependent. Neutron transport calculations under resonance treatment and without resonance treatment are performed by using XSDRNPM/SCALE 5 codes. The impact of resonance treatments and various tritium breeder materials on tritium breeding, energy multiplication, total fission rate (∑f), cumulative fissile fuel enrichment, fissile fuel breeding, average burn up values are comparatively investigated. It is observed that the neutronic results affect from both resonance treatment and the tritium breeder materials as time dependent.

  9. Georgia Tech Studies of Sub-Critical Advanced Burner Reactors with a D-T Fusion Tokamak Neutron Source for the Transmutation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2009-09-01

    The possibility that a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, based on ITER physics and technology, could be used to drive sub-critical, fast-spectrum nuclear reactors fueled with the transuranics (TRU) in spent nuclear fuel discharged from conventional nuclear reactors has been investigated at Georgia Tech in a series of studies which are summarized in this paper. It is found that sub-critical operation of such fast transmutation reactors is advantageous in allowing longer fuel residence time, hence greater TRU burnup between fuel reprocessing stages, and in allowing higher TRU loading without compromising safety, relative to what could be achieved in a similar critical transmutation reactor. The required plasma and fusion technology operating parameter range of the fusion neutron source is generally within the anticipated operational range of ITER. The implications of these results for fusion development policy, if they hold up under more extensive and detailed analysis, is that a D-T fusion tokamak neutron source for a sub-critical transmutation reactor, built on the basis of the ITER operating experience, could possibly be a logical next step after ITER on the path to fusion electrical power reactors. At the same time, such an application would allow fusion to contribute to meeting the nation's energy needs at an earlier stage by helping to close the fission reactor nuclear fuel cycle.

  10. Monochromatic backlighting of direct-drive cryogenic DT implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bittle, W.; Delettrez, J. A.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Janezic, R. T.; Kelly, J. H.; Kosc, T. Z.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Mileham, C.; McKenty, P. W.; Marshall, F. J.; Morse, S. F. B.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Shmayda, W. T.; Sorce, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2017-05-01

    Backlighting is a powerful technique to observe the flow of cold and dense material in high-energy-density-plasma experiments. High-performance, direct-drive cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions are a challenging backlighting configuration because of the low opacity of the DT shell, the high shell velocity, the small size of the stagnating shell, and the very bright self-emission of the hot core. A crystal imaging system with a Si Heα backlighter at 1.865 keV driven by ˜20-ps short pulses from OMEGA EP was developed to radiograph the OMEGA cryogenic implosions. The high throughput of the crystal imaging system makes it possible to record high-quality images with good photon statistics and a spatial resolution of ˜15 μm at 10% to 90% modulation. This imager has been used to study the evolution of preimposed mass-density perturbations in the ablator, to quantify the perturbations caused by the stalk that is used to mount the target, and to study the mix caused by laser imprint or small-scale debris on the target surface. Because of the very low opacity of DT relative to carbon, even 0.1% of mix of carbon into the DT ice can be reliably inferred from the images. With the current implosion designs, mix is only observed for an adiabat below α = 4.

  11. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.

  12. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fissionmore » as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.« less

  13. Burning DT Plasmas with Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-10-01

    Fast ignition with narrowband, coherent ultrafast soft x-ray pulsesfootnotetextS. X. Hu, V. N. Goncharov, and S. Skupsky, ``Burning Plasmas with Ultrashort Soft-X-Ray Flashing,'' to be published in Physics of Plasmas. has been investigated for cryogenic deuterium--tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard x-rays (hν = 3 to 6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft x-ray sources with hν 500-eV photons can be more suitable for igniting the dense DT plasmas. Two-dimensional radiation--hydrodynamics simulations have identified the breakeven conditions for realizing such a ``hybrid'' ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft x-ray heating) with 50-μm-offset targets: an ˜10-ps soft x-ray pulse (hν 500 eV) with a total energy of 500 to 1000 J to be focused into a 10-μm spot size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as ˜50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1-MJ large-scale NIF target, a gain above ˜30 can be reached with the same soft x-ray pulse at 1.65-kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft x-ray sources in future. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  14. Computational modeling and sensitivity in uniform DT burn

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jon; Hryniw, Natalia; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank; Vold, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Understanding deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion is essential to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. A burning DT plasma in a three temperature (3T) approximation and uniform in space is modeled as a system of five non-linear coupled ODEs. Special focus is given to the effects of Compton coupling, Planck opacity, and electron-ion coupling terms. Semi-implicit differencing is used to solve the system of equations. Time step size is varied to examine the stability and convergence of each solution. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create analytic fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different high order fits to NDI date (the reaction rate parameter), and using TOPS versus SESAME opacity data is explored, and the sensitivity to several physics parameters in the coupling terms are also examined. The base model recovers the accepted 3T results for the temperature and burn histories. The Compton coupling is found to have a significant impact on the results. Varying a coefficient of this term shows that the model results can give reasonably good agreement with the peak temperatures reported in multi-group results as well as the accepted 3T results. The base model assumes a molar density of 1 mol/cm{sup 3}, as well as a 5 keV intial temperature for all three temperatures. Different intial conditions are explored as well. Intial temperatures are set to 1 and 3 keV, the ratio of D to T is varied (2 and 3 as opposed to 1 in the base model), and densities are set to 10 mol/cm{sup 3} and 100 mol/cm{sup 3}. Again varying the Compton coefficient, the ion temperature results in the higher density case are in reasonable agreement with a recently published kinetic model.

  15. Calculations to support JET neutron yield calibration: Modelling of neutron emission from a compact DT neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čufar, Aljaž; Batistoni, Paola; Conroy, Sean; Ghani, Zamir; Lengar, Igor; Milocco, Alberto; Packer, Lee; Pillon, Mario; Popovichev, Sergey; Snoj, Luka

    2017-03-01

    At the Joint European Torus (JET) the ex-vessel fission chambers and in-vessel activation detectors are used as the neutron production rate and neutron yield monitors respectively. In order to ensure that these detectors produce accurate measurements they need to be experimentally calibrated. A new calibration of neutron detectors to 14 MeV neutrons, resulting from deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, is planned at JET using a compact accelerator based neutron generator (NG) in which a D/T beam impinges on a solid target containing T/D, producing neutrons by DT fusion reactions. This paper presents the analysis that was performed to model the neutron source characteristics in terms of energy spectrum, angle-energy distribution and the effect of the neutron generator geometry. Different codes capable of simulating the accelerator based DT neutron sources are compared and sensitivities to uncertainties in the generator's internal structure analysed. The analysis was performed to support preparation to the experimental measurements performed to characterize the NG as a calibration source. Further extensive neutronics analyses, performed with this model of the NG, will be needed to support the neutron calibration experiments and take into account various differences between the calibration experiment and experiments using the plasma as a source of neutrons.

  16. Effect of Nuclear Data Libraries on Tritium Breeding in a (D-T) Fusion Driven Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem

    2008-12-01

    In design a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion driven hybrid reactor, neutronics and nuclear data libraries have an essential role for reliable neutronics calculations. Therefore, nuclear data libraries are very important to calculate of the neutronic parameters and selection of tritium breeder materials to be used in the blanket. In this study tritium breeding performances of candidate tritium breeding materials, namely, Li2O, LiH, Li2TiO3, Li2ZrO3 and Li4SiO4 in a (D-T) driven fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor is investigated based on three dimensional (3-D) and one dimensional (1-D) neutronic calculations. 3-D and 1-D neutron transport calculations are performed with Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP 4C), SCALE 5 and ANISN nuclear data codes to determine the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of the blanket. The effects of different nuclear data libraries on TBR are examined and TBR calculation results are comparatively investigated.

  17. Polyimide capsules may hold high pressure DT fuel without cryogenic support for the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.J.; Letts, S.A.

    1997-03-26

    New target designs for the Omega upgrade laser and ignition targets in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require thick (80 - 100 {micro}m) cryogenic fuel layers. The Omega upgrade target will require cryogenic handling after initial fill because of the high fill pressures and the thin capsule walls. For the NIF indirectly driven targets, a larger capsule size and new materials offer hope that they can be built, filled and stored in a manner similar to the targets used in the Nova facility without requiring cryogenic handling.

  18. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition.

    PubMed

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J; Albright, B J; Dodd, E S; Hoffman, N M; McCall, G H; Ramsey, S D

    2016-06-24

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (∼10%).

  19. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; McCall, G. H.; Ramsey, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8 ×1014 W /cm2 ) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μ g of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (˜10 %).

  20. Integrated Two-Dimensional DRACO Simulations of Cryogenic DT Target Performance on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have been performed using the radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO. Taking into account the known nonuniformities of target and laser irradiation, 2-D simulations examine the target performance of a variety of ignition-relevant implosions. The effects of cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal heat transport are mimicked by a time-dependent flux limiter. DRACO simulations show good agreement with experiments in ρR , neutron yield, Ti, neutron rate, and x-ray images for the mid-adiabat (α ~ 4 ) implosions. For low-adiabat (α ~ 2) and high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR > 24) implosions, the integrated simulations with the known nonuniformity sources cannot fully explain the reduction in target performance. Examinations of other possible nonuniformity sources and the thermal conductivity model will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Enhancement of Localized ICRF Heating and Current Drive in TFTR D-T Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    = G Schilling, First Author

    1997-04-15

    Theoretical advantages have led to an increased importance of the modification and sustainment of pressure and magnetic shear profiles in plasmas. We have demonstrated electron heating and current drive in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas with the existing 43/63.6 MHz ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) system, both via the fast wave and via mode conversion of the fast wave to an ion-Bernstein wave. In order to achieve both on- and off-axis mode conversion in a pure D-T (deuterium-tritium) plasma, we have changed the operating frequency of two of our transmitters and antennas to 30 MHz and improved the launched directional wave spectrum. As a second step, two new four-strap fast-wave antennas have been installed, and a new four-strap direct-launch IBW antenna has been added as well. This reconfiguration and the resulting operating characteristics of the TFTR ICRF system in a variety of discharges will be presented.

  2. Optical and X-ray Characterization of Groove Profiles in DT Ice Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Kozioziemski, B J; Salmonson, J; Chernov, A; Atherton, L J; Dewald, E; Izumi, N; Johnson, M A; Kucheyev, S; Lugten, J; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Pipes, J W; Sater, J D; Stefanescu, D

    2008-06-27

    Deuterium-tritium (DT) single-crystal ice layers in spherical shells often form with localized defects that we believe are vapor-etched grain boundary grooves built from dislocations and accommodating slight misorientations between contacting lattice regions. Ignition implosion target requirements limit the cross-sectional areas and total lengths of these grooves, and since they are often the dominant factor in determining layer surface quality, it is important that we be able to characterize their depths, widths and lengths. We present a variety of raytracing and diffraction image modeling results that support our understanding of the profiles of the grooves, which is grounded in x-ray and optical imaging data, and we describe why these data are nevertheless insufficient to adequately determine whether or not a particular layer will meet the groove requirements for ignition. We present accumulated data showing the distribution of groove depths, widths, and lengths from a number of layers, and we discuss how these data motivate the adoption of layer rejection criteria in order to ensure that layers that pass these criteria will almost certainly meet the groove requirements.

  3. Anomalous DD and TT yields relative to the DT yield in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Daniel T.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (DD), T(t,2n)4He (TT) and D(t,n)4He (DT) reactions have been conducted using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In these experiments, which were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility, absolute spectral measurements of the DD protons and TT neutrons were conducted and compared to neutron-time-of-flight measured DT-neutron yields. From these measurements, it is concluded that the DD yield is anomalously low and the TT yield is anomalously high relative to the DT yield, an effect that is enhanced with increasing ion temperature. These results can be explained by an enrichment of tritium in the core of an ICF implosion, which may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. In addition, the spectral measurements of the TT-neutron spectrum were conducted for the first time at reactant central-mass energies in the range of 15-30 keV. The results from these measurements indicate that the TT reaction proceeds primarily through the direct three-body reaction channel, producing a continuous TT-neutron spectrum in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. This work was conducted in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, M. J.-E. Manuel, H. G. Rinderknecht, N. Sinenian, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, P. B. Radha, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, D. P. McNabb, P. A. Amendt, R. N. Boyd, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann, Y. H. Kim, G. P. Grim and A. D. Bacher. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG03-03SF22691), LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974).

  4. Understanding Fuel Magnetization and Mix Using Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155003] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  5. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  6. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  7. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  8. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the

  9. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; Church, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Kirk Miller, E.; Yu Glebov, V.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-05-01

    A new deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [3H(d,γ)5He/3H(d,n)4He] value of (4.2 ± 2.0) × 10-5 was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement, conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester, was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov γ-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values, which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T γ-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-3He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [3He(d, γ)5Li/3He(d,p)4He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results, and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ γ-ray detector calibration using neutron-induced γ-rays. Also, by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures, we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2-9 keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the 5He and 5Li systems resulting from D-T and D-3He fusion, respectively, and result in improved ICF γ-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition Facility.

  10. Study of high gain spherical shell ICF targets containing uniform layers of liquid deuterium tritium fuel. A numericial model for analyzing thermal layering of liquid mixtures of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical inertial confinement fusion target: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E.M.; Kim, Kyekyoon

    1994-05-01

    A numerical model has been developed to describe the thermally induced behavior of a liquid layer of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target and to calculate the far-field temperature gradient which will sustain a uniform liquid layer. This method is much faster than the trial-and-error method previously employed. The governing equations are the equations of continuity, momentum, energy, mass diffusion-convection, and conservation of the individual isotopic species. Ordinary and thermal diffusion equations for the diffusion of fluxes of the species are included. These coupled equations are solved by a finite-difference method using upwind schemes, variable mesh, and rigorous boundary conditions. The solution methodology unique to the present problem is discussed in detail. in particular, the significance of the surface tension gradient driven flows (also called Marangoni flows) in forming uniform liquid layers inside ICF targets is demonstrated. Using the theoretical model, the values of the externally applied thermal gradients that give rise to uniform liquid layers of hydrogen inside a cryogenic spherical-shell ICF target are calculated, and the results compared with the existing experimental data.

  11. Detection of fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction using a 4H-SiC radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, Bohumir; Sagatova, Andrea; Sedlackova, Katarina; Necas, Vladimir; Dubecky, Frantisek; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The particle detector based on a high purity epitaxial layer of 4H-SiC exhibits promising properties in detection of various types of ionizing radiation. Due to the wide band gap of 4H-SiC semiconductor material, the detector can reliably operate at room and also elevated temperatures. In this work we focused on detection of fast neutrons generated the by D-T (deuterium-tritium) nuclear reaction. The epitaxial layer with a thickness of 105 μm was used as a detection part. A circular Schottky contact of a Au/Ni double layer was evaporated on both sides of the detector material. The detector structure was characterized by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements, at first. The results show very low current density (<0.1 nA/cm2) at room temperature and good homogeneity of free carrier concentration in the investigated depth. The fabricated detectors were tested for detection of fast neutrons generated by the D-T reaction. The energies of detected fast neutrons varied from 16.0 MeV to 18.3 MeV according to the acceleration potential of deuterons, which increased from 600 kV up to 2 MV. Detection of fast neutrons in the SiC detector is caused by the elastic and inelastic scattering on the silicon or carbide component of the detector material. Another possibility that increases the detection efficiency is the use of a conversion layer. In our measurements, we glued a HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer on the detector Schottky contact to transform fast neutrons to protons. Hydrogen atoms contained in the conversion layer have a high probability of interaction with neutrons through elastic scattering. Secondary generated protons flying to the detector can be easily detected. The detection properties of detectors with and without the HDPE conversion layer were compared.

  12. Optimization of combined delayed neutron and differential die-away prompt neutron signal detection for characterization of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, M; Lee, T

    2010-12-02

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded multiple laboratories and universities to develop a means to accurately quantify the Plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and ways to also detect potential diversion of fuel pins. Delayed Neutron (DN) counting provides a signature somewhat more sensitive to {sup 235}U than Pu while Differential Die-Away (DDA) is complementary in that it has greater sensitivity to Pu. The two methods can, with care, be combined into a single instrument which also provides passive neutron information. Individually the techniques cannot robustly quantify the Pu content but coupled together the information content in the signatures enables Pu quantification separate to the total fissile content. The challenge of merging DN and DDA, prompt neutron (PN) signal, capabilities in the same design is the focus of this paper. Other possibilities also suggest themselves, such as a direct measurement of the reactivity (multiplication) by either the boost in signal obtained during the active interrogation itself or by the extension of the die-away profile. In an early study, conceptual designs have been modeled using a neutron detector comprising fission chambers or 3He proportional counters and a {approx}14 MeV neutron Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator as the interrogation source. Modeling was performed using the radiation transport code Monte Carlo N-Particles eXtended (MCNPX). Building on this foundation, the present paper quantifies the capability of a new design using an array of {sup 3}He detectors together with fission chambers to optimize both DN and PN detections and active characterization, respectively. This new design was created in order to minimize fission in {sup 238}U (a nuisance DN emitter), to use a realistic neutron generator, to reduce the cost and to achieve near spatial interrogation and detection of the DN and PN, important for detection of diversion, all within

  13. High-fidelity MCNP modeling of a D-T neutron generator for active interrogation of special nuclear material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katalenich, Jeff; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Hartman, Michael R.

    2011-10-01

    Fast and robust methods for interrogation of special nuclear material (SNM) are of interest to many agencies and institutions in the United States. It is well known that passive interrogation methods are typically sufficient for plutonium identification because of a relatively high neutron production rate from 240Pu [1]. On the other hand, identification of shielded uranium requires active methods using neutron or photon sources [2]. Deuterium-deuterium (2.45 MeV) and deuterium-tritium (14.1 MeV) neutron-generator sources have been previously tested and proven to be relatively reliable instruments for active interrogation of nuclear materials [3,4]. In addition, the newest generators of this type are small enough for applications requiring portable interrogation systems. Active interrogation techniques using high-energy neutrons are being investigated as a method to detect hidden SNM in shielded containers [4,5]. Due to the thickness of some containers, penetrating radiation such as high-energy neutrons can provide a potential means of probing shielded SNM. In an effort to develop the capability to assess the signal seen from various forms of shielded nuclear materials, the University of Michigan Neutron Science Laboratory's D-T neutron generator and its shielding were accurately modeled in MCNP. The generator, while operating at nominal power, produces approximately 1×10 10 neutrons/s, a source intensity which requires a large amount of shielding to minimize the dose rates around the generator. For this reason, the existing shielding completely encompasses the generator and does not include beam ports. Therefore, several MCNP simulations were performed to estimate the yield of uncollided 14.1-MeV neutrons from the generator for active interrogation experiments. Beam port diameters of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm were modeled to assess the resulting neutron fluxes. The neutron flux outside the beam ports was estimated to be approximately 2×10 4 n/cm 2 s.

  14. The effects of convergence ratio on the implosion behavior of DT layered inertial confinement fusion capsules

    DOE PAGES

    Haines, Brian M.; Yi, S. A.; Olson, R. E.; ...

    2017-07-10

    The wetted foam capsule design for inertial confinement fusion capsules, which includes a foam layer wetted with deuterium-tritium liquid, enables layered capsule implosions with a wide range of hot-spot convergence ratios (CR) on the National Ignition Facility. In this paper, we present a full-scale wetted foam capsule design that demonstrates high gain in one-dimensional simulations. In these simulations, increasing the convergence ratio leads to an improved capsule yield due to higher hot-spot temperatures and increased fuel areal density. High-resolution two-dimensional simulations of this design are presented with detailed and well resolved models for the capsule fill tube, support tent, surfacemore » roughness, and predicted asymmetries in the x-ray drive. Our modeling of these asymmetries is validated by comparisons with available experimental data. In 2D simulations of the full-scale wetted foam capsule design, jetting caused by the fill tube is prevented by the expansion of the tungsten-doped shell layer due to preheat. While the impacts of surface roughness and predicted asymmetries in the x-ray drive are enhanced by convergence effects, likely underpredicted in 2D at high CR, simulations predict that the capsule is robust to these features. Nevertheless, the design is highly susceptible to the effects of the capsule support tent, which negates all of the one-dimensional benefits of increasing the convergence ratio. Indeed, when the support tent is included in simulations, the yield decreases as the convergence ratio is increased for CR > 20. Finally and nevertheless, the results suggest that the full-scale wetted foam design has the potential to outperform ice layer capsules given currently achievable levels of asymmetries when fielded at low convergence ratios (CR < 20).« less

  15. The effects of convergence ratio on the implosion behavior of DT layered inertial confinement fusion capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Brian M.; Yi, S. A.; Olson, R. E.; Khan, S. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bradley, P. A.; Peterson, R. R.; Kline, J. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Shah, R. C.

    2017-07-01

    The wetted foam capsule design for inertial confinement fusion capsules, which includes a foam layer wetted with deuterium-tritium liquid, enables layered capsule implosions with a wide range of hot-spot convergence ratios (CR) on the National Ignition Facility. We present a full-scale wetted foam capsule design that demonstrates high gain in one-dimensional simulations. In these simulations, increasing the convergence ratio leads to an improved capsule yield due to higher hot-spot temperatures and increased fuel areal density. High-resolution two-dimensional simulations of this design are presented with detailed and well resolved models for the capsule fill tube, support tent, surface roughness, and predicted asymmetries in the x-ray drive. Our modeling of these asymmetries is validated by comparisons with available experimental data. In 2D simulations of the full-scale wetted foam capsule design, jetting caused by the fill tube is prevented by the expansion of the tungsten-doped shell layer due to preheat. While the impacts of surface roughness and predicted asymmetries in the x-ray drive are enhanced by convergence effects, likely underpredicted in 2D at high CR, simulations predict that the capsule is robust to these features. Nevertheless, the design is highly susceptible to the effects of the capsule support tent, which negates all of the one-dimensional benefits of increasing the convergence ratio. Indeed, when the support tent is included in simulations, the yield decreases as the convergence ratio is increased for CR > 20. Nevertheless, the results suggest that the full-scale wetted foam design has the potential to outperform ice layer capsules given currently achievable levels of asymmetries when fielded at low convergence ratios (CR < 20).

  16. An Advanced ESTCP PELAN System for Surface and Near-surface UXO Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    RDX and non-explosive plasticizers) cps counts per second CW Chemical Warfare agent d-T deuterium - tritium DoD Department of Defense DOE...NAVEODTECHDIV and other government agencies, PELAN utilizes a pulsing deuterium - tritium (d-T) neutron generator. By using fast neutron reactions

  17. A standard DT supershot simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.

    1993-09-01

    A simulation of an anticipated TFTR DT supershot is described. The simulation is based on a reproducible, high performance, long duration DD supershot with a major radius of 2.45m. The TRANSP plasma analysis code is used to model fast ion (D,T, and alpha) parameters, including their distributions in energy and pitch angle. Values and fits are provided for comparing plasma modeling codes and for use in codes for analyzing MHD stability and collective alpha particle effects.

  18. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Bunn, T. L.; Carlson, L. C.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Sater, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments—either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60.

  19. Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, E.P.

    2005-07-15

    Simulation of hydrogen distillation plants requires mathematical procedures suitable for multicomponent systems. In most of the present-day simulation methods a distillation column is assumed to be composed of theoretical stages, or plates. However, in the case of a multicomponent mixture theoretical plate does not exist.An alternative kinetic method of simulation is depicted in the work. According to this method a system of mass-transfer differential equations is solved numerically. Mass-transfer coefficients are estimated with using experimental results and empirical equations.Developed method allows calculating the steady state of a distillation column as well as its any non-steady state when initial conditions are given. The results for steady states are compared with ones obtained via Thiele-Geddes theoretical stage technique and the necessity of using kinetic method is demonstrated. Examples of a column startup period and periodic distillation simulations are shown as well.

  20. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Brooks, J.N.; Hogan, J.

    1998-07-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors.

  1. Energy relaxation of multi-MeV protons traveling in compressed DT+Be plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; He, Bin; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-07-15

    We investigate the stopping power of the multi-MeV protons moving in the hot dense deuterium-tritium plasmas mixed with beryllium (Be), which is important in inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is shown that with increasing the density of Be, the stopping power of the proton also increases with the peaks shifting towards higher projectile velocity, which leads to the reduction of both the projectile range and the energy transferred to the electrons.

  2. Simulation of a fusion gamma reaction history diagnostic for the Shenguang-III facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zifeng; Chen, Jiabin; Xu, Tao; Liu, Zhongjie; Zhan, Xiayu; Tang, Qi

    2017-05-01

    The fusion gamma has an advantage to measure fusion reaction history in the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel implosion experiments. A gas Cherenkov detector is available to measure DT fusion gamma in a high background environment. Simulation is carried out by Geant4 to evaluate the conversion efficiency and the time response of this Cherenkov detector. The background gamma rays are roughly estimated based on ENDF/B-VII.0 data, and the signal-to-noise (SNR) is evaluated based on the simulated energy response curve. The simulation result and the SNR analysis are helpful to construct the Cherenkov detector at Shenguang-III facility.

  3. Wetted Foam Liquid DT Layer ICF Experiments at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Peterson, R. R.; Yi, S. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Kline, J. L.; Bradley, P. A.; Yin, L.; Wilson, D. C.; Haines, B. M.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    A key physics issue in indirect-drive ICF relates to the understanding of the limitations on hot spot convergence ratio (CR), principally set by the hohlraum drive symmetry, the capsule mounting hardware (the ``tent''), and the capsule fill tube. An additional key physics issue relates to the complex process by which a hot spot must be dynamically formed from the inner ice surface in a DT ice-layer implosion. These physics issues have helped to motivate the development of a new liquid DT layer wetted foam platform at the NIF that provides an ability to form the hot spot from DT vapor and experimentally study and understand hot spot formation at a variety of CR's in the range of 12fuel during the stagnation process and can allow for a fundamentally different (and potentially more robust) process of hot spot formation. This new experimental platform is currently being used in a series of experiments to discover a range of CR's at which DT layered implosions will have understandable performance - providing a sound basis from which to determine the requirements for ICF ignition. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  4. Compression of polymer-coated laser-fusion targets to ten times liquid DT density

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, J.M.; Mead, W.C.; Campbell, E.M.; Matthews, D.L.; Bailey, D.S.; Hatcher, C.W.; Koppel, L.N.; Lane, S.M.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Manes, K.R.; McClellan, G.; Phillion, D.W.; Price, R.H.; Rupert, V.C.; Slivinsky, V.W.; Swift, C.D.

    1980-06-23

    Polymer-coated glass microspheres filled with DT fuel and argon seed gas were irradiated on the SHIVA 1.06-..mu..m laser using 4-kJ 200 ps (full width at half maximum), Gaussian pulses. Measured light absorption, x-ray spectrum, neutron yields, and x-ray continuum images compare favorably with detailed computer simulations. Pusher neutron activation and argon line imaging diagnostics were utilized to measure fuel density. Fuel densities of 1-3 g/cm/sup 3/ or 5-15 times liquid DT density were inferred.

  5. Neutron emission spectroscopy of DT plasmas at enhanced energy resolution with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Milocco, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Chen, Z. J.; Du, T. F.; Fan, T. S.; Hu, Z. M.; Peng, X. Y.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents measurements done at the Peking University Van de Graaff neutron source of the response of single crystal synthetic diamond (SD) detectors to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of 14-20 MeV. The results show an energy resolution of 1% for incoming 20 MeV neutrons, which, together with 1% detection efficiency, opens up to new prospects for fast ion physics studies in high performance nuclear fusion devices such as SD neutron spectrometry of deuterium-tritium plasmas heated by neutral beam injection.

  6. Neutron emission spectroscopy of DT plasmas at enhanced energy resolution with diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L. Tardocchi, M.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Gorini, G.; Milocco, A.; Chen, Z. J.; Du, T. F.; Fan, T. S.; Hu, Z. M.; Peng, X. Y.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB

    2016-11-15

    This work presents measurements done at the Peking University Van de Graaff neutron source of the response of single crystal synthetic diamond (SD) detectors to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of 14-20 MeV. The results show an energy resolution of 1% for incoming 20 MeV neutrons, which, together with 1% detection efficiency, opens up to new prospects for fast ion physics studies in high performance nuclear fusion devices such as SD neutron spectrometry of deuterium-tritium plasmas heated by neutral beam injection.

  7. An experimental evaluation of a small fusion fuel cleanup system

    SciTech Connect

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Gravelle, F.B.; Schultz, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Small tritium-burning experimental tokamaks will require some means of handling and purifying the deuterium-tritium fuel. A simple purification system would allow reinjection of fuel, minimize tritium inventory on site, and reduce the number of shipments of tritium to and from the tokamak site. This could simplify the licensing and safety aspects for sites unsuited to large inventories of tritium. At the request of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, a number of conceptual designs of fusion fuel cleanup systems were prepared. These designs were based on handling 5000-Ci batches of fuel containing helium (2%), water (0.4%), oxygen and nitrogen (0.1% each), and carbon oxides and methane (0.5% each). The purified fuel was to have impurity concentrations no greater than 1% helium and 0.1% total for the remainder. Six conceptual designs were prepared and evaluated. In each of these, the fuel from the tokamak was diluted to {approximately}25% in helium prior to processing. The basis of the purification cycle was to dilute the fuel with helium as a carrier gas, remove all of the hydrogen and impurities, and regenerate pure fuel for reuse. The preferred design consisted of a gas circulation loop comprising an expansion tank, a pump, and a number of purification units, a uranium bed, a zirconium-aluminum getter bed, and two catalyst beds, Pt/Pd and CuO/MnO{sub 2}. This paper summarizes an experimental evaluation of this system using hydrogen and nontriated impurities. 1 ref.

  8. High aspect ratio hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Burns, S; Izumi, N; Kline, J; LaCaille, G; McNaney, J; Prasad, R; Thomas, C A; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O; Author, A; Author, S G; Author, T

    2012-05-01

    We have fielded a multi-pinhole, hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure the spatially-resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions, and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel that could limit the compressibility required for ignition and burn. Our hard x-ray imaging measurements allow to set an upper limit to the DT fuel preheat, which we find is acceptable in current capsule implosions on the NIF.

  9. Backlighting Direct-Drive Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray backlighting has been frequently used to measure the in-flight characteristics of an imploding shell in both direct- and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. These measurements provide unique insight into the early time and stagnation stages of an implosion and guide the modeling efforts to improve the target designs. Backlighting a layered DT implosion on OMEGA is a particular challenge because the opacity of the DT shell is low, the shell velocity is high, the size and wall thickness of the shell is small, and the self-emission from the hot core at the onset of burn is exceedingly bright. A framing-camera-based crystal imaging system with a Si Heα backlighter at 1.865keV driven by 10-ps short pulses from OMEGA EP was developed to meet these radiography challenges. A fast target inserter was developed to accurately place the Si backlighter foil at a distance of 5 mm to the implosion target following the removal of the cryogenic shroud and an ultra-stable triggering system was implemented to reliably trigger the framing camera coincident with the arrival of the OMEGA EP pulse. This talk will report on a series of implosions in which the DT shell is imaged for a range of convergence ratios and in-flight aspect ratios. The images acquired have been analyzed for low-mode shape variations, the DT shell thickness, the level of ablator mixing into the DT fuel (even 0.1% of carbon mix can be reliably inferred), the areal density of the DT shell, and the impact of the support stalk. The measured implosion performance will be compared with hydrodynamic simulations that include imprint (up to mode 200), cross-beam energy transfer, nonlocal thermal transport, and initial low-mode perturbations such as power imbalance and target misalignment. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Radiation shielding for TFTR DT diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Johnson, D.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1994-07-01

    The authors illustrate the designs of radiation shielding for the TFTR DT diagnostics using the ACX and TVTS systems as specific examples. The main emphasis here is on the radiation transport analyses carried out in support of the designs. Initial results from the DT operation indicate that the diagnostics have been functioning as anticipated and the shielding designs are satisfactory. The experience accumulated in the shielding design for the TFTR DT diagnostics should be useful and applicable to future devices, such as TPX and ITER, where many similar diagnostic systems are expected to be used.

