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Sample records for development cox regression

  1. Survival analysis and Cox regression.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Parejo, N; Rodríguez del Águila, M M; Pérez-Vicente, S

    2011-01-01

    The data provided by clinical trials are often expressed in terms of survival. The analysis of survival comprises a series of statistical analytical techniques in which the measurements analysed represent the time elapsed between a given exposure and the outcome of a certain event. Despite the name of these techniques, the outcome in question does not necessarily have to be either survival or death, and may be healing versus no healing, relief versus pain, complication versus no complication, relapse versus no relapse, etc. The present article describes the analysis of survival from both a descriptive perspective, based on the Kaplan-Meier estimation method, and in terms of bivariate comparisons using the log-rank statistic. Likewise, a description is provided of the Cox regression models for the study of risk factors or covariables associated to the probability of survival. These models are defined in both simple and multiple forms, and a description is provided of how they are calculated and how the postulates for application are checked - accompanied by illustrating examples with the shareware application R.

  2. A new method to analyse the pace of child development: Cox regression validated by a bootstrap resampling procedure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Various perinatal factors influencing neuromotor development are known from cross sectional studies. Factors influencing the age at which distinct abilities are acquired are uncertain. We hypothesized that the Cox regression model might identify these factors. Methods Neonates treated at Aachen University Hospital in 2000/2001 were identified retrospectively (n = 796). Outcome data, based on a structured interview, were available from 466 children, as were perinatal data. Factors possibly related to outcome were identified by bootstrap selection and then included into a multivariate Cox regression model. To evaluate if the parental assessment might change with the time elapsed since birth we studied five age cohorts of 163 normally developed children. Results Birth weight, gestational age, congenital cardiac disease and periventricular leukomalacia were related to outcome in the multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). Analysis of the control cohorts revealed that the parents' assessment of the ability of bladder control is modified by the time elapsed since birth. Conclusions Combined application of the bootstrap resampling procedure and multivariate Cox regression analysis effectively identifies perinatal factors influencing the age at which distinct abilities are acquired. These were similar as known from previous cross sectional studies. Retrospective data acquistion may lead to a bias because the parental memories change with time. This recommends applying this statistical approach in larger prospective trials. PMID:20205739

  3. Objective Bayesian model selection for Cox regression.

    PubMed

    Held, Leonhard; Gravestock, Isaac; Sabanés Bové, Daniel

    2016-12-20

    There is now a large literature on objective Bayesian model selection in the linear model based on the g-prior. The methodology has been recently extended to generalized linear models using test-based Bayes factors. In this paper, we show that test-based Bayes factors can also be applied to the Cox proportional hazards model. If the goal is to select a single model, then both the maximum a posteriori and the median probability model can be calculated. For clinical prediction of survival, we shrink the model-specific log hazard ratio estimates with subsequent calculation of the Breslow estimate of the cumulative baseline hazard function. A Bayesian model average can also be employed. We illustrate the proposed methodology with the analysis of survival data on primary biliary cirrhosis patients and the development of a clinical prediction model for future cardiovascular events based on data from the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease (SMART) cohort study. Cross-validation is applied to compare the predictive performance with alternative model selection approaches based on Harrell's c-Index, the calibration slope and the integrated Brier score. Finally, a novel application of Bayesian variable selection to optimal conditional prediction via landmarking is described. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Simultaneous confidence bands for Cox regression from semiparametric random censorship.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shoubhik; Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2016-01-01

    Cox regression is combined with semiparametric random censorship models to construct simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for subject-specific survival curves. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of the proposed SCBs with the SCBs that are based only on standard Cox. The new SCBs provide correct empirical coverage and are more informative. The proposed SCBs are illustrated with two real examples. An extension to handle missing censoring indicators is also outlined.

  5. Adjusted variable plots for Cox's proportional hazards regression model.

    PubMed

    Hall, C B; Zeger, S L; Bandeen-Roche, K J

    1996-01-01

    Adjusted variable plots are useful in linear regression for outlier detection and for qualitative evaluation of the fit of a model. In this paper, we extend adjusted variable plots to Cox's proportional hazards model for possibly censored survival data. We propose three different plots: a risk level adjusted variable (RLAV) plot in which each observation in each risk set appears, a subject level adjusted variable (SLAV) plot in which each subject is represented by one point, and an event level adjusted variable (ELAV) plot in which the entire risk set at each failure event is represented by a single point. The latter two plots are derived from the RLAV by combining multiple points. In each point, the regression coefficient and standard error from a Cox proportional hazards regression is obtained by a simple linear regression through the origin fit to the coordinates of the pictured points. The plots are illustrated with a reanalysis of a dataset of 65 patients with multiple myeloma.

  6. Comparison of stopped Cox regression with direct methods such as pseudo-values and binomial regression.

    PubMed

    van Houwelingen, Hans C; Putter, Hein

    2015-04-01

    By far the most popular model to obtain survival predictions for individual patients is the Cox model. The Cox model does not make any assumptions on the underlying hazard, but it relies heavily on the proportional hazards assumption. The most common ways to circumvent this robustness problem are 1) to categorize patients based on their prognostic risk score and to base predictions on Kaplan-Meier curves for the risk categories, or 2) to include interactions with the covariates and suitable functions of time. Robust estimators of the t(0)-year survival probabilities can also be obtained from a "stopped Cox" regression model, in which all observations are administratively censored at t(0). Other recent approaches to solve this robustness problem, originally proposed in the context of competing risks, are pseudo-values and direct binomial regression, based on unbiased estimating equations. In this paper stopped Cox regression is compared with these direct approaches. This is done by means of a simulation study to assess the biases of the different approaches and an analysis of breast cancer data to get some feeling for the performance in practice. The tentative conclusion is that stopped Cox and direct models agree well if the follow-up is not too long. There are larger differences for long-term follow-up data. There stopped Cox might be more efficient, but less robust.

  7. Extended cox regression model: The choice of timefunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Hatice; Tutkun, Nihal Ata; Karasoy, Durdu

    2017-07-01

    Cox regression model (CRM), which takes into account the effect of censored observations, is one the most applicative and usedmodels in survival analysis to evaluate the effects of covariates. Proportional hazard (PH), requires a constant hazard ratio over time, is the assumptionofCRM. Using extended CRM provides the test of including a time dependent covariate to assess the PH assumption or an alternative model in case of nonproportional hazards. In this study, the different types of real data sets are used to choose the time function and the differences between time functions are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  9. Inverse probability weighted Cox regression for doubly truncated data.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Micha; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo; Simon, David K; Betensky, Rebecca A

    2017-09-08

    Doubly truncated data arise when event times are observed only if they fall within subject-specific, possibly random, intervals. While non-parametric methods for survivor function estimation using doubly truncated data have been intensively studied, only a few methods for fitting regression models have been suggested, and only for a limited number of covariates. In this article, we present a method to fit the Cox regression model to doubly truncated data with multiple discrete and continuous covariates, and describe how to implement it using existing software. The approach is used to study the association between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms and age of onset of Parkinson's disease. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Analyzing Student Learning Outcomes: Usefulness of Logistic and Cox Regression Models. IR Applications, Volume 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chau-Kuang

    2005-01-01

    Logistic and Cox regression methods are practical tools used to model the relationships between certain student learning outcomes and their relevant explanatory variables. The logistic regression model fits an S-shaped curve into a binary outcome with data points of zero and one. The Cox regression model allows investigators to study the duration…

  11. BFLCRM: A BAYESIAN FUNCTIONAL LINEAR COX REGRESSION MODEL FOR PREDICTING TIME TO CONVERSION TO ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjee; Zhu, Hongtu; Kong, Dehan; Wang, Yalin; Giovanello, Kelly Sullivan; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a Bayesian functional linear Cox regression model (BFLCRM) with both functional and scalar covariates. This new development is motivated by establishing the likelihood of conversion to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in 346 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI-1) and the early markers of conversion. These 346 MCI patients were followed over 48 months, with 161 MCI participants progressing to AD at 48 months. The functional linear Cox regression model was used to establish that functional covariates including hippocampus surface morphology and scalar covariates including brain MRI volumes, cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog), and APOE status can accurately predict time to onset of AD. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. A simulation study is performed to evaluate the finite sample performance of BFLCRM.

  12. [Application of spline-based Cox regression on analyzing data from follow-up studies].

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Yu, Jin-ming; Hu, Da-yi

    2012-09-01

    With R, this study involved the application of the spline-based Cox regression to analyze data related to follow-up studies when the two basic assumptions of Cox proportional hazards regression were not satisfactory. Results showed that most of the continuous covariates contributed nonlinearly to mortality risk while the effects of three covariates were time-dependent. After considering multiple covariates in spline-based Cox regression, when the ankle brachial index (ABI) decreased by 0.1, the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death was 1.071. The spline-based Cox regression method could be applied to analyze the data related to follow-up studies when the assumptions of Cox proportional hazards regression were violated.

  13. A comparison between the use of Cox regression and the use of partial least squares-Cox regression to predict the survival of kidney-transplant patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solimun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this research is to model survival data from kidney-transplant patients using the partial least squares (PLS)-Cox regression, which can both meet and not meet the no-multicollinearity assumption. The secondary data were obtained from research entitled "Factors affecting the survival of kidney-transplant patients". The research subjects comprised 250 patients. The predictor variables consisted of: age (X1), sex (X2); two categories, prior hemodialysis duration (X3), diabetes (X4); two categories, prior transplantation number (X5), number of blood transfusions (X6), discrepancy score (X7), use of antilymphocyte globulin(ALG) (X8); two categories, while the response variable was patient survival time (in months). Partial least squares regression is a model that connects the predictor variables X and the response variable y and it initially aims to determine the relationship between them. Results of the above analyses suggest that the survival of kidney transplant recipients ranged from 0 to 55 months, with 62% of the patients surviving until they received treatment that lasted for 55 months. The PLS-Cox regression analysis results revealed that patients' age and the use of ALG significantly affected the survival time of patients. The factor of patients' age (X1) in the PLS-Cox regression model merely affected the failure probability by 1.201. This indicates that the probability of dying for elderly patients with a kidney transplant is 1.152 times higher than that for younger patients.

  14. Non-Asymptotic Oracle Inequalities for the High-Dimensional Cox Regression via Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We consider finite sample properties of the regularized high-dimensional Cox regression via lasso. Existing literature focuses on linear models or generalized linear models with Lipschitz loss functions, where the empirical risk functions are the summations of independent and identically distributed (iid) losses. The summands in the negative log partial likelihood function for censored survival data, however, are neither iid nor Lipschitz.We first approximate the negative log partial likelihood function by a sum of iid non-Lipschitz terms, then derive the non-asymptotic oracle inequalities for the lasso penalized Cox regression using pointwise arguments to tackle the difficulties caused by lacking iid Lipschitz losses. PMID:24516328

  15. Non-Asymptotic Oracle Inequalities for the High-Dimensional Cox Regression via Lasso.

    PubMed

    Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin

    2014-01-01

    We consider finite sample properties of the regularized high-dimensional Cox regression via lasso. Existing literature focuses on linear models or generalized linear models with Lipschitz loss functions, where the empirical risk functions are the summations of independent and identically distributed (iid) losses. The summands in the negative log partial likelihood function for censored survival data, however, are neither iid nor Lipschitz.We first approximate the negative log partial likelihood function by a sum of iid non-Lipschitz terms, then derive the non-asymptotic oracle inequalities for the lasso penalized Cox regression using pointwise arguments to tackle the difficulties caused by lacking iid Lipschitz losses.

  16. Identity, Regression and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroger, Jane

    1996-01-01

    Seeks to review varied meanings regression has held within psychoanalytic and developmental literatures; focus on the forms, frequencies, and functions of regression when examining data from two structural developmental models addressing dimensions of normative adolescent identity development; and consider precipitants for different forms of…

  17. biospear: an R package for biomarker selection in penalized Cox regression.

    PubMed

    Ternès, Nils; Rotolo, Federico; Michiels, Stefan

    2017-09-12

    The R package biospear allows selecting the biomarkers with the strongest impact on survival and on the treatment effect in high-dimensional Cox models, and estimating expected survival probabilities. Most of the implemented approaches are based on penalized regression techniques. The package is available on the CRAN. ( https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=biospear ). stefan.michiels@gustaveroussy.fr.

  18. Cell Intrinsic Role of Cox-2 in Pancreatic Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Reginald; Li, Yunfeng; Tran, Linh M.; Dry, Sarah; Calvopina, Joseph Hargan; Garcia, Alejandro; Kim, Christine; Wang, Ying; Donahue, Timothy R.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC). However, how COX-2 promotes PDAC development is unclear. While previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of COX-2 inhibition via the use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in PDAC models, none have addressed the cell intrinsic vs. microenvironment roles of COX-2 in modulating PDAC initiation and progression. We tested the cell intrinsic role of COX-2 in PDAC progression, using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches. Cox-2 deletion in Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitor cells significantly delays the development of PDAC in mice with K-ras activation and Pten haploinsufficiency. Conversely, COX-2 over-expression promotes early onset and progression of PDAC in the K-ras mouse model. Loss of PTEN function is a critical factor in determining lethal PDAC onset and overall survival. Mechanistically, COX-2 over-expression increases P-AKT levels in the precursor lesions of Pdx1+;K-rasG12D/+;Ptenlox/+ mice in the absence of Pten LOH. In contrast, Cox-2 deletion in the same setting diminishes P-AKT levels and delays cancer progression. These data suggest an important cell intrinsic role for COX-2 in tumor initiation and progression through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. PDAC that is independent of intrinsic COX-2 expression eventually develops with decreased FKBP5 and increased GRP78 expression, two alternate pathways leading to AKT activation. Together, these results support a cell intrinsic role for COX-2 in PDAC development and suggest that, while anti-COX-2 therapy may delay the development and progression of PDAC, mechanisms known to increase chemoresistance through AKT activation must also be overcome. PMID:22784710

  19. The relationship between intimate partner violence and PTSD: an application of Cox regression with time-varying covariates.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Mieko; Horrocks, Julie

    2003-08-01

    This study uses Cox regression with time-varying covariates to examine the relationship between intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a random sample of Japanese American women and immigrant women from Japan (N = 211). Because applications of survival analysis in trauma research are scarce, this paper presents the utility of this analytical approach by contrasting it with other common methods of analysis (chi-square tests and Cox regression with covariates that do not change over time).

  20. Cox Regression Model Analysis of Infection in Renal Transplants After Operation.

    PubMed

    Junchen, Z; Houjing, Z; Yun, F

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the factors that affect infections after renal transplant, establishing the Cox model to forecast infection for patients of renal transplant. Data were collected from patients who had renal transplantation in Nanking Jinlin Hospital from January 2011 to April 2015 (n = 305 transplants). There were 296 individual data that could be used after deleting the people who were lacking some data, changing the main immunosuppressants during the first year, losing follow-up, and data writing that was not fully 1 year after the operation; 296 individuals were divided by 3:7. The 206 data of patients (7/10 of the total individuals) were used to analyze and build a model, and the rest of the data were used to verify the model, analyzing the 206 data with Cox regression, discovering the factors that affect the infection after renal transplant independently, building the model, and verification. Cox regression showed that there are three independent factors that affect infections after renal transplant: X3, the donor type (relative risk [RR] = 1.929, P = .037); X9, dialysis time (RR = 1.017, P = .032); and X13, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match (RR = 0.257, P = .013). The model is: PI = 0.657X3 + 0.017X9 - 1.359X13. All PI for the 206 individuals were calculated and then divided into three groups: the low-risk group, the median-risk group, and the high-risk group. The model was verified by calculating the PI for all 90 people. The log-rank test showed that the survival rates among these groups were significantly different (P < .001). Donor type, dialysis time, and HLA match are all factors that affect infection after renal transplant. Donor type and dialysis time were the dangerous factors for infection, but HLA match was the protecting factor. The model depends on these three factors and could forecast infection after renal transplant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Dynamics of HPV vaccination initiation in Flanders (Belgium) 2007-2009: a Cox regression model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated dynamic patterns and predictors of HPV vaccination initiation in Flanders (Belgium) by girls aged 12 to 18, between 2007 and 2009, the period immediately after the introduction of the HPV vaccines on the Belgian market. During this period the initiative for vaccination was taken by the girl, her family or the general practitioner/pediatrician/gynecologist. Methods We used a Cox regression model with time constant and time varying predictors to model hazard rates of HPV vaccination initiation. The sample existed of 117,151 female members of the National Alliance of Christian Mutualities, the largest sickness fund in Flanders. Results The study showed that the hazard of HPV vaccination initiation was higher (1) for older girls, (2) for girls with a more favorable socio-economic background, (3) under more generous reimbursement regimes (with this effect being more pronounced for girls with weak socioeconomic backgrounds), (4) for girls that were informed personally about the reimbursement rules. Conclusions When the initiative for HPV vaccination lies with the girls, their families or the physicians (no organized setting) the uptake of the vaccines is affected by both individual and organizational factors. PMID:21672202

  2. Caesarean delivery and its correlates in Northern Region of Bangladesh: application of logistic regression and cox proportional hazard model.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mostafizur; Shariff, Asma Ahmad; Shafie, Aziz; Saaid, Rahmah; Tahir, Rohayatimah Md

    2015-07-31

    Caesarean delivery (C-section) rates have been increasing dramatically in the past decades around the world. This increase has been attributed to multiple factors such as maternal, socio-demographic and institutional factors and is a burning issue of global aspect like in many developed and developing countries. Therefore, this study examines the relationship between mode of delivery and time to event with provider characteristics (i.e., covariates) respectively. The study is based on a total of 1142 delivery cases from four private and four public hospitals maternity wards. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models were the statistical tools of the present study. The logistic regression of multivariate analysis indicated that the risk of having a previous C-section, prolonged labour, higher educational level, mother age 25 years and above, lower order of birth, length of baby more than 45 cm and irregular intake of balanced diet were significantly predict for C-section. With regard to survival time, using the Cox model, fetal distress, previous C-section, mother's age, age at marriage and order of birth were also the most independent risk factors for C-section. By the forward stepwise selection, the study reveals that the most common factors were previous C-section, mother's age and order of birth in both analysis. As shown in the above results, the study suggests that these factors may influence the health-seeking behaviour of women. Findings suggest that program and policies need to address the increase rate of caesarean delivery in Northern region of Bangladesh. Also, for determinant of risk factors, the result of Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) indicated that logistic model is an efficient model.

  3. A comparison of Cox and logistic regression for use in genome-wide association studies of cohort and case-cohort design.

    PubMed

    Staley, James R; Jones, Edmund; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S; Sweeting, Michael J; Wood, Angela M; Howson, Joanna M M

    2017-06-01

    Logistic regression is often used instead of Cox regression to analyse genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and disease outcomes with cohort and case-cohort designs, as it is less computationally expensive. Although Cox and logistic regression models have been compared previously in cohort studies, this work does not completely cover the GWAS setting nor extend to the case-cohort study design. Here, we evaluated Cox and logistic regression applied to cohort and case-cohort genetic association studies using simulated data and genetic data from the EPIC-CVD study. In the cohort setting, there was a modest improvement in power to detect SNP-disease associations using Cox regression compared with logistic regression, which increased as the disease incidence increased. In contrast, logistic regression had more power than (Prentice weighted) Cox regression in the case-cohort setting. Logistic regression yielded inflated effect estimates (assuming the hazard ratio is the underlying measure of association) for both study designs, especially for SNPs with greater effect on disease. Given logistic regression is substantially more computationally efficient than Cox regression in both settings, we propose a two-step approach to GWAS in cohort and case-cohort studies. First to analyse all SNPs with logistic regression to identify associated variants below a pre-defined P-value threshold, and second to fit Cox regression (appropriately weighted in case-cohort studies) to those identified SNPs to ensure accurate estimation of association with disease.

  4. Experiments to Determine Whether Recursive Partitioning (CART) or an Artificial Neural Network Overcomes Theoretical Limitations of Cox Proportional Hazards Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattan, Michael W.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Kattan, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    New computationally intensive tools for medical survival analyses include recursive partitioning (also called CART) and artificial neural networks. A challenge that remains is to better understand the behavior of these techniques in effort to know when they will be effective tools. Theoretically they may overcome limitations of the traditional multivariable survival technique, the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Experiments were designed to test whether the new tools would, in practice, overcome these limitations. Two datasets in which theory suggests CART and the neural network should outperform the Cox model were selected. The first was a published leukemia dataset manipulated to have a strong interaction that CART should detect. The second was a published cirrhosis dataset with pronounced nonlinear effects that a neural network should fit. Repeated sampling of 50 training and testing subsets was applied to each technique. The concordance index C was calculated as a measure of predictive accuracy by each technique on the testing dataset. In the interaction dataset, CART outperformed Cox (P less than 0.05) with a C improvement of 0.1 (95% Cl, 0.08 to 0.12). In the nonlinear dataset, the neural network outperformed the Cox model (P less than 0.05), but by a very slight amount (0.015). As predicted by theory, CART and the neural network were able to overcome limitations of the Cox model. Experiments like these are important to increase our understanding of when one of these new techniques will outperform the standard Cox model. Further research is necessary to predict which technique will do best a priori and to assess the magnitude of superiority.

  5. Maximum Likelihood Inference for the Cox Regression Model with Applications to Missing Covariates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Shao, Qi-Man

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we carry out an in-depth theoretical investigation for existence of maximum likelihood estimates for the Cox model (Cox, 1972, 1975) both in the full data setting as well as in the presence of missing covariate data. The main motivation for this work arises from missing data problems, where models can easily become difficult to estimate with certain missing data configurations or large missing data fractions. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of the maximum partial likelihood estimate (MPLE) for completely observed data (i.e., no missing data) settings as well as sufficient conditions for existence of the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) for survival data with missing covariates via a profile likelihood method. Several theorems are given to establish these conditions. A real dataset from a cancer clinical trial is presented to further illustrate the proposed methodology.

  6. Maximum Likelihood Inference for the Cox Regression Model with Applications to Missing Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Shao, Qi-Man

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we carry out an in-depth theoretical investigation for existence of maximum likelihood estimates for the Cox model (Cox, 1972, 1975) both in the full data setting as well as in the presence of missing covariate data. The main motivation for this work arises from missing data problems, where models can easily become difficult to estimate with certain missing data configurations or large missing data fractions. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of the maximum partial likelihood estimate (MPLE) for completely observed data (i.e., no missing data) settings as well as sufficient conditions for existence of the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) for survival data with missing covariates via a profile likelihood method. Several theorems are given to establish these conditions. A real dataset from a cancer clinical trial is presented to further illustrate the proposed methodology. PMID:19802375

  7. Bootstrap-based methods for estimating standard errors in Cox's regression analyses of clustered event times.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongling; Abrahamowicz, Michal

    2010-03-30

    We propose two bootstrap-based methods to correct the standard errors (SEs) from Cox's model for within-cluster correlation of right-censored event times. The cluster-bootstrap method resamples, with replacement, only the clusters, whereas the two-step bootstrap method resamples (i) the clusters, and (ii) individuals within each selected cluster, with replacement. In simulations, we evaluate both methods and compare them with the existing robust variance estimator and the shared gamma frailty model, which are available in statistical software packages. We simulate clustered event time data, with latent cluster-level random effects, which are ignored in the conventional Cox's model. For cluster-level covariates, both proposed bootstrap methods yield accurate SEs, and type I error rates, and acceptable coverage rates, regardless of the true random effects distribution, and avoid serious variance under-estimation by conventional Cox-based standard errors. However, the two-step bootstrap method over-estimates the variance for individual-level covariates. We also apply the proposed bootstrap methods to obtain confidence bands around flexible estimates of time-dependent effects in a real-life analysis of cluster event times.

  8. Survival of patients with nonseminomatous germ cell cancer: a review of the IGCC classification by Cox regression and recursive partitioning.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, M R; Steyerberg, E W; Stenning, S P; Dusseldorp, E; Habbema, J D F

    2004-03-22

    The International Germ Cell Consensus (IGCC) classification identifies good, intermediate and poor prognosis groups among patients with metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT). It uses the risk factors primary site, presence of nonpulmonary visceral metastases and tumour markers alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). The IGCC classification is easy to use and remember, but lacks flexibility. We aimed to examine the extent of any loss in discrimination within the IGCC classification in comparison with alternative modelling by formal weighing of the risk factors. We analysed survival of 3048 NSGCT patients with Cox regression and recursive partitioning for alternative classifications. Good, intermediate and poor prognosis groups were based on predicted 5-year survival. Classifications were further refined by subgrouping within the poor prognosis group. Performance was measured primarily by a bootstrap corrected c-statistic to indicate discriminative ability for future patients. The weights of the risk factors in the alternative classifications differed slightly from the implicit weights in the IGCC classification. Discriminative ability, however, did not increase clearly (IGCC classification, c=0.732; Cox classification, c=0.730; Recursive partitioning classification, c=0.709). Three subgroups could be identified within the poor prognosis groups, resulting in classifications with five prognostic groups and slightly better discriminative ability (c=0.740). In conclusion, the IGCC classification in three prognostic groups is largely supported by Cox regression and recursive partitioning. Cox regression was the most promising tool to define a more refined classification. British Journal of Cancer (2004) 90, 1176-1183. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6601665 www.bjcancer.com Published online 24 February 2004

  9. High-dimensional, massive sample-size Cox proportional hazards regression for survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Burd, Randall S; Suchard, Marc A

    2014-04-01

    Survival analysis endures as an old, yet active research field with applications that spread across many domains. Continuing improvements in data acquisition techniques pose constant challenges in applying existing survival analysis methods to these emerging data sets. In this paper, we present tools for fitting regularized Cox survival analysis models on high-dimensional, massive sample-size (HDMSS) data using a variant of the cyclic coordinate descent optimization technique tailored for the sparsity that HDMSS data often present. Experiments on two real data examples demonstrate that efficient analyses of HDMSS data using these tools result in improved predictive performance and calibration.

  10. Penalized Cox regression analysis in the high-dimensional and low-sample size settings, with applications to microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jiang; Li, Hongzhe

    2005-07-01

    An important application of microarray technology is to relate gene expression profiles to various clinical phenotypes of patients. Success has been demonstrated in molecular classification of cancer in which the gene expression data serve as predictors and different types of cancer serve as a categorical outcome variable. However, there has been less research in linking gene expression profiles to the censored survival data such as patients' overall survival time or time to cancer relapse. It would be desirable to have models with good prediction accuracy and parsimony property. We propose to use the L(1) penalized estimation for the Cox model to select genes that are relevant to patients' survival and to build a predictive model for future prediction. The computational difficulty associated with the estimation in the high-dimensional and low-sample size settings can be efficiently solved by using the recently developed least-angle regression (LARS) method. Our simulation studies and application to real datasets on predicting survival after chemotherapy for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma demonstrate that the proposed procedure, which we call the LARS-Cox procedure, can be used for identifying important genes that are related to time to death due to cancer and for building a parsimonious model for predicting the survival of future patients. The LARS-Cox regression gives better predictive performance than the L(2) penalized regression and a few other dimension-reduction based methods. We conclude that the proposed LARS-Cox procedure can be very useful in identifying genes relevant to survival phenotypes and in building a parsimonious predictive model that can be used for classifying future patients into clinically relevant high- and low-risk groups based on the gene expression profile and survival times of previous patients.

  11. Comparison between artificial neural network and Cox regression model in predicting the survival rate of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lucheng; Luo, Wenhua; Su, Meng; Wei, Hangping; Wei, Juan; Zhang, Xuebang; Zou, Changlin

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic factors and their significance in gastric cancer (GC) patients, using the artificial neural network (ANN) and Cox regression hazard (CPH) models. A retrospective analysis was undertaken, including 289 patients with GC who had undergone gastrectomy between 2006 and 2007. According to the CPH analysis, disease stage, peritoneal dissemination, radical surgery and body mass index (BMI) were selected as the significant variables. According to the ANN model, disease stage, radical surgery, serum CA19-9 levels, peritoneal dissemination and BMI were selected as the significant variables. The true prediction of the ANN was 85.3% and of the CPH model 81.9%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the ANN model is a more powerful tool in determining the significant prognostic variables for GC patients, compared to the CPH model. Therefore, this model is recommended for determining the risk factors of such patients.

  12. Prediction of Early Breast Cancer Metastasis from DNA Microarray Data Using High-Dimensional Cox Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Zemmour, Christophe; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Chetrit, Bernard; Birnbaum, Daniel; Filleron, Thomas; Boher, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND DNA microarray studies identified gene expression signatures predictive of metastatic relapse in early breast cancer. Standard feature selection procedures applied to reduce the set of predictive genes did not take into account the correlation between genes. In this paper, we studied the performances of three high-dimensional regression methods – CoxBoost, LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator), and Elastic net – to identify prognostic signatures in patients with early breast cancer. METHODS We analyzed three public retrospective datasets, including a total of 384 patients with axillary lymph node-negative breast cancer. The Amsterdam van’t Veer’s training set of 78 patients was used to determine the optimal gene sets and classifiers using sensitivity thresholds resulting in mis-classification of no more than 10% of the poor-prognosis group. To ensure the comparability between different methods, an automatic selection procedure was used to determine the number of genes included in each model. The van de Vijver’s and Desmedt’s datasets were used as validation sets to evaluate separately the prognostic performances of our classifiers. The results were compared to the original Amsterdam 70-gene classifier. RESULTS The automatic selection procedure reduced the number of predictive genes up to a minimum of six genes. In the two validation sets, the three models (Elastic net, LASSO, and CoxBoost) led to the definition of genomic classifiers predicting the 5-year metastatic status with similar performances, with respective 59, 56, and 54% accuracy, 83, 75, and 83% sensitivity, and 53, 52, and 48% specificity in the Desmedt’s dataset. In comparison, the Amsterdam 70-gene signature showed 45% accuracy, 97% sensitivity, and 34% specificity. The gene overlap and the classification concordance between the three classifiers were high. All the classifiers added significant prognostic information to that provided by the traditional

  13. [Cox regression model of hearing loss in workers exposed to noise and metalworking fluids or welding fumes].

    PubMed

    Solano, J C Conte; Gracia, A I Domínguez; Felipe, A I García; Calvo, E Rubio; Prados, A Pérez

    2010-01-01

    Works on labour-related hearing loss have traditionally been centred on the study of noise as the principal cause. The presence of physical and chemical pollutants is very common in the metalworking branch. This article analyses both, together with certain personal habits, with the aim of determining their joint influence on labour-related hearing loss. A sample of 558 workers was analysed using Cox regression with an explicative aim. The character of the cause-effect relations existing between the variables considered is defined with respect to three situations: healthy/altered; recoverable/non-recoverable; with falls in conversational abilities/without falls in conversational abilities. The analysis reflects the fact that metalworking fluids, in the presence of noise, delay the acquisition of different degrees of auditory alteration; an effect contrary to that produced by welding fumes, which accelerate such states. The habit of smoking is recognised as having an influence on the acquisition of an initial acoustic trauma; exposure to noise outside the workplace influences the acquisition of an advanced acoustic trauma; and, on the other hand, the auditory protective equipment provides protection against noise. The antagonistic effect of metalworking fluids and the synergic effect of welding fumes in the face of noise are made evident in relation to these environments, explaining the temporal variation in the evolution of auditory alteration; the influence of tobacco and noise outside the workplace in the acquisition of acoustic trauma are confirmed.

  14. Empirical extensions of the lasso penalty to reduce the false discovery rate in high-dimensional Cox regression models.

    PubMed

    Ternès, Nils; Rotolo, Federico; Michiels, Stefan

    2016-07-10

    Correct selection of prognostic biomarkers among multiple candidates is becoming increasingly challenging as the dimensionality of biological data becomes higher. Therefore, minimizing the false discovery rate (FDR) is of primary importance, while a low false negative rate (FNR) is a complementary measure. The lasso is a popular selection method in Cox regression, but its results depend heavily on the penalty parameter λ. Usually, λ is chosen using maximum cross-validated log-likelihood (max-cvl). However, this method has often a very high FDR. We review methods for a more conservative choice of λ. We propose an empirical extension of the cvl by adding a penalization term, which trades off between the goodness-of-fit and the parsimony of the model, leading to the selection of fewer biomarkers and, as we show, to the reduction of the FDR without large increase in FNR. We conducted a simulation study considering null and moderately sparse alternative scenarios and compared our approach with the standard lasso and 10 other competitors: Akaike information criterion (AIC), corrected AIC, Bayesian information criterion (BIC), extended BIC, Hannan and Quinn information criterion (HQIC), risk information criterion (RIC), one-standard-error rule, adaptive lasso, stability selection, and percentile lasso. Our extension achieved the best compromise across all the scenarios between a reduction of the FDR and a limited raise of the FNR, followed by the AIC, the RIC, and the adaptive lasso, which performed well in some settings. We illustrate the methods using gene expression data of 523 breast cancer patients. In conclusion, we propose to apply our extension to the lasso whenever a stringent FDR with a limited FNR is targeted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Immortal time bias in critical care research: application of time-varying Cox regression for observational cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Ayumi K; Girard, Timothy D; Eden, Svetlana K; Arbogast, Patrick G; Moons, Karel G M; Ely, E Wesley

    2009-11-01

    To examine the bias introduced by using time-fixed methodology to analyze the effects of a time-varying exposure incurred in the intensive care unit. Prospective cohort and Monte Carlo simulation studies. Medical and coronary intensive care units in a university hospital. A total of 224 mechanically ventilated patients. Part I was a case study analyzing the association between delirium in the intensive care unit (exposure variable) and outcomes (intensive care unit length of stay and 6-mo mortality) in a prospective cohort study. Part II was a Monte Carlo simulation generating 16,000 data sets wherein the true associations between delirium and outcomes were known before analysis. In both parts, we assessed associations between delirium in the intensive care unit and outcomes (intensive care unit length of stay and mortality), using time-fixed vs. time-varying Cox regression methodology. In the case study, delirium analyzed as a time-fixed variable was associated with a delayed intensive care unit discharge (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.7, p < .001), but no association was noted using a time-varying method (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval = 0.7-1.6, p = .70). Alternatively, delirium analyzed as a time-fixed variable was not associated with 6-mo mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.9, 95% confidence interval, 0.9-5.0, p = .09), whereas delirium analyzed as a time-varying variable was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval, 1.4-7.7, p = .008). In the simulation study, time-fixed methods produced erroneous results in 97.1% of the data sets with no true association; time-varying methods produced erroneous results in only 3.7%. Similarly, time-fixed methods produced biased results when a true association was present, whereas time-varying methods produced accurate results. Studies using a time-fixed analytic approach to understand relationships between exposures and

  16. Formation of translational risk score based on correlation coefficients as an alternative to Cox regression models for predicting outcome in patients with NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Kössler, Wolfgang; Fiebeler, Anette; Willms, Arnulf; ElAidi, Tina; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Klinge, Uwe

    2011-07-27

    Personalised cancer therapy, such as that used for bronchial carcinoma (BC), requires treatment to be adjusted to the patient's status. Individual risk for progression is estimated from clinical and molecular-biological data using translational score systems. Additional molecular information can improve outcome prediction depending on the marker used and the applied algorithm. Two models, one based on regressions and the other on correlations, were used to investigate the effect of combining various items of prognostic information to produce a comprehensive score. This was carried out using correlation coefficients, with options concerning a more plausible selection of variables for modelling, and this is considered better than classical regression analysis. Clinical data concerning 63 BC patients were used to investigate the expression pattern of five tumour-associated proteins. Significant impact on survival was determined using log-rank tests. Significant variables were integrated into a Cox regression model and a new variable called integrative score of individual risk (ISIR), based on Spearman's correlations, was obtained. High tumour stage (TNM) was predictive for poor survival, while CD68 and Gas6 protein expression correlated with a favourable outcome. Cox regression model analysis predicted outcome more accurately than using each variable in isolation, and correctly classified 84% of patients as having a clear risk status. Calculation of the integrated score for an individual risk (ISIR), considering tumour size (T), lymph node status (N), metastasis (M), Gas6 and CD68 identified 82% of patients as having a clear risk status. Combining protein expression analysis of CD68 and GAS6 with T, N and M, using Cox regression or ISIR, improves prediction. Considering the increasing number of molecular markers, subsequent studies will be required to validate translational algorithms for the prognostic potential to select variables with a high prognostic power; the

  17. Involvement of COX2-Thromboxane Pathway in TCDD-Induced Precardiac Edema in Developing Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, Hiroki; Okuno, Yuki; Nijoukubo, Daisuke; Yamakoshi, Ayumi; Peterson, Richard E.; Stegeman, John J.; Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Kubota, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system is one of the most characteristic and important targets for developmental toxicity by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in fish larvae. However, knowledge of the mechanism of TCDD-induced edema after heterodimerization of aryl hydrocarbon receptor type 2 (AHR2) and AHR nuclear translocator type 1 (ARNT1) is still limited. In the present study, microscopic analysis with a high-speed camera revealed that TCDD increased the size of a small cavity between the heart and body wall in early eleutheroembryos, a toxic effect that we designate as precardiac edema. A concentration-response curve for precardiac edema at 2 days post fertilization (dpf) showed close similarity to that for conventional pericardial edema at 3 dpf. Precardiac edema caused by TCDD was reduced by morpholino knockdown of AHR2 and ARNT1, as well as by an antioxidant (ascorbic acid). A selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX2), NS398, also markedly inhibited TCDD-induced precardiac edema. A thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist, ICI-192,605 almost abolished TCDD-induced precardiac edema and this effect was cancelled by U46619, a TP agonist, which was not influential in the action of TCDD by itself. Knockdown of COX2b and thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXS), but not COX2a, strongly reduced TCDD-induced precardiac edema. Knockdown of COX2b was without effect on mesencephalic circulation failure caused by TCDD. The edema by TCDD was also inhibited by knockdown of c-mpl, a thrombopoietin receptor necessary for thromobocyte production. Finally, induction of COX2b, but not COX2a, by TCDD was seen in eleutheroembryos at 3 dpf. These results suggest a role of the COX2b-thromboxane pathway in precardiac edema formation following TCDD exposure in developing zebrafish. PMID:24858302

  18. Methodological comparison of marginal structural model, time-varying Cox regression, and propensity score methods: the example of antidepressant use and the risk of hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Sanni; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Belitser, Svetlana V; Souverein, Patrick C; Martín, Elisa; Gatto, Nicolle M; Huerta, Consuelo; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Roes, Kit C B; Hoes, Arno W; de Boer, Antonius; Klungel, Olaf H

    2016-03-01

    Observational studies including time-varying treatments are prone to confounding. We compared time-varying Cox regression analysis, propensity score (PS) methods, and marginal structural models (MSMs) in a study of antidepressant [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)] use and the risk of hip fracture. A cohort of patients with a first prescription for antidepressants (SSRI or tricyclic antidepressants) was extracted from the Dutch Mondriaan and Spanish Base de datos para la Investigación Farmacoepidemiológica en Atención Primaria (BIFAP) general practice databases for the period 2001-2009. The net (total) effect of SSRI versus no SSRI on the risk of hip fracture was estimated using time-varying Cox regression, stratification and covariate adjustment using the PS, and MSM. In MSM, censoring was accounted for by inverse probability of censoring weights. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of SSRI use versus no SSRI use on hip fracture was 1.75 (95%CI: 1.12, 2.72) in Mondriaan and 2.09 (1.89, 2.32) in BIFAP. After confounding adjustment using time-varying Cox regression, stratification, and covariate adjustment using the PS, HRs increased in Mondriaan [2.59 (1.63, 4.12), 2.64 (1.63, 4.25), and 2.82 (1.63, 4.25), respectively] and decreased in BIFAP [1.56 (1.40, 1.73), 1.54 (1.39, 1.71), and 1.61 (1.45, 1.78), respectively]. MSMs with stabilized weights yielded HR 2.15 (1.30, 3.55) in Mondriaan and 1.63 (1.28, 2.07) in BIFAP when accounting for censoring and 2.13 (1.32, 3.45) in Mondriaan and 1.66 (1.30, 2.12) in BIFAP without accounting for censoring. In this empirical study, differences between the different methods to control for time-dependent confounding were small. The observed differences in treatment effect estimates between the databases are likely attributable to different confounding information in the datasets, illustrating that adequate information on (time-varying) confounding is crucial to prevent bias. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Early development and regression in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y L; Leonard, H; Piek, J P; Downs, J

    2013-12-01

    This study utilized developmental profiling to examine symptoms in 14 girls with genetically confirmed Rett syndrome and whose families were participating in the Australian Rett syndrome or InterRett database. Regression was mostly characterized by loss of hand and/or communication skills (13/14) except one girl demonstrated slowing of skill development. Social withdrawal and inconsolable crying often developed simultaneously (9/14), with social withdrawal for shorter duration than inconsolable crying. Previously acquired gross motor skills declined in just over half of the sample (8/14), mostly observed as a loss of balance. Early abnormalities such as vomiting and strabismus were also seen. Our findings provide additional insight into the early clinical profile of Rett syndrome.

