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Sample records for developing safer systems

  1. Safer Systems: A NextGen Aviation Safety Strategic Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darr, Stephen T.; Ricks, Wendell R.; Lemos, Katherine A.

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO), is charged by Congress with developing the concepts and plans for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP), developed by the Safety Working Group of the JPDO, focuses on establishing the goals, objectives, and strategies needed to realize the safety objectives of the NextGen Integrated Plan. The three goal areas of the NASSP are Safer Practices, Safer Systems, and Safer Worldwide. Safer Practices emphasizes an integrated, systematic approach to safety risk management through implementation of formalized Safety Management Systems (SMS) that incorporate safety data analysis processes, and the enhancement of methods for ensuring safety is an inherent characteristic of NextGen. Safer Systems emphasizes implementation of safety-enhancing technologies, which will improve safety for human-centered interfaces and enhance the safety of airborne and ground-based systems. Safer Worldwide encourages coordinating the adoption of the safer practices and safer systems technologies, policies and procedures worldwide, such that the maximum level of safety is achieved across air transportation system boundaries. This paper introduces the NASSP and its development, and focuses on the Safer Systems elements of the NASSP, which incorporates three objectives for NextGen systems: 1) provide risk reducing system interfaces, 2) provide safety enhancements for airborne systems, and 3) provide safety enhancements for ground-based systems. The goal of this paper is to expose avionics and air traffic management system developers to NASSP objectives and Safer Systems strategies.

  2. Design and development of a safer non-invasive transungual drug delivery system for topical treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Paulami; Thakur, R S; Ray, Subhabrata; Mazumder, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop a safer non-invasive treatment for nail infections since the current treatment regimen has drawbacks like, incidence of systemic side-effects and higher cost. Proposed topical treatment on the other hand can drastically improve the situation, hence highly desirable. This work was undertaken with a hypothesis to develop a transungual microemulsion gel for topical treatment of onychomycosis. Benzyl alcohol and isopropyl myristate were used as oil, Pluronic F68 as surfactant and ethanol as co surfactant, in double-distilled water and loading itraconazole as the model antifungal drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagram was developed by titrating different ratios of total oil and water with total surfactant, and Km ratio was fixed at 1:1. Microemulsion formulations were prepared based on the phase diagram and incorporated in gels by adding Carbopol 934P. Nail permeation enhancers like urea and salicylic acid were used to increase drug permeation through the nail plate. Parameters like drug loading, clarity, particle size distribution, drug entrapment efficiency (DEE), drug release profile, release kinetics and nail uptake were checked for the evaluation of the formulations. Complete release of drug from the formulation varied from 60 to 120 min. The optimized formulation had DEE of 92.75%, complete drug release in 60 min and highest nail uptake of 0.386%/mm(2) (39 µg of drug) with 5% urea as nail permeation enhancer. The formulation may prove beneficial in safer treatment of onychomycosis.

  3. STS-64 SAFER Assembly development team members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, to be tested on the STS-64 flight, is surrounded by the team members who have spent a number of recent man hours in preparation for the system's first test-flight. In front are (left to right) Russell L. Flack and Bob Lowe. In the back row are (left to right) Jack D. Humphreys, Chuck Deason, Bill Wood and James Brown.

  4. SAFER Inspection of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoville, Zebulon C.; Rajula, Sudhakar

    2005-01-01

    In the aftermath of the space shuttle Columbia accident, it quickly became clear that new methods would need to be developed that would provide the capability to inspect and repair the shuttle's thermal protection system (TPS). A boom extension to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) with a laser topography sensor package was identified as the primary means for measuring the damage depth in acreage tile as well as scanning Reinforced Carbon- Carbon (RCC) surfaces. However, concern over the system's fault tolerance made it prudent to investigate alternate means of acquiring close range photographs and contour depth measurements in the event of a failure. One method that was identified early was to use the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion system to allow EVA access to damaged areas of concern. Several issues were identified as potential hazards to SAFER use for this operation. First, the ability of an astronaut to maintain controlled flight depends upon efficient technique and hardware reliability. If either of these is insufficient during flight operations, a safety tether must be used to rescue the crewmember. This operation can jeopardize the integrity of the Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) or delicate TPS materials. Controls were developed to prevent the likelihood of requiring a tether rescue, and procedures were written to maximize the chances for success if it cannot be avoided. Crewmember ability to manage tether cable tension during nominal flight also had to be evaluated to ensure it would not negatively affect propellant consumption. Second, although propellant consumption, flight control, orbital dynamics, and flight complexity can all be accurately evaluated in Virtual Reality (VR) Laboratory at Johnson Space Center, there are some shortcomings. As a crewmember's hand is extended to simulate measurement of tile damage, it will pass through the vehicle without resistance. In reality, this force will push the crewmember away from the

  5. Development of safer molecules through chirality.

    PubMed

    Patil, P A; Kothekar, M A

    2006-10-01

    Many of the drugs currently used in medical practice are mixtures of enantiomers (racemates). Many a times, the two enantiomers differ in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Replacing existing racemates with single isomers has resulted in improved safety and/or efficacy profile of various racemates. In this review, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of chirality are discussed in brief, followed by an overview of some important chiral switches that have yielded safer alternatives. These include levosalbutamol, S-ketamine, levobupivacaine, S-zopiclone, levocetirizine, S-amlodipine, S-atenolol, S-metoprolol, S-omeprazole, S-pantoprazole and R-ondansetron. Few potential chiral switches under evaluation and some chiral switches that have not been successful are also discussed.

  6. Development of Safer Gene Delivery Systems to Minimize the Risk of Insertional Mutagenesis-Related Malignancies: A Critical Issue for the Field of Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    Integrating gene delivery systems allow for a more stable transgene expression in mammalian cells than the episomal ones. However, the integration of the shuttle vector within the cellular chromosomal DNA is associated with the risk of insertional mutagenesis, which, in turn, may cause malignant cell transformation. The use of a retroviral-derived vector system was responsible for the development of leukemia in five children, who participated in various clinical trials for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) in France and in the United Kingdom. Unfortunately, the hematological malignancy claimed the life of one patient in 2004, who was enrolled in the French clinical trial. In addition, adeno-associated-viral-(AAV-) mediated gene transfer induced tumors in animal models, whereas the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon system was associated with insertional mutagenesis events in cell culture systems. On these grounds, it is necessary to develop safer gene delivery systems for the genetic manipulation of mammalian cells. This paper discusses the latest achievements that have been reported in the field of vector design. PMID:23209944

  7. Building Safer Systems With SpecTRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    System safety, an integral component in software development, often poses a challenge to engineers designing computer-based systems. While the relaxed constraints on software design allow for increased power and flexibility, this flexibility introduces more possibilities for error. As a result, system engineers must identify the design constraints necessary to maintain safety and ensure that the system and software design enforces them. Safeware Engineering Corporation, of Seattle, Washington, provides the information, tools, and techniques to accomplish this task with its Specification Tools and Requirements Methodology (SpecTRM). NASA assisted in developing this engineering toolset by awarding the company several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Ames Research Center and Langley Research Center. The technology benefits NASA through its applications for Space Station rendezvous and docking. SpecTRM aids system and software engineers in developing specifications for large, complex safety critical systems. The product enables engineers to find errors early in development so that they can be fixed with the lowest cost and impact on the system design. SpecTRM traces both the requirements and design rationale (including safety constraints) throughout the system design and documentation, allowing engineers to build required system properties into the design from the beginning, rather than emphasizing assessment at the end of the development process when changes are limited and costly.System safety, an integral component in software development, often poses a challenge to engineers designing computer-based systems. While the relaxed constraints on software design allow for increased power and flexibility, this flexibility introduces more possibilities for error. As a result, system engineers must identify the design constraints necessary to maintain safety and ensure that the system and software design enforces them. Safeware Engineering

  8. Developing safer systems in a NPP environment using the operator`s comfort parameters and virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    The contents of this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays from the operator`s point of view, and the utilization of virtual reality for operations, training and maintenance repairs. The studies involve a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in strengthening design choices from the user`s perspective model of the environment. The contents of this paper focuses on the results which may be implemented in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing systems which are less inherently error prone.

  9. The WIPP transportation system -- ``Safer than any other``

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.R.; Spooner, R.

    1991-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an integrated transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely dispersed generator sites to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The system consists of a Type B container, a specially designed trailer, a lightweight tractor, the DOE TRANSCOM satellite-based vehicle tracking system, and uniquely qualified and highly trained drivers. The DOE has demonstrated that this system is ready to transport the TRU waste to the WIPP site efficiently and safely. Since the system was put in place in November 1988, it has been repeatedly upgraded and enhanced to incorporate additional safety measures. In June of 1989, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) reviewed the transportation system and concluded that ``the system proposed for transportation of TRU waste to WIPP is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the United States today and will reduce risk to very low levels`` (emphasis added). The NAS conclusion was made before the DOE implemented the Enhanced Driver Training Course for carrier drivers. The challenge facing the DOE was to examine the transportation system objectively and determine what additional improvements could be made to further enhance safety.

  10. Integrating zebrafish toxicology and nanoscience for safer product development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The design, manufacture and application of safer products and manufacturing processes have been important goals over the last decade and will advance in the future under the umbrella of "Green Chemistry". In this review, we focus on the burgeoning diversity of new engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and the prescient need for a nanotoxicology paradigm that quickly identifies potentially hazardous nanochemistries. Advances in predictive toxicological modeling in the developing zebrafish offer the most immediate translation to human hazard that is practically achievable with high throughput approaches. Translation in a vertebrate model that is also a low cost alternative to rodents for hazard prediction has been a desirable but elusive testing paradigm. The utility of zebrafish, if applied early in the ENM discovery pipeline, could greatly enhance efforts toward greener and more efficient nanoscience. Early pipeline detection of human and environmental health impacts will quickly inform decisions in the design and production of safer commercial ENMs. PMID:23772181

  11. Integrating zebrafish toxicology and nanoscience for safer product development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Tanguay, Robert L

    2013-04-01

    The design, manufacture and application of safer products and manufacturing processes have been important goals over the last decade and will advance in the future under the umbrella of "Green Chemistry". In this review, we focus on the burgeoning diversity of new engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and the prescient need for a nanotoxicology paradigm that quickly identifies potentially hazardous nanochemistries. Advances in predictive toxicological modeling in the developing zebrafish offer the most immediate translation to human hazard that is practically achievable with high throughput approaches. Translation in a vertebrate model that is also a low cost alternative to rodents for hazard prediction has been a desirable but elusive testing paradigm. The utility of zebrafish, if applied early in the ENM discovery pipeline, could greatly enhance efforts toward greener and more efficient nanoscience. Early pipeline detection of human and environmental health impacts will quickly inform decisions in the design and production of safer commercial ENMs.

  12. Astronaut Carl Meade tests SAFER system during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Carl J. Meade tests the new Simplified Aid for Eva Rescue (SAFER) system 130 nautical miles above Earth. The scene was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera with a 30mm lens attached. The hardware supporting the LIDAR-in-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in the lower right. A TV camera on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm records the space walk.

  13. Automatic-Control System for Safer Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.; Vanasse, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Automatic-control system for radio-frequency (RF) induction brazing of metal tubing reduces probability of operator errors, increases safety, and ensures high-quality brazed joints. Unit combines functions of gas control and electric-power control. Minimizes unnecessary flow of argon gas into work area and prevents electrical shocks from RF terminals. Controller will not allow power to flow from RF generator to brazing head unless work has been firmly attached to head and has actuated micro-switch. Potential shock hazard eliminated. Flow of argon for purging and cooling must be turned on and adjusted before brazing power applied. Provision ensures power not applied prematurely, causing damaged work or poor-quality joints. Controller automatically turns off argon flow at conclusion of brazing so potentially suffocating gas does not accumulate in confined areas.

  14. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration (SAFER): Development, implementation, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.D.; Amaya, J.P.

    1994-05-01

    This report reviews the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) effort during FY 1992, FY 1993, and the first quarter of FY 1994. The report comprises three sections: Introduction, Activities Summary, and Lessons Learned and Related Activities. This section provides context for the report by briefly reviewing the development of SAFER and its operational assumptions. Section 2 describes SAFER workshops and site-specific SAFER implementation support. Additionally, Section 2 provides an update on the status of sites that initially received support from either Observational Approach or SAFER teams and subsequently implemented either of these two related approaches to site restoration streamlining. Section 3 describes lessons learned and upcoming SAFER activities.

  15. Insertional mutagenesis and development of malignancies induced by integrating gene delivery systems: implications for the design of safer gene-based interventions in patients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Marino, Ignazio R; Pentimalli, Francesca; Adamo, Vincenzo; Giordano, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Effective gene-based interventions for the treatment of genetic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular maladies require longterm transgene expression in target cells. Integrating viral vector systems based on the genera of the retroviridae and on adeno-associated virus are suitable tools, as the integration of viral vector genomes into the cellular chromosomal DNA allows for a more stable and long-lasting transgene expression than episomal gene-delivery models. Two nonviral gene-delivery systems with integrating properties have also been developed. These are based on the Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon system and on the Streptomyces bacteriophage integrase phiC31. However, the integration of recombinant vector systems may damage the natural genetic arrangement of the target cell. Such genetic alterations are termed insertional mutagenesis, which might result in malignant cell transformation. Insertional mutagenesis caused leukemia in five patients who participated in clinical trials for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-X1; sadly, one of the patients died. Gene therapists had to assess the real risk-versus-benefit ratio for the use of retroviral vectors in patients and devise novel strategies to minimize the occurrence of insertional mutagenesis-related malignancies. In this respect, a particular emphasis was placed on the engineering of enhancer-less self-inactivating retroviridae-based systems.

  16. Fly-by-Wire Systems Enable Safer, More Efficient Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Using the ultra-reliable Apollo Guidance Computer that enabled the Apollo Moon missions, Dryden Flight Research Center engineers, in partnership with industry leaders such as Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Draper Laboratory, demonstrated that digital computers could be used to fly aircraft. Digital fly-by-wire systems have since been incorporated into large airliners, military jets, revolutionary new aircraft, and even cars and submarines.

  17. STS-64 SAFER Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-10

    S93-50137 (December 1993) --- This small mobility-aiding back harness, complemented in extravehicular activity (EVA) with a hand controller unit and called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, will get extensive in-space evaluation and testing during the STS-64 mission. In this view the SAFER is open to reveal the gas supply and thrusters. SAFER is to fly on STS-76 as well.

  18. Are the SDGs leaving safer surgical systems behind?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faheem; Michelen, Sophia; Massoud, Rashad; Kaafarani, Haytham

    2016-12-01

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has set out its new aims for the post-2015 global agenda in the form of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Discussions around the historically neglected role of emergency and essential surgical interventions in global health has attracted widespread attention with the help of well-timed, high-profile reports including the Lancet Commission for Global Surgery [1]. The case for promoting safe surgery is clear with evidence suggesting that at least two-thirds of the years of life lost globally will be attributed to surgical conditions by 2025 [1]. In 2010 alone, almost 17 million lives, and more than 70 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were lost due to surgically treatable conditions [1]. A central component of the SDGs is its renewed focus on health as a human right in the form of Universal Health Coverage (UHC). However, there are doubts as to how nations will be able to keep the 'promise of leaving no-one behind' without explicit reference to global surgery within the SDG framework [2]. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Safer Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Safer bridges are among a number of spinoff benefits from NASA procedures for testing 'cfracture toughness" of a structural part, meaning its ability to -siscracktsh at might cause failure. The New River Bridge in West Virginia, shown under construction, is the world's largest single span bridge. U.S. Steel fracture toughness requirements for such bridges include NASA-developed test procedures. Bridge materials and other metal structures may develop flaws during their service lifetimes. Such flaws can affect the structural integrity of the part. Thus, it is important to know the "fracture toughness" of a structural part, or its ability to resist cracks. NASA has long experience in developing fracture toughness tests for aerospace hardware. Since 1960, NASA-Lewis has worked closely with the American Society for Testing & Materials. Lewis and NASA-funded industrial contractors have made many important contributions to test procedures, now recommended by ASTM, for measuring fracture toughness.

  20. Safer Choice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Safer Choice is a voluntary program that works to advance the mission of EPA to protect human health and the environment by helping product manufacturers choose the safest chemical ingredients possible.

  1. Developing a Safer Conception Intervention for Men Living with HIV in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Khidir, Hazar; Psaros, Christina; Greener, Letitia; O'Neil, Kasey; Mathenjwa, Mxolisi; Mosery, F N; Moore, Lizzie; Harrison, Abigail; Bangsberg, David R; Smit, Jennifer A; Safren, Steven A; Matthews, Lynn T

    2017-02-13

    Within sexual partnerships, men make many decisions about sexual behavior, reproductive goals, and HIV prevention. There are increasing calls to involve men in reproductive health and HIV prevention. This paper describes the process of creating and evaluating the acceptability of a safer conception intervention for men living with HIV who want to have children with partners at risk for acquiring HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Based on formative work conducted with men and women living with HIV, their partners, and providers, we developed an intervention based on principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy to support men in the adoption of HIV risk-reduction behaviors such as HIV-serostatus disclosure and uptake of and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Structured group discussions were used to explore intervention acceptability and feasibility. Our work demonstrates that men are eager for reproductive health services, but face unique barriers to accessing them.

  2. Safer Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page describes how new rules mean a safer environment.

  3. Development of a theory-guided pan-European computer-assisted safer sex intervention.

    PubMed

    Nöstlinger, Christiana; Borms, Ruth; Dec-Pietrowska, Joanna; Dias, Sonia; Rojas, Daniela; Platteau, Tom; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-12-01

    HIV is a growing public health problem in Europe, with men-having-sex-with-men and migrants from endemic regions as the most affected key populations. More evidence on effective behavioral interventions to reduce sexual risk is needed. This article describes the systematic development of a theory-guided computer-assisted safer sex intervention, aiming at supporting people living with HIV in sexual risk reduction. We applied the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol to develop this counseling intervention in the framework of a European multicenter study. We conducted a needs assessment guided by the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model, formulated change objectives and selected theory-based methods and practical strategies, i.e. interactive computer-assisted modules as supporting tools for provider-delivered counseling. Theoretical foundations were the IMB skills model, social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model, complemented by dual process models of affective decision making to account for the specifics of sexual behavior. The counseling approach for delivering three individual sessions was tailored to participants' needs and contexts, adopting elements of motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioral therapy. We implemented and evaluated the intervention using a randomized controlled trial combined with a process evaluation. IM provided a useful framework for developing a coherent intervention for heterogeneous target groups, which was feasible and effective across the culturally diverse settings. This article responds to the need for transparent descriptions of the development and content of evidence-based behavior change interventions as potential pillars of effective combination prevention strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Start Talking About Risks: Development of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Safer Sex Program for People Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Golin, Carol E.; Patel, Shilpa; Tiller, Katherine; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Grodensky, Catherine A.; Boland, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of HIV infection in the US in general, and in the southeast, in particular, has shifted dramatically over the past two decades, increasingly affecting women and minorities. The site for our intervention was an infectious diseases clinic based at a university hospital serving over 1,300 HIV-infected patients in North Carolina. Our patient population is diverse and reflects the trends seen more broadly in the epidemic in the southeast and in North Carolina. Practicing safer sex is a complex behavior with multiple determinants that vary by individual and social context. A comprehensive intervention that is client-centered and can be tailored to each individual’s circumstances is more likely to be effective at reducing risky behaviors among clients such as ours than are more confrontational or standardized prevention messages. One potential approach to improving safer sex practices among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is Motivational Interviewing (MI), a non-judgmental, client-centered but directive counseling style. Below, we describe: (1) the development of the Start Talking About Risks (STAR) MI-based safer sex counseling program for PLWHA at our clinic site; (2) the intervention itself; and (3) lessons learned from implementing the intervention. PMID:17701337

  5. Integrating MBSE into Ongoing Projects: Requirements Validation and Test Planning for the ISS SAFER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Herbert A.; Williams, Antony; Pierce, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Simplified Aid for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Rescue (SAFER) is the spacewalking astronaut's final safety measure against separating from the ISS and being unable to return safely. Since the late 1990s, the SAFER has been a standard element of the spacewalking astronaut's equipment. The ISS SAFER project was chartered to develop a new block of SAFER units using a highly similar design to the legacy SAFER (known as the USA SAFER). An on-orbit test module was also included in the project to enable periodic maintenance/propulsion system checkout on the ISS SAFER. On the ISS SAFER project, model-based systems engineering (MBSE) was not the initial systems engineering (SE) approach, given the volume of heritage systems engineering and integration (SE&I) products. The initial emphasis was ensuring traceability to ISS program standards as well as to legacy USA SAFER requirements. The requirements management capabilities of the Cradle systems engineering tool were to be utilized to that end. During development, however, MBSE approaches were applied selectively to address specific challenges in requirements validation and test and verification (T&V) planning, which provided measurable efficiencies to the project. From an MBSE perspective, ISS SAFER development presented a challenge and an opportunity. Addressing the challenge first, the project was tasked to use the original USA SAFER operational and design requirements baseline, with a number of additional ISS program requirements to address evolving certification expectations for systems operating on the ISS. Additionally, a need to redesign the ISS SAFER avionics architecture resulted in a set of changes to the design requirements baseline. Finally, the project added an entirely new functionality for on-orbit maintenance. After initial requirements integration, the system requirements count was approaching 1000, which represented a growth of 4x over the original USA SAFER system

  6. Using computer technology for HIV prevention among African-Americans: development of a tailored information program for safer sex (TIPSS)

    PubMed Central

    Noar, Seth M.; Webb, Elizabeth M.; Van Stee, Stephanie K.; Redding, Colleen A.; Feist-Price, Sonja; Crosby, Richard; Troutman, Adewale

    2011-01-01

    New prevention options are urgently needed for African-Americans in the United States given the disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS on this group. This combined with recent evidence supporting the efficacy of computer technology-based interventions in HIV prevention led our research group to pursue the development of a computer-delivered individually tailored intervention for heterosexually active African-Americans—the tailored information program for safer sex (TIPSS). In the current article, we discuss the development of the TIPSS program, including (i) the targeted population and behavior, (ii) theoretical basis for the intervention, (iii) design of the intervention, (iv) formative research, (v) technical development and testing and (vi) intervention delivery and ongoing randomized controlled trial. Given the many advantages of computer-based interventions, including low-cost delivery once developed, they offer much promise for the future of HIV prevention among African-Americans and other at-risk groups. PMID:21257676

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion: A better, safer, cheaper transportation system for human exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-03-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for 'split-sprint' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with 'reference' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower 'initial mass in low earth orbit' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw(e)) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power, and small NEP systems

  8. Nuclear electric propulsion: A better, safer, cheaper transportation system for human exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for 'split-sprint' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with 'reference' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower 'initial mass in low earth orbit' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw(e)) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power, and small NEP systems

  9. Remedial technology and characterization development at the SRS F/H Retention Basins using the DOE SAFER methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, W.C. Jr.; Kuelske, K.J.

    1994-07-01

    The Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) is a strategy used to accelerate and improve the environmental assessment and remediation of the F/H Retention Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). TMs strategy combines the data quality objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to focus on data collection and converge on a remedial action early. This approach emphasizes stakeholder involvement throughout the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process. The SAFER methodology is being applied to the characterization, technology development, and remediation tasks for the F/H Retention Basins. This ``approach was initiated in the scoping phase of these projects through the involvment of major stakeholders; Department of Energy (DOE)-Savannah River Field Office, DOE-Headquarters, Westinghouse Savannah River Company, United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the state of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), in the development of the Remedial Investigation (RI) workplans. A major activity that has been initiated is the development and implementation of a phase I workplan to identify preliminary contaminants of concern (pCOCs). A sampling plan was developed and approved by the major stakeholders for preliminary characterization of wastes remaining in the F/H Retention Basins. The involvement of stakeholders, development of a site conceptual model, development of remedial objectives for probable conditions, identification of the problem and reasonable deviations, and development of initial decision rules in the planning stages will ensure that preliminary data needs are identified and obtained prior to the initiation of the assessment and implementation phases of the projects resulting in the final remediation of the sites in an accelerated and more cost effective manner.

  10. Nuclear Electric Propulsion: A ``Better, Safer, Cheaper'' Transportation System for Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-07-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for ``split-sprint'' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with ``reference'' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower ``initial mass in low earth orbit'' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very large cost savings! Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power

  11. Is your plant inherently safer?

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, P.G.

    1996-07-01

    Managing process risk begins at the conceptual design stage. Using these guidelines, engineers can explore how to make existing and future plants inherently safer. Despite progress made in process design tools and development of industry standards for design, procurement and construction, the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) struggles to improve the safety and operation of existing facilities. The paper discusses design standards and practices, plant design success stories, and achieving inherently safer plant designs.

  12. Safer motherhood.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Of the 500,000 maternal deaths that are recorded each year, 300,000 take place in South and West Asia, 150,000 in Africa, 34,000 in Latin America, and 12,000 in East Asia. Only 6,000 deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth occur in developed countries each year. The lifetime chance of dying in childbirth in a developing country ranges from 1 in 15 to 1 in 70, in marked contrast to the 1 in 3000 to 1 in 10,000 risk in developed countries. The most common medical causes of maternal mortality in Third World countries are hemorrhage, infection, and toxemia. Locations where access to health care is limited have high death rates attributable to obstructed labor and its complications. The poor nutritional status of women in developing countries is a contributing factor to maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. It has been estimated that 63-80% of direct maternal deaths and 88-98% of all maternal deaths could be avoided with proper health care. However, less than 50% of births in developing countries are attended by a physician, nurse, midwife, or trained traditional birth attendant and fewer than 50% of the women in some countries attend even 1 prenatal consultation with a trained person. Although the immediate causes of maternal deaths are generally medical factors, there are usually underlying socioeconomic causes such as poverty, malnutrition, place of residence, educational level, and women's status. Better education, special health programs directed toward men and the community, and more effective use of the media could help promote the socioeconomic changes necessary to enhance women's status. Improved access to maternal health and child spacing services can also be established through training traditional birth attendants, especially in the recognition and referral of complications of pregnancy and delivery. Also needed is the avoidance of unwanted pregnancy through the effective use of contraception. According to World Bank calculations, developing

  13. SaferProducts.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Register & Respond Search Recalls & Reports About Questions Welcome Consumers Report your unsafe product on SaferProducts.gov. Tell ... adequacy of the contents of the Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database on SaferProducts.gov, particularly ...

  14. Recent advances in the development of 14-alkoxy substituted morphinans as potent and safer opioid analgesics.

    PubMed

    Spetea, M; Schmidhammer, H

    2012-01-01

    Morphine and other opioid morphinans produce analgesia primarily through μ opioid receptors (MORs), which mediate beneficial but also non-beneficial actions. There is a continued search for efficacious opioid analgesics with reduced complications. The cornerstone in the development of 14-alkoxymorphinans as novel analgesic drugs was the synthesis of the highly potent MOR agonist 14-O-methyloxymorphone. This opioid showed high antinociceptive potency but also the adverse effects associated with morphine type compounds. Further developments represent the introduction of a methyl and benzyl group at position 5 of 14-O-methyloxymorphone leading to the strong opioid analgesics 14-methoxymetopon and its 5-benzyl analogue, which exhibited less pronounced side effects than morphine although interacting selectively with MORs. Introduction of arylalkyl substituents such as phenylpropoxy in position 14 led to a series of extremely potent antinociceptive agents with enhanced affinities at all three opioid receptor types. During the past years, medicinal chemistry and opioid research focused increasingly on exploring the therapeutic potential of peripheral opioid receptors by peripheralization of opioids in order to minimize the occurrence of centrally-mediated side effects. Strategies to reduce penetration to the central nervous system (CNS) include chemical modifications that increase hydrophilicity. Zwitterionic 6-amino acid conjugates of 14-Oalkyloxymorphones were developed in an effort to obtain opioid agonists that have limited access to the CNS. These compounds show high antinociceptive potency by interacting with peripheral MORs. Opioid drugs with peripheral site of action represent an important target for the treatment of severe and chronic pain without the adverse actions of centrally acting opioids.

  15. Designing a Safer Interactive Healthcare System - The Impact of Authentic User Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Went, Kathryn L.; Gregor, Peter; Ricketts, Ian W.

    Information technology has been widely promoted in the healthcare sector to improve current practice and patient safety. However, end users are seldom involved extensively in the design and development of healthcare systems, with lip service often paid to the idea of true user involvement. In this case study the impact of sustained authentic user participation was explored using an interdisciplinary team, consisting of experts both in interaction and healthcare design and consultant anaesthetists, nurses, and pharmacists, to create an electronic prescribing and administration system. This paper details the interface that was created and provides examples of the way in which the design evolved in response to the sustained authentic user participation methods. The working prototype both reduced the opportunity for user error and was preferred by its users to the existing manual system.

  16. Faster, safer, and better DNA purification by ultracentrifugation using GelRed stain and development of mismatch oligo DNA for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2014-01-01

    Purification of plant DNA involves lengthy ultracentrifugation using ethidium bromide. Here, ultracentrifugation method is improved by staining with GelRed. The resulting method is faster, safer and of higher sensitivity. Purified DNA quality was confirmed by treatment with restriction enzymes and isolation of gene promoters. New type of long adaptor with mismatch sequence was also developed for promoter isolation.

  17. A participatory systems approach to design for safer integrated medicine management.

    PubMed

    Jun, Gyuchan Thomas; Canham, Aneurin; Altuna-Palacios, Ander; Ward, James R; Bhamra, Ran; Rogers, Stephen; Dutt, Amalin; Shah, Priyal

    2017-06-02

    It is recognised that whole systems approaches are required in the design and development of complex health care services. Application of a systems approach benefits from the involvement of key stakeholders. However, participation in the context of community based health care is particularly challenging due to busy and geographically distributed stakeholders. This study used action research to investigate what processes and methods were needed to successfully employ a participatory systems approach. Three participatory workshops planned and facilitated by method experts were held with 30 representative stakeholders. Various methods were used with them and evaluated through an audit of workshop outputs and a qualitative questionnaire. Findings on the method application and participation are presented and methodological challenges are discussed with reference to further research. Practitioner Summary: This study provides practical insights on how to apply a participatory systems approach to complex health care service design. Various template-based methods for systems thinking and risk-based thinking were efficiently and effectively applied with stakeholders.

  18. Can text messages increase safer sex behaviours in young people? Intervention development and pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Free, Caroline; McCarthy, Ona; French, Rebecca S; Wellings, Kaye; Michie, Susan; Roberts, Ian; Devries, Karen; Rathod, Sujit; Bailey, Julia; Syred, Jonathan; Edwards, Phil; Hart, Graham; Palmer, Melissa; Baraitser, Paula

    2016-07-01

    Younger people bear the heaviest burden of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Partner notification, condom use and STI testing can reduce infection but many young people lack the knowledge, skills and confidence needed to carry out these behaviours. Text messages can provide effective behavioural support. The acceptability and feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of safer sex support delivered by text message are not known. To assess the acceptability and feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of a safer sex intervention delivered by text message for young people aged 16-24 years. (1) Intervention development; (2) follow-up procedure development; (3) a pilot, parallel-arm randomised controlled trial with allocation via remote automated randomisation (ratio of 1 : 1) (participants were unmasked, whereas researchers analysing samples and data were masked); and (4) qualitative interviews. Participants were recruited from sexual health services in the UK. Young people aged 16-24 years diagnosed with chlamydia or reporting unprotected sex with more than one partner in the last year. A theory- and evidence-based safer sex intervention designed, with young people's input, to reduce the incidence of STIs by increasing the correct treatment of STIs, partner notification, condom use and STI testing before unprotected sex with a new partner. The intervention was delivered via automated mobile phone messaging over 12 months. The comparator was a monthly text message checking contact details. (1) Development of the intervention based on theory, evidence and expert and user views; (2) follow-up procedures; (3) pilot trial primary outcomes: full recruitment within 3 months and follow-up rate for the proposed primary outcomes for the main trial; and (4) participants' views and experiences regarding the acceptability of the intervention. In total, 200 participants were randomised in the pilot trial, of whom 99 were allocated to the intervention and 101 were

  19. Look before you build; geologic studies for safer land development in the San Francisco Bay area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blair-Tyler, Martha

    1995-01-01

    This Circular provides a general description of the types of geologic hazards that exist throughout the United States. In nontechnical language this book describes how geologic information can be incorporated in the land-use development process and contains useful discussion of several examples from the San Francisco Bay area and elsewhere in the United States of how geologic information is already being used in the development process by some cities and counties.

  20. How can we improve our understanding of cardiovascular safety liabilities to develop safer medicines?

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, HG; Benson, C; Cartwright, EJ; Cross, MJ; Garland, C; Hammond, T; Holloway, C; McMahon, N; Milligan, J; Park, BK; Pirmohamed, M; Pollard, C; Radford, J; Roome, N; Sager, P; Singh, S; Suter, T; Suter, W; Trafford, A; Volders, PGA; Wallis, R; Weaver, R; York, M; Valentin, JP

    2011-01-01

    Given that cardiovascular safety liabilities remain a major cause of drug attrition during preclinical and clinical development, adverse drug reactions, and post-approval withdrawal of medicines, the Medical Research Council Centre for Drug Safety Science hosted a workshop to discuss current challenges in determining, understanding and addressing ‘Cardiovascular Toxicity of Medicines’. This article summarizes the key discussions from the workshop that aimed to address three major questions: (i) what are the key cardiovascular safety liabilities in drug discovery, drug development and clinical practice? (ii) how good are preclinical and clinical strategies for detecting cardiovascular liabilities? and (iii) do we have a mechanistic understanding of these liabilities? It was concluded that in order to understand, address and ultimately reduce cardiovascular safety liabilities of new therapeutic agents there is an urgent need to: Fully characterize the incidence, prevalence and impact of drug-induced cardiovascular issues at all stages of the drug development process. Ascertain the predictive value of existing non-clinical models and assays towards the clinical outcome. Understand the mechanistic basis of cardiovascular liabilities; by addressing areas where it is currently not possible to predict clinical outcome based on preclinical safety data. Provide scientists in all disciplines with additional skills to enable them to better integrate preclinical and clinical data and to better understand the biological and clinical significance of observed changes. Develop more appropriate, highly relevant and predictive tools and assays to identify and wherever feasible to eliminate cardiovascular safety liabilities from molecules and wherever appropriate to develop clinically relevant and reliable safety biomarkers. PMID:21306581

  1. Results from Fielding of the Bio-Surveillance Analysis, Feedback, Evaluation and Response (B-SAFER) System in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, David; Umland, Edith; Brillman, Judith C.; Joyce, Ed; Froman, Philip; Burr, Tom; Judd, Stephen L.; Picard, Richard; Wokoun, Doug; Joner, Mike; Sewell, C. Mack

    2003-01-01

    Public health authorities need a surveillance system that is sensitive enough to detect a disease outbreak early to enable a proper response. In order to meet this challenge we have deployed a pilot component-based system in Albuquerque, NM as part of the National Biodefense Initiative (BDI). B-SAFER gathers routinely collected data from healthcare institutions to monitor disease events in the community. We describe initial results from the deployment of the system for the past 6 months. PMID:14728347

  2. How to sell safer sex.

    PubMed

    Overs, C

    1991-09-01

    Social and economic factors determine the extent of the sex industry in societies. Despite AIDS, the sex industry will continue to thrive. Accordingly, health promotion strategies aimed at sex workers and their clients should not stem from the belief that the industry should cease to exist. This paper offers advice in developing and implementing programs to promote safer sex among sex workers. The social context is 1 element to consider in planning successful campaigns. Interventions must be combined with well-planned prevention campaigns aimed at entire populations. The opinions and participation of those involved in the industry should also be sought, while worker discussion and action upon other community issues should not be discouraged. Care should be given to target the numerous and diverse sex worker audiences in addition to other persons related to and involved in the industry. Programs should address the main obstacles to practicing safer sex, and attention should be given to ensure the provision of an adequate and regular supply of cheap or free condoms through varied distribution channels. In the area of service provision, sex workers need easy access to social support and health care services from which they are often excluded. Activities conducted around the world include the marketing of safer sex, distributing printed information on HIV and AIDS to clients, training sex workers to pass designated constructive ideas to others involved in the sex industry, referring sex workers to sex businesses supportive of safer sex practices, and developing street theater and cabaret shows in bars.

  3. Safer Choice Partner of the Year Awards Application Form

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Design for the Environment program developed the Safer Product Labeling Program Partner of the Year Award program to recognize DfE stakeholders that have furthered the safer chemistry goals of the program

  4. Applying Toyota Production System principles to a psychiatric hospital: making transfers safer and more timely.

    PubMed

    Young, John Q; Wachter, Robert M

    2009-09-01

    Health care organizations have increasingly embraced industrial methods, such as the Toyota Production System (TPS), to improve quality, safety, timeliness, and efficiency. However, the use of such methods in psychiatric hospitals has been limited. A psychiatric hospital applied TPS principles to patient transfers to the outpatient medication management clinics (MMCs) from all other inpatient and outpatient services within the hospital's system. Sources of error and delay were identified, and a new process was designed to improve timely access (measured by elapsed time from request for transfer to scheduling of an appointment and to the actual visit) and patient safety by decreasing communication errors (measured by number of failed transfers). Complexity was substantially reduced, with one streamlined pathway replacing five distinct and more complicated pathways. To assess sustainability, the postintervention period was divided into Period 1 (first 12 months) and Period 2 (next 24 months). Time required to process the transfer and schedule the first appointment was reduced by 74.1% in Period 1 (p < .001) and by an additional 52.7% in Period 2 (p < .0001) for an overall reduction of 87% (p < .0001). Similarly, time to the actual appointment was reduced 31.2% in Period 1 (p < .0001), but was stable in Period 2 (p = .48). The number of transfers per month successfully processed and scheduled increased 95% in the postintervention period compared with the pre-implementation period (p = .015). Finally, data for failed transfers were only available for the postintervention period, and the rate decreased 89% in Period 2 compared with Period 1 (p = .017). The application of TPS principles enhanced access and safety through marked and sustained improvements in the transfer process's timeliness and reliability. Almost all transfer processes have now been standardized.

  5. Building safer systems through critical occurrence reviews: nine years of learning.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Polly; Campbell, Janice; Urmson, Lynn; Damignani, Rita

    2010-01-01

    At The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), the term critical occurrence was developed to describe any event that results in an actual or potential serious, undesirable and unexpected patient or staff outcome including death or major permanent loss of function, not related to the natural course of the patient's illness or underlying condition. It also includes a breach of legislation including the Personal Health Information Protection Act of Ontario. Although broader in its definition, the term aligns closely with critical incident as defined within the amendments to Regulation 965, under the Public Hospitals Act (Government of Ontario 1990). Critical occurrences may include (but are not limited to) potential or actual adverse outcomes (including death) associated with or resulting from medication errors; a wrong site, patient or procedure performed; contaminated drugs, devices or products; an equipment malfunction; an outbreak or unusual pattern/type of nosocomial infection; employee actual or potentially serious injuries.

  6. The use of global positioning systems in promoting safer walking for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Brian; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-07-01

    There are about 5 million people in Europe who have dementia, approximately half of whom need daily care. A common reason why dementia sufferers are admitted to long-term care is because of "wandering", i.e. leaving home without informing a carer, thereby potentially putting themselves at risk. Common methods of managing wandering include locking doors or alerting carers when a door is opened. A new method of managing wandering is by using electronic location devices. These depend on the satellite-based global positioning system (GPS). People can wear a location device in the form of a watch or pendant, or carry it like a mobile phone. This offers affected individuals the possibility of safe walking, with the reassurance that they can be found quickly if lost. However, it is not known how effective this method is and its use raises questions about safety and individual civil liberties. GPS location is a potentially useful method of managing wandering in dementia and there is considerable pressure on caregivers from commercial organisations to adopt the technique. Research is therefore required to determine which people are best suited for such devices, how effective they are in practice and what effect they have on important outcomes.

  7. Communicating the Benefits of SAFER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUL 2010 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3 . DATES COVERED...by the DDESB. DoD 6055.09-STD Chapter 17 provides guidance on preparing and submitting a risk-based site plan (Ref. 3 ). 3.2 RISK MANAGEMENT SAFER...Australian explosives safety seminars (PARARI), International Society of Explosives Engineers ( ISEE ) conferences, the International System Safety

  8. [Negotiating safer sex].

    PubMed

    Gordon, G; Charnock, D

    1991-01-01

    Women have generally assumed responsibility for contraception since the appearance of oral contraceptives and IUDs. But AIDS prevention programs are now asking women to assume responsibility for safer sex through use of condoms, a male method. Women are being asked to carry condoms, to negotiate their use each time they have sex, and to insist if the partner resists. The problem with this strategy is that frequently it is the male partner who makes sexual decisions, and women have less negotiating power. Women are considered feminine if they assume a passive role in sexual activity. This work suggests strategies to improve the negotiating power of women. Options and problems of speaking about safer sex vary in accordance with the nature of the relationship. A woman with a new partner can try to ascertain his sexual history, but may gain no information on his probable health even if he tells her the truth. It may be easier to convince him to use a condom at least in the beginning of the romance. Women working in the sex industry often have greater trouble convincing their friends and lovers to use a condom than their clients. Some family planning workers have begun to speak of safer sex with all their clients. Role playing and workshops or discussions with small groups of women having similar problems may help women overcome their reticence about discussing sexual topics. Some general suggestions to help women negotiate safer sex include choosing an opportune moment and planning in advance what to say; daring to speak directly without beating around the bush (the partner may also be gathering courage to speak); practicing placing condoms on objects and if necessary placing one on the partner without speaking; being honest with the partner about sex, love, and fidelity; and remembering that protection from condoms is mutual given that it is not possible to know who is infected. Until now, programs to help women practice safer sex have concentrated on sex industry

  9. GMES Sentinel-3: A Safer Satellite for a Safer Space World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, S.; Derenne, P.; Palmade, J. L.; Paoli, F.; Baillion, Y.; Berruti, B.

    2013-09-01

    The Sentinel-3 Mission is part of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative whose overall objective is to support Europe's goals regarding sustainable development and global governance of the environment by providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge. In that way, Sentinel-3 will help humanity by contributing to the improvement of the life quality.The Sentinel-3 mission will be more particularly devoted to the provision of Ocean observation data in routine, long term (20 years of operations) and continuous fashion with a consistent quality and a very high level of availability. In addition, the mission will be designed to generate Land optical observation products, ice topography and land hydrology products.THALES ALENIA Space has successfully performed during past years the definition phase of this mission and the system together with ESA to come to an optimized system answering to the users' needs. The results of this development phase and the way forward for a successful implementation of the mission safety compliant to applicable standards will be presented in this paper. In particular, the technical baseline and evolutions will be presented in order to demonstrate the safety improvements versus the previous generation of similar spacecrafts in term of design and operations. A specific focus will be given on quality and safety topics raised and managed during satellite development.The intention of this paper is to present: * The benefits of GMES initiative and specifically of the Sentinel-3 mission for the global humanity to contribute "for a Safer World". * The improvements of Sentinel-3 satellite design & operations in term of Space Safety with regard to previous similar satellites in demonstrating complianceto IADCGuidelines"foraSaferSpace" * The specific Safety and Quality management process implemented daily and the safety concerns raised during Satellite development "for a Safer Satellite" * The

  10. Implementing an ally development model to promote safer schools for LGB youth: a trans-disciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Zammitt, Kimberly A; Pepperell, Jennifer; Coe, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students experience ongoing bullying, harassment, and lack of safety in school. Specialized instructional support personnel (SISPs), such as school counselors, school social workers, and school psychologists, are in a unique position to advocate for LGB students and to implement an ally development model. The purpose of this article is to describe the current climate for LGB students, to discuss the current barriers facing SISPs in advocating for change, and to provide a model of ally development for use at each level of the K-12 system.

  11. Developing a systematic approach to safer medication use during pregnancy: summary of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention--convened meeting.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Cheryl S; Frey, Meghan T; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Greene, Michael F; Chambers, Christina D; Sahin, Leyla; Collins Sharp, Beth A; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-09-01

    To address information gaps that limit informed clinical decisions on medication use in pregnancy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) solicited expert input on a draft prototype outlining a systematic approach to evaluating the quality and strength of existing evidence for associated risks. The draft prototype outlined a process for the systematic review of available evidence and deliberations by a panel of experts to inform clinical decision making for managing health conditions in pregnancy. At an expert meeting convened by the CDC in January 2013, participants divided into working groups discussed decision points within the prototype. This report summarizes their discussions of best practices for formulating an expert review process, developing evidence summaries and treatment guidance, and disseminating information. There is clear recognition of current knowledge gaps and a strong collaboration of federal partners, academic experts, and professional organizations willing to work together toward safer medication use during pregnancy.