  11. Cryogenic DT and D2 Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.

    2006-10-01

    Nearly all inertial confinement fusion ignition target designs are based on a spherical ablator containing a solid, cryogenic-DT-fuel layer. The uniformity of the inner surface of this layer is a critical factor in determining target performance. This talk will describe how cryogenic targets are made, characterized, and imploded on the 60-beam OMEGA laser. While cryogenic D2 targets have been routinely imploded for several years, only recently have targets containing DT-fuel layers been possible. Several of these targets have been imploded on OMEGA and most have had inner-ice-surface uniformity between 1- and 2-μm rms (very close to the ignition specification). These are the first laser-imploded targets to be formed exclusively using beta layering. The creation of these high-uniformity DT layers depends on understanding and controlling many diverse physics processes. These include sublimation and condensation at the inner ice surface (the heart of the layering process), phase transitions of multi-isotopic hydrogen ice, heat flow in the ice, heat flow in the exchange gas surrounding the ice, the geometry of the layering sphere that surrounds the target, and the time that the target is exposed to ambient radiation before being irradiated. In addition, a unique optical shadowgraphic technique has been developed to accurately characterize the 3-D ice-layer-thickness distribution for model comparisons and input to multidimensional hydrocode simulations. The talk will be placed in a historical context, describing previous approaches that worked with smaller targets and, more importantly, the approach being followed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It will describe the mutual constraints that target-design requirements and cryogenic system practicalities impose upon each other, for both direct and indirect drive, and how lessons learned on OMEGA can be used to improve the prospects for a successful ignition campaign on the NIF. Finally, implosion results from

  12. Laser-optical path to nuclear energy without radioactivity: Fusion of hydrogen-boron by nonlinear force driven plasma blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Malekynia, B.; Azizi, N.

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous interaction of terawatt-picosecond laser pulses allows side-on ignition of solid state density fusion fuel with the unexpected possibility of igniting uncompressed hydrogen-boron p- 11B. Suppression of relativistic self-focusing by using very clean laser pulses with an extremely high contrast ratio is essential to achieve ignition thresholds only ten times more difficult than fusion of deuterium-tritium (DT). This opens the possibility for laser driven fusion energy without neutrons and less radioactivity than from burning coal. The complex nonlinear optical properties involved are elaborated.

  13. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Casey, D. T.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E.; Eckart, M.; Erbert, G.; Farley, D.; Fair, J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frank, M.; Frenje, L. J. A.; Friedrich, S.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gibson, C.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Holder, J. P.; Holunda, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J.; Kohut, T.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemki, B.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; La Fortune, K.; Lagin, L.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; LaTray, D.; Leeper, R. J.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M.; Moreno, K. A.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C. D.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Rosen, M. D.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R.; Sater, J.; Sangster, C.; Schneider, M. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Walters, C.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2012-05-01

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 μm diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 ± 3) μm, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 ± 0.09) g cm-2 result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm-3. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 ± 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 1015 that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5±0.1)×1014 which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 ± 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date

  14. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a small fusion fuel cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Gravelle, F.B.; Schultz, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Small tritium-burning experimental tokamaks will require some means of handling and purifying the deuterium-tritium fuel. A simple purification system would allow reinjection of fuel, minimize tritium inventory on site, and reduce the number of shipments of tritium to and from the tokamak site. This could simplify the licensing and safety aspects for sites unsuited to large inventories of tritium. At the request of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, a number of conceptual designs of fusion fuel cleanup systems were prepared. The preferred design consisted of a gas circulation loop comprising an expansion tank, a pump, and a number of purification units, a uranium bed, a zirconium-aluminum getter bed, and two catalyst beds, Pt/Pd and CuO/MnO/sub 2/. This paper summarizes an experimental evaluation of this system using hydrogen and nontriated impurities. Using the information generated in the first part of the study, a simplified cleanup system containing two alternative purification paths was built and tested. The first path was through two uranium beds in series operating at 25 and 400/sup 0/C. In the second path, a zirconium-aluminum getter bed at 700/sup 0/C replaced the hot uranium bed. Both systems were demonstrated to be effective in the cleanup of a multicomponent gas mixture. These results show it is possible to have a simple cleanup system that is effective for purification of hydrogen that is typical of a fusion fuel mixture. This system provides for tritium recovery from the impurities, as well as purification.

  16. Comparison of Hot Spot Formation in DT ice layer and DT liquid layer ICF Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts - the DT wetted CH foam concept and the ``fast formed liquid'' (FFL) concept - will be described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. The wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low (DT ice) and high (DT liquid) vapor pressure capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules will be less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the relative simplicity of the hot spot formation technique might lead to a more robust ignition experiment, a reduction in sensitivity to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry, and an improvement in the computational prediction of hot spot behavior. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. What Happened to DT&E?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Said another way, im- proving outcomes is not about increasing the pass rate for initial operational test and evaluation ( IOT &E) or the number of...right, to “passing IOT &E” and getting to FRP. Forty years of T&E hindsight sug- gests that is a fundamentally flawed strategy. As the Under Secretary...Systems Acquisition Reform Act (WSARA), Public Law ( PL ) 111-23, resurrected the DT&E office. Figure 1 depicts the dollars appropriated for the DT&E and

  18. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Ablator/Fuel Interface during Early Stages of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Glosli, James; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, high-powered laser beams are used to compress a small target to generate fusion reactions. A critical issue in achieving this is the understanding of mix at the ablator/fuel interface. Mixing occurs at various length scales, ranging from atomic inter-species diffusion to hydrodynamic instabilities. Because the interface is preheated by energy from the incoming shock, it is important to understand the dynamics before the shock arrives. The interface is in the warm dense matter phase with a deuterium/tritium fuel mixture on one side and a plastic mixture on the other. We would like to understand various aspects of the evolution, including the state of the interface when the main shock arrives, the role of electric field generation at the interface, and the character and time scales for diffusion. We present a multiscale approach to model these processes, which combines molecular dynamics to simulate the ionic degrees of freedom with orbital-free density functional theory to calculate the electronic structure. Simulation results are presented and connections to hydrodynamic models are discussed. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Quasispherical fuel compression and fast ignition in a heavy-ion-driven X-target with one-sided illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L. John

    2011-03-15

    The HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics code [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] is used to explore one-sided axial target illumination with annular and solid-profile uranium ion beams at 60 GeV to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium fuel filling the volume of metal cases with cross sections in the shape of an ''X'' (X-target). Quasi-three-dimensional, spherical fuel compression of the fuel toward the X-vertex on axis is obtained by controlling the geometry of the case, the timing, power, and radii of three annuli of ion beams for compression, and the hydroeffects of those beams heating the case as well as the fuel. Scaling projections suggest that this target may be capable of assembling large fuel masses resulting in high fusion yields at modest drive energies. Initial two-dimensional calculations have achieved fuel compression ratios of up to 150X solid density, with an areal density {rho}R of about 1 g/cm{sup 2}. At these currently modest fuel densities, fast ignition pulses of 3 MJ, 60 GeV, 50 ps, and radius of 300 {mu}m are injected through a hole in the X-case on axis to further heat the fuel to propagating burn conditions. The resulting burn waves are observed to propagate throughout the tamped fuel mass, with fusion yields of about 300 MJ. Tamping is found to be important, but radiation drive to be unimportant, to the fuel compression. Rayleigh-Taylor instability mix is found to have a minor impact on ignition and subsequent fuel burn-up.

  20. Performance characteristics of a compact D-T generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Pfutzner, H.G.

    1994-12-31

    A compact and fully automated neutron generator system has been developed to be used in a wide range of applications, such as non-destructive analysis of bulk materials, online process control and assay of nuclear materials. It is built around a deuterium-tritium sealed tube neutron generator which was previoulsy used only for oil-well logging. It is designed to maximize the ease of use and convenience for the user. This is done by delegating all control and interlock functions to the computer and also by keeping all parts of the system as compact as possible. The system consists of three components: (1) the compact generator head housing the sealed tube and the high voltage insulating materials, (2) the very compact electronics module containing high voltage supply, low voltage supplies, ion source pulser, hardware interface and laptop PC, and (3) the interconnecting cable harness. The laptop computer is setup to receive commands from the keyboard or from a second user`s computer which is acquiring data from the detectors. The neutron output at 100 kV is 2x10{sup 8} neutrons/sec/4{pi}. The generator can be operated in continuous or pulsed mode. The maximum pulse frequency is 10 kHz and the minimum pulse width is 10 {mu}seconds. The rise and fall times of the neutron pulse (measured with a PMT and plastic scintillator) are under 1.25 {mu}s. Safety features are build into the system. The primary one being that the tube containing the tritium is a very rugged ceramic-metal design which is then contained in a sealed stainless steel housing. There are also allowances for the user`s door and radiation monitor interlocks.

  1. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Ho; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, P.aul Andrew; Gales, Steve; Horsfield, Colin J.; Rubery, Mike; Leatherland, Alex; Johnson, Maria Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu

    2016-05-26

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). In addition, the fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between the observed neutron yields and those simulated.

  2. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong Ho; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). In addition, the fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between themore » observed neutron yields and those simulated.« less

  3. Gamma Ray Imaging of Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Carl; Volegov, Petr; Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Fittinghoff, David; Grim, Gary; NIF Nuclear Diagnostic Team Team; Advanced Imaging Team Team

    2016-10-01

    Experiments consisting of an ablatively driven plastic (CH) shell surrounding a deuterium tritium (DT) fuel region are routinely performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Neutrons produced in the burning fuel in-elastically scatter with carbon atoms in the plastic shell producing 4.4 MeV gamma rays. Providing a spatially resolved distribution of the origin of these gammas can inform models of ablator physics and also provide a bounding volume for the cold fuel (un-burned DT fuel) region. Using the NIF neutron imaging system hardware, initial studies have been performed of the feasibility of imaging these gamma rays. A model of the system has been developed to inform under which experimental conditions this measurement can be made. Presented here is an analysis of the prospects for this diagnostic probe and a proposed set of modifications to the NIF neutron imaging line-of-site to efficiently enable this measurement.

  4. Single-crystal Diamond Detector for DT and DD plasmas diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebai, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Grosso, G.; Croci, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    Single-crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are good candidates as high-energy neutron detectors in the extreme conditions of the next generation thermonuclear fusion facilities like the ITER experiment, due to their high radiation hardness, fast response time and small size. Neutron detection in SDDs is based on the collection of electron-hole pairs produced by charged particles generated by neutron interaction on 12 C . In this work the SDD response to neutrons with energies between 2.8 and 3.8MeV was determined at the Legnaro CN accelerator at the INFN Laboratories in Legnaro (PD, Italy). This work is relevant for the characterization of SDDs response functions, which are key points for Deuterium-Deuterium and Deuterium-Tritium plasma diagnostic.

  5. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  6. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  7. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  8. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  9. New remote maintenance approach for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.; Walker, M.S. ); Brown, T.G. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), to be located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be a steady-state, high-performance fusion machine. It will use hydrogen fuel during its original operation, deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fuel for an extended intermediate period of time and then a limited number of runs using deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The D-D operations wig generate neutron fluxes that will activate materials of the vacuum vessel. From that point on, the resulting ionizing radiation, which will continue to increase, particularly during D-T operation, will prevent personnel access into the vessel to perform either scheduled or unscheduled maintenance activities. All activities performed within the vacuum vessel must be accomplished using remote means. TPX has taken a new approach for remote maintenance of the components within the vacuum vessel. This document describes the system that is being developed.

  10. New remote maintenance approach for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.; Walker, M.S.; Brown, T.G.

    1993-04-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), to be located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be a steady-state, high-performance fusion machine. It will use hydrogen fuel during its original operation, deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fuel for an extended intermediate period of time and then a limited number of runs using deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The D-D operations wig generate neutron fluxes that will activate materials of the vacuum vessel. From that point on, the resulting ionizing radiation, which will continue to increase, particularly during D-T operation, will prevent personnel access into the vessel to perform either scheduled or unscheduled maintenance activities. All activities performed within the vacuum vessel must be accomplished using remote means. TPX has taken a new approach for remote maintenance of the components within the vacuum vessel. This document describes the system that is being developed.

  11. Measurements of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy

    1999-05-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion (dtμ arrow ^4He + n + μ^-) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtμ)pee)] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tμ + HD arrow [(dtμ)pee], a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtμ muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Generalization of DT equations for time dependent sources.

    PubMed

    Neri, Lorenzo; Tudisco, Salvatore; Musumeci, Francesco; Scordino, Agata; Fallica, Giorgio; Mazzillo, Massimo; Zimbone, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    New equations for paralyzable, non paralyzable and hybrid DT models, valid for any time dependent sources are presented. We show how such new equations include the equations already used for constant rate sources, and how it's is possible to correct DT losses in the case of time dependent sources. Montecarlo simulations were performed to compare the equations behavior with the three DT models. Excellent accordance between equations predictions and Montecarlo simulation was found. We also obtain good results in the experimental validation of the new hybrid DT equation. Passive quenched SPAD device was chosen as a device affected by hybrid DT losses and active quenched SPAD with 50 ns DT was used as DT losses free device.

  13. DT neutron measurements and experience on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W. |; Duong, H.H. |; Jassby, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Through semi-independent absolute calibrations of multiply redundant neutron detector systems, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFIR) has achieved {+-}7% (one-sigma) accuracy in its fusion power measurements. This has required careful attention to the linearity of detectors up to the present highest fusion power levels achieved on TFTR of over 10 MW. The extended duration of the DT program on TFTR has also tested the stability of the detector systems. These issues of calibration, linearity, and stability are reviewed for the TFTR experience and how it can be applied to plans for ITER.

  14. Repeated Long-Term DT Application in the DEREG Mouse Induces a Neutralizing Anti-DT Antibody Response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Siffert, Myriam; Spiliotis, Markus; Gottstein, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Tregs) cells play an important role in mediating tolerance to self-antigens but can also mediate detrimental tolerance to tumours and pathogens in a Foxp3-dependent manner. Genetic tools exploiting the foxp3 locus including bacterial artificial chromosome- (BAC-) transgenic DEpletion of REGulatory T cells (DEREG) mice have provided essential information on Treg biology and the potential therapeutic modulation of tolerance. In DEREG mice, Foxp3(+) Tregs selectively express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor, allowing for the specific depletion of Tregs through DT administration. We here provide a detailed overview about an important consideration that long-term administration of DT induces a humoral immune response with an appropriate production of anti-DT antibodies that can inactivate DT and thus abrogate its effect in the DEREG mouse. Additionally, we showed that anti-DT mouse serum partially neutralized DT-induced Foxp3 inhibition.

  15. Repeated Long-Term DT Application in the DEREG Mouse Induces a Neutralizing Anti-DT Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Siffert, Myriam; Spiliotis, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Tregs) cells play an important role in mediating tolerance to self-antigens but can also mediate detrimental tolerance to tumours and pathogens in a Foxp3-dependent manner. Genetic tools exploiting the foxp3 locus including bacterial artificial chromosome- (BAC-) transgenic DEpletion of REGulatory T cells (DEREG) mice have provided essential information on Treg biology and the potential therapeutic modulation of tolerance. In DEREG mice, Foxp3+ Tregs selectively express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor, allowing for the specific depletion of Tregs through DT administration. We here provide a detailed overview about an important consideration that long-term administration of DT induces a humoral immune response with an appropriate production of anti-DT antibodies that can inactivate DT and thus abrogate its effect in the DEREG mouse. Additionally, we showed that anti-DT mouse serum partially neutralized DT-induced Foxp3 inhibition. PMID:28074191

  16. Investigating D-T Reaction Spectra with the Gas Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Michael A.; Kim, Yong Ho; McEvoy, Aaron; Young, Carlton S.; Mack, Joe M.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Horsfield, Colin J.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a new analysis of the gamma ray spectra of the D-T fusion reaction using a Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) is presented. The D-T reaction is an essential process to understand for the future of fusion science. The reaction produces a He^5* nucleus that usually decays into a He^4 + n. It has been seen that this reaction produces a 16.75 MeV gamma ray .0025% of the time. The Gamma Ray History (GRH) group at Los Alamos proposes that there is an even less often occurrence where a gamma ray of around 12 MeV is produced. As the truth of this statement would affect the future potential yield of fusion reactors using D-T fuel, it is worth investigating. D-T spectra were obtained by detecting the produced gamma ray with the GCD at the University of Rochester OMEGA laser facility. A GCD response curve, calculated by the Monte Carlo modeling software ACCEPT, was used to forward convolve theoretical spectra into what the theoretical curves would have looked like in the GCD data. Results are presented.

  17. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-08-10

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere.

  18. Synthesis of selectively labeled histidine and its methylderivatives with deuterium, tritium, and carbon-14.

    PubMed

    Šamonina-Kosicka, J; Kańska, M

    2013-05-30

    Isotopologues of l-histidine and its N-methylderivatives labeled with deuterium and tritium at the 5-position in the imidazole ring were obtained using the isotope exchange method. The deuterium-labeled isotopologues [5-(2)H]-l-histidine, [5-(2)H]-N(τ) -methyl-l-histidine, [5-(2)H]-N(π) -methyl-l-histidine, and [2,5-(2)H(2)]-l-histidine were synthesized by isotope exchange method carried out in a fully deuterated medium with. The same reaction conditions were applied to synthesize [5-(3)H]-N(τ) -methyl-l-histidine, [5-(3)H]-N(π) -methyl-l-histidine, and [5-(3)H]-l-histidine with specific activity of 2.0, 5.0, and 2.6 MBq/mmol, respectively. The N(π) -[methyl-(14)C]-histamine was obtained with specific activity of 0.23 MBq/mmol in a one-step reaction by the direct methylation of histamine by [(14)C]iodomethane. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Observer for a thick layer of solid deuterium-tritium using backlit optical shadowgraphy and interferometry.

    PubMed

    Choux, Alexandre; Busvelle, Eric; Gauthier, Jean Paul; Pascal, Ghislain

    2007-11-20

    Our work is in the context of the French "laser mégajoule" project, about fusion by inertial confinement. The project leads to the problem of characterizing the inner surface, of the approximately spherical target, by optical shadowgraphy techniques. Our work is entirely based on the basic idea that optical shadowgraphy produces "caustics" of systems of optical rays, which contain a great deal of 3D information about the surface to be characterized. We develop a method of 3D reconstruction based upon this idea plus a "small perturbations" technique. Although computations are made in the special "spherical" case, the method is in fact general and may be extended to several other situations.

  20. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  1. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  2. Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch'yan, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2 H and density ρ0 ⩽ 100ρ s (where ρ s is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 1019 W/cm2, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by α-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At Hρ0 ≈ 1 g/cm2, the gain factor is G ≈ 200, whereas at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g/cm2, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E ig of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by α-particles. The trajectories of α-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E ig ˜ ρ{0/-2} and yields E ig = 160 kJ as a lower estimate of the ignition energy for ρ0 = 100ρ s

  3. Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch’yan, A. A.

    2015-03-15

    The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2H and density ρ{sub 0} ⩽ 100ρ{sub s} (where ρ{sub s} is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by α-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 1 g/cm{sup 2}, the gain factor is G ≈ 200, whereas at Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 5 g/cm{sup 2}, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E{sub ig} of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by α-particles. The trajectories of α-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E{sub ig} ∼ ρ{sub 0}{sup −2} and yields E

  4. Experimental Investigation of Muon-catalyzed dt Fusion in Wide Ranges of D/T Mixture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bom, V.R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van; Demin, A.M.; Golubkov, A.N.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Klevtsov, V.G.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Musyaev, R.K.; Perevozchikov, V.V.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Zlatoustovskii, S.V.; Demin, D.L.; Filchenkov, V.V.; Grafov, N.N.; Gritsaj, K.I.; Konin, A.D.; Medved', S.V.; Rudenko, A.I.; Yukhimchuk, S.A.

    2005-04-01

    A vast program of the experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed dt fusion was performed on the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research phasotron. Parameters of the dt cycle were obtained in a wide range of the D/T mixture conditions: temperatures of 20-800 K, densities of 0.2-1.2 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD), and tritium concentrations of 15-86%. In this paper, the results obtained are summarized.

  5. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  6. dP/dt(max)--a measure of 'baroinometry'.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Robert L; del Rio, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    dP/dt(max) is the maximal rate of rise of (usually) left ventricular pressure (LVP), but it is determined by myocardial contractility and the loading conditions on the ventricle, thus it is an imperfect and sometimes incorrect predictor of the inotropic state (myocardial contractility). The value of dP/dt(max) to represent contractility may be improved by adjusting it to ventricular end-diastolic volume (pre-load) or by calculating dP/dt as a function of LVP during isovolumetric contraction and determining the maximal value. Every investigator who uses dP/dt(max) should record this parameter while venous return is changed in order to observe how dependent dP/dt(max) is on pre-load. Since dP/dt(max) does not represent only the inotropic state, we coined the term baroinometry to represent that dP/dt(max) is determined by aortic pressure (baro), the inotropic state (ino), and the length (meter). dP/dt(max) measures the inotropic state only when loading conditions are unchanged. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NUMO: A new (D,T) fusion diagnostic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.J.

    1989-02-06

    A NeUtron MOnochromator, NUMO, for (D,T) fusion diagnostics is described. The monochromator consists of CH/sub 2/ (n,p) converter foil, a sector-magnet monochromator and Faraday cup detector. This system can be used to study some details of (D,T) fusion reaction history. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  9. A high throughput spectrometer system for helium ash detection on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Hillis, D.L.; Fehling, D.T.; Bell, R.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Meigs, A.; Negus, C.; Giroud, C.; Stamp, M.

    2004-10-01

    Acquiring information about helium ash production and transport is fundamental for future burning plasma devices, such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, since the helium ash must be continuously removed from the plasma to prevent the dilution of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This diagnostic for future JET DT operation uses charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) in conjunction with the JET neutral heating beam to measure the helium density at 20 radial locations across the JET plasma via the 4686 A He{sup +} line and an array of heated 1 mm quartz fibers. The CXRS diagnostic utilizes a high throughput short focal length spectrometer with f/1.8 input optics, two entrance slits, a holographic transmission grating, and refractive optics. The detector is a thinned back-illuminated charge coupled device that has high quantum efficiency, a 10 MHz readout speed, and a time resolution of 5 ms.

  10. Development and characterization of sub-100 ps photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Herrmann, H. W.; Caldwell, S. E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedilleo, T. J.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Milnes, J. S.; Howorth, J.; Davis, B.; O'Gara, P. M.; Garza, I.; Miller, E. K.; Stoeffl, W.; Ali, Z.

    2010-10-15

    We describe the evaluation of a microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT), incorporating a 3 {mu}m pore MCP and constant voltage anode and cathode gaps. The use of the small pore size results in PMTs with response functions of the order of 85 ps full-width-half-maximum, while the constant electric field across the anode and cathode gaps produces a uniform response function over the entire operating range of the device. The PMT was characterized on a number of facilities and employed on gas Cherenkov detectors fielded on various deuterium tritium fuel (DT) implosions on the Omega Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. The Cherenkov detectors are part of diagnostic development to measure Gamma ray reaction history for DT implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  11. Impact of Solid Breeder Materials on Tritium Breeding in a Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2006-06-01

    Tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is one of the important parameters in design of a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) driven hybrid reactor. Therefore, selection of tritium breeder materials to be used in the blanket is very crucial. In this study, tritium breeding potential of the solid breeders, namely, or in a (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor fuelled with or was investigated. For this purpose in addition to these solid breeders, different types of liquid breeders, namely natural lithium, Flibe, Flinabe and were used to examine the tritium breeding behavior of liquid-solid breeder couple combinations. Numerical calculations were carried out by using Scale 4.3. According to numerical results, the blanket with fuel using natural lithium as coolant and as solid breeder had the highest TBR value.

  12. Secondary-neutron-yield measurements by current-mode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Secondary deuterium--tritium (DT) neutrons from pure-deuterium inertial confinement fusion targets can be used to diagnose the fuel areal density. Single-hit detectors like LaNSA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or MEDUSA at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) saturate for fairly low secondary DT- and primary DD-neutron yields. These detectors are not suitable for the high-yield, direct-drive implosion experiments currently carried out on the 30 kJ, 60 beam OMEGA laser system or for future cryogenic-capsule experiments on OMEGA. The status of several current-mode detectors (e.g., a single scintillator and a photomultiplier tube) now being developed at LLE for secondary-neutron-yield measurements is described.

  13. Quantitative characterization of inertial confinement fusion capsules using phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Barty, A.; Martz, H.E. Jr.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2005-03-15

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium, Be(Cu), shell. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) shell. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam shells were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately characterized using phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  15. Registration of 3D+t coronary CTA and monoplane 2D+t X-ray angiography.

    PubMed

    Metz, Coert T; Schaap, Michiel; Klein, Stefan; Baka, Nora; Neefjes, Lisan A; Schultz, Carl J; Niessen, Wiro J; van Walsum, Theo

    2013-05-01

    A method for registering preoperative 3D+t coronary CTA with intraoperative monoplane 2D+t X-ray angiography images is proposed to improve image guidance during minimally invasive coronary interventions. The method uses a patient-specific dynamic coronary model, which is derived from the CTA scan by centerline extraction and motion estimation. The dynamic coronary model is registered with the 2D+t X-ray sequence, considering multiple X-ray time points concurrently, while taking breathing induced motion into account. Evaluation was performed on 26 datasets of 17 patients by comparing projected model centerlines with manually annotated centerlines in the X-ray images. The proposed 3D+t/2D+t registration method performed better than a 3D/2D registration method with respect to the accuracy and especially the robustness of the registration. Registration with a median error of 1.47 mm was achieved.

  16. Study of DT-diaphorase in pigment-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Smit, N P; Hoogduijn, M J; Riley, P A; Pavel, S

    1999-11-01

    DT-diaphorase is an FAD-containing enzyme capable of a two-electron reduction of ortho- and paraquinones. Nicotinamide coenzymes (NADH + H+ and NADPH + H+) serve as hydrogen sources in these reactions. The role of DT-diaphorase has been thoroughly investigated in situations when the enzyme is able to reduce exogenous and endogenous quinones, hence protecting the cells against these reactive intermediates. The enzyme has also been studied in connection with its ability to activate some quinoid cytostatics. It is surprising that DT-diaphorase has never been investigated in pigment-producing cells that are known to generate considerable amounts of ortho-quinones. Using a spectrophotometric method we could readily measure the activity of DT-diaphorase in epidermis and various cultured pigment cells. The melanocytes isolated from dark skin showed generally higher DT-diaphorase activity than those from fair skin samples. Also, darkly pigmented congenital naevus cells exhibited higher activity of this enzyme. The most striking was the high DT-diaphorase activity in melanoma cell cultures. In these cells DT-diaphorase activity could be induced by incubation of the cells with 4-hydroxyanisole. A similar effect was seen when a catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor (3-(3,4-dihydroxy-5-nitrobenzylidene)-2,4-pentanedione (OR-462) was utilised. The induction was inhibited by cyclohexidine.

  17. TreeDT: tree pattern mining for gene mapping.

    PubMed

    Sevon, Petteri; Toivonen, Hannu; Ollikainen, Vesa

    2006-01-01

    We describe TreeDT, a novel association-based gene mapping method. Given a set of disease-associated haplotypes and a set of control haplotypes, TreeDT predicts likely locations of a disease susceptibility gene. TreeDT extracts, essentially in the form of haplotype trees, information about historical recombinations in the population: A haplotype tree constructed at a given chromosomal location is an estimate of the genealogy of the haplotypes. TreeDT constructs these trees for all locations on the given haplotypes and performs a novel disequilibrium test on each tree: Is there a small set of subtrees with relatively high proportions of disease-associated chromosomes, suggesting shared genetic history for those and a likely disease gene location? We give a detailed description of TreeDT and the tree disequilibrium tests, we analyze the algorithm formally, and we evaluate its performance experimentally on both simulated and real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that TreeDT has high accuracy on difficult mapping tasks and comparisons to other methods (EATDT, HPM, TDT) show that TreeDT is very competitive.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of the HT and DT fusion burn histories in inertial fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hale, G.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the thermonuclear burn history is an important way to diagnose inertial fusion implosions. Using the gas Cherenkov detectors at the OMEGA laser facility, we measure the HT fusion burn in a H2+T2 gas-fueled implosion for the first time. Using multiple detectors with varied Cherenkov thresholds, we demonstrate a technique for simultaneously measuring both the HT and DT burn histories from an implosion where the total reaction yields are comparable. This new technique will be used to study material mixing and kinetic phenomena in implosions.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of the HT and DT fusion burn histories in inertial fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, Alex B.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Yong Ho; ...

    2017-05-23

    Measuring the thermonuclear burn history is an important way to diagnose inertial fusion implosions. Here, using the gas Cherenkov detectors at the OMEGA laser facility, we measure the HT fusion burn in a H2+T2 gas-fueled implosion for the first time. Then, using multiple detectors with varied Cherenkov thresholds, we demonstrate a technique for simultaneously measuring both the HT and DT burn histories from an implosion where the total reaction yields are comparable. This new technique will be used to study material mixing and kinetic phenomena in implosions.

  20. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.

    2014-11-15

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide “burn-averaged” observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%–5% can be achieved in the range of 2–25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10{sup 14} DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm{sup 2}); 2 × 10{sup 15} DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10{sup −5} γ/n); and 1 × 10{sup 16} DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm{sup 2})

  1. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 1014 DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm2); 2 × 1015 DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10-5 γ/n); and 1 × 1016 DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm2).

  2. Results from D-T experiments on TFTR and implications for achieving an ignited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Blanchard, W.; Batha, S.

    1998-07-01

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enable not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain. In this paper, the implications for the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  3. Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J. and the TFTR Group

    1998-07-14

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain for achieving a magnetic fusion energy reactor. In this paper, the implications of the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  4. One-dimensional particle simulations of Knudsen-layer effects on D-T fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Dimits, Andris M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Wilks, Scott C.

    2014-12-15

    Particle simulations are used to solve the fully nonlinear, collisional kinetic equation describing the interaction of a high-temperature, high-density, deuterium-tritium plasma with absorbing boundaries, a plasma source, and the influence of kinetic effects on fusion reaction rates. Both hydrodynamic and kinetic effects influence the end losses, and the simulations show departures of the ion velocity distributions from Maxwellian due to the reduction of the population of the highest energy ions (Knudsen-layer effects). The particle simulations show that the interplay between sources, plasma dynamics, and end losses results in temperature anisotropy, plasma cooling, and concomitant reductions in the fusion reaction rates. However, for the model problems and parameters considered, particle simulations show that Knudsen-layer modifications do not significantly affect the velocity distribution function for velocities most important in determining the fusion reaction rates, i.e., the thermal fusion reaction rates using the local densities and bulk temperatures give good estimates of the kinetic fusion reaction rates.

  5. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  6. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  7. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    SciTech Connect

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W.; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  8. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DOE PAGES

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; ...

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934more » to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.« less

  9. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Batistoni, P. [EURATOM Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. William; Chiu, Ing L.