  20. A note on calculating asymptotic confidence intervals for the adjusted risk difference and number needed to treat in the Cox regression model.

    PubMed

    Laubender, Ruediger P; Bender, Ralf

    2014-02-28

    Recently, Laubender and Bender (Stat. Med. 2010; 29: 851-859) applied the average risk difference (RD) approach to estimate adjusted RD and corresponding number needed to treat measures in the Cox proportional hazards model. We calculated standard errors and confidence intervals by using bootstrap techniques. In this paper, we develop asymptotic variance estimates of the adjusted RD measures and corresponding asymptotic confidence intervals within the counting process theory and evaluated them in a simulation study. We illustrate the use of the asymptotic confidence intervals by means of data of the Düsseldorf Obesity Mortality Study.

  1. On the use of Cox regression to examine the temporal clustering of flooding and heavy precipitation across the central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallakpour, Iman; Villarini, Gabriele; Jones, Michael P.; Smith, James A.

    2017-08-01

    The central United States is plagued by frequent catastrophic flooding, such as the flood events of 1993, 2008, 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2016. The goal of this study is to examine whether it is possible to describe the occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events at the sub-seasonal scale in terms of variations in the climate system. Daily streamflow and precipitation time series over the central United States (defined here to include North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan) are used in this study. We model the occurrence/non-occurrence of a flood and heavy precipitation event over time using regression models based on Cox processes, which can be viewed as a generalization of Poisson processes. Rather than assuming that an event (i.e., flooding or precipitation) occurs independently of the occurrence of the previous one (as in Poisson processes), Cox processes allow us to account for the potential presence of temporal clustering, which manifests itself in an alternation of quiet and active periods. Here we model the occurrence/non-occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events using two climate indices as time-varying covariates: the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American pattern (PNA). We find that AO and/or PNA are important predictors in explaining the temporal clustering in flood occurrences in over 78% of the stream gages we considered. Similar results are obtained when working with heavy precipitation events. Analyses of the sensitivity of the results to different thresholds used to identify events lead to the same conclusions. The findings of this work highlight that variations in the climate system play a critical role in explaining the occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events at the sub-seasonal scale over the central United States.

  2. Examining Non-Linear Associations between Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and All-Cause Mortality Using Segmented Cox Regression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Healthy adults are advised to perform at least 150 min of moderate-intensity physical activity weekly, but this advice is based on studies using self-reports of questionable validity. This study examined the dose-response relationship of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality using segmented Cox regression to empirically determine the break-points of the dose-response relationship. Data from 7006 adult participants aged 18 or above in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2003–2004 and 2005–2006 were included in the analysis and linked with death certificate data using a probabilistic matching approach in the National Death Index through December 31, 2011. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured using ActiGraph model 7164 accelerometer over the right hip for 7 consecutive days. Each minute with accelerometer count <100; 1952–5724; and ≥5725 were classified as sedentary, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity, respectively. Segmented Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of time spent in sedentary behaviors, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity and all-cause mortality, adjusted for demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and health conditions. Data were analyzed in 2016. During 47,119 person-year of follow-up, 608 deaths occurred. Each additional hour per day of sedentary behaviors was associated with a HR of 1.15 (95% CI 1.01, 1.31) among participants who spend at least 10.9 h per day on sedentary behaviors, and each additional minute per day spent on moderate-intensity physical activity was associated with a HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.91, 0.96) among participants with daily moderate-intensity physical activity ≤14.1 min. Associations of moderate physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality were independent of each other. To conclude, evidence from

  3. Beyond COX-inhibition: 'side-effects' of ibuprofen on neoplastic development and progression.

    PubMed

    Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug of generalized use with over-the-counter availability. Population-based studies have provided evidence that its long-term use is associated with a 30-60% decrease in the risk of developing major types of cancer. Initially, the underlying molecular mechanism was thought to be exclusively dependent on its inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase activity, which is involved in the inflammatory response. However, numerous studies have now shown that the cancer chemopreventive properties of ibuprofen are much more complex and likely involve multiple COX-2-independent effects. Here we review the current knowledge on COX-independent effects of ibuprofen, which affect changes in gene expression or alternative splicing and act through various cell cycle- and apoptosis-regulating pathways, including β-catenin, NF-κB, PPARγ and p53.

  4. Reweighting estimators for Cox regression with missing covariate data: Analysis of insulin resistance and risk of stroke in the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Paik, Myunghee Cho; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete covariates often obscure analysis results from a Cox regression. In an analysis of the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS) to determine the influence of insulin resistance on the incidence of stroke in non-diabetic individuals, insulin level is unknown for 34.1% of the subjects. The available data suggest that the missingness mechanism depends on outcome variables, which may generate biases in estimating the parameters of interest if only using the complete observations. This article aimed to introduce practical strategies to analyze the NOMAS data and present sensitivity analyses by using the reweighting method in standard statistical packages. When the data set structure is in counting process style, the reweighting estimates can be obtained by built-in procedures with variance estimated by the jackknife method. Simulation results indicate that the jackknife variance estimate provides reasonable coverage probability in moderate sample sizes. We subsequently conducted sensitivity analyses for the NOMAS data, showing that the risk estimates are robust to a variety of missingness mechanisms. At the end of this article, we present the core SAS and R programs used in the analysis. PMID:21965165

  5. Assessing outcomes of large-scale public health interventions in the absence of baseline data using a mixture of Cox and binomial regressions.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Thierry; Abdous, Belkacem; Lowndes, Catherine M; Alary, Michel

    2014-01-07

    Large-scale public health interventions with rapid scale-up are increasingly being implemented worldwide. Such implementation allows for a large target population to be reached in a short period of time. But when the time comes to investigate the effectiveness of these interventions, the rapid scale-up creates several methodological challenges, such as the lack of baseline data and the absence of control groups. One example of such an intervention is Avahan, the India HIV/AIDS initiative of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. One question of interest is the effect of Avahan on condom use by female sex workers with their clients. By retrospectively reconstructing condom use and sex work history from survey data, it is possible to estimate how condom use rates evolve over time. However formal inference about how this rate changes at a given point in calendar time remains challenging. We propose a new statistical procedure based on a mixture of binomial regression and Cox regression. We compare this new method to an existing approach based on generalized estimating equations through simulations and application to Indian data. Both methods are unbiased, but the proposed method is more powerful than the existing method, especially when initial condom use is high. When applied to the Indian data, the new method mostly agrees with the existing method, but seems to have corrected some implausible results of the latter in a few districts. We also show how the new method can be used to analyze the data of all districts combined. The use of both methods can be recommended for exploratory data analysis. However for formal statistical inference, the new method has better power.

  6. Isomeric methoxy analogs of nimesulide for development of brain cyclooxygense-2 (COX-2)-targeted imaging agents: Synthesis, in vitro COX-2-inhibitory potency, and cellular transport properties.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Hisa, Takuya; Arai, Jun; Saito, Yohei; Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Mukai, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Maeda, Minoru; Ohkubo, Yasuhito

    2015-11-01

    Nimesulide analogs bearing a methoxy substituent either at the ortho-, meta- or para-position on the phenyl ring, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for potential as radioligands for brain cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) imaging. The synthesis of nimesulide and regioisomeric methoxy analogs was based on the copper-mediated arylation of phenolic derivatives for the construction of diaryl ethers. These isomeric methoxy analogs displayed lipophilicity similar to that of nimesulide itself, as evidenced by their HPLC logP7.4 values. In vitro inhibition studies using a colorimetric COX (ovine) inhibitor-screening assay demonstrated that the para-methoxy substituted analog retains the inhibition ability and selectivity observed for parent nimesulide toward COX-2 enzyme, whereas the meta- and ortho-methoxy substituents detrimentally affected COX-2-inhibition activity, which was further supported by molecular docking studies. Bidirectional transport cellular studies using Caco-2 cell culture model in the presence of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, verapamil, showed that P-gp did not have a significant effect on the efflux of the para-methoxy substituted analog. Further investigations using the radiolabeled form of the para-methoxy substituted analog is warranted for in vivo characterization.

  7. Parental report of the early development of children with regressive autism: the delays-plus-regression phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ozonoff, Sally; Williams, Brenda J; Landa, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    Most children with autism demonstrate developmental abnormalities in their first year, whereas others display regression after mostly normal development. Few studies have examined the early development of the latter group. This study developed a retrospective measure, the Early Development Questionnaire (EDQ), to collect specific, parent-reported information about development in the first 18 months. Based on their EDQ scores, 60 children with autism between the ages of 3 and 9 were divided into three groups: an early onset group (n = 29), a definite regression group (n = 23), and a heterogeneous mixed group (n = 8). Significant differences in early social development were found between the early onset and regression groups. However, over 50 percent of the children who experienced a regression demonstrated some early social deficits during the first year of life, long before regression and the apparent onset of autism. This group, tentatively labeled 'delays-plus-regression', deserves further study.

  8. A Comparison of Seven Cox Regression-Based Models to Account for Heterogeneity Across Multiple HIV Treatment Cohorts in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Giganti, Mark J.; Luz, Paula M.; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Cesar, Carina; Padgett, Denis; Koenig, Serena; Echevarria, Juan; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many studies of HIV/AIDS aggregate data from multiple cohorts to improve power and generalizability. There are several analysis approaches to account for cross-cohort heterogeneity; we assessed how different approaches can impact results from an HIV/AIDS study investigating predictors of mortality. Using data from 13,658 HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy from seven Latin American and Caribbean cohorts, we illustrate the assumptions of seven readily implementable approaches to account for across cohort heterogeneity with Cox proportional hazards models, and we compare hazard ratio estimates across approaches. As a sensitivity analysis, we modify cohort membership to generate specific heterogeneity conditions. Hazard ratio estimates varied slightly between the seven analysis approaches, but differences were not clinically meaningful. Adjusted hazard ratio estimates for the association between AIDS at treatment initiation and death varied from 2.00 to 2.20 across approaches that accounted for heterogeneity; the adjusted hazard ratio was estimated as 1.73 in analyses that ignored across cohort heterogeneity. In sensitivity analyses with more extreme heterogeneity, we noted a slightly greater distinction between approaches. Despite substantial heterogeneity between cohorts, the impact of the specific approach to account for heterogeneity was minimal in our case study. Our results suggest that it is important to account for across cohort heterogeneity in analyses, but that the specific technique for addressing heterogeneity may be less important. Because of their flexibility in accounting for cohort heterogeneity, we prefer stratification or meta-analysis methods, but we encourage investigators to consider their specific study conditions and objectives. PMID:25647087

  9. Inhibition of COX 1 and 2 prior to Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Decreases the Development of Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Feitoza, Carla Q; Gonçalves, Giselle M; Semedo, Patrícia; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Pinheiro, Hélady S; Beraldo, Felipe Caetano; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; de Paula A Teixeira, Vicente; dos Reis, Marlene A; Mazzali, Marilda; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels O S

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) contributes to the development of chronic interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy in renal allograft patients. Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 actively participate in acute ischemic injury by activating endothelial cells and inducing oxidative stress. Furthermore, blockade of COX 1 and 2 has been associated with organ improvement after ischemic damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of COX 1 and 2 in the development of fibrosis by performing a COX 1 and 2 blockade immediately before IRI. We subjected C57Bl/6 male mice to 60 min of unilateral renal pedicle occlusion. Prior to surgery mice were either treated with indomethacin (IMT) at days –1 and 0 or were untreated. Blood and kidney samples were collected 6 wks after IRI. Kidney samples were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), osteopontin (OPN), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), vimentin, connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I, and bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7). To assess tissue fibrosis we performed morphometric analyses and Sirius red staining. We also performed immunohistochemical analysis of anti-actin smooth muscle. Renal function did not significantly differ between groups. Animals pretreated with IMT showed significantly less interstitial fibrosis than nontreated animals. Gene transcript analyses showed decreased expression of TGF-β, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1-β, vimentin, collagen I, CTGF, and IL-10 mRNA (all P < 0.05). Moreover, HO-1 mRNA was increased in animals pretreated with IMT (P < 0.05). Conversely, IMT treatment decreased osteopontin expression and enhanced BMP-7 expression, although these levels did not reach statistical significance when compared with control expression levels. The blockade of COX 1 and 2 resulted in less tissue fibrosis, which

  10. Comparing Methodologies for Developing an Early Warning System: Classification and Regression Tree Model versus Logistic Regression. REL 2015-077

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to explicate the use of logistic regression and classification and regression tree (CART) analysis in the development of early warning systems. It was motivated by state education leaders' interest in maintaining high classification accuracy while simultaneously improving practitioner understanding of the rules by…

  11. Development and Application of Nonlinear Land-Use Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champendal, Alexandre; Kanevski, Mikhail; Huguenot, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The problem of air pollution modelling in urban zones is of great importance both from scientific and applied points of view. At present there are several fundamental approaches either based on science-based modelling (air pollution dispersion) or on the application of space-time geostatistical methods (e.g. family of kriging models or conditional stochastic simulations). Recently, there were important developments in so-called Land Use Regression (LUR) models. These models take into account geospatial information (e.g. traffic network, sources of pollution, average traffic, population census, land use, etc.) at different scales, for example, using buffering operations. Usually the dimension of the input space (number of independent variables) is within the range of (10-100). It was shown that LUR models have some potential to model complex and highly variable patterns of air pollution in urban zones. Most of LUR models currently used are linear models. In the present research the nonlinear LUR models are developed and applied for Geneva city. Mainly two nonlinear data-driven models were elaborated: multilayer perceptron and random forest. An important part of the research deals also with a comprehensive exploratory data analysis using statistical, geostatistical and time series tools. Unsupervised self-organizing maps were applied to better understand space-time patterns of the pollution. The real data case study deals with spatial-temporal air pollution data of Geneva (2002-2011). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has caught our attention. It has effects on human health and on plants; NO2 contributes to the phenomenon of acid rain. The negative effects of nitrogen dioxides on plants are the reduction of the growth, production and pesticide resistance. And finally, the effects on materials: nitrogen dioxide increases the corrosion. The data used for this study consist of a set of 106 NO2 passive sensors. 80 were used to build the models and the remaining 36 have constituted

  12. Heterogeneous Breast Phantom Development for Microwave Imaging Using Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Camerin; Noghanian, Sima

    2012-01-01

    As new algorithms for microwave imaging emerge, it is important to have standard accurate benchmarking tests. Currently, most researchers use homogeneous phantoms for testing new algorithms. These simple structures lack the heterogeneity of the dielectric properties of human tissue and are inadequate for testing these algorithms for medical imaging. To adequately test breast microwave imaging algorithms, the phantom has to resemble different breast tissues physically and in terms of dielectric properties. We propose a systematic approach in designing phantoms that not only have dielectric properties close to breast tissues but also can be easily shaped to realistic physical models. The approach is based on regression model to match phantom's dielectric properties with the breast tissue dielectric properties found in Lazebnik et al. (2007). However, the methodology proposed here can be used to create phantoms for any tissue type as long as ex vivo, in vitro, or in vivo tissue dielectric properties are measured and available. Therefore, using this method, accurate benchmarking phantoms for testing emerging microwave imaging algorithms can be developed. PMID:22550473

  13. Tree-augmented Cox proportional hazards models.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaogang; Tsai, Chih-Ling

    2005-07-01

    We study a hybrid model that combines Cox proportional hazards regression with tree-structured modeling. The main idea is to use step functions, provided by a tree structure, to 'augment' Cox (1972) proportional hazards models. The proposed model not only provides a natural assessment of the adequacy of the Cox proportional hazards model but also improves its model fitting without loss of interpretability. Both simulations and an empirical example are provided to illustrate the use of the proposed method.

  14. Do Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Students Understand Linear Regression? Development and Early Validation of the REGRESS Quiz

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Although regression is widely used for reading and publishing in the medical literature, no instruments were previously available to assess students’ understanding. The goal of this study was to design and assess such an instrument for graduate students in Clinical and Translational Science and Public Health. Methods A 27‐item REsearch on Global Regression Expectations in StatisticS (REGRESS) quiz was developed through an iterative process. Consenting students taking a course on linear regression in a Clinical and Translational Science program completed the quiz pre‐ and postcourse. Student results were compared to practicing statisticians with a master's or doctoral degree in statistics or a closely related field. Results Fifty‐two students responded precourse, 59 postcourse , and 22 practicing statisticians completed the quiz. The mean (SD) score was 9.3 (4.3) for students precourse and 19.0 (3.5) postcourse (P < 0.001). Postcourse students had similar results to practicing statisticians (mean (SD) of 20.1(3.5); P = 0.21). Students also showed significant improvement pre/postcourse in each of six domain areas (P < 0.001). The REGRESS quiz was internally reliable (Cronbach's alpha 0.89). Conclusion The initial validation is quite promising with statistically significant and meaningful differences across time and study populations. Further work is needed to validate the quiz across multiple institutions. PMID:24330688

  15. Do clinical and translational science graduate students understand linear regression? Development and early validation of the REGRESS quiz.

    PubMed

    Enders, Felicity

    2013-12-01

    Although regression is widely used for reading and publishing in the medical literature, no instruments were previously available to assess students' understanding. The goal of this study was to design and assess such an instrument for graduate students in Clinical and Translational Science and Public Health. A 27-item REsearch on Global Regression Expectations in StatisticS (REGRESS) quiz was developed through an iterative process. Consenting students taking a course on linear regression in a Clinical and Translational Science program completed the quiz pre- and postcourse. Student results were compared to practicing statisticians with a master's or doctoral degree in statistics or a closely related field. Fifty-two students responded precourse, 59 postcourse , and 22 practicing statisticians completed the quiz. The mean (SD) score was 9.3 (4.3) for students precourse and 19.0 (3.5) postcourse (P < 0.001). Postcourse students had similar results to practicing statisticians (mean (SD) of 20.1(3.5); P = 0.21). Students also showed significant improvement pre/postcourse in each of six domain areas (P < 0.001). The REGRESS quiz was internally reliable (Cronbach's alpha 0.89). The initial validation is quite promising with statistically significant and meaningful differences across time and study populations. Further work is needed to validate the quiz across multiple institutions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy—A Hypothesis-Driven Review

    PubMed Central

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  17. Ahr2-dependence of PCB126 effects on the swim bladder in relation to expression of CYP1 and cox-2 genes in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Jönsson, Maria E.; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Woodin, Bruce; Stegeman, John J.

    2012-12-01

    The teleost swim bladder is assumed a homolog of the tetrapod lung. Both swim bladder and lung are developmental targets of persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists; in zebrafish (Danio rerio) the swim bladder fails to inflate with exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but studies have suggested roles of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in some Ahr-mediated developmental effects in zebrafish. We determined relationships between swim bladder inflation and CYP1 and Cox-2 mRNA expression in PCB126-exposed zebrafish embryos. We also examined effects on β-catenin dependent transcription, histological effects, and Ahr2 dependence of the effect of PCB126 on swim bladder using morpholinos targeting ahr2. One-day-old embryos were exposed to waterborne PCB126 or carrier (DMSO) for 24 h and then held in clean water until day 4, a normal time for swim bladder inflation. The effects of PCB126 were concentration-dependent with EC{sub 50} values of 1.4 to 2.0 nM for induction of the CYP1s, 3.7 and 5.1 nM (or higher) for cox-2a and cox-2b induction, and 2.5 nM for inhibition of swim bladder inflation. Histological defects included a compaction of the developing bladder. Ahr2-morpholino treatment rescued the effect of PCB126 (5 nM) on swim bladder inflation and blocked induction of CYP1A, cox-2a, and cox-2b. With 2 nM PCB126 approximately 30% of eleutheroembryos failed to inflate the swim bladder, but there was no difference in CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA expression between those embryos and embryos showing inflated swim bladder. Our results indicate that PCB126 blocks swim bladder inflation via an Ahr2-mediated mechanism. This mechanism seems independent of CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA induction but may involve abnormal development of swim bladder cells. -- Highlights: ► PCB126 caused cellular changes in the developing swim bladder. ► Swim bladder inflation was not related to expression of CYP1 or cox

  18. Development of Ni1-xCoxO as the cathode/interconnect contact for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zigui; Xia, Guanguang; Templeton, Joshua D.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Nie, Zimin; Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-06-01

    A new type of material, Ni1-xCoxO, was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode/interconnect contact applications. The phase structure, coefficient of thermal expansion, sintering behavior, electrical property, and mechanical bonding strength of these materials were evaluated against the requirements of the SOFC cathode/interconnect contact. A dense cathode/interconnect contact layer was developed through reaction sintering from Ni and Co metal powders. An area specific resistance (ASR) as low as 5.5 mohm.cm2 was observed after 1000 h exposure in air at 800 °C for the LSM/Ni0.33Co0.67O/AISI441 assembly. Average mechanical strengths of 6.8 and 5.0 MPa were obtained for the cathode/contact/cathode and interconnect/contact/interconnect structures, respectively. The significantly low ASR was probably due to the dense structure and therefore improved electrical conductivity of the Ni0.33Co0.67O contact and the good bonding of the interfaces between the contact and the cathode, and between the contact and the interconnect.

  19. Multiple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    This chapter deals with the multiple linear regression. That is we investigate the situation where the mean of a variable depends linearly on a set of covariables. The noise is supposed to be gaussian. We develop the least squared method to get the parameter estimators and estimates of their precisions. This leads to design confidence intervals, prediction intervals, global tests, individual tests and more generally tests of submodels defined by linear constraints. Methods for model's choice and variables selection, measures of the quality of the fit, residuals study, diagnostic methods are presented. Finally identification of departures from the model's assumptions and the way to deal with these problems are addressed. A real data set is used to illustrate the methodology with software R. Note that this chapter is intended to serve as a guide for other regression methods, like logistic regression or AFT models and Cox regression.

  20. Ahr2-dependence of PCB126 effects on the swim bladder in relation to expression of CYP1 and cox-2 genes in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Maria E; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R; Woodin, Bruce; Stegeman, John J

    2012-12-01

    The teleost swim bladder is assumed a homolog of the tetrapod lung. Both swim bladder and lung are developmental targets of persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR(2)) agonists; in zebrafish (Danio rerio) the swim bladder fails to inflate with exposure to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but studies have suggested roles of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in some Ahr-mediated developmental effects in zebrafish. We determined relationships between swim bladder inflation and CYP1 and Cox-2 mRNA expression in PCB126-exposed zebrafish embryos. We also examined effects on β-catenin dependent transcription, histological effects, and Ahr2 dependence of the effect of PCB126 on swim bladder using morpholinos targeting ahr2. One-day-old embryos were exposed to waterborne PCB126 or carrier (DMSO) for 24h and then held in clean water until day 4, a normal time for swim bladder inflation. The effects of PCB126 were concentration-dependent with EC(50) values of 1.4 to 2.0 nM for induction of the CYP1s, 3.7 and 5.1 nM (or higher) for cox-2a and cox-2b induction, and 2.5 nM for inhibition of swim bladder inflation. Histological defects included a compaction of the developing bladder. Ahr2-morpholino treatment rescued the effect of PCB126 (5 nM) on swim bladder inflation and blocked induction of CYP1A, cox-2a, and cox-2b. With 2nM PCB126 approximately 30% of eleutheroembryos(3) failed to inflate the swim bladder, but there was no difference in CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA expression between those embryos and embryos showing inflated swim bladder. Our results indicate that PCB126 blocks swim bladder inflation via an Ahr2-mediated mechanism. This mechanism seems independent of CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA induction but may involve abnormal development of swim bladder cells.

  1. Comparison of Bayesian regression models and partial least squares regression for the development of infrared prediction equations.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Tiezzi, F; Miglior, F; Carnier, P

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prediction accuracy of 92 infrared prediction equations obtained by different statistical approaches. The predicted traits included fatty acid composition (n = 1,040); detailed protein composition (n = 1,137); lactoferrin (n = 558); pH and coagulation properties (n = 1,296); curd yield and composition obtained by a micro-cheese making procedure (n = 1,177); and Ca, P, Mg, and K contents (n = 689). The statistical methods used to develop the prediction equations were partial least squares regression (PLSR), Bayesian ridge regression, Bayes A, Bayes B, Bayes C, and Bayesian least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. Model performances were assessed, for each trait and model, in training and validation sets over 10 replicates. In validation sets, Bayesian regression models performed significantly better than PLSR for the prediction of 33 out of 92 traits, especially fatty acids, whereas they yielded a significantly lower prediction accuracy than PLSR in the prediction of 8 traits: the percentage of C18:1n-7 trans-9 in fat; the content of unglycosylated κ-casein and its percentage in protein; the content of α-lactalbumin; the percentage of αS2-casein in protein; and the contents of Ca, P, and Mg. Even though Bayesian methods produced a significant enhancement of model accuracy in many traits compared with PLSR, most variations in the coefficient of determination in validation sets were smaller than 1 percentage point. Over traits, the highest predictive ability was obtained by Bayes C even though most of the significant differences in accuracy between Bayesian regression models were negligible. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Incorporating scientific knowledge into phenotype development: penalized latent class regression.

    PubMed

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Zandi, Peter P

    2011-03-30

    The field of psychiatric genetics is hampered by the lack of a clear taxonomy for disorders. Building on the work of Houseman and colleagues (Feature-specific penalized latent class analysis for genomic data. Harvard University Biostatistics Working Paper Series, Working Paper 22, 2005), we describe a penalized latent class regression aimed at allowing additional scientific information to influence the estimation of the measurement model, while retaining the standard assumption of non-differential measurement. In simulation studies, ridge and LASSO penalty functions improved the precision of estimates and, in some cases of differential measurement, also reduced bias. Class-specific penalization enhanced separation of latent classes with respect to covariates, but only in scenarios where there was a true separation. Penalization proved to be less computationally intensive than an analogous Bayesian analysis by a factor of 37. This methodology was then applied to data from normal elderly subjects from the Cache County Study on Memory and Aging. Addition of APO-E genotype and a number of baseline clinical covariates improved the dementia prediction utility of the latent classes; application of class-specific penalization improved precision while retaining that prediction utility. This methodology may be useful in scenarios with large numbers of collinear covariates or in certain cases where latent class model assumptions are violated. Investigation of novel penalty functions may prove fruitful in further refining psychiatric phenotypes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Process of speech acquisition and development of autistic children with or without autistic regression.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Ana Carina; Machado, Gislaine Mara Guerra; Loebmann, Carla; Perissinoto, Jacy

    2014-01-01

    To compare the trajectory of acquisition speech and development of autistic children with or without autistic regression. The sample consisted of 64 children, aged 3-10 years, of both genders, diagnosed by a multidisciplinary team with autism. In the analysis were investigated during the interview: mention whether or not the episode regression speech reported by parents; number of words produced in a minimum period of three months prior to detection of regression; mention whether or not the episode regression social behaviors concomitant arrest in speech, verbal and production at three years of age. We adopted a significance level of 5% for statistical analysis. Thirty one percent of children had speech regression. These, 100% showed regression of social behaviors. Mean words produced before the detection regression were five. The groups did not show difference on the period of acquisition and development of speech. It was possible to compare the trajectory speech development of children with or without regression. And we did not find that the children affected by autistic regression period show more positive clinical outcome in relation to the production of speech.

  4. The development of a flyover noise prediction technique using multiple linear regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathgeber, R. K.

    1981-04-01

    At Cessna Aircraft Company, statistical analyses have been developed to define important trends in flyover noise data. Multiple regression techniques have provided the means to develop flyover noise prediction methods which have resulted in better accuracy than methods used in the past. Regression analyses have been conducted to determine the important relationship between propeller helical tip Mach number and the flyover noise level. Other variables have been included in the regression models either because the added variable contributed to reducing the remaining variation in the model or the variable appeared to be a strong causal agent of flyover noise.

  5. External validation of a Cox prognostic model: principles and methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A prognostic model should not enter clinical practice unless it has been demonstrated that it performs a useful role. External validation denotes evaluation of model performance in a sample independent of that used to develop the model. Unlike for logistic regression models, external validation of Cox models is sparsely treated in the literature. Successful validation of a model means achieving satisfactory discrimination and calibration (prediction accuracy) in the validation sample. Validating Cox models is not straightforward because event probabilities are estimated relative to an unspecified baseline function. Methods We describe statistical approaches to external validation of a published Cox model according to the level of published information, specifically (1) the prognostic index only, (2) the prognostic index together with Kaplan-Meier curves for risk groups, and (3) the first two plus the baseline survival curve (the estimated survival function at the mean prognostic index across the sample). The most challenging task, requiring level 3 information, is assessing calibration, for which we suggest a method of approximating the baseline survival function. Results We apply the methods to two comparable datasets in primary breast cancer, treating one as derivation and the other as validation sample. Results are presented for discrimination and calibration. We demonstrate plots of survival probabilities that can assist model evaluation. Conclusions Our validation methods are applicable to a wide range of prognostic studies and provide researchers with a toolkit for external validation of a published Cox model. PMID:23496923

  6. External validation of a Cox prognostic model: principles and methods.

    PubMed

    Royston, Patrick; Altman, Douglas G

    2013-03-06

    A prognostic model should not enter clinical practice unless it has been demonstrated that it performs a useful role. External validation denotes evaluation of model performance in a sample independent of that used to develop the model. Unlike for logistic regression models, external validation of Cox models is sparsely treated in the literature. Successful validation of a model means achieving satisfactory discrimination and calibration (prediction accuracy) in the validation sample. Validating Cox models is not straightforward because event probabilities are estimated relative to an unspecified baseline function. We describe statistical approaches to external validation of a published Cox model according to the level of published information, specifically (1) the prognostic index only, (2) the prognostic index together with Kaplan-Meier curves for risk groups, and (3) the first two plus the baseline survival curve (the estimated survival function at the mean prognostic index across the sample). The most challenging task, requiring level 3 information, is assessing calibration, for which we suggest a method of approximating the baseline survival function. We apply the methods to two comparable datasets in primary breast cancer, treating one as derivation and the other as validation sample. Results are presented for discrimination and calibration. We demonstrate plots of survival probabilities that can assist model evaluation. Our validation methods are applicable to a wide range of prognostic studies and provide researchers with a toolkit for external validation of a published Cox model.

  7. Development of a User Interface for a Regression Analysis Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    An easy-to -use user interface was implemented in a highly automated regression analysis tool. The user interface was developed from the start to run on computers that use the Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or UNIX operating system. Many user interface features were specifically designed such that a novice or inexperienced user can apply the regression analysis tool with confidence. Therefore, the user interface s design minimizes interactive input from the user. In addition, reasonable default combinations are assigned to those analysis settings that influence the outcome of the regression analysis. These default combinations will lead to a successful regression analysis result for most experimental data sets. The user interface comes in two versions. The text user interface version is used for the ongoing development of the regression analysis tool. The official release of the regression analysis tool, on the other hand, has a graphical user interface that is more efficient to use. This graphical user interface displays all input file names, output file names, and analysis settings for a specific software application mode on a single screen which makes it easier to generate reliable analysis results and to perform input parameter studies. An object-oriented approach was used for the development of the graphical user interface. This choice keeps future software maintenance costs to a reasonable limit. Examples of both the text user interface and graphical user interface are discussed in order to illustrate the user interface s overall design approach.

  8. Choline-to-N-acetyl aspartate and lipids-lactate-to-creatine ratios together with age assemble a significant Cox's proportional-hazards regression model for prediction of survival in high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Rios, Camilo; Motola-Kuba, Daniel; Matus-Santos, Juan; Villa, Antonio R; Moreno-Jimenez, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    A long-lasting concern has prevailed for the identification of predictive biomarkers for high-grade gliomas (HGGs) using MRI. However, a consensus of which imaging parameters assemble a significant survival model is still missing in the literature; we investigated the significant positive or negative contribution of several MR biomarkers in this tumour prognosis. A retrospective cohort of supratentorial HGGs [11 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 17 anaplastic astrocytomas] included 28 patients (9 females and 19 males, respectively, with a mean age of 50.4 years, standard deviation: 16.28 years; range: 13-85 years). Oedema and viable tumour measurements were acquired using regions of interest in T1 weighted, T2 weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and MR spectroscopy (MRS). We calculated Kaplan-Meier curves and obtained Cox's proportional hazards. During the follow-up period (3-98 months), 17 deaths were recorded. The median survival time was 1.73 years (range, 0.287-8.947 years). Only 3 out of 20 covariates (choline-to-N-acetyl aspartate and lipids-lactate-to-creatine ratios and age) showed significance in explaining the variability in the survival hazards model; score test: χ(2) (3) = 9.098, p = 0.028. MRS metabolites overcome volumetric parameters of peritumoral oedema and viable tumour, as well as tumour region ADC measurements. Specific MRS ratios (Cho/Naa, L-L/Cr) might be considered in a regular follow-up for these tumours. Advances in knowledge: Cho/Naa ratio is the strongest survival predictor with a log-hazard function of 2.672 in GBM. Low levels of lipids-lactate/Cr ratio represent up to a 41.6% reduction in the risk of death in GBM.

  9. Developing and testing a global-scale regression model to quantify mean annual streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarossa, Valerio; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Hendriks, A. Jan; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Clavreul, Julie; King, Henry; Schipper, Aafke M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying mean annual flow of rivers (MAF) at ungauged sites is essential for assessments of global water supply, ecosystem integrity and water footprints. MAF can be quantified with spatially explicit process-based models, which might be overly time-consuming and data-intensive for this purpose, or with empirical regression models that predict MAF based on climate and catchment characteristics. Yet, regression models have mostly been developed at a regional scale and the extent to which they can be extrapolated to other regions is not known. In this study, we developed a global-scale regression model for MAF based on a dataset unprecedented in size, using observations of discharge and catchment characteristics from 1885 catchments worldwide, measuring between 2 and 106 km2. In addition, we compared the performance of the regression model with the predictive ability of the spatially explicit global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB by comparing results from both models to independent measurements. We obtained a regression model explaining 89% of the variance in MAF based on catchment area and catchment averaged mean annual precipitation and air temperature, slope and elevation. The regression model performed better than PCR-GLOBWB for the prediction of MAF, as root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were lower (0.29-0.38 compared to 0.49-0.57) and the modified index of agreement (d) was higher (0.80-0.83 compared to 0.72-0.75). Our regression model can be applied globally to estimate MAF at any point of the river network, thus providing a feasible alternative to spatially explicit process-based global hydrological models.

  10. COX-2 chronology

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J

    2005-01-01

    The role of selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors in medical practice has become controversial since evidence emerged that their use is associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction. Selective COX-2 inhibitors were seen as successor to non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, in turn successors to aspirin. The importance of pain relief means that such drugs have always attracted attention. The fact that they work through inhibition of cyclooxygenase, are widespread, and have multiple effects also means that adverse effects that were unanticipated (even though predictable) have always emerged. In this paper I therefore present an historical perspective so that the lessons of the past may be applied to the present. PMID:16227351

  11. Cox-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, E

    1999-01-01

    Increasing pharmacy costs are among the fastest growing segments of the health care budget. Health plans are focusing on appropriately managing pharmaceutical costs, both from a long-term global perspective and a short-term approach emphasizing newly marketed products. Over the next six months, cox-2 inhibitors are expected to be approved by the FDA. This new class of drugs, investigated as a safer alternative to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), is among the most highly anticipated medications to hit the marketplace. How health plans react to the launch of cox-2 inhibitors may serve as an example for future pharmacy management efforts. A proactive policy regarding the use of cox-2 inhibitors may be challenging, but should include: Reviewing clinical information; evaluating the cost of the new drug; and identifying appropriate patient selection criteria. The available management strategies include precertification, a tiered co-payment system, restricting prescriptions to a provider specialty, retrospective physician profiling, and physician education.

  12. Some notes on the role of development in psychoanalytic assistance, differentiation, and regression.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Peter B

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines the role of development assistance as a therapeutic measure within the normal psychoanalytic technique. Freud's definition of assistance "that the analyst gives the patient ... the conscious anticipatory idea to grasp the unconscious material." This proposal is elaborated in the context of developmental differentiation and regression.

  13. The Development of Salary Goal Modeling: From Regression Analysis to a Value-Based Prescriptive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Kenneth D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Development of a comprehensive, pro-active, value-centered model for reviewing college faculty salaries is described. The model, used at Frostburg State University (Maryland), draws on multiple-regression applications to salary equity issues. Applications of the model in evaluating, redressing, and preventing salary equity problems are presented.…

  14. The Development and Demonstration of Multiple Regression Models for Operant Conditioning Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanning, Fred; Newman, Isadore

    Based on the assumption that inferential statistics can make the operant conditioner more sensitive to possible significant relationships, regressions models were developed to test the statistical significance between slopes and Y intercepts of the experimental and control group subjects. These results were then compared to the traditional operant…

  15. Development and Application of Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) for Estimating Atrazine Concentration Distributions in Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Steven J.; Crawford, Charles G.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Regression models were developed for predicting atrazine concentration distributions in rivers and streams, using the Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) methodology. Separate regression equations were derived for each of nine percentiles of the annual distribution of atrazine concentrations and for the annual time-weighted mean atrazine concentration. In addition, seasonal models were developed for two specific periods of the year--the high season, when the highest atrazine concentrations are expected in streams, and the low season, when concentrations are expected to be low or undetectable. Various nationally available watershed parameters were used as explanatory variables, including atrazine use intensity, soil characteristics, hydrologic parameters, climate and weather variables, land use, and agricultural management practices. Concentration data from 112 river and stream stations sampled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment and National Stream Quality Accounting Network Programs were used for computing the concentration percentiles and mean concentrations used as the response variables in regression models. Tobit regression methods, using maximum likelihood estimation, were used for developing the models because some of the concentration values used for the response variables were censored (reported as less than a detection threshold). Data from 26 stations not used for model development were used for model validation. The annual models accounted for 62 to 77 percent of the variability in concentrations among the 112 model development stations. Atrazine use intensity (the amount of atrazine used in the watershed divided by watershed area) was the most important explanatory variable in all models, but additional watershed parameters significantly increased the amount of variability explained by the models. Predicted concentrations from all 10 models were within a factor of 10 of the observed concentrations at most

  16. Introduction to the use of regression models in epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Regression modeling is one of the most important statistical techniques used in analytical epidemiology. By means of regression models the effect of one or several explanatory variables (e.g., exposures, subject characteristics, risk factors) on a response variable such as mortality or cancer can be investigated. From multiple regression models, adjusted effect estimates can be obtained that take the effect of potential confounders into account. Regression methods can be applied in all epidemiologic study designs so that they represent a universal tool for data analysis in epidemiology. Different kinds of regression models have been developed in dependence on the measurement scale of the response variable and the study design. The most important methods are linear regression for continuous outcomes, logistic regression for binary outcomes, Cox regression for time-to-event data, and Poisson regression for frequencies and rates. This chapter provides a nontechnical introduction to these regression models with illustrating examples from cancer research.