  12. Developing a systematic approach to safer medication use during pregnancy: summary of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—convened meeting

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Cheryl S.; Frey, Meghan T.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Greene, Michael F.; Chambers, Christina D.; Sahin, Leyla; Collins Sharp, Beth A.; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    To address information gaps that limit informed clinical decisions on medication use in pregnancy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) solicited expert input on a draft prototype outlining a systematic approach to evaluating the quality and strength of existing evidence for associated risks. The draft prototype outlined a process for the systematic review of available evidence and deliberations by a panel of experts to inform clinical decision making for managing health conditions in pregnancy. At an expert meeting convened by the CDC in January 2013, participants divided into working groups discussed decision points within the prototype. This report summarizes their discussions of best practices for formulating an expert review process, developing evidence summaries and treatment guidance, and disseminating information. There is clear recognition of current knowledge gaps and a strong collaboration of federal partners, academic experts, and professional organizations willing to work together toward safer medication use during pregnancy. PMID:24881821

  13. Perspectives of healthcare providers and HIV-affected individuals and couples during the development of a Safer Conception Counseling Toolkit in Kenya: stigma, fears, and recommendations for the delivery of services.

    PubMed

    Mmeje, Okeoma; Njoroge, Betty; Akama, Eliud; Leddy, Anna; Breitnauer, Brooke; Darbes, Lynae; Brown, Joelle

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction is important to many HIV-affected individuals and couples and healthcare providers (HCPs) are responsible for providing resources to help them safely conceive while minimizing the risk of sexual and perinatal HIV transmission. In order to fulfill their reproductive goals, HIV-affected individuals and their partners need access to information regarding safer methods of conception. The objective of this qualitative study was to develop a Safer Conception Counseling Toolkit that can be used to train HCPs and counsel HIV-affected individuals and couples in HIV care and treatment clinics in Kenya. We conducted a two-phased qualitative study among HCPs and HIV-affected individuals and couples from eight HIV care and treatment sites in Kisumu, Kenya. We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) to assess the perspectives of HCPs and HIV-affected individuals and couples in order to develop and refine the content of the Toolkit. Subsequently, IDIs were conducted among HCPs who were trained using the Toolkit and FGDs among HIV-affected individuals and couples who were counseled with the Toolkit. HIV-related stigma, fears, and recommendations for delivery of safer conception counseling were assessed during the discussions. One hundred and six individuals participated in FGDs and IDIs; 29 HCPs, 49 HIV-affected women and men, and 14 HIV-serodiscordant couples. Participants indicated that a safer conception counseling and training program for HCPs is needed and that routine provision of safer conception counseling may promote maternal and child health by enhancing reproductive autonomy among HIV-affected couples. They also reported that the Toolkit may help dispel the stigma and fears associated with reproduction in HIV-affected couples, while supporting them in achieving their reproductive goals. Additional research is needed to evaluate the Safer Conception Toolkit in order to support its implementation and use in HIV care and

  14. Safer Chemicals Research Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chemical safety is a major priority of the U.S. EPA. Moving toward a healthier, more sustainable environment requires making safer, “greener” chemicals and producing new and existing chemicals in ways that are safer for humans and wildlife.

  15. Technology for Safer Skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Bendix RDR-4B airborne weather radar, developed by Allied Signal Commercial Avionic Systems, is the product of a decade-long Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/NASA/industry/academia research program. Numerous aircraft accidents had occurred because of windshear, a sudden shift in wind direction and velocity. A characteristic of windshear is the microburst, a column of air which cools rapidly in a thunderstorm and generates intense downdrafts. Microbursts can cause an airplane to lose lift and speed and then crash. A Congressional Mandate to the FAA launched the program with NASA to develop the essential technology for detecting and avoiding microbursts. Langley Research Center developed microburst sensors, including Doppler microwave radar, which sends a radio wave ahead of the aircraft to measure windshear velocity. These predictions give pilots time to prepare for the microbursts. After flight tests and the design of certification standards, the FAA required all commercial aircraft to install some type of windshear detector or predictor.

  16. Designing safer flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1996-11-01

    Researchers are developing ways to ensure that power-packed flywheel-battery systems stay safely contained. Packed with power that is available on demand, a practical flywheel battery would go a long way toward making low-pollution, high-mileage hybrid electric cars, trucks, and trains a reality. Few other near-term technologies can foreseeably provide the load-leveling (power-averaging) capabilities necessary for rapid acceleration, speed maintenance on grades, and recovery of braking energy (regenerative braking). But high energy density has its drawbacks. A high-performance composite flywheel rotor spinning anywhere from 30,000 to more than 100,000 revolutions per minute has lots of inertia. That`s going to be tough to control, particularly when moving on rough roads. Another formidable technical challenge is designing a lightweight, cost-effective safety containment system that can resist the impact of burst fragments and transmission of high torque loads just milliseconds after wheel failure.

  17. Simulators for Safer Shipping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Each year one ship out of every five afloat collides with another vessel, rams a dock, or runs a ground. CAORF (Computer Aided Operations Research Facility), designed and built by Sperry Rand Corporation, incorporates technology developed in a wide variety of aerospace simulation and technical training programs. CAORF can be set up to duplicate the exact handling qualities of any vessel under various conditions of wind, tide and current. Currently a dozen different ships can be "plugged in." Bridge instrumentation is typical of modern shipboard equipment including radar, internal and external c.ommunications and new collision avoidance systems. From repetitive operation of simulated ships, MarAd is building a valuable data base for improving marine safety.

  18. Safer work clothing for fishermen.

    PubMed

    Geving, Ingunn Holmen; Reitan, Jarl; Sandsund, Mariann; Faerevik, Hilde; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo; Aasjord, Halvard

    2006-01-01

    The fisherman's work environment consists of many potential risks. A study of occupational accidents in the Norwegian fishing industry in the nine-year period from 1998 to 2006 shows that more than 3/4 of the deaths were caused by loss of fishing vessel or man-overboard accidents. Furthermore, the greatest risk of drowning is found in the smallest fleet. The aim of our project was to develop safer work clothing and through this contribute to a reduction in work accidents and injuries in the fishing fleet. We considered that it is possible to produce protective work clothing that satisfies a specification of requirements covering the fishermen's needs for protection and comfort during work. An end user-centred process including twenty-three personal interviews and a questionnaire was used to clarify the fishermen's needs and wishes before detailed design and product development. We identified an overview of all the fishermen's needs for protection during work, and produced a prioritised list of functional requirements for the clothing. The results show that the clothing previously preferred by fishermen does not satisfy all the users' demands for safety, functionality and comfort. These demands have been taken into consideration when designing improved work clothing for the fishing fleet. A selected number of prototypes were developed on the basis of the established specification of requirements. The prototypes were evaluated according to the users' requirements through tests in SINTEF's Work Physiology Laboratory and on board fishing vessels. The results demonstrate that the new protective clothing satisfies the fishermen's requirements.

  19. Safer sex in tourist resorts.

    PubMed

    Ford, N; Inman, M

    1992-01-01

    A survey in Torbay, England, indicated substantial sexual interaction of an unsafe kind between young residents and tourists. A pilot programme is described which sought to promote safer sexual behaviour: the attention of both tourists and local people who frequented nightclubs was engaged by peer groups who conveyed educational messages.

  20. Safer, More Effective Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data Fentanyl Encounters Data CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain For Patients For Providers Guideline Resources Clinical Tools ... used carefully. The new CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain helps inform providers’ ability to offer safer, more ...

  1. A Safer Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Miracle, Ann L.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-08-11

    The successful migration of juvenile salmonids downriver on the Columbia and Snake Rivers to the Pacific Ocean in the United States Pacific Northwest has been challenged due to the multiple hydropower facilities located on these rivers. Because head injury likely results from physical trauma, such as impacting a physical structure or extreme high velocities, the development of a biomarker assay to quickly assess subacute physical injury and recovery is essential to determine the impact of hydropower structures on fish health.

  2. Safer Pleasure Boats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    'Flamarest' coating developed by Avco Corporation for NASA to protect fuel lines and tanks is sprayed on the interior of polyester boat hull in commercial application. About 30 mils of the coating prevented structural damage to hull during test in which a 13 minute interior gasoline fire was started. An unprotected hull would begin to burn in 30 seconds. Same material applied as tape to wrap fuel lines effectively insulates hose when charred while also reducing spread of flame.

  3. Chemical Safety Alert: Safer Technology and Alternatives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This alert is intended to introduce safer technology concepts and general approaches, explains the concepts and principles, and gives brief examples of the integration of safer technologies into facility risk management activities.

  4. Using the Safer Clinical Systems approach and Model for Improvement methodology to decrease Venous Thrombo-Embolism in Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Angela; Peden, Carol; Jordan, Lesley; Crowe, Josephine; Peden, Carol

    2016-01-01

    A significant incidence of post-procedural deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE) was identified in patients undergoing surgery at our hospital. Investigation showed an unreliable peri-operative process leading to patients receiving incorrect or missed venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. The Trust had previously participated in a project funded by the Health Foundation using the “Safer Clinical Systems” methodology to assess, diagnose, appraise options, and implement interventions to improve a high risk medication pathway. We applied the methodology from that study to this cohort of patients demonstrating that the same approach could be applied in a different context. Interventions were linked to the greatest hazards and risks identified during the diagnostic phase. This showed that many surgical elective patients had no VTE risk assessment completed pre-operatively, leading to missed or delayed doses of VTE prophylaxis post-operatively. Collaborative work with stakeholders led to the development of a new process to ensure completion of the VTE risk assessment prior to surgery, which was implemented using the Model for Improvement methodology. The process was supported by the inclusion of a VTE check in the Sign Out element of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist at the end of surgery, which also ensured that appropriate prophylaxis was prescribed. A standardised operation note including the post-operative VTE plan will be implemented in the near future. At the end of the project VTE risk assessments were completed for 100% of elective surgical patients on admission, compared with 40% in the baseline data. Baseline data also revealed that processes for chemical and mechanical prophylaxis were not reliable. Hospital wide interventions included standardisation of mechanical prophylaxis devices and anti-thromboembolic stockings (resulting in a cost saving of £52,000), and a Trust wide awareness and education programme. The education included

  5. Safer by design strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobaleda-Siles, M.; Guillamon, A. P.; Delpivo, C.; Vázquez-Campos, S.; Puntes, V. F.

    2017-06-01

    Throughout the EU funded FP7 project GUIDENano, we are trying to control and monitor the evolution of nano-enable products during their lifecycle. Small alterations of the nanoparticle (NP) state may have critical consequences on the NP behaviour and performance. For this reason it is important to highlight the importance of an extensive and proper characterization to define the NP physico-chemical characteristics under several environmental conditions. Furthermore, this characterization is necessary to ensure that obtained results are reproducible and allow understanding the behaviour of the NP on biological systems. In this paper different strategies reported in the literature regarding the safety-by-design concept are summarized. Several strategies from the synthetic point of view that help us to modulate the main factors which determine the safety of nanomaterials are proposed.

  6. Ensuring safer drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J. . Fluid Delivery and Electrical Markets); Higgins, P. )

    1994-09-01

    Today's regulatory environment has led to the proliferation of voluntary consensus standards and certification programs that are important to ensuring safety and health in a number of areas. One such area -- the treatment and delivery of potable water -- is addressed by the Drinking Water Additives Program.'' At the request of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), this program was developed in the mid-1980s by an independent, voluntary consensus standards organization called NSF International (formerly known as the National Sanitation Foundation). This paper explains the need for and the structure of the Drinking Water Additives Program; the rationale for transferring responsibility for its execution from the EPA to the private sector; and the impact of its standards on users, manufacturers, and state and local regulatory bodies. Understanding the additives program is critically important to industry suppliers because, as it continues to gain greater awareness and acceptance, there are a growing number of manufacturers sourcing materials and products primarily from suppliers whose products meet the program's certification requirements.

  7. Safer Aviation Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of thermally stable polymer samples were tested. These materials are called low heat release materials and are designed for aircraft interior decorative materials. The materials are designed to give off a minimum amount of noxious gases when heated, which increases the possibility that people can escape from a burning aircraft. New cabin materials have suitably low heat release so that fire does not spread, toxic chemicals are not given off, and the fire-emergency escape time for crew and passengers is lengthened. These low heat-release materials have a variety of advantages and applications: interiors for ground-based facilities, interiors of space vehicles, and many commercial fire-protection environments. A microscale combustion calorimeter at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Center tested NASA Langley Research Center materials samples. The calorimeter is shown. A sharp, quantitative, and reproducible heat-release-rate peak is obtained in the microscale heat-release-rate test. The newly tested NASA materials significantly reduced the heat release capacity and total heat release. The thermal stability and flammability behavior of the samples was very good. The new materials demonstrated a factor of 4 reduction in total heat release over ULTEM (a currently used material). This information is provided in the following barchart. In other tests, the materials showed greater than a factor 9 reduction in heat-release capacity over ULTEM. The newly tested materials were developed for low dielectric constant, low color, and good solubility. A scale up of the material samples is needed to determine the repeatability of the performance in larger samples. Larger panels composed of the best candidate materials will be tested in a larger scale FAA Technical Center fire facility. The NASA Glenn Research Center, Langley (Jeff Hinkley), and the FAA Technical Center (Richard Lyon) cooperatively tested these materials for the Accident Mitigation

  8. Safer staining method for acid fast bacilli.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R C; Zabrowarny, L A

    1993-06-01

    To develop a method for staining acid fast bacilli which excluded highly toxic phenol from the staining solution. A lipophilic agent, a liquid organic detergent, LOC High Studs, distributed by Amway, was substituted. The acid fast bacilli stained red; nuclei, cytoplasm, and cytoplasmic elements stained blue on a clear background. These results compare very favourably with acid fast bacilli stained by the traditional method. Detergents are efficient lipophilic agents and safer to handle than phenol. The method described here stains acid fast bacilli as efficiently as traditional carbol fuchsin methods. LOC High Suds is considerably cheaper than phenol.

  9. Safer staining method for acid fast bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R C; Zabrowarny, L A

    1993-01-01

    To develop a method for staining acid fast bacilli which excluded highly toxic phenol from the staining solution. A lipophilic agent, a liquid organic detergent, LOC High Studs, distributed by Amway, was substituted. The acid fast bacilli stained red; nuclei, cytoplasm, and cytoplasmic elements stained blue on a clear background. These results compare very favourably with acid fast bacilli stained by the traditional method. Detergents are efficient lipophilic agents and safer to handle than phenol. The method described here stains acid fast bacilli as efficiently as traditional carbol fuchsin methods. LOC High Suds is considerably cheaper than phenol. Images PMID:7687254

  10. Graduated driver licensing and safer driving.

    PubMed

    McKnight, A James; Peck, Raymond C

    2003-01-01

    Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) inserts between the leaner permit and full licensure an intermediate or "provisional" license that allows novices to drive unsupervised but subject to provisions intended to reduce the risks that accompany entry into highway traffic. Introduction of GDL has been followed by lowered accident rates, resulting from both limiting exposure of novices to unsafe situations and by helping them to deal with them more safely. Sources of safer driving include extended learning, early intervention, contingent advancement, and multistage instruction. To extend the learning process, most GDL systems lengthen the duration of the learner phase and require a specified level of adult-supervised driving. Results indicate that extended learning can reduce accidents substantially if well structured and highly controlled. Early intervention with novice traffic violators have shown both a general deterrent effect upon novice violators facing suspension and a specific effect upon those who have experienced it. Making advancement to full licensure contingent upon a violation-free record when driving on the provisional license has also evidenced a reduction in accidents and violations during that phase of licensure. Multistage instruction attempts development of advanced skills only after novices have had a chance to master more basic skills. Although this element of GDL has yet to be evaluated, research indicates crash reduction is possible in situations where it does not increase exposure to risk. While the various elements of GDL have demonstrated potential benefit in enhancing the safety of novice drivers, considerable improvement in the nature and enforcement of GDL requirements is needed to realize that potential.

  11. Toward a safer moral climate.

    PubMed

    Rodney, Patricia; Doane, Gweneth Hartrick; Storch, Janet; Varcoe, Colleen

    2006-10-01

    The authors define moral climate in the context of health care as the implicit and explicit values that drive health-care delivery and shape the workplaces in which care is delivered. Over the past six years, their research has focused on describing the moral climates of nurses' workplaces and improving them. In this article, the authors argue that nurses in direct care delivery roles have the insights, expertise and interpersonal skills required to create a much safer moral climate for practice. To make this happen, nurses require opportunities for self-reflection and for true collaboration with their colleagues in management and administration and other health-care disciplines.

  12. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red stripe on suit) test the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles from Earth. The pair was actually performing an in-space rehearsal or demonstration of a contingency rescue using the never-before flown hardware. Meade, who here wears the small back-pack unit with its complementary chest-mounted control unit, and Lee, anchored to Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm, took turns using the SAFER hardware during their shared space walk of September 16, 1994.

  13. Molecular approaches for safer and stronger vaccines.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Rappuoli, R

    1999-11-20

    Progress in molecular biology and biotechnology is making possible the development of new vaccines or the improvement of already existing ones. Recombinant DNA technology, genetic attenuation of bacterial and viral pathogens and their use as vectors for heterologous proteins, expression of microbial antigens in transgenic edible plants, and naked nucleic acid technology represent the most popular approaches hitherto adopted. A successful biotechnological approach to the development of new and improved vaccines has been based on genetic detoxification of bacterial toxins, such as the toxin of Bordetella pertussis, the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli, and the toxin of Vibrio cholerae. Genetically detoxified Bordetella pertussis is now included in a commercially available acellular vaccine against pertussis. Genetically detoxified Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae have been shown to behave as very strong and safe mucosal adjuvants and are now entering the clinical stage. These results demonstrate that a rational molecular approach to the development of safer and stronger vaccines is feasible.

  14. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  15. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  16. Responsible men, blameworthy women: Black heterosexual men's discursive constructions of safer sex and masculinity.

    PubMed

    Bowleg, Lisa; Heckert, Andrea L; Brown, Tia L; Massie, Jenné S

    2015-04-01

    Although Black heterosexual men (BHM) in the United States rank among those most affected by HIV, research about how safer sex messages shape their safer sex behaviors is rare, highlighting the need for innovative qualitative methodologies such as critical discursive psychology (CDP). This CDP study examined how: (a) BHM construct safer sex and masculinity; (b) BHM positioned themselves in relation to conventional masculinity; and (c) discursive context (individual interview vs. focus group) shaped talk about safer sex and masculinity. Data included individual interviews (n = 30) and 4 focus groups (n = 26) conducted with 56 self-identified Black/African American heterosexual men, ages 18 to 44. Analyses highlighted 5 main constructions: (a) condoms as signifiers of "safe" women; (b) blaming women for STI/responsibility for safer sex; (c) relationship/trust/knowledge; (d) condom mandates; and (e) public health safer sex. Discourses positioned BHM in terms of conventional masculinity when talk denied men's agency for safer sex and/or contraception, or positioned women as deceitful, or apathetic about sexual risk and/or pregnancy. Notably, discourses also spotlighted alternative masculinities relevant to taking responsibility for safer sex or sexual exclusivity. Discursive context, namely the homosocial nature of focus group discussions, shaped how participants conversed about safer sex, and masculinity but not the content of that talk. In denying BHM's responsibility for safer sex, BHM's discourses about safer sex and masculinity often mirror public health messages, underscoring a critical need to sync these discourses to reduce sexual risk, and develop gender-transformative safer sex interventions for BHM. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. The SAFER-Project and Seismic Early Warning in Europe (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschau, J.; Gasparini, P.

    2009-12-01

    SAFER (Seismic EArly Warning For EuRope) is the first large scale scientific project in Europe on earthquake early warning. It is funded by the European Commission in the context of Framework Program 6 under the theme Sustainable Development, Global Change and Ecosystems. Its general objective is to develop knowledge and tools for increasing the capability of effective earthquake early warning in Europe and to implement and test these tools in selected European cities. The SAFER project was carried out between 2006 and 2009 by a consortium formed by 20 institutes from 11 European and Mediterranean countries (Germany, Italy, Greece, Romania, Switzerland, Norway, France, the Netherlands, Iceland, Turkey and Egypt) and one each from Japan, Taiwan and USA. Five major earthquake prone cities were chosen as test areas: Athens, Bucharest, Cairo, Istanbul and Naples. The combined population of these cities is about 40 million inhabitants and all have experienced severe earthquakes in recent years. SAFER is strongly multi-disciplinary, calling upon expertise in seismology, structural and geotechnical engineering, informatics and statistics. Some of the specific problems addressed are related to - the rapid determination of earthquake size, complex earthquake features, and damage potential; - the implementation of a fully probabilistic framework for applications of earthquake early warning based on cost-benefit analysis; - the development of a new generation of early warning systems being decentralised and people-centred, and - the implementation of the real-time “shake map”-technology in large European cities. The presentation will review the major scientific findings, comment on the improvements of the earthquake early warning capabilities achieved by SAFER in the five test cities, and present some ideas for the future development of earthquake early warning in Europe.

  18. Using a narrative to spark safer sex communication.

    PubMed

    Donné, Lennie; Hoeks, John; Jansen, Carel

    2017-10-01

    College students are a group at risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). While they are generally well informed about STIs, they do not consistently use condoms. An important element in preventing STIs is safer sex communication, especially with a sexual partner. This may be difficult, however, because of a lack of experience in talking about safer sex or because of the absence of suitable role models. In this study, a narrative intervention was tested that was developed to provide receivers with a social script for safer sex communication. An experiment was conducted among college students (N = 225) who were exposed to either a narrative intervention or a non-narrative (brochure) intervention, followed by a post-test questionnaire. In the narrative condition, part of the participants completed a pre-test questionnaire before being exposed to the intervention. Compared to pre-test scores, the narrative positively influenced safer sex communication intentions. The results show no significant differences between post-test scores of the narrative and the non-narrative condition. Mediation analyses showed that narrative processes (identification and transportation) were positively related to safer sex communication. In this study, we investigated both the effects of a narrative intervention on safer sex communication intentions, and the mechanisms of narrative processing underlying these effects. The narrative turned out to be as effective as a brochure version with the same information. Our mediation analyses suggest that narratives can be made more persuasive by increasing the reader's involvement with the story as a whole, and with one of the characters in particular.

  19. Safety Assessment for Explosive Risk (SAFER) peer review report.

    SciTech Connect

    Heimdahl, Olaf E. R.; LaHoud, Paul; Chapman, Leon Darrel

    2004-08-01

    At the direction of the Department of Defense Explosives Safety Board (DDESB), a Peer Review Team was established to review the status of development of the risk-based explosives safety siting process and criteria as currently implemented in the software 'Safety Assessment for Explosive Risk (SAFER)' Version 2.1. The objective of the Peer Review Team was to provide an independent evaluation of the components of the SAFER model, the ongoing development of the model and the risk assessment process and criteria. This peer review report addressed procedures; protocols; physical and statistical science algorithms; related documents; and software quality assurance, validation and verification. Overall, the risk-based method in SAFER represents a major improvement in the Department of Defense (DoD) approach to explosives safety management. The DDESB and Risk Based Explosives Safety Criteria Team (RBESCT) have made major strides in developing a methodology, which over time may become a worldwide model. The current status of all key areas of the SAFER code has been logically developed and is defensible. Continued improvement and refinement can be expected as implementation proceeds. A consistent approach to addressing and refining uncertainty in each of the primary areas (probability of event, consequences of event and exposure) will be a very beneficial future activity.

  20. Building Safer Communities: The Integrated Community Safety Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kerr, Thomas A; Jordan, Steven Albert

    2001-03-01

    This paper discusses an integrated community safety approach to creating safer communities. It defines community broadly to include two categories of community members: “industry” and “neighbors.” Potential community members within the “industry” category include facilities, government/regulators, customers, stockholders, and suppliers. Within the “neighbors” category are towns, cities, counties, states; people/commodity flow systems; news media and special interest groups; environment; and families of employees. Each of these potential community members and its characteristics are discussed. The integrated community safety approach consists of three major activities: (1) define the boundaries of the community; (2) facilitate the sense of community; and (3) address the needs of the community. Defining the boundaries of the community includes determining the geographical and social boundaries; this is accomplished through conducting a hazard analysis and community involvement to identify all of the community members. Facilitating the sense of community includes conducting a capability/needs assessment and continuing community involvement to identify the issues and concerns of community members. Addressing the needs of the community involves master planning to consider safety issues in all community development actions and continuing community education and involvement. The integrated community safety approach is a workable approach for existing industries and their neighbors as well as new projects that industries and their neighbors might be considering. By using this socio-technical approach to integrating industry and all of its neighbors into a safer community, the integrated community safety approach will better assure the viability and safety of industry and its neighbors while maintaining or improving the overall quality of life.

  1. STS-64 SAFER exercise in bldg 9NW on the air-bearing floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-05-04

    S94-33357 (1994) --- Scott Bleiseth, top, prepares to spin Mike Hess, a fellow EVA engineer, during a test on the air-bearing floor in the Shuttle Mock-up and Integration Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The hardware being tested is part of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER). The pair was developing techniques by which the non-SAFER equipped spacewalker will impart a rotation to the SAFER-using spacewalker during the STS-64 mission. Once the SAFER astronaut is spinning, the device will be activated and its automatic attitude hold capability will be tested. SAFER is to fly on STS-76 as well. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  2. Improved and safer nuclear power.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J J

    1989-04-21

    Recent progress in advanced nuclear power development in the United States is revealing high potential for nuclear reactor systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the present generation. Passive, or intrinsic, characteristics are applied not only to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction but also to ensure continued cooling of the fuel and its containment systems even if a major breakdown of the normal cooling and control functions were to occur. The chance of a severe accident is thereby substantially reduced. The plant designs that are emerging are simpler and more rugged, have a longer life span, and place less burden on equipment and operating personnel. Modular design concepts and design standardization are also used to reduce construction time and engineering costs, giving promise that the cost of generating power from these systems will be competitive with alternative methods.

  3. 70 Years Making the World Safer: Extended

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    Extended version with narration. This video shows our roles in making the world safer — working to end World War II, providing stable isotopes for research, providing unique precision manufacturing capabilities, and meeting nonproliferation and global security missions.

  4. 70 Years Making the World Safer

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    This video shows our roles in making the world safer — working to end World War II, providing stable isotopes for research, providing unique precision manufacturing capabilities, and meeting nonproliferation and global security missions.

  5. Human Factors for More Usable and Safer Health Information Technology: Where Are We Now and Where do We Go from Here?

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, A; Nohr, C; Borycki, E

    2016-11-10

    A wide range of human factors approaches have been developed and adapted to healthcare for detecting and mitigating negative unexpected consequences associated with technology in healthcare (i.e. technology-induced errors). However, greater knowledge and wider dissemination of human factors methods is needed to ensure more usable and safer health information technology (IT) systems.

  6. The basic problems of bed-fence-covers in hospitals for preventing accidents based on the investigation into the actual conditions: for developing the safer bed-fence-cover for elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Megumi; Konishi, Teuko; Toyoda, Mitsuko; Maie, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    The basic problems of bed-fence-covers in hospitals were listed for preventing relevant accidents based on the investigation into actual conditions in a hospital in Kawasaki City. There were many elderly aged patients with dementia, higher brain dysfunction or psychosis in the hospital. They sometimes fell into the gaps of bed-fences, resulting in serious accidents. It was due not only to the structure of the bed-fences, but also to the characteristics of patients. Therefore the authors listed up the problems concerning the accidents to recognize them; (i) as physical conditions, (1) they could not move by themselves because of paralysis or decrease of fitness, (2) they could not feel when they were pinched by the gaps because of decrease of sense, (3) they moved irregularly or violently without their intention, and (ii) as mental conditions, (1) they took dangerous behaviors because of dementias, (2) they could not control their behaviors because of higher brain dysfunctions, (3) they could not control their feelings and moved violently because of mental disorders. The authors intend to develop safer bed-fence-covers to prevent these accidents for the elderly patients.

  7. Safer Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kejha, Joe; Smith, Novis; McCloseky, Joel

    2004-01-01

    A number of nonvolatile, low-flammability liquid oligomers and polymers based on aliphatic organic carbonate molecular structures have been found to be suitable to be blended with ethylene carbonate to make electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells. Heretofore, such electrolytes have often been made by blending ethylene carbonate with volatile, flammable organic carbonates. The present nonvolatile electrolytes have been found to have adequate conductivity (about 2 mS/cm) for lithium ions and to remain liquid at temperatures down to -5 C. At normal charge and discharge rates, lithiumion cells containing these nonvolatile electrolytes but otherwise of standard design have been found to operate at current and energy densities comparable to those of cells now in common use. They do not perform well at high charge and discharge rates -- an effect probably attributable to electrolyte viscosity. Cells containing the nonvolatile electrolytes have also been found to be, variously, nonflammable or at least self-extinguishing. Hence, there appears to be a basis for the development of safer high-performance lithium-ion cells.

  8. Consensus statement: Supporting Safer Conception and Pregnancy For Men And Women Living with and Affected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lynn T; Beyeza-Kashesya, Jolly; Cooke, Ian; Davies, Natasha; Heffron, Renee; Kaida, Angela; Kinuthia, John; Mmeje, Okeoma; Semprini, Augusto E; Weber, Shannon

    2017-05-13

    Safer conception interventions reduce HIV incidence while supporting the reproductive goals of people living with or affected by HIV. We developed a consensus statement to address demand, summarize science, identify information gaps, outline research and policy priorities, and advocate for safer conception services. This statement emerged from a process incorporating consultation from meetings, literature, and key stakeholders. Three co-authors developed an outline which was discussed and modified with co-authors, working group members, and additional clinical, policy, and community experts in safer conception, HIV, and fertility. Co-authors and working group members developed and approved the final manuscript. Consensus across themes of demand, safer conception strategies, and implementation were identified. There is demand for safer conception services. Access is limited by stigma towards PLWH having children and limits to provider knowledge. Efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and acceptability data support a range of safer conception strategies including ART, PrEP, limiting condomless sex to peak fertility, home insemination, male circumcision, STI treatment, couples-based HIV testing, semen processing, and fertility care. Lack of guidelines and training limit implementation. Key outstanding questions within each theme are identified. Consumer demand, scientific data, and global goals to reduce HIV incidence support safer conception service implementation. We recommend that providers offer services to HIV-affected men and women, and program administrators integrate safer conception care into HIV and reproductive health programs. Answers to outstanding questions will refine services but should not hinder steps to empower people to adopt safer conception strategies to meet reproductive goals.

  9. Advancing the science of measurement of diagnostic errors in healthcare: the Safer Dx framework

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are major contributors to harmful patient outcomes, yet they remain a relatively understudied and unmeasured area of patient safety. Although they are estimated to affect about 12 million Americans each year in ambulatory care settings alone, both the conceptual and pragmatic scientific foundation for their measurement is under-developed. Health care organizations do not have the tools and strategies to measure diagnostic safety and most have not integrated diagnostic error into their existing patient safety programs. Further progress toward reducing diagnostic errors will hinge on our ability to overcome measurement-related challenges. In order to lay a robust groundwork for measurement and monitoring techniques to ensure diagnostic safety, we recently developed a multifaceted framework to advance the science of measuring diagnostic errors (The Safer Dx framework). In this paper, we describe how the framework serves as a conceptual foundation for system-wide safety measurement, monitoring and improvement of diagnostic error. The framework accounts for the complex adaptive sociotechnical system in which diagnosis takes place (the structure), the distributed process dimensions in which diagnoses evolve beyond the doctor's visit (the process) and the outcomes of a correct and timely “safe diagnosis” as well as patient and health care outcomes (the outcomes). We posit that the Safer Dx framework can be used by a variety of stakeholders including researchers, clinicians, health care organizations and policymakers, to stimulate both retrospective and more proactive measurement of diagnostic errors. The feedback and learning that would result will help develop subsequent interventions that lead to safer diagnosis, improved value of health care delivery and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25589094

  10. Can we select health professionals who provide safer care.

    PubMed

    Firth-Cozens, J; Cording, H; Ginsburg, R

    2003-12-01

    In order to improve patient safety, health services are looking to other industries' experiences and as a result are adopting a systems approach to learning from error, rather than simply focusing the blame on the individual. However, in health care the individual will remain an important contributor to safety and this paper looks at other literatures besides health to consider a number of individual characteristics and the role they might play in terms of work practices that affect patient safety. It considers the effects of a variety of personality profiles including sensation seeking, Type A, and those with high self esteem; looks at our ability to select for psychological wellbeing; and discusses the ways that psychometrics have been used in medicine to predict performance. It concludes that although rarely used, psychometrics has been shown to be useful in predicting some aspects of performance in medicine and suggests that this is an area well worth further study for the benefit of patient care. Nevertheless, we are a long way away from being able to select safer staff and should instead be developing this knowledge to enable us to recognise and address potential difficulties.

  11. Combining Systems and Teamwork Approaches to Enhance the Effectiveness of Safety Improvement Interventions in Surgery: The Safer Delivery of Surgical Services (S3) Program.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Peter; Morgan, Lauren; New, Steve; Catchpole, Ken; Roberston, Eleanor; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Collins, Gary; Griffin, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Patient safety improvement interventions usually address either work systems or team culture. We do not know which is more effective, or whether combining approaches is beneficial. To compare improvement in surgical team performance after interventions addressing teamwork culture, work systems, or both. Suite of 5 identical controlled before-after intervention studies, with preplanned analysis of pooled data for indirect comparisons of strategies. Operating theatres in 5 UK hospitals performing elective orthopedic, plastic, or vascular surgery PARTICIPANTS:: All operating theatres staff, including surgeons, nurses, anaesthetists, and others INTERVENTIONS:: 4-month safety improvement interventions, using teamwork training (TT), systems redesign and standardization (SOP), Lean quality improvement, SOP + TT combination, or Lean + TT combination. Team technical and nontechnical performance and World Health Organization (WHO) checklist compliance, measured for 3 months before and after intervention using validated scales. Pooled data analysis of before-after change in active and control groups, comparing combined versus single and systems versus teamwork interventions, using 2-way ANOVA. We studied 453 operations, (255 intervention, 198 control). TT improved nontechnical skills and WHO compliance (P < 0.001), but not technical performance; systems interventions (Lean & SOP, 2 & 3) improved nontechnical skills and technical performance (P < 0.001) but improved WHO compliance less. Combined interventions (4 & 5) improved all performance measures except WHO time-out attempts, whereas single approaches (1 & 2 & 3) improved WHO compliance less (P < 0.001) and failed to improve technical performance. Safety interventions combining teamwork training and systems rationalization are more effective than those adopting either approach alone. This has important implications for safety improvement strategies in hospitals.

  12. A SYSTEM DESIGN FOR THE PROVISION OF A SAFER, MORE ECONOMIC, AND MORE EFFICIENT AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE FOR THE ICAO NORTH ATLANTIC REGION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ICAO Fourth North Atlantic Regional Air Navigation Meeting adopted a recommendation which called for the introduction of a systems planning...concept to the ICAO North Atlantic Region. Following acceptance of this recommendation by the ICAO Council, the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) established

  13. Using Technology to Create Safer Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townley, Arthur J.; Martinez, Kenneth

    1995-01-01

    Although classes to create student self-esteem and antigang programs are gaining in popularity, most school districts have not used available technology to help create safer campuses. Increased availability of telephones and two-way radios would enhance school security, along with incorporation of newer technologies such as computers, digitized…

  14. Severe systolic hypertension and the search for safer motherhood.

    PubMed

    Martin, James N

    2016-03-01

    Timely and appropriate response to severe hypertension during gestation is an important component of quality, safe care for pregnant or puerperal mothers regardless of causation. The reduction of severe maternal morbidity and maternal mortality in the hypertensive mother is clearly enhanced by the addition of standard protocols for provider response to severe hypertension, particularly severe systolic hypertension. The program developed in New York State via the Safe Motherhood Initiative promotes the implementation of unit-specific safety bundles, especially one that is focused upon a standardized approach to handling the obstetric emergency of severe hypertension usually associated with preeclampsia/eclampsia. The comprehensive preeclampsia/eclampsia safety bundle as summarized by Drs. Moroz and colleagues is reviewed especially from the perspective of its focus on the timely and specific responses for health care providers to make when severe hypertension is detected in the pregnant patient. Evidence-based guidance to practice considerations and clinical care of patients with preeclampsia/eclampsia is embedded within the program outlined for New York State by Moroz and her District II ACOG colleagues. There is a central focus on timely and appropriate antepartum/postpartum management of severe hypertension, a core concept to lessen maternal risk for cerebral hemorrhage. Ten considerations for further integration into the New York program are suggested. Beyond blood pressure control, there is a need for systematic review of interventions and outcomes over time, attention to possible future variations of the protocol for racial/ethnic patient groups at highest risk for maternal morbidity and mortality, and the identification of biomarker(s) that further specify and quantify risk to the maternal brain and other organ systems when severe hypertension develops. Safer motherhood will happen when evidence for best practice is integrated into systems of care for all

  15. Under construction: building a safer industry.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, John

    2002-01-01

    A revolution in the building industry over the past decade has spawned a new generation of safer materials and practices, decreasing some health risks for construction workers. Concerned consumers, builders, materials manufacturers, and government regulatory agencies have all contributed to a turn toward "green" building materials and practices, meaning that homeowners and office workers now are better able to live and work in healthier environments, and many construction workers are handling and installing less-toxic materials. PMID:11882489

  16. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  17. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema

    Klinger, Jeff

    2016-07-12

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  18. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  19. Require safer substitutes and solutions: making the substitution principle the cornerstone of sustainable chemical policies.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Beverley; Rossi, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Currently, chemical regulations in the United States do not prioritize the production and use of inherently safe chemicals. At present, when regulations get passed to target a chemical for control, safer substitutes are not the goal nor are there specific guidelines or tools used to achieve Green Chemistry, Clean Production, or sustainable product design. In most cases, the replacement is often just as hazardous or simply a reduction of the quantity or concentration of the toxic substance that has been targeted. In contrast, by placing the Substitution Principle at the heart of new chemical policies and regulations, hazardous chemicals would be replaced with less hazardous alternatives or preferably alternatives for which no hazards can be identified. This would hasten the uptake of Green Chemistry, or environmentally benign chemical synthesis. Substituting hazardous chemicals goes beyond finding a drop-in chemical alternative and can include systems, materials or process changes. Regulatory drivers include a clear timeline for phase out of priority chemicals based on their inherent hazard, mandatory substitution planning for hazardous chemicals, financial and technical support for companies to find safer materials, and increased funding for green chemistry development and uptake by companies.

  20. Cascade Distillation System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargushingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support System (LSS) Project is chartered with de-veloping advanced life support systems that will ena-ble NASA human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The goal of AES is to increase the affordabil-ity of long-duration life support missions, and to re-duce the risk associated with integrating and infusing new enabling technologies required to ensure mission success. Because of the robust nature of distillation systems, the AES LSS Project is pursuing develop-ment of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) as part of its technology portfolio. Currently, the system is being developed into a flight forward Generation 2.0 design.

  1. Out of the ashes: the life, death, and rebirth of the "safer" cigarette in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Amy; Colgrove, James

    2004-02-01

    From 1964 through the early 1980s, both federal and voluntary agencies endorsed the concept of "safer" cigarettes. Beginning in the mid-1980s, several factors, including revelations of tobacco industry malfeasance, the development of nicotine replacement therapy, and the reconceptualization of smoking as a chronic disease, led to "safer" cigarettes being discredited. In the past few years, some public health professionals have begun to reconsider the viability of developing such products. The issue before us is stark: will a commitment to limiting the toll exacted by smoking preclude the tolerance of a product that while not safe may possibly be safer?

  2. Developing Data System Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J.; Byrnes, J. B.; Kobler, B.

    2011-12-01

    In the early days of general computer systems for science data processing, staff members working on NASA's data systems would most often be hired as mathematicians. Computer engineering was very often filled by those with electrical engineering degrees. Today, the Goddard Space Flight Center has special position descriptions for data scientists or as they are more commonly called: data systems engineers. These staff members are required to have very diverse skills, hence the need for a generalized position description. There is always a need for data systems engineers to develop, maintain and operate the complex data systems for Earth and space science missions. Today's data systems engineers however are not just mathematicians, they are computer programmers, GIS experts, software engineers, visualization experts, etc... They represent many different degree fields. To put together distributed systems like the NASA Earth Observing Data and Information System (EOSDIS), staff are required from many different fields. Sometimes, the skilled professional is not available and must be developed in-house. This paper will address the various skills and jobs for data systems engineers at NASA. Further it explores how to develop staff to become data scientists.

  3. Beam Instrument Development System

    SciTech Connect

    DOOLITTLE, LAWRENCE; HUANG, GANG; DU, QIANG; SERRANO, CARLOS

    2016-01-08

    Beam Instrumentation Development System (BIDS) is a collection of common support libraries and modules developed during a series of Low-Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control and timing/synchronization projects. BIDS includes a collection of Hardware Description Language (HDL) libraries and software libraries. The BIDS can be used for the development of any FPGA-based system, such as LLRF controllers. HDL code in this library is generic and supports common Digital Signal Processing (DSP) functions, FPGA-specific drivers (high-speed serial link wrappers, clock generation, etc.), ADC/DAC drivers, Ethernet MAC implementation, etc.

  4. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  5. Remote systems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R.; Schaefer, O.; Hussey, J.

    1992-01-01

    Potential space missions of the nineties and the next century require that we look at the broad category of remote systems as an important means to achieve cost-effective operations, exploration and colonization objectives. This paper addresses such missions, which can use remote systems technology as the basis for identifying required capabilities which must be provided. The relationship of the space-based tasks to similar tasks required for terrestrial applications is discussed. The development status of the required technology is assessed and major issues which must be addressed to meet future requirements are identified. This includes the proper mix of humans and machines, from pure teleoperation to full autonomy; the degree of worksite compatibility for a robotic system; and the required design parameters, such as degrees-of-freedom. Methods for resolution are discussed including analysis, graphical simulation and the use of laboratory test beds. Grumman experience in the application of these techniques to a variety of design issues are presented utilizing the Telerobotics Development Laboratory which includes a 17-DOF robot system, a variety of sensing elements, Deneb/IRIS graphics workstations and control stations. The use of task/worksite mockups, remote system development test beds and graphical analysis are discussed with examples of typical results such as estimates of task times, task feasibility and resulting recommendations for design changes. The relationship of this experience and lessons-learned to future development of remote systems is also discussed.

  6. First flight test results of the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Carl J.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small, self-contained, propulsive-backpack system that provides free-flying mobility for an astronaut engaged in a space walk, also known as extravehicular activity (EVA.) SAFER contains no redundant systems and is intended for contingency use only. In essence, it is a small, simplified version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) last flown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985. The operational SAFER unit will only be used to return an adrift EVA astronaut to the spacecraft. Currently, if an EVA crew member inadvertently becomes separated from the Space Shuttle, the Orbiter will maneuver to within the crew member's reach envelope, allowing the astronaut to regain contact with the Orbiter. However, with the advent of operations aboard the Russian MIR Space Station and the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle will not be available to effect a timely rescue. Under these conditions, a SAFER unit would be worn by each EVA crew member. Flight test of the pre-production model of SAFER occurred in September 1994. The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-64 flew a 6.9 hour test flight which included performance, flying qualities, systems, and operational utility evaluations. We found that the unit offers adequate propellant and control authority to stabilize and enable the return of a tumbling/separating crew member. With certain modifications, production model of SAFER can provide self-rescue capability to a separated crew member. This paper will present the program background, explain the flight test results and provide some insight into the complex operations of flight test in space.

  7. First flight test results of the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Carl J.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small, self-contained, propulsive-backpack system that provides free-flying mobility for an astronaut engaged in a space walk, also known as extravehicular activity (EVA.) SAFER contains no redundant systems and is intended for contingency use only. In essence, it is a small, simplified version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) last flown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985. The operational SAFER unit will only be used to return an adrift EVA astronaut to the spacecraft. Currently, if an EVA crew member inadvertently becomes separated from the Space Shuttle, the Orbiter will maneuver to within the crew member's reach envelope, allowing the astronaut to regain contact with the Orbiter. However, with the advent of operations aboard the Russian MIR Space Station and the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle will not be available to effect a timely rescue. Under these conditions, a SAFER unit would be worn by each EVA crew member. Flight test of the pre-production model of SAFER occurred in September 1994. The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-64 flew a 6.9 hour test flight which included performance, flying qualities, systems, and operational utility evaluations. We found that the unit offers adequate propellant and control authority to stabilize and enable the return of a tumbling/separating crew member. With certain modifications, production model of SAFER can provide self-rescue capability to a separated crew member. This paper will present the program background, explain the flight test results and provide some insight into the complex operations of flight test in space.

  8. Liga developer apparatus system

    DOEpatents

    Boehme, Dale R.; Bankert, Michelle A.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2003-01-01

    A system to fabricate precise, high aspect ratio polymeric molds by photolithograpic process is described. The molds for producing micro-scale parts from engineering materials by the LIGA process. The invention is a developer system for developing a PMMA photoresist having exposed patterns comprising features having both very small sizes, and very high aspect ratios. The developer system of the present invention comprises a developer tank, an intermediate rinse tank and a final rinse tank, each tank having a source of high frequency sonic agitation, temperature control, and continuous filtration. It has been found that by moving a patterned wafer, through a specific sequence of developer/rinse solutions, where an intermediate rinse solution completes development of those portions of the exposed resist left undeveloped after the development solution, by agitating the solutions with a source of high frequency sonic vibration, and by adjusting and closely controlling the temperatures and continuously filtering and recirculating these solutions, it is possible to maintain the kinetic dissolution of the exposed PMMA polymer as the rate limiting step.