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  11. DT-diaphorase protects astrocytes from aminochrome-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Huenchuguala, Sandro; Muñoz, Patricia; Graumann, Rebecca; Paris, Irmgard; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes are exposed to aminochrome via the oxidation of dopamine that is taken up from the synaptic cleft after its release from dopaminergic neurons. Glutathione transferase M2-2 (GSTM2) has been shown to protect astrocytes from aminochrome-induced toxicity, but astrocytes also express DT-diaphorase, which has been shown to prevent aminochrome-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, the question is whether DT-diaphorase also protects astrocytes from aminochrome-induced toxicity. DT-diaphorase is constitutively expressed in U373MG cells, and its inhibition by dicoumarol induced a significant increase of aminochrome-induced cell death. However, the inhibition of DT-diaphorase in U373MGsiGST6 cells, which have 74% of GSTM2 gene expression silenced, resulted in a more than 2-fold increase in cell death, suggesting that DT-diaphorase plays an important role in preventing aminochrome-induced toxicity in astrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biotechnology and the chicken B cell line DT40.

    PubMed

    Bachl, J; Caldwell, R B; Buerstedde, J-M

    2007-01-01

    Protein optimization is a major focus of the biotech and pharmaceutical industry. Various in vitro technologies have been developed to accelerate protein evolution and to achieve protein optimization of functional characteristics such as substrate specificity, enzymatic activity and thermostability. The chicken B cell line DT40 diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) gene by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. This machinery can be directed to almost any gene inserted into the Ig locus. Enormously diverse protein libraries of any gene of interest can be quickly generated in DT40 by utilizing random shuffling of complex genetic domains (gene conversion) and by the introduction of novel non-templated genetic information (random mutagenesis). The unique characteristics of the chicken cell line DT40 make it a powerful in-cell diversification system to improve proteins of interest within living cells. One essential advantage of the DT40 protein optimization approach is the fact that variants are generated within an in-cell system thus allowing the direct screening for desired features in the context of intracellular networks. Utilizing specially designed selection strategies, such as the powerful fluorescent protein technology, enables the reliable identification of protein variants exhibiting the most desirable traits. Thus, DT40 is well positioned as a biotechnological tool to generate optimized proteins by applying a powerful combination of gene specific hypermutation, gene conversion and mutant selection. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Measurements of muon-catalyzed dt fusion in solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy Ann

    1999-12-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion ( dtm--> 4He + n + m- ) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtm)pe e] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tm+HD-->[(dtm) pee] , a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against the experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtm muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant simulated fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Coherent fluctuations in the initial TFTR D-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Chang, Z.Y.; Budny, R.V.

    1995-03-01

    The initial operation of TFTR with approximately equal power in the tritium and deuterium neutral beam injectors has resulted in the production of fusion power in excess of 9MW and central {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 0.25%. This {beta}{sub {alpha}} is within a factor of 2--3 of the {beta}{sub {alpha}} in projections of ITER performance. Effects of this {alpha} population on TAE modes, sawteeth and fishbone activity are being searched for. The D-T plasmas are also being studied for evidence of changes in MHD activity which might be attributed to the fast {alpha} population. This paper reports on the activity in the Alfven range of frequencies in the D-T plasmas and on detailed measurements of the MHD activity preceding major disruptions in D-D and D-T.

  15. Inferring Low-Mode Asymmetries from the Elastically Scattered Neutron Spectrum in Layered Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to probe the areal density of layered cryogenic DT direct-drive implosions in inertial confinement fusion experiments on OMEGA. Advanced scintillation detectors record the neutron spectrum using time-of-flight techniques. The shape of the energy spectrum is fully determined by the neutron elastic scattering cross-section for spherically symmetric target configurations. Significant differences from the expected shape have been measured for some recent implosions, which indicate a deviation from a spherically symmetric fuel assembly. Neutron scattering with low-mode perturbations in the DT fuel assembly have been simulated in the Monte Carlo n-particle transport code. The experimental data shows good agreement with the model when the mass distribution of the compressed DT shell is highly asymmetric with one side having a factor-of-2 higher areal density. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Upgrades of Diagnostic Techniques and Technologies for JET next D-T Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Murari, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    JET next D-T campaign is presently scheduled for the year 2017. The main scientific objectives include the assessment of the isotopic effects on various plasma aspects: mainly on confinement, on the threshold to access the H mode and on ELM behaviour. From a technical point of view, the total yield of the entire D-T phase is expected to be 1.7 1021 neutrons, about a factor of six higher than the previous main D-T campaign on JET, DTE1. Therefore the radiation field will be quite relevant for next step devices, since the neutron flux at the first wall (∼10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}s), for example, will be comparable to the one in ITER behind the blanket. From a point of view of diagnostics developments, for many years JET diagnostics have been upgraded in order to provide adequate support for the scientific exploitation of a D-T campaign. The main efforts have concentrated on improving three main aspects of JET measuring capability: 1) the quality of the measurements of the electron and ion fluids to support the plasma physics programme 2) the diagnostic for the fusion products 3) diagnostic technologies for ITER. In terms of general diagnostic capability, compared to the previous DTE1, JET diagnostics have a much better spatial and temporal resolution of both the ion and electron fluid (about one order of magnitude improvement for each parameter). The consistency of the various independent measurements of the same parameters has also increased significantly; the three independent measurements of the electron temperature, for example, agree now within 5%. Moreover, solutions are being addressed to operate some cameras, both visible and IR, even during the full D-T phase to provide imaging of the plasma and the first wall. Various upgrades of neutral particle analysis are being considered, mainly to measure the isotopic composition. A new set of reflectometers is expected to provide valuable information about the changes in the turbulence with the different fuel mixtures

  17. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; ...

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  18. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  19. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Khan, S. F.; Pak, A. E.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; Ma, T.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Field, J. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Hamza, A. V.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations <10 ns. A series of experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.5 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This talk describes these experiments and comparisons with the design code HYDRA. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape; however, other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. The streak camera-based SPIDER diagnostic showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of a low-temperature hot spot. Changes to the laser pulse-shape and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot-spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1 . 8 ×1015 neutrons. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  1. Classification of ASASSN-17dt/AT2017cig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersier, David

    2017-03-01

    We obtained a spectrum of the candidate supernova ASASSN-17dt/AT2017cig (ATEL #10199, the object is also known as ATLAS17cwo), using the SPRAT spectrograph mounted on the robotic 2m Liverpool Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory (La Palma).

  2. Classification of ASASSN-17dt/AT2017cig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersier, David

    2017-03-01

    We obtained a spectrum of the candidate supernova ASASSN-17dt/AT2017cig (ATEL #10199, the object is also known as ATLAS17cwo), using the SPRAT spectrograph mounted on the robotic 2m Liverpool Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory (La Palma).

  3. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edwards, O.; Fair, J.; Fedorov, M.; Fry, J.; Gibson, C.; Haid, B.; Holunga, D.; Kohut, T.; Lewis, T.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E.; Sater, J.; Skulina, K.; Trummer, D.; Walters, C.

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highly constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.

  4. Design of the NIF Cryogenic Target System

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C; Baltz, J; Malsbury, T; Atkinson, D; Brugmann, V; Coffield, F; Edwards, O; Haid, B; Locke, S; Shiromizu, S; Skulina, K

    2008-06-10

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer in a 2 mm diameter capsule at the center of a 9 mm long by 5 mm diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 20 K. At laser shot time, the target is positioned at the center of the NIF target chamber, aligned to the laser beams and held stable to less than 7 {micro}m rms. We have completed the final design of the Cryogenic Target System and are integrating the devices necessary to create, characterize and position the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with supporting analysis and prototype test results, will be presented.

  5. Maintenance concept development for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be the next major experimental machine in the US Fusion Program. Its use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations on the machine. These operations consist of removing and repairing such components as diagnostic equipment modules by using remotely operated maintenance equipment. The major equipment being developed for maintenance external to the vacuum vessel includes both bridge-mounted and floor-mounted manipulator systems. Additionally, decontamination (decon) equipment, hot cell repair facilities, and equipment for handling and packaging solid radioactive waste (rad-waste) are being developed. Recent design activities have focused on establishing maintenance system interfaces with the facility design, developing manipulator system requirements, and using mock-ups to support the tokamak configuration design. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    DOE PAGES

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; ...

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highlymore » constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.« less

  7. Remote maintenance design activities and research and development accomplishments for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations. The remote operations consist of removing and replacing such components as first wall armor protection tiles, radio-frequency (rf) heating modules, and diagnostic modules. The major pieces of equipment being developed for maintenance activities internal to the vacuum vessel include an articulated boom manipulator (ABM), an inspection manipulator, and special tooling. For activities external to the vessel, the equipment includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system, decontamination equipment, hot cell equipment, and solid radiation-waste (rad-waste) handling and packaging equipment. The CIT Project is completing the conceptual design phase; research and development (R and D) activities, which include demonstrations of remote maintenance operations on full-size partial mock-ups are under way. 5 figs.

  8. Conceptual Design of a Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabinski, Leo; Maples, Charlotte; Miernik, Janie; Stratham, Geoffrey; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Turner, Matthew; hide

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a project that aims to develop a conceptual design for a Z-pinch thruster, that could be applied to develop advanced thruster designs which promise high thrust/high specific impulse propulsion. Overviews shows the concept of the design, which use annular nozzles with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel and a Lithium mixture as a cathode, Charts show the engine performance as a function of linear mass, nozzle performance (i.e., plasma segment trajectories), and mission analysis for possible Mars and Jupiter missions using this concept for propulsion. Slides show views of the concepts for the vehicle configuration, thrust coil configuration, the power management system, the structural analysis of the magnetic nozzle, the thermal management system, and the avionics suite,

  9. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d-/sup 3/He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs.

  10. Probing the Physics of Burning DT Capsules Using Gamma-ray Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine; Hale, Gerald M.; Jungman, Gerard; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-02-01

    The Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic developed and lead by the Los Alamos National Laboratory GRH Team is used to determine the bang time and burn width of imploded inertial confinement fusion capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The GRH team is conceptualizing and designing a new Gamma-­to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS), that would be capable of an energy resolution ΔE/E~3-­5%. In this whitepaper we examine the physics that could be explored by the combination of these two gamma-ray diagnostics, with an emphasis on the sensitivity needed for measurements. The main areas that we consider are hydrodynamical mixing, ablator areal density and density profile, and temporal variations of the density of the cold fuel and the ablator during the DT burn of the capsule.

  11. Epidemiological studies of human and animal Salmonella typhimurium DT104 and DT104b isolates in Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, T. M.; McNamara, E.; Hill, M.; Rooney, N.; Barry, J.; Egan, J.; O'Connell, A.; O'Loughlin, J.; McFaddyen, S.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 122 human and animal Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 isolates and 6 epidemiologically related DT104b isolates from human and animal products were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Genomic DNA was subjected to macrorestriction with three enzymes, SpeI, SfiI and XbaI. A total of 14 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles were identified when the PFGE patterns from the three enzymes were combined. The majority of isolates (81.2%) exhibited the same RFLP profile. Six animal DT104 isolates, susceptible to enrofloxacin and resistant to naladixic acid, were identified from the antibiotic susceptibility test. Four of these isolates had a different PFGE profile from the common RFLP. In addition, 4 of the 6 isolates were geographically clustered in one region. It was concluded that there was one predominant strain of S. Typhimurium DT104 in Ireland and that the potential and selection pressures for emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were present. PMID:11293679

  12. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  13. Method and Apparatus to Produce and Maintain a thick, flowing, Liquid Lithium first wall for Toroidal Magnetic Confinement DT Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-10-21

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fission reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  14. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached.

  15. SMT: Split and Merge tractography for DT-MRI.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Acar, Burak

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) based fiber tractography aims at reconstruction of the fiber network of brain. Most commonly employed techniques for fiber tractography are based on the numerical integration of the principal diffusion directions. Although these approaches generate intuitive and easy to interpret results, they are prone to cumulative errors and mostly discard the stochastic nature of DT-MRI data. The proposed Split & Merge Tractography (SMT) technique aims at overcoming the drawbacks of fiber tractography by incorporating it with Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques. SMT is based on clustering diversely distributed short fiber tracts based on their inter-connectivity. SMT also provides real-time interaction to adjust a user defined confidence level for clustering.

  16. TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

  17. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Zhu, Y. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Luo, J. H.; Robini, M.; Croisille, P.

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  18. Small, Portable, Lightweight DT Neutron Generator for Use with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Reichardt; J. T. Mihalczo; R. B. Oberer; L.G. Chiang; J. K. Mattingly

    2001-06-18

    The advantages of 14.1 MeV DT neutrons as an alternate source for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) are mainly increased sensitivity and accuracy which will extend applications considerably as well as result in shorter measurement times for present applications. Since NMIS requires a neutron source of {approximately} 5 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} n/sec, a small, lightweight (<30 lbs. including the power supply and is 3-in.-OD pipe, {approximately} 4-ft. long) is under development at MF Physics Corporation for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). By associated particle (alpha) detectors, a cone of neutrons can be defined which is particularly useful for active neutron interrogation of fissile materials in containers. After final test at ORNL, this DT neutron source will be useful at the Y-12 National Security Complex for routine use with NMIS.

  19. International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 Infections, 1992–2001

    PubMed Central

    Ethelberg, Steen; Mølbak, Kåre

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992–2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs. PMID:15963280

  20. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.; Hora, H.; Kirchhoff, G.

    2016-05-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  1. DT&E Forum for Best Practices and Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    best practices including a number of which are suggested in this report. Second, from discussions with people actually engaged in DT&E efforts...go “ live .” 2-1 2. Lessons Learned and Best Practices This chapter describes the steps taken to derive and format BPLLs suitable for posting to...SETP best practices that were in development when the subtask went live for beta testing should also be completed. In the course of developing these

  2. Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Hryniw, Natalia; Hansen, Jon A; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank

    2011-01-27

    A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

  3. Comparison of post-contrast 3D-T1-MPRAGE, 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR MR images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities at 3-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandham, Balaji; Kalyanpur, Tejas; Gupta, Prashant; Cherian, Mathew

    2017-06-01

    This study was to assess the usefulness of newer three-dimensional (3D)-T1 sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and 3D-T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities. 78 patients who presented with high suspicion of meningeal abnormalities were evaluated using post-contrast 3D-T2-FLAIR, 3D-T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) and 3D-T1-SPACE sequences. The images were evaluated independently by two radiologists for cortical gyral, sulcal space, basal cisterns and dural enhancement. The diagnoses were confirmed by further investigations including histopathology. Post-contrast 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR images yielded significantly more information than MPRAGE images (p < 0.05 for both SPACE and FLAIR images) in detection of meningeal abnormalities. SPACE images best demonstrated abnormalities in dural and sulcal spaces, whereas FLAIR was useful for basal cisterns enhancement. Both SPACE and FLAIR performed equally well in detection of gyral enhancement. In all 10 patients, where both SPACE and T2-FLAIR images failed to demonstrate any abnormality, further analysis was also negative. The 3D-T1-SPACE sequence best demonstrated abnormalities in dural and sulcal spaces, whereas FLAIR was useful for abnormalities in basal cisterns. Both SPACE and FLAIR performed holds good for detection of gyral enhancement. Post-contrast SPACE and FLAIR sequences are superior to the MPRAGE sequence for evaluation of meningeal abnormalities and when used in combination have the maximum sensitivity for leptomeningeal abnormalities. The negative-predictive value is nearly 100%, where no leptomeningeal abnormality was detected on these sequences. Advances in knowledge: Post-contrast 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR images are more useful than 3D-T1-MPRAGE images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities.

  4. DT results of TFTR`s alpha collector

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Timberlake, J.R.; Chong, G.P.; Haasz, A.A.; Pitcher, C.S.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase to complement the results of the lost alpha scintillator detectors which have been operating on TFTR since 1988. Measurements of the energy distribution of escaping alphas have been made by measuring the range of alphas implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Exposed samples have been analyzed for 4 DT plasma discharges at plasma currents of 1.0 and 1.8 MA. The results at 1.0 MA are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss at 3.5 MeV. The 1.8 MA results, however, indicate a large anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas at an energy {approximately}30% below the birth energy and at a total fluence nearly an order of magnitude above expected first orbit loss. This anomalous loss is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. Several potential explanations for this loss process are examined. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations.

  5. TFTR neutral beam control and monitoring for DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Chu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Record fusion power output has recently been obtained in TFTR with the injection of deuterium and tritium neutral beams. This significant achievement was due in part to the controls, software, and data processing capabilities added to the neutral beam system for DT operations. Chief among these improvements was the addition of SUN workstations and large dynamic data storage to the existing Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) system. Essentially instantaneous look back over the recent shot history has been provided for most beam waveforms and analysis results. Gas regulation controls allowing remote switchover between deuterium and tritium were also added. With these tools, comparison of the waveforms and data of deuterium and tritium for four test conditioning pulses quickly produced reliable tritium setpoints. Thereafter, all beam conditioning was performed with deuterium, thus saving the tritium supply for the important DT injection shots. The lookback capability also led to modifications of the gas system to improve reliability and to control ceramic valve leakage by backbiasing. Other features added to improve the reliability and availability of DT neutral beam operations included master beamline controls and displays, a beamline thermocouple interlock system, a peak thermocouple display, automatic gas inventory and cryo panel gas loading monitoring, beam notching controls, a display of beam/plasma interlocks, and a feedback system to control beam power based on plasma conditions.

  6. A DT-diaphorase responsive theranostic prodrug for diagnosis, drug release monitoring and therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peilian; Xu, Jiangsheng; Yan, Donghang; Zhang, Peisheng; Zeng, Fang; Li, Bowen; Wu, Shuizhu

    2015-06-11

    A DT-diaphorase-activatable theranostic prodrug, which contains camptothecin, a self-immolative linker and a trigger group, has been developed for the detection of DT-diaphorase, tracking of drug release and selectively killing cancer cells over-expressed with DT-diaphorase. This strategy may offer a new approach for the development of enzyme-catalyzed theranostic anticancer therapeutics.

  7. Preliminary design studies for a (D-D) or (D-T) driven cold fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor with metallic uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, S. ); Baltacioglu, E.; Yapici, H. )

    1991-01-01

    Based on the possibility of (D,D) fusion at room temperature in a heavy metal (palladium) matrix, a cold fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor design has been evaluated in this paper. The reactor is composed of a number of modular and uniform fuel lattices. The cold fusion neutrons induce fission reactions in the natural metallic uranium fuel, imbedded in the lattice. The neutron spectrum, and consequently the fission power density are nearly constant in the reactor core so that the rector performance becomes almost independent on the reactor size. The energy multiplication for each fusion neutron production in the (D,T) and (D,D) reactors are about 3.3 and 7.0, respectively. The (D,T) reactor mode is self-sufficient in respect to tritium breeding ratio (TBR = 1.2).

  8. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping

    2016-08-01

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  9. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Jianfa Dai, Zhensheng Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping

    2016-08-15

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  10. Measurements of Areal Densities and Temperatures from DT Capsule Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. K.; Hicks, D. G.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Green, K. M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Phillips, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    Spectral measurements were made of 14.1-MeV neutron knock-on particles from imploded DT-filled CH shells on OMEGA. Fuel ρR is inferred from the spectra and yields of D and T knock-ons, while shell ρR is determined from the measured yield of p knock-ons from the CH. Shell electron temperature Te is uniquely determined by using the downshift of the endpoint energies of knock-ons from the fuel. This is possible because knock-on yield is independent of Te while the energy downshift is a function of both shell ρR and shell T_e. In addition, CD and CH shells were also shot. From such implosions, a complex set of multiple particle spectra are obtained simultaneously. This work was performed in part at the LLE NLUF, and was supported in part by the U.S. DOE Contr. DE-FG03-99SF21782, LLE subcont. PO410025G, LLNL subcont. B313975, and by the U.S. DOE Office of ICF under Coop. Agree. No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  11. Detection and use of HT and DT gamma rays to diagnose mix in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Herrmann, H. W.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A.; Leatherland, A.; Gales, S.

    2015-11-01

    Recent results from Omega capsule implosion experiments containing HT-rich gas mixtures indicate that the 19.8 MeV gamma ray from aneutronic HT fusion can be measured using existing time-resolved gas Cherenkov detectors (GCDs). Additional dedicated experiments to characterize HT- γ emission in ICF experiments already have been planned. The concurrent temporally-resolved measurement of both HT- γs and DT- γs opens the door for in-depth exploration of interface mix in gas-filled ICF capsules. We propose a method to temporally resolve and observe the evolution of shell material into the capsule core as a function of fuel/shell interface temperature (which can be varied by varying the capsule shell thickness). Our proposed method uses a CD-lined plastic capsule filled with 50/50 HT gas and diagnosed using GCDs to temporally resolve both the HT ``clean'' and DT ``mix'' gamma ray burn histories. It will be shown that these burn history profiles are sensitive to the depth to which shell material mixes into the gas region. An experiment to observe these differences as a function of capsule shell thickness is proposed to determine if interface mixing is consistent with thermal diffusion (λion ~Tion2 /Zion2 ρ) at the gas/shell interface. Since hydrodynamic mixing from shell perturbations, such as the mounting stalk and glue, could complicate these types of capsule-averaged temporal measurements, simulations including their effects also will be shown. This research supported by the US DOE/NNSA, performed in part at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Spectroscopic identification of SNe 2004ds and SN 2004dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2004-08-01

    A. Gal-Yam, D. Fox and S. Kulkarni, California Institute of Technology, report on red spectra (range 550-780 nm) obtained by Kulkarni and Fox on Aug. 13.5 UT at the 10-m Keck I telescope (+ LRIS). The spectrum of of SN 2004ds (IAUC #8386), shows a broad, well-developed P-Cyg H_alpha line and suggests that this is a type II supernova. The spectrum of SN 2004dt (IAUC #8386), shows the distinctive Si II 6100 absorption trough around 6100 Angstrom, indicating this is a young SN Ia.

  13. New interpretation of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

    PubMed

    Nazikian, R; Kramer, G J; Cheng, C Z; Gorelenkov, N N; Berk, H L; Sharapov, S E

    2003-09-19

    The original description of alpha particle driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in terms of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the antiballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

  14. Using combined D3He-p and DT-n secondary yields to determine ρRfuel and mix in D2 implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Amendt, P.; Wilks, S.; Bellei, C.; Bionta, R.; Moran, M.; Caggiano, J.; Knauer, J.; Hatarik, R.; Friedrich, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S.; Rygg, J.; Casey, D. T.; MacKinnon, A.; Schneider, M.

    2013-10-01

    O. LANDEN LLNL, T. MURPHY, G. KYRALA, M. SCHMITT, N. HOFFMAN LANL, V. YU. GLEBOV, C. SANGSTER, J. DELETTREZ, P. RADHA, S. REGAN, C. STOECKL LLE, J. KILKENNY, A.NIKROO, GA. Secondary yields of DT-neutrons and D3He-protons from ICF implosions filled with pure deuterium fuel are used to experimentally determine fuel ρR and electron temperature. Increased plasma stopping power tends to enhance the DT-n yield and reduce the D3He-p yield. Simultaneous measurements of these secondary particles are used to constrain the modeling of the amount of fuel-shell mix in low-fuel- ρR implosions on OMEGA and NIF. The range of application for this technique will be discussed and results from several experiments will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  15. The effect of laser pulse shape variations on the adiabat of NIF capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Landen, O. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; LePape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Spears, B. K.; Haan, S. W.; Clark, D.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-05-15

    Indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are being performed with the goal of compressing a layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain the self-propagating burn wave that is required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a temporally shaped laser pulse that is carefully tailored to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat (ratio of fuel pressure to the Fermi degenerate pressure). In this report, the impact of variations in the laser pulse shape (both intentionally and unintentionally imposed) on the in-flight implosion adiabat is examined by comparing the measured shot-to-shot variations in ρR from a large ensemble of DT-layered ignition target implosions on NIF spanning a two-year period. A strong sensitivity to variations in the early-time, low-power foot of the laser pulse is observed. It is shown that very small deviations (∼0.1% of the total pulse energy) in the first 2 ns of the laser pulse can decrease the measured ρR by 50%.

  16. Microstructure evolution in D-T neutron irradiated silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugio, K.; Ohkubo, H.; Mukouda, I.; Shimomura, Y.; Kutsukake, C.; Takeuchi, H.

    2002-12-01

    Irradiation of high purity silver with 14 MeV D-T neutrons was carried out at the fusion neutron source facility in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The range of neutron fluence was 6.1×10 17 to 1.1×10 21 n/m 2, which is lower than in earliest D-T neutron irradiations. Thin foil and bulk specimens were irradiated at 288, 423 and 573 K, and observed using transmission electron microscopy. For irradiation at 288 K, the fraction of interstitial clusters in bulk is higher than that in thin foil. In irradiation experiments at 288 and 432 K, the number density of defect clusters is proportional to the neutron fluence to the power of 1.3. In irradiation experiments at 573 K, the defects are mostly stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) and their number density is proportional to the neutron fluence. During isochronal annealing of specimens irradiated at 288 K, disappearance and coalescence of defect clusters were observed, and SFTs were mobile.

  17. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  18. Particle Simulations of Knudsen Layer Effects on DT Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce; Dimits, Andris; Zimmerman, George; Wilks, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic effects have been shown to degrade fusion reactivities near an absorbing bounding surface in some circumstances, the so-called Knudsen layer (KL) effect. There is renewed interest in the KL effect in the context of inertial fusion. We report particle simulations (1D Cartesian in space, 3D in velocity) of the transport of deuterium and tritium (DT) plasma in a system with a partially absorbing boundary and including Coulomb collisions and the effects of non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions on fusion reactivity. Ion-ion Coulomb collisions are implemented with a pairwise scheme that conserves number, momentum, and energy. The influences of the albedo and temperature of the boundary, ion slowing on electrons, ambi-polar electric fields, fusion alphas, and a Cu minority species are studied. Reductions in fusion reactivity are quantified. For DT at 9 keV, the Gamow peak in the fusion reactivity is at 29 keV; but the KL decrements in the ion tail from Maxwellian are observed to occur at higher energies so that the Maxwellian-averaged formula for the fusion reactivity using the space-time local temperatures and densities gives a good fit to the kinetic fusion rate. Kinetic effects are nevertheless important in determining end losses, velocity tail decrements and anisotropy, and ion axial plasma profiles for density, kinetic energy, fluxes, and flows. Work performed for the USDOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 at Lawrence Livermore Nat. Lab.

  19. Exploring Noninvasive Tricuspid dP/dt as a Marker of Right Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Singbal, Yash; Vollbon, William; Huynh, Luan Tan; Wang, William Y S; Ng, Arnold C T; Wahi, Sudhir

    2015-09-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function assumes prognostic significance in various disease states, but RV geometry is not amenable to volumetric assessment by two-dimensional echocardiography. Intra-ventricular pressure rate of rise (dP/dt) predicts myocardial contractility and adjusting for the maximal regurgitant velocity (Vmax) corrects for preload. We examined the relationship of noninvasive tricuspid dP/dt and dP/dt/Vmax with RV ejection fraction (RVEF) by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) as a measure of RV function. Fifty CMRs and echocardiograms performed within 30 days were included. Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) spectral Doppler trace was analyzed offline. TR dP/dt was calculated using simplified Bernoulli equation (dP/dt between 1 and 2 m/sec). dP/dt/Vmax was calculated as a ratio of dP/dt and TR Vmax . RV end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic volumes (ESV) were obtained from contouring of steady-state-free precession axial stack CMR images; RVEF was calculated as [(RVEDV - RVESV)/RVEDV] × 100. RVEF >42% was considered normal. Majority of studies were suitable for analysis. Median age was 48 years (IQR = 36-63); 56.4% were female (n = 22/39). There was correlation between dP/dt and RVEF (r(2) = 0.51, P < 0.01) which improved with dP/dt/Vmax (r(2) = 0.59, P < 0.01). dP/dt >400 mmHg/sec had a positive predictive value of 91%, sensitivity and specificity of 74% and 84% respectively for normal RVEF. Inter-observer agreement and repeatability analysis showed no significant difference. Tricuspid dP/dt correlates well with CMR RVEF. A dP/dt of more than 400 mmHg/sec strongly predicts normal RVEF. Adjusting for preload (dP/dt/Vmax) further improves this correlation. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  1. Simulation and analysis of time-gated monochromatic radiographs of cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Betti, R.; Bittle, W.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R. T.; Kelly, J. H.; Kosc, T. Z.; Mileham, C.; Morse, S. F. B.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J., III; Shmayda, W. T.; Sorce, C.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    Spherical polymer shells containing cryogenic DT ice layers have been imploded on the OMEGA Laser System and radiographed using Si backlighter targets (hν = 1.865 keV) driven with 20-ps IR pulses from the OMEGA EP Laser System. We report on a series of implosions in which the deuterium-tritium (DT) shell is imaged for a range of convergence ratios and in-flight aspect ratios. The shadows of the converging DT ice and polymer shells are recorded while the self-emission is minimized using a time-resolved (40-ps) monochromatic crystal imaging system. The images acquired have been analyzed for the level of ablator mixing into the DT fuel (even 0.1% of carbon mix can be reliably inferred). Simulations are compared with measured x-ray radiographs to provide insight into the early time and stagnation stages of an implosion, to guide the modeling efforts to improve the target designs, and to guide the development of this and other imagining techniques, such as Compton radiography.

  2. [Mortality in free living siskins (Spinus spinus Linnaeus, 1758) due to Salmonella typhimurium, phage type DT104 and DT013].

    PubMed

    Krüger, Alexandra; Redmann, Thomas; Sommer, Dagmar; Antakli, Ali; Kaleta, Erhard F

    2009-09-01

    This report deals with an enzootic due to Salmonella Typhimurium in two free living Eurasian siskins (Spinus spinus Linnaeus, 1758). Other birds in the vicinity of the siskins were not affected. Clinical signs consisted of non-specific symptoms such as ruffled plumage, apathy and reduced food intake. During necropsy, gross lesions were enlarged livers with focal necrosis, pale spleens, enlarged kidneys, pneumonia and enteritis. Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from internal organs in pure culture. Using the polymerase chain reaction, the detection of Salmonella according to EN ISO 6579:2002 was confirmed. The detailed characterisation of both isolates in the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment and in the Robert Koch Institute yielded for the first siskin Salmonella Typhimurium, 4, 5, 12: i : 1, 2, LT DT104, BT a and for the second siskin Salmonella Typhimurium, 4,12 i : 1, 2, LT DT013, BT c. These phage types were identified for the first time in siskins. The detected phage types have importance as causes of disease not only for free living siskins but also as infectious and zoonotic agents for domestic poultry and poultry products.

  3. What's D&T For? Gathering and Comparing the Values of Design and Technology Academics and Trainee Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Some who read and research about Design & Technology (D&T) would say that the concept of value is key to understanding and defining D&T. Closer inspection reveals though that there are two ways in which values are defined in D&T: how values are taught and learnt about in D&T to use them to make judgments in D&T lessons, and…

  4. eDT and Model-based Configuration of 12GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dennison L.

    2015-09-01

    This poster will discuss model-driven setup of CEBAF for the 12GeV era, focusing on the elegant Download Tool (eDT). eDT is a new operator tool that generates magnet design setpoints for various machine energies and pass configurations. eDT was developed in the effort towards a process for reducing machine configuration time and reproducibility by way of an accurate accelerator model.