  17. Box-Cox transformation for QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqing; Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    The maximum likelihood method of QTL mapping assumes that the phenotypic values of a quantitative trait follow a normal distribution. If the assumption is violated, some forms of transformation should be taken to make the assumption approximately true. The Box-Cox transformation is a general transformation method which can be applied to many different types of data. The flexibility of the Box-Cox transformation is due to a variable, called transformation factor, appearing in the Box-Cox formula. We developed a maximum likelihood method that treats the transformation factor as an unknown parameter, which is estimated from the data simultaneously along with the QTL parameters. The method makes an objective choice of data transformation and thus can be applied to QTL analysis for many different types of data. Simulation studies show that (1) Box-Cox transformation can substantially increase the power of QTL detection; (2) Box-Cox transformation can replace some specialized transformation methods that are commonly used in QTL mapping; and (3) applying the Box-Cox transformation to data already normally distributed does not harm the result.

  18. Machine learning algorithms outperform conventional regression models in predicting development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singal, Amit G; Mukherjee, Ashin; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Higgins, Peter D R; Lok, Anna S; Zhu, Ji; Marrero, Jorge A; Waljee, Akbar K

    2013-11-01

    Predictive models for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been limited by modest accuracy and lack of validation. Machine-learning algorithms offer a novel methodology, which may improve HCC risk prognostication among patients with cirrhosis. Our study's aim was to develop and compare predictive models for HCC development among cirrhotic patients, using conventional regression analysis and machine-learning algorithms. We enrolled 442 patients with Child A or B cirrhosis at the University of Michigan between January 2004 and September 2006 (UM cohort) and prospectively followed them until HCC development, liver transplantation, death, or study termination. Regression analysis and machine-learning algorithms were used to construct predictive models for HCC development, which were tested on an independent validation cohort from the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial. Both models were also compared with the previously published HALT-C model. Discrimination was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, and diagnostic accuracy was assessed with net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement statistics. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 41 patients developed HCC. The UM regression model had a c-statistic of 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.67), whereas the machine-learning algorithm had a c-statistic of 0.64 (95% CI 0.60-0.69) in the validation cohort. The HALT-C model had a c-statistic of 0.60 (95% CI 0.50-0.70) in the validation cohort and was outperformed by the machine-learning algorithm. The machine-learning algorithm had significantly better diagnostic accuracy as assessed by net reclassification improvement (P<0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (P=0.04). Machine-learning algorithms improve the accuracy of risk stratifying patients with cirrhosis and can be used to accurately identify patients at high-risk for developing HCC.

  19. Machine Learning Algorithms Outperform Conventional Regression Models in Predicting Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Amit G.; Mukherjee, Ashin; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Higgins, Peter DR; Lok, Anna S.; Zhu, Ji; Marrero, Jorge A; Waljee, Akbar K

    2015-01-01

    Background Predictive models for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been limited by modest accuracy and lack of validation. Machine learning algorithms offer a novel methodology, which may improve HCC risk prognostication among patients with cirrhosis. Our study's aim was to develop and compare predictive models for HCC development among cirrhotic patients, using conventional regression analysis and machine learning algorithms. Methods We enrolled 442 patients with Child A or B cirrhosis at the University of Michigan between January 2004 and September 2006 (UM cohort) and prospectively followed them until HCC development, liver transplantation, death, or study termination. Regression analysis and machine learning algorithms were used to construct predictive models for HCC development, which were tested on an independent validation cohort from the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial. Both models were also compared to the previously published HALT-C model. Discrimination was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and diagnostic accuracy was assessed with net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement statistics. Results After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 41 patients developed HCC. The UM regression model had a c-statistic of 0.61 (95%CI 0.56-0.67), whereas the machine learning algorithm had a c-statistic of 0.64 (95%CI 0.60–0.69) in the validation cohort. The machine learning algorithm had significantly better diagnostic accuracy as assessed by net reclassification improvement (p<0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (p=0.04). The HALT-C model had a c-statistic of 0.60 (95%CI 0.50-0.70) in the validation cohort and was outperformed by the machine learning algorithm (p=0.047). Conclusion Machine learning algorithms improve the accuracy of risk stratifying patients with cirrhosis and can be used to accurately identify patients at high-risk for developing HCC

  20. Gelatinases, endonuclease and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor during development and regression of swine luteal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Luciana Andrea; Turba, Maria Elena; Zannoni, Augusta; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2006-01-01

    Background The development and regression of corpus luteum (CL) is characterized by an intense angiogenesis and angioregression accompanied by luteal tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is the main regulator of angiogenesis, promoting endothelial cell mitosis and differentiation. After the formation of neovascular tubes, the remodelling of ECM is essential for the correct development of CL, particularly by the action of specific class of proteolytic enzymes known as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). During luteal regression, characterized by an apoptotic process and successively by an intense ECM and luteal degradation, the activation of Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonucleases and MMPs activity are required. The levels of expression and activity of VEGF, MMP-2 and -9, and Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonucleases throughout the oestrous cycle and at pregnancy were analyzed. Results Different patterns of VEGF, MMPs and Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease were observed in swine CL during different luteal phases and at pregnancy. Immediately after ovulation, the highest levels of VEGF mRNA/protein and MMP-9 activity were detected. On days 5–14 after ovulation, VEGF expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities are at basal levels, while Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease levels increased significantly in relation to day 1. Only at luteolysis (day 17), Ca++/Mg++-dependent endonuclease and MMP-2 spontaneous activity increased significantly. At pregnancy, high levels of MMP-9 and VEGF were observed. Conclusion Our findings, obtained from a precisely controlled in vivo model of CL development and regression, allow us to determine relationships among VEGF, MMPs and endonucleases during angiogenesis and angioregression. Thus, CL provides a very interesting model for studying factors involved in vascular remodelling. PMID:17137503

  1. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors during development and regression of the bovine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Guerra, D M; Giometti, I C; Price, C A; Andrade, P B; Castilho, A C; Machado, M F; Ripamonte, P; Papa, P C; Buratini, J

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence that fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are involved in the regulation of growth and regression of the corpus luteum (CL). However, the expression pattern of most FGF receptors (FGFRs) during CL lifespan is still unknown. The objective of the present study was to determine the pattern of expression of 'B' and 'C' splice variants of FGFRs in the bovine CL. Bovine CL were collected from an abattoir and classed as corpora hemorrhagica (Stage I), developing (Stage II), developed (Stage III) or regressed (Stage IV) CL. Expression of FGFR mRNA was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and FGFR protein was localised by immunohistochemistry. Expression of mRNA encoding the 'B' and 'C' spliced forms of FGFR1 and FGFR2 was readily detectable in the bovine CL and was accompanied by protein localisation. FGFR1C and FGFR2C mRNA expression did not vary throughout CL lifespan, whereas FGFR1B was upregulated in the developed (Stage III) CL. FGFR3B, FGFR3C and FGFR4 expression was inconsistent in the bovine CL. The present data indicate that FGFR1 and FGFR2 splice variants are the main receptors for FGF action in the bovine CL.

  2. The Moxie of Kathy Cox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Kathy Cox, the superintendent of schools for Georgia, believes "excellence is not an accident". She made a name for herself by winning $1 million proving she was smarter than a fifth-grader on a popular television show. This article presents a profile of Cox, her family, her role as school superintendent, and her accomplishments.…

  3. The Moxie of Kathy Cox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Kathy Cox, the superintendent of schools for Georgia, believes "excellence is not an accident". She made a name for herself by winning $1 million proving she was smarter than a fifth-grader on a popular television show. This article presents a profile of Cox, her family, her role as school superintendent, and her accomplishments.…

  4. Determination of vitacoxib, a novel COX-2 inhibitor, in equine plasma using UPLC-MS/MS detection: Development and validation of new methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Zhao, Tingting; Kong, Jingyuan; Peng, Haoyuan; Lv, Pengyue; Li, Jing; Cao, Xingyuan; Zhang, Suxia

    2017-09-01

    Vitacoxib is an imidazole derivative and the novel COX-2 selective inhibitor to be marketed for veterinary use as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. No analytical assay to quantify vitacoxib in equine plasma samples has been published to date. In the current study, we aim to develop and validate a brief, quick and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of vitacoxib in equine plasma samples. Plasma samples were precipitated with methyl tert-butyl ether. The Phenomenex column (Kinetex 50×2.1mm i.d. particle size=2.6μm, C18, 100Å) at 25°C was used in chromatographic separation with mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water (containing 0.1% formic acid) at flow rate of 0.4mL/min. Vitacoxib and internal standard (IS, celecoxib) were detected under the multiple-reaction monitoring mode by mass spectrometer with ESI+ (m/z 347.9/269.03 for vitacoxib and m/z 382.0/362.0 for IS, respectively). The curve concentration range of was 0.5-500ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification 0.5ng/mL (r(2)=0.996309) in equine plasma samples. The selectivity, precision, recovery, accuracy, matrix effect and stability under various conditions were conformed to the acceptance requirements. Pharmacokinetic studies of vitacoxib in horses via oral administration (0.1mg/kg) demonstrated that the procedure was fully validated and successfully. A meaningful basis for assessing the vitacoxib or clinical applications of vitacoxib to horse is provided in the present study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of weighted regression and sample size in developing a taper model for loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    Kenneth L. Cormier; Robin M. Reich; Raymond L. Czaplewski; William A. Bechtold

    1992-01-01

    A stem profile model, fit using pseudo-likelihood weighted regression, was used to estimate merchantable volume of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in the southeast. The weighted regression increased model fit marginally, but did not substantially increase model performance. In all cases, the unweighted regression models performed as well as the...

  6. Household water treatment in developing countries: comparing different intervention types using meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R

    2009-12-01

    Household water treatment (HWT) is being widely promoted as an appropriate intervention for reducing the burden of waterborne disease in poor communities in developing countries. A recent study has raised concerns about the effectiveness of HWT, in part because of concerns over the lack of blinding and in part because of considerable heterogeneity in the reported effectiveness of randomized controlled trials. This study set out to attempt to investigate the causes of this heterogeneity and so identify factors associated with good health gains. Studies identified in an earlier systematic review and meta-analysis were supplemented with more recently published randomized controlled trials. A total of 28 separate studies of randomized controlled trials of HWT with 39 intervention arms were included in the analysis. Heterogeneity was studied using the "metareg" command in Stata. Initial analyses with single candidate predictors were undertaken and all variables significant at the P < 0.2 level were included in a final regression model. Further analyses were done to estimate the effect of the interventions over time by MonteCarlo modeling using @Risk and the parameter estimates from the final regression model. The overall effect size of all unblinded studies was relative risk = 0.56 (95% confidence intervals 0.51-0.63), but after adjusting for bias due to lack of blinding the effect size was much lower (RR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.76-0.97). Four main variables were significant predictors of effectiveness of intervention in a multipredictor meta regression model: Log duration of study follow-up (regression coefficient of log effect size = 0.186, standard error (SE) = 0.072), whether or not the study was blinded (coefficient 0.251, SE 0.066) and being conducted in an emergency setting (coefficient -0.351, SE 0.076) were all significant predictors of effect size in the final model. Compared to the ceramic filter all other interventions were much less effective (Biosand 0.247, 0

  7. Robustness of Land-Use Regression Models Developed from Mobile Air Pollutant Measurements.

    PubMed

    Hatzopoulou, Marianne; Valois, Marie-France; Levy, Ilan; Mihele, Cristian; Lu, Gang; Bagg, Scott; Minet, Laura; Brook, Jeffrey Robert

    2017-02-27

    Land-Use Regression (LUR) models are useful for resolving fine scale spatial variations in average air pollutant concentrations across urban areas. With the rise of mobile air pollution campaigns, characterized by short-term monitoring and large spatial extents, it is important to investigate the effects of sampling protocols on the resulting LUR. In this study a mobile lab was used to repeatedly visit a large number of locations (~1800), defined by road segments, to derive average concentrations across the city of Montreal, Canada. We hypothesize that the robustness of the LUR from these data depends upon how many independent, random times each location is visited (Nvis) and the number of locations (Nloc) used in model development and that these parameters can be optimized. By performing multiple LURs on random sets of locations, we assessed the robustness of the LUR through consistency in adjusted R2 (i.e., coefficient of variation, CV) and in regression coefficients among different models. As Nloc increased, R2adj became less variable; for Nloc=100 vs. Nloc=300 the CV in R2adj for ultrafine particles decreased from 0.088 to 0.029 and from 0.115 to 0.076 for NO2. The CV in the R2adj also decreased as Nvis increased from 6 to 16; from 0.090 to 0.014 for UFP. As Nloc and Nvis increase, the variability in the coefficient sizes across the different model realizations were also seen to decrease.

  8. Development of land-use regression models for exposure assessment to ultrafine particles in Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattani, Giorgio; Gaeta, Alessandra; Di Menno di Bucchianico, Alessandro; De Santis, Antonella; Gaddi, Raffaela; Cusano, Mariacarmela; Ancona, Carla; Badaloni, Chiara; Forastiere, Francesco; Gariazzo, Claudio; Sozzi, Roberto; Inglessis, Marco; Silibello, Camillo; Salvatori, Elisabetta; Manes, Fausto; Cesaroni, Giulia

    2017-05-01

    The health effects of long-term exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) are poorly understood. Data on spatial contrasts in ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs) concentrations are needed with fine resolution. This study aimed to assess the spatial variability of total particle number concentrations (PNC, a proxy for UFPs) in the city of Rome, Italy, using land use regression (LUR) models, and the correspondent exposure of population here living. PNC were measured using condensation particle counters at the building facade of 28 homes throughout the city. Three 7-day monitoring periods were carried out during cold, warm and intermediate seasons. Geographic Information System predictor variables, with buffers of varying size, were evaluated to model spatial variations of PNC. A stepwise forward selection procedure was used to develop a ;base; linear regression model according to the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects project methodology. Other variables were then included in more enhanced models and their capability of improving model performance was evaluated. Four LUR models were developed. Local variation in UFPs in the study area can be largely explained by the ratio of traffic intensity and distance to the nearest major road. The best model (adjusted R2 = 0.71; root mean square error = ±1,572 particles/cm³, leave one out cross validated R2 = 0.68) was achieved by regressing building and street configuration variables against residual from the ;base; model, which added 3% more to the total variance explained. Urban green and population density in a 5,000 m buffer around each home were also relevant predictors. The spatial contrast in ambient PNC across the large conurbation of Rome, was successfully assessed. The average exposure of subjects living in the study area was 16,006 particles/cm³ (SD 2165 particles/cm³, range: 11,075-28,632 particles/cm³). A total of 203,886 subjects (16%) lives in Rome within 50 m from a high traffic road and they

  9. Targeting Estrogen-Induced COX-2 Activity in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    production was also increased in TSC2-deficient cells. In preclinical models, both Celecoxib and aspirin reduced tumor development. LAM patients had...increased by aspirin treatment, indicative of functional COX-2 expression in the LAM airway. In vitro, 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 reduced the proliferation of...inhibit COX-2 pharmacologically, we treated TSC2-deficient cells with aspirin or NS398, and found that both agents reduced COX-2 protein levels and

  10. Regression calibration with heteroscedastic error variance.

    PubMed

    Spiegelman, Donna; Logan, Roger; Grove, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The problem of covariate measurement error with heteroscedastic measurement error variance is considered. Standard regression calibration assumes that the measurement error has a homoscedastic measurement error variance. An estimator is proposed to correct regression coefficients for covariate measurement error with heteroscedastic variance. Point and interval estimates are derived. Validation data containing the gold standard must be available. This estimator is a closed-form correction of the uncorrected primary regression coefficients, which may be of logistic or Cox proportional hazards model form, and is closely related to the version of regression calibration developed by Rosner et al. (1990). The primary regression model can include multiple covariates measured without error. The use of these estimators is illustrated in two data sets, one taken from occupational epidemiology (the ACE study) and one taken from nutritional epidemiology (the Nurses' Health Study). In both cases, although there was evidence of moderate heteroscedasticity, there was little difference in estimation or inference using this new procedure compared to standard regression calibration. It is shown theoretically that unless the relative risk is large or measurement error severe, standard regression calibration approximations will typically be adequate, even with moderate heteroscedasticity in the measurement error model variance. In a detailed simulation study, standard regression calibration performed either as well as or better than the new estimator. When the disease is rare and the errors normally distributed, or when measurement error is moderate, standard regression calibration remains the method of choice.

  11. Development of prognostic indicators using Classification And Regression Trees (CART) for survival

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Martha E.; Fan, Juanjuan; Su, Xiaogang; McGuire, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an accurate prognosis is an integral component of treatment planning in the practice of periodontics. Prior work has evaluated the validity of using various clinical measured parameters for assigning periodontal prognosis as well as for predicting tooth survival and change in clinical conditions over time. We critically review the application of multivariate Classification And Regression Trees (CART) for survival in developing evidence-based periodontal prognostic indicators. We focus attention on two distinct methods of multivariate CART for survival: the marginal goodness-of-fit approach, and the multivariate exponential approach. A number of common clinical measures have been found to be significantly associated with tooth loss from periodontal disease, including furcation involvement, probing depth, mobility, crown-to-root ratio, and oral hygiene. However, the inter-relationships among these measures, as well as the relevance of other clinical measures to tooth loss from periodontal disease (such as bruxism, family history of periodontal disease, and overall bone loss), remain less clear. While inferences drawn from any single current study are necessarily limited, the application of new approaches in epidemiologic analyses to periodontal prognosis, such as CART for survival, should yield important insights into our understanding, and treatment, of periodontal diseases. PMID:22133372

  12. Development and Validation of a Simplified m-Group Regression Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigemasu, Kazuo

    1976-01-01

    Context for the application and specialization of a Bayesian linear model is m-group regression and the application to the prediction of grade point average. Specialization involves the assumption of homogeneity of regression coefficients (but not intercepts) across groups. Model's predictive efficiency is compared with that of the full m-group…

  13. Development and Testing of Building Energy Model Using Non-Linear Auto Regression Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arida, Maya Ahmad

    In 1972 sustainable development concept existed and during The years it became one of the most important solution to save natural resources and energy, but now with rising energy costs and increasing awareness of the effect of global warming, the development of building energy saving methods and models become apparently more necessary for sustainable future. According to U.S. Energy Information Administration EIA (EIA), today buildings in the U.S. consume 72 percent of electricity produced, and use 55 percent of U.S. natural gas. Buildings account for about 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States, more than industry and transportation. Of this energy, heating and cooling systems use about 55 percent. If energy-use trends continue, buildings will become the largest consumer of global energy by 2025. This thesis proposes procedures and analysis techniques for building energy system and optimization methods using time series auto regression artificial neural networks. The model predicts whole building energy consumptions as a function of four input variables, dry bulb and wet bulb outdoor air temperatures, hour of day and type of day. The proposed model and the optimization process are tested using data collected from an existing building located in Greensboro, NC. The testing results show that the model can capture very well the system performance, and The optimization method was also developed to automate the process of finding the best model structure that can produce the best accurate prediction against the actual data. The results show that the developed model can provide results sufficiently accurate for its use in various energy efficiency and saving estimation applications.

  14. COX2 Inhibition Reduces Aortic Valve Calcification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Gomez, M. Victoria; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, which affects approximately 1% of the US population and is characterized by calcific nodule formation and stenosis of the valve. Klotho-deficient mice were used to study the molecular mechanisms of CAVD as they develop robust aortic valve (AoV) calcification. Through microarray analysis of AoV tissues from klotho-deficient and wild type mice, increased expression of the gene encoding cyclooxygenase 2/COX2 (Ptgs2) was found. COX2 activity contributes to bone differentiation and homeostasis, thus the contribution of COX2 activity to AoV calcification was assessed. Approach and Results In klotho-deficient mice, COX2 expression is increased throughout regions of valve calcification and is induced in the valvular interstitial cells (VICs) prior to calcification formation. Similarly, COX2 expression is increased in human diseased AoVs. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic VICs with osteogenic media induces bone marker gene expression and calcification in vitro, which is blocked by inhibition of COX2 activity. In vivo, genetic loss of function of COX2 cyclooxygenase activity partially rescues AoV calcification in klotho-deficient mice. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 activity in klotho-deficient mice via celecoxib-containing diet reduces AoV calcification and blocks osteogenic gene expression. Conclusions COX2 expression is upregulated in CAVD and its activity contributes to osteogenic gene induction and valve calcification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25722432

  15. Sieve estimation of Cox models with latent structures.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongxiu; Huang, Jian; Liu, Yanyan; Zhao, Xingqiu

    2016-12-01

    This article considers sieve estimation in the Cox model with an unknown regression structure based on right-censored data. We propose a semiparametric pursuit method to simultaneously identify and estimate linear and nonparametric covariate effects based on B-spline expansions through a penalized group selection method with concave penalties. We show that the estimators of the linear effects and the nonparametric component are consistent. Furthermore, we establish the asymptotic normality of the estimator of the linear effects. To compute the proposed estimators, we develop a modified blockwise majorization descent algorithm that is efficient and easy to implement. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed method performs well in finite sample situations. We also use the primary biliary cirrhosis data to illustrate its application.

  16. Development of very high Jc in Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 thin films grown on CaF2

    DOE PAGES

    Tarantini, C.; Kametani, F.; Lee, S.; ...

    2014-12-03

    Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 is the most tunable of the Fe-based superconductors (FBS) in terms of acceptance of high densities of self-assembled and artificially introduced pinning centres which are effective in significantly increasing the critical current density, Jc. Moreover, FBS are very sensitive to strain, which induces an important enhancement in critical temperature,Tc, of the material. In this study we demonstrate that strain induced by the substrate can further improve Jc of both single and multilayer films by more than that expected simply due to the increase in Tc. The multilayer deposition of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 on CaF2 increases the pinning force density (Fp=Jc xmore » μ₀H) by more than 60% compared to a single layer film, reaching a maximum of 84 GN/m3 at 22.5 T and 4.2 K, the highest value ever reported in any 122 phase.« less

  17. Development of very high Jc in Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 thin films grown on CaF2

    PubMed Central

    Tarantini, C.; Kametani, F.; Lee, S.; Jiang, J.; Weiss, J. D.; Jaroszynski, J.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Eom, C. B.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 is the most tunable of the Fe-based superconductors (FBS) in terms of acceptance of high densities of self-assembled and artificially introduced pinning centres which are effective in significantly increasing the critical current density, Jc. Moreover, FBS are very sensitive to strain, which induces an important enhancement in critical temperature, Tc, of the material. In this paper we demonstrate that strain induced by the substrate can further improve Jc of both single and multilayer films by more than that expected simply due to the increase in Tc. The multilayer deposition of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 on CaF2 increases the pinning force density (Fp = Jc × µ0H) by more than 60% compared to a single layer film, reaching a maximum of 84 GN/m3 at 22.5 T and 4.2 K, the highest value ever reported in any 122 phase. PMID:25467177

  18. Developing Asthma in Childhood from Exposure to Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Insights from a Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Vork, Kathleen L.; Broadwin, Rachel L.; Blaisdell, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Studies have identified associations between household secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure and induction of childhood asthma. However, the true nature and strength of this association remains confounded in many studies, producing inconsistent evidence. To look for sources of potential bias and try to uncover consistent patterns of relative risk estimates (RRs), we conducted a meta-analysis of studies published between 1970 and 2005. Data sources Through an extensive literature search, we identified 38 epidemiologic studies of SHS exposure and the development of childhood asthma (that also controlled for atopy history) from 300 potentially relevant articles. Data synthesis We observed substantial heterogeneity within initial summary RRs of 1.48 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32–1.65], 1.25 (1.21–1.30), and 1.21 (1.08–1.36), for ever, current, and incident asthma, respectively. Lack of control for type of atopy history (familial or child) and child’s own smoking status within studies and age category altered summary RRs in separate meta-regressions. After adjusting for these confounding characteristics, consistent patterns of association emerged between SHS exposure and childhood asthma induction. Our summary RR of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.14–1.56) from studies of incident asthma among older children (6–18 years of age) is 1.27 times the estimate from studies of younger children and higher than estimates reported in earlier meta-analyses. Conclusions This new finding indicates that exposure duration may be a more important factor in the induction of asthma than previously understood, and suggests that SHS could be a more fundamental and widespread cause of childhood asthma than some previous meta-analyses have indicated. PMID:17938726

  19. Development of LACIE CCEA-1 weather/wheat yield models. [regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strommen, N. D.; Sakamoto, C. M.; Leduc, S. K.; Umberger, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the casual (phenological, dynamic, physiological), statistical regression, and analog approaches to modeling for grain yield are examined. Given LACIE's primary goal of estimating wheat production for the large areas of eight major wheat-growing regions, the statistical regression approach of correlating historical yield and climate data offered the Center for Climatic and Environmental Assessment the greatest potential return within the constraints of time and data sources. The basic equation for the first generation wheat-yield model is given. Topics discussed include truncation, trend variable, selection of weather variables, episodic events, strata selection, operational data flow, weighting, and model results.

  20. Development of regression models to estimate flow duration statistics at ungaged streams in Oklahoma using a regional approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-regression analysis was used to develop equations for estimating annual and seasonal flow-duration statistics at ungaged streams in and near Oklahoma that are not substantially affected by human alteration. Ordinary least-squares and left-censored (Tobit) multiple-regression techniques were used to develop equations that relate these statistics, from continuous streamflow data at gaged locations with 10 or more years of record, to physical and climatic basin characteristics. Separate equations were developed to estimate these statistics for stations within similar hydrologic and geologic regions. Use of separate regressions by region substantially improved the accuracy of the estimate for streams in eastern and central Oklahoma when compared with estimating equations developed for the entire State, especially for regressions estimating lower flow duration values. For all regions, the equations were more reliable for estimating higher flow duration values. The accuracy of regressions for estimating flow duration statistics in western Oklahoma was very poor, especially for lower flow duration values. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  1. Development of regression models to estimate flow duration statistics at ungaged streams in Oklahoma using a regional approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, Rachel A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-regression analysis was used to develop equations for estimating annual and seasonal flow-duration statistics at ungaged streams in and near Oklahoma that are not substantially affected by human alteration. Ordinary least-squares and left-censored (Tobit) multiple-regression techniques were used to develop equations that relate these statistics, from continuous streamflow data at gaged locations with 10 or more years of record, to physical and climatic basin characteristics. Separate equations were developed to estimate these statistics for stations within similar hydrologic and geologic regions. Use of separate regressions by region substantially improved the accuracy of the estimate for streams in eastern and central Oklahoma when compared with estimating equations developed for the entire State, especially for regressions estimating lower flow duration values. For all regions, the equations were more reliable for estimating higher flow duration values. The accuracy of regressions for estimating flow duration statistics in western Oklahoma was very poor, especially for lower flow duration values.

  2. Development and Evaluation of Land-Use Regression Models Using Modeled Air Quality Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Land-use regression (LUR) models have emerged as a preferred methodology for estimating individual exposure to ambient air pollution in epidemiologic studies in absence of subject-specific measurements. Although there is a growing literature focused on LUR evaluation, fu...

  3. Development and validation of clinical prediction models: marginal differences between logistic regression, penalized maximum likelihood estimation, and genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Kristel J M; Siccama, Ivar; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Debray, T P A; Keijzer, Maarten; Grobbee, Diederick E; Moons, Karel G M

    2012-04-01

    Many prediction models are developed by multivariable logistic regression. However, there are several alternative methods to develop prediction models. We compared the accuracy of a model that predicts the presence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) when developed by four different methods. We used the data of 2,086 primary care patients suspected of DVT, which included 21 candidate predictors. The cohort was split into a derivation set (1,668 patients, 329 with DVT) and a validation set (418 patients, 86 with DVT). Also, 100 cross-validations were conducted in the full cohort. The models were developed by logistic regression, logistic regression with shrinkage by bootstrapping techniques, logistic regression with shrinkage by penalized maximum likelihood estimation, and genetic programming. The accuracy of the models was tested by assessing discrimination and calibration. There were only marginal differences in the discrimination and calibration of the models in the validation set and cross-validations. The accuracy measures of the models developed by the four different methods were only slightly different, and the 95% confidence intervals were mostly overlapped. We have shown that models with good predictive accuracy are most likely developed by sensible modeling strategies rather than by complex development methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantile Regression with Censored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Guixian

    2009-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model and the accelerated failure time model are frequently used in survival data analysis. They are powerful, yet have limitation due to their model assumptions. Quantile regression offers a semiparametric approach to model data with possible heterogeneity. It is particularly powerful for censored responses, where the…

  5. Quantile Regression with Censored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Guixian

    2009-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model and the accelerated failure time model are frequently used in survival data analysis. They are powerful, yet have limitation due to their model assumptions. Quantile regression offers a semiparametric approach to model data with possible heterogeneity. It is particularly powerful for censored responses, where the…

  6. Cell-type-specific roles for COX-2 in UVB-induced skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herschman, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    In human tumors, and in mouse models, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels are frequently correlated with tumor development/burden. In addition to intrinsic tumor cell expression, COX-2 is often present in fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells of the tumor microenvironment, and in infiltrating immune cells. Intrinsic cancer cell COX-2 expression is postulated as only one of many sources for prostanoids required for tumor promotion/progression. Although both COX-2 inhibition and global Cox-2 gene deletion ameliorate ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced SKH-1 mouse skin tumorigenesis, neither manipulation can elucidate the cell type(s) in which COX-2 expression is required for tumorigenesis; both eliminate COX-2 activity in all cells. To address this question, we created Cox-2 flox/flox mice, in which the Cox-2 gene can be eliminated in a cell-type-specific fashion by targeted Cre recombinase expression. Cox-2 deletion in skin epithelial cells of SKH-1 Cox-2 flox/flox;K14Cre + mice resulted, following UVB irradiation, in reduced skin hyperplasia and increased apoptosis. Targeted epithelial cell Cox-2 deletion also resulted in reduced tumor incidence, frequency, size and proliferation rate, altered tumor cell differentiation and reduced tumor vascularization. Moreover, Cox-2 flox/flox;K14Cre + papillomas did not progress to squamous cell carcinomas. In contrast, Cox-2 deletion in SKH-1 Cox-2 flox/flox; LysMCre + myeloid cells had no effect on UVB tumor induction. We conclude that (i) intrinsic epithelial COX-2 activity plays a major role in UVB-induced skin cancer, (ii) macrophage/myeloid COX-2 plays no role in UVB-induced skin cancer and (iii) either there may be another COX-2-dependent prostanoid source(s) that drives UVB skin tumor induction or there may exist a COX-2-independent pathway(s) to UVB-induced skin cancer. PMID:24469308

  7. Cell-type-specific roles for COX-2 in UVB-induced skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jing; Mikulec, Carol; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Magyar, Clara; Dumlao, Darren S; Dennis, Edward A; Fischer, Susan M; Herschman, Harvey

    2014-06-01

    In human tumors, and in mouse models, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels are frequently correlated with tumor development/burden. In addition to intrinsic tumor cell expression, COX-2 is often present in fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells of the tumor microenvironment, and in infiltrating immune cells. Intrinsic cancer cell COX-2 expression is postulated as only one of many sources for prostanoids required for tumor promotion/progression. Although both COX-2 inhibition and global Cox-2 gene deletion ameliorate ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced SKH-1 mouse skin tumorigenesis, neither manipulation can elucidate the cell type(s) in which COX-2 expression is required for tumorigenesis; both eliminate COX-2 activity in all cells. To address this question, we created Cox-2(flox/flox) mice, in which the Cox-2 gene can be eliminated in a cell-type-specific fashion by targeted Cre recombinase expression. Cox-2 deletion in skin epithelial cells of SKH-1 Cox-2(flox/flox);K14Cre(+) mice resulted, following UVB irradiation, in reduced skin hyperplasia and increased apoptosis. Targeted epithelial cell Cox-2 deletion also resulted in reduced tumor incidence, frequency, size and proliferation rate, altered tumor cell differentiation and reduced tumor vascularization. Moreover, Cox-2(flox/flox);K14Cre(+) papillomas did not progress to squamous cell carcinomas. In contrast, Cox-2 deletion in SKH-1 Cox-2(flox/flox); LysMCre(+) myeloid cells had no effect on UVB tumor induction. We conclude that (i) intrinsic epithelial COX-2 activity plays a major role in UVB-induced skin cancer, (ii) macrophage/myeloid COX-2 plays no role in UVB-induced skin cancer and (iii) either there may be another COX-2-dependent prostanoid source(s) that drives UVB skin tumor induction or there may exist a COX-2-independent pathway(s) to UVB-induced skin cancer.

  8. The pharmacology of selective inhibition of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Tilo

    2006-10-01

    Selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 were developed to improve the safety of anti-inflammatory therapy in patients at elevated risk for gastrointestinal complications which are thought to be caused primarily by depression of COX-1 derived mucosal prostanoids. They were not expected to be more efficacious analgesics than compounds acting on both cyclooxygenases, the traditional (t) non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). While these predictions were generally supported by clinical evidence, an elevated rate of severe cardiovascular complications was observed in randomized controlled trials of three chemically distinct COX-2 selective compounds. The cardiovascular hazard is plausibly explained by the depression of COX-2 dependent prostanoids formed in vasculature and kidney; vascular prostacyclin (PGI2) constrains the effect of prothrombotic and atherogenic stimuli, and renal medullary prostacyclin and prostaglandin (PG) E(2) formed by COX-2 contribute to arterial pressure homeostasis. A drug development strategy more closely linking research into the biology of the drug target with clinical drug development may have allowed earlier recognition of these mechanisms and the cardiovascular risk of COX-2 inhibition. Open questions are i) whether the gastrointestinal benefit of COX-2 selective compounds drugs can be conserved by identifying individuals at risk and excluding them from treatment; ii) whether the risk extends to tNSAIDs; iii) and whether alternative strategies to anti-inflammatory therapy with a more advantageous risk-benefit profile can be developed.

  9. JOINT STRUCTURE SELECTION AND ESTIMATION IN THE TIME-VARYING COEFFICIENT COX MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Lu, Wenbin; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2016-01-01

    Time-varying coefficient Cox model has been widely studied and popularly used in survival data analysis due to its flexibility for modeling covariate effects. It is of great practical interest to accurately identify the structure of covariate effects in a time-varying coefficient Cox model, i.e. covariates with null effect, constant effect and truly time-varying effect, and estimate the corresponding regression coefficients. Combining the ideas of local polynomial smoothing and group nonnegative garrote, we develop a new penalization approach to achieve such goals. Our method is able to identify the underlying true model structure with probability tending to one and simultaneously estimate the time-varying coefficients consistently. The asymptotic normalities of the resulting estimators are also established. We demonstrate the performance of our method using simulations and an application to the primary biliary cirrhosis data. PMID:27540275

  10. Targeting inhibition of COX-2: a review of patents, 2002-2006.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Elaine F F; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Josa, Daniela; Caetano, Melissa S; de Souza, Thaís C S

    2007-06-01

    The main COX inhibitors are the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs exert anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects through the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by blocking COX activity. Currently two COX isoenzymes are known, COX-1 and COX-2. Prostaglandins influenced by COX-1 maintain the integrity of the gastric mucosa. On the other hand, prostaglandins influenced by COX-2 mediate the inflammatory process. The common anti-inflammatory drugs (like aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen) all act by blocking the action of both the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. The COX-2 inhibitors represent a new class of drugs that do not affect COX-1, but selectively block COX-2. This selective action provides the benefits of reducing inflammation without irritating the stomach. This review will focus on the most recent developments published in the field, paying particular attention to promising COX-2 inhibitors, their chemistry and biological evaluation, and to new chemical and pharmaceutical processes. Moreover, we will discuss recent patents of structural analogs of the COX-2 inhibitors celecoxib and valdecoxib, and novel potential pyridazine, triazole, indole, thione derivatives as a future target for the treatment of inflammation, pain and other diseases.

  11. Relative risk regression analysis of epidemiologic data.

    PubMed

    Prentice, R L

    1985-11-01

    Relative risk regression methods are described. These methods provide a unified approach to a range of data analysis problems in environmental risk assessment and in the study of disease risk factors more generally. Relative risk regression methods are most readily viewed as an outgrowth of Cox's regression and life model. They can also be viewed as a regression generalization of more classical epidemiologic procedures, such as that due to Mantel and Haenszel. In the context of an epidemiologic cohort study, relative risk regression methods extend conventional survival data methods and binary response (e.g., logistic) regression models by taking explicit account of the time to disease occurrence while allowing arbitrary baseline disease rates, general censorship, and time-varying risk factors. This latter feature is particularly relevant to many environmental risk assessment problems wherein one wishes to relate disease rates at a particular point in time to aspects of a preceding risk factor history. Relative risk regression methods also adapt readily to time-matched case-control studies and to certain less standard designs. The uses of relative risk regression methods are illustrated and the state of development of these procedures is discussed. It is argued that asymptotic partial likelihood estimation techniques are now well developed in the important special case in which the disease rates of interest have interpretations as counting process intensity functions. Estimation of relative risks processes corresponding to disease rates falling outside this class has, however, received limited attention. The general area of relative risk regression model criticism has, as yet, not been thoroughly studied, though a number of statistical groups are studying such features as tests of fit, residuals, diagnostics and graphical procedures. Most such studies have been restricted to exponential form relative risks as have simulation studies of relative risk estimation

  12. Immunohistochemical and morphometric evaluation of COX-1 and COX-2 in the remodeled lung in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis* ,**

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Lin, Flavia; Martins, Vanessa; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the remodeled lung in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, correlating that expression with patient survival. METHODS: We examined open lung biopsy specimens from 24 SSc patients and 30 IPF patients, using normal lung tissue as a control. The histological patterns included fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) in SSc patients and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in IPF patients. We used immunohistochemistry and histomorphometry to evaluate the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in alveolar septa, vessels, and bronchioles. We then correlated that expression with pulmonary function test results and evaluated its impact on patient survival. RESULTS: The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in alveolar septa was significantly higher in IPF-UIP and SSc-NSIP lung tissue than in the control tissue. No difference was found between IPF-UIP and SSc-NSIP tissue regarding COX-1 and COX-2 expression. Multivariate analysis based on the Cox regression model showed that the factors associated with a low risk of death were younger age, high DLCO/alveolar volume, IPF, and high COX-1 expression in alveolar septa, whereas those associated with a high risk of death were advanced age, low DLCO/alveolar volume, SSc (with NSIP), and low COX-1 expression in alveolar septa. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that strategies aimed at preventing low COX-1 synthesis will have a greater impact on SSc, whereas those aimed at preventing high COX-2 synthesis will have a greater impact on IPF. However, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed in order to confirm that. PMID:24473763

  13. Immunohistochemical and morphometric evaluation of COX 1 and COX-2 in the remodeled lung in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Lin, Flavia; Martins, Vanessa; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2013-01-01

    To study the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the remodeled lung in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, correlating that expression with patient survival. We examined open lung biopsy specimens from 24 SSc patients and 30 IPF patients, using normal lung tissue as a control. The histological patterns included fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) in SSc patients and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in IPF patients. We used immunohistochemistry and histomorphometry to evaluate the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in alveolar septa, vessels, and bronchioles. We then correlated that expression with pulmonary function test results and evaluated its impact on patient survival. The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in alveolar septa was significantly higher in IPF-UIP and SSc-NSIP lung tissue than in the control tissue. No difference was found between IPF-UIP and SSc-NSIP tissue regarding COX-1 and COX-2 expression. Multivariate analysis based on the Cox regression model showed that the factors associated with a low risk of death were younger age, high DLCO/alveolar volume, IPF, and high COX-1 expression in alveolar septa, whereas those associated with a high risk of death were advanced age, low DLCO/alveolar volume, SSc (with NSIP), and low COX-1 expression in alveolar septa. Our findings suggest that strategies aimed at preventing low COX-1 synthesis will have a greater impact on SSc, whereas those aimed at preventing high COX-2 synthesis will have a greater impact on IPF. However, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed in order to confirm that.