  9. Heatpipe power system development

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to develop a design approach that could enable the development of near-term, low-cost, space fission-power systems. Sixteen desired attributes were identified for such systems and detailed analyses were performed to verify that they are feasible. Preliminary design work was performed on one concept, the Heatpipe Power system (HPS). As a direct result of this project, funding was obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to build and test an HPS module. The module tests went well, and they now have funding to build a bimodal module.

  10. Space Station Live: FLEX in Space for Safer Combustion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Flame Extinguishment Experiment (FLEX) Principal Investigator Mark Hickman, from Glenn Research Center, discusses why scientists study flames in space. One reason is to create a safer environment t...

  11. RSMASS system model development

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.; Gallup, D.R.

    1998-07-01

    RSMASS system mass models have been used for more than a decade to make rapid estimates of space reactor power system masses. This paper reviews the evolution of the RSMASS models and summarizes present capabilities. RSMASS has evolved from a simple model used to make rough estimates of space reactor and shield masses to a versatile space reactor power system model. RSMASS uses unique reactor and shield models that permit rapid mass optimization calculations for a variety of space reactor power and propulsion systems. The RSMASS-D upgrade of the original model includes algorithms for the balance of the power system, a number of reactor and shield modeling improvements, and an automatic mass optimization scheme. The RSMASS-D suite of codes cover a very broad range of reactor and power conversion system options as well as propulsion and bimodal reactor systems. Reactor choices include in-core and ex-core thermionic reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors, particle bed reactors, and prismatic configuration reactors. Power conversion options include thermoelectric, thermionic, Stirling, Brayton, and Rankine approaches. Program output includes all major component masses and dimensions, efficiencies, and a description of the design parameters for a mass optimized system. In the past, RSMASS has been used as an aid to identify and select promising concepts for space power applications. The RSMASS modeling approach has been demonstrated to be a valuable tool for guiding optimization of the power system design; consequently, the model is useful during system design and development as well as during the selection process. An improved in-core thermionic reactor system model RSMASS-T is now under development. The current development of the RSMASS-T code represents the next evolutionary stage of the RSMASS models. RSMASS-T includes many modeling improvements and is planned to be more user-friendly. RSMASS-T will be released as a fully documented, certified code at the end of

  12. Expert Systems Development Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-28

    two volumes. Volume 1 is the Development Metodology and Volume 2 is an Evaluation Methodology containing methods for evaluation, validation and...system are written in an English -like language which almost anyone can understand. Thus programming in rule based systems can become "programming for...computers and others have little understanding about how computers work. The knowledge engineer must therefore be willing and able to teach the expert

  13. The drive for a safer chemicals policy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Belliveau, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the history, policies and politics of the modern era of safer chemical policy reform in the United States. In the last decade, state laws have modeled a chemical policy framework to phase out unnecessary dangerous chemicals in favor of safer alternatives. These state drivers, along with market campaigns to reduce downstream business use of hazardous chemicals, have weakened the chemical industry's resistance to fixing the broken federal chemical safety system. The obsolete Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) has failed to protect public health and the environment and has stifled innovation toward greener chemistry. Health advocates with a progressive policy vision tempered by legislative pragmatism have launched a TSCA reform campaign to challenge chemical industry power in a weak Congress. The opportunity and limits to winning meaningful TSCA reform are characterized and marked as a critical milestone on the path to a truly comprehensive safer chemical policy for the United States.

  14. LANL receiver system development

    SciTech Connect

    Laubscher, B.; Cooke, B.; Cafferty, M.; Olivas, N.

    1997-08-01

    The CALIOPE receiver system development at LANL is the story of two technologies. The first of these technologies consists of off-the-shelf mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detectors and amplifiers. The vendor for this system is Kolmar Technologies. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer I (TTI) in 1995 and will be referred to in this paper as GEN I. The second system consists of a MCT detector procured from Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC) and an amplifier designed and built by LANL. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer II (TTII) system at the NTS tests in 1996 and will be referred to as GEN II. The LANL CALIOPE experimental plan for 1996 was to improve the lidar system by progressing to a higher rep rate laser to perform many shots in a much shorter period of time. In keeping with this plan, the receiver team set a goal of developing a detector system that was background limited for the projected 100 nanosecond (ns) laser pulse. A set of detailed simulations of the DIAL lidar experiment was performed. From these runs, parameters such as optimal detector size, field of view of the receiver system, nominal laser return power, etc. were extracted. With this information, detector physics and amplifier electronic models were developed to obtain the required specifications for each of these components. These derived specs indicated that a substantial improvement over commercially available, off-the-shelf, amplifier and detector technologies would be needed to obtain the goals. To determine if the original GEN I detector was usable, the authors performed tests on a 100 micron square detector at cryogenic temperatures. The results of this test and others convinced them that an advanced detector was required. Eventually, a suitable detector was identified and a number of these single element detectors were procured from SBRC. These single element detectors were witness for the detector arrays built for another DOE project.

  15. Safer sexual practices among African American women: intersectional socialisation and sexual assertiveness.

    PubMed

    Brown, Danice L; Blackmon, Sha'Kema; Shiflett, Alexandra

    2017-09-18

    Scholars have posited that childhood socialisation experiences may play a key role in influencing behaviours and attitudes that contribute to the acquisition of HIV. This study examined the links between past ethnic-racial and gender socialisation, sexual assertiveness and the safe sexual practices of African American college women utilising a cluster analytic approach. After identifying separate racial-gender and ethnic-gender socialisation profiles, results indicated that ethnic-gender socialisation cluster profiles were directly associated with sexual assertiveness and safer sex behaviour. Greater levels of ethnic socialisation and low traditional gender role socialisation were found to be associated with greater sexual assertiveness and safer sex behaviour. Further analysis showed that sexual assertiveness mediated the links between the identified ethnic-gender socialisation profiles and safer sex behaviour. Implications for policy and programme development are discussed.

  16. Parental influence, gay youths, and safer sex.

    PubMed

    LaSala, Michael C

    2007-02-01

    To begin to understand the role that family relationships and interactions play in young gay men's decisions to avoid unsafe sexual practices, parents and sons (ages 16 to 25) in 30 families were qualitatively interviewed about issues and concerns related to HIV risk. Most of the youths reported feeling obliged to their parents to stay healthy, and these feelings of obligation were important factors in their decisions to avoid unsafe sex. Youths who reported no parental influence came from families in which parents had historically been preoccupied with personal or marital problems or in which there was a history of parental rejection. On the basis of these exploratory findings, AIDS prevention specialists are advised to recruit parents, assess family relationships, and facilitate parent-child communication in their efforts to encourage gay youths to consistently engage in safer sex practices.

  17. Businesses and advocacy groups create a road map for safer chemicals: the BizNGO Principles for Chemicals Policy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mark S; Thorpe, Beverley; Peele, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    This paper details how businesses and environmental organizations are collaborating to define and implement a visionary agenda for integrating safer chemicals into products, describing the challenges they confront and how they are overcoming those challenges. The framework for this assessment is the Principles for Chemicals Policy developed by the Business-NGO Working Group for Safer Chemicals and Sustainable Materials (BizNGO). The four principles--1) knowing and disclosing chemicals in products, 2) assessing and avoiding hazards, 3) committing to continuous improvement, and 4) supporting public policies and industry standards--while appearing to be straightforward, are, in fact, very complex to implement in practice. Together businesses and environmental organizations are charting a path to safer chemicals by sharing best practices, addressing technical aspects of safer chemicals substitution, and analyzing and supporting public policies that advance the rapid development and diffusion of greener chemicals in the economy.

  18. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system.

  19. Internal insulation system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an internal insulation system for cryogenic liquids is described. The insulation system is based on a gas layer concept in which capillary or surface tension effects are used to maintain a stable gas layer within a cellular core structure between the tank wall and the contained cryogen. In this work, a 1.8 meter diameter tank was insulated and tested with liquid hydrogen. Ability to withstand cycling of the aluminum tank wall to 450 K was a design and test condition.

  20. Determinants of Safer Sex Behaviors among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanekar, Amar; Sharma, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Safer sex behaviors (monogamy, sexual abstinence, correct and consistent condom usage) are important for prevention of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS among college students. The purpose of this article was to review studies addressing determinants of safer sex behaviors among college students. In order to collect materials for this…

  1. SAFE(R): A Matlab/Octave Toolbox (and R Package) for Global Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianosi, Francesca; Sarrazin, Fanny; Gollini, Isabella; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is increasingly used in the development and assessment of hydrological models, as well as for dominant control analysis and for scenario discovery to support water resource management under deep uncertainty. Here we present a toolbox for the application of GSA, called SAFE (Sensitivity Analysis For Everybody) that implements several established GSA methods, including method of Morris, Regional Sensitivity Analysis, variance-based sensitivity Analysis (Sobol') and FAST. It also includes new approaches and visualization tools to complement these established methods. The Toolbox is released in two versions, one running under Matlab/Octave (called SAFE) and one running in R (called SAFER). Thanks to its modular structure, SAFE(R) can be easily integrated with other toolbox and packages, and with models running in a different computing environment. Another interesting feature of SAFE(R) is that all the implemented methods include specific functions for assessing the robustness and convergence of the sensitivity estimates. Furthermore, SAFE(R) includes numerous visualisation tools for the effective investigation and communication of GSA results. The toolbox is designed to make GSA accessible to non-specialist users, and to provide a fully commented code for more experienced users to complement their own tools. The documentation includes a set of workflow scripts with practical guidelines on how to apply GSA and how to use the toolbox. SAFE(R) is open source and freely available from the following website: http://bristol.ac.uk/cabot/resources/safe-toolbox/ Ultimately, SAFE(R) aims at improving the diffusion and quality of GSA practice in the hydrological modelling community.

  2. Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system.

  3. Microarray Genomic Systems Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    D Canada Contract Report DRDC Suffield CR 2009-145 June 2008 V. Lam, M. Crichton , T. Dickinson Laing, and D.C. Mah Canada West Biosciences Inc...Genomic Systems Development V. Lam, M. Crichton , T. Dickinson Laing, and D.C. Mah Canada West Biosciences Inc. Canada West Biosciences Inc. 5429... Crichton , M.; Dickinson Laing, T.; Mah, D.C.; DRDC Suffield CR 2009- 145; Defence R&D Canada – Suffield; June 2008. Introduction: Conventional

  4. Guidance Notes on Safer School Construction: Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank Publications, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides a framework of guiding principles and general steps addressing the construction of safer and more disaster resilient education facilities. It is aimed to be adapted to the local context and used to develop a context-specific plan to address a critical gap to reaching the Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development…

  5. Guidance Notes on Safer School Construction: Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank Publications, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides a framework of guiding principles and general steps addressing the construction of safer and more disaster resilient education facilities. It is aimed to be adapted to the local context and used to develop a context-specific plan to address a critical gap to reaching the Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development…

  6. Designing Safer Analgesics via μ-Opioid Receptor Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chan, H C Stephen; McCarthy, Dillon; Li, Jianing; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Yuan, Shuguang

    2017-09-19

    Pain is both a major clinical and economic problem, affecting more people than diabetes, heart disease, and cancer combined. While a variety of prescribed or over-the-counter (OTC) medications are available for pain management, opioid medications, especially those acting on the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) and related pathways, have proven to be the most effective, despite some serious side effects including respiration depression, pruritus, dependence, and constipation. It is therefore imperative that both academia and industry develop novel μOR analgesics which retain their opioid analgesic properties but with fewer or no adverse effects. In this review we outline recent progress towards the discovery of safer opioid analgesics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Safer Formulation Concept for Flame-Generated Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gass, Samuel; Cohen, Joel M.; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Demokritou, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The likely success or failure of the nanotechnology industry depends on the environmental health and safety of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). While efforts toward engineering safer ENMs are sparse, such efforts are considered crucial to the sustainability of the nanotech industry. A promising approach in this regard is to coat potentially toxic nanomaterials with a biologically inert layer of amorphous SiO2. Core-shell particles exhibit the surface properties of their amorphous SiO2 shell while maintaining specific functional properties of their core material. A major challenge in the development of functional core-shell particles is the design of scalable high-yield processes that can meet large-scale industrial demand. Here, we present a safer formulation concept for flame-generated ENMs based on a one-step, in flight SiO2 encapsulation process, which was recently introduced by the authors as a means for a scalable manufacturing of SiO2 coated ENMs. Firstly, the versatility of the SiO2-coating process is demonstrated by applying it to four ENMs (CeO2, ZnO, Fe2O3, Ag) marked by their prevalence in consumer products as well as their range in toxicity. The ENM-dependent coating fundamentals are assessed and process parameters are optimized for each ENM investigated. The effects of the SiO2-coating on core material structure, composition and morphology, as well as the coating efficiency on each nanostructured material, are evaluated using state-of-the-art analytical methods (XRD, N2 adsorption, TEM, XPS, isopropanol chemisorption). Finally, the biological interactions of SiO2-coated vs. uncoated ENMs are evaluated using cellular bioassays, providing valuable evidence for reduced toxicity for the SiO2-coated ENMs. Results indicate that the proposed ‘safer by design’ concept bears great promise for scaled-up application in industry in order to reduce the toxicological profile of ENMs for certain applications. PMID:23961338

  8. Traffic camera system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Toshi

    1997-04-01

    The intelligent transportation system has generated a strong need for the development of intelligent camera systems to meet the requirements of sophisticated applications, such as electronic toll collection (ETC), traffic violation detection and automatic parking lot control. In order to achieve the highest levels of accuracy in detection, these cameras must have high speed electronic shutters, high resolution, high frame rate, and communication capabilities. A progressive scan interline transfer CCD camera, with its high speed electronic shutter and resolution capabilities, provides the basic functions to meet the requirements of a traffic camera system. Unlike most industrial video imaging applications, traffic cameras must deal with harsh environmental conditions and an extremely wide range of light. Optical character recognition is a critical function of a modern traffic camera system, with detection and accuracy heavily dependent on the camera function. In order to operate under demanding conditions, communication and functional optimization is implemented to control cameras from a roadside computer. The camera operates with a shutter speed faster than 1/2000 sec. to capture highway traffic both day and night. Consequently camera gain, pedestal level, shutter speed and gamma functions are controlled by a look-up table containing various parameters based on environmental conditions, particularly lighting. Lighting conditions are studied carefully, to focus only on the critical license plate surface. A unique light sensor permits accurate reading under a variety of conditions, such as a sunny day, evening, twilight, storms, etc. These camera systems are being deployed successfully in major ETC projects throughout the world.

  9. SIRU development. Volume 1: System development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, J. P.; Cooper, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A complete description of the development and initial evaluation of the Strapdown Inertial Reference Unit (SIRU) system is reported. System development documents the system mechanization with the analytic formulation for fault detection and isolation processing structure; the hardware redundancy design and the individual modularity features; the computational structure and facilities; and the initial subsystem evaluation results.

  10. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  11. Advanced Dewatering Systems Development

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell

    2008-07-31

    A new fine coal dewatering technology has been developed and tested in the present work. The work was funded by the Solid Fuels and Feedstocks Grand Challenge PRDA. The objective of this program was to 'develop innovative technical approaches to ensure a continued supply of environmentally sound solid fuels for existing and future combustion systems with minimal incremental fuel cost.' Specifically, this solicitation is aimed at developing technologies that can (i) improve the efficiency or economics of the recovery of carbon when beneficiating fine coal from both current production and existing coal slurry impoundments and (ii) assist in the greater utilization of coal fines by improving the handling characteristics of fine coal via dewatering and/or reconstitution. The results of the test work conducted during Phase I of the current project demonstrated that the new dewatering technologies can substantially reduce the moisture from fine coal, while the test work conducted during Phase II successfully demonstrated the commercial viability of this technology. It is believed that availability of such efficient and affordable dewatering technology is essential to meeting the DOE's objectives.

  12. Advanced Engineering Environments for Space Transportation System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Smith, Charles A.; Beveridge, James

    2000-01-01

    There are significant challenges facing today's launch vehicle industry. Global competition, more complex products, geographically-distributed design teams, demands for lower cost, higher reliability and safer vehicles, and the need to incorporate the latest technologies quicker, all face the developer of a space transportation system. Within NASA, multiple technology development and demonstration projects are underway toward the objectives of safe, reliable, and affordable access to space. New information technologies offer promising opportunities to develop advanced engineering environments to meet these challenges. Significant advances in the state-of-the-art of aerospace engineering practice are envisioned in the areas of engineering design and analytical tools, cost and risk tools, collaborative engineering, and high-fidelity simulations early in the development cycle. At the Marshall Space Flight Center, work has begun on development of an advanced engineering environment specifically to support the design, modeling, and analysis of space transportation systems. This paper will give an overview of the challenges of developing space transportation systems in today's environment and subsequently discuss the advanced engineering environment and its anticipated benefits.

  13. Wear your hat: representational resistance in safer sex discourse.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S D

    1994-01-01

    Through an analysis of four posters used by the AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, this article asks how representation can effectively promote safer sex practices. The images under investigation have different targeted groups--one is aimed at African-American men, one at Latinas, and two at gay men. Using a frame-work that connects definitions of sex in the respective communities with differences surrounding gender, race, and class, the imagery is unpacked in order to expose the effects of safer sex representation. This essay then argues that the degree to which ingrained definitions of sex are challenged constitutes a determining factor in the success or failure of safer sex representations.

  14. Development approach to an enterprise-wide medication reconciliation tool in a free-standing pediatric hospital with commercial best-of-breed systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feliciano B; Leising, Scott; Turner, Scott

    2007-10-11

    Medication reconciliation is essential to providing a safer patient environment during transitions of care in the clinical setting. Current solutions include a mixed-bag of paper and electronic processes. Best-of-breed health information systems architecture poses a specific challenge to organizations that have limited software development resources. Using readily available service-oriented technology, a prototype for an integrated medication reconciliation tool is developed for use in an academic pediatric hospital with commercial systems.

  15. Are some "safer alternatives" hazardous as PBTs? The case study of new flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Cassani, Stefano; Sangion, Alessandro

    2016-04-05

    Some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), as PBDEs, are persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic (PBT) and are restricted/prohibited under various legislations. They are replaced by "safer" flame retardants (FRs), such as new BFRs or organophosphorous compounds. However, informations on the PBT behaviour of these substitutes are often lacking. The PBT assessment is required by the REACH regulation and the PBT chemicals should be subjected to authorization. Several new FRs, proposed and already used as safer alternatives to PBDEs, are here screened by the cumulative PBT Index model, implemented in QSARINS (QSAR-Insubria), new software for the development/validation of QSAR models. The results, obtained directly from the chemical structure for the three studied characteristics altogether, were compared with those from the US-EPA PBT Profiler: the two different approaches are in good agreement, supporting the utility of a consensus approach in these screenings. A priority list of the most harmful FRs, predicted in agreement by the two modelling tools, has been proposed, highlighting that some supposed "safer alternatives" are detected as intrinsically hazardous for their PBT properties. This study also shows that the PBT Index could be a valid tool to evaluate appropriate and safer substitutes, a priori from the chemical design, in a benign by design approach, avoiding unnecessary synthesis and tests.

  16. SIT-5 system development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A 5-cm structurally integrated ion thruster (SIT-5) has been developed for attitude control and stationkeeping of synchronous satellites. With two-dimension thrust-vectoring grids, a first generation unit has demonstrated a thrust of 0.56 mlb at a beam voltage of 1200 V, total mass efficiency of 64%, and electrical efficiency of 46.8%. Structural integrity is demonstrated with a dielectric-coated grid for shock (30 G), sinusoidal (9 G), and random (19.9 G rms) accelerations. System envelope is 31.8 cm long by 13.9 cm flange bolt circle, with a mass of 8.5 kg, including 6.2 kg mercury propellant. Characteristics of a second-generation unit indicate significant performance gains.

  17. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2004-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

  18. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  19. Piroxicam-β-cyclodextrin: a GI safer piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C

    2013-01-01

    Although NSAIDs are very effective drugs, their use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse reactions in the liver, kidney, cardiovascular (CV) system, skin and gut. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects are the most common and constitute a wide clinical spectrum ranging from dyspepsia, heartburn and abdominal discomfort to more serious events such as peptic ulcer with life-threatening complications of bleeding and perforation. The appreciation that CV risk is also increased further complicates the choices of physicians prescribing anti-inflammatory therapy. Despite prevention strategies should be implemented in patients at risk, gastroprotection is often underused and adherence to treatment is generally poor. A more appealing approach would be therefore to develop drugs that are devoid of or have reduced GI toxicity. Gastro- duodenal mucosa possesses many defensive mechanisms and NSAIDs have a deleterious effect on most of them. This results in a mucosa less able to cope with even a reduced acid load. NSAIDs cause gastro-duodenal damage, by two main mechanisms: a physiochemical disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier and systemic inhibition of gastric mucosal protection, through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, PG endoperoxide G/H synthase) activity of the GI mucosa. However, against a background of COX inhibition by anti-inflammatory doses of NSAIDs, their physicochemical properties, in particular their acidity, underlie the topical effect leading to short-term damage. It has been shown that esterification of acidic NSAIDs suppresses their gastrotoxicity without adversely affecting anti-inflammatory activity. Another way to develop NSAIDs with better GI tolerability is to complex these molecules with cyclodextrins (CDs), giving rise to so-called "inclusion complexes" that can have physical, chemical and biological properties very different from either those of the drug or the cyclodextrin. Complexation of NSAIDs with β-cyclodextrin potentially leads to a

  20. Piroxicam-β-Cyclodextrin: A GI Safer Piroxicam

    PubMed Central

    Scarpignato, C

    2013-01-01

    Although NSAIDs are very effective drugs, their use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse reactions in the liver, kidney, cardiovascular (CV) system, skin and gut. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects are the most common and constitute a wide clinical spectrum ranging from dyspepsia, heartburn and abdominal discomfort to more serious events such as peptic ulcer with life-threatening complications of bleeding and perforation. The appreciation that CV risk is also increased further complicates the choices of physicians prescribing anti-inflammatory therapy. Despite prevention strategies should be implemented in patients at risk, gastroprotection is often underused and adherence to treatment is generally poor. A more appealing approach would be therefore to develop drugs that are devoid of or have reduced GI toxicity. Gastro-duodenal mucosa possesses many defensive mechanisms and NSAIDs have a deleterious effect on most of them. This results in a mucosa less able to cope with even a reduced acid load. NSAIDs cause gastro-duodenal damage, by two main mechanisms: a physiochemical disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier and systemic inhibition of gastric mucosal protection, through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, PG endoperoxide G/H synthase) activity of the GI mucosa. However, against a background of COX inhibition by anti-inflammatory doses of NSAIDs, their physicochemical properties, in particular their acidity, underlie the topical effect leading to short-term damage. It has been shown that esterification of acidic NSAIDs suppresses their gastrotoxicity without adversely affecting anti-inflammatory activity. Another way to develop NSAIDs with better GI tolerability is to complex these molecules with cyclodextrins (CDs), giving rise to so-called “inclusion complexes” that can have physical, chemical and biological properties very different from either those of the drug or the cyclodextrin. Complexation of NSAIDs with β-cyclodextrin potentially leads

  1. Salmonella Is a Sneaky Germ: Seven Tips for Safer Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file Error processing SSI file Salmonella is a Sneaky Germ: Seven Tips for Safer Eating Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Salmonella can contaminate more than poultry and eggs. It ...

  2. Alcohol risk management in college settings: the safer California universities randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Saltz, Robert F; Paschall, Mallie J; McGaffigan, Richard P; Nygaard, Peter M O

    2010-12-01

    Potentially effective environmental strategies have been recommended to reduce heavy alcohol use among college students. However, studies to date on environmental prevention strategies are few in number and have been limited by their nonexperimental designs, inadequate sample sizes, and lack of attention to settings where the majority of heavy drinking events occur. To determine whether environmental prevention strategies targeting off-campus settings would reduce the likelihood and incidence of student intoxication at those settings. The Safer California Universities study involved 14 large public universities, half of which were assigned randomly to the Safer intervention condition after baseline data collection in 2003. Environmental interventions took place in 2005 and 2006 after 1 year of planning with seven Safer intervention universities. Random cross-sectional samples of undergraduates completed online surveys in four consecutive fall semesters (2003-2006). Campuses and communities surrounding eight campuses of the University of California and six in the California State University system were utilized. The study used random samples of undergraduates (∼500-1000 per campus per year) attending the 14 public California universities. Safer environmental interventions included nuisance party enforcement operations, minor decoy operations, driving-under-the-influence checkpoints, social host ordinances, and use of campus and local media to increase the visibility of environmental strategies. Proportion of drinking occasions in which students drank to intoxication at six different settings during the fall semester (residence hall party, campus event, fraternity or sorority party, party at off-campus apartment or house, bar/restaurant, outdoor setting), any intoxication at each setting during the semester, and whether students drank to intoxication the last time they went to each setting. Significant reductions in the incidence and likelihood of intoxication at

  3. Correctional Service Canada to undertake Safer Tattooing Practices Initiative.

    PubMed

    2004-08-01

    In 1994, the Expert Committee on AIDS and Prisons recommended that tattooing equipment and supplies be authorized for use in federal correctional institutions, and that prisoners who would offer tattooing services to other prisoners be instructed on how to use tattooing equipment safely. Ten years later, Correctional Service Canada (CSC) has finally announced that, as part of a Safer Tattooing Practices Initiative, it will set up safer tattooing pilot projects in six federal prisons in 2004, and evaluate the initiative.

  4. Supporting HIV prevention and reproductive goals in an HIV-endemic setting: taking safer conception services from policy to practice in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Davies, Natasha E C G; Matthews, Lynn T; Crankshaw, Tamaryn L; Cooper, Di; Schwartz, Sheree R

    2017-03-08

    mobilized to engage with safer conception options alongside other HIV-related healthcare services. Key barriers to widespread safer conception service provision in South Africa include poor translation of policy into practical and measurable implementation plans, inadequate training and limited community engagement. South Africa should leverage the momentum and accountability associated with high priority UTT and eMTCT programmes to reinvigorate implementation efforts by incorporating safer conception into implementation and monitoring frameworks and associated HCP training and community engagement activities. South Africa's experiences should be used to inform policy development and implementation processes in other HIV high-burden countries.

  5. Supervisory development system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, P.L.; Norlach, D.L.

    1985-03-01

    The Supervisory Development System (SDS) consists of a series of training inputs which are designed to meet the training needs of a newly appointed manufacturing supervisor. Each training component has been carefully designed to insure that a new supervisor receives training which is job related and coincides with growth on the job. The SDS is initiated with appointment of the new supervisor and extends to eighteen months after appointment. Mobil's Marketing and Refining Division's U.S. operations are headquartered in Fairfax, Virginia. The Manufacturing function has five refineries located in Beaumont, Texas; Ferndale, Washington; Joliet, Illinois; Paulsboro, New Jersey; and Torrance, California. New first-line supervisors are appointed at a rate of about seven per year in one refinery and up to fifteen or twenty per year in others. First-line supervisors in Mobil's refineries are similar to those found in other refineries. To the hourly rate or blue collar employee, the first-level supervisor represents the company. They are responsible for providing work direction, improving performance, and operating efficiently within a safe environment.

  6. Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Thomas P; Wenzel, Thomas P; Ross, Marc

    2008-03-01

    those riding in them is flawed. For starters, all else is never equal; other aspects of vehicle design appear to control what really happens in a crash, as reflected in the safety record of different kinds of vehicles. What's more, the use of high-strength steel, light-weight metals such as aluminum and magnesium, and fiber-reinforced plastics now offers automotive engineers the means to fashion vehicles that are simultaneously safer and less massive than their predecessors, and such designs would, of course, enjoy the better fuel economy that shedding pounds brings.

  7. Intelligent pumping system developed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The oil field's first intelligent rod pumping system designed specifically to reduce the cost of pumping oil wells now is a reality. As a plus benefit, the system (called Liftronic) is compact and quiet. The new system combines an efficient mechanical design with a computer control system to reduce pumping costs. The unit stands less than 8 ft high, or approx. one-fourth the height of a comparable beam unit. It also mounts directly on the wellhead. The entire system can be concealed behind a fence or enclosed within a small building to make it a more attractive neighbor in residential, commercial, or recreational areas. It is useful also for agricultural areas where overhead irrigation systems restrict the use of many oil field pumping systems.

  8. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-05-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam

  9. How Can We Make PV Modules Safer?: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    Safety is a prime concern for the photovoltaics (PV) industry. As a technology deployed on residential and commercial buildings, it is critical that PV not cause damage to the buildings nor harm the occupants. Many of the PV systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltage (300 to 600 Volts dc) that they may present potential hazards. These PV systems must be safe in terms of mechanical damage (nothing falls on someone), shock hazard (no risk of electrical shock when touching an exposed circuit element), and fire (the modules neither cause nor promote a fire). The present safety standards (IEC 61730 and UL 1703) do a good job of providing for design rules and test requirements for mechanical, shock, and spread of flame dangers. However, neither standard addresses the issue of electrical arcing within a module that can cause a fire. To make PV modules, they must be designed, built, and installed with an emphasis on minimizing the potential for open circuits and ground faults. This paper provides recommendations on redundant connection designs, robust mounting methods, and changes to the safety standards to yield safer PV modules.

  10. Pregnancy termination in Matlab, Bangladesh: trends and correlates of use of safer and less-safe methods.

    PubMed

    DaVanzo, Julie; Rahman, Mizanur

    2014-09-01

    Menstrual regulation (MR), a relatively safe form of pregnancy termination, is legal in Bangladesh during the early stages of pregnancy. However, little is known about the factors associated with whether women who terminate pregnancies choose this method or a less-safe one. Data from the Matlab Demographic Surveillance System on 122,691 pregnancies-5,221 (4.3%) of which were terminated-were used to examine trends between 1989 and 2008 in termination and in use of safer methods (MR or dilation and curettage) and less-safe (all other) methods of pregnancy termination. Logistic and multinomial logistic regressions were used to assess factors associated with whether women terminate pregnancies and whether they use safer methods. Sixty-seven percent of pregnancy terminations were by safer methods and 33% by less-safe means. The proportion of pregnancies that were terminated increased between 1989 and 2008; this increase was entirely due to increased use of safer methods. Women younger than 18 and those 25 or older were more likely than women aged 20-24 to terminate their pregnancies (odds ratios ranged from 1.5 among women aged 16-17 or 25-29 to 26.1 among those aged 45 or older). Among women who terminated their pregnancies, those aged 25-44 were more likely than those aged 20-24 to use a safer method. Compared with women who had no formal education, those with some education were more likely to terminate their pregnancies and to do so using safer methods. A growing proportion of pregnancies in Matlab are terminated, and these terminations are increasingly done using safer methods.

  11. SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOICE, JOHN,; AND OTHERS

    ONE-HUNDRED MANUFACTURERS EXPRESSED INTEREST IN BIDDING FOR A SYSTEM ON SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION CALLED SCSD OR SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT TO THE FIRST CALIFORNIA COMMISSION ON SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS. TWENTY-TWO BUILDINGS COMPRISED THE PROJECT. THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO DEVELOP AN INTEGRATED SYSTEM OF STANDARD SCHOOL BUILDING COMPONENTS…

  12. Exploration Medical System Technical Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, K.; Middour, C.; Cerro, J.; Burba, T.; Hanson, A.; Reilly, J.; Mindock, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element systems engineering goals include defining the technical system needed to implement exploration medical capabilities for Mars. This past year, scenarios captured in the medical system concept of operations laid the foundation for systems engineering technical development work. The systems engineering team analyzed scenario content to identify interactions between the medical system, crewmembers, the exploration vehicle, and the ground system. This enabled the definition of functions the medical system must provide and interfaces to crewmembers and other systems. These analyses additionally lead to the development of a conceptual medical system architecture. The work supports the ExMC community-wide understanding of the functional exploration needs to be met by the medical system, the subsequent development of medical system requirements, and the system verification and validation approach utilizing terrestrial analogs and precursor exploration missions.

  13. Career Development: A Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavenski, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    The author describes a comprehensive career development system implemented by Coca-Cola USA. The system's objectives are (1) to promote from within, (2) to develop talent for the future, (3) to make managers responsible for development efforts, and (4) to make individuals ultimately responsible for their development. (CH)

  14. Career Development: A Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavenski, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    The author describes a comprehensive career development system implemented by Coca-Cola USA. The system's objectives are (1) to promote from within, (2) to develop talent for the future, (3) to make managers responsible for development efforts, and (4) to make individuals ultimately responsible for their development. (CH)

  15. Developing Interim Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caetta, J.

    1997-01-01

    One of the recent challenges in the aerospace industry has been to smoothly transition operations-oriented computer systems to meet increasing demands on smaller budgets. Sometimes the best solution is not affordable, but the current situation is equally untenable.

  16. Motherhood: making it safer for Filipino women.

    PubMed

    Baylon, M C

    1996-01-01

    In November 1995, in the Philippines, the Department of Health implemented the Women's Health and Safe Motherhood Project. Its target audience is poor women in remote and underserved provinces. It addresses maternal health, reproductive tract infections (RTIs), sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), cervical cancer, domestic violence, and the desire to space births. It aims to improve the quality of women's health services through training of health providers, providing women with information to help them make informed choices, providing regular supplies and drugs, privacy and infection control at service delivery points, providing follow-up care, and improved cost-effective and technically-sound referral systems. The project also aims to ensure accessible service delivery points, well-equipped and maintained facilities, client and community feedback in managing service delivery, and information provision in order to increase acceptability of health services. The major components of the project include service delivery, institutional strengthening (via information, education, and communication; training of health providers; and improvement of the logistics system), community partnership for women's health development, and policy and operations research. The service delivery component will adopt a life-cycle approach to service delivery in Region 8 (urban and rural communities). It will pilot the syndromic approach in the management and detection of RTIs and STDs in 10 provinces. The biggest tasks of the project are upgrading referral networks from provincial and district hospitals to rural health units and barangay health stations and upgrading primary hospitals.

  17. Maternal smoking and infant feeding: breastfeeding is better and safer.

    PubMed

    Dorea, Jose G

    2007-05-01

    The rise in smoking rates among young women has implications for children's health aggravated in lower social strata where infant morbidity and mortality rates are higher. The protection afforded by breastfeeding is beneficial to infants in rich and poor countries alike. Women (especially when young, uneducated, and unsupported) who are smokers constitute a risk group for abandoning breastfeeding; moreover, their bottle-fed newborns run a greater risk of morbidity and mortality. Bottle-feeding is attendant on maternal cigarette smoking. The advantages of breastfeeding over bottle-feeding are discussed with regard to systemic effects and the specific effects of cyanide (which can affect the iodine metabolism of infants) and nicotine derived from food and maternal smoking. Despite great strides in bans on smoking, public health policies should be designed to keep in perspective that breastfeeding is an effective tool to counterbalance the health disadvantages that under-privileged infants of smoking mothers face. This paper argues that infants born to smoking parents are better protected by breastfeeding than by formula feeding. Therefore, if public health policies cannot stop addicted mothers from smoking during pregnancy it is fundamental not to miss the chance of encouraging and supporting breastfeeding. The food and health inequalities of socially disadvantaged groups demand well crafted public-health policies to reduce the incidence of diseases and compress morbidity: these policies need to make it clear that breastfeeding is better and safer.

  18. Nanosafety: Towards Safer Nanoparticles by Design.

    PubMed

    Bastús, Neus G; Puntes, Víctor

    2017-04-13

    The continuous development of Nanotechnology is progressively introducing nanoparticles into society. However, little is known about the safety of nanoparticles and functions of engineered nanomaterials, in particular how the physicochemical properties of the materials relate to mechanisms of injury at the nano-bio interface. While comprehensive knowledge on the potential toxicity of NPs is still lacking, as time goes by and research in the field continues, different aspects, such as interactions with the immune system, perturbation of cellular membranes, transportation of toxic moieties and others are emerging as potentially hazardous aspects of NPs. As a result, this rapidly advancing new field requires the development of novel test strategies based on the contribution of toxicological pathways to the pathophysiology of disease that allow complex toxicants to be screened in robust, mechanism-based assays in which the bulk of the investigation can be carried out at the cellular and biomolecular level whilst maintaining limited animal use. A review of these strategies will help to provide guidelines for synthetic nanochemists on how to design NPs to be safe during their full life cycle while maintaining their parental desired properties. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Misunderstanding of 'safer sex' by heterosexually active adults.

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, N S; Kusseling, F S; Shapiro, M F

    1995-01-01

    To assess the understanding of safer sex among heterosexual adults, people enrolled in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) education trials at a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic and a university student health service were surveyed concerning sexual behavior with their latest reported partner. Of 646 sexually active persons enrolled in the trials, 233 (36 percent) reported having had safer sex with their latest partner; 124 of them (53 percent) also reported having vaginal or anal intercourse without a condom during that sexual encounter. Among the 124 who reported safer sex despite having intercourse without a condom, only 23 percent reported asking partners about their HIV status, 46 percent had asked about intravenous drug use, and 47 percent had asked about the number of prior sexual partners. For 34 percent of those surveyed, the length of the sexual relationship with their latest partner was 1 month or less, and 18 percent estimated that this partner had had 11 or more prior sexual partners. STD clinic participants characterized intercourse without a condom as safer sex more often than student health service enrollees (76 percent versus 39 percent, P < 0.001). The concept of safer sex is often misunderstood by persons engaging in behavior at risk for HIV transmission, and the level of misunderstanding differs among samples. Interventions to reduce transmission of HIV must confront misconceptions about the risk of sexual intercourse without condoms and include specific instructions understood by the targeted group. PMID:7480617

  20. Series Bosch System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Evans, Christopher; Mansell, Matt; Swickrath, Michael

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art (SOA) carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology for the International Space Station produces methane as a byproduct. This methane is subsequently vented overboard. The associated loss of hydrogen ultimately reduces the mass of oxygen that can be recovered from CO2 in a closed-loop life support system. As an alternative to SOA CO2 reduction technology, NASA is exploring a Series-Bosch system capable of reducing CO2 with hydrogen to form water and solid carbon. This results in 100% theoretical recovery of oxygen from metabolic CO2. In the past, Bosch-based technology did not trade favorably against SOA technology due to a high power demand, low reaction efficiencies, concerns with carbon containment, and large resupply requirements necessary to replace expended catalyst cartridges. An alternative approach to Bosch technology, labeled "Series-Bosch," employs a new system design with optimized multi-stage reactors and a membrane-based separation and recycle capability. Multi-physics modeling of the first stage reactor, along with chemical process modeling of the integrated system, has resulted in a design with potential to trade significantly better than previous Bosch technology. The modeling process and resulting system architecture selection are discussed.

  1. Towards Safer Rocket Fuels: Hypergolic Imidazolylidene-Borane Compounds as Replacements for Hydrazine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi; Qi, Xiujuan; Liu, Tianlin; Wang, Kangcai; Zhang, Wenquan; Li, Jianlin; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-07-11

    Currently, toxic and volatile hydrazine derivatives are still the main fuel choices for liquid bipropellants, especially in some traditional rocket propulsion systems. Therefore, the search for safer hypergolic fuels as replacements for hydrazine derivatives has been one of the most challenging tasks. In this study, six imidazolylidene-borane compounds with zwitterionic structure have been synthesized and characterized, and their hypergolic reactivity has been studied. As expected, these compounds exhibited fast spontaneous combustion upon contact with white fuming nitric acid (WFNA). Among them, compound 5 showed excellent integrated properties including wide liquid operating range (-70-160 °C), superior loading density (0.99 g cm(-3) ), ultrafast ignition delay times with WFNA (15 ms), and high specific impulse (303.5 s), suggesting promising application potential as safer hypergolic fuels in liquid bipropellant formulations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Arcjet system integration development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zafran, Sidney

    1994-01-01

    Compatibility between an arcjet propulsion system and a communications satellite was verified by testing a Government-furnished, 1.4 kW hydrazine arcjet system with the FLTSATCOM qualification model satellite in a 9.1-meter (30-foot) diameter thermal-vacuum test chamber. Background pressure was maintained at 10(exp -5) torr during arcjet operation by cryopumping the thruster exhaust with an array of 5 K liquid helium cooled panels. Power for the arcjet system was obtained from the FLTSATCOM battery simulator. Spacecraft telemetry was monitored during each thruster firing period. No changes in telemetry data attributable to arcjet operation were detected in any of the tests. Electromagnetic compatibility data obtained included radiated emission measurements, conducted emission measurements, and cable coupling measurements. Significant noise was observed at lower frequencies. Above 500 MHz, radiated emissions were generally within limits, indicating that communication links at S-band and higher frequencies will not be affected. Other test data taken with a diagnostic array of calorimeters, radiometers, witness plates, and a residual gas analyzer evidenced compatible operation, and added to the data base for arcjet system integration. Two test series were conducted. The first series only included the arcjet and diagnostic array operating at approximately 0.1 torr background pressure. The second series added the qualification model spacecraft, a solar panel, and the helium cryopanels. Tests were conducted at 0.1 torr and 10(exp-5) torr. The arcjet thruster was canted 20 degrees relative to the solar panel axis, typical of the configuration used for stationkeeping thrusters on geosynchronous communications satellites.

  3. Arcjet system integration development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafran, Sidney

    1994-03-01

    Compatibility between an arcjet propulsion system and a communications satellite was verified by testing a Government-furnished, 1.4 kW hydrazine arcjet system with the FLTSATCOM qualification model satellite in a 9.1-meter (30-foot) diameter thermal-vacuum test chamber. Background pressure was maintained at 10(exp -5) torr during arcjet operation by cryopumping the thruster exhaust with an array of 5 K liquid helium cooled panels. Power for the arcjet system was obtained from the FLTSATCOM battery simulator. Spacecraft telemetry was monitored during each thruster firing period. No changes in telemetry data attributable to arcjet operation were detected in any of the tests. Electromagnetic compatibility data obtained included radiated emission measurements, conducted emission measurements, and cable coupling measurements. Significant noise was observed at lower frequencies. Above 500 MHz, radiated emissions were generally within limits, indicating that communication links at S-band and higher frequencies will not be affected. Other test data taken with a diagnostic array of calorimeters, radiometers, witness plates, and a residual gas analyzer evidenced compatible operation, and added to the data base for arcjet system integration. Two test series were conducted. The first series only included the arcjet and diagnostic array operating at approximately 0.1 torr background pressure. The second series added the qualification model spacecraft, a solar panel, and the helium cryopanels. Tests were conducted at 0.1 torr and 10(exp-5) torr. The arcjet thruster was canted 20 degrees relative to the solar panel axis, typical of the configuration used for stationkeeping thrusters on geosynchronous communications satellites.

  4. Client uptake of safer conception strategies: implementation outcomes from the Sakh'umndeni Safer Conception Clinic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Bassett, Jean; Holmes, Charles B; Yende, Nompumelelo; Phofa, Rebecca; Sanne, Ian; Van Rie, Annelies

    2017-03-08

    Implementation of safer conception services for HIV-affected couples within primary healthcare clinics in resource-limited settings remains limited. We review service utilization and safer conception strategy uptake during the first three years of Sakh'umndeni, which is a safer conception clinic in South Africa. Sakh'umndeni is located at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre, a high-volume primary healthcare clinic in northern Johannesburg. Men and women desiring to conceive in less than or equal to six months and in relationships in which one or both partners are living with HIV are eligible for safer conception services. Clients receive a baseline health assessment and counselling around periconception HIV risk reduction strategies and choose which strategies they plan to use. Clients are followed-up monthly. We describe client service utilization and uptake and continuation of safer conception methods. Factors associated with male partner attendance are assessed using robust Poisson regression. Overall 440 individuals utilized the service including 157 couples in which both partners attended (55%) and 126 unaccompanied female partners. Over half of the couples (55%) represented were in serodiscordant/unknown status relationships. Higher economic status and HIV-negative status of the women increased male partner involvement, while HIV-negative status of the men decreased male involvement. Regarding safer conception strategies, uptake of antiretroviral therapy initiation (90%), vaginal self-insemination among partnerships with HIV-negative men (75%) and timed condomless intercourse strategies (48%) were variable, but generally high. Overall uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) was 23% and was lower among HIV-negative men than women (7% vs. 44%, p < 0.001). Male medical circumcision (MMC) was used by 28% of HIV-negative men. Over 80% of clients took up at least one recommended safer conception strategy. Continuation of selected strategies over attempted

  5. The business case for transitioning to safer chemicals.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Roger D

    2011-01-01

    Emerging domestic and international chemical regulations and a heightened consumer awareness of chemicals of concern in products is challenging American businesses to reevaluate and reconsider their approaches to supply chain management and product design. Some of these companies recognize business opportunities and are responding proactively with innovative strategies and tactics. This article describes steps that Staples Inc., the world's largest office products provider, is taking to meet demand for products that are safer and more sustainable. In trying to meet the demand for safer products, Staples faces significant barriers, including the complexity of supply chains, data gaps, and confidential business information. New collaborations between companies, government, and advocates, and improved tools and criteria for defining safer products enhance the ability of businesses, like Staples, to meet new consumer demands.