  5. Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2011-12-15

    The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

  6. DT-13 attenuates human lung cancer metastasis via regulating NMIIA activity under hypoxia condition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Sen-Sen; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Ren-Ping; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Du, Hong-Zhi; Mao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Bo-Yang; Li, Rui-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Cancer metastasis plays a major role in tumor deterioration. Metastatic processes are known to be regulated by hypoxic microenvironment and non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA). DT-13, a bioactive saponin monomer isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus, has been reported to inhibit various cancer metastasis, but whether NMIIA is involved in the anti-metastatic activity of DT-13 under hypoxia remains to be determined. Thus, this study aims to clarify the role of DT-13 in regulating 95D cell metastasis under hypoxic microenvironment and to further investigate whether NMIIA is involved in the anti-metastatic mechanism of DT-13. We found that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cells metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, hypoxia significantly inhibited the expression of NMIIA and redistributed NMIIA to the cell periphery, whereas DT-13 reversed the hypoxic effects by upregulating the expression of NMIIA. Moreover, DT-13 treatment redistributed NMIIA to the nuclear periphery and reduced the formation of F-actin in 95D cells. In addition, we found that the Raf-ERK1/2 signaling pathway is involved in regulation of NMIIA by DT-13. Collectively, these findings support NMIIA as a target of DT-13 to prevent lung cancer metastasis.

  7. High-Yield D-T Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Wells, R.P.; Reijonen, J.

    2006-11-15

    A high-yield D-T neutron generator has been developed for neutron interrogation in homeland security applications such as cargo screening. The generator has been designed as a sealed tube with a performance goal of producing 5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} n/s over a long lifetime. The key generator components developed are a radio-frequency (RF) driven ion source and a beam-loaded neutron production target that can handle a beam power of 10 kW. The ion source can provide a 100 mA D{sup +}/T{sup +} beam current with a high fraction of atomic species and can be pulsed up to frequencies of several kHz for pulsed neutron generator operation. Testing in D-D operation has been started.

  8. Alternate-fuel reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

    1983-02-01

    A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

  9. Gyrokinetic electromagnetic isotope effect in ITER-hybrid plasmas and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerler, Tobias; Garcia, Jeronimo; Jenko, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A number of high-realism simulations with the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE have been performed recently for comparison with experimental measurements in, e.g., ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D. Some of these successful validation studies will be reviewed briefly as basis for subsequent predictive simulations for a particular ITER hybrid scenario. Here, comprehensive local GENE simulations have been employed considering the multi-component character of such plasmas including impurities, fuel ions, helium ash, up to two fast ion species as well as electromagnetic fluctuations, inter- and intra-species collisions, and external shear effects. The fluxes are in general in good agreement with those in the above ITER study performed with the CRONOS code suite. A particular subject of interest is the turbulent transport comparison between deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas and pure deuterium (DD) fuel as mostly used in present-day experiments. Here, a strong heat flux drop from DD to DT plasmas can be observed which is in line with experimental evidence found at TFTR and JET. This contribution may hence help to gain a better understanding of this so-called isotope effect and improve projections for future ITER DD- and DT-plasma studies.

  10. Impact of flows on ion temperatures inferred from neutron spectra in asymmetrically driven OMEGA DT implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Aappelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.; Walsh, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Marshall, F.; Michel, T.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Zylstra, A.

    2016-10-01

    Ion temperatures (Tion) in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments have traditionally been inferred from the broadening of primary neutron spectra. Directional motion (flow) of the fuel at burn, expected to arise due to asymmetries imposed by engineering features (such as stalks, fill tubes, tents, or capsule imperfections) or drive non-uniformity, also impacts broadening and may lead to artificially inflated ``Tion'' values. Flow due to low-mode asymmetries is expected to give rise to line-of-sight variations in measured Tion, as observed in OMEGA cryogenic DT implosions but not in similar experiments at the NIF. In this presentation we report on an OMEGA experiment with intentionally asymmetric drive, designed to test the ability to accurately predict and measure line-of-sight differences in apparent Tion due to low-mode asymmetry-seeded flows. The results provide insight into the complexity of hot-spot dynamics, which is a problem that must be mastered to achieve ICF ignition. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  11. Majority ion heating near the ion-ion hybrid layer in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.C.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Efficient direct majority ion heating in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor-grade plasma via absorption of fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is discussed. Majority ion heating results from resonance overlap between the cyclotron layers and the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer in hot, dense plasmas for fast waves launched with high parallel wavenumbers. Analytic and numerical models are used to explore the regime in ITER plasmas.

  12. SIMULATIONS FOR ACTIVE INTERROGATION OF HEU IN CARGO CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, SANG Y.; BEDDINGFIELD, DAVID H.; PARK, JAEYOUNG

    2007-01-22

    We describe the results of a Monte Carlo simulation 10 investigate the feasibility of using a pulsed deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron technique for active interrogation of special nuclear material in cargo containers. Time distributions of fission neutrons from highly enriched uranium induced by a pulsed D-T neutron source were calculated for cargo containers with different hydrogen contents. A simple detector system with polyethylene and cadmium was modeled to calculate the two-group neutron flux at the detector.

  13. Using HT and DT gamma rays to diagnose mix in Omega capsule implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Schmitt, M. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Experimental evidence [1] indicates that shell material can be driven into the core of Omega capsule implosions on the same time scale as the initial convergent shock. It has been hypothesized that shock-generated temperatures at the fuel/shell interface in thin exploding pusher capsules diffusively drives shell material into the gas core between the time of shock passage and bang time. Here, we propose a method to temporally resolve and observe the evolution of shell material into the capsule core as a function of fuel/shell interface temperature (which can be varied by varying the capsule shell thickness). Our proposed method usesmore » a CD plastic capsule filled with 50/50 HT gas and diagnosed using gas Cherenkov detection (GCD) to temporally resolve both the HT "clean" and DT "mix" gamma ray burn histories. Simulations using Hydra [2] for an Omega CD-lined capsule with a sub-micron layer of the inside surface of the shell pre-mixed into a fraction of the gas region produce gamma reaction history profiles that are sensitive to the depth to which this material is mixed. Furthermore, we observe these differences as a function of capsule shell thickness is proposed to determine if interface mixing is consistent with thermal diffusion λii~T2/Z2ρ at the gas/shell interface. Finally, since hydrodynamic mixing from shell perturbations, such as the mounting stalk and glue, could complicate these types of capsule-averaged temporal measurements, simulations including their effects also have been performed showing minimal perturbation of the hot spot geometry.« less

  14. Using HT and DT gamma rays to diagnose mix in Omega capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, M. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A.; Hammel, B. A.; Sepke, S. M.; Leatherland, A.; Gales, S.

    2016-05-26

    Experimental evidence [1] indicates that shell material can be driven into the core of Omega capsule implosions on the same time scale as the initial convergent shock. It has been hypothesized that shock-generated temperatures at the fuel/shell interface in thin exploding pusher capsules diffusively drives shell material into the gas core between the time of shock passage and bang time. Here, we propose a method to temporally resolve and observe the evolution of shell material into the capsule core as a function of fuel/shell interface temperature (which can be varied by varying the capsule shell thickness). Our proposed method uses a CD plastic capsule filled with 50/50 HT gas and diagnosed using gas Cherenkov detection (GCD) to temporally resolve both the HT "clean" and DT "mix" gamma ray burn histories. Simulations using Hydra [2] for an Omega CD-lined capsule with a sub-micron layer of the inside surface of the shell pre-mixed into a fraction of the gas region produce gamma reaction history profiles that are sensitive to the depth to which this material is mixed. Furthermore, we observe these differences as a function of capsule shell thickness is proposed to determine if interface mixing is consistent with thermal diffusion λii~T2/Z2ρ at the gas/shell interface. Finally, since hydrodynamic mixing from shell perturbations, such as the mounting stalk and glue, could complicate these types of capsule-averaged temporal measurements, simulations including their effects also have been performed showing minimal perturbation of the hot spot geometry.

  15. Using HT and DT gamma rays to diagnose mix in Omega capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A.; Hammel, B. A.; Sepke, S. M.; Leatherland, A.; Gales, S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental evidence [1] indicates that shell material can be driven into the core of Omega capsule implosions on the same time scale as the initial convergent shock. It has been hypothesized that shock-generated temperatures at the fuel/shell interface in thin exploding pusher capsules diffusively drives shell material into the gas core between the time of shock passage and bang time. We propose a method to temporally resolve and observe the evolution of shell material into the capsule core as a function of fuel/shell interface temperature (which can be varied by varying the capsule shell thickness). Our proposed method uses a CD plastic capsule filled with 50/50 HT gas and diagnosed using gas Cherenkov detection (GCD) to temporally resolve both the HT “clean” and DT “mix” gamma ray burn histories. Simulations using Hydra [2] for an Omega CD-lined capsule with a sub-micron layer of the inside surface of the shell pre-mixed into a fraction of the gas region produce gamma reaction history profiles that are sensitive to the depth to which this material is mixed. An experiment to observe these differences as a function of capsule shell thickness is proposed to determine if interface mixing is consistent with thermal diffusion λii∼T2/Z2ρ at the gas/shell interface. Since hydrodynamic mixing from shell perturbations, such as the mounting stalk and glue, could complicate these types of capsule-averaged temporal measurements, simulations including their effects also have been performed showing minimal perturbation of the hot spot geometry.

  16. Technique for Forming Solid D2 and D-T Layers for Shock Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sater, J. D.; Espinosa-Loza, F.; Kozioziemski, B.; Mapoles, E. R.

    2016-07-11

    Capsule implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are driven with a carefully tailored laser pulse that delivers a sequence of shocks to the ablator and fuel. In order to ensure the shocks converge at the desired position, the shock strength and velocity are measured in experimental platforms referred to as keyhole targets. We made shock measurements on capsules completely filled with liquid deuterium for the solid deuterium tritide (D-T) layer campaigns. Modeling has been used to extend these results to form an estimate of the shock properties in solid D-T layers. Furthermore, to verify and improve the surrogacy of the liquid-filled keyhole measurements, we have developed a technique to form a solid layer inside the keyhole capsule. The layer is typically uniform over a 400-μm-diameter area. This is sufficient to allow direct measurement of the shock velocity. This layering technique has been successfully applied to 13 experiments on the NIF. The technique may also be applicable to fast-igniter experiments since some proposed designs resemble keyhole targets. We discuss our method in detail and give representative results.

  17. Investigating the foil-generated deuteron beam interaction with a DT target in degenerate and classical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrangiz, M.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2017-06-01

    Deuteron fast ignition of a conically guided pre-compressed DT fuel is investigated. For this purpose, the acceleration of the deuterated thin foil by the intense laser beam is evaluated. The acceleration values and the number of foil-generated deuterons are calculated in terms of the laser pulse duration. Using the created deuterons as the fast ignitors, we investigate the fast ignition scheme by comparing fully degenerate, partial degenerate and classical types of DT plasma. The total energy gain of deuterons "beam fusion" is calculated to show the efficiency of beam reactions in increasing fusion rate. Besides, the stopping time and stopping range of incident deuterons are evaluated. Our numerical results indicate that degeneracy increases the beam-target collisions. Thus, it prepares the ignition situation sooner than the classical plasma. Moreover, the number of generated deuterons and their acceleration depend on the foil thickness and laser parameters. We show that when a 4ps laser with intensity of 10^{19} W/cm^2 focused onto a 20μm foil, 35× 10^{15} deuterons are generated. Moreover, under our analysis, in order to have a practicable fast ignition, 18% of the laser energy is necessary to convert into a deuteron driver.

  18. Technique for Forming Solid D2 and D-T Layers for Shock Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sater, J. D.; Espinosa-Loza, F.; Kozioziemski, B.; Mapoles, E. R.

    2016-07-11

    Capsule implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are driven with a carefully tailored laser pulse that delivers a sequence of shocks to the ablator and fuel. In order to ensure the shocks converge at the desired position, the shock strength and velocity are measured in experimental platforms referred to as keyhole targets. We made shock measurements on capsules completely filled with liquid deuterium for the solid deuterium tritide (D-T) layer campaigns. Modeling has been used to extend these results to form an estimate of the shock properties in solid D-T layers. Furthermore, to verify and improve the surrogacy of the liquid-filled keyhole measurements, we have developed a technique to form a solid layer inside the keyhole capsule. The layer is typically uniform over a 400-μm-diameter area. This is sufficient to allow direct measurement of the shock velocity. This layering technique has been successfully applied to 13 experiments on the NIF. The technique may also be applicable to fast-igniter experiments since some proposed designs resemble keyhole targets. We discuss our method in detail and give representative results.

  19. Technique for Forming Solid D2 and D-T Layers for Shock Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Sater, J. D.; Espinosa-Loza, F.; Kozioziemski, B.; ...

    2016-07-11

    Capsule implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are driven with a carefully tailored laser pulse that delivers a sequence of shocks to the ablator and fuel. In order to ensure the shocks converge at the desired position, the shock strength and velocity are measured in experimental platforms referred to as keyhole targets. We made shock measurements on capsules completely filled with liquid deuterium for the solid deuterium tritide (D-T) layer campaigns. Modeling has been used to extend these results to form an estimate of the shock properties in solid D-T layers. Furthermore, to verify and improve the surrogacymore » of the liquid-filled keyhole measurements, we have developed a technique to form a solid layer inside the keyhole capsule. The layer is typically uniform over a 400-μm-diameter area. This is sufficient to allow direct measurement of the shock velocity. This layering technique has been successfully applied to 13 experiments on the NIF. The technique may also be applicable to fast-igniter experiments since some proposed designs resemble keyhole targets. We discuss our method in detail and give representative results.« less

  20. Stable expression of short interfering RNA for DT-diaphorase induces neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Jorge; Muñoz, Patricia; Nore, Beston F; Ledoux, Susan; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2010-09-20

    DT-Diaphorase has been proposed to play a neuroprotective role in dopaminergic neurons by preventing aminochrome neurotoxicity. There are several studies supporting this idea, but in all studies, we used dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase. We have designed and developed two siRNA to silence the expression of DT-diaphorase to study its role in aminochrome metabolism. We transduced RCSN-3 cells with retroviral particles containing a pRetroSuper plasmid coding a siRNA for DT-diaphorase. The cells selected in the presence of puromycin generated a stable cell line RCSN-3Nq6 and RCSN-3Nq7 with low expression of DT-diaphorase (27% and 33% of wild type, respectively). A significant cell death was observed in RCSN-3 cells expressing siRNA Nq6 and Nq7 for DT-diaphorase when were incubated with 100 μM aminochrome during 48 (4- and 3.5-fold, respectively; P < 0.01). These results support the protective role of DT-diaphorase against aminochrome neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin and show that Nq6 and Nq7 siRNA are very useful tools to study the role of DT-diaphorase in aminochrome metabolism.

  1. Comparison of SEM and Optical Analysis of DT Neutron Tracks in CR-39 Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Mosier-Boss, L.P.G. Forsley, P. Carbonnelle, M.S. Morey, J.R. Tinsley, J. P. Hurley, F.E. Gordon

    2012-01-01

    A solid state nuclear track detector, CR-39, was exposed to DT neutrons. After etching, the resultant tracks were analyzed using both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In this communication, both methods of analyzing DT neutron tracks are discussed.

  2. Identification of virulence properties in Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Surasri N; Anriany, Yuda; Grim, Christopher J; Kim, Sungji; Chang, Zenas; Joseph, Sam W; Cinar, Hediye N

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serover Typhimurium definitive phage type DT104, resistant to multiple antibiotics, is one of the most widespread Salmonella species in human infection worldwide. Although several cohort studies indicate that DT104 carrying the multidrug resistance (MDR) locus on salmonella genomic island 1 is a possible hyper-virulent strain compared to DT104 strains without MDR, or other Salmonella enterica serotypes, existing experimental evidence regarding virulence properties associated with the MDR region is controversial. To address this question, we constructed an isogenic MDR deletion (∆MDR) mutant strain of DT104, SNS12, by allelic exchange and used Caenorhabditis elegans as a host model to assess differences in virulence between these two strains. SNS12 exhibited decreased virulence in C. elegans, and we observed increased colonization and proliferation of the intestine of C. elegans by DT104. The immune response against MDR-carrying DT104 appears to function through a non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway, namely prion-like-(QN-rich)-domain-bearing protein pathway (PQN), in a ced-1 dependent manner in C. elegans. Further, we also demonstrate that genes of the PQN pathway and antimicrobial peptide gene abf-2, are expressed at higher transcriptional levels in worms immediately following exposure to DT104, in comparison with worms exposed to SNS12. Altogether, our results suggest that the MDR region of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has a direct role in virulence against Caenorhabditis elegans.

  3. Identification of Virulence Properties in Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 Using Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Surasri N.; Anriany, Yuda; Grim, Christopher J.; Kim, Sungji; Chang, Zenas; Joseph, Sam W.; Cinar, Hediye N.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serover Typhimurium definitive phage type DT104, resistant to multiple antibiotics, is one of the most widespread Salmonella species in human infection worldwide. Although several cohort studies indicate that DT104 carrying the multidrug resistance (MDR) locus on salmonella genomic island 1 is a possible hyper-virulent strain compared to DT104 strains without MDR, or other Salmonella enterica serotypes, existing experimental evidence regarding virulence properties associated with the MDR region is controversial. To address this question, we constructed an isogenic MDR deletion (∆MDR) mutant strain of DT104, SNS12, by allelic exchange and used Caenorhabditis elegans as a host model to assess differences in virulence between these two strains. SNS12 exhibited decreased virulence in C. elegans, and we observed increased colonization and proliferation of the intestine of C. elegans by DT104. The immune response against MDR-carrying DT104 appears to function through a non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway, namely prion-like-(QN-rich)-domain-bearing protein pathway (PQN), in a ced-1 dependent manner in C. elegans. Further, we also demonstrate that genes of the PQN pathway and antimicrobial peptide gene abf-2, are expressed at higher transcriptional levels in worms immediately following exposure to DT104, in comparison with worms exposed to SNS12. Altogether, our results suggest that the MDR region of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has a direct role in virulence against Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:24124587

  4. Utilization of the catalyzed-DD fuel cycle in reversed-field pinch reactors (RFPRs)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The utilization of deuterium-based fuels offers the potential advantages of greater flexibility in blanket design, significantly reduced tritium inventory, potential reduction in radioactivity level, and utilization of an inexhaustible fuel supply. The extension of the conventional DT-fueled Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) designs to advanced-fuel (catalyzed-DD) operation has recently been reported. Attractive and economically competitive DD/RFPR systems are identified having power densities and plasma parameters comparable to the DT systems. These designs are compared to other fusion reactor designs.

  5. Reducing anti-DT IgG concentrations to improve the efficacy of a diphtheria fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Hall, Philip D; Beagle, Kathryn L; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Frankel, Arthur E

    2008-11-01

    Preformed antidiphtheria toxin (anti-DT) IgG limits the development of diphtheria fusion proteins because the anti-DT IgG binds and removes the diphtheria fusion protein from the circulation. In our phase I trial of DT-granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), a truncated DT linked to human GMCSF, in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia, patients with high concentrations of preexisting anti-DT IgG (>2.5 microg/ml) had significantly lower DT-GMCSF concentrations. This study details the fate of anti-DT IgG during the patient's treatment with DT-GMCSF and describes how we could lower anti-DT IgG concentrations and increase the patient's exposure to DT-GMCSF. Using an enzyme immunoassay, we measured anti-DT IgG concentrations before the first cycle of treatment (baseline) and on day 2 (after one dose of DT-GMCSF) and on day 5 (after four doses of DT-GMCSF). Thirty-three patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia in the phase 1 trial received DT-GMCSF at doses from 1 to 5 microg/kg/day intravenously for 5 days. The mean anti-DT IgG concentration pretherapy was 1.3 microg/ml (range: undetectable to 7.8) and significantly decreased to a mean concentration of 0.7 microg/ml on day 2 (P=0.007) and to 0.5 microg/ml on day 5 (P<0.0001). In two individuals in whom we measured DT-GMCSF concentrations on day 1 and day 5, we observed that a decrease in anti-DT IgG concentrations was associated with an increase in DT-GMCSF concentrations. No relationship was observed between dose of DT-GMCSF and the absolute change in anti-DT IgG concentrations on day 2 (r=-0.01, P=0.98) or day 5 (r=-0.12, P=0.53). For patients with high baseline anti-DT IgG concentrations, a single dose of DT-GMCSF could be used to lower the anti-DT IgG concentrations and potentially result in a significant increase in DT-GMCSF concentrations and efficacy.

  6. Analysis of the dV/dt effect on an IGBT gate circuit in IPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Hua; Zehong, Li; Bo, Zhang; Xiangjun, Huang; Dekai, Cheng

    2013-04-01

    The effect of dV/dt on the IGBT gate circuit in IPM is analyzed both by simulation and experiment. It is shown that a voltage slope applied across the collector-emitter terminals of the IGBT can induce a gate voltage spike through the feedback action of the parasitic capacitances of the IGBT. The dV/dt rate, gate-collector capacitance, gate-emitter capacitance and gate resistance have a direct influence on this voltage spike. The device with a higher dV/dt rate, gate-collector capacitance, gate resistance and lower gate-emitter capacitance is more prone to dV/dt induced self turn-on. By optimizing these parameters, the dV/dt induced voltage spike can be effectively controlled.

  7. Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumour (DT) with Pelvic Extension-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sathish Selva; Ramachandran, Padmini; G, Veena; Madhusudhan, Napa; Kumbhar, Uday

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid Tumour (DT) is a rare benign, myofibroblastic tumour originating from muscle fascia with tendency to recur but, it rarely metastasizes. We are reporting here a case of DT that presented as an intra-abdominal mass with pelvic extension in a patient who underwent hysterectomy for fibroid uterus seventeen years ago. A clinical diagnosis of ovarian malignancy was made. Ovarian tumour markers for surface epithelial and germ cell tumours were negative. Imaging studies suggested DT and the same was excised surgically. A histopathological diagnosis of DT was made and confirmed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) markers. DT should always be considered especially in female patients with previous history of surgery. A complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice with recurrent cases requiring radiotherapy. A differential diagnosis like sarcoma and further toxic chemotherapy can be avoided with careful histopathological evaluation and IHC confirmation of DTs. PMID:24596759

  8. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; ...

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  9. Investigation of the transition between hydrodynamic and kinetic regimes for DT exploding pushers at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R.; Kabadi, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M.; Betti, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Nikroo, A.; Casey, D. T.; Kwan, T.; Simakov, A.; Atzeni, S.; Bellei, C.

    2016-10-01

    Previous experiments were conducted to study the transition from hydrodynamic-like to ion kinetic regimes for D3He exploding pushers, demonstrating the importance of an ion kinetic approach for formulating more robust predictions of implosion characteristics. This presentation details a series of planned experiments at the OMEGA Facility and the NIF using thin-glass exploding pushers with DT fuel. D and T ions have the same charge, unlike D and 3He, yet their masses are unaltered from the D and 3He case. This allows for the investigation of whether ion-thermal decoupling and species separation are largely a result of charge or mass. The initial gas fill pressure will be varied in order to scan the transition from strongly hydrodynamic to strongly kinetic implosions, while leveraging the expansive diagnostic suite developed at NIF and OMEGA. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  10. Plasma wall interaction and tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Amarescu, E.; Ascione, G.; Synakowski, E.

    1996-05-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been operating safely and routinely with deuterium-tritium fuel for more than two years. In this time, TFTR has produced an impressive number of record breaking results including core fusion power, ~ 2 MW/m³, comparable to that expected for ITER. Advances in wall conditioning via lithium pellet injection have played an essential role in achieving these results. Deuterium-tritium operation has also provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium recycling and retention. Tritium retention over two years of operation was approximately 40%. Recently, the in-torus tritium inventory was reduced by half through a combination of glow discharge cleaning, moist-air soaks, and plasma discharge cleaning. The tritium inventory is not a constraint in continued operations. The authors present recent results from TFTR in the context of plasma wall interactions and deuterium-tritium issues.

  11. A novel fusion protein diphtheria toxin-stem cell factor (DT-SCF)-purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Potala, Sirisha; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2010-11-01

    Fusion toxins are an emerging class of targeted therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. Diphtheria toxin-stem cell factor (DT-SCF) is one such novel fusion toxin designed to target malignancies expressing c-kit. Since, c-kit overexpression has been reported on many types of cancers, it appeared to be a reasonably good molecule to target. In the present study, we report construction, expression, purification, and characterization of DT-SCF. DT-SCF gene coding for 1-387 amino acids of diphtheria toxin, His-Ala linker, 2-141 amino acids of SCF was cloned into expression vector with C terminal His tag. The induced DT-SCF protein was exclusively expressed in insoluble fraction. Purification of DT-SCF was achieved by inclusion body isolation and metal affinity chromatography under denaturing and reducing conditions. Purified DT-SCF was renatured partially on-column by gradually reducing denaturant concentration followed by complete refolding through rapid dilution technique. Cell viability assay provided the evidence that DT-SCF is a potent cytotoxic agent selective to cells expressing c-kit. The novelty of this study lies in employing SCF as a ligand in construction of fusion toxin to target wide range of malignancies expressing c-kit. Efficacy of DT-SCF fusion toxin was demonstrated over a range of malignancies such as chronic myeloid leukemia (K562), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MOLT4), pancreatic carcinoma (PANC-1), and cervical carcinoma (HeLa 229). This is the first study reporting specificity and efficacy of DT-SCF against tumor cells expressing c-kit. There was significant correlation (P = 0.007) between c-kit expression on cells and their sensitivity to DT-SCF fusion toxin.

  12. pH-dependent inactivation of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C and porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D; Beall, H; Kasai, M; Arai, H; Gibson, N W; Ross, D

    1993-12-01

    Mitomycin C and porfiromycin were found to inactivate rat hepatic DT-diaphorase. Inactivation was pH dependent; little inactivation was detected at pH 5.8, but inactivation increased as the pH was raised to 7.8. Inactivation was concentration and time dependent and displayed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Inactivation was NADH dependent, indicating that reductive metabolism was necessary for inhibition. [3H]Mitomycin C was covalently bound to DT-diaphorase during inhibition, and the stoichiometry for inactivation of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C was approximately 0.8 nmol of mitomycin C bound/nmol of enzyme. A higher molecular mass product (60 kDa) was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis of DT-diaphorase preincubated with NADH and mitomycin C at pH 7.8, suggesting that mitomycin C is capable of cross-linking DT-diaphorase. The kinetics of inhibition, requirement for NADH for inhibition, covalent binding of [3H] mitomycin C to DT-diaphorase, and approximate 1:1 stoichiometry suggest that this inactivation process may be mechanism based. Inhibition of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C and porfiromycin is not limited to a cell-free system and could also be observed in HT-29 cells in culture at pH 7.2. Bioactivation of mitomycin C or porfiromycin by DT-diaphorase is favored at lower pH, whereas at higher pH values enzyme alkylation and inactivation of DT-diaphorase occur. These data suggest that the success of attempts to exploit the elevated DT-diaphorase content of certain human tumors for improved chemotherapeutic response using mitomycin C or porfiromycin will depend on intracellular pH.

  13. DYNA3D analysis of the DT-20 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Lovejoy, S.C.

    1991-08-22

    A DYNA3D model of the DT-20 shipping container was constructed. Impact onto a rigid steel surface at a velocity of 44 ft/sec (30 foot gravity drop) was studied. The orientation of most interest was a side-drop, but end and corner drops were also studied briefly. The assembly for the baseline side impact contained a 150 lb. payload. During this drop, the outer drum sustains plastic strains of up to 0.15, with most the deformation near the rim. The plywood/Celotex packing is crushed about 3 inches. The inner sealed can sees significant stresses, but barely reaches the onset of yielding in some local areas. Based on hand calculations, the bolts joining the can halves could see stresses near 50 ksi. It is felt that overall, the container should survive this drop. However, detailed modeling of the rim closure and the center bolted joint was not possible due to time constraints. Furthermore, better material models and properties are needed for the Celotex, plywood, and honeycomb in particular. 39 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Combined neutron and x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Christensen, K; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Grim, G P; Hibbard, R; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Merrill, F E; Schmidt, D W; Simpson, R A; Skulina, K; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C H

    2016-11-01

    X-ray and neutrons are commonly used to image inertial confinement fusion implosions, providing key diagnostic information on the fuel assembly of burning deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The x-ray and neutron data provided are complementary as the production of neutrons and x-rays occurs from different physical processes, but typically these two images are collected from different views with no opportunity for co-registration of the two images. Neutrons are produced where the DT fusion fuel is burning; X-rays are produced in regions corresponding to high temperatures. Processes such as mix of ablator material into the hotspot can result in increased x-ray production and decreased neutron production but can only be confidently observed if the two images are collected along the same line of sight and co-registered. To allow direct comparison of x-ray and neutron data, a combined neutron x-ray imaging system has been tested at Omega and installed at the National Ignition Facility to collect an x-ray image along the currently installed neutron imaging line of sight. This system is described, and initial results are presented along with prospects for definitive coregistration of the images.

  15. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  16. Combined neutron and x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Christensen, K.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Hibbard, R.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; Skulina, K.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-11-01

    X-ray and neutrons are commonly used to image inertial confinement fusion implosions, providing key diagnostic information on the fuel assembly of burning deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The x-ray and neutron data provided are complementary as the production of neutrons and x-rays occurs from different physical processes, but typically these two images are collected from different views with no opportunity for co-registration of the two images. Neutrons are produced where the DT fusion fuel is burning; X-rays are produced in regions corresponding to high temperatures. Processes such as mix of ablator material into the hotspot can result in increased x-ray production and decreased neutron production but can only be confidently observed if the two images are collected along the same line of sight and co-registered. To allow direct comparison of x-ray and neutron data, a combined neutron x-ray imaging system has been tested at Omega and installed at the National Ignition Facility to collect an x-ray image along the currently installed neutron imaging line of sight. This system is described, and initial results are presented along with prospects for definitive coregistration of the images.

  17. Signatures of asymmetry in neutron spectra and images predicted by three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of indirect drive implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittenden, J. P.; Appelbe, B. D.; Manke, F.; McGlinchey, K.; Niasse, N. P. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of 3D simulations of indirect drive inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the "high-foot" radiation pulse on the National Ignition Facility. The results are post-processed using a semi-deterministic ray tracing model to generate synthetic deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron spectra as well as primary and down scattered neutron images. Results with low-mode asymmetries are used to estimate the magnitude of anisotropy in the neutron spectra shift, width, and shape. Comparisons of primary and down scattered images highlight the lack of alignment between the neutron sources, scatter sites, and detector plane, which limits the ability to infer the ρr of the fuel from a down scattered ratio. Further calculations use high bandwidth multi-mode perturbations to induce multiple short scale length flows in the hotspot. The results indicate that the effect of fluid velocity is to produce a DT neutron spectrum with an apparently higher temperature than that inferred from the DD spectrum and which is also higher than the temperature implied by the DT to DD yield ratio.

  18. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2013-07-15

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  19. Signatures of asymmetry in neutron spectra and images predicted by three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of indirect drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Chittenden, J. P. Appelbe, B. D.; Manke, F.; McGlinchey, K.; Niasse, N. P. L.