  14. High-dimensional Cox models: the choice of penalty as part of the model building process.

    PubMed

    Benner, Axel; Zucknick, Manuela; Hielscher, Thomas; Ittrich, Carina; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    The Cox proportional hazards regression model is the most popular approach to model covariate information for survival times. In this context, the development of high-dimensional models where the number of covariates is much larger than the number of observations (p>n) is an ongoing challenge. A practicable approach is to use ridge penalized Cox regression in such situations. Beside focussing on finding the best prediction rule, one is often interested in determining a subset of covariates that are the most important ones for prognosis. This could be a gene set in the biostatistical analysis of microarray data. Covariate selection can then, for example, be done by L(1)-penalized Cox regression using the lasso (Tibshirani (1997). Statistics in Medicine 16, 385-395). Several approaches beyond the lasso, that incorporate covariate selection, have been developed in recent years. This includes modifications of the lasso as well as nonconvex variants such as smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD) (Fan and Li (2001). Journal of the American Statistical Association 96, 1348-1360; Fan and Li (2002). The Annals of Statistics 30, 74-99). The purpose of this article is to implement them practically into the model building process when analyzing high-dimensional data with the Cox proportional hazards model. To evaluate penalized regression models beyond the lasso, we included SCAD variants and the adaptive lasso (Zou (2006). Journal of the American Statistical Association 101, 1418-1429). We compare them with "standard" applications such as ridge regression, the lasso, and the elastic net. Predictive accuracy, features of variable selection, and estimation bias will be studied to assess the practical use of these methods. We observed that the performance of SCAD and adaptive lasso is highly dependent on nontrivial preselection procedures. A practical solution to this problem does not yet exist. Since there is high risk of missing relevant covariates when using SCAD or

  15. Methylation status of COX-2 in blood leukocyte DNA and risk of gastric cancer in a high-risk Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Su, Hui-juan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Lian; Ma, Jun-ling; Li, Ji-You; Pan, Kai-feng; You, Wei-cheng

    2015-12-16

    Methylation is a common epigenetic modification which may play a crucial role in cancer development. To investigate the association between methylation of COX-2 in blood leukocyte DNA and risk of gastric cancer (GC), a nested case-control study was conducted in Linqu County, Shandong Province, a high risk area of GC in China. Association between blood leukocyte DNA methylation of COX-2 and risk of GC was investigated in 133 GCs and 285 superficial gastritis (SG)/ chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). The temporal trend of COX-2 methylation level during GC development was further explored in 74 pre-GC and 95 post-GC samples (including 31 cases with both pre- and post-GC samples). In addition, the association of DNA methylation and risk of progression to GC was evaluated in 74 pre-GC samples and their relevant intestinal metaplasia (IM)/dysplasia (DYS) controls. Methylation level was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QMSP). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression analysis. The medians of COX-2 methylation levels were 2.3% and 2.2% in GC cases and controls, respectively. No significant association was found between COX-2 methylation and risk of GC (OR, 1.15; 95% CI: 0.70-1.88). However, the temporal trend analysis showed that COX-2 methylation levels were elevated at 1-4 years ahead of clinical GC diagnosis compared with the year of GC diagnosis (3.0% vs. 2.2%, p=0.01). Further validation in 31 GCs with both pre- and post-GC samples indicated that COX-2 methylation levels were significantly decreased at the year of GC diagnosis compared with pre-GC samples (1.5% vs. 2.5%, p=0.02). No significant association between COX-2 methylation and risk of progression to GC was found in subjects with IM (OR, 0.50; 95% CI: 0.18-1.42) or DYS (OR, 0.70; 95% CI: 0.23-2.18). Additionally, we found that elder people had increased risk of COX-2 hypermethylation (OR, 1.55; 95% CI: 1.02-2.36) and subjects who

  16. Applicability of Monte Carlo cross validation technique for model development and validation using generalised least squares regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Khaled; Rahman, Ataur; A Zaman, Mohammad; Shrestha, Surendra

    2013-03-01

    SummaryIn regional hydrologic regression analysis, model selection and validation are regarded as important steps. Here, the model selection is usually based on some measurements of goodness-of-fit between the model prediction and observed data. In Regional Flood Frequency Analysis (RFFA), leave-one-out (LOO) validation or a fixed percentage leave out validation (e.g., 10%) is commonly adopted to assess the predictive ability of regression-based prediction equations. This paper develops a Monte Carlo Cross Validation (MCCV) technique (which has widely been adopted in Chemometrics and Econometrics) in RFFA using Generalised Least Squares Regression (GLSR) and compares it with the most commonly adopted LOO validation approach. The study uses simulated and regional flood data from the state of New South Wales in Australia. It is found that when developing hydrologic regression models, application of the MCCV is likely to result in a more parsimonious model than the LOO. It has also been found that the MCCV can provide a more realistic estimate of a model's predictive ability when compared with the LOO.

  17. Effect of structural modification of enol-carboxamide-type nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on COX-2/COX-1 selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lazer, E S; Miao, C K; Cywin, C L; Sorcek, R; Wong, H C; Meng, Z; Potocki, I; Hoermann, M; Snow, R J; Tschantz, M A; Kelly, T A; McNeil, D W; Coutts, S J; Churchill, L; Graham, A G; David, E; Grob, P M; Engel, W; Meier, H; Trummlitz, G

    1997-03-14

    Meloxicam (5), an NSAID in the enol-carboxamide class, was developed on the basis of its antiinflammatory activity and relative safety in animal models. In subsequent screening in microsomal assays using human COX-1 and COX-2, we discovered that it possessed a selectivity profile for COX-2 superior to piroxicam and other marketed NSAIDs. We therefore embarked on a study of enol-carboxamide type compounds to determine if COX-2 selectivity and potency could be dramatically improved by structural modification. Substitution at the 6- and 7-positions of the 4-oxo-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide, alteration of the N-methyl substituent, and amide modification were all examined. In addition we explored several related systems including the isomeric 3-oxo-1,2-benzothiazine-4-carboxamides, thienothiazines, indolothizines, benzothienothiazines, naphthothiazines, and 1,3- and 1,4-dioxoisoquinolines. While a few examples were found with greater potency in the COX-2 assay, no compound tested had a better COX-2/COX-1 selectivity profile than that of 5.

  18. COX-2 and PPAR-γ confer cannabidiol-induced apoptosis of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Heinemann, Katharina; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Salamon, Achim; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of cannabidiol is still controversial. This study investigates the role of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in cannabidiol's proapoptotic and tumor-regressive action. In lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and primary cells from a patient with lung cancer, cannabidiol elicited decreased viability associated with apoptosis. Apoptotic cell death by cannabidiol was suppressed by NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor), GW9662 (PPAR-γ antagonist), and siRNA targeting COX-2 and PPAR-γ. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis was paralleled by upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression with a maximum induction of COX-2 mRNA after 8 hours and continuous increases of PPAR-γ mRNA when compared with vehicle. In response to cannabidiol, tumor cell lines exhibited increased levels of COX-2-dependent prostaglandins (PG) among which PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) caused a translocation of PPAR-γ to the nucleus and induced a PPAR-γ-dependent apoptotic cell death. Moreover, in A549-xenografted nude mice, cannabidiol caused upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in tumor tissue and tumor regression that was reversible by GW9662. Together, our data show a novel proapoptotic mechanism of cannabidiol involving initial upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ and a subsequent nuclear translocation of PPAR-γ by COX-2-dependent PGs.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorobenzoylated di- and tripeptides as inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Al-Hourani, Baker Jawabrah; Wuest, Melinda; Mane, Jonathan Y; Tuszynski, Jack; Baracos, Vickie; Suresh, Mavanur; Wuest, Frank

    2012-04-01

    A series of fluorobenzoylated di- and tripeptides as potential leads for the development of molecular probes for imaging of COX-2 expression was prepared according to standard Fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis. All peptides were assessed for their COX-2 inhibitory potency and selectivity profile in a fluorescence-based COX binding assay. Within the series of 15 peptides tested, cysteine-containing peptides numbered 7, 8, 11 and 12, respectively, were the most potent COX-2 inhibitors possessing IC(50) values ranging from 5 to 85 μM. Fluorobenzoylated tripeptides 7 and 8 displayed some COX-2 selectivity (COX-2 selectivity index 2.1 and 1.6), whereas fluorobenzoylated dipeptides 11 and 12 were shown not to be COX-2 selective. Fluorbenzoylated tripeptide FB-Phe-Cys-Ser-OH was further used in molecular modeling docking studies to determine the binding mode within the active site of the COX-2 enzyme.

  20. Targeting Estrogen-Induced COX-2 Activity in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    production was also increased in TSC2-deficient cells. In preclinical models, both Celecoxib and aspirin reduced tumor development. LAM patients had...was increased by aspirin treatment, indicative of functional COX-2 expression in the LAM airway. In vitro, 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 reduced the...cells with aspirin or NS398, and found that both agents reduced COX-2 protein levels and production of PGE2 and 6-K-PGF1a. This result has been included

  1. COX-2 and Prostate Cancer Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    sphingomyelin to ceramide , a mediator of apopto- sis (Figure 1).10 The initial interest in COX-2 grew out of the In colon cancer, much of the focus has been...Sphingomyelin - Ceramide Arachidanic Acid \\\\ COX-1 / COX-2 Prostaglandin G2 Prostaglandin H2 Oxidation of Xenobiolics Prostaglandins Malordialdehyde FIGURE 1...variety of tissues in- corneal model, it was demonstrated that endothe- cluding skin , urinary bladder, gastric mucosa, lial cell COX-2 is essential for

  2. Development of flood regressions and climate change scenarios to explore estimates of future peak flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Smith, Martyn J.; Freehafer, Douglas A.

    2015-12-31

    The application uses predictions of future annual precipitation from five climate models and two future greenhouse gas emissions scenarios and provides results that are averaged over three future periods—2025 to 2049, 2050 to 2074, and 2075 to 2099. Results are presented in ensemble form as the mean, median, maximum, and minimum values among the five climate models for each greenhouse gas emissions scenario and period. These predictions of future annual precipitation are substituted into either the precipitation variable or a water balance equation for runoff to calculate potential future peak flows. This application is intended to be used only as an exploratory tool because (1) the regression equations on which the application is based have not been adequately tested outside the range of the current climate and (2) forecasting future precipitation with climate models and downscaling these results to a fine spatial resolution have a high degree of uncertainty. This report includes a discussion of the assumptions, uncertainties, and appropriate use of this exploratory application.

  3. WebDISCO: a web service for distributed cox model learning without patient-level data sharing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Lun; Wang, Shuang; Ji, Zhanglong; Wu, Yuan; Xiong, Li; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-11-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model is a widely used method for analyzing survival data. To achieve sufficient statistical power in a survival analysis, it usually requires a large amount of data. Data sharing across institutions could be a potential workaround for providing this added power. The authors develop a web service for distributed Cox model learning (WebDISCO), which focuses on the proof-of-concept and algorithm development for federated survival analysis. The sensitive patient-level data can be processed locally and only the less-sensitive intermediate statistics are exchanged to build a global Cox model. Mathematical derivation shows that the proposed distributed algorithm is identical to the centralized Cox model. The authors evaluated the proposed framework at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Emory, and Duke. The experimental results show that both distributed and centralized models result in near-identical model coefficients with differences in the range [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. The results confirm the mathematical derivation and show that the implementation of the distributed model can achieve the same results as the centralized implementation. The proposed method serves as a proof of concept, in which a publicly available dataset was used to evaluate the performance. The authors do not intend to suggest that this method can resolve policy and engineering issues related to the federated use of institutional data, but they should serve as evidence of the technical feasibility of the proposed approach.Conclusions WebDISCO (Web-based Distributed Cox Regression Model; https://webdisco.ucsd-dbmi.org:8443/cox/) provides a proof-of-concept web service that implements a distributed algorithm to conduct distributed survival analysis without sharing patient level data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  4. WebDISCO: a web service for distributed cox model learning without patient-level data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chia-Lun; Wang, Shuang; Ji, Zhanglong; Wu, Yuan; Xiong, Li; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Cox proportional hazards model is a widely used method for analyzing survival data. To achieve sufficient statistical power in a survival analysis, it usually requires a large amount of data. Data sharing across institutions could be a potential workaround for providing this added power. Methods and materials The authors develop a web service for distributed Cox model learning (WebDISCO), which focuses on the proof-of-concept and algorithm development for federated survival analysis. The sensitive patient-level data can be processed locally and only the less-sensitive intermediate statistics are exchanged to build a global Cox model. Mathematical derivation shows that the proposed distributed algorithm is identical to the centralized Cox model. Results The authors evaluated the proposed framework at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Emory, and Duke. The experimental results show that both distributed and centralized models result in near-identical model coefficients with differences in the range 10−15 to 10−12. The results confirm the mathematical derivation and show that the implementation of the distributed model can achieve the same results as the centralized implementation. Limitation The proposed method serves as a proof of concept, in which a publicly available dataset was used to evaluate the performance. The authors do not intend to suggest that this method can resolve policy and engineering issues related to the federated use of institutional data, but they should serve as evidence of the technical feasibility of the proposed approach. Conclusions WebDISCO (Web-based Distributed Cox Regression Model; https://webdisco.ucsd-dbmi.org:8443/cox/) provides a proof-of-concept web service that implements a distributed algorithm to conduct distributed survival analysis without sharing patient level data. PMID:26159465

  5. Development of regression equations to estimate flow durations and low-flow-frequency statistics in New Hampshire streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Regression equations and basin-characteristic digital datasets were developed to help water-resource managers estimate surface-water resources during periods of low flow in New Hampshire. The regression equations were developed to estimate statistics for the seasonal and annual low-flow-frequency and seasonal period-of-record and period-of-record flow durations. Because streamflow is maintained by ground-water discharge during periods of low flow, these equations also will aid in the assessment of ground-water availability. Ultimately, the equations and datasets developed herein can be combined with data on water withdrawals, discharges, and interbasin transfers in a geographic information system (GIS) to allow assessments of water use and water availability in any drainage basin in the State of New Hampshire. Regression equations developed in this study provide estimates of the seasonal (spring, summer, fall, and winter) and annual 7-day 2-year (7Q2) and 7-day 10-year (7Q10) low-flow-frequency values, as well as seasonal period-of-record and period-of-record flow durations (60-, 70-, 80-, 90-, 95-, and 98-percent exceedences) for ungaged reaches of unregulated New Hampshire streams. Regression equations were developed using seasonal and annual low-flow statistics from 58 to 60 continuous-record stream-gaging stations in New Hampshire and nearby areas in neighboring states, and measurements of various characteristics of the drainage basins that contribute flow to those stations. The estimating equations for the seasonal and annual 7Q2 and 7Q10 values were developed using generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression analyses. The GLS equations developed for these flow statistics gave average prediction errors that ranged from 11 to 61 percent. The estimating equations for flow-duration exceedence frequency values were developed using ordinary-least-squares (OLS) regression analysis. The OLS equations developed for these flow statistics gave average prediction errors

  6. Influence of Genetic Polymorphisms in Prostaglandin E2 Pathway (COX-2/HPGD/SLCO2A1/ABCC4) on the Risk for Colorectal Adenoma Development and Recurrence after Polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina; Queirós, Sara; Galaghar, Ana; Sousa, Hugo; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Brandão, Catarina; Medeiros, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Deregulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels reported in colorectal carcinogenesis contributes to key steps of cancer development. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the genetic variability in COX-2/HPGD/SLCO2A1/ABCC4 PGE2 pathway genes on the development and recurrence of colorectal adenomas. Methods: A case-control study was conducted gathering 480 unscreened individuals and 195 patients with personal history of adenomas. A total of 43 tagSNPs were characterized using the Sequenom platform or real-time PCR. Results: Ten tagSNPs were identified as susceptibility biomarkers for the development of adenomas. The top three most meaningful tagSNPs include the rs689466 in COX-2 (odds ratio (OR)=3.23; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.52–6.86), rs6439448 in SLCO2A1 (OR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.22–0.65) and rs1751051 in ABCC4 genes (OR=2.75; 95% CI: 1.58–4.80). The best four-locus gene–gene interaction model included the rs1346271, rs1863642 and rs12500316 single nucleotide polymorphisms in HPGD and rs1678405 in ABCC4 genes and was associated with a 13-fold increased susceptibility (95% CI: 3.84–46.3, P<0.0001, cross-validation (CV) accuracy: 0.78 and CV consistency: 8/10). Interesting, in low-risk patients the ABCC4 rs9524821AA genotype was associated not only with a higher hazard ratio (HR=2.93; 95% CI: 1.07–8.03), but half of these patients had adenoma recurrence at 60 months, considerably higher than the 21% noticed in low-risk patients. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in COX-2/PGE2 pathway appear to contribute to the development of colorectal adenomas and influence the interval time to adenomas recurrence. The definition of risk models through the inclusion of genetic biomarkers might improve the adherence and optimization of current screening and surveillance guidelines for colorectal cancer prevention. PMID:27628421

  7. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Crispens, Marta A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors. PMID:25972361

  8. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Crispens, Marta A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-08-28

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors.

  9. Allan Cox 1926”1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Rob; Dalrymple, Brent

    More than 1000 friends, students, and colleagues from all over the country filled Stanford Memorial Chapel (Stanford, Calif.) on February 3, 1987, to join in “A Celebration of the Life of Allan Cox.” Allan died early on the morning of January 27 while bicycling, the sport he had come to love the most. Between pieces of his favorite music by Bach and Mozart, Stanford administrators and colleagues spoke in tribute of Allan's unique qualities as friend, scientist, teacher, and dean of the School of Earth Sciences. James Rosse, Vice President and Provost of Stanford University, struck a particularly resonant chord with his personal remarks: "Allan reached out to each person he knew with the warmth and attention that can only come from deep respect and affection for others. I never heard him speak ill of others, and I do not believe he was capable of doing anything that would harm another being. He cared too much to intrude where he was not wanted, but his curiosity about people and the loving care with which he approached them broke down reserve to create remarkable friendships. His enthusiasm and good humor made him a welcome guest in the hearts of the hundreds of students and colleagues who shared the opportunity of knowing Allan Cox as a person."

  10. Mass balance-based regression modeling of PAHs accumulation in urban soils, role of urban development.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping; Chang, Andrew C

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contents in 68 soils samples collected at housing developments that represent different length of development periods across Beijing. Based on the data, we derived a mass balanced mathematical model to simulate the dynamics of PAH accumulations in urban soils as affected by the urban developments. The key parameters were estimated by fitting the modified mass balance model to the data of PAH concentrations vs. building age of the sampling green area. The total PAH concentrations would increase from the baseline of 267 ng g(-1) to 3631 ng g(-1) during the period of 1978-2048. It showed that the dynamic changes in the rates of accumulations of light and heavy PAH species were related to the shifting of sources of fuels, combustion efficiencies, and amounts of energy consumed during the course of development.

  11. Early Trabecular Development in Human Vertebrae: Overproduction, Constructive Regression, and Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Acquaah, Frank; Robson Brown, Katharine A.; Ahmed, Farah; Jeffery, Nathan; Abel, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Early bone development may have a significant impact upon bone health in adulthood. Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mass are important determinants of adult bone strength. However, several studies have shown that BMD and bone mass decrease after birth. If early development is important for strength, why does this reduction occur? To investigate this, more data characterizing gestational, infant, and childhood bone development are needed in order to compare with adults. The aim of this study is to document early vertebral trabecular bone development, a key fragility fracture site, and infer whether this period is important for adult bone mass and structure. A series of 120 vertebrae aged between 6 months gestation and 2.5 years were visualized using microcomputed tomography. Spherical volumes of interest were defined, thresholded, and measured using 3D bone analysis software (BoneJ, Quant3D). The findings showed that gestation was characterized by increasing bone volume fraction whilst infancy was defined by significant bone loss (≈2/3rds) and the appearance of a highly anisotropic trabecular structure with a predominantly inferior–superior direction. Childhood development progressed via selective thickening of some trabeculae and the loss of others; maintaining bone volume whilst creating a more anisotropic structure. Overall, the pattern of vertebral development is one of gestational overproduction followed by infant “sculpting” of bone tissue during the first year of life (perhaps in order to regulate mineral homeostasis or to adapt to loading environment) and then subsequent refinement during early childhood. Comparison of early bone developmental data in this study with adult bone volume values taken from the literature shows that the loss in bone mass that occurs during the first year of life is never fully recovered. Early development could therefore be important for developing bone strength, but through structural changes in trabecular

  12. siRNA-mediated knock-down of COX-2 in melanocytes suppresses melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Y; Shin, Jae Y; Kim, Miri R; Hann, Seung-Kyung; Oh, Sang H

    2012-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme induced in response to multiple mitogenic and inflammatory stimuli, including UV light. UV-induced COX-2 expression induces production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in keratinocytes, which mediates inflammation and cell proliferation. Until recently, studies regarding COX-2 and PGE2 in the skin have focused on keratinocytes and skin cancer and the effect of PGs produced by keratinocytes on melanocytes. However, the effects of COX-2 itself or COX-2 inhibitors on melanogenesis are not well known. Therefore, to establish the role of COX-2 in melanogenesis, we investigated the effects of knock-down of COX-2 in melanocytes on melanin production and the expression of melanogenic molecules through silencing of COX-2 expression with COX-2 short interfering RNA (siRNA). COX-2 knock-down in melanocytes decreased the expressions of tyrosinase, TRP-1, TRP-2, gp100 and MITF and also reduced tyrosinase enzyme activity. Furthermore, COX-2 siRNA-transfected melanocytes showed markedly reduced alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanin production. In addition, α-MSH-induced COX-2 expression in both scrambled siRNA-transfected and COX-2 siRNA-transfected melanocytes was greater than α-MSH-untreated cells. Our results suggest that COX-2 might be a candidate target for the development of anti-melanogenic agents and α-MSH-induced pigmentation could be closely associated with COX-2 expression. COX-2 inhibitors might therefore be of particular use in whitening cosmetics for hyperpigmentation disorders such as melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and solar lentigo.

  13. Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    The logistic regression originally is intended to explain the relationship between the probability of an event and a set of covariables. The model's coefficients can be interpreted via the odds and odds ratio, which are presented in introduction of the chapter. The observations are possibly got individually, then we speak of binary logistic regression. When they are grouped, the logistic regression is said binomial. In our presentation we mainly focus on the binary case. For statistical inference the main tool is the maximum likelihood methodology: we present the Wald, Rao and likelihoods ratio results and their use to compare nested models. The problems we intend to deal with are essentially the same as in multiple linear regression: testing global effect, individual effect, selection of variables to build a model, measure of the fitness of the model, prediction of new values… . The methods are demonstrated on data sets using R. Finally we briefly consider the binomial case and the situation where we are interested in several events, that is the polytomous (multinomial) logistic regression and the particular case of ordinal logistic regression.

  14. Selective COX-2 inhibition affects fatty acids, but not COX mRNA expression in patients with FAP

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Laila N.; Fausa, Olav; Bratlie, Jorunn; Høstmark, Arne T.; Aabakken, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) provides a model for sporadic colorectal cancer development. Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition may ameliorate polyp development, but rofecoxib was withdrawn due to cardiovascular side effects. Although this selective COX-2 inhibitor, like diet, may alter the fatty acid and eicosanoid pattern, data on the potential alteration in tissues after use, are scarce. The aims were to study if rofecoxib might influence the fatty acid distribution in serum phospholipids and duodenal lesions, mRNA for COX-1 and COX-2 in leucocytes and duodenal lesions, and finally plasma levels of PGE2 in a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study (n = 38). Significant reductions were found for essential fatty acid index both in serum phospholipids (P = 0.01, 95% CI = −0.9; −0.1), and in duodenal lesions (P = 0.04, 95 CI % = −0.9; −0.1) after treatment. No treatment effects were found on the COX mRNA expression, or in the plasma PGE2 levels. Dietary AA/EPA ratio was inversely associated with all the indicators of EFA status (all P < 0.01). These findings suggest that the effects of COX chemoprevention should be further investigated in FAP and that dietary needs should be included in the treatment of FAP. PMID:20593240

  15. Regression of pulmonary artery hypertension due to development of a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Ashfaq; Sastry, B K S; Aleem, M A; Reddy, Gokul; Mahmood, Syed

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Hypertension (IPAH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure in the absence of an identifiable underlying cause. The condition is usually relentlessly progressive with a short survival in the absence of treatment.(1) We describe a patient of IPAH in whom the pulmonary artery pressures significantly abated with complete disappearance of symptoms, following spontaneous development of a pulmonary arterio-venous malformation (PAVM). Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cox1 mutation abrogates need for Cox23 in cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dela Cruz, Richard; Jeong, Mi-Young; Winge, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Cox23 is a known conserved assembly factor for cytochrome c oxidase, although its role in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) biogenesis remains unresolved. To gain additional insights into its role, we isolated spontaneous suppressors of the respiratory growth defect in cox23∆ yeast cells. We recovered independent colonies that propagated on glycerol/lactate medium for cox23∆ cells at 37°C. We mapped these mutations to the mitochondrial genome and specifically to COX1 yielding an I101F substitution. The I101F Cox1 allele is a gain-of-function mutation enabling yeast to respire in the absence of Cox23. CcO subunit steady-state levels were restored with the I101F Cox1 suppressor mutation and oxygen consumption and CcO activity were likewise restored. Cells harboring the mitochondrial genome encoding I101F Cox1 were used to delete genes for other CcO assembly factors to test the specificity of the Cox1 mutation as a suppressor of cox23∆ cells. The Cox1 mutant allele fails to support respiratory growth in yeast lacking Cox17, Cox19, Coa1, Coa2, Cox14 or Shy1, demonstrating its specific suppressor activity for cox23∆ cells.

  17. DWCox: A density-weighted Cox model for outlier-robust prediction of prostate cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jinfeng; Wang, Sheng; Shang, Jingbo; Lin, Henry; Xin, Doris; Ren, Xiang; Han, Jiawei; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reliable predictions on the risk and survival time of prostate cancer patients based on their clinical records can help guide their treatment and provide hints about the disease mechanism. The Cox regression is currently a commonly accepted approach for such tasks in clinical applications. More complex methods, like ensemble approaches, have the potential of reaching better prediction accuracy at the cost of increased training difficulty and worse result interpretability. Better performance on a specific data set may also be obtained by extensive manual exploration in the data space, but such developed models are subject to overfitting and usually not directly applicable to a different data set. We propose DWCox, a density-weighted Cox model that has improved robustness against outliers and thus can provide more accurate predictions of prostate cancer survival. DWCox assigns weights to the training data according to their local kernel density in the feature space, and incorporates those weights into the partial likelihood function. A linear regression is then used to predict the actual survival times from the predicted risks. In the 2015 Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge, DWCox obtained the best average ranking in prediction accuracy on the risk and survival time. The success of DWCox is remarkable given that it is one of the smallest and most interpretable models submitted to the challenge. In simulations, DWCox performed consistently better than a standard Cox model when the training data contained many sparsely distributed outliers. Although developed for prostate cancer patients, DWCox can be easily re-trained and applied to other survival analysis problems. DWCox is implemented in R and can be downloaded from https://github.com/JinfengXiao/DWCox. PMID:28299178

  18. COX-1 and COX-2 expression in feline oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A; Scase, T; Miller, J; Murphy, S; Sparkes, A; Adams, V

    2006-01-01

    This study demonstrated immunohistochemically the expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC), with primary polyclonal antibodies raised against human epitopes. COX-2 immunolabelling was intracytoplasmic and, in some neoplastic cells, perinuclear; it was demonstrated in a small proportion (< or = 1%) of neoplastic cells and its intensity was usually mild to moderate. In contrast, all neoplastic tissues showed extensive nuclear and cytoplasmic COX-1 immunolabelling. Cytoplasmic COX-1 immunolabelling was less intense than nuclear labelling in neoplastic tissue. In the adjacent histologically normal oral mucosa, COX-2 immunolabelling was absent. The cytoplasmic and nuclear intensity and distribution of COX-1 immunolabelling was significantly higher in neoplastic tissue than in adjacent normal oral mucosa. The results indicate that COX-1 and COX-2 are overexpressed in FOSCC, but the clinical and pathophysiological significance of this finding remains to be determined.

  19. Modeling age-of-onset: Cox model with latent major gene effects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Thompson, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of age-of-onset is a key factor in the segregation and linkage analysis of complex genetic traits, but is complicated by the censoring of unaffected individuals. Most previous work has used parametric distributional assumptions, but it is hard to characterize the distribution of age-of-onset by a single distribution. Other approaches discretize age-of-onset and use logistic regression to model incidence; this approach does not use the information fully. Frailty models have been used for age-of-oset in the biostatistics literature, but these models do not lend themselves to modeling the correlations due to genetic effects which segregate within a family. Here, we propose use of the Cox model with latent major gene effects; conditional on the major genotypes, Cox`s proportional hazards model is used for age-of-onset for each individual. This is a semiparametric model; we do not specify the baseline hazard function. Likelihood analysis of such models is restricted by the difficulty in evaluating of maximizing the likelihood, especially when data are available for some of the members of an extended pedigree. Markov chain Monte Carlo permits genotypic configurations to be realized from the posterior distributions given a current model and the observed data. Hence methods for likelihood analysis can be developed: Monte Carlo EM is used for estimation of the parameters and their variance-covariance matrix. Markers and observed covariates are easily incorporated into this analysis. We present the model, methods for likelihood analysis and the results of a simulation study. The results are comparable with those based on a Cox model with known genotypic dependence in a pedigree. An early-onset Alzheimer`s pedigree and some breast cancer pedigrees have been used as real data examples. Some possible extensions are also discussed.

  20. Compensatory hypertrophy induced by ventricular cardiomyocyte-specific COX-2 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Streicher, John M; Kamei, Kenichiro; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Herschman, Harvey; Wang, Yibin

    2010-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important mediator of inflammation in stress and disease states. Recent attention has focused on the role of COX-2 in human heart failure and diseases owing to the finding that highly specific COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., Vioxx) increased the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in chronic users. However, the specific impact of COX-2 expression in the intact heart remains to be determined. We report here the development of a transgenic mouse model, using a loxP-Cre approach, which displays robust COX-2 overexpression and subsequent prostaglandin synthesis specifically in ventricular myocytes. Histological, functional, and molecular analyses showed that ventricular myocyte specific COX-2 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy and fetal gene marker activation, but with preserved cardiac function. Therefore, specific induction of COX-2 and prostaglandin in vivo is sufficient to induce compensated hypertrophy and molecular remodeling. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Compensatory Hypertrophy Induced by Ventricular Cardiomyocyte Specific COX-2 Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, John M.; Kamei, Kenichiro; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Herschman, Harvey; Wang, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important mediator of inflammation in stress and disease states. Recent attention has focused on the role of COX-2 in human heart failure and diseases, due to the finding that highly specific COX-2 inhibitors (i.e. Vioxx) increased the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in chronic users. However, the specific impact of COX-2 expression in the intact heart remains to be determined. We report here the development of a transgenic mouse model, using a loxP-Cre approach, that displays robust COX-2 overexpression and subsequent prostaglandin synthesis specifically in ventricular myocytes. Histological, functional and molecular analyses showed that ventricular myocyte specific COX-2 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy and fetal gene marker activation, but with preserved cardiac function. Therefore, specific induction of COX-2 and prostaglandin in vivo is sufficient to induce compensated hypertrophy and molecular remodeling. PMID:20170663

  2. Salt supplementation ameliorates developmental kidney defects in COX-2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Patrick; Frölich, Stefanie; Goren, Itamar; Nüsing, Rolf M

    2017-06-01

    Deficiency of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity in the early postnatal period causes impairment of kidney development leading to kidney insufficiency. We hypothesize that impaired NaCl reabsorption during the first days of life is a substantial cause for nephrogenic defects observed in COX-2(-/-) mice and that salt supplementation corrects these defects. Daily injections of NaCl (0.8 mg·g(-1)·day(-1)) for the first 10 days after birth ameliorated impaired kidney development in COX-2(-/-) pups resulting in an increase in glomerular size and fewer immature superficial glomeruli. However, impaired renal subcortical growth was not corrected. Increasing renal tubular flow by volume load or injections of KCl did not relieve the renal histomorphological damage. Administration of torsemide and spironolactone also affected nephrogenesis resulting in diminished glomeruli and cortical thinning. Treatment of COX-2(-/-) pups with NaCl/DOCA caused a stronger mitigation of glomerular size and induced a slight but significant growth of cortical tissue mass. After birth, renal mRNA expression of NHE3, NKCC2, ROMK, NCCT, ENaC, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase increased relative to postnatal day 2 in wild-type mice. However, in COX-2(-/-) mice, a significantly lower expression was observed for NCCT, whereas NaCl/DOCA treatment significantly increased NHE3 and ROMK expression. Long-term effects of postnatal NaCl/DOCA injections indicate improved kidney function with normalization of pathologically enhanced creatinine and urea plasma levels; also, albumin excretion was observed. In summary, we present evidence that salt supplementation during the COX-2-dependent time frame of nephrogenesis partly reverses renal morphological defects in COX-2(-/-) mice and improves kidney function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. COX-1 vs. COX-2 as a determinant of basal tone in the internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Márcio A. F.; Rattan, Neeru; Rattan, Satish

    2009-01-01

    Prostanoids, produced endogenously via cyclooxygenases (COXs), have been implicated in the sustained contraction of different smooth muscles. The two major types of COXs are COX-1 and COX-2. The COX subtype involved in the basal state of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone is not known. To identify the COX subtype, we examined the effect of COX-1- and COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and rofecoxib, respectively, on basal tone in the rat IAS. We also determined the effect of selective deletion of COX-1 and COX-2 genes (COX-1−/− and COX-2−/− mice) on basal tone in murine IAS. Our data show that SC-560 causes significantly more efficacious and potent concentration-dependent decreases in IAS tone than rofecoxib. In support of these data, significantly higher levels of COX-1 than COX-2 mRNA were found in the IAS. In addition, higher levels of COX-1 mRNA and protein were expressed in rat IAS than rectal smooth muscle. In wild-type mice, IAS tone was decreased 41.4 ± 3.4% (mean ± SE) by SC-560 (1 × 10−5 M) and 5.4 ± 2.2% by rofecoxib (P < 0.05, n = 5). Basal tone was 0.172 ± 0.021 mN//mg in the IAS from wild-type mice and significantly less (0.080 ± 0.015 mN/mg) in the IAS from COX-1−/− mice (P < 0.05, n = 5). However, basal tone in COX-2−/− mice was not significantly different from that in wild-type mice. We conclude that COX-1-related products contribute significantly to IAS tone. PMID:19056763

  4. ORACLE INEQUALITIES FOR THE LASSO IN THE COX MODEL.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Sun, Tingni; Ying, Zhiliang; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Cun-Hui

    2013-06-01

    We study the absolute penalized maximum partial likelihood estimator in sparse, high-dimensional Cox proportional hazards regression models where the number of time-dependent covariates can be larger than the sample size. We establish oracle inequalities based on natural extensions of the compatibility and cone invertibility factors of the Hessian matrix at the true regression coefficients. Similar results based on an extension of the restricted eigenvalue can be also proved by our method. However, the presented oracle inequalities are sharper since the compatibility and cone invertibility factors are always greater than the corresponding restricted eigenvalue. In the Cox regression model, the Hessian matrix is based on time-dependent covariates in censored risk sets, so that the compatibility and cone invertibility factors, and the restricted eigenvalue as well, are random variables even when they are evaluated for the Hessian at the true regression coefficients. Under mild conditions, we prove that these quantities are bounded from below by positive constants for time-dependent covariates, including cases where the number of covariates is of greater order than the sample size. Consequently, the compatibility and cone invertibility factors can be treated as positive constants in our oracle inequalities.

  5. ORACLE INEQUALITIES FOR THE LASSO IN THE COX MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Sun, Tingni; Ying, Zhiliang; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Cun-Hui

    2013-01-01

    We study the absolute penalized maximum partial likelihood estimator in sparse, high-dimensional Cox proportional hazards regression models where the number of time-dependent covariates can be larger than the sample size. We establish oracle inequalities based on natural extensions of the compatibility and cone invertibility factors of the Hessian matrix at the true regression coefficients. Similar results based on an extension of the restricted eigenvalue can be also proved by our method. However, the presented oracle inequalities are sharper since the compatibility and cone invertibility factors are always greater than the corresponding restricted eigenvalue. In the Cox regression model, the Hessian matrix is based on time-dependent covariates in censored risk sets, so that the compatibility and cone invertibility factors, and the restricted eigenvalue as well, are random variables even when they are evaluated for the Hessian at the true regression coefficients. Under mild conditions, we prove that these quantities are bounded from below by positive constants for time-dependent covariates, including cases where the number of covariates is of greater order than the sample size. Consequently, the compatibility and cone invertibility factors can be treated as positive constants in our oracle inequalities. PMID:24086091

  6. HNE as an inducer of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Koji

    2017-02-09

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible isoform responsible for high levels of prostaglandin (PG) production during inflammation and immune responses, mediate a variety of biological actions involved in vascular pathophysiology. COX-2 is induced by various stimuli, including proinflammatory cytokines, to result in PG synthesis associated with inflammation and carcinogenesis. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of a group of small molecules that can induce COX-2 expression. The mechanistic studies have revealed that the HNE-induced COX-2 expression results from the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and uniquely requires a serum component, which is eventually identified to be modified low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), such as the oxidized form of LDLs. It has also been shown that HNE-induced COX-2 expression is mechanistically linked to the expression of transcription factor p53 and that the overexpression of COX-2 is associated with down-regulation of a proteasome subunit, leading to the enhanced accumulation of p53 and ubiquitinated proteins and to the enhanced sensitivity toward HNE. Thus, the overall mechanism and pathophysiological role of the COX-2 induction by HNE have become increasingly evident.

  7. Changes in the content of sex steroid hormone receptors in the growing and regressing ovaries of Gallus domesticus during development.

    PubMed

    González-Morán, María Genoveva; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Germán-Castelán, Liliana; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Sex steroids participate in the regulation of reproduction in female chickens. In this work, we determined the content of androgen receptor (AR), intracellular progesterone receptor isoforms (PR-A and PR-B), membrane progesterone receptor γ (mPRγ) and estrogen receptor α (ER-α) in the left growing and right regressing ovaries of Gallus domesticus from 13-day-old chicken embryos to 1-month-old chickens by western blot analysis. A marked difference in the morphological characteristics of the left and the right ovaries during development was observed. Results show a higher content of AR in the left ovary than in the right one in all ages. In the left ovary, the highest content of AR was observed on day 13 of embryonic development, and diminished with age. In the right ovary, AR was expressed from day 13 of embryonic development to 1-day-old, and became undetectable at 1-week and 1-month-old. In the left ovary, PR isoforms were not detected on day 13 of embryonic development, but they presented a marked expression after hatching. In the right ovary, the highest expression of both PR isoforms was found on 1-day-old, and significantly decreased with age. PR-B was the predominant isoform on 1-day and 1-month old in the left ovary, whereas PR-A was the predominant one on day 13 of embryonic development in the right ovary. Interestingly, mPRγ was detected at 1-week and 1-month-old in the left ovary meanwhile in the right ovary, it was detected from day 13 of embryonic development to 1-day-old. ER-α was only detected in the left ovary from day 13 to 1-week-old, while in 1-month-old chickens, it was expressed in both ovaries. In the left ovary, ER-α content was lower from 1-day to 1-month-old as compared with day 13 of embryonic development. Our results demonstrate a differential expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between the left growing and the right regressing ovary, and throughout chickens' age; and this is the first report about mPR expression in birds.

  8. Developing logistic regression models using purchase attributes and demographics to predict the probability of purchases of regular and specialty eggs.