  6. Lighting the Way for Quicker, Safer Healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Who's to say that a little light can t go a long way? Tiny light-emitting diode (LED) chips used to grow plants in space are lighting the way for cancer treatment, wound healing, and chronic pain alleviation on Earth. In 1993, Quantum Devices, Inc. (QDI), of Barneveld, Wisconsin, began developing the HEALS (High Emissivity Aluminiferous Light-emitting Substrate) technology to provide high-intensity, solid-state LED lighting systems for NASA Space Shuttle plant growth experiments. The company evolved out of cooperative efforts with the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison a NASA center for the Commercial Development of Space. Ronald W. Ignatius, QDI s president and chairman, represented one of WCSAR s industrial partners at the time. WCSAR was conducting research on light sources for promoting food growth within closed environments where humans would be present for a long duration, such as the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. With the support of WCSAR, Ignatius experimented with LEDs, which provide high-energy efficiency and virtually no heat, despite releasing waves of light 10 times brighter than the Sun. Ignatius admits that some scientists involved in the project were skeptical at first, thinking that the idea of using LEDs to promote plant growth was far-fetched. The experiments, however, demonstrated that red LED wavelengths could boost the energy metabolism of cells to advance plant growth and photosynthesis. This finding prompted Ignatius to develop a line of LED products that emit the exact wavelength of light that plants use in photosynthesis. Our company gives credit to Dr. Ray Bula, the director of WCSAR, for having the foresight to go against the prevailing dogma of the time and design the first plant experiment using monochromatic light to grow lettuce plants, Ignatius proclaims. In 1989, Ignatius formed QDI to bring the salt grain-sized LEDs to market, and in October 1995

  7. Progressively safer, cheaper demolition of Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Nichols; Norman Pennington

    2000-09-29

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. has been progressively improving Decontamination and Dismantlement (D&D) at the Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project by applying new technologies and better methodologies to the work. Demolition issues existed in the past that necessitated new or improved solutions to maintain worker safety, protect the environment and accomplish the work in a cost effective manner. Lessons learned from D&D of 80 structures has led to a systematic approach, which can be implemented in various D&D arenas. When facility production was halted, hold-up material and process residues remained in the process piping and components. Over 500,000 pounds of material was removed by workers who completed the tasks two years ahead of schedule, $7 million under budget and with an excellent safety record. This success was the result of detailed planning and irdision of lessons learned as work progressed from facility to facility. Work sequences were developed that reduced airborne contamination. Demolition of structures has been performed at Fernald by carefully selected and qualified subcontractors. Asbestos and lead abatement, equipment, piping and conduit removal, and structural demolition have been completed to progressively higher performance specifications developed by Fluor Fernald based on lessons learned during execution. Safety continues to be the primary consideration in performing potentially hazardous work. Technologies such as hydraulic shears have been developed and used to keep workers away from danger. A new technology, ''Cool Suits,'' has been demonstrated to help prevent heat stress when anti-contamination clothing is required in elevated temperature working conditions. For tall structures, implosion technologies have been employed with progressively improved results, Several other new technologies have been evaluated by Fluor Fernald and applied by subcontractors. The improved technologies included the oxy-gas torch, which uses

  8. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer - 13158

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Conley, S.F.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Schatz, Aaron L.; Brown, W.L.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas

    2013-07-01

    documents, the system saves three-to-four man days each month for the field personnel taking the measurements and the scientists and administrators managing the data and the documentation. After the information has received technical review, FLEDG automatically updates the database for water-level measurements and loads the document management system with the completed sampling report. Due to safety considerations, access to wells is conditional. A spreadsheet with appropriate data not only lists the wells that are cleared for work, but also the safety personnel who must be present before work can start. This spreadsheet is used in planning daily activities. Daily plans are structured to ensure that the wells to be sampled are cleared for work and the appropriate safety personnel have been assigned and are present before the work starts. Historically, the spreadsheets have been prepared manually, and as a result, are potentially subject to human error. However, a companion database application has been developed to work with FLEDG - making the entire sampling process more efficient and safer for personnel. The Well Access List - Electronic, WAL-E, is a database that contains much the same information that was previously manually loaded into the spread sheet. In addition, WAL-E contains a managed work-flow application that shows the access requirements and allows for appropriate reviews of the compiled well. Various CHPRC organizations, including Industrial Hygiene, RADCON, and Well Maintenance and Sample Administration are able to enter and review the wells added or deleted from the WAL-E database. The FLEDG system then accesses this database information to identify appropriate support personnel and provide safety requirements to field personnel. In addition, WAL-E offers the assurance that wells have appropriate locks and are correctly labeled and electrically grounded as required, before well activities begin. This feature is an extremely important aspect of the FLEDG

  9. SCCS System SW Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beale, David Michael

    2014-01-01

    The original project to be completed, GenSim, was a Generic Simulator for Application Control Language scripts. This would mock the systems on which the scripts were meant to be run on so that you could run tests without access to the machine. Soon after the project was started, a different project took priority. Unit testing the Application Services Framework code became the focus of the team because of approaching deadlines. Communication was very important to ensure that code wasn't being duplicated and to keep the team up to date with what mock files are available to them. Because of this, daily meetings were conducted until the testing was complete.

  10. Engineering monitoring expert system's developer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1991-01-01

    This research project is designed to apply artificial intelligence technology including expert systems, dynamic interface of neural networks, and hypertext to construct an expert system developer. The developer environment is specifically suited to building expert systems which monitor the performance of ground support equipment for propulsion systems and testing facilities. The expert system developer, through the use of a graphics interface and a rule network, will be transparent to the user during rule constructing and data scanning of the knowledge base. The project will result in a software system that allows its user to build specific monitoring type expert systems which monitor various equipments used for propulsion systems or ground testing facilities and accrues system performance information in a dynamic knowledge base.

  11. Platinum-containing compound platinum pyrithione is stronger and safer than cisplatin in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; He, Zhimin; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-01-01

    DNA is the well-known molecular target of current platinum-based anticancer drugs; consequently, their clinical use is severely restricted by their systemic toxicities and drug resistance originating from non-selective DNA damage. Various strategies have been developed to circumvent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy but the inherent problem remains unsolved. Here we report that platinum pyrithione (PtPT), a chemically well-characterized synthetic complex of platinum, inhibits proteasome function and thereby exhibits greater and more selective cytotoxicity to multiple cancer cells than cisplatin, without showing discernible DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, unlike the classical proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade which inhibits the proteasome via blocking the peptidase activity of 20S proteasomes, PtPT primarily deactivates 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases USP14 and UCHL5. Furthermore, PtPT can selectively induce cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition in cancer cells from leukemia patients but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans. In nude mice, PtPT also remarkably inhibited tumor xenograft growth, without showing the adverse effects that were induced by cisplatin. Hence, we have discovered a new platinum-based anti-tumor agent PtPT which targets 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases rather than DNA in the cell and thereby exerts safer and more potent anti-tumor effects, identifying a highly translatable new platinum-based anti-cancer strategy. PMID:27381943

  12. Toxic release consequence analysis tool (TORCAT) for inherently safer design plant.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Azmi Mohd; Zaini, Dzulkarnain

    2010-10-15

    Many major accidents due to toxic release in the past have caused many fatalities such as the tragedy of MIC release in Bhopal, India (1984). One of the approaches is to use inherently safer design technique that utilizes inherent safety principle to eliminate or minimize accidents rather than to control the hazard. This technique is best implemented in preliminary design stage where the consequence of toxic release can be evaluated and necessary design improvements can be implemented to eliminate or minimize the accidents to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) without resorting to costly protective system. However, currently there is no commercial tool available that has such capability. This paper reports on the preliminary findings on the development of a prototype tool for consequence analysis and design improvement via inherent safety principle by utilizing an integrated process design simulator with toxic release consequence analysis model. The consequence analysis based on the worst-case scenarios during process flowsheeting stage were conducted as case studies. The preliminary finding shows that toxic release consequences analysis tool (TORCAT) has capability to eliminate or minimize the potential toxic release accidents by adopting the inherent safety principle early in preliminary design stage.

  13. Cathodes with intrinsic redox overcharge protection: A new strategy towards safer Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Da-Wei; Chen, Chun-Hua; Ding, Chu-Xiong; Yu, Yan; Maier, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    Overcharge safety is the most crucial problem facing especially large-sized lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) packs owing to the inevitable inhomogeneity of charge-state for each cell. We propose a fresh safety strategy to avoid overcharging, i.e. the use of a solid-state anti-overcharge additive to perform an intrinsic overcharge protection. The mechanism is triggered from a solid-state composite cathode obtained by typically mixing a pre-selected transition-metal oxide with a certain cathodes thus constituting a composite cathode. The effectiveness of this strategy is demonstrated with an example of LiCoO2/CuO (95:5 by weight) composite, which exhibits high-potential (up to 5 V vs. Li+/Li) and long-period (month-level) anti-overcharge performance. It is found that the additive does not hurt the electrochemical cycling performance under normal operational conditions. This novel safety strategy is simple and flexible, which may open a new window to develop safer LIBs systems.

  14. Safer Aircraft Possible With Nitrogen Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A system named On-Board Inert Gas Generation System/On-Board Oxygen Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) was studied with Boeing. The study established the requirements for nitrogen purge (for fuel tank inerting and cargo compartment fire suppression) and oxygen (for passengers and crew). The nitrogen would be used for suppressing fires and fuel tank explosions on the aircraft, and the oxygen would be used for breathing gas during high-altitude or emergency operations.

  15. Managing Risk in Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaoli, Marilyn M.; And Others

    Stanford University's use of a risk assessment methodology to improve the management of systems development projects is discussed. After examining the concepts of hazard, peril, and risk as they relate to the system development process, three ways to assess risk are covered: size, structure, and technology. The overall objective for Stanford…

  16. Managing Risk in Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaoli, Marilyn M.; And Others

    Stanford University's use of a risk assessment methodology to improve the management of systems development projects is discussed. After examining the concepts of hazard, peril, and risk as they relate to the system development process, three ways to assess risk are covered: size, structure, and technology. The overall objective for Stanford…

  17. An Instructional Systems Development Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    Instructional systems development (ISD) is a systems approach to curriculum development and instructional delivery. It is oriented toward occupational needs with an emphasis on what it is that students must learn to perform specific tasks, what facilities best provide a setting for the neccessary learning, and what instructional methods and media…

  18. Implementation of a safer conception service for HIV-affected couples in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Bassett, Jean; Sanne, Ian; Phofa, Rebecca; Yende, Nompumelelo; Van Rie, Annelies

    2014-07-01

    To describe the development and implementation of a safer conception service in a resource-limited setting. Qualitative work to inform the design of a safer conception service was conducted with clients and providers at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre, a primary health center in Johannesburg, South Africa. Services began in July 2013 for HIV-affected participants planning conception within 6 months and included counseling about timed unprotected intercourse and home-based self-insemination, early initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV-infected individuals, pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-uninfected partners and circumcision for men. Participants were enrolled into an implementation science study evaluating method uptake, acceptability, and pregnancy and HIV transmission outcomes. Findings to-date from 51 qualitative participants and 128 clinical cohort participants (82 women and 46 men, representing 82 partnerships) are presented. All men were accompanied by female partners, whereas 56% of women attended with their male partner. Fifteen of the 46 couples (33%) were in confirmed serodiscordant relationships; however, of the 36 additional women attending alone, 56% were unaware of their partners' HIV status or believed them to be HIV-uninfected. The majority of the HIV-infected women (86%) and men (71%) were on cART at enrollment; however, only 47% on cART were virally suppressed. Timed unprotected intercourse, self-insemination and cART were common choices for participants; few elected pre-exposure prophylaxis. Lessons learned from early implementation demonstrate feasibility of safer conception services; however, reaching discordant couples, cART-naïve infected partners, and men remain challenges. Creating demand for safer conception services among those at highest risk for HIV transmission is necessary.

  19. Implementation of a Safer Conception Service for HIV-Affected Couples in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Bassett, Jean; Sanne, Ian; Phofa, Rebecca; Yende, Nompumelelo; Van Rie, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and implementation of a safer conception service in a resource-limited setting. Methods Qualitative work to inform the design of a safer conception service was conducted with clients and providers at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre, a primary health center in Johannesburg, South Africa. Services began in July 2013, for HIV-affected participants planning conception within six months and included counseling about timed unprotected intercourse and home-based self-insemination, early initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV-infected individuals, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-uninfected partners and circumcision for men. Participants were enrolled into an implementation science study evaluating method uptake, acceptability, and pregnancy and HIV transmission outcomes. Results Findings to-date from 51 qualitative participants and 128 clinical cohort participants (82 women and 46 men, representing 82 partnerships) are presented. All men were accompanied by female partners, whereas 56% of women attended with their male partner. Fifteen of 46 couples (33%) were in confirmed serodiscordant relationships, however of the 36 additional women attending alone, 56% were unaware of their partners’ HIV status or believed them to be HIV-uninfected. The majority of HIV-infected women (86%) and men (71%) were on cART at enrollment, however only 47% on cART were virally suppressed. Timed unprotected intercourse, self-insemination and cART were common choices for participants; few elected PrEP. Conclusions Lessons learned from early implementation demonstrate feasibility of safer conception services, however reaching discordant couples, cART-naïve infected partners, and men remain challenges. Creating demand for safer conception services among those at highest risk for HIV transmission is necessary. PMID:24991901

  20. Immobilizer-assisted management of metal-contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Park, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Min-Suk; Owens, Gary; Youn, Gyu-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Su

    2012-07-15

    Production of food crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils is of concern because consumers are potentially exposed to hazardous metals via dietary intake of such crops or crop derived products. Therefore, the current study was conducted to develop management protocols for crop cultivation to allow safer food production. Metal uptake, as influenced by pH change-induced immobilizing agents (dolomite, steel slag, and agricultural lime) and sorption agents (zeolite and compost), was monitored in three common plants representative of leafy (Chinese cabbage), root (spring onion) and fruit (red pepper) vegetables, in a field experiment. The efficiency of the immobilizing agents was assessed by their ability to decrease the phytoavailability of metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn). The fruit vegetable (red pepper) showed the least accumulation of Cd (0.16-0.29 mgkg(-1) DW) and Pb (0.2-0.9 mgkg(-1) DW) in edible parts regardless of treatment, indicating selection of low metal accumulating crops was a reasonable strategy for safer food production. However, safer food production was more likely to be achievable by combining crop selection with immobilizing agent amendment of soils. Among the immobilizing agents, pH change-induced immobilizers were more effective than sorption agents, showing decreases in Cd and Pb concentrations in each plant well below standard limits. The efficiency of pH change-induced immobilizers was also comparable to reductions obtained by 'clean soil cover' where the total metal concentrations of the plow layer was reduced via capping the surface with uncontaminated soil, implying that pH change-induced immobilizers can be practically applied to metal contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

  1. Airborne Turbulence Warning System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rod

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a system by which aircraft pilots will be warned of turbulence. This networked system of in situ sensors will be mounted on various aircraft all of which are linked through a ground based parabolic antenna. As its end result, this system will attempt to reduce the number of accidents arising from turbulence.

  2. Expert systems development and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Regenie, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    Current research in the application of expert systems to problems in the flight research environment is discussed. In what is anticipated to be a broad research area, a real time expert system flight status monitor has been identified as the initial project. This real time expert system flight status monitor is described in terms of concept, application, development, and schedule.

  3. ISE System Development Methodology Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hayhoe, G.F.

    1992-02-17

    The Information Systems Engineering (ISE) System Development Methodology Manual (SDM) is a framework of life cycle management guidelines that provide ISE personnel with direction, organization, consistency, and improved communication when developing and maintaining systems. These guide-lines were designed to allow ISE to build and deliver Total Quality products, and to meet the goals and requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Westinghouse Savannah River Company, and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  4. McArthur conducts SAFER onboard training during Expedition 12

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-21

    ISS012-E-06030 (21 October 2005) --- Astronaut William S. McArthur Jr., Expedition 12 commander and NASA science officer, holds a Hand Control Module (HCM) while looking at laptop computer graphics during a Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) training session in the Unity node of the international space station.

  5. McArthur conducts SAFER onboard training during Expedition 12

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-21

    ISS012-E-06035 (21 October 2005) --- Astronaut William S. McArthur Jr., Expedition 12 commander and NASA science officer, holds a Hand Control Module (HCM) while looking at laptop computer graphics during a Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) training session in the Unity node of the international space station.

  6. Identifying Subtypes of Spousal Assaulters Using the B-SAFER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thijssen, Jill; de Ruiter, Corine

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a structured risk assessment instrument for intimate partner violence, the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER), was coded for 146 files of spousal assault cases from the Dutch probation service, dating from 2004 and 2005. The aim of the study was twofold: (a) to validate Holtzworth-Munroe and…

  7. Using a Narrative to Spark Safer Sex Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donné, Lennie; Hoeks, John; Jansen, Carel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: College students are a group at risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). While they are generally well informed about STIs, they do not consistently use condoms. An important element in preventing STIs is safer sex communication, especially with a sexual partner. This may be difficult, however, because of a lack of…

  8. Exercise in the 70s--Implications for Safer Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehouse, Chauncey A.

    1981-01-01

    Precautionary measures that should be taken by individuals to provide for safer participation in a vigorous exercise program are outlined, including the need for physical examinations, physical conditioning and warm-up, proper clothing and equipment, and awareness of environmental hazards. (JMF)

  9. Tokarev conducts SAFER onboard training during Expedition 12

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-21

    ISS012-E-06025 (21 October 2005) --- Cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, holds a Hand Control Module (HCM) while looking at laptop computer graphics during a Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) training session in the Unity node of the international space station.

  10. The Relationship of Assertiveness to College Students' Safer Sex Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yesmont, Georgia A.

    1992-01-01

    Investigated relationship between assertiveness tendencies and safer sex behaviors in 253 heterosexual college students. Hypothesized that assertiveness would vary positively, and nonassertiveness negatively, with caution about engaging in sexual intimacy, inquiring about potential partner's sexually transmitted disease risk history, and frequency…

  11. Safer medicines management in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Anthony J; Sheikh, Aziz; Hurwitz, Brian; Smeaton, Lesley; Chen, Yen-Fu; Howard, Rachel; Cantrill, Judy; Royal, Simon

    2002-01-01

    Errors in the medicines management process represent an important source of iatrogenic harm in primary care. Most errors result from underlying systems-based problems that are amenable to intervention and potentially preventable. In this paper, we seek to identify the frequency of medication-related morbidity in primary care, understand the underlying systemic reasons that increase risk of medication-related errors and iatrogenic harm, and suggest strategies for improving the safety of medicines management. PMID:12389765

  12. Issues in expert system development

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, C.L.

    1988-03-01

    The explicit representation of domain knowledge and its separation from the processes which manipulate it and the representation formalism particular to artificial intelligence allow expert systems to solve problems which are characterized by a high combinatoric complexity or which are sufficiently ill defined as to not have reasonable software engineering solutions. The expert system approach to problem-solving differs radically from it conventional system development counterpart. This paper defines the expert system and introduces the production system architecture. The relative strengths and weaknesses of expert system and software engineering approaches to problem solving are discussed. Also addressed are criteria for identifying problems amenable to expert system solution and some justification for system development.

  13. Making Medical Devices Safer at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... issues like anxiety, necessary training, and the home environment that might have children and pets. This document also addresses the development of user-friendly instructions, including how to handle ...

  14. Data management system advanced development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Katherine; Humphries, Terry

    1990-01-01

    The Data Management System (DMS) Advanced Development task provides for the development of concepts, new tools, DMS services, and for the testing of the Space Station DMS hardware and software. It also provides for the development of techniques capable of determining the effects of system changes/enhancements, additions of new technology, and/or hardware and software growth on system performance. This paper will address the built-in characteristics which will support network monitoring requirements in the design of the evolving DMS network implementation, functional and performance requirements for a real-time, multiprogramming, multiprocessor operating system, and the possible use of advanced development techniques such as expert systems and artificial intelligence tools in the DMS design.

  15. Near elimination of ventricular pacing in SafeR mode compared to DDD modes: a randomized study of 422 patients.

    PubMed

    Davy, Jean-Marc; Hoffmann, Ellen; Frey, Axel; Jocham, Kurt; Rossi, Stefano; Dupuis, Jean-Marc; Frabetti, Lorenzo; Ducloux, Pascale; Prades, Emmanuel; Jauvert, Gaël

    2012-04-01

    SafeR performance versus DDD/automatic mode conversion (DDD/AMC) and DDD with a 250-ms atrioventricular (AV) delay (DDD/LD) modes was assessed toward ventricular pacing (Vp) reduction. After a 1-month run-in phase, recipients of dual-chamber pacemakers without persistent AV block and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) were randomly assigned to SafeR, DDD/AMC, or DDD/LD in a 1:1:1 design. The main endpoint was the percentage of Vp (%Vp) at 2 months and 1 year after randomization, ascertained from device memories. Secondary endpoints include %Vp at 1 year according to pacing indication and 1-year AF incidence based on automatic mode switch device stored episodes. Among 422 randomized patients (73.2±10.6 years, 50% men, sinus node dysfunction 47.4%, paroxysmal AV block 30.3%, bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome 21.8%), 141 were assigned to SafeR versus 146 to DDD/AMC and 135 to DDD/LD modes. Mean %Vp at 2 months was 3.4±12.6% in SafeR versus 33.6±34.7% and 14.0±26.0% in DDD/AMC and DDD/LD modes, respectively (P<0.0001 for both). At 1 year, mean %Vp in SafeR was 4.5±15.3% versus 37.9±34.4% and 16.7±28.0% in DDD/AMC and DDD/LD modes, respectively (P<0.0001 for both). The proportion of patients in whom Vp was completely eliminated was significantly higher in SafeR (69%) versus DDD/AMC (15%) and DDD/LD (45%) modes (P<0.0001 for both), regardless of pacing indication. The absolute risk of developing permanent AF or of remaining in AF for >30% of the time was 5.4% lower in SafeR than in the DDD pacing group (ns). In this selected patient population, SafeR markedly suppressed unnecessary Vp compared with DDD modes. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Science and Technology for a Safer Nation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    attracting new researchers to prevent, manage and respond to food - contamination events. Efforts include development of a prototype food-event...impact of food contamination events. In response to several contamination events in 2006-2007, NCFPD researchers analyzed food ingredients and

  17. Safer sips: removing arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Breslin, K

    1998-11-01

    U.S. researchers are developing technologies that may someday protect millions of people worldwide whose drinking water is tainted with arsenic. Arsenic is released into water from soil and rock erosion, and is also a by-product of industrial processes including semiconductor manufacturing, petroleum refining, and mining and smelting operations.

  18. Oxygen Assessments Ensure Safer Medical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    A team at White Sands Test Facility developed a test method to evaluate fire hazards in oxygen-enriched environments. Wendell Hull and Associates, located in Las Cruces, New Mexico, entered a Space Act Agreement with NASA and now provides services including fire and explosion investigations, oxygen testing and training, and accident reconstruction and forensic engineering.

  19. Safer sips: removing arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, K

    1998-01-01

    U.S. researchers are developing technologies that may someday protect millions of people worldwide whose drinking water is tainted with arsenic. Arsenic is released into water from soil and rock erosion, and is also a by-product of industrial processes including semiconductor manufacturing, petroleum refining, and mining and smelting operations. PMID:9799197

  20. 40 Years of Safer Aviation Through Reporting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-28

    NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) is one of the tools used to make aviation in the United States as safe as it is. Celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, NASA’s confidential ASRS is widely used by pilots and other airline employees to identify potential hazards. Over the past 40 years, the ASRS has issued more than 6,200 safety alerts to the FAA and other decision makers in the aviation community.

  1. Portable Nanomesh Creates Safer Drinking Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Providing astronauts with clean water is essential to space exploration to ensure the health and well-being of crewmembers away from Earth. For the sake of efficient and safe long-term space travel, NASA constantly seeks to improve the process of filtering and re-using wastewater in closed-loop systems. Because it would be impractical for astronauts to bring months (or years) worth of water with them, reducing the weight and space taken by water storage through recycling and filtering as much water as possible is crucial. Closed-loop systems using nanotechnology allow wastewater to be cleaned and reused while keeping to a minimum the amount of drinking water carried on missions. Current high-speed filtration methods usually require electricity, and methods without electricity usually prove impractical or slow. Known for their superior strength and electrical conductivity, carbon nanotubes measure only a few nanometers in diameter; a nanometer is one billionth of a meter, or roughly one hundred-thousandth the width of a human hair. Nanotubes have improved water filtration by eliminating the need for chemical treatments, significant pressure, and heavy water tanks, which makes the new technology especially appealing for applications where small, efficient, lightweight materials are required, whether on Earth or in space. "NASA will need small volume, effective water purification systems for future long-duration space flight," said Johnson Space Center s Karen Pickering. NASA advances in water filtration with nanotechnology are now also protecting human health in the most remote areas of Earth.

  2. The SAFER guides: empowering organizations to improve the safety and effectiveness of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to improve quality and safety of healthcare. However, EHR users have experienced safety concerns from EHR design and usability features that are not optimally adapted for the complex work flow of real-world practice. Few strategies exist to address unintended consequences from implementation of EHRs and other health information technologies. We propose that organizations equipped with EHRs should consider the strategy of "proactive risk assessment" of their EHR-enabled healthcare system to identify and address EHR-related safety concerns. In this paper, we describe the conceptual underpinning of an EHR-related self-assessment strategy to provide institutions a foundation upon which they could build their safety efforts. With support from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), we used a rigorous, iterative process to develop a set of 9 self-assessment tools to optimize the safety and safe use of EHRs. These tools, referred to as the Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience (SAFER) guides, could be used to self-assess safety and effectiveness of EHR implementations, identify specific areas of vulnerability, and create solutions and culture change to mitigate risks. A variety of audiences could conduct these assessments, including frontline clinicians or care teams in different practices, or clinical, quality, or administrative leaders within larger institutions. The guides use a multifaceted systems-based approach to assess risk and empower organizations to work with internal or external stakeholders (eg, EHR developers) on optimizing EHR functionality and using EHRs to drive improvements in the quality and safety of healthcare.

  3. Firmware Development Improves System Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Most manufacturing processes require physical pointwise positioning of the components or tools from one location to another. Typical mechanical systems utilize either stop-and-go or fixed feed-rate procession to accomplish the task. The first approach achieves positional accuracy but prolongs overall time and increases wear on the mechanical system. The second approach sustains the throughput but compromises positional accuracy. A computer firmware approach has been developed to optimize this point wise mechanism by utilizing programmable interrupt controls to synchronize engineering processes 'on the fly'. This principle has been implemented in an eddy current imaging system to demonstrate the improvement. Software programs were developed that enable a mechanical controller card to transmit interrupts to a system controller as a trigger signal to initiate an eddy current data acquisition routine. The advantages are: (1) optimized manufacturing processes, (2) increased throughput of the system, (3) improved positional accuracy, and (4) reduced wear and tear on the mechanical system.

  4. Operator care and eco-concerned development of a fast, facile and economical assay for basic nitrogenous drugs based on simplified ion-pair mini-scale extraction using safer solvent combined with drop-based spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Plianwong, Samarwadee; Sripattanaporn, Areerut; Waewsa-nga, Kwanrutai; Buacheen, Parin; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak

    2012-08-30

    A fast, facile, and economical assay for basic nitrogenous drugs has been developed based on the mini-scale extraction of the drug-dye ion pair complex combined with the use of safe-for-analyst and eco-friendlier organic extractant and drop-based micro-spectrophotometry. Instead of using large volume devices, the extraction was simply carried out in typical 1.5 mL microcentrifuge tubes along with the use of micropipettes for accurate transfer of liquids, vortex mixer for efficient partitioning of solutes and benchtop centrifuge for rapid phase separation. In the last step, back-extraction was performed by using the microvolume of acidic solution in order to concentrate the colored species into a confined aqueous microdrop and to keep the analyst away from unwanted contact and inhalation of organic solvents during the quantitation step which was achieved by using cuvetteless UV-vis micro-spectrophotometry without any prior dilutions. Using chlorpheniramine maleate as a representative analyte and n-butyl acetate as a less toxic and non-ozone depleting extractant, the miniaturized method was less laborious and much faster. It was accurate, precise and insensitive to the interferences from common excipients. Notably, it gave the assay results of drug in tablets and oral solution comparable to the large-scale pharmacopeial method while the consumption of organic solvents and the release of wastes were lowered by 200-400 folds.

  5. Safer environment makes sense for all.

    PubMed

    Frith, Sue

    2011-06-01

    Sue Frith, deputy head of the NHS Security Management Service (NHS SMS), explains the organisation's important role in advising, and supporting, security staff at NHS hospitals in dealing with incidents ranging from verbal abuse to serious violence and aggression. Arguing that security in the NHS is "everyone's business", she explains both a range of processes and initiatives,already in place to safeguard people and assets, and discusses recent developments, such as a new incident reporting website, designed to help keep patients, staff, visitors, and property, at healthcare facilities safe and secure.

  6. Development of a stereofluoroscopy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    A technique of 3-D video imaging, was developed for use on manned missions for observation and control of remote manipulators. An improved medical diagnostic fluoroscope with a stereo, real-time output was also developed. An explanation of how this system works, and recommendations for future work in this area are presented.

  7. Development of Vocational Training Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education, Training, and Youth.

    The EUROTECNET program was implemented to develop and improve vocational training policies and systems to meet the challenges of change in the economic and social situation through the development of innovative responses and actions. Each Member State of the European Community was asked to identify one issue of strategic and critical importance to…

  8. Development of the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Auditory development involves changes in the peripheral and central nervous system along the auditory pathways, and these occur naturally, and in response to stimulation. Human development occurs along a trajectory that can last decades, and is studied using behavioral psychophysics, as well as physiologic measurements with neural imaging. The auditory system constructs a perceptual space that takes information from objects and groups, segregates sounds, and provides meaning and access to communication tools such as language. Auditory signals are processed in a series of analysis stages, from peripheral to central. Coding of information has been studied for features of sound, including frequency, intensity, loudness, and location, in quiet and in the presence of maskers. In the latter case, the ability of the auditory system to perform an analysis of the scene becomes highly relevant. While some basic abilities are well developed at birth, there is a clear prolonged maturation of auditory development well into the teenage years. Maturation involves auditory pathways. However, non-auditory changes (attention, memory, cognition) play an important role in auditory development. The ability of the auditory system to adapt in response to novel stimuli is a key feature of development throughout the nervous system, known as neural plasticity.

  9. Development of the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Auditory development involves changes in the peripheral and central nervous system along the auditory pathways, and these occur naturally, and in response to stimulation. Human development occurs along a trajectory that can last decades, and is studied using behavioral psychophysics, as well as physiologic measurements with neural imaging. The auditory system constructs a perceptual space that takes information from objects and groups, segregates sounds, and provides meaning and access to communication tools such as language. Auditory signals are processed in a series of analysis stages, from peripheral to central. Coding of information has been studied for features of sound, including frequency, intensity, loudness, and location, in quiet and in the presence of maskers. In the latter case, the ability of the auditory system to perform an analysis of the scene becomes highly relevant. While some basic abilities are well developed at birth, there is a clear prolonged maturation of auditory development well into the teenage years. Maturation involves auditory pathways. However, non-auditory changes (attention, memory, cognition) play an important role in auditory development. The ability of the auditory system to adapt in response to novel stimuli is a key feature of development throughout the nervous system, known as neural plasticity. PMID:25726262

  10. 75 FR 71123 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Safer Detergent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Safer Detergent... ICR, entitled: ``Safer Detergent Stewardship Initiative (SDSI) Program'' and identified by EPA ICR No... surfactants. Title: Safer Detergent Stewardship Initiative (SDSI) Program. ICR numbers: EPA ICR No. 2261.02...

  11. Expert System Development Methodology (ESDM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sary, Charisse; Gilstrap, Lewey; Hull, Larry G.

    1990-01-01

    The Expert System Development Methodology (ESDM) provides an approach to developing expert system software. Because of the uncertainty associated with this process, an element of risk is involved. ESDM is designed to address the issue of risk and to acquire the information needed for this purpose in an evolutionary manner. ESDM presents a life cycle in which a prototype evolves through five stages of development. Each stage consists of five steps, leading to a prototype for that stage. Development may proceed to a conventional development methodology (CDM) at any time if enough has been learned about the problem to write requirements. ESDM produces requirements so that a product may be built with a CDM. ESDM is considered preliminary because is has not yet been applied to actual projects. It has been retrospectively evaluated by comparing the methods used in two ongoing expert system development projects that did not explicitly choose to use this methodology but which provided useful insights into actual expert system development practices and problems.

  12. Beyond stereotypes: promoting safer sex behaviors among Latino adolescents.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M; Rodriguez, Dorothy

    2003-01-01

    Latino youth are at increasing risk for consequences of risky sexual behavior including pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as HIV infection. The diversity among Latinos and the prevalence of stereotypes about Latino sexual altitudes, beliefs, and behaviors present barriers in effective prevention and treatment. Strategies for promoting safe sex among Latino adolescents include recognizing the diversity among Latino adolescents and assessing attitudes, beliefs, and values that can be used to support safer sex behaviors.

  13. PNNL Tests Fish Passage System

    ScienceCinema

    Colotelo, Alison

    2016-08-18

    Scientists from PNNL are testing a fish transportation system developed by Whooshh Innovations. The Whooshh system uses a flexible tube that works a bit like a vacuum, guiding fish over hydroelectric dams or other structures. Compared to methods used today, this system could save money while granting fish quicker, safer passage through dams and hatcheries.

  14. PNNL Tests Fish Passage System

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison

    2015-03-13

    Scientists from PNNL are testing a fish transportation system developed by Whooshh Innovations. The Whooshh system uses a flexible tube that works a bit like a vacuum, guiding fish over hydroelectric dams or other structures. Compared to methods used today, this system could save money while granting fish quicker, safer passage through dams and hatcheries.

  15. Psychosocial predictors of "safer sex" behaviors in young adults.

    PubMed

    Basen-Engquist, K

    1992-01-01

    This study tested a model of safer sex behavior using variables from social learning theory, the health belief model, the theory of reasoned action, and theories of cognitive coping style. Two types of safer sex behavior were measured: frequency of condom use and the discussion of AIDS and past partners with a sexual partner. The participants--275 undergraduate students--completed an anonymous written questionnaire. The variables (behavioral intention, perceived susceptibility, barriers, self-efficacy, monitoring, blunting, and social support) predicted 35% of the variance in condom use and 13% of the variance in discussion (adjusted R2s). Intention was the strongest predictor of both types of safer sex behavior. Perceived susceptibility and perceived barriers were associated with intention to use a condom; perceived barriers was inversely related to condom use. Self-efficacy was associated with the intention to discuss and reported discussion of AIDS and past partners with a sexual partner; social support was related to the intention to discuss. An information-avoiding coping style was negatively associated with condom use. Implications for future research and intervention efforts in the area of AIDS prevention are discussed.

  16. Women's autonomy in negotiating safer sex to prevent HIV: findings from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Atteraya, Madhu Sudhan; Kimm, Heejin; Song, In Han

    2014-02-01

    Women with greater autonomy have higher HIV-related knowledge and condom use. Inability to negotiate safer sex in high-risk situations might increase HIV infection. This study examined the relationship between women's autonomy and ability to negotiate safer sex practices among married women. The 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey data were used. The data were collected by two-stage stratified cluster sampling and face-to-face interviews. Autonomy was measured in Decision-Making Participation and Assets Ownership, while ability to negotiate safer sex consists of Refusal of Sex and Ask for Condom Use. Among 12,674 women of 15-49 years, married women were analyzed (n = 8,896). Women with greater autonomy in decision-making participation were more likely to negotiate safer sex. After controlling for socio-demographic factors, odds ratios (OR) for refusal of sex was 2.70 (95% CI [2.14, 3.40]) in women with the highest decision-making participation. These women showed higher OR for 'ask for condom use' in high risk situations (2.10, 95% CI [1.81, 2.44]). Assets ownership also demonstrated a positive statistical relationship with asking for a condom use (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.10, 1.56]). The results point to the importance of women's autonomy on sexual health. It emphasizes women's empowerment-based approach to curbing HIV/AIDS in developing countries.

  17. Automotive Stirling engine systems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the Automotive Stirling Engine (ASE) program is to develop a Stirling engine for automotive use that provides a 30 percent improvement in fuel economy relative to a comparable internal-combustion engine while meeting emissions goals. This paper traces the engine systems' development efforts focusing on: (1) a summary of engine system performance for all Mod I engines; (2) the development, program conducted for the upgraded Mod I; and (3) vehicle systems work conducted to enhance vehicle fuel economy. Problems encountered during the upgraded Mod I test program are discussed. The importance of the EPA driving cycle cold-start penalty and the measures taken to minimize that penalty with the Mod II are also addressed.

  18. Passionate scholarship 2001-2010: a vision for making academe safer for joyous risk-takers.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Kathleen T

    2010-01-01

    What is passionate scholarship? According to students and graduates from a nursing doctoral program interviewed 10 years ago, passionate scholars must risk committing to a personally meaningful and socially relevant topic close to the heart. This insight spawned a string of exploratory inquiries and educational interventions in search of the "ideal conditions" that foster passionate scholarship. Updating the findings of that original study published in Advances in Nursing Science in 2001, this article describes a 3-year, faculty development initiative. Beyond increasing scholarly productivity, the findings suggest that turning faculty groups into communities of scholarly caring can make academic environments safer for passionate risk-takers.

  19. Cutting the cost of South African antiretroviral therapy using newer, safer drugs.

    PubMed

    Venter, W F; Kaiser, B; Pillay, Y; Conradie, F; Gomez, G B; Clayden, P; Matsolo, M; Amole, C; Rutter, L; Abdullah, F; Abrams, E J; Casas, C P; Barnhart, M; Pillay, A; Pozniak, A; Hill, A; Fairlie, L; Boffito, M; Moorhouse, M; Chersich, M; Serenata, C; Quevedo, J; Loots, G

    2016-12-21

    Antiretrovirals are a significant cost driver for HIV programmes. Current first-line regimens have performed well in real-life programmes, but have a low barrier to virological resistance and still carry toxicity that limits adherence. New drug developments may mean that we have access to safer, more robust and cheaper regimens, but only if the appropriate clinical trials are conducted. We briefly discuss these trials, and demonstrate the large cost savings to the South African HIV programme if these are successful.

  20. Self-rescue strategies for EVA crewmembers equipped with the SAFER backpack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Baughman, David

    1994-01-01

    An extravehicular astronaut who becomes separated from a space station has three options available: grappling the station immediately by means of a 'shepherd's crook' device; rescue by either a second crewmember flying an MMU or a robotic-controlled MMU; or self-rescue by means of a propulsive system. The first option requires very fast response by a tumbling astronaut; the second requires constant availability of an MMU, as well as a rendezvous procedure thousands of feet from the station. This paper will consider the third option, propulsive self-rescue. In particular, the capability of the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsive backpack, which is to be tested on STS-64 in Sep. 1994, will be studied. This system possesses an attitude hold function that can automatically detumble an astronaut after separation. On-orbit tests of candidate self-rescue systems have demonstrated the need for such a feature. SAFER has a total delta(v) capability of about 10 fps, to cover both rotations and translations, compared with a possible separation rate of 2.5 fps. But the delta(v) required for self-rescue is critically dependent on the delay before return can be initiated, as a consequence of orbital effects. A very important practical question is then whether the total delta(v) of SAFER is adequate to perform self-rescue for worst case values of separation speed, time to detumble, and time for the astronaut to visually acquire the station. This paper shows that SAFER does indeed have sufficient propellant to carry out self-rescue in all realistic separation cases, as well as in cases which are considerably more severe than anything likely to be encountered in practice. The return trajectories and total delta(v)'s discussed are obtained by means of an 'inertial line-of-sight targeting' scheme, derived in the paper, which allows orbital effects to be corrected by making use of the visual information available to the pilot, namely the line-of-sight direction to the

  1. ‘It is not expected for married couples’: a qualitative study on challenges to safer sex communication among polygamous and monogamous partners in southeastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mtenga, Sally Mmanyi; Geubbels, Eveline; Tanner, Marcel; Merten, Sonja; Pfeiffer, Constanze

    2016-01-01

    prevention interventions in Tanzania should be carefully adapted to the local context including respective social norms, gender systems, marital context and relationship uncertainties as aspects that facilitate or hinder safer sex dialogue between partners. The WHO-CSDH framework could be strengthened by explicitly integrating relationship quality, marital status, and social norms as additional determinants of health. PMID:27633036

  2. Mobile munitions assessment system development

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, L.C.; Watts, K.D.; Jorgensen, C.L.

    1996-05-01

    The United States has been involved in the development, testing, storage and disposal of chemical weapons since World War I. As a result, there are numerous sites which contain the presence of chemical warfare materiel. This materiel is in the form of buried surplus munitions, munitions that did not detonate during testing and other forms. These items pose a significant human health and environmental hazard and must be disposed of properly. The US Army was tasked by the Department of Defense with the remediation of all non-stockpile chemical warfare materiel. To help comply with this tasking, the Army Project Manager for Nonstockpile Chemical Materiel is sponsoring the development of a Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS). The system is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Dugway Proving Ground. The purpose of the system is to inspect suspect munitions and containers, identify the fill, evaluate the fuzing and firing train and analyze samples from the surrounding area to determine if chemical warfare materiel is present. The information gained from the application of the MMAS and other systems is intended to be used to establish the best method to handle and dispose of a given munition and its contents.

  3. Healthcare system intervention for safer use of medicines in elderly patients in primary care-a qualitative study of the participants' perceptions of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and agreement for change.

    PubMed

    Lenander, Cecilia; Bondesson, Åsa; Midlöv, Patrik; Viberg, Nina

    2015-09-04

    The elderly population is increasing and with advanced age comes a higher risk for contracting diseases and excessive medicine use. Polypharmacy can lead to drug-related problems and an increased need of health care. More needs to be done to help overcome these problems. In order for new models to be successful and possible to implement in health care they have to be accepted by caregivers. The aim of this study was to evaluate participants' perceptions of the SÄKLÄK project, which aims to enhance medication safety, especially for elderly patients, in primary care. This is a qualitative study within the SÄKLÄK project. The SÄKLÄK project is a multi-professional intervention in primary care consisting of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and written agreements for change. A total of 17 participants from the intervention's primary care units were interviewed. Most of the interviews were done on a one-to-one basis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. A survey was also sent to the primary care unit heads. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore the participants' perceptions. The analysis of the interviews yielded six categories: multi-professional co-operation, a focus on areas of improvement, the joy of sharing knowledge, disappointment with the focus of the feedback, spend time to save time and impact on work. From these categories a theme developed: "Medication safety is a large area. In order to make improvements time needs to be invested and different professions must contribute." This study shows that our studied intervention method is feasible to use in primary care and that the multi-professional approach was perceived as being very positive by the participants. Multi-professional co-operation was time consuming, but was also deemed as an investment and an opportunity to share knowledge. Some points of improvement of the method were identified such as simplification of the self-assessment form and clearer instructions for

  4. Control System for Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlman, Inga

    2008-10-01

    Ecological sustainability presupposes that a global human population acts in such ways, that their total impact on the biosphere, together with nature's reactions, keeps the biosphere sufficient for sustaining generations to come. Human conduct is ultimately controlled by means of law. The problem can be summed up as: Controlling system—Population—Sustainable ecosystems This paper discusses two interlinked issues: a) the social scientific need for systems theory in the context of achieving and maintaining sustainable development and b) how theory of anticipatory modelling and computing can be applied when constructing and applying societal controlling systems for ecological sustainability with as much local democracy and economic efficiency as possible.

  5. Knowledge systems for sustainable development

    PubMed Central

    Cash, David W.; Clark, William C.; Alcock, Frank; Dickson, Nancy M.; Eckley, Noelle; Guston, David H.; Jäger, Jill; Mitchell, Ronald B.

    2003-01-01

    The challenge of meeting human development needs while protecting the earth's life support systems confronts scientists, technologists, policy makers, and communities from local to global levels. Many believe that science and technology (S&T) must play a more central role in sustainable development, yet little systematic scholarship exists on how to create institutions that effectively harness S&T for sustainability. This study suggests that efforts to mobilize S&T for sustainability are more likely to be effective when they manage boundaries between knowledge and action in ways that simultaneously enhance the salience, credibility, and legitimacy of the information they produce. Effective systems apply a variety of institutional mechanisms that facilitate communication, translation and mediation across boundaries. PMID:12777623

  6. Inserting Agility in System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Agile IT Acquisition, IT Box, Scrum Inserting Agility in System Development Matthew R. Kennedy and Lt Col Dan Ward, USAF With the fast-paced nature...1,700 individuals and 71 countries, found Scrum and eXtreme Programming to be the most widely followed method- ologies (VersionOne, 2007). Other...University http://www.dau.mil 259 Defense ARJ, July 2012, Vol. 19 No. 3 : 249–264 Scrum Scrum is a framework used for project management, which is

  7. Data bus system development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Two data bus systems were designed fabricated, Data Bus System I and Data Bus System II. The technical features of the delivered hardware include the following: (1) 5 MHz selfclocking data bus; (2) bidirectional communications utilizing Manchester Code at data rates in excess of 20,000 words per second; (3) utilization of MSI COS/MOS technology (4) probability of accepting an erroneous data bit less than 1 in 10 to the 25th power (5) low power consumption (50 to 1 reduction in quiescent current over P/MOS) (6) compatibility with projected high density packaging. Three distinct types of data bus remote terminals were developed: the subsystem interface unit, the combination of an electronic interface unit and a standard interface unit-serial, and an SIU/Preprocessor.