    2016-05-15

    We present the results of 3D simulations of indirect drive inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the “high-foot” radiation pulse on the National Ignition Facility. The results are post-processed using a semi-deterministic ray tracing model to generate synthetic deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron spectra as well as primary and down scattered neutron images. Results with low-mode asymmetries are used to estimate the magnitude of anisotropy in the neutron spectra shift, width, and shape. Comparisons of primary and down scattered images highlight the lack of alignment between the neutron sources, scatter sites, and detector plane, which limits the ability to infer the ρr of the fuel from a down scattered ratio. Further calculations use high bandwidth multi-mode perturbations to induce multiple short scale length flows in the hotspot. The results indicate that the effect of fluid velocity is to produce a DT neutron spectrum with an apparently higher temperature than that inferred from the DD spectrum and which is also higher than the temperature implied by the DT to DD yield ratio.

  20. Safety evaluation of steroidal saponin DT-13 isolated from the tuber of Liriope muscari (Decne.) Baily.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengtang; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2011-09-01

    Steroidal saponin DT-13 (25 (R, S)-ruscogenin-1-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl - (1→2)] [β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-fucopyranoside) is the main active component of the tube of Liriope muscari (Decne.) Baily and has been studied as a candidate drug for cancer metastasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of DT-13 systematically by genotoxicity and acute oral toxicity and subchronic 90-day oral gavage toxicity. Results of Ames test confirmed that DT-13 did not induce mutations in histidine auxotrophs Salmonella typhimurium (TA 97, TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102) both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation system at the doses of 0.05-500 μg/plate. Meanwhile, DT-13 did not induce clastogenicity at doses of 1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg in mouse micronucleus test. And the single oral dose of DT-13 at 5000 mg/kg did not produce mortality or significant changes in the general behavior and gross appearance of the internal organs of mice. In subchronic toxicity study, DT-13 was administrated to Sprague-Dawley rats via oral gavage at doses of 10, 60 and 360 mg/kg for 90 days. Necropsy, hematological and biochemical analysis, and histopathological examination did not reveal any remarkable and treatment related changes. In conclusion, DT-13 is of low toxicity at the tested doses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion and persistence of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium strains phage type DT120 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Danila; Monno, Rosa; Nuccio, Federica; Legretto, Marilisa; Oliva, Marta; Coscia, Maria Franca; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Calia, Carla; Capolongo, Carmen; Pazzani, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-two multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from 255 clinical strains collected in Southern Italy in 2006-2008 were characterised for antimicrobial resistance genes, pulsotype, and phage type. Most strains (83.9%) were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (ACSSuT) encoded in 88.5% by the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1) and in 11.5% by the InH-like integron (bla OXA-30-aadA1) and catA1, sul1, and tet(B) genes. STYMXB.0061 (75%) and DT120 (84.6%) were the prevalent pulsotype and phage type identified in these strains, respectively. Five other resistance patterns were found either in single or in a low number of isolates. The pandemic clone DT104 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) has been identified in Italy since 1992, while strains DT120 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) have never been previously reported in Italy. In Europe, clinical strains DT120 have been reported from sporadic outbreaks linked to the consumption of pork products. However, none of these strains were STYMXB.0061 and SGI1 positive. The prevalent identification and persistence of DT120 isolates would suggest, in Southern Italy, a phage type shifting of the pandemic DT104 clone pulsotype STYMXB.0061. Additionally, these findings raise epidemiological concern about the potential diffusion of these emerging multidrug resistant (SGI linked) DT120 strains.

  2. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-15

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an 'X.' X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of {approx}50 g/cm{sup 3} at peak compression, and fusion gains of {approx}50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities {approx}2 g/cm{sup 2} using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities {approx}100 g/cm{sup 3}, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in {approx}200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of {approx}300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not

  3. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-01

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an "X." X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of ˜50 g/cm3 at peak compression, and fusion gains of ˜50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm2 using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm3, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not reach the ignition zone in time to affect the burning

  4. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  5. Absolute monitoring of DD and DT neutron fluences using the associated-particle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, N. E.; Wehring, B. W.

    1980-06-01

    An associated-particle system was constructed for use with a Texas Nuclear neutron generator. Associated-particle and neutron energy spectra were measured simultaneously using this system and an NE-213 proton recoil spectrometer, respectively. The associated-particle system proved to be not only an accurate monitor of DT neutron fluence, but also an accurate monitor of DD contamination in the DT spectrum. The DD and DT neutron fluences calculated from the measured associated-particle counting rates showed the best agreement with the measured neutron fluences when the laboratory distributions were assumed to be isotropic.

  6. The chicken B-cell line DT40 proteome, beadome and interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    In developing a new quantitative AP-MS method for exploring interactomes in the chicken B-cell line DT40, we also surveyed the most abundant proteins in this organism and explored the likely contaminants that bind to a variety of affinity resins that would later be confirmed quantitatively [1]. We present the ‘Top 150 abundant DT40 proteins list’, the DT40 beadomes as well as protein interaction lists for the Phosphatidyl inositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase 2β and Fanconi anaemia protein complexes. PMID:26217713

  7. Performance of Indirectly-Driven Capsule Implosions on NIF Using Adiabat-Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Indirectly-driven capsule implosions are being conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Early experiments conducted during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) were driven by a laser pulse with a relatively low-power initial foot (``low-foot''), which was designed to keep the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel on a low adiabat to achieve a high fuel areal density (ρR). These implosions were successful in achieving high ρR, but fell significantly short of the predicted neutron yield. A leading candidate to explain this degraded performance was ablation front instability growth, which can lead to the mixing of ablator material with the DT fuel layer and in extreme cases into the central DT hot spot. A subsequent campaign employing a modified laser pulse with increased power in the foot (``high-foot'') was designed to reduce the adverse effects of ablation front instability growth. These implosions have been very successful, increasing neutron yields by more than an order of magnitude, but at the expense of reduced fuel compression. To bridge these two regimes, a series of implosions have been designed to simultaneously achieve both high stability and high ρR. These implosions employ adiabat-shaping, where the driving laser pulse is high in the initial picket similar to the high-foot to retain the favorable stability properties at the ablation front. The remainder of the foot is similar to that of the low-foot, driving a lower velocity shock into the DT fuel to keep the adiabat low and compression high. This talk will present results and analysis of these implosions and will discuss implications for improved implosion performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Branched Lateral Tail Fiber Organization in T5-Like Bacteriophages DT57C and DT571/2 is Revealed by Genetic and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Golomidova, Alla K; Kulikov, Eugene E; Prokhorov, Nikolai S; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo С; Knirel, Yuriy A; Kostryukova, Elena S; Tarasyan, Karina K; Letarov, Andrey V

    2016-01-21

    The T5-like siphoviruses DT57C and DT571/2, isolated from horse feces, are very closely related to each other, and most of their structural proteins are also nearly identical to T5 phage. Their LTFs (L-shaped tail fibers), however, are composed of two proteins, LtfA and LtfB, instead of the single Ltf of bacteriophage T5. In silico and mutant analysis suggests a possible branched structure of DT57C and DT571/2 LTFs, where the LtfB protein is connected to the phage tail via the LtfA protein and with both proteins carrying receptor recognition domains. Such adhesin arrangement has not been previously recognized in siphoviruses. The LtfA proteins of our phages are found to recognize different host O-antigen types: E. coli O22-like for DT57C phage and E. coli O87 for DT571/2. LtfB proteins are identical in both phages and recognize another host receptor, most probably lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O81 type. In these two bacteriophages, LTF function is essential to penetrate the shield of the host's O-antigens. We also demonstrate that LTF-mediated adsorption becomes superfluous when the non-specific cell protection by O-antigen is missing, allowing the phages to bind directly to their common secondary receptor, the outer membrane protein BtuB. The LTF independent adsorption was also demonstrated on an O22-like host mutant missing O-antigen O-acetylation, thus showing the biological value of this O-antigen modification for cell protection against phages.

  9. Branched Lateral Tail Fiber Organization in T5-Like Bacteriophages DT57C and DT571/2 is Revealed by Genetic and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Golomidova, Alla K.; Kulikov, Eugene E.; Prokhorov, Nikolai S.; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo С.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Tarasyan, Karina K.; Letarov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    The T5-like siphoviruses DT57C and DT571/2, isolated from horse feces, are very closely related to each other, and most of their structural proteins are also nearly identical to T5 phage. Their LTFs (L-shaped tail fibers), however, are composed of two proteins, LtfA and LtfB, instead of the single Ltf of bacteriophage T5. In silico and mutant analysis suggests a possible branched structure of DT57C and DT571/2 LTFs, where the LtfB protein is connected to the phage tail via the LtfA protein and with both proteins carrying receptor recognition domains. Such adhesin arrangement has not been previously recognized in siphoviruses. The LtfA proteins of our phages are found to recognize different host O-antigen types: E. coli O22-like for DT57C phage and E. coli O87 for DT571/2. LtfB proteins are identical in both phages and recognize another host receptor, most probably lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O81 type. In these two bacteriophages, LTF function is essential to penetrate the shield of the host’s O-antigens. We also demonstrate that LTF-mediated adsorption becomes superfluous when the non-specific cell protection by O-antigen is missing, allowing the phages to bind directly to their common secondary receptor, the outer membrane protein BtuB. The LTF independent adsorption was also demonstrated on an O22-like host mutant missing O-antigen O-acetylation, thus showing the biological value of this O-antigen modification for cell protection against phages. PMID:26805872

  10. MR safety: simultaneous B0, dΦ/dt, and dB/dt measurements on MR-workers up to 7 T.

    PubMed

    Groebner, Jens; Umathum, Reiner; Bock, Michael; Krafft, Axel J; Semmler, Wolfhard; Rauschenberg, Jaane

    2011-12-01

    The EU directive on safety requirements (2004/40/EC) limits the exposure to time varying magnetic fields to dB /dt=200 mT/s. This action value is not clearly defined as it considers only the temporal change of the magnitude of B. Thus, only the translational motion in the magnet's fringe field is considered and rotations are neglected. A magnetic field probe was constructed to simultaneously record the magnetic flux density B(x, y, z) with a 3-axis Hall sensor and the induced voltage due to movements with a set of three orthogonal coils. Voltages were converted into time-varying magnetic flux d Φ(x, y, z)/dt serving as an exposition parameter for both translations and rotations. To separate the two types of motion, d B/dt was additionally calculated on the basis of the Hall sensor's data. The calibrated probe was attached to the forehead of 8 healthcare workers and 17 MR physicists, and B and dΦ/dt were recorded during standard operating procedures at three different MR systems up to 7 T. The maximum percentage of the translational motion referring the data including both translations and rotations amounts to 32%. During volunteer measurements, maximum exposure values of dΦ/dt=21 mWb/s, dB/dt=1.40 T/s and |B|=2.75 T were found. The findings in this work indicate that both translations and rotations in the vicinity of an MR system should be taken into account, and that a single regulatory action level might not be sufficient.

  11. Pellet fueling technology development leading to efficient fueling of ITER burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Jernigan, T.C.; Houlberg, W.A.; Owen, L.W.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Maruyama, S.; Parks, P.B.

    2005-05-15

    Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for core fueling of ITER [ITER Technical Basis 2002 ITER EDA Documentation Series (Vienna: IAEA)] burning plasmas. Efficient core plasma fueling with deuterium and tritium D-T is a requirement for achieving high fusion gain and it cannot be achieved with gas fueling. Injection of pellets from the inner wall has been shown on present day tokamaks to provide efficient fueling and is planned for use on ITER. Modeling of the fueling deposition from inner wall pellet injection using the Parks ExB drift model indicates that pellets have the capability to fuel well inside the separatrix. Gas fueling calculations show very poor neutral penetration due to the high density and wide scrape off layer. Isotopically mixed D-T pellets can provide efficient tritium fueling that will minimize tritium wall loading when compared to gas puffing. Currently the performance of the ITER inner wall guide tube design is under test with initial results indicating that pellet speeds in excess of 300 m/s will lead to fragmented pellets. The ITER pellet injection technology requirements and remaining development issues are discussed along with a plan to reach the design goal for employment on ITER.

  12. Fueling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorker, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    This report deals with concepts of the Tiber II tokamak reactor fueling systems. Contained in this report are the fuel injection requirement data, startup fueling requirements, intermediate range fueling requirements, power range fueling requirements and research and development considerations. (LSR)

  13. Muon catalyzed fusion in plasma state and high intensity DT fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    dt/mu/ molecular formation rates in a plasma state of DT mixture by d and t ions are, respectively, 63 and 77 times higher than the ones by electrons. High plasma oscillation frequency in a high electron density plasma enhances the formation rate in the high temperature dt mixture. The DT muon catalyzed fusion has the ability to produce much higher intensity 14 MeV neutron source (in order of 5 /times/ 10/sup 16/n/cm/sup 2//sec) than other means of stripping and spallation approaches. Such neutrons can be used for testing of first wall material candidates for magnetic fusion reactors, for incinerating fission products (e.g., Cs/sup 137/) and for creating high thermal flux neutron sources, on the order of 10/sup 17/n/cm/sup 2//sec. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Investigation of Celotex{trademark} charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  15. Investigation of Celotex trademark charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  16. High efficient ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by PW-ps laser pulses for producing fusion flames in DT and HB11 of solid state density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks in the range of 1020 cm/s2 has been confirmed experimentally after this was long predicted as a non-thermal direct conversion of optical energy into plasma motion due to dominating nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces [1]. The use of laser pulses of more than PW power and ps or shorter duration can ignite a nuclear fusion flame in solid density deuterium tritium because the necessary energy flux of >108J/cm2 according to the theory of Chu [2] is available [3]. For the studies of the necessary velocities of the generated fusion flames above 1000 km/s the detailed processes can be analyzed by using the advanced genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model [4] where it was surprising that the ignition of the fusion flame by the picosecond interaction needs a comparably long development in the nanosecond range before the thermal processes result in shock fronts similar to the Rakine-Hugoniot theory. For the evaluation of power generation the problem of lateral energy losses was studied by using very high pulsed magnetic fields. The recently produced 10 Kilotesla magnetic fields [5] are very promising for solutions.

  17. Numerical investigation on the stabilization of the deceleration phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to alpha particle heating in ignition target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Zhu, Shaoping; Pei, Wenbing; Ye, Wenhua; Li, Meng; Xu, Xiaowen; Wu, Junfeng; Dai, Zhensheng; Wang, Lifeng

    2012-09-01

    Tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) target is adopted in order to experimentally diagnose the properties of the ignition hot spot and the highly compressed main fusion fuel (Edwards M. J. et al., Phys. Plasmas, 18 (2011) 051003). As compared with deuterium-tritium (DT) target, the thermonuclear alpha particles which are needed to heat the fusion fuel, are much less in the THD target. In the present paper, the effect of alpha particle heating on the deceleration phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability (dp-RTI), which is one of the key problems in hot spot formation, is investigated systematically through numerical simulations. It is found that the mass ablation at the hot spot boundary is greatly increased due to the direct alpha particle heating. As a result, the dp-RTI growth rates are greatly reduced and the cut-off mode number decreases greatly from about 33 to 17. This explains why the hydrodynamic instability in the THD target grows more severely than in the DT ignition target.

  18. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a signature for shell mixing in National Ignition Facility capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.; Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Jungman, Gerard; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic calculations and results from computational simulations are presented that suggest that reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons can be used to diagnose mixing of the ablator shell material into the fuel in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, W. H. Lowdermilk, and M. S. Sorem, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. Such mixing processes in NIF capsules are of fundamental physical interest and can have important effects on capsule performance, quenching the total thermonuclear yield. The sensitivity of RIF neutrons to hydrodynamical mixing arises through the dependence of RIF production on charged-particle stopping lengths in the mixture of DT fuel and ablator material. Since the stopping power in the plasma is a sensitive function of the electron temperature and density, it is also sensitive to mix. RIF production scales approximately inversely with the degree of mixing taking place, and the ratio of RIF to down-scattered neutrons provides a measure of the mix fraction and/or the mixing length. For sufficiently high-yield capsules, where spatially resolved RIF images may be possible, neutron imaging could be used to map RIF images into detailed mix images.

  19. Profile and predictors of global distress: can the DT guide nursing practice in prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Lotfi-Jam, Kerryann; Gough, Karla; Schofield, Penelope; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-02-01

    This study examines the ability of the distress thermometer to accurately identify patients with higher symptoms, unmet needs and psychological morbidity. Baseline data collected as part of a randomized controlled trial evaluating a nurse-led supportive care intervention for men with prostate cancer commencing radiotherapy at a specialist cancer hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Measures assessed global distress (DT), anxious and depressive symptomatology (HADS), prostate-cancer specific quality of life (EPIC-26), unmet supportive care needs (SCNS-SF34R) and cancer treatment-related concerns (CATS). Following descriptive and correlational analysis, hierarchical multiple regression was employed to examine the contribution of variable sets to explaining variance in DT scores. Less than 20% of men reported DT scores of 4 or higher, indicating overall low distress. The DT accurately identified almost all men reporting HADS score indicative of anxious or depressive symptomatology, suggesting it accurately identifies psychological morbidity. Importantly, the DT identified a further group of distressed men, not identified by HADS, whose distress related to unmet needs and prostate cancer-specific issues, indicating the DT is superior in identifying other forms of distress. While the hierarchical multiple regression confirmed anxious and depressive symptomatology as the best predictor of distress score, many other scales are also good predictors of DT scores, supporting the argument that distress is multi-determined. Nurses can be confident that the DT accurately identifies patients with psychological morbidity and importantly identifies other patients with distress who may require intervention. A distress score of 4 or higher identified participants with higher physical symptomatology, higher unmet needs, more concerns about treatment and poorer quality of life. The low prevalence of distress reaching cut off scores suggests nurses would not be overwhelmed by the outcomes

  20. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  1. Significant antitumor effect of a synthetic lipid A analogue, DT-5461, on murine syngeneic tumor models.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, E; Tohgo, A; Soga, T; Kusama, T; Osada, Y

    1992-01-01

    The antitumor effect of a synthetic lipid A analogue, DT-5461, was investigated using syngeneic tumor models in mice. Intravenous injection of DT-5461 into mice transplanted with solid tumors of MethA fibrosarcoma, MH134 hepatoma, MM46 mammary carcinoma, Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL), and colon adenocarcinomas 26 and 38 resulted in significant reductions in the weight of all tumors except Colon 26, with marked hemorrhagic necrosis of tumor tissues. Efficacy was almost equal to that of an Escherichia coli-type synthetic lipid A (compound 506), and also to those of some chemotherapeutics including Adriamycin, mitomycin C, fluorouracil and cisplatin. Furthermore, DT-5461 was more effective than other immunotherapeutics, including picibanil (OK-432) and lentinan. However, its antitumor effects were inferior to those of Adriamycin or OK-432 against the malignant ascites caused by intraperitoneal inoculation with MethA or with MH134 cells; life span was not prolonged by either intraperitoneal or intravenous administration. In addition, although DT-5461 showed direct inhibitory effects on the in vitro growth of MethA or MH134, these were much weaker than those of Adriamycin. These findings clearly indicated that DT-5461 with systemic administration is a highly effective antitumor agent on solid tumors, and suggest that the antitumor effect of DT-5461 with potent necrotizing activity might derive from indirect mechanisms related to the activation of host immune systems and not to the weak direct cytotoxicity.

  2. Dynamic recrystallization mechanisms and their transition in the Daling Thrust (DT) zone, Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir; Dasgupta, Sujoy

    2016-04-01

    The Daling Thrust (DT) delineates a zone of intense shear localization in the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) of the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. From microstructural studies of deformed quartzite samples, we show a transition in the dynamic recrystallization mechanism with increasing distance from the DT, dominated by grain boundary bulging (BLG) recrystallization closest to the DT, and progressively replaced by sub-grain rotation (SGR) recrystallization away from the thrust. The transition is marked by a characteristic variation in the fractal dimension (D) of grain boundaries, estimated from the area-perimeter method. For the BLG regime, D ≈ 1.046, which decreases significantly to a value as low as 1.025 for the SGR regime. Using the available thermal data for BLG and SGR recrystallization, we infer increasing deformation temperatures away from the DT in the hanging wall. Based on the quartz piezometer our estimates reveal strong variations in the flow stress (59.00 MPa to 16.00 MPa) over a distance of ~ 1.2 km from the DT. Deformation mechanism maps constructed for different temperatures indicate that the strain rates (10- 12 S- 1 to 10- 14 S- 1) comply with the geologically possible range. Finally, we present a mechanical model to provide a possible explanation for the cause of stress intensification along the DT.

  3. Emergence of Salmonella typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) as an important cause of salmonellosis in horses in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Weese, J S; Baird, J D; Poppe, C; Archambault, M

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) has emerged as a common cause of salmonellosis in humans and cattle, yet previous reports involving horses are sparse. This study reports the emergence of DT104 as an important pathogen in horses in Ontario. The first clinical case of DT104 infection at the Ontario Veterinary College was identified in 1997. Seventeen cases of DT104-associated salmonellosis were identified between 1997 and 2000. In 2000, 12 of 13 cases of salmonellosis were due to DT104. Salmonellosis in horses due to DT104 is of concern, since the organism is multiresistant to antibiotics and poses increased zoonotic risk. Phage type distribution of Salmonella isolates should be monitored to determine whether DT104 will remain a prevalent equine pathogen. PMID:11665427

  4. Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Phage Types DT102, DT104, and U302 by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Su, Lin-Hui; Chu, Chi-Hong; Wang, Mei-Hwei; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Chu, Chishih

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common cause of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in humans and animals. Multidrug-resistant serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104, which emerged in the 1990s, has become widely distributed in many countries. A total of 104 clinical isolates of Salmonella serogroup B were collected from three major hospitals in Taiwan during 1997 to 2003 and were examined by a multiplex PCR targeting the resistance genes and the spv gene of the virulence plasmid. A total of 51 isolates (49%) were resistant to all drugs (ACSSuT [resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline]), and all contained a 1.25-kb PCR fragment of integron that is part of the 43-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). The second group was resistant to SSu (28%), and the third was susceptible to all five drugs (13%). Fifty-nine isolates were serotyped to be serovar Typhimurium by the tube agglutination method using H antisera. The virulence plasmid was found in 54 (91.5%) of the 59 serovar Typhimurium isolates. A majority (94.1%) of the Salmonella serogroup B isolates with the ACSSuT resistance pattern harbored a virulence plasmid. Phage typing identified three major phage types: DT104, DT120, and U302. Analysis of the isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed six genotypes. We found two genotypes in DT104 strains, two in DT120, and the other two in U302. The presence of a monophasic serovar (4,5,12:i:−) has added difficulty in the determination of the serovars of multidrug-resistant Salmonella serogroup B isolates. Nevertheless, the multiplex PCR devised in the present study appears to be efficient and useful in the rapid identification of ACSSuT-type serovar Typhimurium with SGI1, irrespective of their phage types. PMID:16825349

  5. Expression of mammalian DT-diaphorase in Escherichia coli: purification and characterization of the expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Wang, R; Yang, C S; Lu, A Y

    1990-12-01

    A full-length cDNA clone, pKK-DTD4, complementary to rat liver cytosolic DT-diaphorase [NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2)] mRNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. The pKK-DTD4 cDNA was obtained by extending the 5'-end sequence of a rat liver DT-diaphorase cDNA clone, pDTD55, to include an ATG initiation codon and the NH2-terminal codons using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Restriction sites for EcoRI and HindIII were incorporated at the 5'- and 3'-ends of the cDNA, respectively, by the PCR reaction. The resulting full-length cDNA was inserted into an expression vector, pKK2.7, at the EcoRI and HindIII restriction sites. E. coli strain AB1899 was transformed with the constructed expression plasmid, and DT-diaphorase was expressed under the control of the tac promotor. The expressed DT-diaphorase exhibited high activity of menadione reduction and was inhibited by dicumarol at a concentration of 10(-5)M. After purification by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography, the expressed enzyme migrated as a single band on 12.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel with a molecular weight equivalent to that of the purified rat liver cytosolic DT-diaphorase. The purified expressed protein was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against rat liver DT-diaphorase on immunoblot analysis. It utilized either NADPH or NADH as electron donor at equal efficiency and displayed high activities in reduction of menadione, 1,4-benzoquinone, and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol which are typical substrates for DT-diaphorase. The expressed DT-diaphorase exhibited a typical flavoprotein spectrum with absorption peaks at 380 and 452 nm. Flavin content determination showed that it contained 2 mol of FAD per mole of the enzyme. Edman protein sequencing of the first 20 amino acid residues at the NH2 terminus of the expressed protein indicated that the expressed DT-diaphorase is not blocked at the NH2 terminus and has an alanine as the first amino acid. The remaining 19 amino acid

  6. The X-Target: A novel high gain target with single-sided heavy-ion beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2012-10-01

    A new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided heavy ion axial illumination has been explored [1]. It takes advantage of the unique energy deposition properties of heavy ion beams that have a classical, long penetration range. This class of target uses heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an ``X''. X-targets that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT are capable of assembling fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm^2 using two MJ-scale annular beams to implode quasi-spherically the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm^3. A 3MJ fast-ignition solid ion beam heats the fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. The main concern for the X-target is the amount of high-Z atomic mixing at the ignition zone produced by hydro-instabilities, which, if large enough, could cool the fuel during the ignition process and prevent the propagation of the fusion burn. Analytic estimates and implosion calculations using the radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA in 2D (RZ), at typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, have shown that for the relatively low implosion velocities, low stagnation fuel densities, and low quasi-spherical fuel convergence ratios of the X-target, these hydro-instabilities do not have a large effect on the burning process. These preliminary studies need to be extended by further hydrodynamic calculations using finer resolution, complemented with turbulent mix modeling and validated by experiments, to ascertain the stability of the X-target design. We will present the current status of the X-target. [4pt] [1] E. Henestroza and B. G. Logan, Phys. Plasmas 19, 072706 (2012)

  7. Could Advanced Fusion Fuels Be Used with Today's Technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarius, J. F.; Kulcinski, G. L.; El-Guebaly, L. A.; Khater, H. Y.

    1998-03-01

    Could today's technology suffice for engineering advanced-fuel, magnetic-fusion power plants, thus making fusion development primarily a physics problem? Such a path would almost certainly cost far less than the present D-T development program, which is driven by daunting engineering challenges as well as physics questions. Advanced fusion fuels, in contrast to D-T fuel, produce a smaller fraction of the fusion power as neutrons but have lower fusion reactivity, leading to a trade-off between engineering and physics. This paper examines the critical fusion engineering issues and related technologies with an eye to their application in tokamak and alternate-concept D-3He power plants. These issues include plasma power balance, magnets, surface heat flux, input power, fuel source, radiation damage, radioactive waste disposal, and nuclear proliferation.

  8. D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT or MIF-2): doubling the MIF cytokine family.

    PubMed

    Merk, Melanie; Mitchell, Robert A; Endres, Stefan; Bucala, Richard

    2012-07-01

    D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT) is a newly described cytokine and a member of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) protein superfamily. MIF is a broadly expressed pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates both the innate and the adaptive immune response. MIF activates the MAP kinase cascade, modulates cell migration, and counter-acts the immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids. For many cell types, MIF also acts as an important survival or anti-apoptotic factor. Circulating MIF levels are elevated in the serum in different infectious and autoimmune diseases, and neutralization of the MIF protein via antibodies or small molecule antagonists improves the outcome in numerous animal models of human disease. Recently, a detailed investigation of the biological role of the closely homologous protein D-DT, which is encoded by a gene adjacent to MIF, revealed an overlapping functional spectrum with MIF. The D-DT protein also is present in most tissues and circulates in serum at similar concentrations as MIF. D-DT binds the MIF cell surface receptor complex, CD74/CD44, with high affinity and induces similar cell signaling and effector functions. Furthermore, an analysis of the signaling properties of the two proteins showed that they work cooperatively, and that neutralization of D-DT in vivo significantly decreases inflammation. In this review, we highlight the similarities and differences between MIF and D-DT, which we propose to designate "MIF-2", and discuss the implication of D-DT/MIF-2 expression for MIF-based therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Immune suppression induced by Vi capsular polysaccharide is overcome by Vi-DT conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Kothari, Sudeep; Kim, Deok Ryun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kothari, Neha; Lee, Eugene; Park, Tai Hyun; Carbis, Rodney

    2012-02-01

    The influence pre-exposure of mice to Vi capsular polysaccharide, purified from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi, on the subsequent immune response induced by a Vi-diphtheria toxoid (Vi-DT) conjugate was evaluated. Vi induced low anti Vi IgG titers with the dominant subclass being IgG3. The Vi-DT conjugate induced high titers of anti Vi IgG with the dominant subclass being IgG1 but with considerable quantities of IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. Priming of mice with Vi suppressed the response to a subsequent dose of conjugate and the suppression was overcome by a second dose of conjugate. Priming with conjugate prevented suppression of the anti Vi response and subsequent dosing with Vi raised titers back to previous levels but did not boost to new higher levels. The anti DT IgG response to one dose of conjugate was relatively strong and protracted and continued to rise for 12 weeks, compared to the response to one dose of DT which was poor and peaked at two weeks. The prolonged anti DT response was most likely due to the slow release of DT from the conjugate lattice as it degrades within the mouse resulting in a continuous stimulation of the immune response. The presence of increasing amounts of un-conjugated Vi, up to 50%, administered with the conjugate resulted in increasingly higher levels of both anti Vi and anti DT. Larger amounts of un-conjugated Vi inhibited the anti Vi response. These findings have implications for vaccine quality and a limit for un-conjugated polysaccharide should not exceed 50% and from a vaccine program perspective if the results presented here translate to humans then a Vi conjugate, once it becomes available, should replace Vi polysaccharide vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The saponin monomer of dwarf lilyturf tuber, DT-13, inhibits angiogenesis under hypoxia and normoxia via multi-targeting activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Renping; Sun, Li; Lin, Sensen; Bai, Xianshu; Yu, Boyang; Yuan, Shengtao; Zhang, Luyong

    2013-04-01

    The saponin monomer of dwarf lilyturf tuber, DT-13, exhibits anticancer activity by reducing human breast cancer cell adhesion and migration under hypoxia. To further investigate the anticancer activity of DT-13, we investigated whether DT-13 exhibits anti-angiogenic activity. DT-13 showed no effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation but inhibited tube formation and migration under normoxia and hypoxia. Moreover, DT-13 significantly reduced density of vessels in vivo observed from a chicken chorioallantoic membrane model. Western blotting results showed that DT-13 suppressed the increased level of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p-Akt induced by hypoxia. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor excretion was suppressed by DT-13. DT-13 inhibited migration and tube formation induced by vascular endothelial growth factor under normoxia and hypoxia. In addition, DT-13 reduced the level of p-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and p-Akt induced by vascular endothelial growth factor. Our data suggest that DT-13 inhibits angiogenesis under normoxia and hypoxia and also inhibits angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor via targeting at multi elements.

  11. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  12. Experimental Determination of DT Yield in High Current DD Dense Plasma Focii

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D. R.; Hagen, E. C.; Meehan, B. T.; Springs, R. K.; O'Brien, R. J.

    2013-06-18

    Dense Plasma Focii (DPF), which utilize deuterium gas to produce 2.45 MeV neutrons, may in fact also produce DT fusion neutrons at 14.1 MeV due to the triton production in the DD reaction. If beam-target fusion is the primary producer of fusion neutrons in DPFs, it is possible that ejected tritons from the first pinch will interact with the second pinch, and so forth. The 2 MJ DPF at National Security Technologies’ Losee Road Facility is able to, and has produced, over 1E12 DD neutrons per pulse, allowing an accurate measurement of the DT/DD ratio. The DT/DD ratio was experimentally verified by using the (n,2n) reaction in a large piece of praseodymium metal, which has a threshold reaction of 8 MeV, and is widely used as a DT yield measurement system1. The DT/DD ratio was experimentally determined for over 100 shots, and then compared to independent variables such as tube pressure, number of pinches per shot, total current, pinch current and charge voltage.