    PubMed

    Bejaei, M; Wiseman, K; Cheng, K M

    2015-01-01

    Consumers' interest in specialty eggs appears to be growing in Europe and North America. The objective of this research was to develop logistic regression models that utilise purchaser attributes and demographics to predict the probability of a consumer purchasing a specific type of table egg including regular (white and brown), non-caged (free-run, free-range and organic) or nutrient-enhanced eggs. These purchase prediction models, together with the purchasers' attributes, can be used to assess market opportunities of different egg types specifically in British Columbia (BC). An online survey was used to gather data for the models. A total of 702 completed questionnaires were submitted by BC residents. Selected independent variables included in the logistic regression to develop models for different egg types to predict the probability of a consumer purchasing a specific type of table egg. The variables used in the model accounted for 54% and 49% of variances in the purchase of regular and non-caged eggs, respectively. Research results indicate that consumers of different egg types exhibit a set of unique and statistically significant characteristics and/or demographics. For example, consumers of regular eggs were less educated, older, price sensitive, major chain store buyers, and store flyer users, and had lower awareness about different types of eggs and less concern regarding animal welfare issues. However, most of the non-caged egg consumers were less concerned about price, had higher awareness about different types of table eggs, purchased their eggs from local/organic grocery stores, farm gates or farmers markets, and they were more concerned about care and feeding of hens compared to consumers of other eggs types.

  9. Tomato powder impedes the development of azoxymethane-induced colorectal cancer in rats through suppression of COX-2 expression via NF-κB and regulating Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Tuzcu, Mehmet; Aslan, Abdullah; Tuzcu, Zeynep; Yabas, Mehmet; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Kucuk, Omer; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Since dietary factors have been connected to a reduced risk of a diversity of human cancers, in this study we investigated the effects of tomato powder (TP) on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal cancer in Wistar rats, and possible mechanism(s) by which TP shows its chemopreventive activity. Here we show that TP added to feed at 5% rate decreases the rate of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and reduces the development of adenocarcinoma and growth of AOM-induced colorectal cancer in rats. In addition, we demonstrate that TP supplementation shows its chemopreventive activities through inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression via NF-κB pathway and promotion of apoptosis, as well as regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in colorectal tissue of AOM-treated rats. Our findings identify an intimate connection between dietary supplementation of TP and the decreased risk of colorectal cancer in rats, and suggest that consumption of TP would be a natural candidate for the prevention of colorectal cancer in men.

  10. Bayesian inference for multivariate meta-analysis Box-Cox transformation models for individual patient data with applications to evaluation of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Shah, Arvind K; Lin, Jianxin

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we propose a class of Box-Cox transformation regression models with multidimensional random effects for analyzing multivariate responses for individual patient data in meta-analysis. Our modeling formulation uses a multivariate normal response meta-analysis model with multivariate random effects, in which each response is allowed to have its own Box-Cox transformation. Prior distributions are specified for the Box-Cox transformation parameters as well as the regression coefficients in this complex model, and the deviance information criterion is used to select the best transformation model. Because the model is quite complex, we develop a novel Monte Carlo Markov chain sampling scheme to sample from the joint posterior of the parameters. This model is motivated by a very rich dataset comprising 26 clinical trials involving cholesterol-lowering drugs where the goal is to jointly model the three-dimensional response consisting of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) (LDL-C, HDL-C, TG). Because the joint distribution of (LDL-C, HDL-C, TG) is not multivariate normal and in fact quite skewed, a Box-Cox transformation is needed to achieve normality. In the clinical literature, these three variables are usually analyzed univariately; however, a multivariate approach would be more appropriate because these variables are correlated with each other. We carry out a detailed analysis of these data by using the proposed methodology.

  11. Ku80 cooperates with CBP to promote COX-2 expression and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yu; Xuan, Yang; Jia, Yunlu; Hu, Wenxian; Yu, Wendan; Dai, Meng; Li, Zhenglin; Yi, Canhui; Zhao, Shilei; Li, Mei; Du, Sha; Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Wu, Taihua; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Huang, Wenlin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shusen; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. Using streptavidin-agarose pulldown and proteomics assay, we identified and validated Ku80, a dimer of Ku participating in the repair of broken DNA double strands, as a new binding protein of the COX-2 gene promoter. Overexpression of Ku80 up-regulated COX-2 promoter activation and COX-2 expression in lung cancer cells. Silencing of Ku80 by siRNA down-regulated COX-2 expression and inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. Ku80 knockdown suppressed phosphorylation of ERK, resulting in an inactivation of the MAPK pathway. Moreover, CBP, a transcription co-activator, interacted with and acetylated Ku80 to co-regulate the activation of COX-2 promoter. Overexpression of CBP increased Ku80 acetylation, thereby promoting COX-2 expression and cell growth. Suppression of CBP by a CBP-specific inhibitor or siRNA inhibited COX-2 expression as well as tumor cell growth. Tissue microarray immunohistochemical analysis of lung adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between levels of Ku80 and COX-2 and clinicopathologic variables. Overexpression of Ku80 was associated with poor prognosis in patients with lung cancers. We conclude that Ku80 promotes COX-2 expression and tumor growth and is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:25797267

  12. Development and Application of Regression Models for Estimating Nutrient Concentrations in Streams of the Conterminous United States, 1992-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, Norman E.; Mueller, David K.; Wolock, David M.; Hitt, Kerie J.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2010-01-01

    Data collected for the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program from 1992-2001 were used to investigate the relations between nutrient concentrations and nutrient sources, hydrology, and basin characteristics. Regression models were developed to estimate annual flow-weighted concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus using explanatory variables derived from currently available national ancillary data. Different total-nitrogen regression models were used for agricultural (25 percent or more of basin area classified as agricultural land use) and nonagricultural basins. Atmospheric, fertilizer, and manure inputs of nitrogen, percent sand in soil, subsurface drainage, overland flow, mean annual precipitation, and percent undeveloped area were significant variables in the agricultural basin total nitrogen model. Significant explanatory variables in the nonagricultural total nitrogen model were total nonpoint-source nitrogen input (sum of nitrogen from manure, fertilizer, and atmospheric deposition), population density, mean annual runoff, and percent base flow. The concentrations of nutrients derived from regression (CONDOR) models were applied to drainage basins associated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) River Reach File (RF1) to predict flow-weighted mean annual total nitrogen concentrations for the conterminous United States. The majority of stream miles in the Nation have predicted concentrations less than 5 milligrams per liter. Concentrations greater than 5 milligrams per liter were predicted for a broad area extending from Ohio to eastern Nebraska, areas spatially associated with greater application of fertilizer and manure. Probabilities that mean annual total-nitrogen concentrations exceed the USEPA regional nutrient criteria were determined by incorporating model prediction uncertainty. In all nutrient regions where criteria have been established, there is at least a 50 percent probability of exceeding

  13. Development of a modified factor analysis/multiple regression model to apportion suspended particulate matter in a complex urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Maria T.; Daisey, Joan M.; Lioy, Paul J.

    A modified factor analysis/multiple regression (FA/MR) receptor-oriented source apportionment model has been developed which permits application of FA/MR statistical methods when some of the tracers are not unique to an individual source type. The new method uses factor and regression analyses to apportion non-unique tracer ambient concentrations in situations where there are unique tracers for all sources contributing to the non-unique tracer except one, and ascribes the residual concentration to that source. This value is then used as the source tracer in the final FA/MR apportionment model for ambient paniculate matter. In addition, factor analyses results are complemented with examination of regression residuals in order to optimize the number of identifiable sources. The new method has been applied to identify and apportion the sources of inhalable particulate matter (IPM; D5015 μm), Pb and Fe at a site in Newark, NJ. The model indicated that sulfate/secondary aerosol contributed an average of 25.8 μ -3 (48%) to IPM concentrations, followed by soil resuspension (8.2 μ -3 or 15%), paint spraying/paint pigment (6.7/gmm -3or 13%), fuel oil burning/space heating (4.3 μ -3 or 8 %), industrial emissions (3.6 μm -3 or 7 %) and motor vehicle exhaust (2.7 μ -3 or 15 %). Contributions to ambient Pb concentrations were: motor vehicle exhaust (0.16μm -3or 36%), soil resuspension (0.10μm -3 or 24%), fuel oil burning/space heating (0.08μm -3or 18%), industrial emissions (0.07 μ -3 or 17 %), paint spraying/paint pigment (0.036 μm -3or 9 %) and zinc related sources (0.022 μ -3 or 5 %). Contributions to ambient Fe concentrations were: soil resuspension (0.43μ -3or 51%), paint spraying/paint pigment (0.28 μm -3or 33 %) and industrial emissions (0.15 μ -3or 18 %). The models were validated by comparing partial source profiles calculated from modeling results with the corresponding published source emissions composition.

  14. Spatial variations and development of land use regression models of oxidative potential in ten European study areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedynska, Aleksandra; Hoek, Gerard; Wang, Meng; Yang, Aileen; Eeftens, Marloes; Cyrys, Josef; Keuken, Menno; Ampe, Christophe; Beelen, Rob; Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Cirach, Marta; de Hoogh, Kees; De Nazelle, Audrey; Nystad, Wenche; Akhlaghi, Helgah Makarem; Declercq, Christophe; Stempfelet, Morgane; Eriksen, Kirsten T.; Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Lanki, Timo; Meliefste, Kees; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Janssen, Nicole A. H.; Brunekreef, Bert; Kooter, Ingeborg M.

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative potential (OP) has been suggested as a health-relevant measure of air pollution. Little information is available about OP spatial variation and the possibility to model its spatial variability. Our aim was to measure the spatial variation of OP within and between 10 European study areas. The second aim was to develop land use regression (LUR) models to explain the measured spatial variation. OP was determined with the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay in ten European study areas. DTT of PM2.5 was measured at 16-40 sites per study area, divided over street, urban and regional background sites. Three two-week samples were taken per site in a one-year period in three different seasons. We developed study-area specific LUR models and a LUR model for all study areas combined to explain the spatial variation of OP. Significant contrasts between study areas in OP were found. OP DTT levels were highest in southern Europe. DTT levels at street sites were on average 1.10 times higher than at urban background locations. In 5 of the 10 study areas LUR models could be developed with a median R2 of 33%. A combined study area model explained 30% of the measured spatial variability. Overall, LUR models did not explain spatial variation well, possibly due to low levels of OP DTT and a lack of specific predictor variables.

  15. Development and application of generalized-least-squares regression models to estimate low-flow duration discharges in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.

    1994-01-01

    Physically based mathematical models were developed by use of generalized-least-squares regression analyses to estimate long-term 95-, 98-, and 99-percent duration discharges for ungaged streams in Massachusetts. Duration discharges for 61 sites were used in the recession analyses; 37 sites were streamflow-gaging stations and 24 sites were low-flow partial-record stations. The duration discharges were related to basin chacteristics measured from digital data bases, by use of geographic information systems computer software. Significant chacterisfics used in the models were drainage area, area underlain by stratified-drift deposits per unit of stream length in the basin, and a surrogate for the effective head on the aquifer in the stratified-drift deposits, computed by subtracting the minimum basin elevation from the mean basin elevation. Standard errors of prediction were 57.5, 85.6, and 98.5 percent for models for the 95-, 98-, and 99-percent duration discharges, respectively. Model error variances were about 10 times the sampling error variances, indicating that the precision of future models are likely to be improved more by obtaining better measurements of basin characteristics or by adding new sites to the analyses than by collecting more streamflow data at the sites presently used in the analyses. The models were used to predict duration discharges for 35 selected sites in the Concord River, Noah Coastal, South Coastal, Narragansett and Tenmile River Basins. Ninety-perrcent prediction intervals were computed for the estimates at each of the sites, except at sites where values of the independent variables were outside the ranges of those for the sites used in the regression analyses.

  16. Maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation and pregnancy outcomes in developing countries: meta-analysis and meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Shankar, Anuraj H; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of supplementation with multiple micronutrients versus iron and folic acid on pregnancy outcomes in developing countries. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Outcomes of interest were birth weight, low birth weight, small size for gestational age, perinatal mortality and neonatal mortality. Pooled relative risks (RRs) were estimated by random effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup meta-analyses and meta-regression. Findings Multiple micronutrient supplementation was more effective than iron and folic acid supplementation at reducing the risk of low birth weight (RR: 0.86, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.79–0.93) and of small size for gestational age (RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.78–0.93). Micronutrient supplementation had no overall effect on perinatal mortality (RR: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.90–1.22), although substantial heterogeneity was evident (I2 = 58%; P for heterogeneity = 0.008). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses suggested that micronutrient supplementation was associated with a lower risk of perinatal mortality in trials in which > 50% of mothers had formal education (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.82–1.06) or in which supplementation was initiated after a mean of 20 weeks of gestation (RR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80–0.97). Conclusion Maternal education or gestational age at initiation of supplementation may have contributed to the observed heterogeneous effects on perinatal mortality. The safety, efficacy and effective delivery of maternal micronutrient supplementation require further research. PMID:21673856

  17. Dexamethasone damages the rat stomach but not small intestine during inhibition of COX-1.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Aya; Taniguchi, Masaki; Takahira, Yuka; Tanaka, Akiko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2007-06-01

    We previously reported that inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2 is required for the gastrointestinal ulcerogenic properties of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Inhibition of COX-1 up-regulates COX-2 expression, and the prostaglandins (PGs) produced by COX-2 help to maintain the mucosal integrity during inhibition of COX-1. In the present study we investigated whether dexamethasone damages rat gastrointestinal mucosa during inhibition of COX-1 and further developed the idea that COX-2 expression is a key event in the ulcerogenic actions of NSAIDs. Dexamethasone was given p.o. in the absence or presence of SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor), and the stomach or intestine was examined 8 or 24 hr later, respectively. Neither dexamethasone nor SC-560 alone damaged the gastrointestinal mucosa. In the presence of SC-560, however, dexamethasone damaged the stomach but not small intestine. SC-560 decreased PGE(2) levels in both tissues, with a gradual recovery accompanying the up-regulation of COX-2 expression, and both the recovery of PGE(2) levels and the expression of COX-2 were inhibited by dexamethasone. In the animals treated with SC-560, iNOS expression was up-regulated in the intestinal but not the gastric mucosa, and this response was also inhibited by dexamethasone. These results suggest a risk from steroid therapy in the stomach when COX-2 expression is up-regulated. Dexamethasone does not provoke damage in the intestine, despite inhibiting the up-regulation of COX-2 expression under conditions of PG deficiency; at least one of the reasons is that this agent prevents the expression of iNOS, a major factor in the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions.

  18. Development of synthetic velocity - depth damage curves using a Weighted Monte Carlo method and Logistic Regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2014-05-01

    Damage curves are the most significant component of the flood loss estimation models. Their development is quite complex. Two types of damage curves exist, historical and synthetic curves. Historical curves are developed from historical loss data from actual flood events. However, due to the scarcity of historical data, synthetic damage curves can be alternatively developed. Synthetic curves rely on the analysis of expected damage under certain hypothetical flooding conditions. A synthetic approach was developed and presented in this work for the development of damage curves, which are subsequently used as the basic input to a flood loss estimation model. A questionnaire-based survey took place among practicing and research agronomists, in order to generate rural loss data based on the responders' loss estimates, for several flood condition scenarios. In addition, a similar questionnaire-based survey took place among building experts, i.e. civil engineers and architects, in order to generate loss data for the urban sector. By answering the questionnaire, the experts were in essence expressing their opinion on how damage to various crop types or building types is related to a range of values of flood inundation parameters, such as floodwater depth and velocity. However, the loss data compiled from the completed questionnaires were not sufficient for the construction of workable damage curves; to overcome this problem, a Weighted Monte Carlo method was implemented, in order to generate extra synthetic datasets with statistical properties identical to those of the questionnaire-based data. The data generated by the Weighted Monte Carlo method were processed via Logistic Regression techniques in order to develop accurate logistic damage curves for the rural and the urban sectors. A Python-based code was developed, which combines the Weighted Monte Carlo method and the Logistic Regression analysis into a single code (WMCLR Python code). Each WMCLR code execution

  19. Immunohistochemical evaluation of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa G; Maraee, Alaa H; Saif, Hala F Abd-Elsattar

    2014-04-01

    Both keloids (KLs) and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are considered as dermal fibroproliferative diseases that differ clinically and histopathologically. Although several factors have been postulated in the etiopathogenesis of these conditions, there has been growing evidence to suggest the role of COXs in the pathogenesis of abnormal wound healing because of the reduction of formation of KL and HS in patients using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a COX-2 inhibitor. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the pattern and localization of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in KL and HS compared with surgical scars. COX-1 and COX-2 were analyzed on skin biopsies of 30 patients who presented with KL (15) and HS (15) and 10 normal surgical scars (controls). Both COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed not only in dermal components (fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells) but also in keratinocytes of the overlying epidermis in the different studied scar lesions. The percentage of COX-1 expression increased progressively from surgical scar (40%) to HS (53.3%) to KL (100%) with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). COX-2 was expressed in 100% of surgical scars, 73.3% of HS and 86.7% of KL with the absence of significant differences (P > 0.05). The significant difference in COX-1 expression between HS and KL may refer to the presence of different pathways for the emergence of these diseases. The expression of COX-2 in all scars (normal or abnormal) indicates its active role as an inflammatory mediator. Keratinocytes play an active role in induction of scarring by up-regulation of inflammatory mediators, such as COX-1 and COX-2.

  20. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Bartzanas, T.; Panagakis, P.; Zhang, G.; Kittas, C.

    2016-11-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  1. Developing synergy regression models with space-borne ALOS PALSAR and Landsat TM sensors for retrieving tropical forest biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Suman; Jeganathan, C.; Sharma, L. K.; Nathawat, M. S.; Das, Anup K.; Mohan, Shiv

    2016-06-01

    Forest stand biomass serves as an effective indicator for monitoring REDD (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation). Optical remote sensing data have been widely used to derive forest biophysical parameters inspite of their poor sensitivity towards the forest properties. Microwave remote sensing provides a better alternative owing to its inherent ability to penetrate the forest vegetation. This study aims at developing optimal regression models for retrieving forest above-ground bole biomass (AGBB) utilising optical data from Landsat TM and microwave data from L-band of ALOS PALSAR data over Indian subcontinental tropical deciduous mixed forests located in Munger (Bihar, India). Spatial biomass models were developed. The results using Landsat TM showed poor correlation ( R 2 = 0.295 and RMSE = 35 t/ha) when compared to HH polarized L-band SAR ( R 2 = 0.868 and RMSE = 16.06 t/ha). However, the prediction model performed even better when both the optical and SAR were used simultaneously ( R 2 = 0.892 and RMSE = 14.08 t/ha). The addition of TM metrics has positively contributed in improving PALSAR estimates of forest biomass. Hence, the study recommends the combined use of both optical and SAR sensors for better assessment of stand biomass with significant contribution towards operational forestry.

  2. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, D K; Bartzanas, T; Panagakis, P; Zhang, G; Kittas, C

    2016-11-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  3. Using multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to develop crash modification factors for urban freeway interchange influence areas.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Kirolos; Gan, Albert; Lu, Jinyan

    2013-06-01

    Crash modification factors (CMFs) are used to measure the safety impacts of changes in specific geometric characteristics. Their development has gained much interest following the adoption of CMFs by the recently released Highway Safety Manual (HSM) and SafetyAnalyst tool in the United States. This paper describes a study to develop CMFs for interchange influence areas on urban freeways in the state of Florida. Despite the very different traffic and geometric conditions that exist in interchange influence areas, most previous studies have not separated them from the rest of the freeway system in their analyses. In this study, a promising data mining method known as multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) was applied to develop CMFs for median width and inside and outside shoulder widths for "total" and "fatal and injury" (FI) crashes. In addition, CMFs were also developed for the two most frequent crash types, i.e., rear-end and sideswipe. MARS is characterized by its ability to accommodate the nonlinearity in crash predictors and to allow the impact of more than one geometric variable to be simultaneously considered. The methodology further implements crash predictions from the model to identify changes in geometric design features. Four years of crashes from 2007 to 2010 were used in the analysis and the results showed that MARS's prediction capability and goodness-of-fit statistics outperformed those of the negative binomial model. The influential variables identified included the outside and inside shoulder widths, median width, lane width, traffic volume, and shoulder type. It was deduced that a 2-ft increase in the outside and inside shoulders (from 10ft to 12ft) reduces FI crashes by 10% and 33%, respectively. Further, a 42-ft reduction in the median width (from 64ft to 22ft) increases the rear-end, total, and FI crashes by 473%, 263%, and 223%, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a Likelihood of Survival Scoring System for Hospitalized Equine Neonates Using Generalized Boosted Regression Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dembek, Katarzyna A.; Hurcombe, Samuel D.; Frazer, Michele L.; Morresey, Peter R.; Toribio, Ramiro E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical management of critically ill equine neonates (foals) can be expensive and labor intensive. Predicting the odds of foal survival using clinical information could facilitate the decision-making process for owners and clinicians. Numerous prognostic indicators and mathematical models to predict outcome in foals have been published; however, a validated scoring method to predict survival in sick foals has not been reported. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system that can be used by clinicians to predict likelihood of survival of equine neonates based on clinical data obtained on admission. Methods and Results Data from 339 hospitalized foals of less than four days of age admitted to three equine hospitals were included to develop the model. Thirty seven variables including historical information, physical examination and laboratory findings were analyzed by generalized boosted regression modeling (GBM) to determine which ones would be included in the survival score. Of these, six variables were retained in the final model. The weight for each variable was calculated using a generalized linear model and the probability of survival for each total score was determined. The highest (7) and the lowest (0) scores represented 97% and 3% probability of survival, respectively. Accuracy of this survival score was validated in a prospective study on data from 283 hospitalized foals from the same three hospitals. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the survival score in the prospective population were 96%, 71%, 91%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions The survival score developed in our study was validated in a large number of foals with a wide range of diseases and can be easily implemented using data available in most equine hospitals. GBM was a useful tool to develop the survival score. Further evaluations of this scoring system in field conditions are needed. PMID:25295600

  5. Construction of a consistent high-definition spatio-temporal atlas of the developing brain using adaptive kernel regression.

    PubMed

    Serag, Ahmed; Aljabar, Paul; Ball, Gareth; Counsell, Serena J; Boardman, James P; Rutherford, Mary A; Edwards, A David; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Medical imaging has shown that, during early development, the brain undergoes more changes in size, shape and appearance than at any other time in life. A better understanding of brain development requires a spatio-temporal atlas that characterizes the dynamic changes during this period. In this paper we present an approach for constructing a 4D atlas of the developing brain, between 28 and 44 weeks post-menstrual age at time of scan, using T1 and T2 weighted MR images from 204 premature neonates. The method used for the creation of the average 4D atlas utilizes non-rigid registration between all pairs of images to eliminate bias in the atlas toward any of the original images. In addition, kernel regression is used to produce age-dependent anatomical templates. A novelty in our approach is the use of a time-varying kernel width, to overcome the variations in the distribution of subjects at different ages. This leads to an atlas that retains a consistent level of detail at every time-point. Comparisons between the resulting atlas and atlases constructed using affine and non-rigid registration are presented. The resulting 4D atlas has greater anatomic definition than currently available 4D atlases created using various affine and non-rigid registration approaches, an important factor in improving registrations between the atlas and individual subjects. Also, the resulting 4D atlas can serve as a good representative of the population of interest as it reflects both global and local changes. The atlas is publicly available at www.brain-development.org.

  6. Prediction of Mild Cognitive Impairment Conversion Using a Combination of Independent Component Analysis and the Cox Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2017-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a transitional stage from normal aging to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and corresponds to a higher risk of developing AD. Thus, it is necessary to explore and predict the onset of AD in MCI stage. In this study, we propose a combination of independent component analysis (ICA) and the multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model to investigate promising risk factors associated with MCI conversion among 126 MCI converters and 108 MCI non-converters from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data, we extracted brain networks from AD and normal control groups via ICA and then constructed Cox models that included network-based neuroimaging factors for the MCI group. We carried out five separate Cox analyses and the two-modality neuroimaging Cox model identified three significant network-based risk factors with higher prediction performance (accuracy = 73.50%) than those in either single-modality model (accuracy = 68.80%). Additionally, the results of the comprehensive Cox model, including significant neuroimaging factors and clinical variables, demonstrated that MCI individuals with reduced gray matter volume in a temporal lobe-related network of structural MRI [hazard ratio (HR) = 8.29E-05 (95% confidence interval (CI), 5.10E- 07 ~ 0.013)], low glucose metabolism in the posterior default mode network based on FDG-PET [HR = 0.066 (95% CI, 4.63E-03 ~ 0.928)], positive apolipoprotein E ε4-status [HR = 1. 988 (95% CI, 1.531 ~ 2.581)], increased Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale scores [HR = 1.100 (95% CI, 1.059 ~ 1.144)] and Sum of Boxes of Clinical Dementia Rating scores [HR = 1.622 (95% CI, 1.364 ~ 1.930)] were more likely to convert to AD within 36 months after baselines. These significant risk factors in such comprehensive Cox model had the best prediction

  7. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402

  8. Use of Cox's Cure Model to Establish Clinical Determinants of Long-Term Disease-Free Survival in Neoadjuvant-Chemotherapy-Treated Breast Cancer Patients without Pathologic Complete Response.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma; Yonemori, Kan; Hirata, Taizo; Shimizu, Chikako; Tamura, Kenji; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    In prognostic studies for breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the ordinary Cox proportional-hazards (PH) model has been often used to identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS). This model assumes that all patients eventually experience relapse or death. However, a subset of NAC-treated breast cancer patients never experience these events during long-term follow-up (>10 years) and may be considered clinically "cured." Clinical factors associated with cure have not been studied adequately. Because the ordinary Cox PH model cannot be used to identify such clinical factors, we used the Cox PH cure model, a recently developed statistical method. This model includes both a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component for the hazard for uncured patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical factors associated with cure and the variables associated with the time to recurrence or death in NAC-treated breast cancer patients without a pathologic complete response, by using the Cox PH cure model. We found that hormone receptor status, clinical response, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, histological grade, and the number of lymph node metastases were associated with cure.

  9. Nanoceria Inhibit the Development and Promote the Regression of Pathologic Retinal Neovascularization in the Vldlr Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Seal, Sudipta; McGinnis, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are known to occur and progress because of oxidative stress, the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of the cellular defensive capabilities. Age related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and inherited retinal degeneration share oxidative stress as a common node upstream of the blinding effects of these diseases. Knockout of the Vldlr gene results in a mouse that develops intraretinal and subretinal neovascular lesions within the first month of age and is an excellent model for a form of AMD called retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) catalytically scavenge ROS by mimicking the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. A single intravitreal injection of nanoceria into the Vldlr-/- eye was shown to inhibit: the rise in ROS in the Vldlr-/- retina, increases in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the photoreceptor layer, and the formation of intraretinal and subretinal neovascular lesions. Of more therapeutic interest, injection of nanoceria into older mice (postnatal day 28) resulted in the regression of existing vascular lesions indicating that the pathologic neovessels require the continual production of excessive ROS. Our data demonstrate the unique ability of nanoceria to prevent downstream effects of oxidative stress in vivo and support their therapeutic potential for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD and DR. PMID:21364932

  10. Accuracy of identifying juvenile/adult status from third molar development using prediction probabilities derived from logistic regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ashith B; Bhowmik, Biyas; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G

    2014-05-01

    The use of third molars in predicting juvenile/adult status (development was assessed using Köhler's grading on 268 orthopantomograms of Indian subjects. Logistic regression analysis was applied to determine allocation accuracy of juvenile/adult status and the level of probability that is "reliable" in predicting juvenile/adult status. Allocation accuracies ranged between 75.8% and 78.2% for the sexes combined, with minimal male-female differences. Adults were categorized more accurately than juveniles, suggesting that Köhler's grading puts Indian juveniles at greater risk of unwarranted punishment. In both sexes, juvenile/adult status was "reliably" predicted when the probability was >80% using individual third molars (excepting the lower right third molar in males); combining upper and lower third molars on the left/right sides, "reliable" predictions were possible when the probability was >80% and >90% for females and males, respectively. Overall, "reliable" juvenile/adult status prediction was achieved in c. 36% of subjects. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Time windows matter in ADHD-related developing neuropsychological basic deficits: A comprehensive review and meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Pauli-Pott, Ursula; Becker, Katja

    2015-08-01

    Normative development of neuropsychological functions that are assumed to underlie attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may show transition periods, i.e., periods of heightened developmental discontinuity and reduced differential continuity. During such periods differences between ADHD cases and controls in these functions might be obscured because assessments probably not only reflect individual differences in the ADHD-related deviation but also individual differences in speed/onset of the transition. Our review focuses on executive inhibitory control (IC) and delay aversion/discounting (DA) because normative developmental processes of these characteristics are relatively well described. For complex IC performance a transition period can be assumed in preschool years, for DA around puberty. Published meta-analyses on neuropsychological IC tasks and a meta-regression analysis of 23 case-control comparisons in DA tasks comprising 1395 individuals with ADHD and 1195 controls confirmed our assumption. Effect sizes of case-control comparisons were significantly larger outside transition periods, i.e., in age-periods of relative developmental continuity. An increasingly precise identification of such time windows could contribute to the understanding of the etiological pathways of ADHD.

  12. Development of fuzzy system and nonlinear regression models for ozone and PM2.5 air quality forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiqiu

    2007-12-01

    Ozone forecast models using nonlinear regression (NLR) have been successfully applied to daily ozone forecast for seven metro areas in Kentucky, including Ashland, Bowling Green, Covington, Lexington, Louisville, Owensboro, and Paducah. In this study, the updated 2005 NLR ozone forecast models for these metro areas were evaluated on both the calibration data sets and independent data sets. These NLR ozone forecast models explained at least 72% of the variance of the daily peak ozone. Using the models to predict the ozone concentrations during the 2005 ozone season, the metro area mean absolute errors (MAEs) of the model hindcasts ranged from 5.90 ppb to 7.20 ppb. For the model raw forecasts, the metro area MAEs ranged from 7.90 ppb to 9.80 ppb. Based on previously developed NLR ozone forecast models for those areas, Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy system models were developed for the seven metro areas. The fuzzy "c-means" clustering technique coupled with an optimal output predefuzzification approach (least square method) was used to train the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy system. Two types of fuzzy models, basic fuzzy and NLR-fuzzy system models, were developed. The basic fuzzy and NLR-fuzzy models exhibited essentially equivalent performance to the existing NLR models on 2004 ozone season hindcasts and forecasts. Both types of fuzzy models had, on average, slightly lower metro area averaged MAEs than the NLR models. Among the seven Kentucky metro areas Ashland, Covington, and Louisville are currently designated nonattainment areas for both ground level O 3 and PM2.5. In this study, summer PM2.5 forecast models were developed for providing daily average PM2.5 forecasts for the seven metro areas. The performance of the PM2.5 forecast models was generally not as good as that of the ozone forecast models. For the summer 2004 model hindcasts, the metro-area average MAE was 5.33 mug/m 3. Exploratory research was conducted to find the relationship between the winter PM2.5 concentrations and

  13. Development and transferability of a nitrogen dioxide land use regression model within the Veneto region of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcon, Alessandro; de Hoogh, Kees; Gulliver, John; Beelen, Rob; Hansell, Anna L.

    2015-12-01

    When measurements or other exposure models are unavailable, air pollution concentrations could be estimated by transferring land-use regression (LUR) models from other areas. No studies have looked at transferability of LUR models from regions to cities. We investigated model transferability issues. We developed a LUR model for 2010 using annual average nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations retrieved from 47 regulatory stations of the Veneto region, Northern Italy. We applied this model to 40 independent sites in Verona, a city inside the region, where NO2 had been monitored in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) during 2010. We also used this model to estimate average NO2 concentrations at the regulatory network in 2008, 2009 and 2011. Of 33 predictor variables offered, five were retained in the LUR model (R2 = 0.75). The number of buildings in 5000 m buffers, industry surface area in 1000 m buffers and altitude, mainly representing large-scale air pollution dispersion patterns, explained most of the spatial variability in NO2 concentrations (R2 = 0.68), while two local traffic proxy indicators explained little of the variability (R2 = 0.07). The performance of this model transferred to urban sites was poor overall (R2 = 0.18), but it improved when only predicting inner-city background concentrations (R2 = 0.52). Recalibration of LUR coefficients improved model performance when predicting NO2 concentrations at the regulatory sites in 2008, 2009 and 2011 (R2 between 0.67 and 0.80). Models developed for a region using NO2 regulatory data are unable to capture small-scale variability in NO2 concentrations in urban traffic areas. Our study documents limitations in transferring a regional model to a city, even if it is nested within that region.

  14. Regulation of COX-2 expression by miR-146a in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Ashley L; Lutz, Carol S

    2014-09-01

    Prostaglandins are a class of molecules that mediate cellular inflammatory responses and control cell growth. The oxidative conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 is carried out by two isozymes of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is constitutively expressed, while COX-2 can be transiently induced by external stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, COX-2 is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including lung cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression. Previous studies have implicated an important role for miRNAs in human cancer. We demonstrate here that miR-146a expression levels are significantly lower in lung cancer cells as compared with normal lung cells. Conversely, lung cancer cells have higher levels of COX-2 protein and mRNA expression. Introduction of miR-146a can specifically ablate COX-2 protein and the biological activity of COX-2 as measured by prostaglandin production. The regulation of COX-2 by miR-146a is mediated through a single miRNA-binding site present in the 3' UTR. Therefore, we propose that decreased miR-146a expression contributes to the up-regulation and overexpression of COX-2 in lung cancer cells. Since potential miRNA-mediated regulation is a functional consequence of alternative polyadenylation site choice, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate COX-2 mRNA alternative polyadenylation and miRNA targeting will give us key insights into how COX-2 expression is involved in the development of a metastatic condition.

  15. COX-2 verexpression in pretreatment biopsies predicts response of rectal cancers to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Fraser M.; Reynolds, John V. . E-mail: reynoldsjv@stjames.ie; Kay, Elaine W.; Crotty, Paul; Murphy, James O.; Hollywood, Donal; Gaffney, Eoin F.; Stephens, Richard B.; Kennedy, M. John

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the utility of COX-2 expression as a response predictor for patients with rectal cancer who are undergoing neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment biopsies (PTB) from 49 patients who underwent RCT were included. COX-2 and proliferation in PTB were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL stain. Response to treatment was assessed by a 5-point tumor-regression grade (TRG) based on the ratio of residual tumor to fibrosis. Results: Good response (TRG 1 + 2), moderate response (TRG 3), and poor response (TRG 4 + 5) were seen in 21 patients (42%), 11 patients (22%), and 17 patients (34%), respectively. Patients with COX-2 overexpression in PTB were more likely to demonstrate moderate or poor response (TRG 3 + 4) to treatment than were those with normal COX-2 expression (p = 0.026, chi-square test). Similarly, poor response was more likely if patients had low levels of spontaneous apoptosis in PTBs (p = 0.0007, chi-square test). Conclusions: COX-2 overexpression and reduced apoptosis in PTB can predict poor response of rectal cancer to RCT. As COX-2 inhibitors are commercially available, their administration to patients who overexpress COX-2 warrants assessment in clinical trials in an attempt to increase overall response rates.

  16. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  17. Viscum album-Mediated COX-2 Inhibition Implicates Destabilization of COX-2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chaitrali; Hegde, Pushpa; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive use of Viscum album (VA) preparations in the complementary therapy of cancer and in several other human pathologies has led to an increasing number of cellular and molecular approaches to explore the mechanisms of action of VA. We have recently demonstrated that, VA preparations exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect by selectively down-regulating the COX-2-mediated cytokine-induced secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the important molecular signatures of inflammatory reactions. In this study, we observed a significant down-regulation of COX-2 protein expression in VA-treated A549 cells however COX-2 mRNA levels were unaltered. Therefore, we hypothesized that VA induces destabilisation of COX-2 mRNA, thereby depleting the available functional COX-2 mRNA for the protein synthesis and for the subsequent secretion of PGE2. To address this question, we analyzed the molecular degradation of COX-2 protein and its corresponding mRNA in A549 cell line. Using cyclohexamide pulse chase experiment, we demonstrate that, COX-2 protein degradation is not affected by the treatment with VA whereas experiments on transcriptional blockade with actinomycin D, revealed a marked reduction in the half life of COX-2 mRNA due to its rapid degradation in the cells treated with VA compared to that in IL-1β-stimulated cells. These results thus demonstrate that VA-mediated inhibition of PGE2 implicates destabilization of COX-2 mRNA. PMID:25664986

  18. Developing a Referral Protocol for Community-Based Occupational Therapy Services in Taiwan: A Logistic Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-Hui; Tsai, Athena Yi-Jung; Huang, Wen-Ni

    2016-01-01

    Because resources for long-term care services are limited, timely and appropriate referral for rehabilitation services is critical for optimizing clients’ functions and successfully integrating them into the community. We investigated which client characteristics are most relevant in predicting Taiwan’s community-based occupational therapy (OT) service referral based on experts’ beliefs. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews using the Multidimensional Assessment Instrument (MDAI). Community-dwelling participants (n = 221) ≥ 18 years old who reported disabilities in the previous National Survey of Long-term Care Needs in Taiwan were enrolled. The standard for referral was the judgment and agreement of two experienced occupational therapists who reviewed the results of the MDAI. Logistic regressions and Generalized Additive Models were used for analysis. Two predictive models were proposed, one using basic activities of daily living (BADLs) and one using instrumental ADLs (IADLs). Dementia, psychiatric disorders, cognitive impairment, joint range-of-motion limitations, fear of falling, behavioral or emotional problems, expressive deficits (in the BADL-based model), and limitations in IADLs or BADLs were significantly correlated with the need for referral. Both models showed high area under the curve (AUC) values on receiver operating curve testing (AUC = 0.977 and 0.972, respectively). The probability of being referred for community OT services was calculated using the referral algorithm. The referral protocol facilitated communication between healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions for OT referrals. The methods and findings should be useful for developing referral protocols for other long-term care services. PMID:26863544

  19. Developing a Referral Protocol for Community-Based Occupational Therapy Services in Taiwan: A Logistic Regression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hui-Fen; Chang, Ling-Hui; Tsai, Athena Yi-Jung; Huang, Wen-Ni; Wang, Jye

    2016-01-01

    Because resources for long-term care services are limited, timely and appropriate referral for rehabilitation services is critical for optimizing clients' functions and successfully integrating them into the community. We investigated which client characteristics are most relevant in predicting Taiwan's community-based occupational therapy (OT) service referral based on experts' beliefs. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews using the Multidimensional Assessment Instrument (MDAI). Community-dwelling participants (n = 221) ≥ 18 years old who reported disabilities in the previous National Survey of Long-term Care Needs in Taiwan were enrolled. The standard for referral was the judgment and agreement of two experienced occupational therapists who reviewed the results of the MDAI. Logistic regressions and Generalized Additive Models were used for analysis. Two predictive models were proposed, one using basic activities of daily living (BADLs) and one using instrumental ADLs (IADLs). Dementia, psychiatric disorders, cognitive impairment, joint range-of-motion limitations, fear of falling, behavioral or emotional problems, expressive deficits (in the BADL-based model), and limitations in IADLs or BADLs were significantly correlated with the need for referral. Both models showed high area under the curve (AUC) values on receiver operating curve testing (AUC = 0.977 and 0.972, respectively). The probability of being referred for community OT services was calculated using the referral algorithm. The referral protocol facilitated communication between healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions for OT referrals. The methods and findings should be useful for developing referral protocols for other long-term care services.