  8. Seismographs, sensors, and satellites: Better technology for safer communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groat, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    In the past 25 years, our ability to measure, monitor, and model the processes that lead to natural disasters has increased dramatically. Equally important has been the improvement in our technological capability to communicate information about hazards to those whose lives may be affected. These innovations in tracking and communicating the changes-floods, earthquakes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions-in our dynamic planet, supported by a deeper understanding of earth processes, enable us to expand our predictive capabilities and point the way to a safer future. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Airport baggage scanning technology makes flying safer for Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Harry

    2013-08-28

    Each time you step on a commercial flight, you can feel safer because of a researcher you've probably never heard of. His name is Harry Martz. He's a veteran scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) who wakes up every day thinking how his research can advance X-ray imaging technology to thwart the next terrorist attack. "My job is to improve national security," Martz said. "That's why my research team exists. We have to outsmart the terrorists. It's a constant battle."

  10. Electronic cigarettes: a safer alternative or potential poison?

    PubMed

    Smith, Janet E

    2014-10-01

    Electronic cigarettes have been marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes, and their use is expanding exponentially. However, there is a severe lack of scientific data about the ingredients in the liquid used in the device and the health consequences of using electronic cigarettes. As technology has outpaced regulations, the production and sale of electronic cigarettes are, as yet, unregulated and do not fall under the purview of the Food and Drug Administration. This article will review the mechanism of action and what is currently known about the safety of electronic cigarettes. The risk of poisoning for children will also be identified, as well as the implications for home healthcare clinicians.

  11. Artificial Intelligence For A Safer And More Efficient Car Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adorni, Giovanni

    1989-03-01

    In this paper a project, PROMETHEUS, is described in which fourteen of Europe's leading car manufacturers are to join with approximately forty research institutes and governmental agencies to make the traffic of Europe safer, more efficient and more economical. PROMETHEUS project is divided into seven areas. In this paper one of the seven areas, PRO-ART, is described. PRO-ART is aimed at clarifying the need for and the principles of the artificial intelligence to be used in the next generation automobile. After a brief description of the overhall project, the description of the seven years PRO-ART Italian research programme will be given.

  12. Nanosat Intelligent Power System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael A.; Beaman, Robert G.; Mica, Joseph A.; Truszkowski, Walter F.; Rilee, Michael L.; Simm, David E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a class of satellites called nano-satellites. The technologies developed for these satellites will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections theme and will be of great benefit to other NASA enterprises. A major challenge for these missions is meeting significant scientific- objectives with limited onboard and ground-based resources. Total spacecraft power is limited by the small satellite size. Additionally, it is highly desirable to minimize operational costs by limiting the ground support required to manage the constellation. This paper will describe how these challenges are met in the design of the nanosat power system. We will address the factors considered and tradeoffs made in deriving the nanosat power system architecture. We will discuss how incorporating onboard fault detection and correction capability yields a robust spacecraft power bus without the mass and volume penalties incurred from redundant systems and describe how power system efficiency is maximized throughout the mission duration.

  13. Remote Arrhythmia Monitoring System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liszka, Kathy J.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Telemedicine is taking a step forward with the efforts of team members from the NASA Glenn Research Center, the MetroHealth campus of Case Western University, and the University of Akron. The Arrhythmia Monitoring System is a completed, working test bed developed at Glenn that collects real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signals from a mobile or homebound patient, combines these signals with global positioning system (GPS) location data, and transmits them to a remote station for display and monitoring. Approximately 300,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks, which are arrhythmia cases. However, not all patients identified at risk for arrhythmias can be monitored continuously because of technological and economical limitations. Such patients, who are at moderate risk of arrhythmias, would benefit from technology that would permit long-term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment. Embedded Web Technology developed at Glenn to remotely command and collect data from embedded systems using Web technology is the catalyst for this new telemetry system (ref. 1). In the end-to-end system architecture, ECG signals are collected from a patient using an event recorder and are transmitted to a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA) using Bluetooth, a short-range wireless technology. The PDA concurrently tracks the patient's location via a connection to a GPS receiver. A long distance link is established via a standard Internet connection over a 2.5-generation Global System for Mobile Communications/General Packet Radio Service (GSM/GPRS)1 cellular, wireless infrastructure. Then, the digital signal is transmitted to a call center for monitoring by medical professionals.

  14. ITER Plasma Control System Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, Joseph; ITER PCS Design Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS) continues with the preliminary design phase for 1st plasma and early plasma operation in H/He up to Ip = 15 MA in L-mode. The design is being developed through a contract between the ITER Organization and a consortium of plasma control experts from EU and US fusion laboratories, which is expected to be completed in time for a design review at the end of 2016. This design phase concentrates on breakdown including early ECH power and magnetic control of the poloidal field null, plasma current, shape, and position. Basic kinetic control of the heating (ECH, ICH, NBI) and fueling systems is also included. Disruption prediction, mitigation, and maintaining stable operation are also included because of the high magnetic and kinetic stored energy present already for early plasma operation. Support functions for error field topology and equilibrium reconstruction are also required. All of the control functions also must be integrated into an architecture that will be capable of the required complexity of all ITER scenarios. A database is also being developed to collect and manage PCS functional requirements from operational scenarios that were defined in the Conceptual Design with links to proposed event handling strategies and control algorithms for initial basic control functions. A brief status of the PCS development will be presented together with a proposed schedule for design phases up to DT operation.

  15. Reciprocating Feed System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trewek, Mary (Technical Monitor); Blackmon, James B.; Eddleman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The reciprocating feed system (RFS) is an alternative means of providing high pressure propellant flow at low cost and system mass, with high fail-operational reliability. The RFS functions by storing the liquid propellants in large, low-pressure tanks and then expelling each propellant through two or three small, high-pressure tanks. Each RFS tank is sequentially filled, pressurized, expelled, vented, and refilled so as to provide a constant, or variable, mass flow rate to the engine. This type of system is much lighter than a conventional pressure fed system in part due to the greatly reduced amount of inert tank weight. The delivered payload for an RFS is superior to that of conventional pressure fed systems for conditions of high total impulse and it is competitive with turbopump systems, up to approximately 2000 psi. An advanced version of the RFS uses autogenous pressurization and thrust augmentation to achieve higher performance. In this version, the pressurization gases are combusted in a small engine, thus making the pressurization system, in effect, part of the propulsion system. The RFS appears to be much less expensive than a turbopump system, due to reduced research and development cost and hardware cost, since it is basically composed of small high- pressure tanks, a pressurization system, and control valves. A major benefit is the high reliability fail-operational mode; in the event of a failure in one of the three tank-systems, it can operate on the two remaining tanks. Other benefits include variable pressure and flow rates, ease of engine restart in micro-gravity, and enhanced propellant acquisition and control under adverse acceleration conditions. We present a system mass analysis tool that accepts user inputs for various design and mission parameters and calculates such output values payload and vehicle weights for the conventional pressure fed system, the RFS, the Autogenous Pressurization Thrust Augmentation (APTA) RFS, and turbopump systems

  16. The First Global Patient Safety Challenge "Clean Care is Safer Care": from launch to current progress and achievements.

    PubMed

    Allegranzi, Benedetta; Storr, Julie; Dziekan, Gerald; Leotsakos, Agnès; Donaldson, Liam; Pittet, Didier

    2007-06-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a major safety issue affecting the quality of care of hundreds of millions of patients every year in both developed and developing countries. To meet the goal of ensuring patient safety across healthcare settings around the globe, the World Health Organization launched the World Alliance for Patient Safety in October 2004. Healthcare-associated infections were identified as a fundamental work priority and selected as the topic of the First Global Patient Safety Challenge launched by the Alliance. Under the banner "Clean Care is Safer Care", the Challenge aims at implementing several actions to reduce healthcare-associated infections worldwide, regardless of the level of development of healthcare systems and the availability of resources. Implementation strategies include the integration of multiple interventions in the areas of blood safety, injection safety, clinical procedure safety, and water, sanitation and waste management, with the promotion of hand hygiene in healthcare as the cornerstone. Several initiatives have been undertaken to raise global awareness and to obtain country commitment to support action on this issue. The new Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care, including the most consistent scientific evidence available, have been issued in an advanced draft form. An implementation strategy is proposed therein to provide solutions to overcome obstacles to improvement in compliance with hand hygiene practices, together with a range of practical tools for use in healthcare settings. The latter are currently undergoing testing in several pilot sites to evaluate feasibility, acceptability and sustainability.

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 538: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-04-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 538: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]). (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk. (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for either clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and where DOE will reach consensus with NDEP before beginning the next phase of work.

  18. Spaceport Processing System Development Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing System Development Lab (SPSDL), developed and maintained by the Systems Hardware and Engineering Branch (NE-C4), is a development lab with its own private/restricted networks. A private/restricted network is a network with restricted or no communication with other networks. This allows users from different groups to work on their own projects in their own configured environment without interfering with others utilizing their resources in the lab. The different networks being used in the lab have no way to talk with each other due to the way they are configured, so how a user configures his software, operating system, or the equipment doesn't interfere or carry over on any of the other networks in the lab. The SPSDL is available for any project in KSC that is in need of a lab environment. My job in the SPSDL was to assist in maintaining the lab to make sure it's accessible for users. This includes, but is not limited to, making sure the computers in the lab are properly running and patched with updated hardware/software. In addition to this, I also was to assist users who had issues in utilizing the resources in the lab, which may include helping to configure a restricted network for their own environment. All of this was to ensure workers were able to use the SPSDL to work on their projects without difficulty which would in turn, benefit the work done throughout KSC. When I wasn't working in the SPSDL, I would instead help other coworkers with smaller tasks which included, but wasn't limited to, the proper disposal, moving of, or search for essential equipment. I also, during the free time I had, used NASA's resources to increase my knowledge and skills in a variety of subjects related to my major as a computer engineer, particularly in UNIX, Networking, and Embedded Systems.

  19. A safer alternative: Cannabis substitution as harm reduction.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nicholas; Sales, Paloma; Averill, Sheigla; Murphy, Fiona; Sato, Sye-Ok; Murphy, Sheigla

    2015-11-01

    Substitution is operationalised as a conscious choice made by users to use one drug instead of, or in conjunction with another based on: perceived safety, level of addiction potential, effectiveness in relieving symptoms, access and level of acceptance. Harm reduction is a set of strategies that aim to minimise problems associated with drug use while recognising that for some users, abstinence may be neither a realistic nor a desirable goal. In this paper, we aim for deeper understandings of older adult cannabis users' beliefs and substitution practices as part of the harm reduction framework. We present selected findings from our qualitative study of Baby Boomer (born 1946-1964) marijuana users in the San Francisco Bay Area. Although the sample consisted of primary cannabis users, many had personal experience with other drugs throughout their lifetimes. Data collection consisted of an audio-recorded, semi-structured in-depth life history interview followed by a questionnaire and health survey. Qualitative interviews were analysed to discover users' harm reduction beliefs and cannabis substitution practices. Study participants described using cannabis as a safer alternative for alcohol, illicit drugs and pharmaceuticals based on their perceptions of less adverse side effects, low-risk for addiction and greater effectiveness at relieving symptoms, such as chronic pain. Cannabis substitution can be an effective harm reduction method for those who are unable or unwilling to stop using drugs completely. More research is needed on cannabis as a safer alternative. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  20. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems.

  1. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  2. Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A.; Lin, W.; Ascoli, E.; Barson, S.; Sindir, M.

    2001-01-01

    Many industrial and commercial products operate in a dynamic flow environment and the aerodynamically generated noise has become a very important factor in the design of these products. In light of the importance in characterizing this dynamic environment, Rocketdyne has initiated a multiyear effort to develop an advanced general-purpose Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis System (CAAS) to address these issues. This system will provide a high fidelity predictive capability for aeroacoustic design and analysis. The numerical platform is able to provide high temporal and spatial accuracy that is required for aeroacoustic calculations through the development of a high order spectral element numerical algorithm. The analysis system is integrated with well-established CAE tools, such as a graphical user interface (GUI) through PATRAN, to provide cost-effective access to all of the necessary tools. These include preprocessing (geometry import, grid generation and boundary condition specification), code set up (problem specification, user parameter definition, etc.), and postprocessing. The purpose of the present paper is to assess the feasibility of such a system and to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the numerical algorithm through numerical examples. Computations of vortex shedding noise were carried out in the context of a two-dimensional low Mach number turbulent flow past a square cylinder. The computational aeroacoustic approach that is used in CAAS relies on coupling a base flow solver to the acoustic solver throughout a computational cycle. The unsteady fluid motion, which is responsible for both the generation and propagation of acoustic waves, is calculated using a high order flow solver. The results of the flow field are then passed to the acoustic solver through an interpolator to map the field values into the acoustic grid. The acoustic field, which is governed by the linearized Euler equations, is then calculated using the flow results computed

  3. Measures of condom and safer sex social norms and stigma towards HIV/AIDS among Beijing MSM.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yifei; Lu, Hongyan; Raymond, H Fisher; Sun, Yanming; Sun, Jiangping; Jia, Yujiang; He, Xiong; Fan, Song; Xiao, Yan; McFarland, Willi; Ruan, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    Social norms around condom use and safe sex as well as HIV/AIDS stigma are used to identify persons at higher risk for HIV. These measures have been developed and tested in a variety of settings and populations. While efforts have been undertaken to develop context specific measures of these domains among Chinese MSM, the feasibility of using existing measures is unknown. A survey of MSM, based on respondent-driven sampling, was conducted in Beijing. Existing measures of condom social norms, attitudes towards safer sex and HIV/AIDS stigma were piloted. Internal consistency of all measures was high. As expected higher levels of condom social norms and positive attitudes towards safer sex were associated with condom use. HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination had a significant relationship with never having an HIV test and lack of discussion of HIV/AIDS with male partners. Correlates of low condom social norms were age, education, employment and resident status. Existing measures of condom social norms, attitudes towards safer sex and HIV/AIDS stigma appear to be appropriate for use among Chinese MSM. Using existing measures as opposed to developing new measures has the potential to expedite investigations into psychosocial correlates of HIV risk behavior.

  4. Measures of condom and safer sex social norms and stigma towards HIV/AIDS among Beijing MSM

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yifei; Lu, Hongyan; Raymond, H. Fisher; Sun, Yanming; Sun, Jiangping; Jia, Yujiang; He, Xiong; Fan, Song; Xiao, Yan; McFarland, Willi; Ruan, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    Social norms around condom use and safe sex as well as HIV/AIDS stigma are used to identify persons at higher risk for HIV. These measures have been developed and tested in a variety of settings and populations. While efforts have been undertaken to develop context specific measures of these domains among Chinese MSM, the feasibility of using existing measures is unknown. A survey of MSM, based on respondent-driven sampling (RDS), was conducted in Beijing. Existing measures of condom social norms, attitudes towards safer sex and HIV/AIDS stigma were piloted. Internal consistency of all measures was high. As expected higher levels of condom social norms and positive attitudes towards safer sex were associated with condom use. HIV / AIDS stigma and discrimination had a significant relationship with never having an HIV test and lack of discussion of HIV/AIDS with male partners. Correlates of low condom social norms were age, education, employment and resident status. Existing measures of condom social norms, attitudes towards safer sex and HIV/AIDS stigma appear to be appropriate for use among Chinese MSM. Using existing measures as opposed to developing new measures has the potential to expedite investigations into psychosocial correlates of HIV risk behavior. PMID:24057931

  5. Optical Strain Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of physical phenomena affecting the durability of SSME components require measurement systems operational in hostile environments. The need for such instrumentation caused the definition and operation of an optical strain measurement system. This optical strain measurement system based on the speckle shift method is being developed. This is a noncontact, automatic method of measuring surface strain in one dimension that corrects for error due to rigid body motion. It provides a gauge length of 1 to 2 mm and allows the region of interest on the test specimen to be mapped point by point. The output is a graphics map of the points inspected on the specimen; data points is stored in quasi-real time. This is the first phase of a multiphase effort in optical strain measurement. The speckle pattern created by the test specimen is interpreted as high order interference fringes resulting from a random diffraction grating, being the natural surface roughness of the specimen. Strain induced on the specimen causes a change in spacing of the surface roughness, which in turn shifts the position of the interference pattern (speckles).

  6. Optical Strain Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of physical phenomena affecting the durability of SSME components require measurement systems operational in hostile environments. The need for such instrumentation caused the definition and operation of an optical strain measurement system. This optical strain measurement system based on the speckle shift method is being developed. This is a noncontact, automatic method of measuring surface strain in one dimension that corrects for error due to rigid body motion. It provides a gauge length of 1 to 2 mm and allows the region of interest on the test specimen to be mapped point by point. The output is a graphics map of the points inspected on the specimen; data points is stored in quasi-real time. This is the first phase of a multiphase effort in optical strain measurement. The speckle pattern created by the test specimen is interpreted as high order interference fringes resulting from a random diffraction grating, being the natural surface roughness of the specimen. Strain induced on the specimen causes a change in spacing of the surface roughness, which in turn shifts the position of the interference pattern (speckles).

  7. Anger as a moderator of safer sex motivation among low-income urban women.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Kerstin E E; Carey, Michael P

    2005-10-01

    Theoretical models suggest that both HIV knowledge and HIV risk perception inform rational decision making and, thus, predict safer sex motivation and behavior. However, the amount of variance explained by knowledge and risk perception is typically small. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated whether the predictive power of HIV knowledge and HIV risk perception on safer sex motivation is affected by trait anger. We hypothesized that anger may disrupt rational decision making, distorting the effects of both HIV knowledge and risk perception on safer sex intentions. Data from 232 low-income, urban women at risk for HIV infection were used to test a path model with past sexual risk behavior, HIV knowledge, and HIV risk perception as predictors of safer sex intentions. Moderator effects of anger on safer sex intentions were tested by simultaneous group comparisons between high-anger and low-anger women (median split). The theoretically expected "rational pattern" was found among low-anger women only, including (a) a positive effect of knowledge on safer sex intentions, and (b) buffer (inhibitor) effects of HIV knowledge and HIV risk perception on the negative path leading from past risk behavior to safer sex intentions. Among high-anger women, an "irrational pattern" emerged, with no effects of HIV knowledge and negative effects of both past risk behavior and HIV risk perception on safer sex intentions. In sum, the results suggest that rational knowledge- and risk-based decisions regarding safer sex may be limited to low-anger women.

  8. Space Launch System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Development of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) heavy lift rocket is shifting from the formulation phase into the implementation phase in 2014, a little more than three years after formal program approval. Current development is focused on delivering a vehicle capable of launching 70 metric tons (t) into low Earth orbit. This "Block 1" configuration will launch the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) on its first autonomous flight beyond the Moon and back in December 2017, followed by its first crewed flight in 2021. SLS can evolve to a130-t lift capability and serve as a baseline for numerous robotic and human missions ranging from a Mars sample return to delivering the first astronauts to explore another planet. Benefits associated with its unprecedented mass and volume include reduced trip times and simplified payload design. Every SLS element achieved significant, tangible progress over the past year. Among the Program's many accomplishments are: manufacture of Core Stage test panels; testing of Solid Rocket Booster development hardware including thrust vector controls and avionics; planning for testing the RS-25 Core Stage engine; and more than 4,000 wind tunnel runs to refine vehicle configuration, trajectory, and guidance. The Program shipped its first flight hardware - the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Stage Adapter (MSA) - to the United Launch Alliance for integration with the Delta IV heavy rocket that will launch an Orion test article in 2014 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Objectives of this Earth-orbit flight include validating the performance of Orion's heat shield and the MSA design, which will be manufactured again for SLS missions to deep space. The Program successfully completed Preliminary Design Review in 2013 and Key Decision Point C in early 2014. NASA has authorized the Program to move forward to Critical Design Review, scheduled for 2015 and a December 2017 first launch. The Program's success to date is due to prudent use of proven

  9. Eight principles for safer opioid prescribing and cautions with benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R; Reisfield, Gary M; Dasgupta, Nabarun

    2015-01-01

    The provision of long-term opioid analgesic therapy for chronic pain requires a careful risk/benefit analysis followed by clinical safety measures to identify and reduce misuse, abuse, and addiction and their associated morbidity and mortality. Multiple data sources show that benzodiazepines, prescribed for comorbid insomnia, anxiety, and mood disorders, heighten the risk of respiratory depression and other adverse outcomes when combined with opioid therapy. Evidence is presented for hazards associated with coadministration of opioids and benzodiazepines and the need for caution when initiating opioid therapy for chronic pain. Clinical recommendations follow, as drawn from 2 previously published literature reviews, one of which proffers 8 principles for safer opioid prescribing; the other review presents risks associated with benzodiazepines, suggests alternatives for co-prescribing benzodiazepines and opioids, and outlines recommendations regarding co-prescribing if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  10. Safer lithium ion batteries based on nonflammable electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ziqi; Wu, Bingbin; Xiao, Lifen; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yao; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi; Cao, Yuliang

    2015-04-01

    The safety of lithium ion batteries has long been a critical obstacle for their high-power and large-scale applications because of the flammable nature of their carbon anode and organic carbonate electrolytes. To eliminate the potential safety hazards, lithium ion batteries should be built up with thermal-stable electrodes and nonflammable electrolytes. Here we report safer lithium ion batteries using nonflammable phosphonate electrolyte, thermal-stable LiFePO4 cathode and alloy anodes. Benefiting from the electrochemical compatibility and strong fire-retardancy of the phosphonate electrolyte, the cathode and anode materials in the nonflammable phosphonate electrolyte demonstrate similar charge-discharge performances with those in the conventional carbonate electrolyte, showing a great prospect for large-scale applications in electric vehicles and grid-scale electric energy storage.

  11. Diode laser cyclophotocoagulation paves way to a safer trabeculectomy in eyes with medically uncontrollable intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kirti; Dangda, Sonal; Ahir, Nitasha; Mutreja, Ankush; Bhattacharyya, Mainak

    2017-04-01

    High intraocular pressure (IOP) not responding to systemic and topical anti-glaucoma medications renders the eye at risk for both intra- and post-operative complications of glaucoma filtration surgery. Laser cyclophotocoagulation is able to lower IOP in such refractory glaucoma eyes and may make the surgical event safer. This study assessed diode laser cyclophotocoagulation (DLCP) when used as a temporary measure for lowering IOP prior to performing trabeculectomy. This study is a  retrospective analysis of cases planned for trabeculectomy surgery, uncontrolled on maximally tolerable systemic anti-glaucoma medications. They were analysed for response to DLCP in terms of IOP control, vision-related complications, increased inflammation, post-trabeculectomy hypotony and chances of phthisis and ciliary shutdown. Twelve eyes of ten patients aged 35-65 years were identified and all followed up for at least 2 years. One week following DLCP, the IOP (mean ± SD) declined by 51 % from 46.8 ± 5.4 to 22.8 ± 3.3 mmHg. The IOP was further reduced to 15.4 ± 2.7 mmHg at 4 weeks after trabeculectomy; it remained in the mid-teens for a minimum of 2 years in all cases. The mean (±SD) visual acuity improved from 1.4 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 LogMAR equivalents following trabeculectomy. In four eyes, phacoemulsification was performed 5-7 months after trabeculectomy with improvement in best-corrected visual acuity. One patient developed transient hypotony, post-trabeculectomy, which resolved by 6 days. There were no other complications like increased inflammation, prolonged hypotony or suprachoroidal haemorrhage. DLCP is, thus, effective and safe for temporarily controlling IOP; thereby trabeculectomy can be performed in a quieter ocular milieu.

  12. [Percutaneous lithotripsy: how to make it safer. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Granata, M; Costanzo, V; Condorelli, S; Pisciotta, F; Matera, M; Costantino, G

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous surgery (PCN) is now a routinary method for the treatment of the majority of renal stones, since it has become safer than in the past, because, thanks to new endourologic instruments and to ultrasounds, it has been possible to reduce the mistakes of the renal puncture. Furthermore, the use of balloons catheters for the dilatation of the nephrostomic channel allows the reduction of operating time and hemorrhage risk. In this paper, the authors expose their experience in PCN operations carried out with the help of X-ray and ultrasonography, during the indirect laying of the stones, and the use of a balloon catheter for the creation of a working channel. The Authors report their experience with the use of ultrasounds and concomitant X-rays for renal puncture, and of balloon catheter as track dilator, during 68 consecutive PCN carried out for renal lithiasis, 55 primary and 13 secondary to ESWL treatments; every stone has been cracked by a "Swiss-lithoclast" balistic lithotripter. For every patient, time of operation, complications and hospitalization-days were registered. Only three patients (4.4%) had haemorrhages and in one case of A-V fistula nephrectomy was necessary. The patients stayed in hospital approx. four days; the nephrostomic drainage was generally removed 3 days after the operation. The very low incidence of complications and the very short time of hospitalization suggest that ultrasounds and balloon-catheters may be useful to this surgery and may make it safer than in the past. Moreover, ultrasonography reduces the rate of X-rays exposition for operators and patients; the cost of the balloon is easily balanced by the reduction of operating times and hospitalization-days.

  13. Design of a safer approach to intravenous drug infusions: failure mode effects analysis

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Leonard, J; Probst, L; DeLizio, L; Vitale, R

    2004-01-01

    in 1500 fewer infusions prepared by nurses per year. Nursing staff expressed a significant preference and pediatric residents unanimously expressed a strong preference for the revised process. Conclusions: Standardization of infusion delivery reduced the frequency for completing the most unreliable elements of the process and reduced the riskiness of the individual elements. Both contribute to a safer system. PMID:15289629

  14. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d) major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I)-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b). Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d) was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Suppression of MHC H2-K(d)-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d)-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells. PMID:26670279

  15. Toward safer multi-walled carbon nanotube design: Establishing a statistical model that relates surface charge and embryonic zebrafish mortality.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Leanne M; Melnikov, Fjodor; Wehmas, Leah C; Anastas, Paul T; Tanguay, Robert L; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2016-01-01

    Given the increased utility and lack of consensus regarding carbon nanotube (CNT) environmental and human health hazards, there is a growing demand for guidelines that inform safer CNT design. In this study, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model is utilized as a stable, sensitive biological system to evaluate the bioactivity of systematically modified and comprehensively characterized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). MWNTs were treated with strong acid to introduce oxygen functional groups, which were then systematically thermally reduced and removed using an inert temperature treatment. While 25 phenotypic endpoints were evaluated at 24 and 120 hours post-fertilization (hpf), high mortality at 24 hpf prevented further resolution of the mode of toxicity leading to mortality. Advanced multivariate statistical methods are employed to establish a model that identifies those MWNT physicochemical properties that best estimate the probability of observing an adverse outcome. The physicochemical properties considered in this study include surface charge, percent surface oxygen, dispersed aggregate size and morphology and electrochemical activity. Of the five physicochemical properties, surface charge, quantified as the point of zero charge (PZC), was determined as the best predictor of mortality at 24 hpf. From a design perspective, the identification of this property-hazard relationship establishes a foundation for the development of design guidelines for MWNTs with reduced hazard.

  16. Developing a Carbon Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks, and the relationship between emissions (fossil and land use) and the resulting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations in a changing climate has been recognized as an important goal by the IPCC. The existing surface greenhouse gas observing networks provide accurate and precise measurements of background values, but they are not configured to target the extended, complex and dynamic regions of the carbon budget. Space Agencies around the globe are committed to CO2 and CH4 observations: GOSAT-1/2, OCO-2/3, MERLin, TanSat, and CarbonSat. In addition to these Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, a new mission in Geostationary Orbit (GEO), geoCARB, which would provide mapping-like measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations over major land areas, has been recently proposed to the NASA Venture Program. These pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage to answer the key carbon-climate questions at process relevant scales nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources at urban scales. They do demonstrate, however, that a well-planned future system of system integrating space-based LEO and GEO missions with extensive in situ observations could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address critical open issues in the carbon-climate system. Dr. Diana Wickland devoted enormous energy in developing a comprehensive apprioach to understand the global carbon cycle; she understood well that an integrated, coordinated, international approach is needed. This shines through in her recent contribution in co-chairing the team that produced the "CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space." A NASA-funded community

  17. Engineering safer-by-design, transparent, silica-coated ZnO nanorods with reduced DNA damage potential

    PubMed Central

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Watson, Christa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Elder, Alison; Brain, Joseph D.; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles absorb UV light efficiently while remaining transparent in the visible light spectrum rendering them attractive in cosmetics and polymer films. Their broad use, however, raises concerns regarding potential environmental health risks and it has been shown that ZnO nanoparticles can induce significant DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Even though research on ZnO nanoparticle synthesis has made great progress, efforts on developing safer ZnO nanoparticles that maintain their inherent optoelectronic properties while exhibiting minimal toxicity are limited. Here, a safer-by-design concept was pursued by hermetically encapsulating ZnO nanorods in a biologically inert, nanothin amorphous SiO2 coating during their gas-phase synthesis. It is demonstrated that the SiO2 nanothin layer hermetically encapsulates the core ZnO nanorods without altering their optoelectronic properties. Furthermore, the effect of SiO2 on the toxicological profile of the core ZnO nanorods was assessed using the Nano-Cometchip assay by monitoring DNA damage at a cellular level using human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6). Results indicate significantly lower DNA damage (>3 times) for the SiO2-coated ZnO nanorods compared to uncoated ones. Such an industry-relevant, scalable, safer-by-design formulation of nanostructured materials can liberate their employment in nano-enabled products and minimize risks to the environment and human health. PMID:24955241

  18. Technical developments of OTEC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trenka, A.R.; Thomas, A.; Vega, L.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology Program seeks to develop the technology of converting the ocean's vast energy resource into usable forms to the point where industry can assess its potential, commercial utility. The current focus in the program is on the utilization of open-cycle OTEC to produce electricity. The open-cycle OTEC process is one of the few alternative energy options which provides the potential for baseload-carrying capability. This paper provides a very brief overview of the program activities and focuses on results recently obtained from the program's experimental facility designed to allow testing of OC-OTEC subsystems under actual operating conditions utilizing seawater. The facility, referred to as the Seacoast Test Facility (STF), is currently composed of a Heat and Mass Transfer Scoping Test Apparatus (HMTSTA) being supplied by up to 1600 gallons per minute of warm seawater and 1000 gallons per minute of cold seawater. Researchers have obtained experimental data on the performance of evaporators and surface condensers. Also, information on mist elimination and deaeration processes have been obtained. Plans call for modification to the HMTSTA to accommodate the addition of direct-contact condensers. Summary results will be discussed addressing recent studies, by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), of corrosion and biofouling of aluminum alloy surface condensers. Also discussed is the production of desalinated seawater using an open-cycle OTEC process. Finally to be discussed will be recent developments in OTEC turbines and an assessment of seawater supply systems required for OTEC. A brief overview of the program's future plans also will be presented. 4 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Recent developments in aircraft protection systems for laser guide star operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stomski, Paul J.; Murphy, Thomas W.; Campbell, Randy

    2012-07-01

    The astronomical community's use of high power laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) systems presents a potential hazard to aviation. Historically, the most common and trusted means of protecting aircraft and their occupants has been the use of safety observers (aka spotters) armed with shut-off switches. These safety observers watch for aircraft at risk and terminate laser propagation before the aircraft can be adversely affected by the laser. Efforts to develop safer and more cost-effective automated aircraft protection systems for use by the astronomical community have been inhibited by both technological and regulatory challenges. This paper discusses recent developments in these two areas. Specifically, with regard to regulation and guidance we discuss the 2011 release of AS-6029 by the SAE as well as the potential impact of RTCA DO-278A. With regard to the recent developments in the technology used to protect aircraft from laser illumination, we discuss the novel Transponder Based Aircraft Detection (TBAD) system being installed at W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO). Finally, we discuss our strategy for evaluating TBAD compliance with the regulations and for seeking appropriate approvals for LGS operations at WMKO using a fully automated, flexibly configured, multi-tier aircraft protection system incorporating this new technology.

  20. Membrane transporters and drug development: relevance to pharmacogenomics, nutrigenomics, epigenetics, and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    The study of membrane transporters may result in breakthroughs in the discovery of new drugs and the development of safer drugs. Membrane transporters are essential for fundamental cellular functions and normal physiological processes. These molecules influence drug absorption and distribution and play key roles in drug therapeutic effects. A primary goal of current research in drug discovery and development is to fully understand the interactions between transporters and drugs at both the system levels in the human body and the individual level for personalized therapy. Systematic studies of membrane transporters will help in not only better understanding of diseases from the systems biology point of view but also better drug design and development. The exploration of both pharmacogenomics and systems biology in transporters is necessary to connect individuals' genetic profiles with systematic drug responses in the human body. Understanding of gene-diet interactions and the effects of epigenetic changes on transporter gene expression may help improve clinical drug efficacy. The integration of pharmacogenomics, nutrigenomics, epigenetics, and systems biology may enable us to move from disease treatment to disease prevention and optimal health. The key issues in such integrative understanding include the correlations between structure and function, genotype and phenotype, and systematic interactions among transporters, other proteins, nutrients, drugs, and the environment. The exploration in these key issues may ultimately contribute to personalized medicine with high efficacy but less toxicity.

  1. The SAFER Latinos Project: Addressing a Community Ecology Underlying Latino Youth Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D.; Collins, Elizabeth; Klevens, Joanne; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Ivonne; del Cid, Alex Taylor; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the intervention model, early implementation experience, and challenges for the "Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos" (SAFER) Latinos project. The SAFER Latinos project is an attempt to build the evidence for a multilevel participatory youth violence prevention model tailored to the specific circumstances of…

  2. EPA introduces new Safer Choice labels and recognizes five Chicago area partners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chicago (July 21, 2015) - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 5 Administrator Susan Hedman today highlighted the benefits of the Agency's new Safer Choice label and congratulated five Chicago area Safer Choice award-winners at an event at the Loyol

  3. The SAFER Latinos Project: Addressing a Community Ecology Underlying Latino Youth Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D.; Collins, Elizabeth; Klevens, Joanne; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Ivonne; del Cid, Alex Taylor; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the intervention model, early implementation experience, and challenges for the "Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos" (SAFER) Latinos project. The SAFER Latinos project is an attempt to build the evidence for a multilevel participatory youth violence prevention model tailored to the specific circumstances of…

  4. Determinants of Safer Sex Patterns among Gay/Bisexual Male Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotherram-Borus, Mary Jane; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined cognitive-behavioral (health-belief, social cognitive, peer support), risk-taking, and stress/coping models as predictors of safer sex practices among 136 gay/bisexual males, ages 14-19. Components of the health-belief, self-efficacy theories, and emotional distress models corresponded with safer sex practices; peer support was not…

  5. Predictors of Safer Sex Intentions and Protected Sex Among Heterosexual HIV-Negative Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Mausbach, Brent T.; Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a version of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) for predicting safe sex behavior in a sample of 228 HIV-negative heterosexual methamphetamine users. We hypothesized that, in addition to TPB constructs, participants’ amount of methamphetamine use and desire to stop unsafe sex behaviors would predict intentions to engage in safer sex behaviors. In turn, we predicted that safer sex intentions would be positively correlated with participants’ percentage of protected sex. Hierarchical linear regression indicated that 48% of the total variance in safer sex intentions was predicted by our model, with less negative attitudes toward safer sex, greater normative beliefs, greater control beliefs, less methamphetamine use, less intent to have sex, and greater desire to stop unsafe sex emerging as significant predictors of greater safer sex intentions. Safer sex intentions were positively associated with future percent protected sex (p<.05). These findings suggest that, among heterosexual methamphetamine users, the TPB is an excellent model for predicting safer sex practices in this population, as are some additional factors (e.g., methamphetamine use). Effective interventions for increasing safer sex practices in methamphetamine user will likely include constructs from this model with augmentations to help reduce methamphetamine use. PMID:19085216

  6. Seriously mentally ill women's safer sex behaviors and the theory of reasoned action.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Mary E; Pinkerton, Steven D; Somlai, Anton M; Kelly, Jeffrey A; McAuliffe, Timothy L; Gibson, Richard H; Hackl, Kristin

    2009-10-01

    Seriously mentally ill women at risk for HIV infection (n = 96) participated in structured interviews assessing sexual and substance-use behavior over a 3-month period. The majority of the women (63.5%) did not use condoms. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action, attitudes toward condom use and perceived social norms about safer sex were associated with safer sex intentions. Supplementing variables from the theory of reasoned action with safer sex self-efficacy explained additional variance in safer sex intentions. Greater safer sex intentions were related to both greater condom use and less frequent unprotected intercourse. In addition, less frequent sex after drug use and a less fatalistic outlook were associated with less frequent unprotected intercourse. Life circumstances specific to this population are particularly important to examine to improve the effectiveness of risk reduction interventions for seriously mentally ill women.

  7. SWOT analysis for safer carriage of bulk liquid chemicals in tankers.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ozcan; Er, Ismail Deha

    2008-06-15

    The application of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis to formulation of strategy concerned with the safe carriage of bulk liquid chemicals in maritime tankers was examined in this study. A qualitative investigation using SWOT analysis has been implemented successfully for ships that are designed to carry liquid chemicals in bulk. The originality of this study lies in the use of SWOT analysis as a management tool to formulate strategic action plans for ship management companies, ship masters and officers for the carriage of dangerous goods in bulk. With this transportation-based SWOT analysis, efforts were made to explore the ways and means of converting possible threats into opportunities, and changing weaknesses into strengths; and strategic plans of action were developed for safer tanker operation.

  8. A Highly Thermostable Ceramic-Grafted Microporous Polyethylene Separator for Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi; Cao, Yuliang

    2015-11-04

    The safety concern is a critical obstacle to large-scale energy storage applications of lithium-ion batteries. A thermostable separator is one of the most effective means to construct the safe lithium-ion batteries. Herein, we demonstrate a novel ceramic (SiO2)-grafted PE separator prepared by electron beam irradiation. The separator shows similar thickness and pore structure to the bare separator, while displaying strong dimensional thermostability, as the shrinkage ratio is only 20% even at an elevated temperature of 180 °C. Besides, the separator is highly electrochemically inert, showing no adverse effect on the energy and power output of the batteries. Considering the excellent electrochemical and thermal stability, the SiO2-grafted PE separator developed in this work is greatly beneficial for constructing safer lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Young People's Views and Experiences of a Mobile Phone Texting Intervention to Promote Safer Sex Behavior.

    PubMed

    French, Rebecca Sophia; McCarthy, Ona; Baraitser, Paula; Wellings, Kaye; Bailey, Julia V; Free, Caroline

    2016-04-15

    The risk of poor sexual health, including unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), is greatest amongst young people. Innovative and acceptable interventions to improve sexual health are required. Mobile phone text messaging (short message service, SMS) interventions have the potential to reach large numbers of people at relatively low cost, but greater understanding is needed on how these interventions should be developed and how they work. The aim of this paper is to explore young people's views of and experiences with a mobile phone text messaging intervention to promote safer sex behavior. We undertook qualitative interviews with young people aged 16 to 24 years as part of a pilot trial of a sexual health intervention delivered by text message in the United Kingdom. Study participants received sexual health promotion text messages based on behavior-change techniques. The message content, tailored by gender and STI status, included support for correct STI treatment and promotion of safer sex behaviors. Young people were eligible if they had received a positive chlamydia test or had more than one partner and at least one episode of unprotected sex in the last year. Telephone interviews were conducted 2 to 3 weeks after initiation of the intervention. A semi-structured topic guide was followed to explore participant experiences and a thematic analysis was conducted. We conducted 16 telephone interviews with participants who had received the text intervention and an additional four interviews with those in the control group (13 women and 7 men). Intervention participants found text messages easy to understand and appearing to come from a friendly and trustworthy source. They considered the frequency and timing of messages to be appropriate, and delivery via mobile phones convenient. Receipt of support by text message allowed recipients to assimilate information at their own pace, and prompted reflection on and sharing of messages with friends

  10. EPA Recognizes Partners for Creating and Using Safer Choice Products/June 22 is the first annual awards ceremony for 2015 Safer Choice Partner of the Year Award Winners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing 21 Safer Choice Partner of the Year winners across 15 states for outstanding achievement in the design, manufacture, promotion, and use of Safer Choice products for the nation.

  11. Developing Information Systems for Competitive Intelligence Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhof, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    Discusses issues connected with developing information systems for competitive intelligence support; defines the elements of an effective competitive information system; and summarizes issues affecting system design and implementation. Highlights include intelligence information; information needs; information sources; decision making; and…

  12. Actions of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S on the Reproductive Neuroendocrine System During Early Development in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenhui; Zhao, Yali; Yang, Ming; Farajzadeh, Matthew; Pan, Chenyuan; Wayne, Nancy L

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known environmental, endocrine-disrupting chemical, and bisphenol S (BPS) has been considered a safer alternative for BPA-free products. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of BPA and BPS on the reproductive neuroendocrine system during zebrafish embryonic and larval development and to explore potential mechanisms of action associated with estrogen receptor (ER), thyroid hormone receptor (THR), and enzyme aromatase (AROM) pathways. Environmentally relevant, low levels of BPA exposure during development led to advanced hatching time, increased numbers of GnRH3 neurons in both terminal nerve and hypothalamus, increased expression of reproduction-related genes (kiss1, kiss1r, gnrh3, lhβ, fshβ, and erα), and a marker for synaptic transmission (sv2). Low levels of BPS exposure led to similar effects: increased numbers of hypothalamic GnRH3 neurons and increased expression of kiss1, gnrh3, and erα. Antagonists of ER, THRs, and AROM blocked many of the effects of BPA and BPS on reproduction-related gene expression, providing evidence that those three pathways mediate the actions of BPA and BPS on the reproductive neuroendocrine system. This study demonstrates that alternatives to BPA used in the manufacture of BPA-free products are not necessarily safer. Furthermore, this is the first study to describe the impact of low-level BPA and BPS exposure on the Kiss/Kiss receptor system during development. It is also the first report of multiple cellular pathways (ERα, THRs, and AROM) mediating the effects of BPA and BPS during embryonic development in any species.

  13. Development of laser transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jiawu; Zhang, Yulan; Yang, Jiandong; Zhang, Xinming

    1998-08-01

    This paper discusses a light transfer system of therapeutic machine using carbon-dioxide laser. This system is based on imitating human being arm motion principle, consists of optical cardans mainly and can move in three-D space freely. Through it carbon-dioxide laser (which wavelength is 10.6 micrometer) is reflected, focused or diverged and transferred to the different therapeutic part of body to realize the purpose of cutting operation, gasification, cauterization and irradiation. This system includes an indicating system using He-Ne laser, by which carbon-dioxide laser can arrive therapeutic part accurately. This system possesses some advantages e.g. an accurate transfer, large moving range, small power consumption, high power density and easy operation. At present the occupancy in home market of this kind laser transfer system products is over 95%. Some products have been exported to other countries.