  13. On the Role of DT-Diaphorase Inhibition in Aminochrome-Induced Neurotoxicity In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Soto, Andrea; Díaz-Veliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Muñoz, Patricia; Henny, Pablo; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2017-03-11

    Dopamine oxidation in the pathway leading to neuromelanin formation generates the ortho-quinone aminochrome, which is potentially neurotoxic but normally rapidly converted by DT-diaphorase to nontoxic leukoaminochrome. However, when administered exogenously into rat striatum, aminochrome is able to produce damage to dopaminergic neurons. Because of a recent report that substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) tyrosine hydroxylase (T-OH) levels were unaltered by aminochrome when there was cell shrinkage of dopaminergic neurons along with a reduction in striatal dopamine release, the following study was conducted to more accurately determine the role of DT-diaphorase in aminochrome neurotoxicity. In this study, a low dose of aminochrome (0.8 nmol) with or without the DT-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol (0.2 nmol) was injected into the left striatum of rats. Intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 32 nmol) was used as a positive neurotoxin control in other rats. Two weeks later, there was significant loss in numbers of T-OH immunoreactive fibers in SNpc, also a loss in cell density in SNpc, and prominent apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg sc)-induced contralateral rotations in rats that had been treated with aminochrome, with aminochrome/dicoumarol, or with 6-OHDA. Findings demonstrate that neurotoxic aminochrome is able to exert neurotoxicity only when DT-diaphorase is suppressed-implying that DT-diaphorase is vital in normally suppressing toxicity of in vivo aminochrome, generated in the pathway towards neuromelanin formation.

  14. Estimates of the DT Fusion Gamma Spectrum Using an Energy Thresholding Gas Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Colin; Rubery, Michael; Hans, Herrmann; Mack, Joseph; Young, Carl; Caldwell, Steven; Scott, Evans; Sedillo, Thomas; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Shah, Rahul; Kirk, Miller; Wolfgang, Stoefll

    2011-10-01

    In addition to alphas and neutrons, the DT fusion reaction also produces gamma rays from the intermediate excited 5He nucleus with a small branching ratio 10E-5 gamma/n. The very small branching ratio of the gamma-rays are mitigated by the very large yields that are expected on NIF (10E+19). The excited 5He can produce gamma-rays by decay to the ground state, emitting a 16.75 MeV gamma-ray (width 0.5 MeV), or to a broad first excited state emitting a 12 MeV gamma ray (width 5 MeV). Knowledge of the relative gamma-ray BR of these two states, from which we infer the DT gamma ray spectrum, is important to making absolutely calibrated measurements on a variety of experiments. We have carried out an energy thresh-holding experiment for DT ICF implosions on the Omega laser using a Gas Cherenkov Detector, and compared the relative intensities at various thresholds with theoretical gamma spectra folded with detector response as calculated by ACCEPT and GEANT4 codes. We present recent results from this experiment, our estimate of the precision of the DT fusion gamma spectrum and the implications for the future determination of the DT gamma/n BR.

  15. DT Serpentis: neither a symbiotic star nor a planetary nebula associate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.; Bento, Joao; Bojičić, Ivan S.; Parker, Quentin A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an alternative interpretation for the putative symbiotic star DT Serpentis, and its proposed planetary nebula (PN), recently announced by Munari et al. Our analysis is based on their data combined with additional archival data trawled from Virtual Observatory data bases. We show that the star known as DT Ser is not a symbiotic star, and is merely superposed on the newly discovered but unrelated background PN. There is no evidence for any periodic variability for DT Ser as expected for a symbiotic star. We further establish that there is no physical association between DT Ser and the PN, which has a considerably higher extinction, befitting the larger distance we estimate. The significantly different radial velocities of the star and nebula also likely preclude any association. Finally, we show that the mid-infrared source detected by the IRAS and WISE surveys is actually coincident with the PN so there is no evidence for DT Ser being a dusty post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  16. The genome of the chicken DT40 bursal lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Molnár, János; Póti, Ádám; Pipek, Orsolya; Krzystanek, Marcin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Swanton, Charles; Tusnády, Gábor E; Szallasi, Zoltan; Csabai, István; Szüts, Dávid

    2014-09-15

    The chicken DT40 cell line is a widely used model system in the study of multiple cellular processes due to the efficiency of homologous gene targeting. The cell line was derived from a bursal lymphoma induced by avian leukosis virus infection. In this study we characterized the genome of the cell line using whole genome shotgun sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism array hybridization. The results indicate that wild-type DT40 has a relatively normal karyotype, except for whole chromosome copy number gains, and no karyotype variability within stocks. In a comparison to two domestic chicken genomes and the Gallus gallus reference genome, we found no unique mutational processes shaping the DT40 genome except for a mild increase in insertion and deletion events, particularly deletions at tandem repeats. We mapped coding sequence mutations that are unique to the DT40 genome; mutations inactivating the PIK3R1 and ATRX genes likely contributed to the oncogenic transformation. In addition to a known avian leukosis virus integration in the MYC gene, we detected further integration sites that are likely to de-regulate gene expression. The new findings support the hypothesis that DT40 is a typical transformed cell line with a relatively intact genome; therefore, it is well-suited to the role of a model system for DNA repair and related processes. The sequence data generated by this study, including a searchable de novo genome assembly and annotated lists of mutated genes, will support future research using this cell line.

  17. Assessment of right ventricular systolic function with dP/dt in healthy subjects: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Sait; Unlü, Murat; Arslan, Zekeriya; Baysan, Oben; Balta, Sevket; Kurt, Ibrahim Halil; Küçük, Uğur; Celik, Turgay

    2013-03-01

    The objective of our study is to determine the mean values of right ventricular (RV) dP/dt and to compare it with other right ventricular function parameters by echocardiography. This observational study consisted of 112 healthy subjects who had trivial tricuspid regurgitation. Full echocardiographic examination was performed. RV systolic function was assessed by using myocardial performance index (RV MPI), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), myocardial acceleration during isovolumic contraction (RV IVA), RV fractional area change (RV FAC), tissue Doppler-derived tricuspid lateral annular systolic velocity (Tri S`) and RV dP/dt (dP/dt). Pearson correlation test was used in examining the correlation between parameters. Differences between correlations were compared with Fisher's z transformation. The mean of RV dP/dt (0.5-2) was 1016±421 mmHg/s (95% CI=891-1142) and the mean of RV dP/dt (1-2) was 1524±573 mmHg/s (95% CI=1354-1694). RV pulse Doppler MPI and RV tissue Doppler imaging MPI were negatively correlated with RV dP/dt (0.5-2) (r=-0.482 and r=-0.504, p<0.01). Tri S' was positively correlated with RV dP/dt (0.5-2) (r=0.667, p<0.01) and with the RV dP/dt (1-2) (r=0.312, p<0.05). TAPSE was positively correlated with RV dP/dt (0.5-2) (r=0.585, p<0.01) and with the RV dP/dt (1-2) (r=0.323, p<0.05). RV IVA was positively correlated with RV dP/dt (0.5-2) (r=0.512, p<0.01). FAC (%) was not correlated with both RV dP/dt (0.5-2) and RV dP/dt (1-2). The results of our study were as follows: 1) we described the mean of RV dP/dt (0.5-2) and RV dP/dt (1-2) in healthy population; 2) the correlation between dP/dt (0.5-2) and RV function parameters was better than between dP/dt (1-2) and RV function parameters.

  18. Neutron Spectroscopy on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    The performance of cryogenic fuel implosion experiments in progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is measured by an experimental threshold factorfootnotetextM. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051003 (2011). (ITFX) and a generalized Lawson Criterion.footnotetextC. D. Zhou and R. Betti, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102707 (2008); P. Y. Chang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 135002 (2010); and R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010). The ITFX metric is determined by the fusion yield and the areal density of an assembled deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mass. Typical neutron yields from NIF implosions are greater than 10^14 allowing the neutron energy spectrum to be measured with unprecedented precision. A NIF spectrum is composed of neutrons created by fusion (DT, DD, and TT reactions) and neutrons scattered by the dense, cold fuel layer. Neutron scattering is used to determine the areal density of a NIF implosion and is measured along four lines of sight by two neutron time-of-flight detectors, a neutron imaging system, and the magnetic recoil spectrometer. An accurate measurement of the instrument response function for these detectors allows for the routine production of neutron spectra showing DT fuel areal densities up to 1.3 g/cm^2. Spectra over neutron energies of 10 to 17 MeV show areal-density asymmetries of 20% that are inconsistent with simulations. New calibrations and analyses have expended the spectral coverage down to energies less than the deuterium backscatter edge (1.5 MeV for 14 MeV neutrons). These data and analyses are presented along with a compilation of other nuclear diagnostic data that show a larger-than-expected variation in the areal density over the cold fuel mass. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with NIC.

  19. Transport and performance in DIII-D discharges with weak or negative central magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, C.M.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.

    1996-12-01

    Discharges exhibiting the highest plasma energy and fusion reactivity yet realized in the DIII-D tokamak have been produced by combining the benefits of a hollow or weakly sheared central current profile with a high confinement (H-mode) edge. In these discharges, low power neutral beam injection heats the electrons during the initial current ramp, and {open_quotes}freezes in{close_quotes} a hollow or flat central current profile. When the neutral beam power is increased, formation of a region of reduced transport and highly peaked profiles in the core often results. Shortly before these plasmas would otherwise disrupt, a transition is triggered from the low (L-mode) to high (H-mode) confinement regimes, thereby broadening the pressure profile and avoiding the disruption. These plasmas continue to evolve until the high performance phase is terminated nondisruptively at much higher {beta}{sub T} (ratio of plasma pressure to toroidal magnetic field pressure) than would be attainable with peaked profiles and an L-mode edge. Transport analysis indicates that in this phase, the ion diffusivity is equivalent to that predicted by Chang-Hinton neoclassical theory over the entire plasma volume. This result is consistent with suppression of turbulence by locally enhanced E x B flow shear, and is supported by observations of reduced fluctuations in the plasma. Calculations of performance in these discharges extrapolated to a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture indicates that such plasmas could produce a DT fusion gain Q{sub DT} = 0.32.

  20. The development and advantages of beryllium capsules for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Douglas C.; Bradley, Paul A.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Smitherman, David P.; Chrien, Robert E.; Margevicius, Robert W.; Thoma, D. J.; Foreman, Larry R.; Hoffer, James K.; Goldman, S. Robert; Caldwell, Stephen E.; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Haan, Steven W.; Marinak, Michael M.; Pollaine, Stephen M.; Sanchez, Jorge J.

    1998-05-01

    Capsules with beryllium ablators have long been considered as alternatives to plastic for the National Ignition Facility laser [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]; now the superior performance of beryllium is becoming well substantiated. Beryllium capsules have the advantages of high density, low opacity, high tensile strength, and high thermal conductivity. Three-dimensional (3-D) calculations with the HYDRA code [NTIS Document No. DE-96004569 (M. M. Marinak et al. in UCRL-LR-105821-95-3)] confirm two-dimensional (2-D) LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasmas Phys. Controlled Thermonucl. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] results that particular beryllium capsule designs are several times less sensitive than the CH point design to instability growth from deuterium-tritium (DT) ice roughness. These capsule designs contain more ablator mass and leave some beryllium unablated at ignition. By adjusting the level of copper dopant, the unablated mass can increase or decrease, with a corresponding decrease or increase in sensitivity to perturbations. A plastic capsule with the same ablator mass as the beryllium and leaving the same unablated mass also shows this reduced perturbation sensitivity. Beryllium's low opacity permits the creation of 250 eV capsule designs. Its high tensile strength allows it to contain DT fuel at room temperature. Its high thermal conductivity simplifies cryogenic fielding.

  1. X-ray wavefront characterization with two-dimensional wavefront sensors: shearing interferometers and Hartmann wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin L.

    2013-02-01

    Phase reconstructions from a two-dimensional shearing interferometer, based on two orthogonal phase gratings in a single plane, and a Hartmann sensor are compared. Design alternatives for both wavefront sensors are given, and simulated performance of both the two-dimensional x-ray shearing interferometer and Hartmann wavefront sensor are presented for two different phase profiles. The first comparison is an evaluation of metrology on deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers in an inertial confinement fusion capsule, and the second comparison is a high frequency "asterisk" phase profile, which tests the ability of these wavefront sensors to detect spikes of ablator material seen in DT fuel capsule implosions. Both of these sensors can measure the two-dimensional wavefront gradient of an x-ray beam, as well as the x-ray absorption. These instruments measure the two-dimensional wavefront gradient in a single measurement, and the wavefront sensor is located in a single plane, making them much less sensitive to vibrations than most other wavefront sensing techniques.

  2. Propulsion of space ships by nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, J. G.; Kravárik, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in the research on deuterium-tritium (D-T) inertially confined microexplosions encourages one to reconsider the nuclear propulsion of spaceships based on the concept originally proposed in the Orion project. We discuss first the acceleration of medium-sized spaceships by D-T explosions whose output is in the range of 0.1 10 t of TNT. The launching of such a ship into an Earth orbit or beyond by a large nuclear explosion in an underground cavity is sketched out in the second section of the paper, and finally we consider a hypothetical Mars mission based on these concepts. In the conclusion it is argued that propulsion based on the Orion concept only is not the best method for interplanetary travel owing to the very large number of nuclear explosion required. A combination of a super gun and subsequent rocket propulsion using advanced chemical fuels appears to be the best solution for space flights of the near future.

  3. Argon frost continuous cryopump for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. A.; McCurdy, H. C.

    A cryopumping system based on the snail continuous cryopump concept is being developed for fusion applications under a DOE SBIR grant. The primary pump is a liquid helium cooled compound pump designed to continuously pump and fractionate deuterium/tritium and helium. The D/T pumping stage is a 500 mm bore cryocondensation pump with a nominal pumping speed of 45,000 L/s. It will be continuously regenerated by a snail regeneration head every 12 minutes. Continuous regeneration will dramatically reduce the vulnerable tritium inventory in a fusion reactor. Operating at an inlet pressure of 1 millitorr, eight of these pumps could pump the projected D/T flow in the ITER CDA design while reducing the inventory of tritium in the pumping system from 630 to 43 grams. The helium fraction will be pumped in a compound argon frost stage. This stage will also operate continuously with a snail regeneration head. In addition, the argon spray head will be enclosed inside the snail, thereby removing gaseous argon from the process chamber. Since the cryocondensation stage will intercept over 90% of the D/T/H stream, a purified stream from this stage could be directly reinjected into the plasma as gas or pellets, thereby bypassing the isotope separation system and further simplifying the fuel cycle. Experiments were undertaken in phase 1 which demonstrated continuous cryosorption pumping of hydrogen on CO2 and argon frosts. The pumping system and its relevance to fusion reactor pumping will be discussed.

  4. The Ignition Target for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Carlisle, K; Kilkenny, J

    2007-03-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>10{sup 8} K), pressures (10-GBar) and matter densities (> 100 g/cm{sup 3}). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. An overview of the campaign for ignition will be presented, along with technologies for target fabrication, assembly and metrology and advances in growth and x-ray imaging of DT ice layers. The sum of these efforts represents a quantum leap in target precision, characterization, manufacturing rate and flexibility over current state-of-the-art.

  5. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  6. Argon frost continuous cryopump for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; McCurdy, H.C.

    1993-12-01

    A cryopumping system based on the snail continuous cryopump concept is being developed for fusion applications under a DOE SBIR grant. The primary pump is a liquid helium cooled compound pump designed to continuously pump and fractionate deuterium/tritium and helium. The D/T pumping stage is a 500 mm bore cryocondensation pump with a nominal pumping speed of 45,000 L/s. It will be continuously regenerated by a snail regeneration by head every 12 minutes. Continuous regeneration will dramatically reduce the vulnerable tritium inventory in a fusion reactor. Operating at an inlet pressure of 1 millitorr, eight of these pumps could pump the projected D/T flow in the ITER CDA design while reducing the inventory of tritium in the pumping system from 630 to 43 grams. The helium fraction will be pumped in a compound argon frost stage. This stage will also operate continuously with a snail regeneration head. In addition the argon spray head will be enclosed inside the snail, thereby removing gaseous argon from the process chamber. Since the cryocondensation stage will intercept over 90% of the D/T/H steam, a purified stream from this stage could be directly reinjected into the plasma as gas or pellets, thereby bypassing the isotope separation system and further simplifying the fuel cycle. Experiments were undertaken in Phase I which demonstrated continuous cryosorption pumping of hydrogen on CO{sub 2} and argon frosts. The pumping system and its relevance to fusion reactor pumping will be discussed.

  7. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N.; Wilson, D. C.; Stoeffl, W.; Dauffy, L.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.

    2010-10-01

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded γ-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion γ-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10-5γ/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional γ-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available γ-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV γ-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on C12 nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  8. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited).

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H W; Hoffman, N; Wilson, D C; Stoeffl, W; Dauffy, L; Kim, Y H; McEvoy, A; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M; Miller, E K; Ali, Z A

    2010-10-01

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded γ-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion γ-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10(-5)γ/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional γ-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available γ-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV γ-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on (12)C nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  9. Strategy for D/He-3 fusion development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santarius, John F.

    1988-01-01

    It is concluded that Deuterium/Helium-3 fusion faces a more difficult physics development path but an easier technology development path than does Deuterium/Tritium. Early D/He-3 tests in next generation D/T fusion experiments might provide a valuable D/He-3 proof-of-principle at modest cost. At least one high leverage alternate concept should be vigorously pursued. Space applications of D/He-3 fusion are critically important to large scale development.

  10. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  11. The End of Hegemony: Technologies of a New Tripolar World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-15

    in Computer Engineering and from the University of Tennessee in 2009 with a Master of Science degree in Aviation Systems, concentration in Flight...wing aircraft, with primary qualifications in the HH-60G, MI-17, UH-60A, OH-6, C-12, and UH-1N. He has commanded a geographically separated flight...increased prompt radiation effects with reduced collateral damage and minimal secondary radioactivity.75 Through the use of a deuterium- tritium (DT

  12. Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Laser-Induced Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Thermal neutrons are of considerable interest to the Department of Defense and for commercial applications. Unlike high- energy photons, neutrons easily...develop a compact generator for thermal neutrons with large enough flux. The limited availability of radio-isotopes, combined with the relatively...Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion, which generates Alpha particles and fast neutrons . In these sources, Deuterium ions are accelerated to about 130 keV and hit

  14. Anti-thrombotic activity of DT-13, a saponin isolated from the root tuber of Liriope muscari.

    PubMed

    Tian, Youqing; Ma, Shengtang; Lin, Biqi; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the anti-thrombotic activity of DT-13 in experimental animal models. The anti-thrombotic activity of DT-13 was evaluated by measuring the thrombus induced by inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation in mice and rats. The anti-thrombotic mechanism of DT-13 was investigated by assessing the mRNA expression levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tissue factor (TF) in rat IVC tissue around thrombus. DT-13 markedly inhibited thrombosis induced by IVC ligation for 6 h in mice (2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, p.o.) and for 18 h in rats (1.4 mg/kg, p.o.). Furthermore, DT-13 down-regulated the increased mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TF in rats. DT-13 has an anti-thrombotic activity due to down-regulation of the increased mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TF.

  15. Two novel dermonecrotic toxins LiRecDT4 and LiRecDT5 from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom: from cloning to functional characterization.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni; Pigozzo, Romine Bachmann; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Appel, Marcia Helena; Silva, Dilza Trevisan; Dreyfuss, Juliana Luporini; Toma, Leny; Dietrich, Carl Peter; Nader, Helena B; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Gremski, Waldemiro

    2007-03-01

    Loxoscelism (the condition produced by the bite of brown spiders) has been reported worldwide, but especially in warmer regions. Clinical manifestations include skin necrosis with gravitational spreading while systemic loxoscelism may include renal failure, hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. The venom contains several toxins, of which the best biochemically and biologically studied is the dermonecrotic toxin, a phospholipase-D. Purified toxin induces cutaneous and systemic loxoscelism, especially necrotic lesions, hematological disturbances and renal failure. Herein, we describe cloning, heterologous expression and purification of two novel dermonecrotic toxins: LiRecDT4 and LiRecDT5. The recombinant proteins stably expressed in Escherichia coli cells were purified from culture supernatants in a single step using Ni(2+)-chelating chromatography producing soluble proteins of 34 kDa (LiRecDT4) and 37 kDa (LiRecDT5). Circular dichroism analysis evidenced correctly folding for toxins but differences in secondary structures. Both proteins were recognized by whole venom serum antibodies and by a specific antibody to dermonecrotic toxin. Also, recombinant toxins with phospholipase activity induced experimental skin lesions and caused a massive inflammatory response in rabbit skin dermis. Nevertheless, toxins displayed different effects upon platelet aggregation, increase in vascular permeability and not caused death in mice. These characteristics in combination with functional studies illustrates that a family of dermonecrotic toxins exists, and includes two novel members that are useful for future structural and functional studies. They will also be useful in biotechnological ends, for example, as inflammatory and platelet aggregating studies, as antigens for serum therapy source and for lipids biochemical research.

  16. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe.

  17. Thyratron characteristics under high di/dt and high-repetition-rate operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.; Hill, J.; Kan, T.

    1981-05-11

    Power conditioning systems for high peak and average power, high repetition rate discharge excited lasers involve operation of modulator components in unconventional regimes. Reliable operation of switches and energy storage elements under high voltage and high di/dt conditions is a pacing item for laser development at the present time. To test and evaluate these components a Modulator Component Test Facility (MCTF) was constructed. The MCTF consists of a command charge system, energy storage capacitors, thyratron switch with inverse thyratron protection, and a resistive load. The modulator has initially been operated at voltages up to 60 kV at 600 Hz. Voltage, current, and calorimetric diagnostics are provided for major modulator components. Measurements of thyratron characteristics under high di/dt operation are presented. Commutation energy loss and di/dt have been measured as functions of the tube hydrogen pressure.

  18. Design of a Neutron Temporal Diagnostic for measuring DD or DT burn histories at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bradley, D. K.; Le Pape, S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Isumi, N.; Macphee, A.; Zayas, C.; Spears, B. K.; Hermann, H.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The DD or DT burn history in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions provides essential information about implosion performance and helps to constrain numerical modeling. The capability of measuring this burn history is thus important for the NIF in its pursuit of ignition. Currently, the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic is the only system capable of measuring the burn history for DT implosions with yields greater than ~ 1e14. To complement GRH, a new NIF Neutron Temporal Diagnostic (NTD) is being designed for measuring the DD or DT burn history with yields greater than ~ 1e10. A traditional scintillator-based design and a pulse-dilation-based design are being considered. Using MCNPX simulations, both designs have been optimized, validated and contrasted for various types of implosions at the NIF. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  19. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  20. Coarsening Kinetics of gamma-prime Precipitates in the Commercial Nickel Base Superalloy Rene88DT (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2009-4211 COARSENING KINETICS OF γ’ PRECIPITATES IN THE COMMERCIAL NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOY RENE88DT (PREPRINT) J. Tiley, G.B...IN THE COMMERCIAL NICKEL BASE SUPERALLOY RENE88DT (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F...between the analytically derived and experimentally observed values, of these rate constants. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Rene88DT, nickel base superalloy

  1. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Bacteriocin DT24 Produced by Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacillus brevis DT24 and Determination of its Anti-Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Potential.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Disha; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Patel, Jignesh Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has increased the interest for finding new antimicrobials in the past decade. Probiotic Lactic acid bacteria producing antimicrobial proteins like bacteriocin can be excellent agents for development as novel therapeutic agents and complement to conventional antibiotic therapy. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, most causative agent of Urinary tract infection, has developed resistance to various antibiotics. In the present investigation, antibacterial substance like bacteriocin (Bacteriocin DT24) produced by probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24 from vaginal sample of healthy Indian woman was partially purified and characterized. It was efficiently working against various pathogens, that is, Uropathogenic E. coli, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial peptide was relatively heat resistant and also active over a broad range of pH 2-10. It has been partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography and checked on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bacteriocin DT24 was approximately 7-kDa protein. The peptide is inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, trypsin and lipase but not when treated with catalase, α-amylase and pepsin. It showed bacteriostatic mode of action against uropathogenic E. coli. Such characteristics indicate that this bacteriocin-producing probiotic may be a potential candidate for alternative agents to control urinary tract infections and other pathogens.

  2. D-3He proton yield as a diagnostic for D-T and D2 filled inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, T. E.; Blue, J. W.; Durham, J. S.; Harris, D. B.; Hnesh, A. S.; Reyes, J. J.

    1983-02-01

    The ratio of D-3He to D-D reactions (RD3He/RDD) is proportional to fuel ρR for D2 and D-T filled targets. For D2 filled targets, the ratio varies as (RD3He/RDD)=0.14ρR, for ρR≲0.02 g/cm2. For present day D2 filled target experiments, it is necessary to detect 104 D-3He reactions against a background source of 108 D-D reactions. For D2 filled targets, detection of the 14.7-MeV proton of the D-3He reaction can be accomplished with sheets of the solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 and metal foils. Spatial coincidence can be used as a means of eliminating background due to imperfections in the track detector and background due to protons in the CR-39 which are elastically scattered by D-D neutrons.

  3. Enhancement of hypermutation frequency in the chicken B cell line DT40 for efficient diversification of the antibody repertoire

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Masaki; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Todo, Kagefumi; Ikeda, Mika; Kanayama, Naoki Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2010-05-28

    Chicken B cell line DT40 continuously accumulates mutations in the immunoglobulin variable region (IgV) gene by gene conversion and point mutation, both of which are mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), thereby producing an antibody (Ab) library that is useful for screening monoclonal Abs (mAbs) in vitro. We previously generated an engineered DT40 line named DT40-SW, whose AID expression can be reversibly switched on or off, and developed an in vitro Ab generation system using DT40-SW cells. To efficiently create an Ab library with sufficient diversity, higher hypermutation frequency is advantageous. To this end, we generated a novel cell line DT40-SW{Delta}C, which conditionally expresses a C-terminus-truncated AID mutant lacking the nuclear export signal. The transcription level of the mutant AID gene in DT40-SW{Delta}C cells was similar to that of the wild-type gene in DT40-SW cells. However, the protein level of the truncated AID mutant was less than that of the wild type. The mutant protein was enriched in the nuclei of DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, although the protein might be highly susceptible to degradation. In DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, both gene conversion and point mutation occurred in the IgV gene with over threefold higher frequency than in DT40-SW cells, suggesting that a lower level of the mutant AID protein was sufficient to increase mutation frequency. Thus, DT40-SW{Delta}C cells may be useful for constructing Ab libraries for efficient screening of mAbs in vitro.

  4. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  5. DT fusion power production in ELM free H modes in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimini, F. G.; JET Team

    1999-11-01

    Experiments in the ELM free hot ion H mode regime have been carried out in DT plasmas in JET. Initial experiments undertaken at constant neutral beam (NB) power (~11 MW) demonstrated that core fuelling was dominated by wall/target recycling rather than NB fuelling and made it possible to arrange an optimum core DT mix by adjusting the DT mix in wall/target, gas and NB. High power experiments at 4.2 MA/3.6 T have successfully and reliably delivered fusion power (Pfus) up to 16.1 MW and plasma stored energy (Wdia) up to 17 MJ. The results are in good agreement with extrapolations, carried out with the TRANSP and JETTO codes, from similar deuterium discharges. Transiently, values of Qtot up to 0.95 +/-0.17 were achieved, consistent with values of nDT(0)τE, diaTi (0) approx 8.7 × 1020 m-3·s·keV+/-20%. The ratio of fusion power to input power, Qin, is in excess of 0.6. There are indications of an isotope effect on the edge pressure pedestal, but no net dependence of global confinement on isotopic plasma composition has been found.

  6. The interplanetary and magnetospheric causes of extreme dB/dt at equatorial locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebesin, Babatunde O.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2016-11-01

    The 1 min resolution solar wind and geomagnetic data obtained from seven equatorial/low-latitude stations during four extreme geomagnetic activities are used to investigate the extreme dB/dt perturbations. Simulations of the magnetospheric-ionospheric environment were also performed for varying amplitudes of the solar proton density. Simulations were carried out using the Space Weather Modeling Framework/BATS-R-US + RCM model. Both the observations and simulations demonstrated that the appearance time of the extreme dB/dt perturbations at equatorial stations during disturbed conditions is instantaneous and equitable to those experienced at auroral regions yielding time lags of the order of a few seconds. We find that the rapid dB/dt enhancements are caused by the electric field of magnetospheric current origin, which is being enhanced by solar wind density and ram pressure variations and boosted by the equatorial electrojet. Our results indicate that the solar wind proton density variations could be used as a predictor of extreme dB/dt enhancement at equatorial latitudes.

  7. DT-diaphorase Protects Against Autophagy Induced by Aminochrome-Dependent Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia S; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2017-05-06

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) oligomers have been reported to inhibit autophagy. Aminochrome-induced SNCA oligomers are neurotoxic, but the flavoenzyme DT-diaphorase prevents both their formation and their neurotoxicity. However, the possible protective role of DT-diaphorase against autophagy impairment by aminochrome-induced SNCA oligomers remains unclear. To test this idea, we used the cell line RCSN-3NQ7SNCA, with constitutive expression of a siRNA against DT-diaphorase and overexpression SNCA, and RCSN-3 as control cells. A significant increase in LC3-II expression was observed in RCSN-3 cells treated with 20 μM aminochrome and 10 μM rapamycin followed by a decrease in cell death compared to RCSN-3 cells incubated with 20 μM aminochrome alone. The incubation of RCSN-3NQ7SNCA cells with 20 μM aminochrome and 10 μM rapamycin does not change the expression of LC3-II in comparison with RCSN-3NQ7SNCA cells incubated with 20 μM aminochrome alone. The incubation of both cell lines preincubated with 100 nM bafilomycin and 20 μM aminochrome increases the level of LC3-II. Under the same conditions, cell death increases in both cell lines in comparison with cells incubated with 20 μM aminochrome. These results support the protective role of DT-diaphorase against SNCA oligomers-induced autophagy inhibition.

  8. Kinetics of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104 growth and inactivation in pasteurised liquid egg products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential impact of intentional post-pasteurisation contamination of liquid egg products with the multi-antibiotic resistant pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) was assessed by determining the viability of this bacterium in whole egg, albumen and 10% sug...

  9. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  10. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, N.; Heinikainen, S.; Siitonen, A.; Pelkonen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium DT1 is endemic to Finland and has caused human outbreaks since the 1960s. Domestic DT1 isolates (n=235) from 1972 to 1999 from human cases, animals and other sources, as well as foreign DT1 isolates from human cases (n=20) were analysed by molecular methods. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) yielded 38 XbaI profiles. Of these, XbaI profile 10 was seen in 49% (125/255) of the isolates. Twelve IS200 profiles were obtained; the most common IS200 profile D was seen in 64% (33/52) of the isolates. Two clusters were formed by compilation of the XhaI-, BlnI- and SpeI-PFGE and IS200 profiles and possession of the serovar-specific virulence plasmid. The major cluster contained eight IS200 profiles, including IS200 profile D and XhaI profile 10, and had no virulence plasmid, and can be regarded as typical of the endemic Typhimurium DT1 infection. PMID:15061501

  11. Preliminary results from the observation of DT Lupus, a newly discovered oscillating Algol binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, C. T.