  20. Development of Land Use Regression models for particulate matter and associated components in a low air pollutant concentration airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgawati, Mila; Heyworth, Jane S.; Wheeler, Amanda J.; McCaul, Kieran A.; Blake, David; Boeyen, Jonathon; Cope, Martin; Yeap, Bu Beng; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Brunekreef, Bert; Hinwood, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Perth, Western Australia represents an area where pollutant concentrations are considered low compared with international locations. Land Use Regression (LUR) models for PM10, PM2.5 and PM2.5 Absorbance (PM2.5Abs) along with their elemental components: Fe, K, Mn, V, S, Zn and Si were developed for the Perth Metropolitan area in order to estimate air pollutant concentrations across Perth. The most important predictor for PM10 was green spaces. Heavy vehicle traffic load was found to be the strongest predictor for PM2.5Abs. Traffic variables were observed to be the important contributors for PM10 and PM2.5 elements in Perth, except for PM2.5 V which had distance to coast as the predominant predictor. Open green spaces explained more of the variability in the PM10 elements than for PM2.5 elements, and population density was more important for PM2.5 elements than for PM10 elements. The PM2.5 and PM2.5Abs LUR models explained 67% and 82% of the variance, respectively, but the PM10 model only explained 35% of the variance. The PM2.5 models for Mn, V, and Zn explained between 70% and 90% of the variability in concentrations. PM10 V, Si, K, S and Fe models explained between 53% and 71% of the variability in respective concentrations. Testing the models using leave one-out cross validation, hold out validation and cross-hold out validation supported the validity of LUR models for PM10, PM2.5 and PM2.5Abs and their corresponding elements in Metropolitan Perth despite the relatively low concentrations.

  1. AtCOX17, an Arabidopsis homolog of the yeast copper chaperone COX17.

    PubMed

    Balandin, Teresa; Castresana, Carmen

    2002-08-01

    We have identified a new plant gene, AtCOX17, encoding a protein that shares sequence similarity to COX17, a Cu-binding protein from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and vertebrates that mediates the delivery of Cu to the mitochondria for the assembly of a functional cytochrome oxidase complex. The newly characterized Arabidopsis protein has six Cys residues at positions corresponding to those known to coordinate Cu binding in the yeast homolog. Moreover, we show that the Arabidopsis COX17 cDNA complements a COX17 mutant of yeast restoring the respiratory deficiency associated with that mutation. These two lines of evidence indicate that the plant protein identified here is a functional equivalent of yeast COX17 and might serve as a Cu delivery protein for the plant mitochondria. COX17 was identified by investigating the hypersensitive response-like necrotic response provoked in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves after harpin inoculation. AtCOX17 expression was activated by high concentrations of Cu, bacterial inoculation, salicylic acid treatment, and treatments that generated NO and hydrogen peroxide. All of the conditions inducing COX17 are known to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and to produce an increase of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that gene induction occurs in response to stress situations that interfere with mitochondrial function.

  2. Pregnancy induced changes in Cox-1, Cox-2 and NOSIII vascular and renal expression.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Rosa A; Bracho, Ismael; Alvarez, Victor M Pérez; Anguiano, Liliana; López, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    In order to establish if there is a mutual regulation between COX and NOS in vascular and renal tissue during pregnancy, we measured the protein expression of COX-1, COX-2 and NOSIII by Western blot comparing the thoracic and abdominal aorta and the renal cortex and medulla of non pregnant and pregnant (21st day) Wistar rats. We found there was no difference in the quantity of protein of any of the two isoforms of COX between the two segments of the aorta of non pregnant animals while an increased expression of both COX-1 And COX-2 was found in the abdominal compared to the thoracic segment of the pregnant rats. An increased expression of NOS III was found in the abdominal segment of the aorta form pregnant rats. No changes were found between pregnant and no pregnant animals in the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the renal cortex or medulla while an increased expression of NOS III was found in the cortex from pregnant compared to non pregnant animals. These results suggest the influence of pregnancy is not homogeneous along the aorta and also that a balance between prostaglandins and nitric oxide is responsible of the blunted vascular reactivity during pregnancy in the rat.

  3. Disruption of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway attenuates atherogenesis consequent to COX-2 deletion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhou; Crichton, Irene; Tang, Soon Yew; Hui, Yiqun; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Levin, Mark D.; Lawson, John A.; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)–derived prostacyclin (PGI2) is sufficient to explain most elements of the cardiovascular hazard from nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, randomized trials are consistent with the emergence of cardiovascular risk during chronic dosing with NSAIDs. Although deletion of the PGI2 receptor fosters atherogenesis, the importance of COX-2 during development has constrained the use of conventional knockout (KO) mice to address this question. We developed mice in which COX-2 was deleted postnatally, bypassing cardiorenal defects exhibited by conventional KOs. When crossed into ApoE-deficient hyperlipidemic mice, COX-2 deletion accelerated atherogenesis in both genders, with lesions exhibiting leukocyte infiltration and phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells, as reflected by loss of α-smooth muscle cell actin and up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Stimulated peritoneal macrophages revealed suppression of COX-2–derived prostanoids and augmented 5-lipoxygenase product formation, consistent with COX-2 substrate rediversion. Although deletion of the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) did not influence atherogenesis, it attenuated the proatherogeneic impact of COX-2 deletion in hyperlipidemic mice. Chronic administration of NSAIDs may increasingly confer a cardiovascular hazard on patients at low initial risk. Promotion of atherogenesis by postnatal COX-2 deletion affords a mechanistic explanation for this observation. Coincident inhibition of FLAP may offer an approach to attenuating such a risk from NSAIDs. PMID:22493243

  4. Metamorphic Geodesic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Joshi, Sarang; Sanchez, Mar; Styner, Martin; Niethammer, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamorphic geodesic regression approach approximating spatial transformations for image time-series while simultaneously accounting for intensity changes. Such changes occur for example in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the developing brain due to myelination. To simplify computations we propose an approximate metamorphic geodesic regression formulation that only requires pairwise computations of image metamorphoses. The approximated solution is an appropriately weighted average of initial momenta. To obtain initial momenta reliably, we develop a shooting method for image metamorphosis. PMID:23286131

  5. Regression of follicular lymphoma with Devil’s Claw: coincidence or causation?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer patients frequently use alternative therapies. Two follicular lymphoma patients who had objective tumour regression after taking Devil’s Claw without cytotoxic therapy are reported here. Methods and Results Patient 1 presented with coexistent immunoglobulin G plasma cell dyscrasia and stage iiia lymphoma (nodes 5 cm in diameter). Computed tomography scan 10 months later showed partial regression. On enquiry, it was learned that the patient was taking Devil’s Claw and Essiac (Essiac Products Services, Pompano Beach, FL, U.S.A.). This patient later developed overt myeloma, at which time he stopped the herbal supplements and underwent high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation, since which no lymphoma progression has occurred. Patient 2 presented with stage iiia lymphoma (nodes 2.5 cm in diameter). He learned of patient 1 through our lymphoma patient support group and started Devil’s Claw. Computed tomography scan 11 months later showed decreased adenopathy and splenomegaly, which has been sustained for 4 years. Discussion and Conclusions Devil’s Claw tuberous root has anti-inflammatory properties, probably through suppression of cyclooxygenase 2 (cox-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. There are no prior reports of anticancer activity. Inhibition of cox-2 has a role in colon cancer prevention, has been implicated in lymphomagenesis, and is associated both with lymphoma stage and with response to treatment. However, spontaneous regression in lymphoma has been reported in 16% of patients in one series, of whom none were on herbal medications or cox-2 inhibitors. The key issue in both these patients is whether disease regression was “spontaneous” or causally related to therapy with Devil’s Claw. The timing of the response suggests a positive effect. Further investigation is warranted, preferably with a cox-2 inhibitor of known purity. PMID:19672427

  6. New Insights on COX-2 in Chronic Inflammation Driving Breast Cancer Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Saunders, C; Ramsay, R G; Thompson, E W

    2015-12-01

    The medicinal use of aspirin stretches back to ancient times, before it was manufactured in its pure form in the late 19th century. Its accepted mechanistic target, cyclooxygenase (COX), was discovered in the 1970s and since this landmark discovery, the therapeutic application of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has increased dramatically. The most significant benefits of NSAIDs are in conditions involving chronic inflammation (CI). Given the recognized role of CI in cancer development, the use of long-term NSAID treatment in the prevention of cancer is an enticing possibility. COX-2 is a key driver of CI, and here we review COX-2 expression as a predictor of survival in various cancer types, including breast. Obesity and post-partum involution are natural inflammatory states that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We outline the COX-2 mediated mechanisms contributing to the growth of cancers. We dissect the cellular mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and how COX-2 may induce this to facilitate tumor progression. Finally we examine the potential regulation of COX-2 by c-Myb, and the possible interplay between c-Myb/COX-2 in proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1α)/COX-2 in invasive pathways in breast cancer.

  7. Endomicroscopic Imaging of COX-2 Activity in Murine Sporadic and Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foersch, Sebastian; Neufert, Clemens; Neurath, Markus F.; Waldner, Maximilian J.

    2013-01-01

    Although several studies propose a chemopreventive effect of aspirin for colorectal cancer (CRC) development, the general use of aspirin cannot be recommended due to its adverse side effects. As the protective effect of aspirin has been associated with an increased expression of COX-2, molecular imaging of COX-2, for instance, during confocal endomicroscopy could enable the identification of patients who would possibly benefit from aspirin treatment. In this pilot trial, we used a COX-2-specific fluorescent probe for detection of colitis-associated and sporadic CRC in mice using confocal microscopy. Following the injection of the COX-2 probe into tumor-bearing APCmin mice or mice exposed to the AOM + DSS model of colitis-associated cancer, the tumor-specific upregulation of COX-2 could be validated with in vivo fluorescence imaging. Subsequent confocal imaging of tumor tissue showed an increased number of COX-2 expressing cells when compared to the normal mucosa of healthy controls. COX-2-expression was detectable with subcellular resolution in tumor cells and infiltrating stroma cells. These findings pose a proof of concept and suggest the use of CLE for the detection of COX-2 expression during colorectal cancer surveillance endoscopy. This could improve early detection and stratification of chemoprevention in patients with CRC. PMID:23401648

  8. Endomicroscopic Imaging of COX-2 Activity in Murine Sporadic and Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Foersch, Sebastian; Neufert, Clemens; Neurath, Markus F; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2013-01-01

    Although several studies propose a chemopreventive effect of aspirin for colorectal cancer (CRC) development, the general use of aspirin cannot be recommended due to its adverse side effects. As the protective effect of aspirin has been associated with an increased expression of COX-2, molecular imaging of COX-2, for instance, during confocal endomicroscopy could enable the identification of patients who would possibly benefit from aspirin treatment. In this pilot trial, we used a COX-2-specific fluorescent probe for detection of colitis-associated and sporadic CRC in mice using confocal microscopy. Following the injection of the COX-2 probe into tumor-bearing APCmin mice or mice exposed to the AOM + DSS model of colitis-associated cancer, the tumor-specific upregulation of COX-2 could be validated with in vivo fluorescence imaging. Subsequent confocal imaging of tumor tissue showed an increased number of COX-2 expressing cells when compared to the normal mucosa of healthy controls. COX-2-expression was detectable with subcellular resolution in tumor cells and infiltrating stroma cells. These findings pose a proof of concept and suggest the use of CLE for the detection of COX-2 expression during colorectal cancer surveillance endoscopy. This could improve early detection and stratification of chemoprevention in patients with CRC.

  9. Integrated Cox's model for predicting survival time of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhibing; Li, Longti; Fu, Rui; Lu, Jing-Min; He, Jing-Dong; Li, Sen

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumor and is highly lethal. This study aims to figure out signatures for predicting the survival time of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Clinical information, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and single-nucleotide polymorphism array data of patients with glioblastoma multiforme were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Patients were separated into two groups by using 1 year as a cutoff, and a logistic regression model was used to figure out any variables that can predict whether the patient was able to live longer than 1 year. Furthermore, Cox's model was used to find out features that were correlated with the survival time. Finally, a Cox model integrated the significant clinical variables, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and single-nucleotide polymorphism was built. Although the classification method failed, signatures of clinical features, messenger RNA expression levels, and microRNA expression levels were figured out by using Cox's model. However, no single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to prognosis were found. The selected clinical features were age at initial diagnosis, Karnofsky score, and race, all of which had been suggested to correlate with survival time. Both of the two significant microRNAs, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222, were targeted to p27(Kip1) protein, which implied the important role of p27(Kip1) on the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme patients. Our results suggested that survival modeling was more suitable than classification to figure out prognostic biomarkers for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. An integrated model containing clinical features, messenger RNA levels, and microRNA expression levels was built, which has the potential to be used in clinics and thus to improve the survival status of glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  10. Clinical significance of Cox-2, Survivin and Bcl-2 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Zhu, Jiang; Gou, Hongfeng; Cao, Dan; Jiang, Ming; Hou, Mei

    2011-09-01

    Cox-2, Survivin and Bcl-2 are frequently overexpressed in numerous types of cancers. They are known to be the important regulators of apoptosis. This study was designed to investigate the correlation between the clinical characteristics and the expression of Cox-2, Survivin and Bcl-2 in hepatocellular carcinoma. A total of 63 postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples, 10 adjacent non-tumor samples and 10 normal liver samples were immunochemically detected for the expression of Cox-2, Survivin and Bcl-2. A median follow-up of 4 years for the 63 HCC patients was conducted. Univariate tests and multivariate Cox regression were performed for statistical analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the survival. Positive expression of Cox-2 (84.3%) and Survivin (77.8%) was detected significantly more frequently in the HCC samples than in the normal liver tissues (30% and 0, respectively). Bcl-2 was highly expressed in the adjacent non-tumor tissue. Cox-2 was positively correlative to Survivin. Survivin and Bcl-2 were significantly associated with the pathological grade of HCC (P<0.05). Expression of both Cox-2 and Survivin was significantly associated with the poor overall survival (OS) (P=0.0141, P=0.0039). Furthermore, multivariate analysis confirmed the independent prognostic value of Survivin expression, along with tumor size and hepatic function. Cox-2 and Survivin were highly expressed in the HCC tissue. Survivin and Bcl-2 were significantly associated with the pathological grade of HCC. The expression of Survivin was an independent prognostic factor for HCC after a hepatectomy. Treatment that inhibits Survivin may be a promising targeted approach in HCC.

  11. A mechanistic perspective on the specificity and extent of COX-2 inhibition in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Vivian S W

    2004-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2-specific inhibitors form one of the most commonly prescribed groups of pain relief drugs. Despite the known reproductive toxicity of NSAIDs, which are nonspecific COX inhibitors, little is known about the differential role between COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition on reproduction. It has been suggested that COX-2 plays a prominent role in animals at all stages of reproduction, from ovulation to implantation to decidualisation and delivery. Both estrogen and progesterone have been shown to be involved in regulation of COX production in tissues of the reproductive tract. Similar to NSAIDs, warnings on reproduction have been included in the product labelling of marketed COX-2-specific inhibitors. Variations in the level of warnings in these labels are noted, with an order of stringency being celecoxib approximate, equals etoricoxib > rofecoxib approximate, equals valdecoxib. The specificity of etoricoxib for COX-2 has been found to be approximately 3-fold greater than that of rofecoxib and valdecoxib and approximately 14-fold more than celecoxib in human whole blood assays. There is growing evidence to suggest that the inducible COX-2, rather than the COX-1, is the main enzyme responsible for reproduction. It was demonstrated that the change in estrogen and progesterone levels during pregnancy contributes to the dramatic increase in COX-2 expression. This further strengthens the earlier findings that COX-2 activities are necessary to support pregnancy. It is also worth mentioning that although a definite correlation between the specificity of a COX-2-specific inhibitor and the level of precaution stated in the drug labels in UK was not obtained, a direct relationship between the specificity and the potential to result in teratogenicity has not been excluded. With growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing more COX-2-specific inhibitors and the fact that reproductive toxicity is not tested in pregnant women before marketing, it is

  12. Development of hybrid genetic-algorithm-based neural networks using regression trees for modeling air quality inside a public transportation bus.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Akhil; Kaur, Devinder; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-02-01

    The present study developed a novel approach to modeling indoor air quality (IAQ) of a public transportation bus by the development of hybrid genetic-algorithm-based neural networks (also known as evolutionary neural networks) with input variables optimized from using the regression trees, referred as the GART approach. This study validated the applicability of the GART modeling approach in solving complex nonlinear systems by accurately predicting the monitored contaminants of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), 0.3-0.4 microm sized particle numbers, 0.4-0.5 microm sized particle numbers, particulate matter (PM) concentrations less than 1.0 microm (PM10), and PM concentrations less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) inside a public transportation bus operating on 20% grade biodiesel in Toledo, OH. First, the important variables affecting each monitored in-bus contaminant were determined using regression trees. Second, the analysis of variance was used as a complimentary sensitivity analysis to the regression tree results to determine a subset of statistically significant variables affecting each monitored in-bus contaminant. Finally, the identified subsets of statistically significant variables were used as inputs to develop three artificial neural network (ANN) models. The models developed were regression tree-based back-propagation network (BPN-RT), regression tree-based radial basis function network (RBFN-RT), and GART models. Performance measures were used to validate the predictive capacity of the developed IAQ models. The results from this approach were compared with the results obtained from using a theoretical approach and a generalized practicable approach to modeling IAQ that included the consideration of additional independent variables when developing the aforementioned ANN models. The hybrid GART models were able to capture majority of the variance in the monitored in-bus contaminants. The genetic

  13. Grassland and cropland net ecosystem production of the U.S. Great Plains: Regression tree model development and comparative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Howard, Daniel; Dahal, Devendra; Gilmanov, Tagir; Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Smith, Kelcy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and results of two ecological-based net ecosystem production (NEP) regression tree models capable of up scaling measurements made at various flux tower sites throughout the U.S. Great Plains. Separate grassland and cropland NEP regression tree models were trained using various remote sensing data and other biogeophysical data, along with 15 flux towers contributing to the grassland model and 15 flux towers for the cropland model. The models yielded weekly mean daily grassland and cropland NEP maps of the U.S. Great Plains at 250 m resolution for 2000–2008. The grassland and cropland NEP maps were spatially summarized and statistically compared. The results of this study indicate that grassland and cropland ecosystems generally performed as weak net carbon (C) sinks, absorbing more C from the atmosphere than they released from 2000 to 2008. Grasslands demonstrated higher carbon sink potential (139 g C·m−2·year−1) than non-irrigated croplands. A closer look into the weekly time series reveals the C fluctuation through time and space for each land cover type.

  14. Regression: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Regression, another mechanism studied by Sigmund Freud, has had much research, e.g., hypnotic regression, frustration regression, schizophrenic regression, and infra-human-animal regression (often directly related to fixation). Many investigators worked with hypnotic age regression, which has a long history, going back to Russian reflexologists.…

  15. Regression: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Regression, another mechanism studied by Sigmund Freud, has had much research, e.g., hypnotic regression, frustration regression, schizophrenic regression, and infra-human-animal regression (often directly related to fixation). Many investigators worked with hypnotic age regression, which has a long history, going back to Russian reflexologists.…

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Arachidonic Acid Complexes with COX-1 and COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Furse, Kristina E.; Pratt, Derek A.; Porter, Ned A.; Lybrand, Terry P.

    2008-01-01

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes are responsible for the committed step in prostaglandin biosynthesis, the generation of prostaglandin H2. As a result, these enzymes are pharmacologically important targets for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and newer COX-2 selective inhibitors. The cyclooxygenases are functional homodimers, and each subunit contains both a cyclooxygenase and a peroxidase active site. These enzymes are quite interesting mechanistically, as the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 requires two oxygenation and two cyclization reactions, resulting in the formation of five new chiral centers with nearly absolute regio- and stereochemical fidelity. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the equilibrium behavior of both COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme isoforms with bound arachidonate. These simulations were compared with reference simulations of arachidonate in solution to explore the effect of enzyme on substrate conformation and positioning in the active site. The simulations suggest that the substrate has greater conformational freedom in the COX-2 active site, consistent with the larger COX-2 active site volume observed in X-ray crystal structures. The simulations reveal different conformational behavior for arachidonate in each subunit over the course of extended equilibrium MD simulations. The simulations also provide detailed information for several protein channels that might be important for oxygen and water transport to or from active sites, or for intermediate trafficking between the cyclooxygenase and peroxidase active sites. The detailed comparisons for COX-1 versus COX-2 active site structural fluctuations may also provide useful information for design of new isozyme-selective inhibitors. PMID:16519514

  17. Complete regression of experimental prostate cancer in nude mice by repeated hyperthermia using magnetite cationic liposomes and a newly developed solenoid containing a ferrite core.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Noriyasu; Ito, Akira; Nakahara, Yoko; Honda, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Tozawa, Keiichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2006-05-15

    Magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) can be used to induce hyperthermia because they generate heat in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). This study aimed at developing more practical method for MCL hyperthermia examining the effect of MCL-induced hyperthermia on human prostate cancer in vivo. A newly developed AMF generator incorporating a solenoid with a ferrite core (FC) was used. Human prostate cancer cells (PC-3 and LNCap) were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. MCLs were injected into tumor nodule and the mice were exposed into AMF three times at 24-hr intervals (repeated hyperthermia; RH) until complete tumor regression was observed. Irradiation with an AMF generated by newly developed device can adequately increase the temperature of tumor tissue. Frequent RH resulted in complete tumor regression in all nude mice. RH using MCLs may be a promising new therapy for hormone-refractory human prostate cancer in the future.

  18. Development of Multivariate Regression Model for the Hydrologic System of Chari-Logone Catchment of the Lake Chad Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djimadoumngar, K. N.; Lee, J.; Bila, M. D.; Djoret, D.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Food security and water shortage from frequent droughts have been major issues in the northern sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA). The shrinking Lake Chad is one of the examples experiencing severe droughts and insecure food production. One of major challenges in the NSSA is the lack of data collection and monitoring systems to support a decision-making process in the agriculture and water resources management. The present study aims to help better understand a hydrologic system of the Lake Chad using multivariate regression models and enhance the models to forecast the river discharge along the Chari-Logone river system, which contributes over 90% of water into the Lake. As regressands, the river discharge data from two monitoring stations at Bongor and Logone-Gana were collected from 2001-2007. The regressors include precipitation, soil moisture, soil and air temperature, specific humidity, evapotranspiration and surface runoff. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data were used for the precipitation, and all other regressor parameters were obtained from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). We performed cross-correlation analysis between the river discharge and each regressor parameter to quantify the time lag to have the best correlation, which implies the responding time of the river discharge to the change of other hydrological parameters. The estimated time lags were integrated into the multivariate regression model. The results show that, for the river discharge data, precipitation, soil moisture, and surface runoff have linear relationships while evapotranspiration, soil and air temperature, and specific humidity have non-linear relationships. The observed river discharge and the predicted one, which is a function of precipitation and soil moisture, shows a good match with 93% of correlation.

  19. High regression rate of coronary aneurysms developed in patients with immune globulin-resistant Kawasaki disease treated with steroid pulse therapy.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shinya; Sakaguchi, Heima; Kuwahara, Takashi; Uchida, Yasushi; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2010-04-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute vasculitis syndrome of unknown etiology that mainly affects small and medium-size arteries, particularly the coronary artery. Coronary artery lesions may develop into aneurismal formation and thrombotic occlusion, and progress to ischemic heart disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of steroid pulse therapy following intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) treatment on the regression rate of aneurysms in Kawasaki disease. Among 93 sequential patients referred to us, because of coronary artery lesions in the acute phase, we found 23 aneurysms in 12 patients during the period from January 1997 to January 2008. We divided them into two groups: a non-steroid group, 7 patients (13 aneurysms) treated with single or multiple IVIG but no steroid pulse therapy; and a steroid group, 5 patients (10 aneurysms) treated with multiple IVIG followed by steroid pulse therapy. We compared the regression rate of the aneurysms between the two groups, retrospectively. The regression rates of the aneurysms in the steroid group were significantly higher than those in the non-steroid group when we analyzed 1) all aneurysms (p = 0.007), 2) giant aneurysms (aneurismal diameter was 4 or more x normal, or > 8 mm) (p = 0.018), and 3) aneurysms in IVIG-resistant patients who were resistant to initial IVIG therapy (p = 0.035). All aneurysms, including the giant aneurysms in the steroid group, regressed, and the regression rate of the aneurysms in the non-steroid group was about 46%(6/13). Steroid pulse therapy may be beneficial for IVIG-resistant patients. Our data suggest that steroid pulse therapy may lead to regression of aneurysms.

  20. Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Zaqout, Sami; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field. PMID:27065817

  1. Allelic variation in the canine Cox-2 promoter causes hypermethylation of the canine Cox-2 promoter in clinical cases of renal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel allelic variants in the promoter of the canine cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) gene are associated with renal dysplasia (RD). These variants consist of either deletions of putative SP1 transcription factor-binding sites or insertions of tandem repeats of SP1-binding sites located in the CpG island just upstream of the ATG translation initiation site. The canine Cox-2 gene was studied because Cox-2-deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that is strikingly similar to RD in dogs. Findings The allelic variants were associated with hypermethylation of the Cox-2 promoter only in clinical cases of RD. The wild-type allele was never methylated, even in clinical cases that were heterozygous for a mutant allele. In cases that were biopsy-negative, the promoter remained unmethylated, regardless of the genotype. Methylated DNA was found in DNA from various adult tissues of dogs with clinical RD. Conclusions The mechanism of action of the allelic variation in the canine Cox-2 promoter most likely involves variation in the extent of epigenetic downregulation of this gene. This epigenetic downregulation must have occurred early in development because methylated Cox-2 promoter DNA sequences are found in various adult tissues. PMID:24708682

  2. 2-Carbaborane-3-phenyl-1H-indoles--synthesis via McMurry reaction and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Laube, Markus; Neumann, Wilma; Scholz, Matthias; Lönnecke, Peter; Crews, Brenda; Marnett, Lawrence J; Pietzsch, Jens; Kniess, Torsten; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie

    2013-02-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors have been the focus of medicinal chemistry efforts for years, and many compounds that exhibit high selectivity and affinity have been developed. As carbaboranes represent interesting pharmacophores as phenyl mimetics in drug development, this paper presents the synthesis of carbaboranyl derivatives of COX-2-selective 2,3-disubstituted indoles. Despite the lability of carbaboranes under reducing conditions, 2-carbaborane-3-phenyl-1H-indoles could be synthesized by McMurry cyclization of the corresponding amides. Whereas the meta-carbaboranyl-substituted derivatives lacked COX inhibitory activity, an ortho-carbaboranyl analogue was active, but showed a selectivity shift toward COX-1.

  3. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs.

  4. Effects of Ge Gen Decoction on PGE2 content and COX activity in the degenarated cervical intervertebral discs of rats.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhou; Fang, Suping; Huo, Hairu; Qi, Yun; Guo, Shuying; Jiang, Tingliang; Shi, Qi

    2005-09-01

    After the rat model of cervical spondylosis was developed for 6 months, the PGE2 content and COX activity in the cervical intervertebral discs were determined respectively by radioimmunoassay and catalytic activity assay. The results indicated that the PGE2 content and COX activity in the model rat increased significantly, and that Ge Gen Decoction could down-regulate the PGE2 content and inhibit COX activity. This is possibly one of the mechanisms of Ge Gen Decoction for treating cervical spondylosis.

  5. Development of structure-taste relationships for monosubstituted phenylsulfamate sweeteners using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Damien P; Spillane, William J; Newell, John

    2005-08-24

    Twenty monosubstituted phenylsulfamates (cyclamates) have been synthesized and have had their taste portfolios determined. These have been combined with 63 compounds already in the literature to give a database of 83 ortho, meta, and para compounds. A training set of 75 compounds was randomly selected leaving eight compounds as a test set. A series of nine predictors determined with Corey-Pauling-Koltun models, calculated from the PC SPARTAN PRO program and Hammett sigma values taken mainly from the literature, have been used to establish structure-taste relationships for these types of sweeteners. The taste panel data for all compounds were categorized into three classes, namely, sweet (S), nonsweet (N), and sweet/nonsweet (N/S), and a novel "sweetness value" or weighting was also calculated for each compound. Linear and quadratic discriminant analysis were first used with the S, N, and N/S data, but the results were somewhat disappointing. Classification and regression tree analysis using the sweetness values for all 75 compounds was more successful, and only 14 were misclassified and six of the eight test set compounds were correctly classified. For the 29 meta compounds, one subset using just two parameters classified 83% of these compounds. Finally, using various methods, predictions were made on the likely tastes of a number of meta compounds and a striking agreement was found between the tree prediction and those given by earlier models. This appears to offer a strong vindication of the tree approach.

  6. Development and evaluation of a regression-based model to predict cesium concentration ratios for freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Pinder, John E; Rowan, David J; Rasmussen, Joseph B; Smith, Jim T; Hinton, Thomas G; Whicker, F W

    2014-08-01

    Data from published studies and World Wide Web sources were combined to produce and test a regression model to predict Cs concentration ratios for freshwater fish species. The accuracies of predicted concentration ratios, which were computed using 1) species trophic levels obtained from random resampling of known food items and 2) K concentrations in the water for 207 fish from 44 species and 43 locations, were tested against independent observations of ratios for 57 fish from 17 species from 25 locations. Accuracy was assessed as the percent of observed to predicted ratios within factors of 2 or 3. Conservatism, expressed as the lack of under prediction, was assessed as the percent of observed to predicted ratios that were less than 2 or less than 3. The model's median observed to predicted ratio was 1.26, which was not significantly different from 1, and 50% of the ratios were between 0.73 and 1.85. The percentages of ratios within factors of 2 or 3 were 67 and 82%, respectively. The percentages of ratios that were <2 or <3 were 79 and 88%, respectively. An example for Perca fluviatilis demonstrated that increased prediction accuracy could be obtained when more detailed knowledge of diet was available to estimate trophic level.

  7. Soman increases neuronal COX-2 levels: possible link between seizures and protracted neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kreipke, Christian W; Thomas, David M; Van Shura, Kerry E; Lyman, Megan; McDonough, John H; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-12-01

    Nerve agent-induced seizures cause neuronal damage in brain limbic and cortical circuits leading to persistent behavioral and cognitive deficits. Without aggressive anticholinergic and benzodiazepine therapy, seizures can be prolonged and neuronal damage progresses for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the nerve agent soman on expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the initial enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the proinflammatory prostaglandins and a factor that has been implicated in seizure initiation and propagation. Rats were exposed to a toxic dose of soman and scored behaviorally for seizure intensity. Expression of COX-2 was determined throughout brain from 4h to 7 days after exposure by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Microglial activation and astrogliosis were assessed microscopically over the same time-course. Soman increased COX-2 expression in brain regions known to be damaged by nerve agents (e.g., hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex and thalamus). COX-2 expression was induced in neurons, and not in microglia or astrocytes, and remained elevated through 7 days. The magnitude of COX-2 induction was correlated with seizure intensity. COX-1 expression was not changed by soman. Increased expression of neuronal COX-2 by soman is a late-developing response relative to other signs of acute physiological distress caused by nerve agents. COX-2-mediated production of prostaglandins is a consequence of the seizure-induced neuronal damage, even after survival of the initial cholinergic crisis is assured. COX-2 inhibitors should be considered as adjunct therapy in nerve agent poisoning to minimize nerve agent-induced seizure activity.

  8. Soman Increases Neuronal COX-2 Levels: Possible Link between Seizures and Protracted Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kreipke, Christian W.; Thomas, David M.; Van Shura, Kerry E.; Lyman, Megan; McDonough, John H.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve agent-induced seizures cause neuronal damage in brain limbic and cortical circuits leading to persistent behavioral and cognitive deficits. Without aggressive anticholinergic and benzodiazepine therapy, seizures can be prolonged and neuronal damage progresses for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the nerve agent soman on expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the initial enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the proinflammatory prostaglandins and a factor that has been implicated in seizure initiation and propagation. Rats were exposed to a toxic dose of soman and scored behaviorally for seizure intensity. Expression of COX-2 was determined throughout brain from 4 hr to 7 days after exposure by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Microglial activation and astrogliosis were assessed microscopically over the same time-course. Soman increased COX-2 expression in brain regions known to be damaged by nerve agents (e.g., hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex and thalamus). COX-2 expression was induced in neurons, and not in microglia or astrocytes, and remained elevated through 7 days. The magnitude of COX-2 induction was correlated with seizure intensity. COX-1 expression was not changed by soman. Increased expression of neuronal COX-2 by soman is a late-developing response relative to other signs of acute physiological distress caused by nerve agents. COX-2-mediated production of prostaglandins is a consequence of the seizure-induced neuronal damage, even after survival of the initial cholinergic crisis is assured. COX-2 inhibitors should be considered as adjunct therapy in nerve agent poisoning to minimize nerve agent-induced seizure activity. PMID:20600289

  9. Anandamide and decidual remodelling: COX-2 oxidative metabolism as a key regulator.

    PubMed

    Almada, M; Piscitelli, F; Fonseca, B M; Di Marzo, V; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N

    2015-11-01

    Recently, endocannabinoids have emerged as signalling mediators in reproduction. It is widely accepted that anandamide (AEA) levels must be tightly regulated, and that a disturbance in AEA levels may impact decidual stability and regression. We have previously characterized the endocannabinoid machinery in rat decidual tissue and reported the pro-apoptotic action of AEA on rat decidual cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that plays a crucial role in early pregnancy, and is also a key modulator in the crosstalk between endocannabinoids and prostaglandins. On the other hand, AEA-oxidative metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a mean to inactivate its action, but it yields the formation of a new class of mediators, named prostaglandin-ethanolamides, or prostamides. In this study we found that AEA-induced apoptosis in decidual cells involves COX-2 metabolic pathway. AEA induced COX-2 expression through p38 MAPK, resulting in the formation of prostamide E2 (PME2). Our findings also suggest that AEA-induced effect is associated with NF-kB activation. Finally, we describe the involvement of PME2 in the induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rat decidual cells. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of COX-2 as a gatekeeper in the uterine environment and clarify the impact of the deregulation of AEA levels on the decidual remodelling process.

  10. Ridge Regression: A Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joseph M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is an approach to the problem of large standard errors of regression estimates of intercorrelated regressors. The effect of ridge regression on the estimated squared multiple correlation coefficient is discussed and illustrated. (JKS)

  11. Long Term Association of Tropospheric Trace gases over Pakistan by exploiting satellite observations and development of Econometric Regression based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeb, Naila; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad; Khan, Saud Ahmed; Noreen, Asma; Murtaza, Rabbia

    2017-04-01

    . Furthermore to explore causal relation, regression analysis is employed to estimate model for CO and TOC. This model numerically estimated the long term association of trace gases over the region.

  12. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  13. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:23875171

  14. Quantile regression for climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasinghe, Dilhani Shalika

    Quantile regression is a developing statistical tool which is used to explain the relationship between response and predictor variables. This thesis describes two examples of climatology using quantile regression.Our main goal is to estimate derivatives of a conditional mean and/or conditional quantile function. We introduce a method to handle autocorrelation in the framework of quantile regression and used it with the temperature data. Also we explain some properties of the tornado data which is non-normally distributed. Even though quantile regression provides a more comprehensive view, when talking about residuals with the normality and the constant variance assumption, we would prefer least square regression for our temperature analysis. When dealing with the non-normality and non constant variance assumption, quantile regression is a better candidate for the estimation of the derivative.

  15. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  16. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  17. Mitochondrial disease genes COA6, COX6B and SCO2 have overlapping roles in COX2 biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Pratt, Anthony T.; Soma, Shivatheja; Theriault, Sarah G.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a complex process facilitated by several assembly factors. Pathogenic mutations were recently reported in one such assembly factor, COA6, and our previous work linked Coa6 function to mitochondrial copper metabolism and expression of Cox2, a copper-containing subunit of CcO. However, the precise role of Coa6 in Cox2 biogenesis remained unknown. Here we show that yeast Coa6 is an orthologue of human COA6, and like Cox2, is regulated by copper availability, further implicating it in copper delivery to Cox2. In order to place Coa6 in the Cox2 copper delivery pathway, we performed a comprehensive genetic epistasis analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that simultaneous deletion of Coa6 and Sco2, a mitochondrial copper metallochaperone, or Coa6 and Cox12/COX6B, a structural subunit of CcO, completely abrogates Cox2 biogenesis. Unlike Coa6 deficient cells, copper supplementation fails to rescue Cox2 levels of these double mutants. Overexpression of Cox12 or Sco proteins partially rescues the coa6Δ phenotype, suggesting their overlapping but non-redundant roles in copper delivery to Cox2. These genetic data are strongly corroborated by biochemical studies demonstrating physical interactions between Coa6, Cox2, Cox12 and Sco proteins. Furthermore, we show that patient mutations in Coa6 disrupt Coa6–Cox2 interaction, providing the biochemical basis for disease pathogenesis. Taken together, these results place COA6 in the copper delivery pathway to CcO and, surprisingly, link it to a previously unidentified function of CcO subunit Cox12 in Cox2 biogenesis. PMID:26669719

  18. Towards a universal barcode of oomycetes--a comparison of the cox1 and cox2 loci.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Joon; Beakes, Gordon; Glockling, Sally; Kruse, Julia; Nam, Bora; Nigrelli, Lisa; Ploch, Sebastian; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Shivas, Roger G; Telle, Sabine; Voglmayr, Hermann; Thines, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Oomycetes are a diverse group of eukaryotes in terrestrial, limnic and marine habitats worldwide and include several devastating plant pathogens, for example Phytophthora infestans (potato late blight). The cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 gene (cox2) has been widely used for identification, taxonomy and phylogeny of various oomycete groups. However, recently the cox1 gene was proposed as a DNA barcode marker instead, together with ITS rDNA. The cox1 locus has been used in some studies of Pythium and Phytophthora, but has rarely been used for other oomycetes, as amplification success of cox1 varies with different lineages and sample ages. To determine which out of cox1 or cox2 is best suited as a universal oomycete barcode, we compared these two genes in terms of (i) PCR efficiency for 31 representative genera, as well as for historic herbarium specimens, and (ii) sequence polymorphism, intra- and interspecific divergence. The primer sets for cox2 successfully amplified all oomycete genera tested, while cox1 failed to amplify three genera. In addition, cox2 exhibited higher PCR efficiency for historic herbarium specimens, providing easier access to barcoding-type material. Sequence data for several historic type specimens exist for cox2, but there are none for cox1. In addition, cox2 yielded higher species identification success, with higher interspecific and lower intraspecific divergences than cox1. Therefore, cox2 is suggested as a partner DNA barcode along with ITS rDNA instead of cox1. The cox2-1 spacer could be a useful marker below species level. Improved protocols and universal primers are presented for all genes to facilitate future barcoding efforts.

  19. A generalized multivariate regression model for modelling ocean wave heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Feng, Y.; Swail, V. R.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a generalized multivariate linear regression model is developed to represent the relationship between 6-hourly ocean significant wave heights (Hs) and the corresponding 6-hourly mean sea level pressure (MSLP) fields. The model is calibrated using the ERA-Interim reanalysis of Hs and MSLP fields for 1981-2000, and is validated using the ERA-Interim reanalysis for 2001-2010 and ERA40 reanalysis of Hs and MSLP for 1958-2001. The performance of the fitted model is evaluated in terms of Pierce skill score, frequency bias index, and correlation skill score. Being not normally distributed, wave heights are subjected to a data adaptive Box-Cox transformation before being used in the model fitting. Also, since 6-hourly data are being modelled, lag-1 autocorrelation must be and is accounted for. The models with and without Box-Cox transformation, and with and without accounting for autocorrelation, are inter-compared in terms of their prediction skills. The fitted MSLP-Hs relationship is then used to reconstruct historical wave height climate from the 6-hourly MSLP fields taken from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR, Compo et al. 2011), and to project possible future wave height climates using CMIP5 model simulations of MSLP fields. The reconstructed and projected wave heights, both seasonal means and maxima, are subject to a trend analysis that allows for non-linear (polynomial) trends.

  20. Covariate analysis of survival data: a small-sample study of Cox's model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Tolley, H.D.; Bryson, M.C.; Goldman, A.S.