  14. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  15. Better learning in schools to improve attitudes toward abstinence and intentions for safer sex among adolescents in urban Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background School-based sex education is an effective medium to convey health information and skills about preventing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unwanted pregnancies among adolescents. However, research on school-based sex education is limited in many developing countries, including Nepal. This study thus had two main objectives: (1) to assess students’ evaluation of school-based sex education, and (2) to examine the associations between students’ evaluations of school-based sex education and their (a) attitudes toward abstinence and (b) intentions for safer sex. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among 634 students from six schools in the Kathmandu Valley during May–June 2010. We used a self-administered questionnaire to assess students’ evaluations of school-based sex education, attitudes toward abstinence, and intentions for safer sex. The data were then analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Results Regarding “information on HIV and sexual health”, many students perceived that they received the least amount of information on HIV counseling and testing centers (mean 2.29, SD 1.00) through their schools. In terms of “support and involvement of teachers and parents” in sex education, parents’ participation ranked as the lowest (mean 1.81, SD 1.01). Audiotapes were reported as the least used among the listed “teaching aids for sexual health education” (mean 1.54, SD 0.82). In multivariate analysis, receiving more “information on HIV and sexual health” was positively associated with more positive “attitudes toward abstinence” (β = 0.11, p = <0.018) and greater “intentions for safer sex” (β = 0.17, p = <0.001) among students. Similarly, increased “support and involvement from teachers and parents” was also positively associated with more positive “attitudes toward abstinence” (β = 0.16, p = <0.001) and greater “intentions for safer sex” (β = 0.15, p

  16. Better learning in schools to improve attitudes toward abstinence and intentions for safer sex among adolescents in urban Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rachana Manandhar; Otsuka, Keiko; Poudel, Krishna C; Yasuoka, Junko; Lamichhane, Medin; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-03-20

    School-based sex education is an effective medium to convey health information and skills about preventing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unwanted pregnancies among adolescents. However, research on school-based sex education is limited in many developing countries, including Nepal. This study thus had two main objectives: (1) to assess students' evaluation of school-based sex education, and (2) to examine the associations between students' evaluations of school-based sex education and their (a) attitudes toward abstinence and (b) intentions for safer sex. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 634 students from six schools in the Kathmandu Valley during May-June 2010. We used a self-administered questionnaire to assess students' evaluations of school-based sex education, attitudes toward abstinence, and intentions for safer sex. The data were then analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Regarding "information on HIV and sexual health", many students perceived that they received the least amount of information on HIV counseling and testing centers (mean 2.29, SD 1.00) through their schools. In terms of "support and involvement of teachers and parents" in sex education, parents' participation ranked as the lowest (mean 1.81, SD 1.01). Audiotapes were reported as the least used among the listed "teaching aids for sexual health education" (mean 1.54, SD 0.82). In multivariate analysis, receiving more "information on HIV and sexual health" was positively associated with more positive "attitudes toward abstinence" (β = 0.11, p = <0.018) and greater "intentions for safer sex" (β = 0.17, p = <0.001) among students. Similarly, increased "support and involvement from teachers and parents" was also positively associated with more positive "attitudes toward abstinence" (β = 0.16, p = <0.001) and greater "intentions for safer sex" (β = 0.15, p = <0.002). Our results suggest that students' needs and expectations

  17. Safetxt: a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention delivered by mobile phone to increase safer sex behaviours in young people

    PubMed Central

    French, Rebecca S; Roberts, Ian; Bailey, Julia V; Wellings, Kaye; Michie, Susan; Free, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the procedures proposed for a main trial of a safer sex intervention for young people delivered by mobile phone text message (‘safetxt’). Design and setting Pilot randomised controlled trial. Participants were recruited through sexual health services in the UK. An independent online randomisation system allocated participants to receive the safetxt intervention or to receive the control text messages (monthly messages about participation in the study). Texting software delivered the messages in accordance with a predetermined schedule. Participants Residents of England aged 16–24 who had received either a positive chlamydia test result or reported unsafe sex in the last year (defined as more than 1 partner and at least 1 occasion of sex without a condom). Intervention The safetxt intervention is designed to reduce sexually transmitted infection in young people by supporting them in using condoms, telling a partner about an infection and testing before unprotected sex with a new partner. Safetxt was developed drawing on: behavioural science; face-to-face interventions; the factors known to influence safer sex behaviours and the views of young people. Outcomes The coprimary outcomes of the pilot trial were the recruitment rate and completeness of follow-up. Results We recruited 200 participants within our target of 3 months and we achieved 81% (162/200) follow-up response for the proposed primary outcome of the main trial, cumulative incidence of chlamydia at 12 months. Conclusions Recruitment, randomisation, intervention delivery and follow-up were successful and a randomised controlled trial of the safetxt intervention is feasible. Trial registration number ISRCTN02304709; Results. PMID:28011811

  18. Safetxt: a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention delivered by mobile phone to increase safer sex behaviours in young people.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ona L; French, Rebecca S; Baraitser, Paula; Roberts, Ian; Rathod, Sujit D; Devries, Karen; Bailey, Julia V; Edwards, Phil; Wellings, Kaye; Michie, Susan; Free, Caroline

    2016-12-23

    To test the procedures proposed for a main trial of a safer sex intervention for young people delivered by mobile phone text message ('safetxt'). Pilot randomised controlled trial. Participants were recruited through sexual health services in the UK. An independent online randomisation system allocated participants to receive the safetxt intervention or to receive the control text messages (monthly messages about participation in the study). Texting software delivered the messages in accordance with a predetermined schedule. Residents of England aged 16-24 who had received either a positive chlamydia test result or reported unsafe sex in the last year (defined as more than 1 partner and at least 1 occasion of sex without a condom). The safetxt intervention is designed to reduce sexually transmitted infection in young people by supporting them in using condoms, telling a partner about an infection and testing before unprotected sex with a new partner. Safetxt was developed drawing on: behavioural science; face-to-face interventions; the factors known to influence safer sex behaviours and the views of young people. The coprimary outcomes of the pilot trial were the recruitment rate and completeness of follow-up. We recruited 200 participants within our target of 3 months and we achieved 81% (162/200) follow-up response for the proposed primary outcome of the main trial, cumulative incidence of chlamydia at 12 months. Recruitment, randomisation, intervention delivery and follow-up were successful and a randomised controlled trial of the safetxt intervention is feasible. ISRCTN02304709; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Motherhood can be safer -- even where conditions are hard.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The Prevention of Maternal Mortality (PMM) Network in West Africa has demonstrated that, even under sub-optimal conditions, motherhood can be safer and needless deaths can be avoided. The PMM Network's 10 teams from Ghana, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone designed projects to enable women with complications during pregnancy or delivery to overcome delays in deciding to seek medical help, travelling to a health facility, and receiving help after arriving at the facility. Operating rooms and blood banks were opened in some hospitals and health centers were upgraded at a cost under US $15,000. In one case, an abandoned warehouse was turned into a health center. Other PMM activities included staff training, making drugs more readily available, setting up a fund to lower drug prices, and increasing stocks of safe blood. The teams arranged for local truck drivers' unions to provide emergency transport and organized groups of men in remote villages to carry women in hammocks to motorized transport. The teams worked with traditional leaders and held educational sessions at community gatherings. Even in the poorest areas, the number of women seeking care for obstetric complications increased and their risk of dying dropped. The PMM Network is supported by Columbia University's School of Public Health, with funding from the Carnegie Corporation.

  20. Are other fluorescent tags used instead of ethidium bromide safer?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ethidium bromide (EtBr) is a well-known fluorescent tag usually applied in molecular biological techniques like agarose gel electrophoresis. The mechanism of action for such compounds is known, in which these compounds are able to bind to the kinetoplastid DNA and to alter their conformation to Z-DNA molecules that stop replication of kinetoplastid DNA leading to Trypanosoma death. Although the usual amounts used in laboratories are considered as below the level required to cause toxicity (LD50 in oral administration in rat is 1.5 g/Kg), the mentioned concentrations are high enough to involve in replication of mitochondrial DNA in some human cell lines. Regarding the points that EtBr is very stable in the environment and if degraded especially by use of bleaches that result in formation of mutagenic compounds, there is a big concern about its use. Although application of EtBr is going to be restricted and replaced with other tags such as SYBR® products, the safety of the new substituted compounds are still in doubt and except a few data, there is no essential evidence available to confirm that they are safer than EtBr. Further investigations are recommended to compare their relative biosafety hazards. PMID:24355254

  1. The Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) : are we safer?

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Nancy E.

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) is designed to make world safer by reducing the role of U.S. nuclear weapons and reducing the salience of nuclear weapons. U.S. also seeks to maintain a credible nuclear deterrent and reinforce regional security architectures with missile defenses and other conventional military capabilities. But recent studies suggest that nuclear proliferation is a direct response to the perceived threat of U.S. conventional capabilities not U.S. nuclear stockpile. If this is true, then the intent of the NPR to reduce the role and numbers of nuclear weapons and strengthen conventional military capabilities may actually make the world less safe. First stated objective of NPR is to reduce the role and numbers of U.S. nuclear weapons, reduce the salience of nuclear weapons and move step by step toward eliminating them. Second stated objective is a reaffirmation of U.S. commitment to maintaining a strong deterrent which forms the basis of U.S. assurances to allies and partners. The pathway - made explicit throughout the NPR - for reducing the role and numbers of nuclear weapons while maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent and reinforcing regional security architectures is to give conventional forces and capabilities and missile defenses (e.g. non-nuclear elements) a greater share of the deterrence burden.

  2. Autonomous Operations System: Development and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.; Wilkins, Kim N.; Walker, Mark; Stahl, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous control systems provides the ability of self-governance beyond the conventional control system. As the complexity of mechanical and electrical systems increases, there develops a natural drive for developing robust control systems to manage complicated operations. By closing the bridge between conventional automated systems to knowledge based self-awareness systems, nominal control of operations can evolve into relying on safe critical mitigation processes to support any off-nominal behavior. Current research and development efforts lead by the Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) group at NASA Kennedy Space Center aims to improve cryogenic propellant transfer operations by developing an automated control and health monitoring system. As an integrated systems, the center aims to produce an Autonomous Operations System (AOS) capable of integrating health management operations with automated control to produce a fully autonomous system.

  3. Developing a Comprehensive Reward System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Votruba, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Providing incentives for teachers of adults is an important means of attracting, retaining, and stimulating staff. Developing a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards and incentives and instituting them effectively are important administrative functions. (SK)

  4. Developing a Comprehensive Reward System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Votruba, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Providing incentives for teachers of adults is an important means of attracting, retaining, and stimulating staff. Developing a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards and incentives and instituting them effectively are important administrative functions. (SK)

  5. IAC control system analysis development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1982-03-01

    The MultiOptimal Differential Equation Language (MODEL) is described. It provides a means for generating numerical solutions to systems of differential equations using a digital computer. The notation of this language is similar to that usually used in describing physical systems by differential equations. Thus, the learning process is simplified, programming becomes easier, and debugging is more readily accomplished. Programs written in the MultiOptimal Differential Equation Language are machine translated into FORTRAN 4 code which is optimal in several respects. The interactive version of MODEL makes use of interactive system routines so that the user may observe the solution as it is being generated and interact with the program in a manner similar to that associated with analog simulation. The DISCOS-Control version of the MODEL simulation language is used to describe the control system for a plant which is modelled by the DISCOS program. DISCOS plant variables may be referenced in the control system description and all the sensor signals, coupling torques, momentum devices and external loads are automatically linked to the DISCOS plant model.

  6. Conceptual Framework Approach for System-of-Systems Software Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    perturbations in system behavior. In this thesis, we explore the benefits of developing a conceptual framework as the basis for the system-of-systems...work to determine the feasibility of applying the conceptual framework techniques described in this thesis to system-of-systems acquisitions with the objective of reducing accidental complexity and controlling essential complexity.

  7. NASA develops teleoperator retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The teleoperator retrieval system vehicle was designed to reboost and/or deorbit the Skylab; however, usefulness in survey, stabilization, retrieval and delivery was examined. Thrusters, designed for cold gas propulsion, were adapted to hydrazine propulsion. Design specifications and cost analysis are given.

  8. States Develop Quality Data Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiker, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Quality data can be a powerful tool for teachers, administrators and policymakers to use when trying to improve schools or individual programs. Data can show if a dropout prevention program is working; if students are entering postsecondary programs ready to learn; and how students are doing once they leave the P-20 educational system. This…

  9. Developing a Management System (AMOAS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrell, James E.; Price, Bonnie B.

    To evaluate their school management personnel, the Muhlenberg (Pennsylvania) School District adopted the Administrative Management by Objectives Appraisal System (AMOAS). Administrators are evaluated on the basis of objectives that they establish in conjunction with their immediate supervisor and on everyday job performance. Above satisfactory…

  10. Developing a Management System (AMOAS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrell, James E.; Price, Bonnie B.

    To evaluate their school management personnel, the Muhlenberg (Pennsylvania) School District adopted the Administrative Management by Objectives Appraisal System (AMOAS). Administrators are evaluated on the basis of objectives that they establish in conjunction with their immediate supervisor and on everyday job performance. Above satisfactory…

  11. Development of Intelligent Unmanned Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Planning Element, Perception Element, Intelligence Element, and Control Element. The architecture is implemented on a system distributed over ten single...detection) sensors. The control architecture consists of four primary elements, i.e. Planning Element, Perception Element, Intelligence Element, and...keep the vehicle on a specified path. The Perception Element contains the components that perform the sensing tasks required to determine the

  12. Developing Best Practices: System-wide Actions for Coastal Resilience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-09

    solutions for a safer, better world flooding and major storms in low-lying areas 6 10/9/2015 3 Bayville and Breezy Point, NY - Protocol to move emergency...vehicles and debris removal equipment to high ground before flooding . Best Practices: Examples BUILDING STRONG® Innovative solutions for a safer

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF CHICKEN LYMPHOID SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Sung; Good, Robert A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of Ig-synthesizing cells in the bursa of chick embryo was studied by immunohistochemical staining method as well as by in vitro incorporation of leucine-3H into Ig. Ig-synthesizing cells are first detected in the bursa of a 14 day old chick embryo and increase with the maturation of the embryo. Acrylamide gel analysis of leucine-3H-labeled Ig shows that synthesis of nonsecretory IgM-H0 precedes that of secretory IgM-H, reflecting an ontogenetic sequence of development of lymphoid cells synthesizing IgM. Since IgM-H0 is not secreted, we further studied biochemical differences between two heavy chains. The difference is attributable to lack of galactose attachment to H0 chains. It is proposed that during differentiation of lymphoid cells synthesizing and secreting Ig, attachment of galactose may play an obligatory role in the development of cellular capacity for Ig secretion. PMID:5033422

  14. X2000 power system electronics development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene; Sauers, Jim; Giampoli, Paul; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim; Repp, John

    2005-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for potential use on future deep space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems.

  15. System Development Working Group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Bifano, William J.

    1986-01-01

    The critical need is the need for funding and testing as bridging support for highly leveraged technology of Spacecraft 2000 to promote flight development introduction and acceptance. Critical needs are foreseen to augment these capabilities to satisfy specific enabling technology validation and to flight qualify selected technologies. Recommendations are summarized. This presentation is represented by figures.

  16. Developing a Continuous Improvement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-16

    Advocates for successful change methodologies generally tout their particular improvement pro-gram as the “silver bullet” process to solve all problems ...establish cooperative relationships at workplaces that have implemented a comprehensive safety and health management system. Approval into VPP is...increased productivity and reduced waste. Problems with this involve the continual costs of maintaining the processes and the lack of linking the product

  17. Eurofix System and its Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermans, G. W. A.; Helwig, A. W. S.; van Willigen, D.

    This paper, and the following six papers, were presented during the NAV 98 Conference held at Church House, Westminster, London on 9th and 10th December 1998. A full listing of the Conference, and how to obtain a copy of the proceedings, is shown on Page 300.The existing Loran-C and Chayka infrastructure can, with some minor changes, become a very powerful augmentation system for GNSS (GPS, GLONASS and the future Galileo). Delft University initially proposed the Eurofix concept in 1989. Although the necessary modification to the LF navigation systems are minimal, the GNSS user may get significant benefits from the Eurofix signals in terms of accuracy, integrity and availability. The reason is the high signal structure, signal propagation, and the operations dissimilarity of both systems. The broadcast correction and integrity data improves GNSS accuracy down to the metre level. In this way, the measured Loran-C and Chayka ranges are continuously updated. Thus, in the case of GNSS signal interruptions, highly calibrated Loran-C/Chayka may take over the navigation function. Tests carried out in Europe at the Loran-C station at Sylt (Germany) drew large international attention, leading to further tests in the USA by the US Coast Guard in 1998. Recently, a Dutch-Russian consortium implemented Eurofix on the Chayka transmitter at Bryansk (Russia) which is now successfully broadcasting DGPS as well as DGLONASS correction data. This paper highlights some on-air Eurofix DGPS performance experiments carried out in Europe and the USA. With all the European Loran-C and Chayka transmitters modified, Eurofix can be used all over the European continent. As multiple stations can normally be received simultaneously, the user may locally apply networked DGNSS, which may reduce spatial decorrelation effects significantly. Post-processed results of this Regional Area Augmentation System are presented.

  18. Making safer preoperative arrangements for patients using vitamin K antagonists

    PubMed Central

    van Fessem, Joris; Willems, Jessica; Kruip, Marieke; Hoeks, Sanne; Jan Stolker, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Use of vitamin K antagonists creates a risk for patient health and safety. The Dutch framework “Nationwide Standard Integrated Care of Anticoagulation” propagates a shared plan and responsibility by surgeon and anesthesiologist together in the preoperative setting. In our institution, this framework had not been implemented. Therefore, a quality-improvement project was started at the Anesthesia Department to improve perioperative safety. After exploration of barriers, multiple interventions were carried out to encourage co-workers at the preoperative screening department to take shared responsibility: distribution of prints, adjustments in electronic patient records, introduction of a protocol and education sessions. Efficacy was measured retrospectively performing a before-after study collecting perioperative data of patients using vitamin K antagonists. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of predefined safe preoperative plans. Secondary outcome measures were (1) incidence of postoperative bleeding and thrombo-embolic events within the first 24 hours after intervention and (2) necessity to preoperative correction of anticoagulation. Before intervention 72 (29%) safe, 93 (38%) partially unsafe and 83 (33%) unsafe arrangements were made. After the intervention these numbers were 105 (80%), 23 (17%) en 4 (3%), respectively: a significant 51% increase in safe preoperative plans (P<0.001). We observed no significant difference (P=0.369) regarding bleeding and thrombo-embolic events: pre-intervention 12 (5%) cases of postoperative bleeding were documented, vs. 6 (5%) post intervention and the number of thrombo-embolic events was 5 (2%) vs. 0. Also, no significant differences concerning preoperative correction of anticoagulation were observed: 11 (4%) vs. 8 (6%) (P=0.489). This quality improvement project demonstrates a major improvement in safer preoperative arrangements in our institution regarding vitamin K antagonists, using the described interventions

  19. Developing TRUPACT system impact resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories has taken the lead in the development of the TRansUranic PACkage Transporter I (TRUPACT-I) for transporting contact-handled transuranic waste. TRUPACT-I is a Type B package designed for transport by truck and rail. One of the regulatory requirements of a Type B package is that it survive a drop onto a 15.2-cm-dia punch. This paper discusses the development of the puncture resistant panels used in TRUPACT-I. Concepts tested ranged from monolithic steel plates to laminated Kevlar fabric bonded to a steel backing plate. The TRUPACT-I wall design incorporated the laminated Kevlar and stainless steel puncture panel.

  20. Cannon launched electromechanical control actuation system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of an electromechanical control actuation system from trade study results through breadboard test and high-g launch demonstration tests is summarized. Primary emphasis is on design, development, integration and test of the gear reduction system.

  1. Army Systems Engineering Career Development Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    Army Systems Engineering Career Development Model Technical Report SERC-2015-TR-042-3 January 15, 2015 Principal Investigators: Dr... Career Development Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER HQ0034-13-D-0004 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Pennotti /Val Gavito Michael...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Army Improved Systems Engineering (SE) Career Development System (CDS) report begins with a description of the

  2. Development of thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities for Oyster creek

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    GPU Nuclear (GPUN) has been involved in developing analytical methodologies for Oyster Creek plant thermal-hydraulic response simulation for approx. 15 yr. Plant-system-related transient analysis is being accomplished via RETRAN02 MOD4 and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analysis by SAFER-CORECOOL. This paper reviews the developmental process and lessons learned through this process.

  3. EPA Honors PRIDE Industries with Safer Choice Partner of the Year Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded its first ever Safer Choice Partner of the Year awards for outstanding achievement in the design, manufacture, promotion and use of environmentally friendly products in the nation's homes, sc

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Making Health Care Safer Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution ... resistance and improving prescribing practices. Work with other health care facilities to prevent infections, transmission, and resistance. Problem ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now

    MedlinePlus

    ... processing SSI file Error processing SSI file Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities. Health Care Providers can Know if patients in your facility ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... processing SSI file Error processing SSI file Making Health Care Safer Protect patients from antibiotic resistance Language: English ... hours later. Know when to stop antibiotic treatment. Health care facility CEOs/ administrators can Prevent infections and their ...

  7. EPAs Safer Choice program encourages better decisions when choosing spring cleaning products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (March 24, 2015) - The snow is gone and temperatures are rising. That means it is time for spring cleaning, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Safer Choice program this spring is encouraging consumers to loo

  8. EPA announces two Safer Choice Partners of the Year winners in Southern California

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded its first ever Safer Choice Partner of the Year awards for outstanding achievement in the design, manufacture, promotion and use of environmentally friendly products in the nation's ho

  9. An Algorithm to Identify Compounded Non-Sterile Products that Can Be Formulated on a Commercial Scale or Imported to Promote Safer Medication Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha; MacArthur, Robert B.; Löbenberg, Raimar; Cies, Jeffrey J.; Cernak, Ibolja; Parrish, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of commercially-available pediatric drug products and dosage forms is well-known. A group of clinicians and scientists with a common interest in pediatric drug development and medicines-use systems developed a practical framework for identifying a list of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) with the greatest market potential for development to use in pediatric patients. Reliable and reproducible evidence-based drug formulations designed for use in pediatric patients are needed vitally, otherwise safe and consistent clinical practices and outcomes assessments will continue to be difficult to ascertain. Identification of a prioritized list of candidate APIs for oral formulation using the described algorithm provides a broader integrated clinical, scientific, regulatory, and market basis to allow for more reliable dosage forms and safer, effective medicines use in children of all ages. Group members derived a list of candidate API molecules by factoring in a number of pharmacotherapeutic, scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory variables into the selection algorithm that were absent in other rubrics. These additions will assist in identifying and categorizing prime API candidates suitable for oral formulation development. Moreover, the developed algorithm aids in prioritizing useful APIs with finished oral liquid dosage forms available from other countries with direct importation opportunities to North America and beyond. PMID:28975916

  10. Developing Electronic Performance Support Systems for Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Michael P.; And Others

    This paper discusses a variety of development strategies and issues involved in the development of electronic performance support systems (EPSS) for professionals. The topics of front-end analysis, development, and evaluation are explored in the context of a case study involving the development of an EPSS to support teachers in the use of…

  11. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D. N.; Vallance, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program aims to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. The major cause of failure of early gas turbine regenerators was found to be chemical attack of the ceramic material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. Results of 53,065 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, show promise. Five aluminum silicate cores attained the durability objective of 10,000 hours at 800 C (1472 F). Another aluminum silicate core shows minimal evidence of chemical attack after 8071 hours at 982 C (1800 F). Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are included.

  12. Environmental Protection: Improved Inspections and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks Statement of John Stephenson, Director, Natural Resources and Environment GAO-01-176T Report...Inspections and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number...resources they need to improve tank compliance and safety. Therefore, to better ensure that underground storage tanks meet federal requirements to prevent

  13. Environmental Protection: Improved Inspections and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-08

    and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks Statement of John Stephenson, Director, Natural Resources and Environment GAO-02-712T...Inspections and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number...02-712T Underground Storage Tanks Madam Chairwoman and Members of the Subcommittee: I am pleased to have this opportunity to come before you today to

  14. Challenges with couples, serodiscordance and HIV disclosure: healthcare provider perspectives on delivering safer conception services for HIV-affected couples, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Crankshaw, Tamaryn L; Mindry, Deborah; Munthree, Chantal; Letsoalo, Thabo; Maharaj, Pranitha

    2014-01-01

    Safer conception interventions should ideally involve both members of an HIV-affected couple. With serodiscordant couples, healthcare providers will need to manage periconception risk behaviour as well tailor safer conception strategies according to available resources and the HIV status of each partner. Prior to widespread implementation of safer conception services, it is crucial to better understand provider perspectives regarding provision of care since they will be pivotal to the successful delivery of safer conception. This paper reports on findings from a qualitative study exploring the viewpoints and experiences of doctors, nurses, and lay counsellors on safer conception care in a rural and in an urban setting in Durban, South Africa. We conducted six semistructured individual interviews per site (a total of 12 interviews) as well as a focus group discussion at each clinic site (a total of 13 additional participants). All interviews were coded in Atlas.ti using a grounded theory approach to develop codes and to identify core themes and subthemes in the data. Managing the clinical and relationship complexities related to serodiscordant couples wishing to conceive was flagged as a concern by all categories of health providers. Providers added that, in the HIV clinical setting, they often found it difficult to balance their professional priorities, to maintain the health of their clients, and to ensure that partners were not exposed to unnecessary risk, while still supporting their clients' desires to have a child. Many providers expressed concern over issues related to disclosure of HIV status between partners, particularly when managing couples where one partner was not aware of the other's status and expressed the desire for a child. Provider experiences were that female clients most often sought out care, and it was difficult to reach the male partner to include him in the consultation. Providers require support in dealing with HIV disclosure issues and in

  15. Challenges with couples, serodiscordance and HIV disclosure: healthcare provider perspectives on delivering safer conception services for HIV-affected couples, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Crankshaw, Tamaryn L; Mindry, Deborah; Munthree, Chantal; Letsoalo, Thabo; Maharaj, Pranitha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Introduction Safer conception interventions should ideally involve both members of an HIV-affected couple. With serodiscordant couples, healthcare providers will need to manage periconception risk behaviour as well tailor safer conception strategies according to available resources and the HIV status of each partner. Prior to widespread implementation of safer conception services, it is crucial to better understand provider perspectives regarding provision of care since they will be pivotal to the successful delivery of safer conception. This paper reports on findings from a qualitative study exploring the viewpoints and experiences of doctors, nurses, and lay counsellors on safer conception care in a rural and in an urban setting in Durban, South Africa. Methods We conducted six semistructured individual interviews per site (a total of 12 interviews) as well as a focus group discussion at each clinic site (a total of 13 additional participants). All interviews were coded in Atlas.ti using a grounded theory approach to develop codes and to identify core themes and subthemes in the data. Results Managing the clinical and relationship complexities related to serodiscordant couples wishing to conceive was flagged as a concern by all categories of health providers. Providers added that, in the HIV clinical setting, they often found it difficult to balance their professional priorities, to maintain the health of their clients, and to ensure that partners were not exposed to unnecessary risk, while still supporting their clients’ desires to have a child. Many providers expressed concern over issues related to disclosure of HIV status between partners, particularly when managing couples where one partner was not aware of the other's status and expressed the desire for a child. Provider experiences were that female clients most often sought out care, and it was difficult to reach the male partner to include him in the consultation. Conclusions Providers

  16. Development of low-toxicity gelcasting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.; Omatete, O.O.; Walls, C.A.; Nunn, S.D.; Ogle, R.J.; Westmoreland, G.

    1998-03-01

    A series of low-toxicity gelcasting systems has been developed. The reagents used in these systems have very low acute toxicity. The new systems perform at least as well as, and in some cases better than, the original acrylamide-based system. The development of these systems is described herein, including the search for new gel compositions, the study of suspensions made with the new gel precursor solutions, and pyrolysis of the dried gels and gelcast parts. Applications of the new gelcasting systems include complex silicon nitride parts, large-diameter rings, rapid prototyping by green machining, and metal-powder gel casting.

  17. A real-life example of choosing an inherently safer process option.

    PubMed

    Study, Karen

    2007-04-11

    While choosing an inherently safer alternative may seem straightforward, sometimes what seems to be the most obvious alternative may not provide the best risk reduction. The process designer must maintain a broad perspective to be able to recognize all potential hazards when evaluating design options. All aspects of operation such as start-up, shut-down, utility failure, as well as normal operation should be considered. Choosing the inherently safer option is best accomplished early in the option selection phase of a project; however, recycle back to the option selection phase may be needed if an option is not thoroughly evaluated early in the process. In this paper, a project to supply ammonia to a catalytic reactor will be reviewed. During the course of the project, an "inherently safer" alternative was selected and later discarded due to issues uncovered during the detail design phase. The final option chosen will be compared to (1) the original design and (2) the initial "inherently safer" alternative. The final option was inherently safer than both the original design and the initial "inherently safer" alternative even though the design team initially believed that it would not be.

  18. Interactive Development Environments for Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Anthony I.

    1986-01-01

    Most medical information systems are interactive information systems, since they provide their users with conversational access to data. The design of an interactive information system requires attention to data design, process design, and user interface design so that the resulting system will be easy to use and reliable. This paper describes some automated tools aimed at assisting software designers and developers in creating interactive information systems, with emphasis on the Software through Pictures environment and the User Software Engineering (USE) methodology.

  19. Systems Biology Approach to DevelopingSystems Therapeutics”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The standard drug development model uses reductionist approaches to discover small molecules targeting one pathway. Although systems biology analyzes multiple pathways, the approach is often used to develop a small molecule interacting at only one pathway in the system. Similar to that in physics where a departure from the old reductionist “Copenhagen View” of quantum physics to a new and predictive systems based, collective model has emerged yielding new breakthroughs such as the LASER, a new model is emerging in biology where systems biology is used to develop a new technology acting at multiple pathways called “systems therapeutics.” PMID:24900858

  20. Intelligent System Controller for remote systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development (OTD) has sponsored the development of the Generic Intelligent System Controller (GISC) for application to the clean up of hazardous waste sites. Of primary interest to the OTD is the development of technologies which result in faster, safer, and cheaper cleanup of hazardous waste sites than possible using conventional approaches. An objective of the GISC development project is to achieve these goals by developing a modular robotics control approach which reduces the time and cost of development by allowing reuse of control system software and uses computer models to improve the safety of remote site cleanup while reducing the time and life cycle costs.

  1. “WE NEED SOMEWHERE TO SMOKE CRACK”: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY OF AN UNSANCTIONED SAFER SMOKING ROOM IN VANCOUVER, CANADA

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Kerr, Thomas; Lampkin, Hugh; Small, Will

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many cities around the globe have experienced substantial increases in crack cocaine use. Public health programmes have begun to address crack smoking, primarily through the distribution of safer crack use equipment, but their impacts have been limited. More comprehensive safer environmental interventions, specifically safer smoking rooms (SSR), have been implemented only in select European cities. However, none have been subjected to rigorous evaluation. This ethnographic study was undertaken at an ‘unsanctioned’ SSR operated by a drug user-led organization in Vancouver, Canada, to explore how this intervention shaped crack smoking practices, public crack smoking, and related harms. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was undertaken at this SSR from September to December 2011, and included approximately 50 hours of ethnographic observation and 23 in-depth interviews with people who smoke crack. Data were analyzed by drawing on the ‘Risk Environment’ framework and concepts of ‘symbolic’, ‘everyday’, and ‘structural’ violence. Findings Our findings illustrate how a high demand for SSRs was driven by the need to minimize exposure to policing (structural violence), drug scene violence (everyday violence), and stigma (symbolic violence) that characterized unregulated drug use settings (e.g., public spaces). Although resource scarcity and social norms operating within the local drug scene (e.g., gendered power relations) perpetuated crack pipe-sharing within unregulated drug use settings, the SSR fostered harm reduction practices by reshaping the social-structural context of crack smoking and reduced the potential for health harms. Conclusion Given the significant potential of SSRs in reducing health and social harms, there is an urgent need to scale up these interventions. Integrating SSRs into public health systems, and supplementing these interventions with health and social supports, has potential to improve the health and safety of crack

  2. "We need somewhere to smoke crack": An ethnographic study of an unsanctioned safer smoking room in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Ryan; Kerr, Thomas; Lampkin, Hugh; Small, Will

    2015-07-01

    Many cities around the globe have experienced substantial increases in crack cocaine use. Public health programmes have begun to address crack smoking, primarily through the distribution of safer crack use equipment, but their impacts have been limited. More comprehensive safer environmental interventions, specifically safer smoking rooms (SSR), have been implemented only in select European cities. However, none have been subjected to rigorous evaluation. This ethnographic study was undertaken at an 'unsanctioned' SSR operated by a drug user-led organization in Vancouver, Canada, to explore how this intervention shaped crack smoking practices, public crack smoking, and related harms. Ethnographic fieldwork was undertaken at this SSR from September to December 2011, and included approximately 50 hours of ethnographic observation and 23 in-depth interviews with people who smoke crack. Data were analyzed by drawing on the 'Risk Environment' framework and concepts of 'symbolic', 'everyday', and 'structural' violence. Our findings illustrate how a high demand for SSRs was driven by the need to minimize exposure to policing (structural violence), drug scene violence (everyday violence), and stigma (symbolic violence) that characterized unregulated drug use settings (e.g., public spaces). Although resource scarcity and social norms operating within the local drug scene (e.g., gendered power relations) perpetuated crack pipe-sharing within unregulated drug use settings, the SSR fostered harm reduction practices by reshaping the social-structural context of crack smoking and reduced the potential for health harms. Given the significant potential of SSRs in reducing health and social harms, there is an urgent need to scale up these interventions. Integrating SSRs into public health systems, and supplementing these interventions with health and social supports, has potential to improve the health and safety of crack-smoking populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  3. AMPA receptor regulation mechanisms: future target for safer neuroprotective drugs.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Dikshit, Madhu

    2004-06-01

    transporters, which require high-frequency firing for activation. On activation they might enhance the activity of NMDA receptors at the synapse to increase the levels of AMPA receptors. AMPA receptors surfaced at this juncture can contribute to heavy Ca2+ influx. Thus, blocking this pathway could be of considerable importance in preventing the excitotoxicity. A number of proteins such as the GRIP, PICK, and NSF also modulate the functions of AMPA receptors. Polyamines also block Ca2+ permeable AMPA receptors and thus are protective. NO and cGMP also play an important role in negatively regulating AMPA receptors and thus could offer protection. Modulation of AMPA receptor by different mechanisms has been discussed in the present review to implicate importance of these targets/pathways for safer and future neuroprotective drugs.

  4. Development of a School Leadership Evaluation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlando, Nik

    2014-01-01

    This action research study examined the effectiveness of the process implemented by Partnerships to Uplift Communities (PUC) Schools Charter Management Organization to develop their school leader evaluation system in collaboration with current PUC school leaders. The development of the leadership evaluation system included the collective voices of…

  5. Development of medical data information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    Computerized storage and retrieval of medical information is discussed. Tasks which were performed in support of the project are: (1) flight crew health stabilization computer system, (2) medical data input system, (3) graphic software development, (4) lunar receiving laboratory support, and (5) Statos V printer/plotter software development.

  6. Development of a School Leadership Evaluation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlando, Nik

    2014-01-01

    This action research study examined the effectiveness of the process implemented by Partnerships to Uplift Communities (PUC) Schools Charter Management Organization to develop their school leader evaluation system in collaboration with current PUC school leaders. The development of the leadership evaluation system included the collective voices of…

  7. Extending the Instructional Systems Development Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Colin E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes ways that components of Information Engineering (IE) methodology can be used by training system developers to extend Instructional Systems Development (ISD) methodology. Aspects of IE that are useful in ISD are described, including requirements determination, group facilitation, integrated automated tool support, and prototyping.…

  8. Security alarm communication and display systems development

    SciTech Connect

    Waddoups, I.G.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a variety of alarm communication and display systems for a broad spectrum of users. This paper will briefly describe the latest systems developed for the Department of Energy (DOE), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the Department of State (DOS) applications. Applications covered will vary from relatively small facilities to large complex sites. Ongoing system developments will also be discussed. The concluding section will summarize the practical, implementable state-of-the-art features available in new systems. 6 figs.

  9. Development of Residential SOFC Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takashi; Miyachi, Itaru; Suzuki, Minoru; Higaki, Katsuki

    2011-06-01

    Since 2001 Kyocera has been developing 1kW class Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for power generation system. We have developed a cell, stack, module and system. Since 2004, Kyocera and Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. have been developed SOFC residential co-generation system. From 2007, we took part in the "Demonstrative Research on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells" Project conducted by New Energy Foundation (NEF). Total 57 units of 0.7kW class SOFC cogeneration systems had been installed at residential houses. In spite of residential small power demand, the actual electric efficiency was about 40%(netAC,LHV), and high CO2 reduction performance was achieved by these systems. Hereafter, new joint development, Osaka Gas, Toyota Motors, Kyocera and Aisin Seiki, aims early commercialization of residential SOFC CHP system.

  10. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  11. Toward the Development of Expert Assessment Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselbring, Ted S.

    1986-01-01

    The potential application of "expert systems" to the diagnosis and assessment of special-needs children is examined and existing prototype systems are reviewed. The future of this artificial intelligence technology is discussed in relation to emerging development tools designed for the creation of expert systems by the lay public. (Author)

  12. Toward the Development of Expert Assessment Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselbring, Ted S.

    1986-01-01

    The potential application of "expert systems" to the diagnosis and assessment of special-needs children is examined and existing prototype systems are reviewed. The future of this artificial intelligence technology is discussed in relation to emerging development tools designed for the creation of expert systems by the lay public. (Author)

  13. Autonomous Systems in Human Behavior and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, P.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews research which demonstrates that responses from different behavior systems to a given stimulus situation may be far from perfectly correlated with each other. Discusses the phylogenetic and ontogenetic development of these systems and the roles of both the species and the individual in bringing the systems into mutual correspondence.…

  14. Curriculum Development System for Navy Technical Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lucius

    Documentation for the U.S. Navy's curriculum development system is brought together in this paper, beginning with a description of the Naval Technical Training System. This description includes the Navy Training Plan (NTP) process, which is the current mechanism for introducing new courses; the organization and administration of the system; the…

  15. Curriculum Development System for Navy Technical Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lucius

    Documentation for the U.S. Navy's curriculum development system is brought together in this paper, beginning with a description of the Naval Technical Training System. This description includes the Navy Training Plan (NTP) process, which is the current mechanism for introducing new courses; the organization and administration of the system; the…

  16. NASA develops new digital flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    1994-01-01

    This news release reports on the development and testing of a new integrated flight and propulsion automated control system that aerospace engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center have been working on. The system is being tested in the V/STOL (Vertical/Short Takeoff and Landing) Systems Research Aircraft (VSRA).

  17. Multiple IMU system development, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landey, M.; Mckern, R.

    1974-01-01

    A redundant gimballed inertial system is described. System requirements and mechanization methods are defined and hardware and software development is described. Failure detection and isolation algorithms are presented and technology achievements described. Application of the system as a test tool for shuttle avionics concepts is outlined.

  18. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Anderson, Kevin; Book, Paul

    1999-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the development of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC) and Beta version. We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models in the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC and Beta system development. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has seven chapters, a bibliography, and two appendices.

  19. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. [prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development of twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems, six heating and six heating and cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications, is reported. Schedules and technical discussions, along with illustrations on the progress made from April 1, 1977 through June 30, 1977 are detailed.

  20. Developing Sustainable Life Support System Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Evan A.

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable spacecraft life support concepts may allow the development of more reliable technologies for long duration space missions. Currently, life support technologies at different levels of development are not well evaluated against each other, and evaluation methods do not account for long term reliability and sustainability of the hardware. This paper presents point-of-departure sustainability evaluation criteria for life support systems, that may allow more robust technology development, testing and comparison. An example sustainable water recovery system concept is presented.

  1. Advanced Mating System Development for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of space flight sealing and the work required for the further development of a dynamic interface seal for the use on space mating systems to support a fully androgynous mating interface. This effort has resulted in the advocacy of developing a standard multipurpose interface for use with all modern modular space architecture. This fully androgynous design means a seal-on-seal (SOS) system.

  2. Gaming for Safer Sex: Young German and Turkish People Report No Specific Culture-Related Preferences Toward Educational Games Promoting Safer Sex.

    PubMed

    Brüll, Phil; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wiers, Reinout W; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive sex education programs specifically designed for adolescents and young adults that take into account gender norms and cultural background have shown promise as a means of countering the high sexually transmitted infection rate in young people. Recently, digital gaming interventions delivered on computers or mobile devices have emerged as another way to promote safer sex behavior in a young population. Tailoring these computer-based interventions to their target population has been recognized to increase positive behavior outcomes. In this qualitative study, we investigated whether young female and male adults from two different cultural backgrounds (all living in Germany) would have different preferences and needs in relation to an educational game promoting safer sex. We conducted four semistructured focus group interviews comprising open-ended questions with male and female participants who had either a German or a Turkish background. In total, 20 individuals, aged between 18 and 22 years, from two socially diverse and ethnically mixed vocational schools in Germany participated. Independent of cultural background and gender, participants preferred a real-world design with a first-person visual perspective over a fantasy-like third-person perspective. Furthermore, they preferred highly customizable avatars. All participants mentioned the importance of including an alcohol-intoxicated avatar and most participants wanted there to be additional information available about various safer sex approaches and about the use of different barrier protection methods. Males and females reported similar preferences for the design of an educational game promoting safer sex, with the only difference being exactly how the topic of having sexual intercourse should be addressed in the game. Males preferred a direct approach, whereas females had a preference for treating this subject more sympathetically. Educational games offer anonymity and can provide young people

  3. Nascom System Development Plan: System Description, Capabilities and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) System Development Plan (NSDP), reissued annually, describes the organization of Nascom, how it obtains communication services, its current systems, its relationship with other NASA centers and International Partner Agencies, some major spaceflight projects which generate significant operational communication support requirements, and major Nascom projects in various stages of development or implementation.

  4. MSFC Lunar Environments Test System (LETS) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Norwood, Joey; Abbas, Mian; Alexander, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    A review of the NASA MSFC Lunar Environment Test System (LETS) System Development is presented. The contents include: 1) MSFC LETS Chamber Status; 2) LETS Simulant Containment Box Development; 3) Tests Conducted in LETS To date: Simulant Dust Migration; 4) Summary; and 5) Forward Work.

  5. Dynamical Systems Approaches to Emotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camras, Linda A.; Witherington, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Within the last 20 years, transitions in the conceptualization of emotion and its development have given rise to calls for an explanatory framework that captures emotional development in all its organizational complexity and variability. Recent attempts have been made to couch emotional development in terms of a dynamical systems approach through…

  6. Adolescent Career Development and the Family System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Al

    Trends in recent literature advocate a family systems approach to career development. To examine associations between process aspects of adolescent career development and family adaptability-family cohesion, 262 Virginia high school students (157 females, 105 males) completed the Career Development Inventory, the Assessment of Career Decision…

  7. Systems Engineering Leadership Development: Advancing Systems Engineering Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Phil; Whitfield, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Systems Engineering Leadership Development Program, with particular emphasis on the work being done in the development of systems engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center. There exists a lack of individuals with systems engineering expertise, in particular those with strong leadership capabilities, to meet the needs of the Agency's exploration agenda. Therefore there is a emphasis on developing these programs to identify and train systems engineers. The presentation reviews the proposed MSFC program that includes course work, and developmental assignments. The formal developmental programs at the other centers are briefly reviewed, including the Point of Contact (POC)

  8. HVDC control developments - addressing system requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, R.L.; Patel, H.S.; Piwko, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    This article describes typical high voltage direct current (HVDC) control systems and some of the new developments in the control area. HVDC control systems are showing their flexible characteristics as demonstrated, for example, by the new modulation, torsional damping, and alternating current voltage and reactive power controllers. Extensive studies are conducted to design and integrate such controllers into HVDC systems and to assure against any detrimental interactions within the total control system. 8 figures.

  9. Psychology of developing and designing expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; MacGregor, D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses psychological problems relevant to developing and designing expert systems. With respect to the former, the psychological literature suggests that several cognitive biases may affect the elicitation of a valid knowledge base from the expert. The literature also suggests that common expert system inference engines may be quite inconsistent with reasoning heuristics employed by experts. With respect to expert system user interfaces, care should be taken when eliciting uncertainty estimates from users, presenting system conclusions, and ordering questions.

  10. Development of a Guide Star Search System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Omata, K.; Takata, T.; Kosugi, G.; Ozawa, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Sasaki, T.

    1997-03-01

    A Guide Star Search System is developed with the aid of a script language for building GUI, Tcl/Tk. Using a Data Base Management System, the authors have realized quick search for guide stars in an observational field from the Guide Star Catalog and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Star Catalog. This system has been implemented in OOPS (Okoyama Optical Polarimetry and Spectroscopy System) at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory.

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER

  12. A Peer-Led, Social Media-Delivered, Safer Sex Intervention for Chinese College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wai Han; Wong, Carlos King Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background The peer-led, social media-delivered intervention is an emerging method in sexual health promotion. However, no research has yet investigated its effectiveness as compared with other online channels or in an Asian population. Objective The objective of this study is to compare a peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention with a sexual health website. Both conditions target Chinese college students in Hong Kong. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a peer-led, safer sex Facebook group as the intervention and an existing online sexual health website as the control. The intervention materials were developed with peer input and followed the information-motivation-behavioral skills model; the intervention was moderated by peer educators. The participants filled out the online questionnaires before and after the 6-week intervention period. Outcome evaluations included safer sex attitudes, behavioral skills, and behaviors, while process evaluation focused on online experience, online-visiting frequency, and online engagement. The effect of online-visiting frequency and online engagement on outcome variables was investigated. Results Of 196 eligible participants—100 in the control group and 96 in the intervention group—who joined the study, 2 (1.0%) control participants joined the Facebook group and 24 of the remaining 194 participants (12.4%) were lost to follow-up. For the process evaluation, participants in the intervention group reported more satisfying online experiences (P<.001) and a higher level of online-visiting frequency (P<.001). They also had more positive comments when compared with the control group. For outcome evaluation, within-group analysis showed significant improvement in condom use attitude (P=.02) and behavioral skills (P<.001) in the intervention group, but not in the control group. No significant between-group difference was found. After adjusting for demographic data, increased online

  13. A Peer-Led, Social Media-Delivered, Safer Sex Intervention for Chinese College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wai Han; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Wong, William Chi Wai

    2017-08-09

    The peer-led, social media-delivered intervention is an emerging method in sexual health promotion. However, no research has yet investigated its effectiveness as compared with other online channels or in an Asian population. The objective of this study is to compare a peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention with a sexual health website. Both conditions target Chinese college students in Hong Kong. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a peer-led, safer sex Facebook group as the intervention and an existing online sexual health website as the control. The intervention materials were developed with peer input and followed the information-motivation-behavioral skills model; the intervention was moderated by peer educators. The participants filled out the online questionnaires before and after the 6-week intervention period. Outcome evaluations included safer sex attitudes, behavioral skills, and behaviors, while process evaluation focused on online experience, online-visiting frequency, and online engagement. The effect of online-visiting frequency and online engagement on outcome variables was investigated. Of 196 eligible participants-100 in the control group and 96 in the intervention group-who joined the study, 2 (1.0%) control participants joined the Facebook group and 24 of the remaining 194 participants (12.4%) were lost to follow-up. For the process evaluation, participants in the intervention group reported more satisfying online experiences (P<.001) and a higher level of online-visiting frequency (P<.001). They also had more positive comments when compared with the control group. For outcome evaluation, within-group analysis showed significant improvement in condom use attitude (P=.02) and behavioral skills (P<.001) in the intervention group, but not in the control group. No significant between-group difference was found. After adjusting for demographic data, increased online-visiting frequency was associated with better

  14. SP-100 power system development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondt, Jack F.

    1990-01-01

    The SP-100 ground engineering system development project objectives, approach and status are described. The SP-100 GES development project is phase II of a three-phase program funded and directed by three United States Federal Agencies (NASA, DOD and DOE) to develop space reactor power systems for space applications in the 10 to 1000 KWe power range. The first phase of the program lasted three years, and this was completed at the end of FY 1985. SP-100 Phase I analytically and experimentally reviewed all near-term space reactor power system candidates and selected one system that best met the project mission requirements for future civilian and military space applications. The SP-100 Phase II started in fiscal year 1986 to develop the Phase I selected space reactor power system to be technically ready for space applications in the mid- to late 1990s.