    2011-10-01

    Observations using personal telescopes in light-polluted skies in Kyalami, Johannesburg, suggest that the Algol system DT Lup be re-classified as an oscillating eclipsing Algol system. Preliminary frequency calculations produce an oscillation frequency of ~8.73 cycles per day.

  12. Improved streamflow recession parameter estimation with attention to calculation of - dQ/dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Clément; Rupp, David E.; Selker, John S.

    2017-10-01

    The rate of streamflow recession can be used to assess storage-outflow properties of source aquifers. A common method of analyzing streamflow recession is to plot the time rate of change in streamflow Q as a function of Q in a log-log space. Theory predicts, for diagnostic recession regimes, a power law relationship - dQ/dt = aQb, where recession coefficients a and b are functions of the hydraulic and geometric properties of the aquifer and of boundary and initial conditions. Observational error reduces the accuracy of estimates of a and b with errors in estimating the time derivative of the late-time recession (-dQ/dt) being particularly sensitive to observational error. Here we propose a method to improve estimation of a and b with particular focus on the estimation of -dQ/dt. Compared to previously published methods we find greater robustness in estimates of -dQ/dt and recession parameters and less sensitivity to the methodological parameters employed. Previous methods result in up to 50 to 100% error when estimating the recession parameter b, while the proposed methodology produces errors below 5% in the cases analyzed.

  13. The Interplanetary and Magnetospheric Causes of Extreme DB/dt at Equatorial Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adebesin, Babatunde O.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2016-01-01

    The 1 min resolution solar wind and geomagnetic data obtained from seven equatorial low-latitude stations during four extreme geomagnetic activities are used to investigate the extreme dB/dt perturbations. Simulations of the magnetospheric-ionospheric environment were also performed for varying amplitudes of the solar proton density. Simulations were carried out using the Space Weather Modeling Framework BATS-R-US + RCM model. Both the observations and simulations demonstrated that the appearance time of the extreme dB/dt perturbations at equatorial stations during disturbed conditions is instantaneous and equitable to those experienced at auroral regions yielding time lags of the order of a few seconds. We find that the rapid dB/dt enhancements are caused by the electric field of magnetospheric current origin, which is being enhanced by solar wind density and ram pressure variations and boosted by the equatorial electro jet. Our results indicate that the solar wind proton density variations could be used as a predictor of extreme dB/dt enhancement at equatorial latitudes.

  14. A scintillating-fiber 14-MeV neutron detector on TFTR during DT operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Chrien, R.E.; Barnes, C.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Lavelle, M.J.; O`Gara, P.M.; Jordan, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    A compact 14-MeV neutron detector using an array of scintillating fibers has been tested on the TFTR tokamak under conditions of a high gamma background. This detector uses a fiber-matrix geometry, a magnetic field-insensitive phototube with an active HV base and pulse-height discrimination to reject low-level pulses from 2.5 MeV neutron and intense gammas. Laboratory calibrations have been performed at EG&G Las Vegas using a pulsed DT neutron generator and a 30 kCi {sup 60}Co source as background, at PPPL using DT neutron sources, and at LANL using an energetic deuterium beam and target at a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. During the first high power DT shots on TFTR in December 1993, the detector was 15.5 meters from the torus in a large collimator. For a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 18} n/sec from the tokamak, it operated in an equivalent background of 1 {times} 10{sup 10} gammas/cm{sup 2}/sec ({approximately}4 mA current drain) at a DT count rate of 200 kHz.

  15. DUACS DT2014: the new multi-mission altimeter data set reprocessed over 20 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Marie-Isabelle; Faugère, Yannice; Taburet, Guillaume; Dupuy, Stéphanie; Pelloquin, Camille; Ablain, Michael; Picot, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    The new DUACS DT2014 reprocessed products have been available since April 2014. Numerous innovative changes have been introduced at each step of an extensively revised data processing protocol. The use of a new 20-year altimeter reference period in place of the previous 7-year reference significantly changes the sea level anomaly (SLA) patterns and thus has a strong user impact. The use of up-to-date altimeter standards and geophysical corrections, reduced smoothing of the along-track data, and refined mapping parameters, including spatial and temporal correlation-scale refinement and measurement errors, all contribute to an improved high-quality DT2014 SLA data set. Although all of the DUACS products have been upgraded, this paper focuses on the enhancements to the gridded SLA products over the global ocean. As part of this exercise, 21 years of data have been homogenized, allowing us to retrieve accurate large-scale climate signals such as global and regional MSL trends, interannual signals, and better refined mesoscale features.An extensive assessment exercise has been carried out on this data set, which allows us to establish a consolidated error budget. The errors at mesoscale are about 1.4 cm2 in low-variability areas, increase to an average of 8.9 cm2 in coastal regions, and reach nearly 32.5 cm2 in high mesoscale activity areas. The DT2014 products, compared to the previous DT2010 version, retain signals for wavelengths lower than ˜ 250 km, inducing SLA variance and mean EKE increases of, respectively, +5.1 and +15 %. Comparisons with independent measurements highlight the improved mesoscale representation within this new data set. The error reduction at the mesoscale reaches nearly 10 % of the error observed with DT2010. DT2014 also presents an improved coastal signal with a nearly 2 to 4 % mean error reduction. High-latitude areas are also more accurately represented in DT2014, with an improved consistency between spatial coverage and sea ice edge

  16. DT-13, a saponin monomer of dwarf lilyturf tuber, induces autophagy and potentiates anti-cancer effect of nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyang; Sun, Li; de Carvalho, Evandro Lopes; Li, Xinxin; Lv, Xiaodan; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Semukunzi, Herve; Yuan, Shengtao; Lin, Sensen

    2016-06-15

    Metabolic stress induces autophagy as a protective mechanism in tumorigenesis and development. Conversely, excessive autophagy in nutrient-deprived cancer cells would be beneficial for cancer therapy. DT-13, the saponin monomer 13 of the Dwarf lilyturf tuber, inhibited tumor metastasis and angiogenesis in previous studies. However, there is scarcity of data regarding the effect of DT-13 on autophagy process. Here, we demonstrated that DT-13 induced autophagy in human cancer cell lines and caused significant cell apoptosis under nutrient starvation. We firstly showed that DT-13 increased the accumulation of GFP-LC3 puncta and induced the expression of LC3-II in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DT-13 also upregulated the expression of Beclin-1, Atg-3 and Atg-7, and induced autophagic flux in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. We next found that low-toxic concentrations of DT-13 significantly induced apoptosis under nutrient deprivation. We finally demonstrated that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway was involved in the cytotoxic effect of DT-13. Our data indicated that DT-13 was a novel autophagy inducer and might be considered in future treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Screening Young Adult Cancer Survivors for Distress with the Distress Thermometer (DT): Comparisons with a Structured Clinical Diagnostic Interview

    PubMed Central

    Recklitis, Christopher J.; Blackmon, Jaime E.; Chang, Grace

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The validity of the Distress Thermometer (DT) as a screen for psychological distress in young adult (YA) cancer survivors was assessed by comparing it with results of a psychiatric diagnostic interview, the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID), in order to evaluate accuracy of the DT and identify optimal cut-off scores for this population. METHODS 247 survivors (age 18–40 years) completed the DT and SCID. Based on the SCID, participants were classified as having: 1) One or more SCID diagnoses; 2) Significant symptoms, but no SCID diagnosis; or 3) No significant SCID symptoms. ROC analyses determined sensitivity and specificity of all possible DT cut-off scores for detecting survivors with a SCID diagnosis, and subsequently for survivors with significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis. RESULTS The recommended DT cut-off score of ≥ 5 failed to identify 31.81% of survivors with a SCID diagnosis (sensitivity 68.18%, specificity 78.33%), and 32.81% of survivors with either Significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis. No alternative DT cut-off score met criteria for acceptable sensitivity (≥.85) and specificity (≥.75). CONCLUSIONS The DT does not reliably identify YA cancer survivors with psychiatric problems identified by a “gold standard” structured psychiatric interview; the DT should not be used as a stand-alone psychological screen in this population. PMID:26457669

  18. Dt2 is a gain-of-function MADS-Domain factor gene that controls semi-determinacy in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Similar to Arabidopsis, the wild soybean (Glycine soja) and many soybean (Glycine max) cultivars exhibit indeterminate stem growth controlled by a gene Dt1 – the functional counterpart of the Arabidopsis TFL1. Mutations in TFL1 and Dt1 both result in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) switching from ve...

  19. Evaluation of cardiac function in unrestrained dogs and monkeys using left ventricular dP/dt.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Lewis V; Warner, William A; Arthur, Susan R; Gleason, Carol R; Lewen, Geoff; Levesque, Paul C; Gill, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical assessment for alterations in cardiac ventricular function for drug candidates has not been a focus of ICH S7b guidelines for cardiovascular safety studies, but there is growing interest given that the cardiovascular risk is associated with positive and negative inotropes. From 2003 through 2013, 163 telemetry studies with left-ventricular function analyses were conducted in dogs and monkeys at Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) in support for drug development programs. The ability of the telemetry system to detect changes in cardiac contractility was verified with positive control agents pimobendan and atenolol. Control data from a subset of studies were analyzed to determine dP/dt reference range values, and minimum detectable mean differences (control vs. treated) for statistical significance. Median minimum detectable differences for dogs ranged from 14 to 21% for positive dP/dt and 11 to 21% for negative dP/dt. For monkeys, median minimum detectable differences were 25 and 14% for positive and negative dP/dt, respectively. For BMS programs, 15 drug candidates were identified that produced primary effects on contractility. Changes in contractility that were associated with, and potentially secondary to, drug-related effects on heart rate or systemic blood pressure were observed with an additional 29 drug candidates. Changes in contractility have been observed in large animals during drug development studies at BMS over the past 10years. Model sensitivity has been demonstrated and a dP/dt beat-to-beat cloud analysis tool has been developed to help distinguish primary effects from those potentially secondary to systemic hemodynamic changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ON THE PROGENITOR SYSTEM OF THE TYPE Iax SUPERNOVA 2014dt IN M61

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Miller, Adam A.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-01-10

    We present pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images of the Type Iax supernova (SN Iax) 2014dt in M61. After astrometrically aligning these images, we do not detect any stellar sources at the position of the SN in the pre-explosion images to relatively deep limits (3σ limits of M {sub F438W} > –5.0 mag and M {sub F814W} > –5.9 mag). These limits are similar to the luminosity of SN 2012Z's progenitor system (M {sub F435W} = –5.43 ± 0.15 and M {sub F814W} = –5.24 ± 0.16 mag), the only probable detected progenitor system in pre-explosion images of a SN Iax, and indeed, of any white-dwarf supernova. SN 2014dt is consistent with having a C/O white-dwarf primary/helium-star companion progenitor system, as was suggested for SN 2012Z, although perhaps with a slightly smaller or hotter donor. The data are also consistent with SN 2014dt having a low-mass red giant or main-sequence star companion. The data rule out main-sequence stars with M {sub init} ≳ 16 M {sub ☉} and most evolved stars with M {sub init} ≳ 8 M {sub ☉} as being the progenitor of SN 2014dt. Hot Wolf-Rayet stars are also allowed, but the lack of nearby bright sources makes this scenario unlikely. Because of its proximity (D = 12 Mpc), SN 2014dt is ideal for long-term monitoring, where images in ∼2 yr may detect the companion star or the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf.

  1. On the Progenitor System of the Type Iax Supernova 2014dt in M61

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Miller, Adam A.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    We present pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images of the Type Iax supernova (SN Iax) 2014dt in M61. After astrometrically aligning these images, we do not detect any stellar sources at the position of the SN in the pre-explosion images to relatively deep limits (3σ limits of M F438W > -5.0 mag and M F814W > -5.9 mag). These limits are similar to the luminosity of SN 2012Z's progenitor system (M F435W = -5.43 ± 0.15 and M F814W = -5.24 ± 0.16 mag), the only probable detected progenitor system in pre-explosion images of a SN Iax, and indeed, of any white-dwarf supernova. SN 2014dt is consistent with having a C/O white-dwarf primary/helium-star companion progenitor system, as was suggested for SN 2012Z, although perhaps with a slightly smaller or hotter donor. The data are also consistent with SN 2014dt having a low-mass red giant or main-sequence star companion. The data rule out main-sequence stars with M init >~ 16 M ⊙ and most evolved stars with M init >~ 8 M ⊙ as being the progenitor of SN 2014dt. Hot Wolf-Rayet stars are also allowed, but the lack of nearby bright sources makes this scenario unlikely. Because of its proximity (D = 12 Mpc), SN 2014dt is ideal for long-term monitoring, where images in ~2 yr may detect the companion star or the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf.

  2. Screening cancer patients' families with the distress thermometer (DT): a validation study.

    PubMed

    Zwahlen, Diana; Hagenbuch, Niels; Carley, Margaret I; Recklitis, Christopher J; Buchi, Stefan

    2008-10-01

    Although family members of cancer patients are at great risk of experiencing psychological distress, clinical tools to assist with recognizing and intervening with appropriate psychosocial care are sparse. This study reports on the first validation of the distress thermometer (DT) as a screening instrument for symptoms of depression and anxiety in family members of cancer patients. The DT was administered with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in a sample of 321 family members. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) demonstrated that the DT has good diagnostic utility relative to the HADS (area under the curve= 0.88 relative to the HADS anxiety scale; 0.84 relative to the HADS depression scale, respectively). The ROC curves indicate that using a cut-off of 4/5 maximizes sensitivity (86.2% HADS anxiety scale; 88.2% HADS depression scale) and specificity (71.2% HADS anxiety scale; 67.6% HADS depression scale); however, the alternative lower cut-off of 3/4 increases sensitivity (94.1% for both scales) and hence reduces the risk of missing distressed family members (specificity is 62.9% for HADS anxiety scale; 59.1% for HADS depression scale). The results offer validation of the DT for screening family members of cancer patients and support its use for clinical assessment. Distress screening with DT for family members of cancer patients is a promising and efficient approach to integrating family members in the program of care and provides the first step toward meeting their unmet needs with referral for supportive services.

  3. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  4. Demonstration of 55 +/- 7-Gbar Hot-Spot Pressure in Direct-Drive Layered DT Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Direct-drive ignition target designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require hot-spot pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. Only one-third of the required pressure was inferred in earlier experimental campaigns conducted on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA laser with direct-drive implosions of layered DT cryogenic targets. Laser and target improvements were implemented on OMEGA to increase the stagnation pressure, including a set of phase plates to increase the laser irradiation uniformity on target and a purified fuel with isotope composition reaching a 50:50 DT ratio. Diagnostic improvements were made for a neutron burnwidth measurement with a 40-ps impulse response and a 16-channel Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope to measure gated (30-ps) x-ray images of the core near peak compression with 6- μm resolution. The inferred volume-averaged, peak pressure in the current campaign almost doubled to 55 +/- 7 Gbar with a neutron yield approaching 5 ×1013 . Further target performance improvements to reach hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition on OMEGA require mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), which reduces the laser coupling. A proposed technique to reduce CBET by driving the spherical target with overlapping laser beams having individual focal spots smaller than the outside diameter of the target was investigated. The diameter of the target was discretely varied from 800 to 1000 μm, while the laser focal spot size was kept constant at 820 μm. The larger targets driven with up to 30 kJ of laser energy used dynamic bandwidth reduction, where the smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is only applied to the pickets. The smaller targets driven with 26 kJ of laser energy had SSD on the entire pulse. This talk will summarize the results of this CBET mitigation campaign and describe a path forward to achieve ignition hydro-equivalence on OMEGA. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under

  5. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  6. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  7. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  8. Fuel pin

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  9. Effect of varying differentiator frequency response on recorded peak dP/dt. [for left ventricular contractile state index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, W. H.; Marlon, A. M.; Adams, M.; Harrison, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Dogs were used to study the effects of varying the differentiator cutoff frequency on the recorded peak first derivative of left ventricular pressure with respect to time (dP/dt), using high-precision solid-state pressure transducers and recording equipment. In canine hearts with a basic periodicity of 1 to 3 Hz, the differentiator frequency response required to record an accurate peak dP/dt is found to be influenced by the value of peak dP/dt. At peak dP/dt ranging from 1500 to 9000 mm Hg/sec (200 and 1200 kPa/sec), a differentiator cutoff frequency of at least 90 Hz was required to record accurately peak dP/dt.

  10. The Feasibility Of Fusion Reactors Fueled With D-{sup 3}He And D-D

    SciTech Connect

    Stott, Peter

    2009-10-08

    In this paper we discuss the feasibility of fusion reactors based on D-{sup 3}He and D-D fuel mixtures. The low reactivity of the D-{sup 3}He and D-D fusion reactions and the large energy losses due to bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation at high plasma temperatures severely restricts the choice of fuel mixtures that can be brought to ignition. These fuel mixtures are extremely sensitive to impurities and to helium ash retention and they would require reactor conditions (plasma density, temperature, beta and energy confinement time) that are much more demanding than the requirements for D-T. A reactor burning D-{sup 3}He or D-D would be far beyond the most optimistic extrapolations of known magnetic confinement schemes, it would have problems with sustainable fuel supplies and it would produce substantial numbers of neutrons. Our conclusion is that these fuels cannot be considered as realistic alternatives to D-T.

  11. The Feasibility Of Fusion Reactors Fueled With D-3He And D-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Peter

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we discuss the feasibility of fusion reactors based on D-3He and D-D fuel mixtures. The low reactivity of the D-3He and D-D fusion reactions and the large energy losses due to bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation at high plasma temperatures severely restricts the choice of fuel mixtures that can be brought to ignition. These fuel mixtures are extremely sensitive to impurities and to helium ash retention and they would require reactor conditions (plasma density, temperature, beta and energy confinement time) that are much more demanding than the requirements for D-T. A reactor burning D-3He or D-D would be far beyond the most optimistic extrapolations of known magnetic confinement schemes, it would have problems with sustainable fuel supplies and it would produce substantial numbers of neutrons. Our conclusion is that these fuels cannot be considered as realistic alternatives to D-T.

  12. A novel noninvasive method to assess left ventricular -dP/dt using diastolic blood pressure and isovolumic relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Rupal; Kolias, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    Left ventricular Doppler-derived -dP/dt determined from the continuous-wave Doppler spectrum of the mitral regurgitation (MR) jet has been shown to be a valuable marker of diastolic function, but requires the presence of MR for its assessment. We sought to determine if a novel method of determining -dP/dt using the diastolic blood pressure and isovolumic relaxation time (DBP-IVRT method) correlates with Doppler-derived -dP/dt using the MR method (Doppler-MR method). Thirty-three patients with less than severe MR were enrolled. -dP/dt was determined using the Doppler-MR method from the continuous-wave Doppler spectrum of the MR jet (32 mmHg/time from 3 to 1 m/sec). -dP/dt was also determined using the DBP-IVRT method using the following equation: -dP/dt = (DBP - LVEDP)/IVRT, where left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was estimated based on tissue Doppler and mitral inflow patterns. Twenty-five patients had adequate Doppler waveforms for analysis. The average amount of MR was mild-to-moderate severity. The mean -dP/dt was 680 ± 201 mmHg by the Doppler-MR method and 681 ± 237 mmHg by the DBP-IVRT method. There was a significant correlation between the 2 methods of determining -dP/dt (Pearson r = 0.574, P = 0.003). The Bland-Altman plot revealed almost no bias between the 2 methods; the difference in -dP/dt between the 2 techniques was noted to be greater for patients with higher -dP/dt, however. Diastolic blood pressure and isovolumic relaxation time may be used to noninvasively assess diastolic function in patients who do not have MR, especially in those with reduced diastolic function. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The saponin DT-13 inhibits gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen-Sen; Fan, Wei; Sun, Li; Li, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Ren-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yu, Bo-Yang; Yuan, Sheng-Tao

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of DT-13 on gastric cancer cell migration, and to explore the possible mechanisms underlying the anti-metastasis activity of DT-13. Growth inhibition of DT-13 was analyzed by the MTT assay. Cell migration was measured by the scratch-wound assay and transwell double chamber assay. To investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the anti-metastasis activity of DT-13, chemokine receptors that are involved in cancer metastasis (CCR2, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR4, and CXCR6) were detected by conventional PCR. The effect of DT-13 on CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was further evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. The secretion of CCL5 (ligand of CCR5) and SDF-1 (ligand of CXCR4) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DT-13 inhibited BGC-823 and HGC-27 cell growth in a dose dependent manner, and the estimated IC50 value for 24 h treatment was 23.5 ± 5.1 μmol·L(-1) for BGC-823 cells and 35.6 ± 7.6 μmol·L(-1) for HGC-27 cells. DT-13 also significantly decreased gastric cancer cell migration. DT-13 significantly decreased the gene expression of CCR5 in both BGC-823 and HGC-27 gastric cancer cells, and moderately reduced the expression of CXCR4. Similar to the results of gene expression, significant down-regulation of CCR5 protein was observed, but CXCR4 protein levels were much less affected. CCL5 secretion, but not SDF-1 production, was inhibited by DT-13. DT-13 inhibited gastric cancer cell migration by down-regulation of the CCR5-CCL5 axis. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiological analysis of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.S.

    1993-10-26

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be capable of providing a laser output pulse at 0.35 {mu}m wavelength with an energy of 1.8 MJ and a power of 500 TW. The NIF will house a multi-beamline, Nd-doped-glass laser capable of delivering such pulses into a target chamber. In the target chamber, a positioner will center a target containing fusion fuel (a deuterium-tritium mixture) for each ignition shot. Diagnostics in the chamber will provide the test data (e.g., neutron and x-ray yields). The NIF baseline case would result in deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron yields of about 10{sup 16} to 10{sup 19} per fusion shot. The baseline fusion shots would use 2 Ci of tritium per capsule, with an annual input of about 600 Ci (60 mg). The resulting anticipated annual airborne emissions would consist of approximately 10 Ci of tritium and small amounts of activated air species. The NEF shielding configuration would limit the direct and skyshine radiation intensities around the facility to less than 0.1 rem/y on site and to less than 0.001 rem/y off site. This report presents the results of atmospheric transport calculations for tritium and activated air emissions; neutron and secondary gamma-ray shielding calculations; and results of benchmark studies for validating the EPA CAP88-PC code (for the transport of tritium) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory neutron-photon transport code TART. All calculations were normalized to the annual baseline case of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 20} DT-fusion neutrons. Tritium emissions were normalized to 10 Ci/y. Radiological analyses show that normal NIF operations would result in off-site radiation intensities that would represent insignificant increases over the natural background radiation intensity. The NIF is a national facility, and the DOE has not completed the site evaluation process. Although the results presented in this report are for LLNL, the analytical approach is applicable to any site.

  15. Utilization of TRISO Fuel with LWR Spent Fuel in Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem; Altunok, Taner

    2010-10-01

    HTRs use a high performance particulate TRISO fuel with ceramic multi-layer coatings due to the high burn up capability and very neutronic performance. TRISO fuel because of capable of high burn up and very neutronic performance is conducted in a D-T fusion driven hybrid reactor. In this study, TRISO fuels particles are imbedded body-centered cubic (BCC) in a graphite matrix with a volume fraction of 68%. The neutronic effect of TRISO coated LWR spent fuel in the fuel rod used hybrid reactor on the fuel performance has been investigated for Flibe, Flinabe and Li20Sn80 coolants. The reactor operation time with the different first neutron wall loads is 24 months. Neutron transport calculations are evaluated by using XSDRNPM/SCALE 5 codes with 238 group cross section library. The effect of TRISO coated LWR spent fuel in the fuel rod used hybrid reactor on tritium breeding (TBR), energy multiplication (M), fissile fuel breeding, average burn up values are comparatively investigated. It is shown that the high burn up can be achieved with TRISO fuel in the hybrid reactor.

  16. Analysis of Time-Dependent Tritium Breeding Capability of Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaokang; Pu, Yong; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is an important mission for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) operating on a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel cycle. It is necessary to study the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and breeding tritium inventory variation with operation time so as to provide an accurate data for dynamic modeling and analysis of the tritium fuel cycle. A water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket is one candidate of blanket concepts for the CFETR. Based on the detailed 3D neutronics model of CFETR with the WCCB blanket, the time-dependent TBR and tritium surplus were evaluated by a coupling calculation of the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the fusion activation code FISPACT-2007. The results indicated that the TBR and tritium surplus of the WCCB blanket were a function of operation time and fusion power due to the Li consumption in breeder and material activation. In addition, by comparison with the results calculated by using the 3D neutronics model and employing the transfer factor constant from 1D to 3D, it is noted that 1D analysis leads to an over-estimation for the time-dependent tritium breeding capability when fusion power is larger than 1000 MW. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, and 2014GB119000), and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  17. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, M.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``Onsite Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  18. Beryllium and carbon films in JET following D T operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, M.; Coad, J. P.; Bekris, N.; Erents, S. K.; Hole, D.; Matthews, G. F.; Penzhorn, R.-D.; Contributors to EFDA-JET work programme

    2003-03-01

    After the D-T operation (DTE-1 campaign) at JET a large number of limiter and divertor tiles were dismounted from the torus for ex situ examination. The relative distributions of deuterium, tritium, beryllium and carbon are presented and discussed. Significant asymmetry observed in the distribution of erosion and deposition zones indicates preferential flow of the deuterium background plasma and impurities towards the inner divertor leg. The comparison of the beryllium content on the limiter tiles from the main chamber and the content of this element on the inner divertor tiles clearly proves the beryllium erosion from the main chamber wall and its transport to the divertor. However, no beryllium is detected in the shadowed regions of the divertor where the formation of thick and fuel-rich carbon films occurs. This is interpreted in terms of different mechanisms governing the erosion and transport of Be and C. The results allow a conclusion that the operation with a full beryllium wall would lead to a significantly decreased fuel inventory due to removal of the carbon source.

  19. Fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, P.D.; Nesselrode, F.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a fuel pump. It includes: a fuel reservoir member, the fuel reservoir member being formed with fuel chambers, the chambers comprising an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, means to supply fuel to the inlet chamber, means to deliver fuel from the outlet chamber to a point of use, the fuel reservoir member chambers also including a bypass chamber, means interconnecting the bypass chamber with the outlet chamber; the fuel pump also comprising pump means interconnecting the inlet chamber and the outlet chamber and adapted to suck fuel from the fuel supply means into the inlet chamber, through the pump means, out the outlet chamber, and to the fuel delivery means; the bypass chamber and the pump means providing two substantially separate paths of fuel flow in the fuel reservoir member, bypass plunger means normally closing off the flow of fuel through the bypass chamber one of the substantially separate paths including the fuel supply means and the fuel delivery means when the bypass plunger means is closed, the second of the substantially separate paths including the bypass chamber when the bypass plunger means is open, and all of the chambers and the interconnecting means therebetween being configured so as to create turbulence in the flow of any fuel supplied to the outlet chamber by the pump means and bypassed through the bypass chamber and the interconnecting means.

  20. Classical Impossibility of DT Reactor below 120 KeV and Design of DT Micro-Reactor for Land Mine Detection by Fast Neutron Gamma Activation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, B. C.

    1996-11-01

    There is an industrial demand for a multipurpose 20 KeV, 100 cc DT micro reactor but charge exchange renders beam-heated DT reactors unworkable [1-3] or classically impossible [4] below 120 keV. We describe a 150 KeV autocollider in Alternating Gradient Strong Focusing Migma field [5] based on cryo-cooled NiSn, designed for midplane B=5 T [6], stabilized by nonlinear electron oscillations effect [7]. Ion density: 3 × 10^12cm-3/cc. Method to enhance N^14 ``signature'' of explosive in γ-spectrum by a factor of 10 will be presented. 1. B. Maglich et al., presentations to CTR/AEC, 6/18/74 and 11/3/74; 2. J. Treglio, J. Appl. Phys., 46, 4344 (1975); 3. Decision (based on ref. 2) to cancel Tokamak T-30 program in USSR (1/7/76); 4. D.W. Scott and B.C. Maglich, this Meeting, Sess. 5.1.1.1 TFTR; 5. J.P. Blewett, Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990) U.S.Pat. 5,034,183; 6. D.A. Gross, GE Corp. R and D Center; 7. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 299 (1993) U.S.Pat. 4,788,024.

  1. Spatio-temporal interpolation of soil moisture in 3D+T using automated sensor network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, C.; Hengl, T.; Magney, T. S.; Brown, D. J.; Gräler, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil sensor networks provide frequent in situ measurements of dynamic soil properties at fixed locations, producing data in 2- or 3-dimensions and through time (2D+T and 3D+T). Spatio-temporal interpolation of 3D+T point data produces continuous estimates that can then be used for prediction at unsampled times and locations, as input for process models, and can simply aid in visualization of properties through space and time. Regression-kriging with 3D and 2D+T data has successfully been implemented, but currently the field of geostatistics lacks an analytical framework for modeling 3D+T data. Our objective is to develop robust 3D+T models for mapping dynamic soil data that has been collected with high spatial and temporal resolution. For this analysis, we use data collected from a sensor network installed on the R.J. Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF), a 37-ha Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) site in Pullman, WA. For five years, the sensors have collected hourly measurements of soil volumetric water content at 42 locations and five depths. The CAF dataset also includes a digital elevation model and derivatives, a soil unit description map, crop rotations, electromagnetic induction surveys, daily meteorological data, and seasonal satellite imagery. The soil-water sensor data, combined with the spatial and temporal covariates, provide an ideal dataset for developing 3D+T models. The presentation will include preliminary results and address main implementation strategies.

  2. Regularization of DT-MR images using a successive Fermat median filtering method.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kiwoon; Kim, Dongyoun; Kim, Sunghee; Park, Insung; Jeong, Jaewon; Kim, Taehwan; Hong, Cheolpyo; Han, Bongsoo

    2008-05-21

    Tractography using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a method to determine the architecture of axonal fibers in the central nervous system by computing the direction of greatest diffusion in the white matter of the brain. To reduce the noise in DT-MRI measurements, a tensor-valued median filter, which is reported to be denoising and structure preserving in the tractography, is applied. In this paper, we proposed the successive Fermat (SF) method, successively using Fermat point theory for a triangle contained in the two-dimensional plane, as a median filtering method. We discussed the error analysis and numerical study about the SF method for phantom and experimental data. By considering the computing time and the image quality aspects of the numerical study simultaneously, we showed that the SF method is much more efficient than the simple median (SM) and gradient descents (GD) methods.

  3. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B.; Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Soare, S.; Darrow, D.; Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J.; Gorini,; Nocente, M.; and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  4. The AGHS at JET and preparations for a future DT campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.

    2015-03-15

    The Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) at JET is a unique facility enabling JET to perform reactor like, DT operations. As a future DT experimental campaign (DTE2) is scheduled for 2017 this paper provides a brief overview of the AGHS and a summary of ongoing work supporting the currently JET experimental campaign. In order to improve tritium accountancy a solid state based detector for tritium is being developed. Another important upgrade concerns tritium injection, 4 existing GIMs (Tritium Gas Introduction Module) will inject a mix of D and T rather than T{sub 2} in the divertor region rather than in the torus mid plane enabling a far better control and variability of the introduction of tritium into the plasma. An overview of the scale of DTE2 is included as well as an example of some of the upgrades currently being undertaken to fully exploit the learning opportunities for ITER and DEMO DTE2 provides. (authors)

  5. Benchmark testing and independent verification of the VS2DT computer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, James T.; Goodrich, Michael T.