    1982-09-01

    Cox's proportional-hazards model is frequently used to adjust for covariate effects in survival-data analysis. The small-sample performances of the maximum partial likelihood estimators of the regression parameters in a two-covariate hazard function model are evaluated with respect to bias, variance, and power in hypothesis tests. Previous Monte Carlo work on the two-sample problem is reviewed.

  1. The Mitochondrial Genome of Conus textile, coxI-coxII Intergenic Sequences and Conoidean Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Stevenson, Bradford J.; Ownby, John-Paul; Cady, Matthew T.; Watkins, Maren; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2009-01-01

    The cone snails belong to the superfamily Conoidea, comprising ∼10,000 venomous marine gastropods. We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of Conus textile. The gene order is identical in Conus textile, Lophiotoma cerithiformis (another Conoidean gastropod), and the neogastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta, (not in the superfamily Conoidea). However, the intergenic interval between the coxI/coxII genes, was much longer in C. textile (165 bp) than in any other previously analyzed gastropod. We used the intergenic region to evaluate evolutionary patterns. In most neogastropods and three conidean families the intergenic interval is small (<30 nucleotides). Within Conus, the variation is from 130-170 bp, and each different clade within Conus has a narrower size distribution. In Conasprella, a subgenus traditionally assigned to Conus, the intergenic regions vary between 200-500 bp, suggesting that the species in Conasprella are not congeneric with Conus. The intergenic region was used for phylogenetic analysis of a group of fish-hunting Conus, despite the short length resolution was better than using standard markers. Thus, the coxI/coxII intergenic region can be used both to define evolutionary relationships between species in a clade, and to understand broad evolutionary patterns across the large superfamily Conoidea. PMID:17936021

  2. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 both play an important role in the protection of the duodenal mucosa in cats.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Amagase, Kikuko; Ebara, Satomi; Akiba, Yasutada; Takeuchi, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs often cause ulcers in the duodenum in humans, the role of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcers has not been fully elucidated. We examined in cats the 1) ulcerogenic effects of selective COX-1 (SC-560, ketorolac) and COX-2 (celecoxib, meloxicam) inhibitors on the gastrointestinal mucosa, 2) effect of feeding and cimetidine on the expression of COX isoforms and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) level in the duodenum, and 3) localization of COX isoforms in the duodenum. COX inhibitors were administered after the morning meal in cats once daily for 3 days. Gastrointestinal lesions were examined on day 4. Localization and expression of COX isoforms (by immunohistochemistry, Western blot) and PGE(2) level (by enzyme immunoassay) were examined. Results were as follows. First, selective COX-1 or COX-2 inhibitors alone produced marked ulcers in the duodenum but did not cause obvious lesions in the small intestine. Coadministration of SC-560 and celecoxib produced marked lesions in the small intestine. Second, feeding increased both the expression of COX isoforms and PGE(2) level in the duodenum, and the effects were markedly inhibited by pretreatment with cimetidine. Third, COX-1 was localized in goblet and Brunner's gland cells, Meissner's and Auerbach's plexus, smooth muscle cells, and arterioles; and COX-2 was observed in capillaries, venules, and basal granulated cells. The expression of COX isoforms in the duodenum is up-regulated by feeding, and inhibition of either COX-1 or COX-2 causes ulcers in the duodenum, suggesting that both isoforms play an important role in the protection of the duodenal mucosa.

  3. Development and validation of a logistic regression model to distinguish transition zone cancers from benign prostatic hyperplasia on multi-parametric prostate MRI.

    PubMed

    Iyama, Yuji; Nakaura, Takeshi; Katahira, Kazuhiro; Iyama, Ayumi; Nagayama, Yasunori; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-09-01

    To develop a prediction model to distinguish between transition zone (TZ) cancers and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) on multi-parametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). This retrospective study enrolled 60 patients with either BPH or TZ cancer, who had undergone 3 T-MRI. We generated ten parameters for T2-weighted images (T2WI), diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and dynamic MRI. Using a t-test and multivariate logistic regression (LR) analysis to evaluate the parameters' accuracy, we developed LR models. We calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of LR models by a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, and the LR model's performance was compared with radiologists' performance with their opinion and with the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (Pi-RADS v2) score. Multivariate LR analysis showed that only standardized T2WI signal and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maintained their independent values (P < 0.001). The validation analysis showed that the AUC of the final LR model was comparable to that of board-certified radiologists, and superior to that of Pi-RADS scores. A standardized T2WI and mean ADC were independent factors for distinguishing between BPH and TZ cancer. The performance of the LR model was comparable to that of experienced radiologists. • It is difficult to diagnose transition zone (TZ) cancer. • We performed quantitative image analysis in multi-parametric MRI. • Standardized-T2WI and mean-ADC were independent factors for diagnosing TZ cancer. • We developed logistic-regression analysis to diagnose TZ cancer accurately. • The performance of the logistic-regression analysis was higher than PIRADSv2.

  4. Comparing spatial regression to random forests for large ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental data may be “large” due to number of records, number of covariates, or both. Random forests has a reputation for good predictive performance when using many covariates, whereas spatial regression, when using reduced rank methods, has a reputation for good predictive performance when using many records. In this study, we compare these two techniques using a data set containing the macroinvertebrate multimetric index (MMI) at 1859 stream sites with over 200 landscape covariates. Our primary goal is predicting MMI at over 1.1 million perennial stream reaches across the USA. For spatial regression modeling, we develop two new methods to accommodate large data: (1) a procedure that estimates optimal Box-Cox transformations to linearize covariate relationships; and (2) a computationally efficient covariate selection routine that takes into account spatial autocorrelation. We show that our new methods lead to cross-validated performance similar to random forests, but that there is an advantage for spatial regression when quantifying the uncertainty of the predictions. Simulations are used to clarify advantages for each method. This research investigates different approaches for modeling and mapping national stream condition. We use MMI data from the EPA's National Rivers and Streams Assessment and predictors from StreamCat (Hill et al., 2015). Previous studies have focused on modeling the MMI condition classes (i.e., good, fair, and po

  5. Development and application of a multiple linear regression model to consider the impact of weekly waste container capacity on the yield from kerbside recycling programmes in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Baird, Jim; Curry, Robin; Reid, Tim

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the development and application of a multiple linear regression model to identify how the key elements of waste and recycling infrastructure, namely container capacity and frequency of collection, affect the yield from municipal kerbside recycling programmes. The overall aim of the research was to gain an understanding of the factors affecting the yield from municipal kerbside recycling programmes in Scotland with an underlying objective to evaluate the efficacy of the model as a decision-support tool for informing the design of kerbside recycling programmes. The study isolates the principal kerbside collection service offered by all 32 councils across Scotland, eliminating those recycling programmes associated with flatted properties or multi-occupancies. The results of the regression analysis model have identified three principal factors which explain 80% of the variability in the average yield of the principal dry recyclate services: weekly residual waste capacity, number of materials collected and the weekly recycling capacity. The use of the model has been evaluated and recommendations made on ongoing methodological development and the use of the results in informing the design of kerbside recycling programmes. We hope that the research can provide insights for the further development of methods to optimise the design and operation of kerbside recycling programmes.

  6. QSTR with extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices. 16. Development of predictive classification and regression models for toxicity of ionic liquids towards Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kunal; Das, Rudra Narayan

    2013-06-15

    Ionic liquids have been judged much with respect to their wide applicability than their considerable harmful effects towards the living ecosystem which has been observed in many instances. Hence, toxicological introspection of these chemicals by the development of predictive mathematical models can be of good help. This study presents an attempt to develop predictive classification and regression models correlating the structurally derived chemical information of a group of 62 diverse ionic liquids with their toxicity towards Daphnia magna and their interpretation. We have principally used the extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices along with various topological non-ETA and thermodynamic parameters as independent variables. The developed quantitative models have been subjected to extensive statistical tests employing multiple validation strategies from which acceptable results have been reported. The best models obtained from classification and regression studies captured necessary structural information on lipophilicity, branching pattern, electronegativity and chain length of the cationic substituents for explaining ecotoxicity of ionic liquids towards D. magna. The derived information can be successfully used to design better ionic liquid analogues acquiring the qualities of a true eco-friendly green chemical.

  7. The Role of Coa2 in Hemylation of Yeast Cox1 Revealed by Its Genetic Interaction with Cox10 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Megan; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) assembly factor Coa2 are impaired in Cox1 maturation and exhibit a rapid degradation of newly synthesized Cox1. The respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells is suppressed either by the presence of a mutant allele of the Cox10 farnesyl transferase involved in heme a biosynthesis or through impaired proteolysis by the disruption of the mitochondrial Oma1 protease. Cox10 with an N196K substitution functions as a robust gain-of-function suppressor of the respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells but lacks suppressor activity for two other CcO assembly mutant strains, the coa1Δ and shy1Δ mutants. The suppressor activity of N196K mutant Cox10 is dependent on its catalytic function and the presence of Cox15, the second enzyme involved in heme a biosynthesis. Varying the substitution at Asn196 reveals a correlation between the suppressor activity and the stabilization of the high-mass homo-oligomeric Cox10 complex. We postulate that the mutant Cox10 complex has enhanced efficiency in the addition of heme a to Cox1. Coa2 appears to impart stability to the oligomeric wild-type Cox10 complex involved in Cox1 hemylation. PMID:19841065

  8. Splines for diffeomorphic image regression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nikhil; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a method for splines on diffeomorphisms for image regression. In contrast to previously proposed methods to capture image changes over time, such as geodesic regression, the method can capture more complex spatio-temporal deformations. In particular, it is a first step towards capturing periodic motions for example of the heart or the lung. Starting from a variational formulation of splines the proposed approach allows for the use of temporal control points to control spline behavior. This necessitates the development of a shooting formulation for splines. Experimental results are shown for synthetic and real data. The performance of the method is compared to geodesic regression.

  9. A regression model for the temporal development of soil pipes and associated gullies in the alluvial-fill valley of the Rio Puerco, central New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condit, C. D.; Elston, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    On Mars, the association of gullied escarpments and chaotic terrain is evidence for failure and scarp retreat of poorly consolidated materials. Some martian gullies have no surface outlets and may have drained through subterranean channels. Similar features, though on a much smaller scale, can be seen in alluvium along terrestrial river banks in semiarid regions, such as the Rio Puerco Valley of central New Mexico. Many of the escarpments along the Rio Puerco are developing through formation of collapse gullies, which drain through soil pipes. Gully development can be monitored on aerial photographs taken in 1935, 1962, and 1980. A regression model was developed to quantify gully evolution over a known time span. Soil pipes and their associated collapse gullies make recognizable signatures on the air photos. The areal extent of this signature can be normalized to the scarp length of each pipe-gully system, which makes comparisons between systems possible.

  10. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  11. Fungible weights in logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2016-06-01

    In this article we develop methods for assessing parameter sensitivity in logistic regression models. To set the stage for this work, we first review Waller's (2008) equations for computing fungible weights in linear regression. Next, we describe 2 methods for computing fungible weights in logistic regression. To demonstrate the utility of these methods, we compute fungible logistic regression weights using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (2010) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, and we illustrate how these alternate weights can be used to evaluate parameter sensitivity. To make our work accessible to the research community, we provide R code (R Core Team, 2015) that will generate both kinds of fungible logistic regression weights. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Development and implementation of a regression model for predicting recreational water quality in the Cuyahoga River, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio 2009-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, Amie M.G.; Plona, Meg B.

    2012-01-01

    The Cuyahoga River within Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP) is at times impaired for recreational use due to elevated concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli), a fecal-indicator bacterium. During the recreational seasons of mid-May through September during 2009–11, samples were collected 4 days per week and analyzed for E. coli concentrations at two sites within CVNP. Other water-quality and environ-mental data, including turbidity, rainfall, and streamflow, were measured and (or) tabulated for analysis. Regression models developed to predict recreational water quality in the river were implemented during the recreational seasons of 2009–11 for one site within CVNP–Jaite. For the 2009 and 2010 seasons, the regression models were better at predicting exceedances of Ohio's single-sample standard for primary-contact recreation compared to the traditional method of using the previous day's E. coli concentration. During 2009, the regression model was based on data collected during 2005 through 2008, excluding available 2004 data. The resulting model for 2009 did not perform as well as expected (based on the calibration data set) and tended to overestimate concentrations (correct responses at 69 percent). During 2010, the regression model was based on data collected during 2004 through 2009, including all of the available data. The 2010 model performed well, correctly predicting 89 percent of the samples above or below the single-sample standard, even though the predictions tended to be lower than actual sample concentrations. During 2011, the regression model was based on data collected during 2004 through 2010 and tended to overestimate concentrations. The 2011 model did not perform as well as the traditional method or as expected, based on the calibration dataset (correct responses at 56 percent). At a second site—Lock 29, approximately 5 river miles upstream from Jaite, a regression model based on data collected at the site during the recreational

  13. Design of Fluorine-Containing 3,4-Diarylfuran-2(5H)-ones as Selective COX-1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Elleman, Anna V; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Daniel, Cristina K; Crews, Brenda C; Nance, Kellie D; Huda, Tamanna; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2014-11-13

    We report the design and synthesis of fluorine-containing cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-selective inhibitors to serve as prototypes for the development of a COX-1-targeted imaging agent. Deletion of the SO2CH3 group of rofecoxib switches the compound from a COX-2- to a COX-1-selective inhibitor, providing a 3,4-diarylfuran-2(5H)-one scaffold for structure-activity relationship studies of COX-1 inhibition. A wide range of fluorine-containing 3,4-diarylfuran-2(5H)-ones were designed, synthesized, and tested for their ability to selectively inhibit COX-1 in purified protein and human cancer cell assays. Compounds containing a fluoro-substituent on the C-3 phenyl ring and a methoxy-substituent on the C-4 phenyl ring of the 3,4-diarylfuran-2(5H)-one scaffold were the best COX-1-selective agents of those evaluated, exhibiting IC50s in the submicromolar range. These compounds provide the foundation for development of an agent to facilitate radiologic imaging of ovarian cancer expressing elevated levels of COX-1.

  14. Hyperglycemia Induced by Glucokinase Deficiency Accelerates Atherosclerosis Development and Impairs Lesion Regression in Combined Heterozygous Glucokinase and the Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adingupu, Damilola D.; Andréasson, Anne-Christine; Ahnmark, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Models combining diabetes and atherosclerosis are important in evaluating the cardiovascular (CV) effects and safety of antidiabetes drugs in the development of treatments targeting CV complications. Our aim was to evaluate if crossing the heterozygous glucokinase knockout mouse (GK+/−) and hyperlipidemic mouse deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−) will generate a disease model exhibiting a diabetic and macrovascular phenotype. Methods. The effects of defective glucokinase on the glucose metabolism and on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis on high-fat diets were studied in both genders of GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice. Coronary vascular function of the female GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice was also investigated. Results. GK+/−ApoE−/− mice show a stable hyperglycemia which was increased on Western diet. In oral glucose tolerance test, GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed significant glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Plasma lipids were comparable with ApoE−/− mice; nevertheless the GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed slightly increased atherosclerosis development. Conclusions. The GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed a stable and reproducible hyperglycemia, accelerated atherosclerotic lesion progression, and no lesion regression after lipid lowering. This novel model provides a promising tool for drug discovery, enabling the evaluation of compound effects against both diabetic and cardiovascular endpoints simultaneously in one animal model. PMID:27774459

  15. Developing Street-Level PM2.5 and PM10 Land Use Regression Models in High-Density Hong Kong with Urban Morphological Factors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Ng, Edward

    2016-08-02

    Monitoring street-level particulates is essential to air quality management but challenging in high-density Hong Kong due to limitations in local monitoring network and the complexities of street environment. By employing vehicle-based mobile measurements, land use regression (LUR) models were developed to estimate the spatial variation of PM2.5 and PM10 in the downtown area of Hong Kong. Sampling runs were conducted along routes measuring a total of 30 km during a selected measurement period of total 14 days. In total, 321 independent variables were examined to develop LUR models by using stepwise regression with PM2.5 and PM10 as dependent variables. Approximately, 10% increases in the model adjusted R(2) were achieved by integrating urban/building morphology as independent variables into the LUR models. Resultant LUR models show that the most decisive factors on street-level air quality in Hong Kong are frontal area index, an urban/building morphological parameter, and road network line density and traffic volume, two parameters of road traffic. The adjusted R(2) of the final LUR models of PM2.5 and PM10 are 0.633 and 0.707, respectively. These results indicate that urban morphology is more decisive to the street-level air quality in high-density cities than other cities. Air pollution hotspots were also identified based on the LUR mapping.

  16. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Yu, James Y H; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E; Crews, Brenda C; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel (18)F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional (18)F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an (18)F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The (18)F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging

  17. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  18. COX, LOX and platelet aggregation inhibitory properties of Lauraceae neolignans.

    PubMed

    Coy, Ericsson David; Cuca, Luis Enrique; Sefkow, Michael

    2009-12-15

    The anti-inflammatory potential of 26 neolignans (14 of the bicyclooctane-type and 12 of the benzofuran-type), isolated from three Lauraceae species (Pleurothyrium cinereum, Ocotea macrophylla and Nectandra amazonum), was evaluated in vitro through inhibition of COX-1, COX-2, 5-LOX and agonist-induced aggregation of rabbit platelets. Benzofuran neolignans were found to be selective COX-2 inhibitors, whereas bicyclooctane neolignans inhibit selectively the PAF-action as well as COX-1 and 5-LOX. The neolignan 9-nor-7,8-dehydro-isolicarin B 15 and cinerin C 7 were found to be the most potent COX-2 inhibitor and PAF-antagonist, respectively. Nectamazin C 10 exhibited dual 5-LOX/COX-2 inhibition.

  19. [COX-2 regulation of prostaglandins in synaptic signaling].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Wei

    2009-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme converting arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs), which is a key messenger in traumatic brain injury- and ischemia-induced neuronal damage and in neuroinflammation. COX-2 is implicated in the pathogeneses of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence implies that the contribution of COX-2 to neuropathology is associated with its involvement in synaptic alteration. Elevation or inhibition of COX-2 has been shown to enhance or suppress excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). These events are mainly mediated via PGE2, the predominant reaction product of COX-2, and the PGE2 subtype 2 receptor (EP2). Thus, elucidation of COX-2 in synaptic signaling may provide a mechanistic basis for designing new drugs aimed at preventing, treating or alleviating neuroinflammation-associated neurological disorders.

  20. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  1. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  2. Regressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Black, C; Dieppe, P; Huskisson, T; Hart, F D

    1986-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a disease which usually progresses or reaches a plateau with persistence of symptoms and signs. Regression is extremely unusual. Four cases of established scleroderma are described in which regression is well documented. The significance of this observation and possible mechanisms of disease regression are discussed. Images PMID:3718012

  3. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  4. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  5. Brain-targeted ACE2 overexpression attenuates neurogenic hypertension by inhibiting COX mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Xia, Huijing; Xu, Ping; Lazartigues, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Overactivity of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenases (COX) in the brain are implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We previously reported that Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) overexpression in the brain attenuates the development of DOCA-salt hypertension, a neurogenic hypertension model with enhanced brain RAS and sympathetic activity. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated whether oxidative stress, mitogen activated protein kinase signaling and cyclooxygenase (COX) activation in the brain are modulated by ACE2 in neurogenic hypertension. DOCA-salt hypertension significantly increased expression of Nox-2 (+61 ±5 %), Nox-4 (+50 ±13 %) and nitrotyrosine (+89 ±32 %) and reduced activity of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase (−29 ±4 %) and SOD (−31 ±7 %), indicating increased oxidative stress in the brain of non-transgenic mice. This increased oxidative stress was attenuated in transgenic mice overexpressing ACE2 in the brain. DOCA-salt-induced reduction of nNOS expression (−26 ±7 %) and phosphorylated eNOS/total eNOS (−30 ±3 %), and enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), were reversed by ACE2 overexpression. In addition, ACE2 overexpression blunted the hypertension-mediated increase in gene and protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the PVN. Furthermore, gene silencing of either COX-1 or COX-2 in the brain, reduced microglial activation and accompanied neuro-inflammation, ultimately attenuating DOCA-salt hypertension. Together, these data provide evidence that brain ACE2 overexpression reduces oxidative stress and COX-mediated neuro-inflammation, improves anti-oxidant and nitric oxide signaling, and thereby attenuates the development of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25489058

  6. Novel Allelic Variants in the Canine Cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2) Promoter Are Associated with Renal Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Mary H.; Bell, Jerold S.; Rothman, Debby A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia (RD) in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2) deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs. PMID:21346820

  7. Coexpression of COX-2 and iNOS in Angiogenesis of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Youichi; Sobajima, Jun; Higashi, Morihiro; Ishiguro, Toru; Fukuchi, Minoru; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Yakabi, Koji; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-04-01

    Using immunohistochemical staining, the present study was conducted to examine whether cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) affect angiogenesis in early-stage esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We also analyzed the correlation between these two factors. Cyclooxygenase 2, iNOS, and angiogenesis in early-stage ESCC are unclear. Using 10 samples of normal squamous epithelium, 7 samples of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (LGIN), and 45 samples of superficial esophageal cancer, we observed the expression of COX-2 and iNOS. We then investigated the COX-2 and iNOS immunoreactivity scores and the correlation between COX-2 or iNOS scores and microvessel density (MVD) using CD34 or CD105. The intensity of COX-2 or iNOS expression differed significantly according to histological type (P < 0.001). The scores of COX-2 and iNOS were lowest for normal squamous epithelium, followed in ascending order by LGIN, carcinoma in situ and tumor invading the lamina propria mucosae (M1-M2 cancer); and tumor invading the muscularis mucosa (M3) or deeper cancer. The differences were significant (P < 0.001). Cancers classified M1-M2 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively); M3; or deeper cancer (P < 0.01) had significantly higher COX-2 and iNOS scores than normal squamous epithelium. There was a significant correlation between COX-2 and iNOS scores (P < 0.001, rs = 0.51). Correlations between COX-2 score and CD34-positive MVD or CD105-positive MVD were significant (rs = 0.53, P < 0.001; rs = 0.62, P < 0.001, respectively). Inducible nitric oxide synthase score was also significantly correlated with CD34 MVD and CD105 MVD (rs = 0.45, P < 0.001; rs = 0.60, P < 0.001, respectively). Chemoprevention of COX-2 or iNOS activity may blunt the development of ESCC from precancerous lesions.

  8. Fully Regressive Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ehrsam, Eric; Kallini, Joseph R.; Lebas, Damien; Modiano, Philippe; Cotten, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Fully regressive melanoma is a phenomenon in which the primary cutaneous melanoma becomes completely replaced by fibrotic components as a result of host immune response. Although 10 to 35 percent of cases of cutaneous melanomas may partially regress, fully regressive melanoma is very rare; only 47 cases have been reported in the literature to date. AH of the cases of fully regressive melanoma reported in the literature were diagnosed in conjunction with metastasis on a patient. The authors describe a case of fully regressive melanoma without any metastases at the time of its diagnosis. Characteristic findings on dermoscopy, as well as the absence of melanoma on final biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27672418

  9. Prolactin (PRL) induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression and prostaglandin (PG) production in hamster Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, María Eugenia; Ambao, Verónica; Carino, Mónica Herminia; Rossi, Soledad Paola; González, Lorena; Turyn, Daniel; Campo, Stella; Calandra, Ricardo Saúl; Frungieri, Mónica Beatriz

    2012-01-02

    Serum prolactin (PRL) variations play a crucial role in the photoperiodic-induced testicular regression-recrudescence transition in hamsters. We have previously shown that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), is expressed mostly in Leydig cells of reproductively active hamsters with considerable circulating and pituitary levels of PRL. In this study, we describe a stimulatory effect of PRL on COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells, which is mediated by IL-1β and prevented by P38-MAPK and JAK2 inhibitors. Furthermore, by preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), we isolated PRL charge analogues from pituitaries of active [isoelectric points (pI): 5.16, 4.61, and 4.34] and regressed (pI: 5.44) hamsters. More acidic PRL charge analogues strongly induced COX2 expression, while less acidic ones had no effect. Our studies suggest that PRL induces COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells through IL-1β and activation of P38-MAPK and JAK2. PRL microheterogeneity detected in active/inactive hamsters may be responsible for the photoperiodic variations of COX2 expression in Leydig cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantification of Burkholderia coxL Genes in Hawaiian Volcanic Deposits▿

    PubMed Central

    Weber, C. F.; King, G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Isolation of multiple carbon monoxide (CO)-oxidizing Burkholderia strains and detection by culture-independent approaches suggest that Burkholderia may be an important component of CO-oxidizing communities in Hawaiian volcanic deposits. The absolute and relative abundance of the bacteria in these communities remains unknown, however. In this study, a quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) approach has been developed to enumerate Burkholderia coxL genes (large subunit of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase). This represents the first attempt to enumerate coxL genes from CO oxidizers in environmental samples. coxL copy numbers have been determined for samples from three sites representing a vegetation gradient on a 1959 volcanic deposit that included unvegetated cinders (bare), edges of vegetated sites (edge), and sites within tree stands (canopy). Q-PCR has also been used to estimate copy numbers of Betaproteobacteria 16S rRNA gene copy numbers and total Bacteria 16S rRNA. coxL genes could not be detected in the bare site (detection limit, ≥4.7 × 103 copies per reaction) but average 1.0 × 108 ± 2.4 × 107 and 8.6 × 108 ± 7.6 ×107 copies g−1 (dry weight) in edge and canopy sites, respectively, which differ statistically (P = 0.0007). Average Burkholderia coxL gene copy numbers, expressed as a percentage of total Bacteria 16S rRNA gene copy numbers, are 6.2 and 0.7% for the edge and canopy sites, respectively. Although the percentage of Burkholderia coxL is lower in the canopy site, significantly greater gene copy numbers demonstrate that absolute abundance of coxL increases in vegetated sites and contributes to the expansion of CO oxidizer communities during biological succession on volcanic deposits. PMID:20139318

  11. ``Regressed experts'' as a new state in teachers' professional development: lessons from Computer Science teachers' adjustments to substantial changes in the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Neomi; Ben-David Kolikant, Yifat; Beeri, Catriel

    2012-09-01

    Due to a program reform in Israel, experienced CS high-school teachers faced the need to master and teach a new programming paradigm. This situation served as an opportunity to explore the relationship between teachers' content knowledge (CK) and their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This article focuses on three case studies, with emphasis on one of them. Using observations and interviews, we examine how the teachers, we observed taught and what development of their teaching occurred as a result of their teaching experience, if at all. Our findings suggest that this situation creates a new hybrid state of teachers, which we term "regressed experts." These teachers incorporate in their professional practice some elements typical of novices and some typical of experts. We also found that these teachers' experience, although established when teaching a different CK, serve as a leverage to improve their knowledge and understanding of aspects of the new content.

  12. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sokołowski, Grzegorz; Bałdys-Waligórska, Agata; Trofimiuk, Małgorzata; Adamek, Dariusz; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Gołkowski, Filip

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Microvessel density in angiogenesis is regarded as a prognostic factor of tumour invasiveness, independent of cell proliferation. In recent studies of pituitary tumours, correlation between the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and micro-vascularization density and microvessel surface density has been established. We studied the expression of COX-2 in different types of pituitary adenomas to determine the usefulness of COX-2 expression as a prognostic factor of tumour progression or recurrence in patients with hypophyseal tumours. Material/Methods We retrospectively studied a group of 60 patients of mean age 46.7±17.6 (range, 18 to 85) years who underwent pituitary tumour surgery. Expression of COX-2, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was analyzed in relation to histopathology features of tumour, clinical symptoms, MR imaging and post-operative recurrence/progression of disease. Results COX-2 was expressed in adenomas of 87% of patients, with a median index value of 57.5% [IQR=60.5]. Highest COX-2 expression was observed in hormonally inactive adenomas and gonadotropinomas and lowest in prolactinomas. We found no differences in COX-2 expression with respect to patient age, gender, tumour size, degree of tumour invasiveness, or whether tumours were immunopositive or immunonegative for pituitary hormones, nor have we found any relation between COX-2 expression and recurrence or progression of tumour size. Conclusions COX-2 does not appear to be a predictive factor for recurrence or progression of tumour size. Nevertheless, due to the observed relatively high expression of COX-2 in pituitary adenomas, further studies with COX-2 inhibitors are justified in these tumours. PMID:22460097

  13. Characterization of the peroxide sensitivity of COX-deficient yeast strains reveals unexpected relationships between COX assembly proteins.

    PubMed

    Veniamin, Simona; Sawatzky, Luanne G; Banting, Graham S; Glerum, D Moira

    2011-10-15

    A number of distinct cuproproteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane are required for the assembly of cytochrome oxidase (COX), thought to function in a "bucket brigade" fashion to provide copper to the Cu(A) and Cu(B) sites. In yeast, the loss of two these proteins, Sco1p and Cox11p, leads to respiratory deficiency and a specific inability to survive exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Using a quantitative assay, we have identified subtle differences in the peroxide-sensitive phenotypes between sco1 and cox11 mutant strains. Interestingly, the peroxide sensitivity of the sco1 null strain can be suppressed by overexpressing either SCO2 or COX11, although overexpression of neither SCO1 nor SCO2 can rescue the cox11 null strain. We also find that overexpression of either CTT1, encoding the cytosolic catalase T, or CTA1, encoding the mitochondrial matrix catalase, suppresses the peroxide sensitivity in both the sco1 and the cox11 null mutants. Direct measurement of peroxide metabolism shows that sco1 and cox11 null strains fail to degrade a significant amount of exogenously provided H(2)O(2). Taken together, our data demonstrate that although Cox11p and Sco1p play distinct roles in COX assembly, they seem to play overlapping or related roles in peroxide metabolism that require further investigation.

  14. The heme a synthase Cox15 associates with cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediates during Cox1 maturation.

    PubMed

    Bareth, Bettina; Dennerlein, Sven; Mick, David U; Nikolov, Miroslav; Urlaub, Henning; Rehling, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Cox1, the core subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase, receives two heme a cofactors during assembly of the 13-subunit enzyme complex. However, at which step of the assembly process and how heme is inserted into Cox1 have remained an enigma. Shy1, the yeast SURF1 homolog, has been implicated in heme transfer to Cox1, whereas the heme a synthase, Cox15, catalyzes the final step of heme a synthesis. Here we performed a comprehensive analysis of cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediates containing Shy1. Our analyses suggest that Cox15 displays a role in cytochrome c oxidase assembly, which is independent of its functions as the heme a synthase. Cox15 forms protein complexes with Shy1 and also associates with Cox1-containing complexes independently of Shy1 function. These findings indicate that Shy1 does not serve as a mobile heme carrier between the heme a synthase and maturing Cox1 but rather cooperates with Cox15 for heme transfer and insertion in early assembly intermediates of cytochrome c oxidase.

  15. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 cellular expression and distribution after respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Meyerholz, David K; Ackermann, Mark R

    2010-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play an important role in pulmonary physiology and various pathophysiological processes following infection. The initial step in the biosynthesis of PGs is regulated by two distinct cyclooxygenase enzymes, cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2. The goal of this study was to investigate the pulmonary cellular localization and distribution of COX-1 and COX-2 in a neonatal lamb model following respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus 3 (PI3) infection, organisms that also cause significant respiratory disease in children. No significant differences were seen in pulmonary COX-1 expression at various microanatomical locations following RSV or PI3 infection compared to controls. In contrast, COX-2 was upregulated following RSV and PI3 infection. Strong expression was restricted to bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells and macrophages, while minimal expression was present in the same microanatomical locations in the uninfected lungs. Other microanatomical locations in both the controls and the infected lungs lacked expression. This work suggests that during RSV or PI3 infection: (1) COX-1 cellular expression is not altered, (2) COX-2 cellular expression is upregulated in airway bronchiolar and bronchial epithelial cells and macrophages, (3) respiratory epithelium along with macrophages are important microanatomical compartments regulating the host inflammatory response during viral infection, and (4) COX-2 may be a potential target for RSV and PI3 therapy.

  16. Spontaneous skin regression and predictors of skin regression in Thai scleroderma patients.

    PubMed

    Foocharoen, Chingching; Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2011-09-01

    Skin tightness is a major clinical manifestation of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Importantly for both clinicians and patients, spontaneous regression of the fibrosis process has been documented. The purpose of this study is to identify the incidence and related clinical characteristics of spontaneous regression among Thai SSc patients. A historical cohort with 4 years of follow-up was performed among SSc patients over 15 years of age diagnosed with SSc between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2006 in Khon Kaen, Thailand. The start date was the date of the first symptom and the end date was the date of the skin score ≤2. To estimate the respective probability of regression and to assess the associated factors, the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis was used. One hundred seventeen cases of SSc were included with a female to male ratio of 1.5:1. Thirteen patients (11.1%) experienced regression. The incidence rate of spontaneous skin regression was 0.31 per 100 person-months and the average duration of SSc at the time of regression was 35.9±15.6 months (range, 15.7-60 months). The factors that negatively correlated with regression were (a) diffuse cutaneous type, (b) Raynaud's phenomenon, (c) esophageal dysmotility, and (d) colchicine treatment at onset with a respective hazard ratio (HR) of 0.19, 0.19, 0.26, and 0.20. By contrast, the factor that positively correlated with regression was active alveolitis with cyclophosphamide therapy at onset with an HR of 4.23 (95% CI, 1.23-14.10). After regression analysis, only Raynaud's phenomenon at onset and diffuse cutaneous type had a significantly negative correlation to regression. A spontaneous regression of the skin fibrosis process was not uncommon among Thai SSc patients. The factors suggesting a poor predictor for cutaneous manifestation were Raynaud's phenomenon, diffuse cutaneous type while early cyclophosphamide therapy might be related to a better skin outcome.

  17. Inhibition of 5-LOX, COX-1, and COX-2 increases tendon healing and reduces muscle fibrosis and lipid accumulation after rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Oak, Nikhil R; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Saripalli, Anjali L; Davis, Max E; Harning, Julie A; Lynch, Evan B; Roche, Stuart M; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    The repair and restoration of function after chronic rotator cuff tears are often complicated by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration of the diseased muscle. The inflammatory response has been implicated in the development of fatty degeneration after cuff injuries. Licofelone is a novel anti-inflammatory drug that inhibits 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 enzymes, which play important roles in inducing inflammation after injuries. While previous studies have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective inhibitors of COX-2 (coxibs) may prevent the proper healing of muscles and tendons, studies about bone and cartilage have demonstrated that drugs that inhibit 5-LOX concurrently with COX-1 and COX-2 may enhance tissue regeneration. After the repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in rats, licofelone would increase the load to failure of repaired tendons and increase the force production of muscle fibers. Controlled laboratory study. Rats underwent supraspinatus release followed by repair 28 days later. After repair, rats began a treatment regimen of either licofelone or a vehicle for 14 days, at which time animals were euthanized. Supraspinatus muscles and tendons were then subjected to contractile, mechanical, histological, and biochemical analyses. Compared with controls, licofelone-treated rats had a grossly apparent decrease in inflammation and increased fibrocartilage formation at the enthesis, along with a 62% increase in the maximum load to failure and a 51% increase in peak stress to failure. Licofelone resulted in a marked reduction in fibrosis and lipid content in supraspinatus muscles as well as reduced expression of several genes involved in fatty infiltration. Despite the decline in fibrosis and fat accumulation, muscle fiber specific force production was reduced by 23%. The postoperative treatment of cuff repair with licofelone may reduce fatty degeneration and enhance the development

  18. Time-warped geodesic regression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi; Singh, Nikhil; Kwitt, Roland; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We consider geodesic regression with parametric time-warps. This allows for example, to capture saturation effects as typically observed during brain development or degeneration. While highly-flexible models to analyze time-varying image and shape data based on generalizations of splines and polynomials have been proposed recently, they come at the cost of substantially more complex inference. Our focus in this paper is therefore to keep the model and its inference as simple as possible while allowing to capture expected biological variation. We demonstrate that by augmenting geodesic regression with parametric time-warp functions, we can achieve comparable flexibility to more complex models while retaining model simplicity. In addition, the time-warp parameters provide useful information of underlying anatomical changes as demonstrated for the analysis of corpora callosa and rat calvariae. We exemplify our strategy for shape regression on the Grassmann manifold, but note that the method is generally applicable for time-warped geodesic regression.

  19. Time-Warped Geodesic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Singh, Nikhil; Kwitt, Roland; Niethammer, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We consider geodesic regression with parametric time-warps. This allows, for example, to capture saturation effects as typically observed during brain development or degeneration. While highly-flexible models to analyze time-varying image and shape data based on generalizations of splines and polynomials have been proposed recently, they come at the cost of substantially more complex inference. Our focus in this paper is therefore to keep the model and its inference as simple as possible while allowing to capture expected biological variation. We demonstrate that by augmenting geodesic regression with parametric time-warp functions, we can achieve comparable flexibility to more complex models while retaining model simplicity. In addition, the time-warp parameters provide useful information of underlying anatomical changes as demonstrated for the analysis of corpora callosa and rat calvariae. We exemplify our strategy for shape regression on the Grassmann manifold, but note that the method is generally applicable for time-warped geodesic regression. PMID:25485368

  20. The flavouring phytochemical 2-pentanone reduces prostaglandin production and COX-2 expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Jenny; Karlsson, Pernilla Christina; Göransson, Ulf; Rafter, Joseph James; Bohlin, Lars

    2008-03-01

    Many phytochemicals found in the diet may prevent colon carcinogenesis by affecting biochemical processes in the colonic mucosa. Inflammation and subsequent elevation of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are two such factors involved in the development of colon cancer, and inhibition of these processes could be important targets for chemoprevention. We have previously shown COX-2 inhibitory activity locally in the colon; e.g. in human fecal water from a group of vegetarians. In this study we focus on 2-pentanone, a frequently occurring compound in common foods such as banana and carrot. The aim was to study the inhibitory effects on prostaglandin production and COX-2 protein expression in tumour necrosis factor-alpha stimulated colon cancer cells (HT29) by radioimmunoassay and Western blotting. 2-Pentanone inhibited both prostaglandin production and COX-2 protein expression in human colon cancer cells. A concentration of 400 mumol/l 2-pentanone inhibited the prostaglandin production by 56.9+/-12.9% which is in the same range as the reference compound NS398 (59.8+/-7.6%). The two highest concentrations of 2-pentanone were further analyzed by Western blot, and 400 micromol/l and 200 micromol/l 2-pentanone resulted in a 53.3+/-9.6% and +/-27.1% reduction of the COX-2 protein levels respectively. Further studies on flavouring compounds, for example 2-pentanone, as colon cancer chemopreventives would be very valuable, and such results may contribute to future dietary recommendations.

  1. Development of comprehensive descriptors for multiple linear regression and artificial neural network modeling of retention behaviors of a variety of compounds on different stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, M; Parastar, F

    2000-12-01

    A new series of six comprehensive descriptors that represent different features of the gas-liquid partition coefficient, K(L), for commonly used stationary phases is developed. These descriptors can be considered as counterparts of the parameters in the Abraham solvatochromic model of solution. A separate multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed by using the six descriptors for each stationary phase of poly(ethylene glycol adipate) (EGAD), N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl) ethylenediamine (THPED), poly(ethylene glycol) (Ucon 50 HB 660) (U50HB), di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEHPA) and tetra-n-butylammonium N,N-(bis-2-hydroxylethyl)-2-aminoethanesulfonate (QBES). The results obtained using these models are in good agreement with the experiment and with the results of the empirical model based on the solvatochromic theory. A 6-6-5 neural network was developed using the descriptors appearing in the MLR models as inputs. Comparison of the mean square errors (MSEs) shows the superiority of the artificial neural network (ANN) over that of the MLR. This indicates that the retention behavior of the molecules on different columns show some nonlinear characteristics. The experimental solvatochromic parameters proposed by Abraham can be replaced by the calculated descriptors in this work.