  15. Space Station Power System Advanced Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Baraona, C. R.; Valgora, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the Space Station Advanced Development Program are related to the development of a set of design options and/or new capabilities to support Space Station development and operation, taking into account also a quantification of the performance and risk of key state-of-the-art technologies, and a reduction of the cost and schedule risk in Space Station development. Attention is given to the photovoltaic power system, a solar dynamic system, and aspects of power management and distribution. A major issue will be the selection of the power generation system. In view of the advantages of the solar dynamic system, it is attempted to resolve issues associated with this system.

  16. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Hannan, N.A.; Perkins, K.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Worley, B.A.; Dobranich, D.

    1992-10-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. Since October 1991, US (DOE), (DOD) and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review. The vision and strategy of the interagency team for developing NTP system models will be discussed in this paper. A review of the progress on the Level 1 interagency model is also presented.

  17. Space Launch Flight Termination System initial development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkevich, B.; Brierley, S.; Lupia, D.; Leiker, T.

    This paper describes the studies, capabilities and challenges in initial development of a new digital encrypted termination system for space launch vehicles. This system is called the Space Launch Flight Termination System (SLFTS). Development of SLFTS is required to address an obsolescence issue and to improve the security of flight termination systems presently in use on the nation's space launch vehicles. SLFTS development was implemented in a four phase approach with the goal of producing a high secure, cost effective flight termination system for United Launch Alliance (ULA) and the United States Air Force (USAF) Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). These detailed study phases developed the requirements, design and implementation approach for a new high secure flight termination system. Studies led to a cost effective approach to replace the High Alphabet Command Receiver Decoders (HA-CRD) presently used on the EELV (Delta-IV & Atlas-V), with a common SLFTS unit. SLFTS is the next generation flight termination system for space launch vehicles, providing an assured high secure command destruct system for launch vehicles in flight. The unique capabilities and challenges to develop this technology for space launch use will be addressed in this paper in detail. This paper summarizes the current development status, design and capabilities of SLFTS for EELV.

  18. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is part of the Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical (MEMS) acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical-sensor-based systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used in characterizing both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data has cross-disciplinary utility to the microgravity life and physical sciences and the structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, while providing enhanced stability.

  19. Making patients safer! Reducing error in Canadian healthcare.

    PubMed

    Baker, G R; Norton, P

    2001-01-01

    Media reports of adverse events experienced by patients raise questions about whether these are isolated exceptions or part of a larger problem. There is no reliable Canadian data on medical error; but there is little reason to expect that the situation differs markedly from Australia or the United States which have rigorously studied the problem. Research in Australia has concluded that as many as 16% of hospital patients are injured as a result of their treatment. The Australian study and more recent research in the United States have created widespread concern that an epidemic of error exists in healthcare. Fortunately, experts in healthcare and other industries, have pointed toward a number of solutions that will reduce these errors. Three key strategies need to be pursued First, better information about the numbers and types of errors that occur is needed to help pinpoint change efforts. Non-punitive reporting policies must be put in place, to assist in altering the traditional culture of blame that has discouraged error reporting. Second, a set of strategies have to focus on developing more effective systems, including physician-order entry and medication administration systems which have been shown to have a dramatic impact in reducing errors. These systems are expensive, but their importance in reducing injury - and greatly reducing the costs of additional care that come from such injuries - make them an essential part of the answer. Finally, healthcare organizations need to work to create more effective cultures oriented toward preventing errors and intercepting errors that inevitably occur. These cultures will require a new emphasis on teamwork, a continual focus on redesigning care systems, particularly in high risk areas such as operating rooms, intensive care units and emergency rooms. These are not easy tasks and will require investments in new equipment and new skills. These steps are essential if we are to maintain public confidence in healthcare.

  20. Safer-drinking Strategies Used by Chronically Homeless Individuals with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grazioli, Véronique S.; Hicks, Jennifer; Kaese, Greta; Lenert, James; Collins, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence experience severe alcohol-related consequences. It is therefore important to identify factors that might be associated with reduced alcohol-related harm, such as the use of safer-drinking strategies. Whereas effectiveness of safer-drinking strategies has been well-documented among young adults, no studies have explored this topic among more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. The aims of this study were thus to qualitatively and quantitatively document safer-drinking strategies used in this population. Participants (N=31) were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence participating in a pilot study of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. At weeks 0 and 8, research staff provided a list of safer-drinking strategies for participants to endorse. Implementation of endorsed safer-drinking strategies was recorded at the next appointment. At both time points, strategies to buffer the effects of alcohol on the body (e.g., eating prior to and during drinking) were most highly endorsed, followed by changing the manner in which one drinks (e.g., spacing drinks), and reducing alcohol consumption. Quantitative analyses indicated that all participants endorsed safer-drinking strategies, and nearly all strategies were implemented (80–90% at weeks 0 and 8, respectively). These preliminary findings indicate that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence use strategies to reduce harm associated with their drinking. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to test whether interventions that teach safer-drinking strategies may reduce overall alcohol-related harm in this population. PMID:25690515

  1. Safer-drinking strategies used by chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Grazioli, Véronique S; Hicks, Jennifer; Kaese, Greta; Lenert, James; Collins, Susan E

    2015-07-01

    Chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence experience severe alcohol-related consequences. It is therefore important to identify factors that might be associated with reduced alcohol-related harm, such as the use of safer-drinking strategies. Whereas effectiveness of safer-drinking strategies has been well-documented among young adults, no studies have explored this topic among more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. The aims of this study were thus to qualitatively and quantitatively document safer-drinking strategies used in this population. Participants (N=31) were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence participating in a pilot study of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. At weeks 0 and 8, research staff provided a list of safer-drinking strategies for participants to endorse. Implementation of endorsed safer-drinking strategies was recorded at the next appointment. At both time points, strategies to buffer the effects of alcohol on the body (e.g., eating prior to and during drinking) were most highly endorsed, followed by changing the manner in which one drinks (e.g., spacing drinks), and reducing alcohol consumption. Quantitative analyses indicated that all participants endorsed safer-drinking strategies, and nearly all strategies were implemented (80-90% at weeks 0 and 8, respectively). These preliminary findings indicate that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence use strategies to reduce harm associated with their drinking. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to test whether interventions that teach safer-drinking strategies may reduce overall alcohol-related harm in this population.

  2. AGT 100 automotive gas turbine system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E. G.

    1982-01-01

    General Motors is developing an automotive gas turbine system that can be an alternate powerplant for future automobiles. Work sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA Lewis Research Center is emphasizing small component aerodynamics and high-temperature structural ceramics. Reliability requirements of the AGT 100 turbine system include chemical and structural ceramic component stability in the gas turbine environment. The power train system, its configuration and schedule are presented, and its performance tested. The aerodynamic component development is reviewed with discussions on the compressor, turbine, regenerator, interturbine duct and scroll, and combustor. Ceramic component development is also reviewed, and production cost and required capital investment are taken into consideration.

  3. AGT 100 automotive gas turbine system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E. G.

    1982-01-01

    General Motors is developing an automotive gas turbine system that can be an alternate powerplant for future automobiles. Work sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA Lewis Research Center is emphasizing small component aerodynamics and high-temperature structural ceramics. Reliability requirements of the AGT 100 turbine system include chemical and structural ceramic component stability in the gas turbine environment. The power train system, its configuration and schedule are presented, and its performance tested. The aerodynamic component development is reviewed with discussions on the compressor, turbine, regenerator, interturbine duct and scroll, and combustor. Ceramic component development is also reviewed, and production cost and required capital investment are taken into consideration.

  4. Communication challenges in system development: involvement of system developers in small-scale IT projects.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lone Stub; Bjoernes, Charlotte D; Bertelsen, Pernille

    2010-01-01

    A well-known challenge in system development is the aspect of user participation. In this paper we shift perspective from how to involve users in system development to how project managers with a clinical background, but without technical system knowledge, can involve system developers in IT projects. Using data from the development of an online patient book (an ICT application for clinical practice), we analyze challenges using the concept of language-games. We conclude that further research and development of participatory and communicative methods to involve system developers in IT projects, based in a clinical context, is needed.

  5. Appendix E: Parallel Pascal development system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Parallel Pascal Development System enables Parallel Pascal programs to be developed and tested on a conventional computer. It consists of several system programs, including a Parallel Pascal to standard Pascal translator, and a library of Parallel Pascal subprograms. The library includes subprograms for using Parallel Pascal on a parallel system with a fixed degree of parallelism, such as the Massively Parallel Processor, to conveniently manipulate arrays which have dimensions than the hardware. Programs can be conveninetly tested with small sized arrays on the conventional computer before attempting to run on a parallel system.

  6. Appendix E: Parallel Pascal development system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Parallel Pascal Development System enables Parallel Pascal programs to be developed and tested on a conventional computer. It consists of several system programs, including a Parallel Pascal to standard Pascal translator, and a library of Parallel Pascal subprograms. The library includes subprograms for using Parallel Pascal on a parallel system with a fixed degree of parallelism, such as the Massively Parallel Processor, to conveniently manipulate arrays which have dimensions than the hardware. Programs can be conveninetly tested with small sized arrays on the conventional computer before attempting to run on a parallel system.

  7. Development of Bio-GAS systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayanagi, M.; Kitamura, S.; Nemoto, H.; Kimura, T.; Zaiki, Y.; Kitakohji, T.; Fujita, S.; Kameda, M.; Noda, M.; Kawasaki, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Four experiment systems which have fundamental significance in the field of biotechnology are developed for the Get Away Special (GAS). Unique considerations were necessary to develop the systems which carry out biotechnological experiments under GAS's restricted conditions: delicate thermal control, fluid handling and protection from contamination. All experimental processes are controlled by internal sequencers and results of the experiments are recorded as images and numerical data within the systems. The systems are standardized in order to enable repeated use with a variety of experiments by replacement of the experiment modules and modification of experiment sequencing programs.

  8. Automated Operations Development for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Automated space operations command and control software development and its implementation must be an integral part of the vehicle design effort. The software design must encompass autonomous fault detection, isolation, recovery capabilities and also provide "single button" intelligent functions for the crew. Development, operations and safety approval experience with the Timeliner system onboard the International Space Station (ISS), which provided autonomous monitoring with response and single command functionality of payload systems, can be built upon for future automated operations as the ISS Payload effort was the first and only autonomous command and control system to be in continuous execution (6 years), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week within a crewed spacecraft environment. Utilizing proven capabilities from the ISS Higher Active Logic (HAL) System, along with the execution component design from within the HAL 9000 Space Operating System, this design paper will detail the initial HAL System software architecture and interfaces as applied to NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in support of the Advanced Exploration Systems, Autonomous Mission Operations project. The development and implementation of integrated simulators within this development effort will also be detailed and is the first step in verifying the HAL 9000 Integrated Test-Bed Component [2] designs effectiveness. This design paper will conclude with a summary of the current development status and future development goals as it pertains to automated command and control for the HDU.

  9. Embryonic Development of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    de Lahunta, Alexander; Glass, Eric N; Kent, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Ultimately, it is only with an understanding of normal embryologic development that there can be an understanding of why and how a specific malformation develops. Knowing from where and when a specific part of the nervous system develops and what morphogens are at play will enable us to identify undescribed malformation as well as better define causality. The following article reviews the normal embryologic development of the mammalian nervous system and is intended to serve as a foundation for the understanding of the various malformations presented in this issue.

  10. Progress in the Development of Nanotheranostic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Honggang; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This thematic issue includes both review and research articles and is intended to provide an overview on the recent progress in the development of nanostructure-based therapeutic, diagnostic, and theranostic systems. PMID:27217827

  11. Operational development of small plant growth systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheld, H. W.; Magnuson, J. W.; Sauer, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a study undertaken on the first phase of an empricial effort in the development of small plant growth chambers for production of salad type vegetables on space shuttle or space station are discussed. The overall effort is visualized as providing the underpinning of practical experience in handling of plant systems in space which will provide major support for future efforts in planning, design, and construction of plant-based (phytomechanical) systems for support of human habitation in space. The assumptions underlying the effort hold that large scale phytomechanical habitability support systems for future space stations must evolve from the simple to the complex. The highly complex final systems will be developed from the accumulated experience and data gathered from repetitive tests and trials of fragments or subsystems of the whole in an operational mode. These developing system components will, meanwhile, serve a useful operational function in providing psychological support and diversion for the crews.

  12. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT ON THE DUPIC SAFEGUARDS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    H. KIM; H. CHA; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A safeguards system has been developed since 1993 in the course of supporting a fuel cycle process to fabricate CANDU fuel with spent PWR fuel (known as Direct Use of PWR spent fuel In CANDU, DUPIC). The major safeguards technology involved here was to design and fabricate a neutron coincidence counting system for process accountability, and also an unattended continuous monitoring system in association with independent verification by the IAEA. This combined technology was to produce information of nuclear material content and to maintain knowledge of the continuity of nuclear material flow. In addition to hardware development, diagnosis software is being developed to assist data acquisition, data review, and data evaluation based on a neural network system on the IAEA C/S system.

  13. Lentivirus pre-packed with Cas9 protein for safer gene editing.

    PubMed

    Choi, J G; Dang, Y; Abraham, S; Ma, H; Zhang, J; Guo, H; Cai, Y; Mikkelsen, J G; Wu, H; Shankar, P; Manjunath, N

    2016-07-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an easy way to edit specific site/s in the genome and thus offers tremendous opportunity for human gene therapy for a wide range of diseases. However, one major concern is off-target effects, particularly with long-term expression of Cas9 nuclease when traditional expression methods such as via plasmid/viral vectors are used. To overcome this limitation, we pre-packaged Cas9 protein (Cas9P LV) in lentiviral particles for transient exposure and showed its effectiveness for gene disruption in cells, including primary T cells expressing specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). We then constructed an 'all in one virus' to express sgRNAs in association with pre-packaged Cas9 protein (sgRNA/Cas9P LV). We successfully edited CCR5 in TZM-bl cells by this approach. Using an sgRNA-targeting HIV long terminal repeat, we also were able to disrupt HIV provirus in the J-LAT model of viral latency. Moreover, we also found that pre-packaging Cas9 protein in LV particle reduced off-target editing of chromosome 4:-29134166 locus by CCR5 sgRNA, compared with continued expression from the vector. These results show that sgRNA/Cas9P LV can be used as a safer approach for human gene therapy applications.

  14. Is There a New Alternative for a Safer Kidney Artery Ligation in Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy?

    PubMed

    Cabello, Ramiro; García, Juan Vicente; Quicios, Cristina; Bueno, Gonzalo; González, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Controlled ligation and division of the renal hilum are critical steps during laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy. Major hemorrhage from technical failure, although an infrequent occurrence, can cause significant, yet preventable, morbidity or death. Polymer-secured nontransfixion clips are used worldwide for renal pedicle control during laparoscopic nephrectomy, but their use is contraindicated for renal artery ligation during laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy. Laparoscopic staplers are reliable transfixion systems for controlling kidney pedicle. However, stapler malfunction is not negligible, reaching up to 1.7%. A new double shank (DS) titanium-secured nontransfixion clip can dodge legal concerns on polymer-secured clips, while maintaining most of their advantages, without technical failures that may be seen in laparoscopic staplers. New alternatives must be proposed and explored to reach an agreement of the urological community. The new DS-titanium-secured clips could be a step forward toward a safer surgery for kidney donors, at least equivalent to hand ties to occlude the renal artery.

  15. System Administrator for LCS Development Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System Project is creating a Checkout and Control System that will eventually launch the next generation of vehicles from Kennedy Space Center. KSC has a large set of Development and Operational equipment already deployed in several facilities, including the Launch Control Center, which requires support. The position of System Administrator will complete tasks across multiple platforms (Linux/Windows), many of them virtual. The Hardware Branch of the Control and Data Systems Division at the Kennedy Space Center uses system administrators for a variety of tasks. The position of system administrator comes with many responsibilities which include maintaining computer systems, repair or set up hardware, install software, create backups and recover drive images are a sample of jobs which one must complete. Other duties may include working with clients in person or over the phone and resolving their computer system needs. Training is a major part of learning how an organization functions and operates. Taking that into consideration, NASA is no exception. Training on how to better protect the NASA computer infrastructure will be a topic to learn, followed by NASA work polices. Attending meetings and discussing progress will be expected. A system administrator will have an account with root access. Root access gives a user full access to a computer system and or network. System admins can remove critical system files and recover files using a tape backup. Problem solving will be an important skill to develop in order to complete the many tasks.

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-11-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]); (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk; (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP), where the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) will reach consensus with the NDEP before beginning the next phase of work. Corrective Action Unit 553 is located in Areas 19 and 20 of the NTS, approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: 19-99-01, Mud Spill; 19-99-11, Mud Spill; 20-09-09, Mud Spill; and 20-99-03, Mud Spill. There is sufficient information and process

  17. Surface interactions with compartmentalized cellular phosphates explain rare earth oxide nanoparticle hazard and provide opportunities for safer design.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dunphy, Darren R; Cai, Xiaoming; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Haiyuan; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, Andre; Xia, Tian

    2014-02-25

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use.

  18. Surface Interactions with Compartmentalized Cellular Phosphates Explain Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticle Hazard and Provide Opportunities for Safer Design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use. PMID:24417322

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2011-11-08

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2012-01-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  1. Development and Deployment of the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Christopher A.; Landon, Matthew R.; Hanson, Carl E.

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

  3. Community Influences on Married Women's Safer Sex Negotiation Attitudes in Bangladesh: A Multilevel Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jesmin, Syeda S; Cready, Cynthia M

    2016-02-01

    The influence of disadvantaged or deprived community on individuals' health risk-behaviors is increasingly being documented in a growing body of literature. However, little is known about the effects of community characteristics on women's sexual attitudes and behaviors. To examine community effects on married women's safer sex negotiation attitudes, we analyzed cross-sectional data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys on a sample of 15,134 married women in 600 communities. We estimated two multilevel logistic regression models. Model 1, which included only individual-level variables, showed that women's autonomy/empowerment, age, and HIV knowledge had significant associations with their safer sex negotiation attitudes. We did not find any socioeconomic status gradient in safer sex negotiation attitudes at the individual level. Adding community-level variables in Model 2 significantly improved the fit of the model. Strikingly, we found that higher community-level poverty was associated with greater positive safer sex negotiation attitudes. Prevailing gender norms and overall women's empowerment in the community also had significant effects. While research on community influences calls for focusing on disadvantaged communities, our research highlights the importance of not underestimating the challenges that married women in economically privileged communities may face in negotiating safer sex. To have sufficient and equitable impact on married women's sexual and reproductive health, sexual and reproductive health promotion policies and programs need to be directed to women in wealthier communities as well.

  4. Understanding barriers to safer sex practice in Zimbabwean marriages: implications for future HIV prevention interventions.

    PubMed

    Mugweni, Esther; Omar, Mayeh; Pearson, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Against the backdrop of high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence in stable relationships in Southern Africa, our study presents sociocultural barriers to safer sex practice in Zimbabwean marriages. We conducted 36 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with married men and women in Zimbabwe in 2008. Our aim was to identify barriers faced by married women when negotiating for safer sex. Participants identified individual, relational and community-level barriers. Individual level barriers made women voiceless to negotiate for safer sex. Being voiceless emanated from lack sexual decision-making power, economic dependence, low self-efficacy or fear of actual or perceived consequences of negotiating for safer sex. Relational barriers included trust and self-disclosure. At the community level, extended family members and religious leaders were said to explicitly or implicitly discourage women's safer sex negotiation. Given the complexity and multi-levelled nature of barriers affecting sexual behaviour in marriage, our findings suggest that HIV prevention interventions targeted at married women would benefit from empowering individual women, couples and also addressing the wider community.

  5. System analysis: Developing tools for the future

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, K.; clever, J.; Draper, J.V.; Davies, B.; Lonks, A.

    1996-02-01

    This report introduces and evaluates system analysis tools that were developed, or are under development, for the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). Additionally, it discusses system analysis work completed using these tools aimed at completing a system analysis of the retrieval of waste from underground storage tanks on the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. The tools developed and evaluated include a mixture of commercially available tools adapted to RTDP requirements, and some tools developed in house. The tools that are included in this report include: a Process Diagramming Tool, a Cost Modeling Tool, an Amortization Modeling Tool, a graphical simulation linked to the Cost Modeling Tool, a decision assistance tool, and a system thinking tool. Additionally, the importance of performance testing to the RTDP and the results of such testing executed is discussed. Further, the results of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) System Diagram, the TWR Operations Cost Model, and the TWR Amortization Model are presented, and the implication of the results are discussed. Finally, the RTDP system analysis tools are assessed and some recommendations are made regarding continuing development of the tools and process.

  6. Spaceport Command and Control System Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) launch control system for the Orion capsule and Space Launch System, the next generation manned rocket currently in development. This large system requires a large amount of intensive testing that will properly measure the capabilities of the system. Automating the test procedures would save the project money from human labor costs, as well as making the testing process more efficient. Therefore, the Exploration Systems Division (formerly the Electrical Engineering Division) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has recruited interns for the past two years to work alongside full-time engineers to develop these automated tests, as well as innovate upon the current automation process.

  7. Motives and barriers to safer sex and regular STI testing among MSM soon after HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Heijman, Titia; Zuure, Freke; Stolte, Ineke; Davidovich, Udi

    2017-03-07

    Understanding why some recently with HIV diagnosed men who have sex with men (MSM) choose for safer sex and regular STI testing, whereas others do not, is important for the development of interventions that aim to improve the sexual health of those newly infected. To gain insight into motives and barriers to condom use and regular STI testing among MSM soon after HIV diagnosis, 30 HIV-positive MSM participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews on sexual health behaviours in the first year after HIV diagnosis. Typical barriers to condom use soon after diagnosis were emotions such as anger, relief, and feelings of vulnerability. Additional barriers were related to pre-diagnosis patterns of sexual-social behaviour that were difficult to change, communication difficulties, and substance use. Barriers to STI testing revolved around perceptions of low STI risk, faulty beliefs, and burdensome testing procedures. The great diversity of motives and barriers to condom use and STI testing creates a challenge to accommodate newly infected men with information, motivation, and communication skills to match their personal needs. An adaptive, tailored intervention can be a promising tool of support.

  8. Safer obstetric anesthesia through education and mentorship: a model for knowledge translation in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Patricia; Evans, Faye; Nsereko, Etienne; Nyirigira, Gaston; Ruhato, Paulin; Sargeant, Joan; Chipp, Megan; Enright, Angela

    2014-11-01

    High rates of maternal mortality remain a widespread problem in the developing world. Skilled anesthesia providers are required for the safe conduct of Cesarean delivery and resuscitation during obstetrical crises. Few anesthesia providers in low-resource settings have access to continuing education. In Rwanda, anesthesia technicians with only three years of post-secondary training must manage complex maternal emergencies in geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this special article is to describe implementation of the SAFE (Safer Anesthesia From Education) Obstetric Anesthesia course in Rwanda, a three-day refresher course designed to improve obstetrical anesthesia knowledge and skills for practitioners in low-resource areas. In addition, we describe how the course facilitated the knowledge-to-action (KTA) cycle whereby a series of steps are followed to promote the uptake of new knowledge into clinical practice. The KTA cycle requires locally relevant teaching interventions and continuation of knowledge post intervention. In Rwanda, this meant carefully considering educational needs, revising curricula to suit the local context, employing active experiential learning during the SAFE Obstetric Anesthesia course, encouraging supportive relationships with peers and mentors, and using participant action plans for change, post-course logbooks, and follow-up interviews with participants six months after the course. During those interviews, participants reported improvements in clinical practice and greater confidence in coordinating team activities. Anesthesia safety remains challenged by resource limitations and resistance to change by health care providers who did not attend the course. Future teaching interventions will address the need for team training.

  9. Work Values System Development during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.

    2007-01-01

    Work values stability, change, and development can be appreciably reduced to a living system model [Ford, D. H. (1994). "Humans as self-constructing living systems: A developmental perspective on behavior and personality" (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates]. This theoretical model includes discrepancy-reducing and…

  10. Systems Development at the Grom Hayes Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yother, Larry W.

    1987-01-01

    Details the "painful" history, development, and progress of a "home-grown" library automation system at the Hartford State Technical College; describes several of the most common activities generated from menus; and looks at future prospects of the system. (Author/CLB)

  11. CD-ROM Development Systems: A Tutorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses topics related to systems for in-house CD-ROM development: functions, including data capture, data conversion, data editing, indexing, database construction, simulation/testing, and formatting; components, including hardware, the processor, peripherals, and selection considerations; software, including the operating system, system…

  12. Development of the Choctaw Health Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Binh N.

    The Choctaw Tribe is the first and only tribe to develop a health delivery system to take over an existing Indian Health Service inpatient facility. The takeover was accomplished in January 1984 under the Indian Self-Determination Act through a contract with the Indian Health Service. The Choctaw Health Delivery System includes a 35-bed general…

  13. Control technology development. [distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic control design approaches were developed for distributed parameter systems. A hardware flexible beam facility was constructed to demonstrate and verify the theoretical control concepts. Efforts were made in the area of model order estimation for control systems with uncertain or time varying parameters.

  14. Develop Education Systems that Integrate All Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiker, Jason

    2007-01-01

    During the last few years, the development of seamless education systems to promote students' postsecondary success has been discussed by policymakers at the local, state and federal levels as well as reform-minded individuals. Florida, Washington, Iowa, Georgia and California either have statewide integrated systems or are moving quickly toward…

  15. Curriculum Development in History Using Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acun, Ramazan

    2011-01-01

    This work provides a conceptual framework for developing coherent history curricula at university level. It can also be used for evaluating existing curricula in terms of coherence. For this purpose, two models that are closely inter-connected called History Education System (Tarih Egitim Sistemi or TES) and History Research System (Tarih…

  16. Development of the Choctaw Health Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Binh N.

    The Choctaw Tribe is the first and only tribe to develop a health delivery system to take over an existing Indian Health Service inpatient facility. The takeover was accomplished in January 1984 under the Indian Self-Determination Act through a contract with the Indian Health Service. The Choctaw Health Delivery System includes a 35-bed general…

  17. Develop Education Systems that Integrate All Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiker, Jason

    2007-01-01

    During the last few years, the development of seamless education systems to promote students' postsecondary success has been discussed by policymakers at the local, state and federal levels as well as reform-minded individuals. Florida, Washington, Iowa, Georgia and California either have statewide integrated systems or are moving quickly toward…

  18. Epigenetic Systems View of Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Gilbert

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the history of the hierarchical epigenetic systems view as applied to human development and offers examples of its implementation. Notes the agreement by many authors that the multilevel systems view is the right model for developmental psychology in both human and animal studies. (BC)

  19. Developing WWW Information Systems on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianqun; Reid, Edna O. F.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses basic concepts and technologies related to World Wide Web information system development. Describes the design and implementation of Virtual Travel Mart, a Web-based end- user oriented information system. Emphasizes design considerations, which focus on user needs; creativity; integration of in-house databases on the Internet; currency;…

  20. Software Development Standard for Mission Critical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-17

    applied on contracts for mission critical systems . This report provides a full lifecycle software development process standard. This version includes an...integration and test environments. 5.3 Updated requirements for system requirements analysis . v Issue Date Sections Changes 5.4 Updated...requirements for system architectural design. 5.5 Updated requirements for software requirements analysis . 5.6 Major update to software

  1. Developing the E-Scape Software System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Most innovations have contextual pre-cursors that prompt new ways of thinking and in their turn help to give form to the new reality. This was the case with the e-scape software development process. The origins of the system existed in software components and ideas that we had developed through previous projects, but the ultimate direction we took…

  2. Developing the E-Scape Software System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Most innovations have contextual pre-cursors that prompt new ways of thinking and in their turn help to give form to the new reality. This was the case with the e-scape software development process. The origins of the system existed in software components and ideas that we had developed through previous projects, but the ultimate direction we took…

  3. Customer Service in a Youth Development System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetro, Charles G.

    The Training and Development Corporation (TDC) began the redesign of its youth development system with the belief that the center of effort would be local and success would ultimately turn on the capacity of individuals and organizations to transform themselves. TDC's first generation Career Advancement Center (CAC) prototype was in place by 1986.…

  4. General Systems Decisions in Educational Development. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Ermel, Jr.

    Effective action in educational development is dependent upon an adequate consideration of requisite variety. An adequate consideration of requisite variety includes a delineation of the information field appropriate for the decisionmaking system. An interaction of the information domain with each state of development, state-set, and whole would…

  5. Evaluation Systems, Ethics, and Development Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    After some 65 years of international development assistance, it is still difficult to show the effectiveness of aid in ways that are fully convincing. In part, this reflects inadequacies in the evaluation systems of the bilateral, multilateral, and global organizations that provide official development aid. Underlying these weaknesses often are a…

  6. Control Systems for Information Systems Development Projects (Part I)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Gary W.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses control of management information systems and finds a similarity in management of research and development activity. Part II will appear in AEDS Journal, Volume 4, number 2, December 1970. (JF)

  7. EM Safety Innovations Aim Toward Safer Technologies and Better Information for Users

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, M.; Geiger, J.; Carpenter, C.

    2002-02-26

    Beginning in 2000, the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science and Technology (OST) has substantially re-examined and improved our approach to worker safety and health. Consistent with OST's responsibilities for safety, these initiatives can be categorized generally as: (1) Making our technologies inherently safer to use; and (2) Providing useful safety and health information about our technologies to the sites and technology operators. This evolved through a collaborative process by the EM Office of Safety, Health and Security, the EM Office of Science and Technology, EM Focus Areas and others. It was, initially, largely in response to a set of eight recommendations by the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) and to lessons learned from a serious accident in August, 2000 involving an OST-funded new technology. The cornerstone of this effort is the Policy for Occupational Safety and Health in EM's Science and Technology Program, issued in January 2001. DOE Focus Areas are focusing more attention on worker safety and health in their solicitations and procurement documents for new technology research and development (R&D) projects. EM Headquarters is working with Focus Areas, site environmental contractors, technology developers, and their respective DOE field organizations to ensure that roles and responsibilities for worker safety and health are clearly defined when a new technology is demonstrated at an environmental management site. The peer review process administered by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) now requires technology developers to think through their approach to safety and health in a more detailed, focused way than previously. In Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSRs), developers are comparing their new technologies to baseline technologies on the basis of safety and health. Technology Safety Data Sheets (TSDSs) are being prepared for new technologies when they reach the

  8. Development and Integration of Control System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young K.

    1998-01-01

    The computer simulation tool, TREETOPS, has been upgraded and used at NASA/MSFC to model various complicated mechanical systems and to perform their dynamics and control analysis with pointing control systems. A TREETOPS model of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-1) dynamics and control system was developed to evaluate the AXAF-I pointing performance for Normal Pointing Mode. An optical model of Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) was also developed and its optical performance analysis was done using the MACOS software.

  9. A Comparison of Information System Development Methodologies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    r Dll -ft lU 5? R COMPARISON OF INFORMATION SYSTEM DEYELOPMENT IETHOOOLOGXES(U) AIR FORCE ]NST OF TECH IGHMT-PRTTERSON RFI 0ON SCHOOL OF SYSTEMS AND...DEVELOPMENT METHODOLJOGI ES THESIS Steven D. Branch Captain, USAF AFIT/GI R /LSR/87D-1 ...................i TON STTEM " A Approyed for public relecog4i...AFIT/GIR/LSR/87D- 1 A COMPARISON OF INFORMATION SYSTEM - DEVELOPMENT METHODOLOGIES .> THESIS ’ r ~( D~9ii Captain, USAF% AFIT/GIR/LSR/8?D-1 FE 0

  10. New approaches to launch vehicle system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, A. D.; Matzenauer, J. O.

    1990-02-01

    DOD and NASA seek launch capabilities that are more dependable and flexible in operation and which increase vehicle cargo lift capabilities. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) has been developing new approaches to system design and operation which promise increased operational capabilities at reduced costs. The joint ALS program is addressing these goals of reduced launch costs, efficient and flexible launch operations, and enhanced industrial productivity. The new approaches to space launch capability, development, and operation established by the ALS program are summarized. Modular, simplified designs reduce complexity, labor, and costs. Total quality management principles are being applied to build in quality from inception, match system capabilities to user needs, and achieve new economies.

  11. The mechanical control of nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Franze, Kristian

    2013-08-01

    The development of the nervous system has so far, to a large extent, been considered in the context of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. However, there is growing evidence that many biological systems also integrate mechanical information when making decisions during differentiation, growth, proliferation, migration and general function. Based on recent findings, I hypothesize that several steps during nervous system development, including neural progenitor cell differentiation, neuronal migration, axon extension and the folding of the brain, rely on or are even driven by mechanical cues and forces.

  12. Parallel reactor systems for bioprocess development.

    PubMed

    Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    Controlled parallel bioreactor systems allow fed-batch operation at early stages of process development. The characteristics of shaken bioreactors operated in parallel (shake flask, microtiter plate), sparged bioreactors (small-scale bubble column) and stirred bioreactors (stirred-tank, stirred column) are briefly summarized. Parallel fed-batch operation is achieved with an intermittent feeding and pH-control system for up to 16 bioreactors operated in parallel on a scale of 100 ml. Examples of the scale-up and scale-down of pH-controlled microbial fed-batch processes demonstrate that controlled parallel reactor systems can result in more effective bioprocess development. Future developments are also outlined, including units of 48 parallel stirred-tank reactors with individual pH- and pO2-controls and automation as well as liquid handling system, operated on a scale of ml.

  13. SNAP-8 electrical generating system development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The SNAP-8 program has developed the technology base for one class of multikilowatt dynamic space power systems. Electrical power is generated by a turbine-alternator in a mercury Rankine-cycle loop to which heat is transferred and removed by means of sodium-potassium eutectic alloy subsystems. Final system overall criteria include a five-year operating life, restartability, man rating, and deliverable power in the 90 kWe range. The basic technology has been demonstrated by more than 400,000 hours of major component endurance testing and numerous startup and shutdown cycles. A test system, comprised of developed components, delivered up to 35 kWe for a period exceeding 12,000 hours. The SNAP-8 system baseline is considered to have achieved a level of technology suitable for final application development for long-term multikilowatt space missions.

  14. SNAP-8 electrical generating system development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The SNAP-8 program has developed the technology base for one class of multikilowatt dynamic space power systems. Electrical power is generated by a turbine-alternator in a mercury Rankine-cycle loop to which heat is transferred and removed by means of sodium-potassium eutectic alloy subsystems. Final system overall criteria include a five-year operating life, restartability, man rating, and deliverable power in the 90 kWe range. The basic technology was demonstrated by more than 400,000 hours of major component endurance testing and numerous startup and shutdown cycles. A test system, comprised of developed components, delivered up to 35 kWe for a period exceeding 12,000 hours. The SNAP-8 system baseline is considered to have achieved a level of technology suitable for final application development for long-term multikilowatt space missions.

  15. [Development of the lung cancer diagnostic system].

    PubMed

    Lv, You-Jiang; Yu, Shou-Yi

    2009-07-01

    To develop a lung cancer diagnosis system. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 1883 patients with primary lung cancer or benign pulmonary diseases (pneumonia, tuberculosis, or pneumonia pseudotumor). SPSS11.5 software was used for data processing. For the relevant factors, a non-factor Logistic regression analysis was used followed by establishment of the regression model. Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 system development platform and VB.Net corresponding language were used to develop the lung cancer diagnosis system. The non-factor multi-factor regression model showed a goodness-of-fit (R2) of the model of 0.806, with a diagnostic accuracy for benign lung diseases of 92.8%, a diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer of 89.0%, and an overall accuracy of 90.8%. The model system for early clinical diagnosis of lung cancer has been established.

  16. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, N.A.; Worley, B.A.; Walton, J.T.; Perkins, K.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Dobranich, D.

    1992-11-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. This is crucial for mission analysis and for control subsystem testing as well as for the modeling of various failure modes. Performance must be accurately predicted during steady-state and transient operation, including startup, shutdown and post operation cooling. The development and application of verified and validated system models has the potential to reduce the design, testing, cost and time required for the technology to reach flight-ready status. Since October 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD) and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling.

  17. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, James T.; Hannan, Nelson A.; Perkins, Ken R.; Buksa, John H.; Worley, Brian A.; Dobranich, Dean

    1992-08-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. This is crucial for mission analysis and for control subsystem testing as well as for the modeling of various failure modes. Performance must be accurately predicted during steady-state and transient operation, including startup, shutdown, and post operation cooling. The development and application of verified and validated system models has the potential to reduce the design, testing, and cost and time required for the technology to reach flight-ready status. Since Oct. 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. The first level will provide rapid, parameterized calculations of overall system performance. Succeeding computer programs will provide analysis of each component in sufficient detail to guide the design teams and experimental efforts. The computer programs will allow simulation of the entire system to allow prediction of the integrated performance. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review.

  18. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.; Hannan, Nelson A.; Perkins, Ken R.; Buksa, John H.; Worley, Brian A.; Dobranich, Dean

    1992-01-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. This is crucial for mission analysis and for control subsystem testing as well as for the modeling of various failure modes. Performance must be accurately predicted during steady-state and transient operation, including startup, shutdown, and post operation cooling. The development and application of verified and validated system models has the potential to reduce the design, testing, and cost and time required for the technology to reach flight-ready status. Since Oct. 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. The first level will provide rapid, parameterized calculations of overall system performance. Succeeding computer programs will provide analysis of each component in sufficient detail to guide the design teams and experimental efforts. The computer programs will allow simulation of the entire system to allow prediction of the integrated performance. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review.

  19. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  20. Towards a sustainable system of drug development.

    PubMed

    Moors, Ellen H M; Cohen, Adam F; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-11-01

    Drug development has become the exclusive activity of large pharmaceutical companies. However, the output of new drugs has been decreasing for the past decade and the prices of new drugs have risen steadily, leading to access problems for many patients. By analyzing the history of drug development and the pharmaceutical industry, we identified the main factors causing this system failure. Although many solutions have been suggested to fix the drug development system, we believe that a combination of reforms of the regulatory and patent systems is necessary to make drug development sustainable. These reforms must be combined with a larger, open-access role for public research institutes in the discovery, clinical evaluation and safety evaluation of new drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rock support system development test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Patricio, J.G. . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1984-03-30

    The Test Plan has been prepared to support design activities for the development of a rock support system for a Nuclear Waste Repository in Basalt (NWRB). The rock support system is assumed to consist of a combination of shotcrete and rock bolts. The seven testing activities include mix development and physical testing of shotcrete, durability testing of shotcrete, durability testing of rock bolt grouts, field tests on rock bolts, field testing of shotcrete, and heated room test. The objective of the Test Plan is to develop required data through combined laboratory, field, and office studies for design and design validation of the rock support system. The overall Test Plan is developed to provide a logical progression from laboratory tests performed to characterize fundamental thermomechanical properties of shotcrete and grouts, to field tests on rock bolts and shotcrete, and in situ performance tests. 21 refs., 15 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. Personnel launch system autoland development study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossi, J. A.; Langehough, M. A.; Tollefson, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Personnel Launch System (PLS) Autoland Development Study focused on development of the guidance and control system for the approach and landing (A/L) phase and the terminal area energy management (TAEM) phase. In the A/L phase, a straight-in trajectory profile was developed with an initial high glide slope, a pull-up and flare to lower glide slope, and the final flare touchdown. The TAEM system consisted of using a heading alignment cone spiral profile. The PLS autopilot was developed using integral LQG design techniques. The guidance and control design was verified using a nonlinear 6 DOF simulation. Simulation results demonstrated accurate steering during the TAEM phase and adequate autoland performance in the presence of wind turbulence and wind shear.

  3. HAMMER COURSEWARE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMS) SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT & IMPLEMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, P.R.

    2006-04-28

    HAMMER Courseware Management System (HAMMERCMS) is the official name of the system Fluor Hanford, Inc., uses to facilitate development of, deliver, and track training presented in some electronic form (mainly, web-based training) to Hanford Site employees, subcontractors, and vendors.

  4. Graphene Based Ultra-Capacitors for Safer, More Efficient Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Mackey, Paul J.; Zide, Carson J.

    2016-01-01

    Current power storage methods must be continuously improved in order to keep up with the increasingly competitive electronics industry. This technological advancement is also essential for the continuation of deep space exploration. Today's energy storage industry relies heavily on the use of dangerous and corrosive chemicals such as lithium and phosphoric acid. These chemicals can prove hazardous to the user if the device is ruptured. Similarly they can damage the environment if they are disposed of improperly. A safer, more efficient alternative is needed across a wide range of NASA missions. One solution would a solid-state carbon based energy storage device. Carbon is a safer, less environmentally hazardous alternative to current energy storage materials. Using the amorphous carbon nanostructure, graphene, this idea of a safer portable energy is possible. Graphene was electrochemically produced in the lab and several coin cell devices were built this summer to create a working prototype of a solid-state graphene battery.

  5. Motivational Influences on the Safer Sex Behavior of Agency-based Male Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael D.; Seal, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Although indoor male sex workers (MSWs) have been found to engage in lower rates of HIV risk behavior with clients than street-based MSWs, few studies have examined the motivations behind such practices. We interviewed 30 MSWs working for the same escort agency regarding their safer sex practices with clients and their reasons for these. As in other research, MSWs reported little risk behavior with clients. Five motivational themes related to safer sex on the job emerged: health concerns, emotional intimacy, client attractiveness, relationships, and structural work factors. Results suggest that participants engaged in rational decision-making relative to sex with clients, facilitated by reduced economic incentive for riskier behavior and a supportive social context. MSWs desired a safe sexual work place, personal integrity, and minimal negative consequences to personal relationships. Collaborating with sex work employers to study their role in encouraging a safer workplace may be important to future research. PMID:18288599

  6. Development of a change management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Cathy Bonifas

    1993-01-01

    The complexity and interdependence of software on a computer system can create a situation where a solution to one problem causes failures in dependent software. In the computer industry, software problems arise and are often solved with 'quick and dirty' solutions. But in implementing these solutions, documentation about the solution or user notification of changes is often overlooked, and new problems are frequently introduced because of insufficient review or testing. These problems increase when numerous heterogeneous systems are involved. Because of this situation, a change management system plays an integral part in the maintenance of any multisystem computing environment. At the NASA Ames Advanced Computational Facility (ACF), the Online Change Management System (OCMS) was designed and developed to manage the changes being applied to its multivendor computing environment. This paper documents the research, design, and modifications that went into the development of this change management system (CMS).

  7. Money boys, HIV risks, and the associations between norms and safer sex: a respondent-driven sampling study in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjie; Liu, Hui; Cai, Yumao; Rhodes, Anne G; Hong, Fuchang

    2009-08-01

    Money boys (MBs) are male sex workers who sell sex to men who have sex with men (MSM). This study estimates the proportion of MBs in the Chinese MSM, compares HIV risks between MBs and non-MB MSM, and examines the associations between practicing safer sex and peer norms of condom use. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to sample 351 MSM in the city of Shenzhen in 2007. The RDS-adjusted proportion of MBs among MSM was 9%. Compared to non-MB MSM, more MBs reported having had multiple male and female sexual partners. Half of MBs and non-MB MSM had consistently used condoms. Both descriptive and subjective norms were positively associated with condom use. The MB proportion of 9% in MSM implies a relatively large population of MBs in China. The association between peer norms and consistent condom use can assist with the development of culturally competent HIV interventions that promote safer sex.

  8. Developing Intelligent Transportation Systems in an Integrated Systems Analysis Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Paddack, E

    2002-01-15

    We are working on developing an Integrated Systems Analysis Environment (ISAE) for application to analysis and optimization of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). ISAE is based on the concept of Co-simulation, which allows the modeling of complex systems with extreme flexibility. Co-simulation allows the development of virtual ITS systems that can be analyzed and optimized as an overall integrated system. The virtual ITS system is defined by selecting different components from a component library. System component models can be written in multiple programming languages running on different computer platforms. At the same time, ISAE provides full protection for proprietary models. Co-simulation is a cost-effective alternative to competing methodologies, such as developing a translator or selecting a single programming language for all system components. Co-simulation has been recently demonstrated using an example of an automotive system. The demonstration was successfully performed. The paper describes plans on how to implement ISAE and Co-simulation to ITS, and the great advantages that this implementation would represent.

  9. System development of the Screwworm Eradication Data System (SEDS) algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, G.; Forsberg, F.; Giddings, L.; Phinney, D.

    1976-01-01

    The use of remotely sensed data is reported in the eradication of the screwworm and in the study of the role of the weather in the activity and development of the screwworm fly. As a result, the Screwworm Eradication Data System (SEDS) algorithm was developed.