    1994-11-01

    The finite difference flow and transport simulator VS2DT was benchmark tested against several other codes which solve the same equations (Richards equation for flow and the Advection-Dispersion equation for transport). The benchmark problems investigated transient two-dimensional flow in a heterogeneous soil profile with a localized water source at the ground surface. The VS2DT code performed as well as or better than all other codes when considering mass balance characteristics and computational speed. It was also rated highly relative to the other codes with regard to ease-of-use. Following the benchmark study, the code was verified against two analytical solutions, one for two-dimensional flow and one for two-dimensional transport. These independent verifications show reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions, and complement the one-dimensional verification problems published in the code's original documentation.

  6. Benchmark testing and independent verification of the VS2DT computer code

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, J.T.; Goodrich, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    The finite difference flow and transport simulator VS2DT was benchmark tested against several other codes which solve the same equations (Richards equation for flow and the Advection-Dispersion equation for transport). The benchmark problems investigated transient two-dimensional flow in a heterogeneous soil profile with a localized water source at the ground surface. The VS2DT code performed as well as or better than all other codes when considering mass balance characteristics and computational speed. It was also rated highly relative to the other codes with regard to ease-of-use. Following the benchmark study, the code was verified against two analytical solutions, one for two-dimensional flow and one for two-dimensional transport. These independent verifications show reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions, and complement the one-dimensional verification problems published in the code`s original documentation.

  7. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Belli, F.; Cecil, F. E.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Darrow, D.; Ericsson, G.; Fernandes, A. M.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Von Thun, C. Perez; Popovichev, S.; Riva, M.; Santala, M.; Soare, S.; Sousa, J.; Syme, D. B.; Tardocchi, M.; Zoita, V. L.; Chugunov, I. N.; Gin, D. B.; Khilkevich, E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Yavorskij, V.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2014-08-01

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  8. A novel explicit 2D+t cyclic shape model applied to echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Casero, Ramón; Noble, J Alison

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel explicit 2D+t cyclic shape model that extends the Point Distribution Model (PDM) to shapes like myocardial contours with cyclic dynamics. We also propose an extension to Procrustes alignment that removes pose and subject size variability while maintaining dynamic effects. Our model draws on ideas from Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) and Kernel PCA (KPCA) and solves 3 shortcomings of previous implicit models: (1) cardiac cycles in the data set do not each need to have the same number of frames, (2) the required number of subjects for statistically significant results is substantially reduced and (3) the displacement of contour points incorporates time as an explicit variable. We illustrate our method by computing models of the myocardium in the 4 principal planes of 2D+t echocardiography data.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain of dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Clément, C; Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2012-01-01

    The dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mouse suffers from severe motor coordination deficits, characterized, among various symptoms, by a spastic ataxia and dystonic movements, indicating central defects in motor structures in addition to dystrophy of peripheral sensory tracts and partial degeneration of spinocerebellar tracts. Neurochemical alterations, notably in dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems, were previously observed in basal ganglia and cerebellum. A quantitative histochemical cartography of brain acetylcholinesterase activity in Dst(dt-J) mutants, in comparison with controls, revealed increases in the neostriatum, the habenula-interpeduncular pathway, the cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus and its target structures, the thalamus, major regions of the basal ganglia, such as substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, globus pallidum, and subthalamic nucleus, as well as in associated extrapyramidal regions, such as red nucleus, brainstem reticular formation, and superior colliculus. These acetylcholinesterase changes may play a role in motor deficits, particularly the dystonic symptomatology observed in the mutation.

  10. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  11. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  12. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Zierow, Swen; Syed, Mansoor; Bucala, Richard; Bhandari, Vineet; Lolis, Elias J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new inflammatory activity for extracellular d-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT), the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung on D-DT intratracheal installation of C57BL/6J mice with an EC50 of 5.6 μg. We also find that D-DT and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) have additive effects in neutrophil recruitment. Although the tautomerase site of D-DT and its homologue MIF are biophysically very different, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP) forms a covalent bond with Pro-1 of both proteins, resulting in a 6-phenylpyrimidine (6-PP) adduct. Recruitment of neutrophils to the lung for the 6-PP adducts of D-DT and MIF are reduced by ∼50% relative to the apo proteins, demonstrating that an unmodified Pro-1 is important for this activity, but there is no cooperativity in inhibition of the proteins together. The differences in the binding mode of the 6-PP adduct for D-DT was determined by crystallographic studies at 1.13 Å resolution and compared to the structure of the MIF–6-PP complex. There are major differences in the location of the 6-PP adduct to the D-DT and MIF active sites that provide insight into the lack of cooperativity by 4-IPP and into tuning the properties of the covalent inhibitors of D-DT and MIF that are necessary for the development of therapeutic small molecules against neutrophil damage from lung infections such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients.—Rajasekaran, D., Zierow, S., Syed, M., Bucala, R., Bhandari, V., Lolis, E. J. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment. PMID:25016026

  13. THEHYCO-3DT: Thermal hydrodynamic code for the 3 dimensional transient calculation of advanced LMFBR core

    SciTech Connect

    Vitruk, S.G.; Korsun, A.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The multilevel mathematical model of neutron thermal hydrodynamic processes in a passive safety core without assemblies duct walls and appropriate computer code SKETCH, consisted of thermal hydrodynamic module THEHYCO-3DT and neutron one, are described. A new effective discretization technique for energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is applied in hexagonal - z geometry. The model adequacy and applicability are presented. The results of the calculations show that the model and the computer code could be used in conceptual design of advanced reactors.

  14. Development and evaluation of systems for controlling parallel high di/dt thyratrons

    SciTech Connect

    Litton. A.; McDuff, G.

    1982-01-01

    Increasing numbers of high power, high repetition rate applications dictate the use or thyratrons in multiple of hard parallel configurations to achieve the required rate of current rise, di/dt. This in turn demands the development of systems to control parallel thyratron commutation with nanosecond accuracy. Such systems must be capable of real-time, fully-automated control in multi-kilohertz applications while still remaining cost effective. This paper describes the evolution of such a control methodology and system.

  15. Growth and survival of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella typhimurium DT104 in liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, Michael T; Mcquestin, Olivia J; Tamplin, Mark; Kelley, Lynda C

    2009-09-01

    Since 11 September 2001, quality and food safety are no longer the concerns of only consumers, industry, regulatory agencies, or other government officials. Liquid foods that are prepared or stored in bulk, including liquid egg products, are considered to be at potential risk for sabotage. Because of their versatility, low price, and functional properties, many of these products are being marketed. Four of the most common products of this type are whole egg, egg albumen, 10% sugared yolk, and 10% salted yolk. Although all of the serotypes of Salmonella enterica may cause illness, multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has become widespread and can cause severe illness that is difficult to treat. Studies were conducted to determine growth patterns of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in four commercial liquid egg products held at 4, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 42 degrees C for 0 to 384 h. All experiments were performed in duplicate and repeated twice. Standard methods were used to estimate cell numbers, and log CFU per gram of egg product was plotted against time. The number of cells of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 increased to 8 to 9 log CFU/g in whole egg and 10% sugared yolk, increased by 1 log CFU/g in liquid albumen, but decreased by 3 log CFU/g in 10% salted yolk. Data from this study have been archived in the ComBase database to further assist policy makers or other scientists interested in Salmonella growth characteristics in liquid eggs. However, based on data generated in this study, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 probably does not constitute a food threat agent in liquid eggs.

  16. TIA-1 or TIAR is required for DT40 cell viability.

    PubMed

    Le Guiner, Caroline; Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Breathnach, Richard

    2003-03-21

    TIA-1 and TIAR are a pair of related RNA-binding proteins which have been implicated in apoptosis. We show that chicken DT40 cells with both tia-1 alleles and one tiar allele disrupted (tia-1(-/-)tiar(-/+) cells) are viable. However, their growth and survival in medium containing low serum levels is significantly reduced compared with DT40 cells. The remaining intact tiar allele in tia-1(-/-)tiar(-/+) cells can only be disrupted if TIA-1 expression is first restored to the cells by transfection of a TIA-1 expression vector. We conclude that DT40 cells require either TIA-1 or TIAR for viability. TIA-1 overexpression in tia-1(-/-)tiar(-/+) cells leads to a radical drop in TIAR levels, by inducing efficient splicing of two tiar alternative exons carrying in-frame stop codons. In wild-type DT40 cells, tiar transcripts including these exons can also be detected. These transcripts increase significantly in abundance in cycloheximide-treated cells, suggesting that splicing of the exons exposes mRNAs to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. TIA-1 or TIAR depletion leads to a marked drop in splicing of the exons. The human tiar gene contains a corresponding pair of TIA-1-inducible alternative exons, and we show that there is very high sequence conservation between chickens and humans of the exon pair and parts of the flanking introns. The TIA-1/TIAR responsiveness of these alternative tiar exons is likely to be of physiological importance for controlling TIAR levels.

  17. Degradation pathway and field-scale DT50 determination of Boscalid in a sandy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Anneli S.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Tappe, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Santanu; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The research on environmental fate of pesticides has received increasing attention within the last decades and the persistence of several compounds in soil matrices is well documented. However, the fate of the new fungicide Boscalid (introduced in 2003) is not yet completely investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the environmental fate of Boscalid in a sandy soil. Three years after the second application on a cropland site in Kaldenkirchen, Germany, 65 undisturbed soil samples from the plough layer were derived. Boscalid residues were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and measured with UPLC-MS/MS. The Boscalid residues ranged between 0.12 and 0.53 μg kg-1with a field mean of 0.20 ± 0.09 μg kg-1. These results differed considerably from the predicted field concentration of 16.89 μg kg-1 (calculated from the application rate) and half-lives (DT50) of 104-182 days compared to 345 days reported in literature. Adjusting the extraction efficiency to 20% could not explain the large difference. Therefore, an incubation study with 14C-labeled Boscalid was conducted to measure the DT50 under controlled conditions. Here, the DT50 values were in the range of values stated in literature (297-337 days compared to 345 days) but still much larger than the DT50 based on the field-study values (104-182 days). Our results indicate that Boscalid dissipation under field conditions is much faster at agricultural sites with sandy soil type as expected from laboratory incubation experiments. Future experiments with Boscalid will be conducted in two different soils with different particle size. A laboratory experiment with uniformly 13C-labeled Boscalid will provide insight into the uptake and incorporation in microbial biomass.

  18. Multiple Clones within Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Phage Type DT104

    PubMed Central

    Markogiannakis, Antonis; Tassios, Panayotis T.; Lambiri, Maria; Ward, Linda R.; Kourea-Kremastinou, Jenny; Legakis, Nicholas J.; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis C.

    2000-01-01

    Six distinct clones were present among Greek multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium phage type DT104, since isolates belonging to resistance phenotypes including the ACSSuT (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline) core could be distinguished with respect to their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, int1 integron structures, and presence or absence of antibiotic resistance genes ant(3")-Ia, pse-1, and tem-1. PMID:10699039

  19. Induction and Resuscitation of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104†

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, A. R.; de Rezende, C. L. E.; Joseph, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 11601was tested for its ability to maintain viability in minimal, chemically defined solutions. Periodic monitoring of growth and survival in microcosms of different ion concentrations, maintained at various temperatures, showed a gradual decline in culturable organisms (∼235 days) at 5°C. Organisms maintained at a higher temperature (21°C) showed continuous, equivalent CFU per milliliter (∼106) up to 400 days after inoculation. Fluorescence microscopy with Baclight revealed that nonculturable cells were actually viable, while observations with scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells had retained their structural integrity. Temperature upshift (56°C ± 0.5, 15 s) of the nonculturable organisms (5°C) in Trypticase soy broth followed by immediate inoculation onto Trypticase soy agar (TSA) gave evidence of resuscitation. Interestingly, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 from the microcosms at either 5°C (1 to 200 days) or 21°C (1 to 250 days) did not show enhanced growth after intermittent inoculation onto catalase-supplemented TSA. Furthermore, cells from 21°C microcosms exposed to oxidative and osmotic stress showed greater resistance to stresses over increasing times of exposure than did recently grown cells. It is possible that the exceptional survivability and resilience of this particular strain may in part reflect the growing importance of this multidrug-resistant organism, in general, as a cause of intestinal disease in humans. The fact that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 11601 is capable of modifying its physiological characteristics, including entry into and recovery from the viable but nonculturable state, suggests the overall possibility that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 may be able to respond uniquely to various adverse environmental conditions. PMID:14602627

  20. Surface characterization of TFTR first wall graphite tiles used during DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M. T.; Willms, R. S.; Gentile, C.; Skinner, C.

    2001-01-01

    Surface characterization studies were performed on graphite tiles used as first wall materials during DT operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These ex situ analysis studies revealed a number of interesting and unexpected features. In this work we examined the spatial and (where possible) the depth distribution of impurity species deposited onto the plasma facing surfaces using Xray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS).

  1. Two new diketopiperazines from the tin mine tailings-derived fungus Schizophyllum commune YIM DT 10058.

    PubMed

    Chunyu, Wei-Xun; Ding, Zhang-Gui; Zhao, Jiang-Yuan; Wang, Yong-Xia; Han, Xiu-Lin; Li, Ming-Gang; Wen, Meng-Liang

    2017-07-01

    Two new diketopiperazines, named diphenylalazine C (1) and epicoccin U (2), together with six known compounds (3-8) were isolated from the EtOAc extract of the fermentation broth of the tin mine tailings-derived fungus Schizophyllum commune YIM DT 10058. Their structures were elucidated by detailed analysis of spectroscopic data and comparison with related known compounds. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited weak antibacterial and cytotoxic activities.

  2. DT-13 inhibits cancer cell migration by regulating NMIIA indirectly in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongzhi; Huang, Yue; Hou, Xiaoyin; Yu, Xiaowen; Lin, Sensen; Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Ruiming; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Yuan, Shengtao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is one of the main causes of mortality among patients with malignant tumors. Previous studies concerning tumor metastasis have merely focused on the cancer cells in the tumor. However, an increasing number of studies show that the tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in the progression of cancer, particularly in tumor metastasis. Since fibroblasts and adipocytes are two of the most representative mesenchymal cells in the tumor microenvironment, we established a hypoxia-induced cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) model and a chemically induced adipocyte model to reveal the effect of the microenvironment on cancer development. In these models, the conditioned medium from the tumor microenvironment was found to significantly promote the migration of human lung cancer cell line 95D and regulate the expression of non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA), which is consistent with results in the published literature. Then, we confirmed the hypothesis that the tumor microenvironment can regulate NMIIA in cancer cells and facilitate migration by using the non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin. Thus, this is the first report that the tumor microenvironment can promote cancer cell migration by regulating the expression of NMIIA. Our present data also indicated that DT-13, the saponin monomer 13 of dwarf lilyturf tuber, inhibited cancer cell migration in the tumor microenvironment model. Further results showed that DT-13 exhibited anti-migratory effects by inhibiting the c-raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Consequently, our research confirmed that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cell migration in vitro, indicating the potential anti-metastatic effect of DT-13 on lung cancer and the scientific basis for drug development.

  3. Bcl6 Is Required for Somatic Hypermutation and Gene Conversion in Chicken DT40 Cells.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alan M; Maman, Yaakov; Alinikula, Jukka; Schatz, David G

    2016-01-01

    The activation induced cytosine deaminase (AID) mediates diversification of B cell immunoglobulin genes by the three distinct yet related processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch recombination (CSR), and gene conversion (GCV). SHM occurs in germinal center B cells, and the transcription factor Bcl6 is a key regulator of the germinal center B cell gene expression program, including expression of AID. To test the hypothesis that Bcl6 function is important for the process of SHM, we compared WT chicken DT40 B cells, which constitutively perform SHM/GCV, to their Bcl6-deficient counterparts. We found that Bcl6-deficient DT40 cells were unable to perform SHM and GCV despite enforced high level expression of AID and substantial levels of AID in the nucleus of the cells. To gain mechanistic insight into the GCV/SHM dependency on Bcl6, transcriptional features of a highly expressed SHM target gene were analyzed in Bcl6-sufficient and -deficient DT40 cells. No defect was observed in the accumulation of single stranded DNA in the target gene as a result of Bcl6 deficiency. In contrast, association of Spt5, an RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and AID binding factor, was strongly reduced at the target gene body relative to the transcription start site in Bcl6-deficient cells as compared to WT cells. However, partial reconstitution of Bcl6 function substantially reconstituted Spt5 association with the target gene body but did not restore detectable SHM. Our observations suggest that in the absence of Bcl6, Spt5 fails to associate efficiently with Pol II at SHM targets, perhaps precluding robust AID action on the SHM target DNA. Our data also suggest, however, that Spt5 binding is not sufficient for SHM of a target gene even in DT40 cells with strong expression of AID.

  4. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M. Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4–20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80–140 mg/cm{sup 2} and CH-ablator ρR's of 400–680 mg/cm{sup 2} are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  5. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm2 and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm2 are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  6. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  7. E and DE/DT waveshapes for narrow bipolar pulses in intracloud lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Thomson, Ewen M.; Pierce, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Wideband electric field and dE/dt waveforms were recorded and digitized at a 100 MS/s rate at KSC during the summer and fall of 1989. These waveforms were combined to produce composite electric fields with an effective bandwidth of 3 to 50 MHz. Bipolar electric field pulses are characterized in terms of their E and dE/dt waveshapes. Half width mean durations were found to be 1.83 and 3.64 microseconds for negative and positive bipolar pulses respectively. Twenty of thirty of these pulses were found to occur independently of any other lightning activity. Analysis of the frequency content of these pulses as a function of time shows that radiation at different frequencies peak at different times. In addition to the initial peak and subsequent overshoot in the composite E waveshape, secondary humps following the initial peak are characterized according to their time of occurrence within the pulse. THe 156 narrow negative bipolar pulses and 10 positive narrow bipolar pulses are analyzed. The dE/dt signatures range from impulsive variations lasting several microseconds both before and after the initial peak of the electric field pulse, to smoother variations closely associated with peak.

  8. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Tuszewski, M.

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}0{sub 12}:Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss.

  9. Investigation of Characteristics of Large dB/dt for Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, D.; Ngwira, C.; Damas, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    When geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) flow through electrical networks, they become a potential threat for electrical power systems. Changes in the geomagnetic field (dB/dt) during severe geomagnetic disturbances are the main sources of GICs. These dB/dt phenomena were studied by selecting 24 strong geomagnetic storms with Dst ≤ - 150 nT. ACE spacecraft solar wind data: flow speed, proton density, By and Bz IMF components of the solar wind were correlated with measurements of the magnetic field detected on ground stations at different latitudes. This article reports characteristics of the solar wind during time intervals of large changes in the horizontal geomagnetic field with a threshold of dB/dt ≥ ± 20 nT/min for the 24 geomagnetic storms. The results of this investigation can help scientists to understand the mechanisms responsible for causing large magnetic field variations in order to predict and mitigate possible large events in the future, which is critical for our society that relies constantly on electricity for livelihood and security. In addition, this ongoing project will continue to investigate electron flux response before, during, and after large changes in geomagnetic field.

  10. Foil deposition alpha collector probe for TFTR`s D-T phase

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, H.W.; Darrow, D.S.; Timberlake, J.; Zweben, S.J.; Chong, G.P.; Pitcher, C.S.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    A new foil deposition alpha collector sample probe has been developed for TFTR`s D-T phase. D-T fusion produced alpha particles escaping from the plasma are implanted in nickel foils located in a series of collimating ports on the detector. The nickel foils are removed from the tokamak after exposure to one or more plasma discharges and analyzed for helium content. This detector is intended to provide improved alpha particle energy resolution and pitch angle coverage over existing lost alpha detectors, and to provide an absolutely calibrated cross-check with these detectors. The ability to resolve between separate energy components of alpha particle loss is estimated to be {approx} 20%. A full 360{degree} of pitch angle coverage is provided for by 8 channels having an acceptance range of {approx} 53{degree} per channel. These detectors will be useful in characterizing classical and anomalous alpha losses and any collective alpha instabilities that may be excited during the D-T campaign of TFTR.

  11. Fixed and free line ratio DT2 PIXE fitting and simulation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, M. A.; Chaves, P. C.; Taborda, A.; Marques, J. P.; Barradas, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The DATTPIXE software package, which full extent version become operational in 1992, has been largely used both in academic research and for standard analysis. Developments of a new PIXE setup, having an X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) EDS high resolution detection system and a CdTe detector, raised the need for a deep revision of the software used to fit PIXE spectra and interpret data. First steps taken in 2007 essentially comprised a new fitting code based on a proven Bayesian inference routine. Meanwhile, fundamental processes associated to PIXE spectra, which became more evident in X-ray Microcalorimeter spectrometer (XMS) high resolution EDS spectra, made clear the need for a full new code. Using some of the routines developed in DATTPIXE, the new DT2 package is written in Fortran 2003 and includes both the fitting and data handling codes. DT2 is now designed to include in the fitting model and deal with diagram lines as well as with satellite lines (Radiative Auger Emission (RAE), multi-ionization satellites and even chemically shifted lines) or even lines having other origins such as low energy γ-rays. In this communication we present the new DT2 package and discuss its new features, such as the possibility of fixing or leave free the relative intensity of spectra lines, even if they belong to transitions to the same shell.

  12. E and DE/DT waveshapes for narrow bipolar pulses in intracloud lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Thomson, Ewen M.; Pierce, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Wideband electric field and dE/dt waveforms were recorded and digitized at a 100 MS/s rate at KSC during the summer and fall of 1989. These waveforms were combined to produce composite electric fields with an effective bandwidth of 3 to 50 MHz. Bipolar electric field pulses are characterized in terms of their E and dE/dt waveshapes. Half width mean durations were found to be 1.83 and 3.64 microseconds for negative and positive bipolar pulses respectively. Twenty of thirty of these pulses were found to occur independently of any other lightning activity. Analysis of the frequency content of these pulses as a function of time shows that radiation at different frequencies peak at different times. In addition to the initial peak and subsequent overshoot in the composite E waveshape, secondary humps following the initial peak are characterized according to their time of occurrence within the pulse. THe 156 narrow negative bipolar pulses and 10 positive narrow bipolar pulses are analyzed. The dE/dt signatures range from impulsive variations lasting several microseconds both before and after the initial peak of the electric field pulse, to smoother variations closely associated with peak.

  13. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  14. Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) [1] targets as a complementary path to the baseline cryogenic single-shell approach [2]. Benefits of DS targets include room-temperature deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma-mediated laser backscatter, low threshold-ignition temperatures (4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances [3], and loose shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several challenges, including room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT (790 atm) in the inner shell; strict concentricity requirements on the two shells; development of nanoporous, low-density, metallic foams for structural support of the inner shell and hydrodynamic instability mitigation; and effective control of perturbation growth on the high-Atwood number interface between the DT fuel and the high-Z inner shell. Recent progress in DS ignition target designs using vacuum hohlraums is described, offering the potential for low levels of laser backscatter from stimulated Raman and Brillouin processes. In addition, vacuum hohlraums have the operational advantages of room temperature fielding and fabrication simplicity, as well as benefiting from extensive benchmarking on the Nova and Omega laser facilities. As an alternative to standard cylindrical hohlraums, a rugby-shaped geometry is also introduced that may provide energetics and symmetry tuning benefits for more robust DS designs with yields exceeding 10 MJ for 2 MJ of 3w laser energy. The recent progress in hohlraum designs and required advanced materials development are scheduled to culminate in a prototype demonstration of a NIF-scale ignition-ready DS in 2007. [1] P. Amendt et al., PoP 9, 2221 (2002). [2] J.D. Lindl et al., PoP 11, 339 (2004). [3] M.N. Chizhkov et al., Laser Part. Beams 23, 261 (2005). In collaboration with C. Cerjan, A. Hamza, J. Milovich and H. Robey.

  15. Progress towards ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. J.; Patel, P. K.; Lindl, J. D.; Atherton, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Landen, O. L.; Moses, E. I.; Springer, P. T.; Benedetti, R.; Bernstein, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; and others

    2013-07-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes a precision laser system now capable of delivering 1.8 MJ at 500 TW of 0.35-μm light to a target. NIF has been operational since March 2009. A variety of experiments have been completed in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and inertial fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support its missions with nearly 60 X-ray, optical, and nuclear diagnostic systems. A primary goal of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the NIF was to implode a low-Z capsule filled with ∼0.2 mg of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel via laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion and demonstrate fusion ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn with a net energy gain of ∼5–10 (fusion yield/input laser energy). This requires assembling the DT fuel into a dense shell of ∼1000 g/cm{sup 3} with an areal density (ρR) of ∼1.5 g/cm{sup 2}, surrounding a lower density hot spot with a temperature of ∼10 keV and a ρR ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, or approximately an α-particle range. Achieving these conditions demand precise control of laser and target parameters to allow a low adiabat, high convergence implosion with low ablator fuel mix. We have demonstrated implosion and compressed fuel conditions at ∼80–90% for most point design values independently, but not at the same time. The nuclear yield is a factor of ∼3–10× below the simulated values and a similar factor below the alpha dominated regime. This paper will discuss the experimental trends, the possible causes of the degraded performance (the off-set from the simulations), and the plan to understand and resolve the underlying physics issues.

  16. Integrated modeling of cryogenic layered highfoot experiments at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Clark, D.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; and others

    2016-05-15

    Integrated radiation hydrodynamic modeling in two dimensions, including the hohlraum and capsule, of layered cryogenic HighFoot Deuterium-Tritium (DT) implosions on the NIF successfully predicts important data trends. The model consists of a semi-empirical fit to low mode asymmetries and radiation drive multipliers to match shock trajectories, one dimensional inflight radiography, and time of peak neutron production. Application of the model across the HighFoot shot series, over a range of powers, laser energies, laser wavelengths, and target thicknesses predicts the neutron yield to within a factor of two for most shots. The Deuterium-Deuterium ion temperatures and the DT down scattered ratios, ratio of (10–12)/(13–15) MeV neutrons, roughly agree with data at peak fuel velocities <340 km/s and deviate at higher peak velocities, potentially due to flows and neutron scattering differences stemming from 3D or capsule support tent effects. These calculations show a significant amount alpha heating, 1–2.5× for shots where the experimental yield is within a factor of two, which has been achieved by increasing the fuel kinetic energy. This level of alpha heating is consistent with a dynamic hot spot model that is matched to experimental data and as determined from scaling of the yield with peak fuel velocity. These calculations also show that low mode asymmetries become more important as the fuel velocity is increased, and that improving these low mode asymmetries can result in an increase in the yield by a factor of several.

  17. Progress towards ignition on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. J.; Patel, P. K.; Lindl, J. D.; Atherton, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Moses, E. I.; Nikroo, A.; Petrasso, R.; Sangster, T. C.; Springer, P. T.; Batha, S.; Benedetti, R.; Bernstein, L.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Chen, K. C.; Clark, D. S.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Fair, J. E.; Farrell, M.; Fortner, R. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M. G.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Grim, G.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Harding, D. R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hein, N.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hicks, D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hoppe, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jacoby, B.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kyrala, G.; LaFortune, K. N.; Pape, S. Le; Leeper, R. J.; Lerche, R.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Macphee, A.; Mapoles, E. R.; Marinak, M. M.; Mauldin, M.; McKenty, P. W.; Meezan, M.; Michel, P. A.; Milovich, J.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M.; Munro, D. H.; Olson, C. L.; Opachich, K.; Pak, A. E.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M.; Ross, S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sater, J.; Schneider, D. H.; Séguin, F. H.; Sepke, S. M.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Stoeckl, C.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Widman, K.; Wilke, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; Zylstra, A.

    2013-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes a precision laser system now capable of delivering 1.8 MJ at 500 TW of 0.35-μm light to a target. NIF has been operational since March 2009. A variety of experiments have been completed in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and inertial fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support its missions with nearly 60 X-ray, optical, and nuclear diagnostic systems. A primary goal of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the NIF was to implode a low-Z capsule filled with ˜0.2 mg of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel via laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion and demonstrate fusion ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn with a net energy gain of ˜5-10 (fusion yield/input laser energy). This requires assembling the DT fuel into a dense shell of ˜1000 g/cm3 with an areal density (ρR) of ˜1.5 g/cm2, surrounding a lower density hot spot with a temperature of ˜10 keV and a ρR ˜0.3 g/cm2, or approximately an α-particle range. Achieving these conditions demand precise control of laser and target parameters to allow a low adiabat, high convergence implosion with low ablator fuel mix. We have demonstrated implosion and compressed fuel conditions at ˜80-90% for most point design values independently, but not at the same time. The nuclear yield is a factor of ˜3-10× below the simulated values and a similar factor below the alpha dominated regime. This paper will discuss the experimental trends, the possible causes of the degraded performance (the off-set from the simulations), and the plan to understand and resolve the underlying physics issues.

  18. Integrated modeling of cryogenic layered highfoot experiments at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Clark, D.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S.; Spears, B.; Springer, P. T.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R.; Celliers, P. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Integrated radiation hydrodynamic modeling in two dimensions, including the hohlraum and capsule, of layered cryogenic HighFoot Deuterium-Tritium (DT) implosions on the NIF successfully predicts important data trends. The model consists of a semi-empirical fit to low mode asymmetries and radiation drive multipliers to match shock trajectories, one dimensional inflight radiography, and time of peak neutron production. Application of the model across the HighFoot shot series, over a range of powers, laser energies, laser wavelengths, and target thicknesses predicts the neutron yield to within a factor of two for most shots. The Deuterium-Deuterium ion temperatures and the DT down scattered ratios, ratio of (10-12)/(13-15) MeV neutrons, roughly agree with data at peak fuel velocities <340 km/s and deviate at higher peak velocities, potentially due to flows and neutron scattering differences stemming from 3D or capsule support tent effects. These calculations show a significant amount alpha heating, 1-2.5× for shots where the experimental yield is within a factor of two, which has been achieved by increasing the fuel kinetic energy. This level of alpha heating is consistent with a dynamic hot spot model that is matched to experimental data and as determined from scaling of the yield with peak fuel velocity. These calculations also show that low mode asymmetries become more important as the fuel velocity is increased, and that improving these low mode asymmetries can result in an increase in the yield by a factor of several.

  19. Colicin E2 Expression in Lactobacillus brevis DT24, A Vaginal Probiotic Isolate, against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Disha; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to combat the urinary tract infection in women. During menstruation elevated protein concentration and increase in oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations with decrease in vaginal Lactobacilli all together contribute to urinary tract infections. Lactobacillus species are a predominant member of the vaginal microflora and are critical in the prevention of a number of urogenital diseases. In order to increase antimicrobial potential of vaginal Lactobacilli, bacteriocin colicin E2 which has specific activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli has been overexpressed in vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24. Recombinant Lactobacillus brevis DT24 expressing colicin E2 showed much higher inhibitory activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli than wild type L. brevis DT24 in vitro. Efficacy of probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24 expressing colicin E2 protein is required for further in vivo evaluation.

  20. Colicin E2 Expression in Lactobacillus brevis DT24, A Vaginal Probiotic Isolate, against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Disha

    2014-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to combat the urinary tract infection in women. During menstruation elevated protein concentration and increase in oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations with decrease in vaginal Lactobacilli all together contribute to urinary tract infections. Lactobacillus species are a predominant member of the vaginal microflora and are critical in the prevention of a number of urogenital diseases. In order to increase antimicrobial potential of vaginal Lactobacilli, bacteriocin colicin E2 which has specific activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli has been overexpressed in vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24. Recombinant Lactobacillus brevis DT24 expressing colicin E2 showed much higher inhibitory activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli than wild type L. brevis DT24 in vitro. Efficacy of probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24 expressing colicin E2 protein is required for further in vivo evaluation. PMID:24649377