  10. Systems analysis for the development of small resource recovery systems: research and development needs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crnkovich, P G; Helmstetter, A J

    1980-10-01

    The technologies that should be developed to make small-scale solid waste processing facilities attractive and viable for small municipalities with solid waste between 50 and 250 tons per day are identified. Research and development needs for refuse derived fuel systems, thermal systems, and biological processes are listed. Selected research and development needs discussed for mechanical processing systems are: develop data bank for low-cost, low-energy shredder options; develop performance data for shredders applied after separation; develop data bank for Trommel performance; and identification and evaluation of low-cost materials separation equipment. Selected research and development needs discussed for thermal systems are: emission levels from solid/waste/to/energy systems; determination of the theoretical efficiencies for thermal processing systems; boiler erosion/corrosion evaluation for systems firing refuse derived fuel; optimization of feed and ash handling systems; refractory life and maintenance requirements; development of 5- to 20-TPD systems; and optimization studies of control systems for small modular incinerators. Selected research and development needs discussed for biological processing systems are: optimum design and operation to maximize gas recovery rates and investigate process configuration alternatives for anaerobic digesters.

  11. Development of Solar Powered Irrigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkerim, A. I.; Sami Eusuf, M. M. R.; Salami, M. J. E.; Aibinu, A.; Eusuf, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Development of a solar powered irrigation system has been discussed in this paper. This system would be SCADA-based and quite useful in areas where there is plenty of sunshine but insufficient water to carry out farming activities, such as rubber plantation, strawberry plantation, or any plantation, that requires frequent watering. The system is powered by solar system as a renewable energy which uses solar panel module to convert Sunlight into electricity. The development and implementation of an automated SCADA controlled system that uses PLC as a controller is significant to agricultural, oil and gas monitoring and control purpose purposes. In addition, the system is powered by an intelligent solar system in which solar panel targets the radiation from the Sun. Other than that, the solar system has reduced energy cost as well as pollution. The system is equipped with four input sensors; two soil moisture sensors, two level detection sensors. Soil moisture sensor measures the humidity of the soil, whereas the level detection sensors detect the level of water in the tank. The output sides consist of two solenoid valves, which are controlled respectively by two moistures sensors.

  12. NASA Redox Storage System Development Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1984-10-01

    The Redox Storage System Technology Project was jointly supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA. The objectives of the project were to develop the Redox flow battery concept and to probe its technical and economic viability. The iron and chromium redox couples were selected as the reactants. Membranes and electrodes were developed for the original mode of operating at 25 C with the reactants separated by an ion-exchange membrane. Analytical capabilities and system-level operating concepts were developed and verified in a 1-kW, 13-kWh preprototype system. A subsequent change was made in operating mode, going to 65 C and using mixed reactants. New membranes and a new electrode catalyst were developed, resulting in single cell operation as high as 80 mA/sq cm with energy efficiencies greater than 80 percent. Studies indicate a likely system cost of about $75/kWh. Standard Oil of Ohio (Sohio) has undertaken further development of the Redox system. An exclusive patent license was obtained from NASA by Sohio. Transfer of Redox technology to Sohio is supported by the NASA Technology Utilization Office.

  13. NASA Redox Storage System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Redox Storage System Technology Project was jointly supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA. The objectives of the project were to develop the Redox flow battery concept and to probe its technical and economic viability. The iron and chromium redox couples were selected as the reactants. Membranes and electrodes were developed for the original mode of operating at 25 C with the reactants separated by an ion-exchange membrane. Analytical capabilities and system-level operating concepts were developed and verified in a 1-kW, 13-kWh preprototype system. A subsequent change was made in operating mode, going to 65 C and using mixed reactants. New membranes and a new electrode catalyst were developed, resulting in single cell operation as high as 80 mA/sq cm with energy efficiencies greater than 80 percent. Studies indicate a likely system cost of about $75/kWh. Standard Oil of Ohio (Sohio) has undertaken further development of the Redox system. An exclusive patent license was obtained from NASA by Sohio. Transfer of Redox technology to Sohio is supported by the NASA Technology Utilization Office.

  14. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  15. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  16. Urban women's negotiation strategies for safer sex with their male partners.

    PubMed

    Williams, S P; Gardos, P S; Ortiz-Torres, B; Tross, S; Ehrhardt, A A

    2001-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission of HIV is growing at an increasing rate. One primary prevention strategy is to consistently use condoms. With the exception of female condoms, women do not "wear" condoms and therefore must negotiate condom use with their male partners. This present study examines the strategies women believe they would use in a safer sex negotiation with a male partner including (1) initiating negotiations, (2) resolving conflict, and (3) maintaining the intention to practice safer sex. The findings highlight the importance of understanding women's patterns of negotiation as well as their repertoire of negotiation skills prior to their exposure to behavioral interventions and prevention programs.

  17. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Williams, Eric; Harper, Roger; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; hide

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep spare or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start - addressing this issue through proper system design is straightforward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission system. While space fission system were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if Ae are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems.

  18. Solar-Electric Dish Stirling System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    Electrical power generated with the heat from the sun, called solar thermal power, is produced with three types of concentrating solar systems - trough or line-focus systems; power towers in which a centrally-located thermal receiver is illuminated with a large field of sun-tracking heliostats; and dish/engine systems. A special case of the third type of system, a dish/Stirling system, is the subject of this paper. A dish/Stirling system comprises a parabolic dish concentrator, a thermal receiver, and a Stirling engine/generator located at the focus of the dish. Several different dish/Stirling systems have been built and operated during the past 15 years. One system claims the world record for net conversion of solar energy to electric power of 29.4%; and two different company`s systems have accumulated thousands of hours of on-sun operation. Due to de-regulation and intense competition in global energy markets as well as the immaturity of the technology, dish/Stirling systems have not yet found their way into the marketplace. This situation is changing as solar technologies become more mature and manufacturers identify high-value niche markets for their products. In this paper, I review the history of dish/Stirling system development with an emphasis on technical and other issues that directly impact the Stirling engine. I also try to provide some insight to the opportunities and barriers confronting the application of dish/Stirling in power generation markets.

  19. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Williams, Eric; Harper, Roger; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep spare or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start - addressing this issue through proper system design is straightforward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission system. While space fission system were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if Ae are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems.

  20. Development of an Analysis System for Low Voltage Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Katsuhiro; Wada, Masaru; Hirano, Shinichiro; Hirai, Yoshihiro; Tsuboe, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masahiro; Furukawa, Toshiyuki

    In recent years, distributed resources such as photovoltaic power generation system or wind-turbine generator system are increased, therefore the distributed resources which connect to distribution networks are increased gradually. Under the situation there are several problems such as expansion of the voltage fluctuation, increase of the short circuit current, increase of harmonics phenomenon which we have to consider, and the problems make us difficult to examine the effect of interconnection and to design the distribution system. However, analysis support system to evaluate the influence to connect distributed resources to low voltage distribution system has not developed. Therefore We have developed the analysis system for low voltage for low voltage distribution systems. We can evaluate the influence of distributed resources accurately, examine the interconnection and design the configuration of distribution networks by using the analysis system. In this paper, the concept of the analysis system, the load flow method for unbalanced V-connection 3-phase 4-line distribution system and the calculation method for the connectable capacity of distributed resources. Outline of the man/machine interface and examples of calculation results for sample network are also described.

  1. Solar energy food dehydration system: Concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, L.V.

    1988-01-01

    The research activities to be carried out to form the body of this work were planned, first, to increase the general knowledge in the areas of solar energy application and, secondly, to provide sufficient data for the development of a new solar energy powered food dehydrating system. The research work does not aim merely at pursuing the study and development of a new component or a new type of material to be used in the solar industry. But the final and main part of this research is devoted to the development and design of a solar energy system uncharted before the purpose of dehydrating various agricultural products. This proposed solar powered system development is thereby a contribution of technological knowledge to the field of Applied Sciences. It is one of the viable and effective solutions to solving the world's food and energy shortage problem, especially in the less developed regions of the world. The body of this work, thus is divided into three major parts as follows: (1) The search for a thorough understanding of the origin and fundamental characteristics of solar energy. (2) Past and present applications of solar energy. (3) The development and design of a new solar energy powered system for the dehydration of food crops.

  2. Clover development during spaceflight: A model system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Debell, Lynnette; Paulsen, Avelina; Spooner, Brian S.; Wong, Peter P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  3. Clover development during spaceflight: a model system.

    PubMed

    Guikema, J A; DeBell, L; Paulsen, A; Spooner, B S; Wong, P P

    1994-01-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  4. Clover development during spaceflight: A model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guikema, James A.; Debell, Lynnette; Paulsen, Avelina; Spooner, Brian S.; Wong, Peter P.

    1994-08-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  5. Multipurpose simulation systems for regional development forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Kostina, N.I.

    1995-09-01

    We examine the development of automaton-modeling multipurpose simulation systems as an efficient form of simulation software for MIS. Such systems constitute a single problem-oriented package of applications based on a general simulation model, which is equipped with a task source language, interaction tools, file management tools, and an output document editor. The simulation models are described by the method of probabilistic-automaton modeling, which ensures standard representation of models and standardization of the modeling algorithm. Examples of such systems include the demographic forecasting system DEPROG, the VOKON system for assessing the quality of consumer services in terms of free time, and the SONET system for servicing partially accessible customers. The development of computer-aided systems for production and economic control is now moving to the second state, namely operationalization of optimization and forecasting problems, whose solution may account for the main economic effect of MIS. Computation and information problems, which were the main focus of the first stage of MIS development, are thus acquiring the role of a source of information for optimization and forecasting problems in addition to their direct contribution to preparation and analysis of current production and economic information.

  6. Techniques for Improving the Performance of Future EVA Maneuvering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor W.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small propulsive backpack that was developed as an in-house effort at Johnson Space Center; it is a lightweight system which attaches to the underside of the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) backpack of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). SAFER provides full six-axis control, as well as Automatic Attitude Hold (AAH), by means of a set of cold-gas nitrogen thrusters and a rate sensor-based control system. For compactness, a single hand controller is used, together with mode switching, to command all six axes. SAFER was successfully test-flown on the STS-64 mission in September 1994 as a Development Test Objective (DTO); development of an operational version is now proceeding. This version will be available for EVA self-rescue on the International Space Station and Mir, starting with the STS-86/Mir-7 mission in September 1997. The DTO SAFER was heavily instrumented, and produced in-flight data that was stored in a 12 MB computer memory on-board. This has allowed post-flight analysis to yield good estimates for the actual mass properties (moments and products of inertia and center of mass location) encountered on-orbit. By contrast, Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) post-flight results were generated mainly from analysis of video images, and so were not very accurate. The main goal of the research reported here was to use the detailed SAFER on-orbit mass properties data to optimize the design of future EVA maneuvering systems, with the aim being to improve flying qualities and/or reduce propellant consumption. The Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division Virtual Reality (VR) Laboratory proved to be a valuable research tool for such studies. A second objective of the grant was to generate an accurate dynamics model in support of the reflight of the DTO SAFER on STS-76/Mir-3. One complicating factor was the fact that a hand controller stowage box was added to the underside of SAFER on this flight; the position of

  7. Groundwork for Universal Canister System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Laura L.; Gross, Mike; Prouty, Jeralyn L.; Rigali, Mark J.; Craig, Brian; Han, Zenghu; Lee, John Hok; Liu, Yung; Pope, Ron; Connolly, Kevin; Feldman, Matt; Jarrell, Josh; Radulescu, Georgeta; Scaglione, John; Wells, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and go vernment - sponsored nuclear energy re search. S ome of the waste s that that must be managed have be en identified as good candidates for disposal in a deep borehole in crystalline rock (SNL 2014 a). In particular, wastes that can be disposed of in a small package are good candidates for this disposal concept. A canister - based system that can be used for handling these wastes during the disposition process (i.e., storage, transfers, transportation, and disposal) could facilitate the eventual disposal of these wastes. This report provides information for a program plan for developing specifications regarding a canister - based system that facilitates small waste form packaging and disposal and that is integrated with the overall efforts of the DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy Used Fuel Dis position Camp aign's Deep Borehole Field Test . Groundwork for Universal Ca nister System Development September 2015 ii W astes to be considered as candidates for the universal canister system include capsules containing cesium and strontium currently stored in pools at the Hanford Site, cesium to be processed using elutable or nonelutable resins at the Hanford Site, and calcine waste from Idaho National Laboratory. The initial emphasis will be on disposal of the cesium and strontium capsules in a deep borehole that has been drilled into crystalline rock. Specifications for a universal canister system are derived from operational, performance, and regulatory requirements for storage, transfers, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. Agreements between the Department of Energy and the States of Washington and Idaho, as well as the Deep Borehole Field Test plan provide schedule requirements for development of the universal canister system

  8. Building a safer foundation: the Lessons Learnt patient safety training programme.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Maria; Arora, Sonal; Tiew, Stephenie; Hayden, Jacky; Sevdalis, Nick; Vincent, Charles; Baker, Paul

    2014-01-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a novel patient safety training programme for junior doctors across a Foundation School-'Lessons Learnt: Building a Safer Foundation'. Prospective preintervention /postintervention study across 16 Foundation Programmes in North West England, UK. 1169 participants including all Foundation Programme Directors, Administrators, Foundation trainees and senior faculty. Half-day stakeholder engagement event and faculty development through recruitment and training of local senior doctors. Foundation trainee-led monthly 60-min sessions integrated into compulsory Foundation teaching from January to July 2011 comprising case-based discussion and analysis of patient safety incidents encountered in practice, facilitated by trained faculty. Participants' satisfaction and Foundation trainees' patient safety knowledge, skills, attitudes and behavioural change. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with 'Lessons Learnt'. There was a significant improvement in trainees' objective patient safety knowledge scores (Meanpreintervention=51.1%, SD=17.3%; Meanpostintervention=57.6%, SD=20.1%, p<0.001); subjective knowledge ratings and patient safety skills. Trainees' perceived control and behavioural intentions regarding safety improved significantly postintervention. Feelings and personal beliefs about safety did not shift significantly. Trainees reported significantly more patient safety incidents in the 6 months following introduction of 'Lessons Learnt' (Meanpreintervention=0.67, SD=1.11; Meanpostintervention=1.18, SD=1.46, p<0.001). 32 quality improvement projects were initiated by trainees, spanning the development of novel clinical protocols; implementation of user-informed teaching and improved rota design Patient safety training can be implemented and sustained to deliver significant improvements in patient safety knowledge, skills and behaviours of junior doctors-with potential for wider positive organisational impact. Medical

  9. Development of Constellation's Launch Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lougheed, Kirk D.; Peaden, Cary J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Constellation Program's Launch Control System (LCS) development effort at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It provides a brief history of some preceding efforts to provide launch control and ground processing systems for other NASA programs, and some lessons learned from those experiences. It then provides high level descriptions of the LCS mission, objectives, organization, architecture, and progress. It discusses some of our development tenets, including our use of standards based design and use of off-the-shelf products whenever possible, incremental development cycles, and highly reliable, available, and supportable enterprise class system servers. It concludes with some new lessons learned and our plans for the future.

  10. Notch signaling in the developing cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Kyle; Karsan, Aly

    2007-07-01

    The Notch proteins encompass a family of transmembrane receptors that have been highly conserved through evolution as mediators of cell fate. Recent findings have demonstrated a critical role of Notch in the developing cardiovascular system. Notch signaling has been implicated in the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition during development of the heart valves, in arterial-venous differentiation, and in remodeling of the primitive vascular plexus. Mutations of Notch pathway components in humans are associated with congenital defects of the cardiovascular system such as Alagille syndrome, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and bicuspid aortic valves. This article focuses on the role of the Notch pathway in the developing cardiovascular system and congenital human cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Development of a nitrogen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Marshall, R. D.; Powell, J. D., III; Schubert, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    An eight-stage nitrogen generation module was developed. The design integrated a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four palladium/silver hydrogen separator stages. Alternating ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages are used to remove hydrogen and ammonia formed in the dissociation of hydrazine which results in negligible ammonia and hydrogen concentrations in the product nitrogen stream. An engineering breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was also developed. It was developed as an integratable subsystem for a central spacecraft air revitalization system. The subsystem consists of the hydrazine storage and feed mechanism, the nitrogen generation module, the peripheral mechanical and electrical components required to control and monitor subsystem performance, and the instrumentation required to interface with other subsystems of an air revitalization system. The breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was integrated and tested with a one-person capacity experimental air revitalization system. The integration, checkout and testing was successfully accomplished.

  12. A Systems Engineering Approach to Architecture Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Pietro, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Architecture development is conducted prior to system concept design when there is a need to determine the best-value mix of systems that works collectively in specific scenarios and time frames to accomplish a set of mission area objectives. While multiple architecture frameworks exist, they often require use of unique taxonomies and data structures. In contrast, this presentation characterizes architecture development using terminology widely understood within the systems engineering community. Using a notional civil space architecture example, it employs a multi-tier framework to describe the enterprise level architecture and illustrates how results of lower tier, mission area architectures integrate into the enterprise architecture. It also presents practices for conducting effective mission area architecture studies, including establishing the trade space, developing functions and metrics, evaluating the ability of potential design solutions to meet the required functions, and expediting study execution through the use of iterative design cycles.

  13. A Systems Engineering Approach to Architecture Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Pietro, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Architecture development is often conducted prior to system concept design when there is a need to determine the best-value mix of systems that works collectively in specific scenarios and time frames to accomplish a set of mission area objectives. While multiple architecture frameworks exist, they often require use of unique taxonomies and data structures. In contrast, this paper characterizes architecture development using terminology widely understood within the systems engineering community. Using a notional civil space architecture example, it employs a multi-tier framework to describe the enterprise level architecture and illustrates how results of lower tier, mission area architectures integrate into the enterprise architecture. It also presents practices for conducting effective mission area architecture studies, including establishing the trade space, developing functions and metrics, evaluating the ability of potential design solutions to meet the required functions, and expediting study execution through the use of iterative design cycles.

  14. A Systems Engineering Approach to Architecture Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Pietro, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Architecture development is often conducted prior to system concept design when there is a need to determine the best-value mix of systems that works collectively in specific scenarios and time frames to accomplish a set of mission area objectives. While multiple architecture frameworks exist, they often require use of unique taxonomies and data structures. In contrast, this paper characterizes architecture development using terminology widely understood within the systems engineering community. Using a notional civil space architecture example, it employs a multi-tier framework to describe the enterprise level architecture and illustrates how results of lower tier, mission area architectures integrate into the enterprise architecture. It also presents practices for conducting effective mission area architecture studies, including establishing the trade space, developing functions and metrics, evaluating the ability of potential design solutions to meet the required functions, and expediting study execution through the use of iterative design cycles

  15. Constellation Space Suit System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Daniel, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation Program has initiated the first new flight suit development project since the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed for the Space Shuttle Program in the 1970s. The Constellation suit system represents a significant challenge to designers in that the system is required to address all space suit functions needed through all missions and mission phases. This is in marked contrast to the EMU, which was designed specifically for micro-gravity space walks. The Constellation suit system must serve in all of the following scenarios: launch, entry and abort crew survival; micro-gravity extravehicular activity (EVA); and lunar (1/6th-gravity) surface EVA. This paper discusses technical efforts performed from May 2006 through February 2007 for the Constellation space suit system pressure garment.

  16. Software development methodology for high consequence systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, L.S.; Bouchard, J.F.; Collins, E.W.; Eisenhour, M.; Neidigk, D.D.; Shortencarier, M.J.; Trellue, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes a Software Development Methodology for High Consequence Systems. A High Consequence System is a system whose failure could lead to serious injury, loss of life, destruction of valuable resources, unauthorized use, damaged reputation or loss of credibility or compromise of protected information. This methodology can be scaled for use in projects of any size and complexity and does not prescribe any specific software engineering technology. Tasks are described that ensure software is developed in a controlled environment. The effort needed to complete the tasks will vary according to the size, complexity, and risks of the project. The emphasis of this methodology is on obtaining the desired attributes for each individual High Consequence System.

  17. Developing Automatic Controllers for sprinkler irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playán, E.; Salvador, R.; Cavero, J.; López, C.; Lecina, S.; Zapata, N.

    2012-04-01

    The application of new technologies to the control and automation of irrigation processes is quickly gaining attention. The automation of irrigation execution (through irrigation controllers) is now widespread. However, the automatic generation and execution of irrigation schedules is receiving growing attention due to the possibilities offered by the telemetry/remote control systems currently being installed in collective pressurized networks. These developments can greatly benefit from the combination of irrigation system and crop models, and from the interaction with agrometeorological databases, hydraulic models of pressurized collective distribution networks, weather forecasts and management databases for water users associations. Prospects for the development of such systems in collective sprinkler irrigation systems are analyzed in this presentation. Additionally, experimental results are presented on the application of these concepts to a hydrant irrigating a solid-set irrigated maize field.

  18. Master Console System Monitoring and Control Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    The Master Console internship during the spring of 2013 involved the development of firing room displays at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This position was with the Master Console Product Group (MCPG) on the Launch Control System (LCS) project. This project is responsible for the System Monitoring and Control (SMC) and Record and Retrieval (R&R) of launch operations data. The Master Console is responsible for: loading the correct software into each of the remaining consoles in the firing room, connecting the proper data paths to and from the launch vehicle and all ground support equipment, and initializing the entire firing room system to begin processing. During my internship, I developed a system health and status display for use by Master Console Operators (MCO) to monitor and verify the integrity of the servers, gateways, network switches, and firewalls used in the firing room.

  19. Computer system SANC: its development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A.; Bardin, D.; Bondarenko, S.; Christova, P.; Kalinovskaya, L.; Sadykov, R.; Sapronov, A.; Riemann, T.

    2016-10-01

    The SANC system is used for systematic calculations of various processes within the Standard Model in the one-loop approximation. QED, electroweak, and QCD corrections are computed to a number of processes being of interest for modern and future high-energy experiments. Several applications for the LHC physics program are presented. Development of the system and the general problems and perspectives for future improvement of the theoretical precision are discussed.

  20. Water system microbial check valve development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Greenley, D. R.; Putnam, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    A residual iodine microbial check valve (RIMCV) assembly was developed and tested. The assembly is designed to be used in the space shuttle potable water system. The RIMCV is based on an anion exchange resin that is supersaturated with an iodine solution. This system causes a residual to be present in the effluent water which provides continuing bactericidal action. A flight prototype design was finalized and five units were manufactured and delivered.

  1. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  2. Fourth-generation photovoltaic concentrator system development

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1991, under a contract with Sandia for the Concentrator Initiative, the ENTECH team initiated the design and development of a fourth-generation concentrator module. In 1992, Sandia also contracted with ENTECH to develop a new control and drive system for the ENTECH array. This report documents the design and development work performed under both contracts. Manufacturing processes for the new module were developed at the same time under a complementary PVMaT contract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Two 100-kW power plants were deployed in 1995 in Texas using the newly developed fourth-generation concentrator technology, one at the CSW Solar Park near Ft. Davis and one at TUE Energy Park in Dallas. Technology developed under the Sandia contracts has made a successful transition from the laboratory to the production line to the field.

  3. Development of a multiplane multispeed balancing system for turbine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype high speed balancing system was developed for assembled gas turbine engine modules. The system permits fully assembled gas turbine modules to be operated and balanced at selected speeds up to full turbine speed. The balancing system is a complete stand-alone system providing all necesary lubrication and support hardware for full speed operation. A variable speed motor provides the drive power. A drive belt and gearbox provide rotational speeds up to 21,000 rpm inside a vacuum chamber. The heart of the system is a dedicated minicomputer with attendant data acquisition, storage and I/O devices. The computer is programmed to be completely interactive with the operator. The system was installed at CCAD and evaluated by testing 20 T55 power turbines and 20 T53 power turbines. Engine test results verified the performance of the high speed balanced turbines.

  4. Preclinical pharmacokinetics: an approach towards safer and efficacious drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonu Sundd

    2006-02-01

    Lack of efficacy and toxicity are considered to be major reasons for drug failures and pharmacokinetics governs them to a large extent. Compound with favorable pharmacokinetics is more likely to be efficacious and safe. Therefore, the preclinical pharmacokinetic evaluation should be comprehensive enough to ensure that compounds do not fail in the clinic. Preclinical ADME screening facilitates early elimination of weak candidates and directs the entire focus of the drug development program towards fewer potential lead candidates. Hence, it is mandatory that the pre-clinical candidates are subjected to as many possible reality checks. Reliance on in-vitro tests should be minimized because they do not represent the real physiological environment but rather slow down the pace of a drug discovery program. Compounds can be straight away subjected to in-vivo high throughput screens such as cassette dosing, cassette analysis or rapid rat screen etc. Candidates with the desired in-vivo pharmacokinetic profile may be further profiled in-vitro, using assays such as metabolic stability, reaction phenotyping, CYP-450 inhibition and induction, plasma protein binding etc. in human microsomes, human recombinant CYP-450 enzymes and human plasma. This also provides an early indication of whether the compound which worked in animals would work in human as well. In-vitro metabolic stability profile is a qualitative as well as quantitative comparison of metabolism of a compound in human and animal models. It helps in identifying the right model for toxicity studies. Extensive metabolism is generally considered a liability as it limits the systemic exposure and shortens the half-life of a compound. Several strategies such as reduction of lipophilicity, modification and / or blocking of metabolically soft spots and use of enzyme inhibitors; have been developed to combat metabolism. In spite of several concerns, the fact that active metabolites of several marketed drugs have been

  5. Developing stereo image based robot control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijadi, Pambudi, I. R.; Woran, M.; Naa, C. F.; Srigutomo, W.

    2015-04-01

    Application of image processing is developed in various field and purposes. In the last decade, image based system increase rapidly with the increasing of hardware and microprocessor performance. Many fields of science and technology were used this methods especially in medicine and instrumentation. New technique on stereovision to give a 3-dimension image or movie is very interesting, but not many applications in control system. Stereo image has pixel disparity information that is not existed in single image. In this research, we proposed a new method in wheel robot control system using stereovision. The result shows robot automatically moves based on stereovision captures.

  6. Telerobotic work system: Concept development and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Lyle M.

    1987-01-01

    The basic concept of a telerobotic work system (TWS) consists of two dexterous manipulator arms controlled from a remote station. The term telerobotic describes a system that is a combination of teleoperator control and robotic operation. Work represents the function of producing physical changes. System describes the integration of components and subsystems to effectively accomplish the needed mission. Telerobotics reduces exposure to hazards for flight crewmembers and increases their productivity. The requirements for the TWS are derived from both the mission needs and the functional capabilities of existing hardware and software to meet those needs. The development of the TWS is discussed.

  7. Development of an Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlosi, S.; Brown, S.; Colston, B.; Jones, L.; Masquelier, D.; Meyer, P.; McBride, M.; Nasarabad, S.; Ramponi, A.J.; Venkatseswarm, K.; Milanovich, F.

    2000-10-12

    An Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) is being designed and evaluated for use in domestic counter-terrorism. The goal is a fully automated system that utilizes both flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to continuously monitor the air for BW pathogens in major buildings or high profile events. A version 1 APDS system consisting of an aerosol collector, a sample preparation subsystem, and a flow cytometer for detecting the antibody-labeled target organisms has been completed and evaluated. Improved modules are under development for a version 2 APDS including a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-designed aerosol preconcentrator, a multiplex flow cytometer, and a flow-through PCR detector.

  8. Developing stereo image based robot control system

    SciTech Connect

    Suprijadi,; Pambudi, I. R.; Woran, M.; Naa, C. F; Srigutomo, W.

    2015-04-16

    Application of image processing is developed in various field and purposes. In the last decade, image based system increase rapidly with the increasing of hardware and microprocessor performance. Many fields of science and technology were used this methods especially in medicine and instrumentation. New technique on stereovision to give a 3-dimension image or movie is very interesting, but not many applications in control system. Stereo image has pixel disparity information that is not existed in single image. In this research, we proposed a new method in wheel robot control system using stereovision. The result shows robot automatically moves based on stereovision captures.

  9. System safety in Stirling engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Stirling Engine Project Office has required that contractors make safety considerations an integral part of all phases of the Stirling engine development program. As an integral part of each engine design subtask, analyses are evolved to determine possible modes of failure. The accepted system safety analysis techniques (Fault Tree, FMEA, Hazards Analysis, etc.) are applied in various degrees of extent at the system, subsystem and component levels. The primary objectives are to identify critical failure areas, to enable removal of susceptibility to such failures or their effects from the system and to minimize risk.

  10. Development of Inflatable Entry Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Player, Charles J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Corliss, James

    2005-01-01

    Achieving the objectives of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration will require the development of new technologies, which will in turn require higher fidelity modeling and analysis techniques, and innovative testing capabilities. Development of entry systems technologies can be especially difficult due to the lack of facilities and resources available to test these new technologies in mission relevant environments. This paper discusses the technology development process to bring inflatable aeroshell technology from Technology Readiness Level 2 (TRL-2) to TRL-7. This paper focuses mainly on two projects: Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE), and Inflatable Aeroshell and Thermal Protection System Development (IATD). The objectives of IRVE are to conduct an inflatable aeroshell flight test that demonstrates exoatmospheric deployment and inflation, reentry survivability and stability, and predictable drag performance. IATD will continue the development of the technology by conducting exploration specific trade studies and feeding forward those results into three more flight tests. Through an examination of these projects, and other potential projects, this paper discusses some of the risks, issues, and unexpected benefits associated with the development of inflatable entry systems technology.

  11. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M.; Van Dyke, M. K.; Godfroy, T. J.; Pedersen, K. W.; Martin, J. J.; Dickens, R.; Williams, E.; Harper, R.; Salvail, P.; Hrbud, I.

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep space or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start. Addressing this issue through proper system design is straight-forward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission systems. While space fission systems were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if we are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, working with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories, and others, has conducted preliminary research related to a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE). An unfueled core has been fabricated by LANL, and resistance heaters used to verify predicted core thermal performance by closely mimicking heat from fission. The core is designed to use only established nuclear technology and be highly testable. In FY01 an energy conversion system and thruster will be coupled to the core, resulting in an 'end-to-end' nuclear electric propulsion demonstrator being tested using resistance heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. Results of the SAFE test program will be presented. The applicability

  12. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M.; Van Dyke, M. K.; Godfroy, T. J.; Pedersen, K. W.; Martin, J. J.; Dickens, R.; Williams, E.; Harper, R.; Salvail, P.; Hrbud, I.

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep space or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start. Addressing this issue through proper system design is straight-forward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission systems. While space fission systems were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if we are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, working with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories, and others, has conducted preliminary research related to a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE). An unfueled core has been fabricated by LANL, and resistance heaters used to verify predicted core thermal performance by closely mimicking heat from fission. The core is designed to use only established nuclear technology and be highly testable. In FY01 an energy conversion system and thruster will be coupled to the core, resulting in an 'end-to-end' nuclear electric propulsion demonstrator being tested using resistance heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. Results of the SAFE test program will be presented. The applicability

  13. Water system microbial check valve development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Greenley, D. R.; Putnam, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Development work on a device for the Space Shuttle that will prevent the transfer of viable microorganisms within water systems is described. The device serves as a check valve in that it prevents the transfer or cross-contamination of microorganisms from a nonpotable system into a potable water system when these systems are interconnected. In this regard, the function of the device is similar to that of the air gap found in conventional one gravity systems. The device is essentially a bed of resin material impregnated with iodine. Basic design data for a variety of flow and temperature conditions are presented, together with results of challenging the beds with suspensions of seven microorganisms including aerobes, anaerobes, and spore formers.

  14. NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.; Charnock, James K.; Bagwell, Donald R.; Grigsby, Donner

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several systems to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These systems provide current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, and real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors. The goal of the NASA program is to provide the research and development to demonstrate an engineering model AVOSS in real-time operation at a major airport. The demonstration is only of concept feasibility, and additional effort is required to deploy an operational system for actual aircraft spacing reduction. This paper describes the AVOSS system architecture, a wake vortex facility established at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), initial operational experience with the AVOSS system, and emerging considerations for subsystem requirements. Results of the initial system operation suggest a significant potential for reduced spacing.

  15. System for Anomaly and Failure Detection (SAFD) system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreilly, D.

    1992-01-01

    This task specified developing the hardware and software necessary to implement the System for Anomaly and Failure Detection (SAFD) algorithm, developed under Technology Test Bed (TTB) Task 21, on the TTB engine stand. This effort involved building two units; one unit to be installed in the Block II Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Hardware Simulation Lab (HSL) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and one unit to be installed at the TTB engine stand. Rocketdyne personnel from the HSL performed the task. The SAFD algorithm was developed as an improvement over the current redline system used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Controller (SSMEC). Simulation tests and execution against previous hot fire tests demonstrated that the SAFD algorithm can detect engine failure as much as tens of seconds before the redline system recognized the failure. Although the current algorithm only operates during steady state conditions (engine not throttling), work is underway to expand the algorithm to work during transient condition.

  16. System for Anomaly and Failure Detection (SAFD) system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreilly, D.

    1992-07-01

    This task specified developing the hardware and software necessary to implement the System for Anomaly and Failure Detection (SAFD) algorithm, developed under Technology Test Bed (TTB) Task 21, on the TTB engine stand. This effort involved building two units; one unit to be installed in the Block II Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Hardware Simulation Lab (HSL) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and one unit to be installed at the TTB engine stand. Rocketdyne personnel from the HSL performed the task. The SAFD algorithm was developed as an improvement over the current redline system used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Controller (SSMEC). Simulation tests and execution against previous hot fire tests demonstrated that the SAFD algorithm can detect engine failure as much as tens of seconds before the redline system recognized the failure. Although the current algorithm only operates during steady state conditions (engine not throttling), work is underway to expand the algorithm to work during transient condition.

  17. Implementing safer alternatives to lithographic cleanup solvents to protect the health of workers and the environment.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Patrice; Wolf, Katy; Quint, Julia

    2009-03-01

    The use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in lithographic printing cleanup is an environmental and occupational hazard. Regulations to reduce ambient ozone levels limited VOC emissions from lithographic cleanup operations and spurred the development of low-VOC alternatives. The purpose of this project was to promote the substitution of hazardous cleanup solvents with less toxic chemicals to protect the health of workers and the environment. A convenience sample of printers, employers, union, industry, and government representatives was constructed. Data regarding the lithographic printing work force and the use of cleanup solvents and alternatives were collected through: (1) work site walk-throughs, (2) a focus group, (3) key informant interviews, (4) a half-day workshop, and (5) demonstration projects. Overall, 66 individuals from 15 different print shops, 10 government agencies, the lithographic printing industry, and one printer's union participated in one or more aspects of the project. Printer inhalation exposure to hazardous cleanup solvents was prevalent and printers were not aware of safer alternatives. Employers should implement low-VOC, low-toxicity cleanup products in a timely manner to protect the health of printers and the environment. Use of low-VOC lithographic cleanup products does not mitigate the potential for printer dermal exposure and may carry safety and ergonomic implications. Lithographic cleanup solvent manufacturers should seek low-VOC ingredients that do not pose a dermal exposure hazard. Linking environmental and occupational health prevented the development of substitutes that would have introduced worker hazards and provided an opportunity to circumvent some of the inadequacies of the current occupational health regulatory apparatus. Governmental organizations should establish and maintain institutional interdisciplinary mechanisms to support these linkages.

  18. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2001-08-21

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 411. Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis), Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2015-03-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 411, Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis). CAU 411 is located on the Nevada Test and Training Range and consists of a single corrective action site (CAS), NAFR-23-01, Pu Contaminated Soil. There is sufficient information and historical documentation from previous investigations and the 1996 interim corrective action to recommend closure of CAU 411 using the SAFER process. Based on existing data, the presumed corrective action for CAU 411 is clean closure. However, additional data will be obtained during a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, and to determine whether the CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. This SAFER Plan provides the methodology to gather the necessary information for closing the CAU. The results of the field investigation will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 20, 2014, by representatives of NDEP, the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine whether CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 411; Collect environmental samples from designated target populations to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information; If COCs are no longer present, establish clean closure as the corrective action; If COCs are present, the extent of contamination will be defined and further corrective actions

  20. Reusable thermal protection system development: A prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Howard

    1992-10-01

    The state of the art in passive reusable thermal protection system materials is described. Development of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, which was the first reusable vehicle, is discussed. The thermal protection materials and given concepts and some of the shuttle development and manufacturing problems are described. Evolution of a family of grid and flexible ceramic external insulation materials from the initial shuttle concept in the early 1970's to the present time is described. The important properties and their evolution are documented. Application of these materials to vehicles currently being developed and plans for research to meet the space programs future needs are summarized.

  1. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program is to develop conceptual designs of gas fired advanced turbine systems that can be adapted for operation on coal and biomass fuels. The technical, economic, and environmental performance operating on natural gas and in a coal fueled mode is to be assessed. Detailed designs and test work relating to critical components are to be completed and a market study is to be conducted.

  2. Development of Human System Integration at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; McGuire, Kerry; Thompson, Shelby; Vos, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Human Systems Integration seeks to design systems around the capabilities and limitations of the humans which use and interact with the system, ensuring greater efficiency of use, reduced error rates, and less rework in the design, manufacturing and operational deployment of hardware and software. One of the primary goals of HSI is to get the human factors practitioner involved early in the design process. In doing so, the aim is to reduce future budget costs and resources in redesign and training. By the preliminary design phase of a project nearly 80% of the total cost of the project is locked in. Potential design changes recommended by evaluations past this point will have little effect due to lack of funding or a huge cost in terms of resources to make changes. Three key concepts define an effective HSI program. First, systems are comprised of hardware, software, and the human, all of which operate within an environment. Too often, engineers and developers fail to consider the human capacity or requirements as part of the system. This leads to poor task allocation within the system. To promote ideal task allocation, it is critical that the human element be considered early in system development. Poor design, or designs that do not adequately consider the human component, could negatively affect physical or mental performance, as well as, social behavior. Second, successful HSI depends upon integration and collaboration of all the domains that represent acquisition efforts. Too often, these domains exist as independent disciplines due to the location of expertise within the service structure. Proper implementation of HSI through participation would help to integrate these domains and disciplines to leverage and apply their interdependencies to attain an optimal design. Via this process domain interests can be integrated to perform effective HSI through trade-offs and collaboration. This provides a common basis upon which to make knowledgeable decisions. Finally

  3. The Systems Theory Framework of Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The Systems Theory Framework (STF; McMahon & Patton, 1995; Patton & McMahon, 2006) of career development was proposed as a metatheoretical framework that accommodates the contribution of all theories and offers an integrative and coherent framework of career influences. In this article, the author provides an overview of the STF, outlines its…

  4. Developing a Package Training System for Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battersby, D. L. N.

    1974-01-01

    The hotel and catering industry is one of Great Britain's largest. A packaged training system has been developed to satisfy the needs of this industry, an ever-growing occupational field with multiple categories. The material provided in each package outlines short pieces of instruction and helps the trainer create appropriate training. (DS)

  5. The Software First System Development Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-15

    SCII85] J. Schill, R. Smeaton , R. Jackman, "The Conversion of Commands & Control Software to Ada: Experiences and Lessons Learned", A, Vol. IV...NY., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1984. [WILL87] Williams, T. "Real-Time Development Tools Aid Embedded Control System Design," Computer Desitn, October

  6. Teaching Information Systems Development via Process Variants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Wee-Kek; Tan, Chuan-Hoo

    2010-01-01

    Acquiring the knowledge to assemble an integrated Information System (IS) development process that is tailored to the specific needs of a project has become increasingly important. It is therefore necessary for educators to impart to students this crucial skill. However, Situational Method Engineering (SME) is an inherently complex process that…

  7. Counter Trafficking System Development "Analysis Training Program"

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dennis C.

    2010-12-01

    This document will detail the training curriculum for the Counter-Trafficking System Development (CTSD) Analysis Modules and Lesson Plans are derived from the United States Military, Department of Energy doctrine and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Global Security (GS) S Program.

  8. Normal development of the female reproductive system

    EPA Science Inventory

    The embryonic development of the female reproductive system involves a progression of events that is conserved across vertebrate species. The early gonad progresses from a form that is undifferentiated in both genotypic males and females. Rudimentary male (Wolffian) and female (M...

  9. Developing a Package Training System for Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battersby, D. L. N.

    1974-01-01

    The hotel and catering industry is one of Great Britain's largest. A packaged training system has been developed to satisfy the needs of this industry, an ever-growing occupational field with multiple categories. The material provided in each package outlines short pieces of instruction and helps the trainer create appropriate training. (DS)

  10. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  11. Demonstration of a System Development Environment

    PubMed Central

    Blum, B. I.

    1985-01-01

    This demonstration illustrates how modern development environments can be used to improve the process of designing and implementing information systems. Following a brief introduction to the topic of application generation, automatic programming, and software environments, one product — TEDIUM* — will be demonstrated.

  12. Building a Workforce Development System in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spieker, Sally

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Human Resources Investment Council developed a blueprint to guide a system that is needs-driven, accessible, interconnected, accountable, sustainable, and has collaborative governance. Vocational Technical Education Providers (VTEP) representing secondary education, technical schools, proprietary institutions, the University of Alaska,…

  13. Digital hydraulic valving system. [design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and development are reported of a digital hydraulic valving system that would accept direct digital inputs. Topics include: summary of contractual accomplishments, design and function description, valve parameters and calculations, conclusions, and recommendations. The electrical control circuit operating procedure is outlined in an appendix.

  14. MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Prototype Development

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Chichester; S.A. Pozzi; J.L. Dolan; M.T. Kinlaw; S.J. Thompson; A.C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J.T. Johnson; S.M. Watson

    2013-09-01

    This document serves as both an FY2103 End-of-Year and End-of-Project report on efforts that resulted in the design of a prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter leveraged upon the findings of previous project efforts. The prototype design includes 32 liquid scintillator detectors with cubic volumes 7.62 cm in dimension configured into 4 stacked rings of 8 detectors. Detector signal collection for the system is handled with a pair of Struck Innovative Systeme 16-channel digitizers controlled by in-house developed software with built-in multiplicity analysis algorithms. Initial testing and familiarization of the currently obtained prototype components is underway, however full prototype construction is required for further optimization. Monte Carlo models of the prototype system were performed to estimate die-away and efficiency values. Analysis of these models resulted in the development of a software package capable of determining the effects of nearest-neighbor rejection methods for elimination of detector cross talk. A parameter study was performed using previously developed analytical methods for the estimation of assay mass variance for use as a figure-of-merit for system performance. A software package was developed to automate these calculations and ensure accuracy. The results of the parameter study show that the prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter design is very nearly optimized under the restraints of the parameter space.

  15. Teaching Information Systems Development via Process Variants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Wee-Kek; Tan, Chuan-Hoo

    2010-01-01

    Acquiring the knowledge to assemble an integrated Information System (IS) development process that is tailored to the specific needs of a project has become increasingly important. It is therefore necessary for educators to impart to students this crucial skill. However, Situational Method Engineering (SME) is an inherently complex process that…

  16. Normal development of the female reproductive system

    EPA Science Inventory

    The embryonic development of the female reproductive system involves a progression of events that is conserved across vertebrate species. The early gonad progresses from a form that is undifferentiated in both genotypic males and females. Rudimentary male (Wolffian) and female (M...

  17. A Systems Approach to Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, James D.

    1974-01-01

    A systems approach to management development in today's business world becomes more than a theoretical diagram of how things should work or just a training program. It is an assessment of a company's strengths and weaknesses and should be a prelude to successful business planning. (Author/DS)

  18. The Systems Theory Framework of Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The Systems Theory Framework (STF; McMahon & Patton, 1995; Patton & McMahon, 2006) of career development was proposed as a metatheoretical framework that accommodates the contribution of all theories and offers an integrative and coherent framework of career influences. In this article, the author provides an overview of the STF, outlines its…

  19. System Transfer, Education, and Development in Mozambique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossa, Jose

    2011-01-01

    In this study the author used conceptual historical method to assess the phenomenon of system transfer and the association between education and development in Mozambique. The assessment was administered through critical analysis of documents pertaining to the Salazar (1924-1966), Machel (1975-1986), and Chissano (1986-2005) administrations. The…

  20. Development of a Solar System Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornstein, Seth D.; Duncan, D.; S, C. A. T.

    2009-01-01

    Concept inventories can provide useful insight into students’ understanding of key physical concepts. Knowing what your students have learned during a course is a valuable tool for improving your own teaching. Unfortunately, current astronomy concept inventories are not suitable for an introductory solar system course because they either cover too broad of a range of topics (e.g. Astronomy Diagnostic Test) or are too narrowly focused (e.g. Greenhouse Effect Concept Inventory, Lunar Phase Concept Inventory). We have developed the Solar System Concept Inventory (SSCI) to cover those topics commonly taught in an introductory solar system course. The topics included on the SSCI were selected by having faculty identify the key concepts they address when teaching about the solar system. SSCI topics include formation mechanisms, planetary interiors, atmospheric effects, and small solar system bodies. Student interviews were conducted to identify common naive ideas and reasoning difficulties relating to these key topics. Preliminary development of the SSCI was completed at the University of Colorado and involved over 400 students. A larger, national, multi-institutional field test is planned for Spring 2009 as a Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) research project. We present here the results from the preliminary development and proposed changes for the next stage of research. We would like to thank the NSF for funding under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program.