  2. Acute upregulation of COX-2 by renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mann, B; Hartner, A; Jensen, B L; Hilgers, K F; Höcherl, K; Krämer, B K; Kurtz, A

    2001-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the influence of acute renal artery stenosis on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and renin expression in the juxtaglomerular apparatus. For this purpose, male Sprague-Dawley rats received a left renal artery clip, and COX-2 mRNA, COX-2 immunoreactivity, plasma renin activity, and renin mRNA levels were determined. COX-2 mRNA and COX-2 immunoreactivity in the macula densa region in the clipped kidneys increased as early as 6 h after clipping and reached a maximal expression 1-2 days after clipping. Although values for plasma renin activity were elevated markedly at all time points examined, remaining renin mRNA levels were unchanged after 6 h and then increased to reach a maximum value 1-2 days after clipping. In the contralateral intact kidney, renin mRNA and COX-2 immunoreactivity decreased to approximately 50% of their normal values. To investigate a possible causal relationship between the changes of COX-2 and of renin expression, clipped rats were treated with the COX-2 blocker celecoxib (40 mg. kg(-1). day(-1)). This treatment, however, did not change renin mRNA either in the clipped or in the contralateral intact kidney. Our findings indicate that renal artery stenosis causes ipsilaterally an acute upregulation and contralaterally a downregulation of juxtaglomerular COX-2 expression. The lacking effect of celecoxib on renin gene expression does not support the concept of a direct mediator function of COX-2-derived prostaglandins in the control of renin expression during renal hypoperfusion.

  3. [Specific inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2): current knowledge and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Rioda, W T; Nervetti, A

    2001-01-01

    The Authors summarize the current knowledge on a new class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the coxib (celecoxib and rofecoxib), in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Celecoxib and rofecoxib are selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors which possess the same anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities, but a better gastric tolerability compared to the non-selective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors. The Authors also report other possible therapeutic effects of these NSADIs as evidenced by the more recent data of the literature. Celecoxib seems to reduce the incidence of new polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. It has been suggested the use of celecoxib as a protective drug against the development of colorectal cancer. Other (neoplastic) or pre-neoplastic conditions, such as bladder dysplasia, Barret esophagus, attinic keratosis and Alzheimer's disease seem to have benefit from this class of drugs.

  4. COX-2 inhibition potentiates antiangiogenic cancer therapy and prevents metastasis in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lihong; Stevens, Janine; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Logsdon, Daniel; Morris, Holly; Swing, Deborah A; Patel, Nimit L; Kalen, Joseph; Haines, Diana C; Zudaire, Enrique; St Croix, Brad

    2014-06-25

    Antiangiogenic agents that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling are important components of current cancer treatment modalities but are limited by alternative ill-defined angiogenesis mechanisms that allow persistent tumor vascularization in the face of continued VEGF pathway blockade. We identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a soluble tumor-derived angiogenic factor associated with VEGF-independent angiogenesis. PGE2 production in preclinical breast and colon cancer models was tightly controlled by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and COX-2 inhibition augmented VEGF pathway blockade to suppress angiogenesis and tumor growth, prevent metastasis, and increase overall survival. These results demonstrate the importance of the COX-2/PGE2 pathway in mediating resistance to VEGF pathway blockade and could aid in the rapid development of more efficacious anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Box-Cox Mixed Logit Model for Travel Behavior Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orro, Alfonso; Novales, Margarita; Benitez, Francisco G.

    2010-09-01

    To represent the behavior of travelers when they are deciding how they are going to get to their destination, discrete choice models, based on the random utility theory, have become one of the most widely used tools. The field in which these models were developed was halfway between econometrics and transport engineering, although the latter now constitutes one of their principal areas of application. In the transport field, they have mainly been applied to mode choice, but also to the selection of destination, route, and other important decisions such as the vehicle ownership. In usual practice, the most frequently employed discrete choice models implement a fixed coefficient utility function that is linear in the parameters. The principal aim of this paper is to present the viability of specifying utility functions with random coefficients that are nonlinear in the parameters, in applications of discrete choice models to transport. Nonlinear specifications in the parameters were present in discrete choice theory at its outset, although they have seldom been used in practice until recently. The specification of random coefficients, however, began with the probit and the hedonic models in the 1970s, and, after a period of apparent little practical interest, has burgeoned into a field of intense activity in recent years with the new generation of mixed logit models. In this communication, we present a Box-Cox mixed logit model, original of the authors. It includes the estimation of the Box-Cox exponents in addition to the parameters of the random coefficients distribution. Probability of choose an alternative is an integral that will be calculated by simulation. The estimation of the model is carried out by maximizing the simulated log-likelihood of a sample of observed individual choices between alternatives. The differences between the predictions yielded by models that are inconsistent with real behavior have been studied with simulation experiments.

  6. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  7. Morse-Smale Regression

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Samuel; Rübel, Oliver; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel partition-based regression approach that incorporates topological information. Partition-based regression typically introduce a quality-of-fit-driven decomposition of the domain. The emphasis in this work is on a topologically meaningful segmentation. Thus, the proposed regression approach is based on a segmentation induced by a discrete approximation of the Morse-Smale complex. This yields a segmentation with partitions corresponding to regions of the function with a single minimum and maximum that are often well approximated by a linear model. This approach yields regression models that are amenable to interpretation and have good predictive capacity. Typically, regression estimates are quantified by their geometrical accuracy. For the proposed regression, an important aspect is the quality of the segmentation itself. Thus, this paper introduces a new criterion that measures the topological accuracy of the estimate. The topological accuracy provides a complementary measure to the classical geometrical error measures and is very sensitive to over-fitting. The Morse-Smale regression is compared to state-of-the-art approaches in terms of geometry and topology and yields comparable or improved fits in many cases. Finally, a detailed study on climate-simulation data demonstrates the application of the Morse-Smale regression. Supplementary materials are available online and contain an implementation of the proposed approach in the R package msr, an analysis and simulations on the stability of the Morse-Smale complex approximation and additional tables for the climate-simulation study. PMID:23687424

  8. Morse–Smale Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Samuel; Rubel, Oliver; Bremer, Peer -Timo; Pascucci, Valerio; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-19

    This paper introduces a novel partition-based regression approach that incorporates topological information. Partition-based regression typically introduces a quality-of-fit-driven decomposition of the domain. The emphasis in this work is on a topologically meaningful segmentation. Thus, the proposed regression approach is based on a segmentation induced by a discrete approximation of the Morse–Smale complex. This yields a segmentation with partitions corresponding to regions of the function with a single minimum and maximum that are often well approximated by a linear model. This approach yields regression models that are amenable to interpretation and have good predictive capacity. Typically, regression estimates are quantified by their geometrical accuracy. For the proposed regression, an important aspect is the quality of the segmentation itself. Thus, this article introduces a new criterion that measures the topological accuracy of the estimate. The topological accuracy provides a complementary measure to the classical geometrical error measures and is very sensitive to overfitting. The Morse–Smale regression is compared to state-of-the-art approaches in terms of geometry and topology and yields comparable or improved fits in many cases. Finally, a detailed study on climate-simulation data demonstrates the application of the Morse–Smale regression. Supplementary Materials are available online and contain an implementation of the proposed approach in the R package msr, an analysis and simulations on the stability of the Morse–Smale complex approximation, and additional tables for the climate-simulation study.

  9. Development and validation of regression-based QSAR models for quantification of contributions of molecular fragments to skin sensitization potency of diverse organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nandy, A; Kar, S; Roy, K

    2013-01-01

    In our present work, we have developed regression-based QSAR models for skin sensitization potential of 51 diverse organic chemicals. The objective behind the present work is to determine the influence of different molecular features on the skin sensitizing potential of chemicals. Among several models developed, the two best ones are discussed to unveil specific information regarding the contribution of different structural and physicochemical features towards the property of skin sensitization. The QSAR models suggested that aromatic compounds are more skin sensitizing than aliphatic ones, but in the case of carbonyl compounds, aliphatic ones are more skin sensitizing than aromatic ones. Other descriptors such as LUMO and <2-Atype_H-47> signify the importance of the electrophilic and hydrophilic character respectively of the molecules for showing skin sensitizing property. Another two descriptors, and (3)χC also exert significant contributions towards the skin sensitization potential of the chemicals. Further, it is observed that the nitrogen atoms (nN), triple bonds (nTB) and also the fragment Al-C(=X)-Al (Atype_C38) are responsible for skin sensitizing property. All the above information provides additional support for further research involving identification of the skin sensitization potential of new chemicals.

  10. Combined use of COX-1 and VEGF immunohistochemistry refines the histopathologic prognosis of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Osman, Wesam M; Youssef, Nermeen S

    2015-01-01

    The course of RCC is asymptomatic, resulting in 25-30% of patients presenting with metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. The development of novel agents targeting angiogenesis and signal transduction pathways has improved patient outcomes. Role of cyclooxygenase in cancer development has been the subject of close scrutiny. COX-1 has been recognized to be involved in regulation of angiogenesis. To date, no immunohistochemical studies have been performed to assess the possible association between COX-1 and VEGF in RCC. This study is designed to evaluate the relationship between these two proteins in RCC. Also, the relationship between their combined immunohistochemical expression and different clinicopathological prognostic parameters in RCC is investigated. Immunohistochemical expression of COX-1 and VEGF was evaluated retrospectively on 64 cases of primary RCC including: 45 clear cell carcinoma, 12 papillary carcinoma and 7 of chromophope carcinoma. High COX-1 expression was detected in 62.5% of RCCs with a significant association with tumor grade (P=0.028), and highly significant relationship with tumor size and stage (P=0.001). There was a highly significant relationship between the VEGF score and tumor size (P=0.001), and stage (P=0.006). There was a positive correlation between COX-1 and VEGF expression score (P=0.001). Combined expression of both markers predicts high stage tumors (stage III/IV). Immunohistochemical expression of COX-1 and VEGF is associated with poor prognostic parameters in RCC. Their combined expression has a beneficial role in prediction of high stage tumors (III/IV).

  11. Synthesizing Regression Results: A Factored Likelihood Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Meng-Jia; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2013-01-01

    Regression methods are widely used by researchers in many fields, yet methods for synthesizing regression results are scarce. This study proposes using a factored likelihood method, originally developed to handle missing data, to appropriately synthesize regression models involving different predictors. This method uses the correlations reported…

  12. Synthesizing Regression Results: A Factored Likelihood Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Meng-Jia; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2013-01-01

    Regression methods are widely used by researchers in many fields, yet methods for synthesizing regression results are scarce. This study proposes using a factored likelihood method, originally developed to handle missing data, to appropriately synthesize regression models involving different predictors. This method uses the correlations reported…

  13. Structure-based parallel medicinal chemistry approach to improve metabolic stability of benzopyran COX-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Li; Hamper, Bruce C; Fletcher, Theresa R; Wendling, Jay M; Carter, Jeffery; Gierse, James K; Liao, Subo

    2011-02-01

    Combination of the structure-based design and solid-phase parallel synthesis provided an integrated approach to rapidly develop the structure-activity relationship of benzopyran COX-2 inhibitors. Binding free energies predicted by free energy perturbation theory yielded good agreement with experimental results. New potent and selective lead compounds with improved metabolic properties were identified.

  14. Boosted Beta Regression

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Matthias; Wickler, Florian; Maloney, Kelly O.; Mitchell, Richard; Fenske, Nora; Mayr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1). Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures. PMID:23626706

  15. Regression coefficient-based scoring system should be used to assign weights to the risk index.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Mehta, Vinay; Girman, Cynthia J; Adhikari, Deepak; Johnson, Michael L

    2016-11-01

    Some previously developed risk scores contained a mathematical error in their construction: risk ratios were added to derive weights to construct a summary risk score. This study demonstrates the mathematical error and derived different versions of the Charlson comorbidity score (CCS) using regression coefficient-based and risk ratio-based scoring systems to further demonstrate the effects of incorrect weighting on performance in predicting mortality. This retrospective cohort study included elderly people from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cox proportional hazards regression models were constructed for time to 1-year mortality. Weights were assigned to 17 comorbidities using regression coefficient-based and risk ratio-based scoring systems. Different versions of CCS were compared using Akaike information criteria (AIC), McFadden's adjusted R(2), and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Regression coefficient-based models (Beta, Beta10/integer, Beta/Schneeweiss, Beta/Sullivan) had lower AIC and higher R(2) compared to risk ratio-based models (HR/Charlson, HR/Johnson). Regression coefficient-based CCS reclassified more number of people into the correct strata (NRI range, 9.02-10.04) compared to risk ratio-based CCS (NRI range, 8.14-8.22). Previously developed risk scores contained an error in their construction adding ratios instead of multiplying them. Furthermore, as demonstrated here, adding ratios fail to even work adequately from a practical standpoint. CCS derived using regression coefficients performed slightly better than in fitting the data compared to risk ratio-based scoring systems. Researchers should use a regression coefficient-based scoring system to develop a risk index, which is theoretically correct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of NO2 and NOx land use regression models for estimating air pollution exposure in 36 study areas in Europe - The ESCAPE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beelen, Rob; Hoek, Gerard; Vienneau, Danielle; Eeftens, Marloes; Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Pedeli, Xanthi; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Künzli, Nino; Schikowski, Tamara; Marcon, Alessandro; Eriksen, Kirsten T.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Stephanou, Euripides; Patelarou, Evridiki; Lanki, Timo; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Declercq, Christophe; Falq, Grégoire; Stempfelet, Morgane; Birk, Matthias; Cyrys, Josef; von Klot, Stephanie; Nádor, Gizella; Varró, Mihály János; Dėdelė, Audrius; Gražulevičienė, Regina; Mölter, Anna; Lindley, Sarah; Madsen, Christian; Cesaroni, Giulia; Ranzi, Andrea; Badaloni, Chiara; Hoffmann, Barbara; Nonnemacher, Michael; Krämer, Ursula; Kuhlbusch, Thomas; Cirach, Marta; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Bellander, Tom; Korek, Michal; Olsson, David; Strömgren, Magnus; Dons, Evi; Jerrett, Michael; Fischer, Paul; Wang, Meng; Brunekreef, Bert; de Hoogh, Kees

    2013-06-01

    Estimating within-city variability in air pollution concentrations is important. Land use regression (LUR) models are able to explain such small-scale within-city variations. Transparency in LUR model development methods is important to facilitate comparison of methods between different studies. We therefore developed LUR models in a standardized way in 36 study areas in Europe for the ESCAPE (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects) project.Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were measured with Ogawa passive samplers at 40 or 80 sites in each of the 36 study areas. The spatial variation in each area was explained by LUR modelling. Centrally and locally available Geographic Information System (GIS) variables were used as potential predictors. A leave-one out cross-validation procedure was used to evaluate the model performance.There was substantial contrast in annual average NO2 and NOx concentrations within the study areas. The model explained variances (R2) of the LUR models ranged from 55% to 92% (median 82%) for NO2 and from 49% to 91% (median 78%) for NOx. For most areas the cross-validation R2 was less than 10% lower than the model R2. Small-scale traffic and population/household density were the most common predictors. The magnitude of the explained variance depended on the contrast in measured concentrations as well as availability of GIS predictors, especially traffic intensity data were important. In an additional evaluation, models in which local traffic intensity was not offered had 10% lower R2 compared to models in the same areas in which these variables were offered.Within the ESCAPE project it was possible to develop LUR models that explained a large fraction of the spatial variance in measured annual average NO2 and NOx concentrations. These LUR models are being used to estimate outdoor concentrations at the home addresses of participants in over 30 cohort studies.

  17. 2-Carbaborane-3-phenyl-1H-indoles – Synthesis via McMurry Reaction and COX Inhibition Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Wilma; Scholz, Matthias; Lönnecke, Peter; Crews, Brenda; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Pietzsch, Jens; Kniess, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors have been in the focus of medicinal chemistry for years and many compounds exhibiting high selectivity and affinity were developed. As carbaboranes represent interesting pharmacophores as phenyl mimetics in drug development, this paper presents the synthesis of carbaboranyl derivatives of COX-2-selective 2,3-disubstituted indoles. Despite the lability of carbaboranes under reducing conditions, 2-carbaborane-3-phenyl-1H-indoles could be synthesized by McMurry cyclization of the corresponding amides. While the meta-carbaboranyl-substituted derivatives (3a-c) lacked COX inhibition activity, the ortho-carbaboranyl analog (3d) was active but showed a selectivity shift towards COX-1. PMID:23303738

  18. Molecular docking and analgesic studies of Erythrina variegata׳s derived phytochemicals with COX enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Emran, Talha Bin; Mahib, Muhammad Mamunur Rashid; Dash, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from plants are a good source for the NSAID drug development. We studied the analgesic activity of ethanolic extract of Erythrina variegata L. (Fabaceae) followed by molecular docking analysis. The analgesic activity of Erythrina variegata L. is evaluated by various methods viz., acetic acid-induced writhing test, hot plate and tail immersion test. Subsequently, molecular docking analysis has been performed to identify compounds having activity against COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes by using GOLD docking fitness. The result of preliminary phytochemical screening revealed that the extract contains alkaloids and flavonoids. In analgesic activity tests, the extract at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) produced a increase in pain threshold in a dose dependent manner. In acetic acid induced writhing test, the inhibitory effect was similar to the reference drug diclofenac sodium. The extract showed 18.89% writhing inhibitory effect at the dose 200 mg/kg b.w., whereas diclofenac sodium showed 79.42% inhibition of writhing at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. The results of tail immersion and hot plate test also showed potential analgesic activity of the extract which is also comparable to the standard drug morphine (5 mg/kg b.w.). Docking studies shows that phaseollin of Erythrina variegata L. has the best fitness score against the COX-1 which is 56.64 and 59.63 for COX- 2 enzyme. Phaseollin of Erythrina variegata L. detected with significant fitness score and hydrogen bonding against COX-1 and COX-2 is reported for further validation.

  19. Development of West-European PM2.5 and NO2 land use regression models incorporating satellite-derived and chemical transport modelling data.

    PubMed

    de Hoogh, Kees; Gulliver, John; Donkelaar, Aaron van; Martin, Randall V; Marshall, Julian D; Bechle, Matthew J; Cesaroni, Giulia; Pradas, Marta Cirach; Dedele, Audrius; Eeftens, Marloes; Forsberg, Bertil; Galassi, Claudia; Heinrich, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Katsouyanni, Klea; Korek, Michal; Künzli, Nino; Lindley, Sarah J; Lepeule, Johanna; Meleux, Frederik; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Nystad, Wenche; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Peters, Annette; Peuch, Vincent-Henri; Rouil, Laurence; Udvardy, Orsolya; Slama, Rémy; Stempfelet, Morgane; Stephanou, Euripides G; Tsai, Ming Y; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Brunekreef, Bert; Vienneau, Danielle; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-11-01

    Satellite-derived (SAT) and chemical transport model (CTM) estimates of PM2.5 and NO2 are increasingly used in combination with Land Use Regression (LUR) models. We aimed to compare the contribution of SAT and CTM data to the performance of LUR PM2.5 and NO2 models for Europe. Four sets of models, all including local traffic and land use variables, were compared (LUR without SAT or CTM, with SAT only, with CTM only, and with both SAT and CTM). LUR models were developed using two monitoring data sets: PM2.5 and NO2 ground level measurements from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) and from the European AIRBASE network. LUR PM2.5 models including SAT and SAT+CTM explained ~60% of spatial variation in measured PM2.5 concentrations, substantially more than the LUR model without SAT and CTM (adjR(2): 0.33-0.38). For NO2 CTM improved prediction modestly (adjR(2): 0.58) compared to models without SAT and CTM (adjR(2): 0.47-0.51). Both monitoring networks are capable of producing models explaining the spatial variance over a large study area. SAT and CTM estimates of PM2.5 and NO2 significantly improved the performance of high spatial resolution LUR models at the European scale for use in large epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of land use regression models for elemental, organic carbon, PAH, and hopanes/steranes in 10 ESCAPE/TRANSPHORM European study areas.

    PubMed

    Jedynska, Aleksandra; Hoek, Gerard; Wang, Meng; Eeftens, Marloes; Cyrys, Josef; Keuken, Menno; Ampe, Christophe; Beelen, Rob; Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Cirach, Marta; de Hoogh, Kees; De Nazelle, Audrey; Nystad, Wenche; Declercq, Christophe; Eriksen, Kirsten T; Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Lanki, Timo; Meliefste, Kees; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Brunekreef, Bert; Kooter, Ingeborg M

    2014-12-16

    Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to model concentrations of mainly traffic-related air pollutants (nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) mass or absorbance). Few LUR models are published of PM composition, whereas the interest in health effects related to particle composition is increasing. The aim of our study was to evaluate LUR models of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), hopanes/steranes, and elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC) content of PM2.5. In 10 European study areas, PAH, hopanes/steranes, and EC/OC concentrations were measured at 16-40 sites per study area. LUR models for each study area were developed on the basis of annual average concentrations and predictor variables including traffic, population, industry, natural land obtained from geographic information systems. The highest median model explained variance (R(2)) was found for EC - 84%. The median R(2) was 51% for OC, 67% for benzo[a]pyrene, and 38% for sum of hopanes/steranes, with large variability between study areas. Traffic predictors were included in most models. Population and natural land were included frequently as additional predictors. The moderate to high explained variance of LUR models and the overall moderate correlation with PM2.5 model predictions support the application of especially the OC and PAH models in epidemiological studies.

  1. Development and application of a regression equation for estimating the occurrence of atrazine in shallow ground water beneath agricultural areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stackelberg, Paul E.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Wolock, David M.; Hitt, Kerie J.

    2006-01-01

    Results from 52 ground-water studies throughout the United States were used to examine relations between the occurrence of atrazine in shallow ground water in agricultural settings and explanatory variables that describe the natural setting, agricultural-management practices, and the type and amount of development in each area. The explanatory variables that were found to be correlated with atrazine occurrence were soil-infiltration rates, presence of artificial drainage (tile drains or trenches), available water-holding capacity of soils, soil permeability, amount of study area using ground water for irrigation source (as percentage of total area), amount of agricultural land (as percentage of total area), and intensity of atrazine use. Ordinary least-squares regression equations that used one or more of these explanatory variables describe as much as 58 percent of the variation in atrazine-detection frequencies. Application of a multivariate equation to unmonitored agricultural areas across the conterminous United States illustrates that atrazine use alone is insufficient for estimating the occurrence of atrazine in shallow ground water. Instead, areas in which soil characteristics and agricultural-management practices favor the movement of water from land surface to the water table and that also have intensive atrazine use are the most vulnerable to atrazine contamination.

  2. Application of nonparametric regression and statistical testing to identify the impact of oil and natural gas development on local air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hanqi; Small, Mitchell J.; Pekney, Natalie J.

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the current work was to develop a statistical method and associated tool to evaluate the impact of oil and natural gas exploration and production activities on local air quality. Nonparametric regression of pollutant concentrations on wind direction was combined with bootstrap hypothesis testing to provide statistical inference regarding the existence of a local/regional air quality impact. The block bootstrap method was employed to address the effect of autocorrelation on test significance. The method was applied to short-term air monitoring data collected at three sites within Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest. All of the measured pollutant concentrations were well below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, so the usual criteria and methods for data analysis were not sufficient. Using advanced directional analysis methods, test results were first applied to verify the existence of a regional impact at a background site. Next the impact of an oil field on local NOx and SO2 concentrations at a second monitoring site was identified after removal of the regional effect. Analysis of a third site also revealed air quality impacts from nearby areas with a high density of oil and gas wells. All results and conclusions were quantified in terms of statistical significance level for the associated inferences. The proposed method can be used to formulate hypotheses and verify conclusions regarding oil and gas well impacts on air quality and support better-informed decisions for their management and regulation.

  3. Induction of luteal regression in the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) by a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist and the effects on subsequent follicular development.

    PubMed

    Hodges, J K; Green, D I; Cottingham, P G; Sauer, M J; Edwards, C; Lightman, S L

    1988-03-01

    Doses of 100 or 200 micrograms of a novel GnRH antagonist ([N-acetyl-D beta Na11-D-pCl-Phe2-D-Phe3-D-Arg6-Phe7-Arg8-D-Ala10]NH2 GnRH) (4 animals/dose) were administered on Days 10/11 of the luteal phase and induced a marked suppression of circulating bioactive LH and progesterone concentrations within 1 day of treatment (P less than 0.01). Thereafter, progesterone concentrations remained low or undetectable until after the next ovulation. Similar results were obtained when 200 micrograms antagonist were given on Days 5/6 of the luteal phase (N = 4). The interval from injection of antagonist (200 micrograms but not 100 micrograms) to ovulation (based on a rise in progesterone above 10 ng/ml) was significantly longer than that from prostaglandin-induced luteal regression to ovulation in control cycles (N = 4/treatment) (range, 13-15 days after antagonist vs 8-10 days after prostaglandin, P less than 0.01). This delay of 4-5 days was equivalent to the duration for which LH concentrations were significantly suppressed by 200 micrograms antagonist when administered to ovariectomized animals (N = 3). Corpus luteum function during the cycle after GnRH antagonist treatment appeared normal according to the pattern of circulating progesterone. These results show that corpus luteum function and preovulatory follicular development in the marmoset monkey are dependent on pituitary gonadotrophin secretion.

  4. Why are we regressing?

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    In this first of a series of statistical methodology commentaries for the clinician, we discuss the use of multivariate linear regression. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. George: Gaussian Process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    George is a fast and flexible library, implemented in C++ with Python bindings, for Gaussian Process regression useful for accounting for correlated noise in astronomical datasets, including those for transiting exoplanet discovery and characterization and stellar population modeling.

  6. Understanding poisson regression.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Matthew J; Higgins, Melinda

    2014-04-01

    Nurse investigators often collect study data in the form of counts. Traditional methods of data analysis have historically approached analysis of count data either as if the count data were continuous and normally distributed or with dichotomization of the counts into the categories of occurred or did not occur. These outdated methods for analyzing count data have been replaced with more appropriate statistical methods that make use of the Poisson probability distribution, which is useful for analyzing count data. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the Poisson distribution and its use in Poisson regression. Assumption violations for the standard Poisson regression model are addressed with alternative approaches, including addition of an overdispersion parameter or negative binomial regression. An illustrative example is presented with an application from the ENSPIRE study, and regression modeling of comorbidity data is included for illustrative purposes.

  7. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  8. Accounting for covariate measurement error in a Cox model analysis of recurrence of depression.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Mazumdar, S; Stone, R A; Dew, M A; Houck, P R; Reynolds, C F

    2001-01-01

    When a covariate measured with error is used as a predictor in a survival analysis using the Cox model, the parameter estimate is usually biased. In clinical research, covariates measured without error such as treatment procedure or sex are often used in conjunction with a covariate measured with error. In a randomized clinical trial of two types of treatments, we account for the measurement error in the covariate, log-transformed total rapid eye movement (REM) activity counts, in a Cox model analysis of the time to recurrence of major depression in an elderly population. Regression calibration and two variants of a likelihood-based approach are used to account for measurement error. The likelihood-based approach is extended to account for the correlation between replicate measures of the covariate. Using the replicate data decreases the standard error of the parameter estimate for log(total REM) counts while maintaining the bias reduction of the estimate. We conclude that covariate measurement error and the correlation between replicates can affect results in a Cox model analysis and should be accounted for. In the depression data, these methods render comparable results that have less bias than the results when measurement error is ignored.

  9. Role of LKB1-CRTC1 on Glycosylated COX-2 and Response to COX-2 Inhibition in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chunxia; Gao, Ruli; Zhang, Min; Amelio, Antonio L.; Fallahi, Mohammad; Chen, Zirong; Gu, Yumei; Hu, Chengbin; Welsh, Eric A.; Engel, Brienne E.; Haura, Eric B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Wu, Lizi; Zajac-Kaye, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) directs the synthesis of prostaglandins including PGE-2 linking inflammation with mitogenic signaling. COX-2 is also an anticancer target, however, treatment strategies have been limited by unreliable expression assays and by inconsistent tumor responses to COX-2 inhibition. Methods: We analyzed the TCGA and Director’s Challenge lung cancer datasets (n = 188) and also generated an LKB1-null lung cancer gene signature (n = 53) to search the Broad Institute/Connectivity-MAP (C-MAP) dataset. We performed ChIP analyses, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and drug testing of tumor cell lines (n = 8) and primary lung adenocarcinoma surgical resections (n = 13). Results: We show that COX-2 is a target of the cAMP/CREB coactivator CRTC1 signaling pathway. In addition, we detected a correlation between LKB1 status, CRTC1 activation, and presence of glycosylated, but not inactive hypoglycosylated COX-2 in primary lung adenocarcinoma. A search of the C-MAP drug database discovered that all high-ranking drugs positively associated with the LKB1-null signature are known CRTC1 activators, including forskolin and six different PGE-2 analogues. Somatic LKB1 mutations are present in 20.0% of lung adenocarcinomas, and we observed growth inhibition with COX-2 inhibitors in LKB1-null lung cancer cells with activated CRTC1 as compared with LKB1-wildtype cells (NS-398, P = .002 and Niflumic acid, P = .006; two-tailed t test). Conclusion: CRTC1 activation is a key event that drives the LKB1-null mRNA signature in lung cancer. We also identified a positive feedback LKB1/CRTC1 signaling loop for COX-2/PGE2 regulation. These data suggest a role for LKB1 status and glycosylated COX-2 as specific biomarkers that provide a framework for selecting patients for COX-2 inhibition studies. PMID:25465874

  10. Logistic regression for circular data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Daffaie, Kadhem; Khan, Shahjahan

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers the relationship between a binary response and a circular predictor. It develops the logistic regression model by employing the linear-circular regression approach. The maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the parameters. The Newton-Raphson numerical method is used to find the estimated values of the parameters. A data set from weather records of Toowoomba city is analysed by the proposed methods. Moreover, a simulation study is considered. The R software is used for all computations and simulations.

  11. QSAR analyses of conformationally restricted 1,5-diaryl pyrazoles as selective COX-2 inhibitors: application of connection table representation of ligands.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, S; Manivannan, E; Chaturvedi, S C

    2005-04-15

    As a part of our continuing efforts in discerning the structural and physicochemical requirements for selective COX-2 over COX-1 inhibition among the fused pyrazole ring systems, herein we report the QSAR analyses of the title compounds. The conformational flexibility of the title compounds was examined using a simple connection table representation. The conformational investigation was aided by calculating a connection table parameter called fraction of rotable bonds, b_rotR encompassing the number of rotable bonds and b_count, the number of bonds including implicit hydrogens of each ligand. The hydrophobic and steric correlation of the title compounds towards selective COX-2 inhibition was reported previously in one of our recent publications. In this communication, we attempt to calculate Wang-Ford charges of the non-hydrogen common atoms of AM1 optimized geometries of the title compounds. Owing to the partial conformational flexibility of title compounds, conformationally restricted and unrestricted descriptors were calculated from MOE. Correlation analysis of these 2D, 3D and Wang-Ford charges was accomplished by linear regression analysis. 2D molecular descriptor b_single, 3D molecular descriptors glob, std_dim3 showed significant contribution towards COX-2 inhibitory activity. Balaban J, a connectivity topological index showed a negative and positive contribution towards COX-1 and selective COX-2 over COX-1 inhibition, respectively. Wang-Ford charges calculated on C(7) showed a significant contribution towards COX-1 inhibitory activity whereas charges calculated on C(8) were crucial in governing the selectivity of COX-2 over COX-1 inhibition among these congeners.

  12. 32. SCIENTISTS ALLAN COX (SEATED), RICHARD DOELL, AND BRENT DALRYMPLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SCIENTISTS ALLAN COX (SEATED), RICHARD DOELL, AND BRENT DALRYMPLE AT CONTROL PANEL, ABOUT 1965. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  13. Students Speak With Gary Cox, EPIC Project Manager

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center Gary Cox EPIC Project Manager, participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at South Effingham Middle School...

  14. Getting to the heart of COX-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Breyer, Matthew D

    2005-09-01

    Aspirin protects against heart disease, while COX-2 Inhibitors appear to injure the heart. The studies by [this Issue of Cell Metabolism]) shed light on two distinct prostaglandin receptors contributing to these conflicting cardiovascular effects.

  15. Interquantile Shrinkage in Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liewen; Wang, Huixia Judy; Bondell, Howard D.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional analysis using quantile regression typically focuses on fitting the regression model at different quantiles separately. However, in situations where the quantile coefficients share some common feature, joint modeling of multiple quantiles to accommodate the commonality often leads to more efficient estimation. One example of common features is that a predictor may have a constant effect over one region of quantile levels but varying effects in other regions. To automatically perform estimation and detection of the interquantile commonality, we develop two penalization methods. When the quantile slope coefficients indeed do not change across quantile levels, the proposed methods will shrink the slopes towards constant and thus improve the estimation efficiency. We establish the oracle properties of the two proposed penalization methods. Through numerical investigations, we demonstrate that the proposed methods lead to estimations with competitive or higher efficiency than the standard quantile regression estimation in finite samples. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. PMID:24363546

  16. Survival Data and Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    We start this chapter by introducing some basic elements for the analysis of censored survival data. Then we focus on right censored data and develop two types of regression models. The first one concerns the so-called accelerated failure time models (AFT), which are parametric models where a function of a parameter depends linearly on the covariables. The second one is a semiparametric model, where the covariables enter in a multiplicative form in the expression of the hazard rate function. The main statistical tool for analysing these regression models is the maximum likelihood methodology and, in spite we recall some essential results about the ML theory, we refer to the chapter "Logistic Regression" for a more detailed presentation.

  17. Regressive evolution in Astyanax cavefish.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R

    2009-01-01

    A diverse group of animals, including members of most major phyla, have adapted to life in the perpetual darkness of caves. These animals are united by the convergence of two regressive phenotypes, loss of eyes and pigmentation. The mechanisms of regressive evolution are poorly understood. The teleost Astyanax mexicanus is of special significance in studies of regressive evolution in cave animals. This species includes an ancestral surface dwelling form and many con-specific cave-dwelling forms, some of which have evolved their recessive phenotypes independently. Recent advances in Astyanax development and genetics have provided new information about how eyes and pigment are lost during cavefish evolution; namely, they have revealed some of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in trait modification, the number and identity of the underlying genes and mutations, the molecular basis of parallel evolution, and the evolutionary forces driving adaptation to the cave environment.

  18. Relationship of the Topological Distances and Activities between mPGES-1 and COX-2 versus COX-1: Implications of the Different Post-Translational Endoplasmic Reticulum Organizations of COX-1 and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Hironari; So, Shui-Ping; Ruan, Ke-He

    2015-06-16

    In vascular inflammation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE₂) is largely biosynthesized by microsomal PGE₂ synthase-1 (mPGES-1), competing with other downstream eicosanoid-synthesizing enzymes, such as PGIS, a synthase of a vascular protector prostacyclin (PGI₂), to isomerize the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin H2 (PGH₂). In this study, we found that a majority of the product from the cells co-expressing human COX-2, mPGES-1, and PGIS was PGE₂. We hypothesize that the molecular and cellular mechanisms are related to the post-translational endoplasmic reticulum (ER) arrangement of those enzymes. A set of fusion enzymes, COX-2-linker [10 amino acids (aa)]-PGIS and COX-2-linker (22 amino acids)-PGIS, were created as "The Bioruler", in which the 10 and 22 amino acids are defined linkers with known helical structures and distances (14.4 and 30.8 Å, respectively). Our experiments have shown that the efficiency of PGI₂ biosynthesis was reduced when the separation distance increased from 10 to 22 amino acids. When COX-2-10aa-PGIS (with a 14.4 Å separation) was co-expressed with mPGES-1 on the ER membrane, a major product was PGE₂, but not PGI₂. However, expression of COX-2-10aa-PGIS and mPGES-1 on a separated ER with a distance of ≫30.8 Å reduced the level of PGE₂ production. These data indicated that the mPGES-1 is "complex-likely" colocalized with COX-2 within a distance of 14.4 Å. In addition, the cells co-expressing COX-1-10aa-PGIS and mPGES-1 produced PGI₂ mainly, but not PGE₂. This indicates that mPGES-1 is expressed much farther from COX-1. These findings have led to proposed models showing the different post-translational ER organization between COX-2 and COX-1 with respect to the topological arrangement of the mPGES-1 during vascular inflammation.

  19. XRA image segmentation using regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jesse S.

    1996-04-01

    Segmentation is an important step in image analysis. Thresholding is one of the most important approaches. There are several difficulties in segmentation, such as automatic selecting threshold, dealing with intensity distortion and noise removal. We have developed an adaptive segmentation scheme by applying the Central Limit Theorem in regression. A Gaussian regression is used to separate the distribution of background from foreground in a single peak histogram. The separation will help to automatically determine the threshold. A small 3 by 3 widow is applied and the modal of the local histogram is used to overcome noise. Thresholding is based on local weighting, where regression is used again for parameter estimation. A connectivity test is applied to the final results to remove impulse noise. We have applied the algorithm to x-ray angiogram images to extract brain arteries. The algorithm works well for single peak distribution where there is no valley in the histogram. The regression provides a method to apply knowledge in clustering. Extending regression for multiple-level segmentation needs further investigation.

  20. Risk of hyperkalemia associated with selective COX-2 inhibitors†

    PubMed Central

    Aljadhey, Hisham; Tu, Wanzhu; Hansen, Richard A.; Blalock, Susan; Brater, D. Craig; Murray, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors have been linked to cardiac death. The mechanism for this adverse effect appears to be by ischemic insult; however another mechanism could involve hyperkalemia. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of selective COX-2 inhibitors and non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on serum potassium concentration and the electrocardiogram. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using propensity score matching of patients from an inner-city academic medical center at Indianapolis, Indiana. Two hundred and two patients prescribed selective COX-2 inhibitors were matched to 202 patients prescribed non-selective NSAIDs using propensity scores methods. Outcomes included change in serum potassium concentration from baseline and the risk of an abnormal electrocardiogram. Results Compared to patients prescribed non-selective NSAIDs, those prescribed a selective COX-2 inhibitor had a higher risk of serum potassium increase greater than 5 mEq/L (OR, 2.56; 95%CI, 1.03–6.36). However, patients prescribed selective COX-2 inhibitors had no greater risk of electrocardiogram abnormality (OR, 1.16; 95%CI, 0.74–1.82). Conclusions Selective COX-2 inhibitors may have a greater risk of hyperkalemia than non-selective NSAIDs. This study was exploratory with small numbers of patients. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and any association with cardiovascular events. PMID:20842761

  1. COX-2 inhibitor reduces skeletal muscle hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Novak, Margaret L; Billich, William; Smith, Sierra M; Sukhija, Kunal B; McLoughlin, Thomas J; Hornberger, Troy A; Koh, Timothy J

    2009-04-01

    Anti-inflammatory strategies are often used to reduce muscle pain and soreness that can result from high-intensity muscular activity. However, studies indicate that components of the acute inflammatory response may be required for muscle repair and growth. The hypothesis of this study was that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity is required for compensatory hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. We used the synergist ablation model of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, along with the specific COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, to investigate the role of COX-2 in overload-induced muscle growth in mice. COX-2 was expressed in plantaris muscles during compensatory hypertrophy and was localized mainly in or near muscle cell nuclei. Treatment with NS-398 blunted the increases in mass and protein content in overloaded muscles compared with vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, the COX-2 inhibitor decreased activity of the urokinase type plasminogen activator, macrophage accumulation, and cell proliferation, all of which are required for hypertrophy after synergist ablation. Expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphorylation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and p70S6K were increased following synergist ablation, but were not affected by NS-398. Additionally, expression of atrogin-1 was reduced during hypertrophy, but was also not affected by NS-398. These results demonstrate that COX-2 activity is required for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, possibly through facilitation of extracellular protease activity, macrophage accumulation, and cell proliferation.

  2. Development of an Anisotropic Geological-Based Land Use Regression and Bayesian Maximum Entropy Model for Estimating Groundwater Radon across Northing Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, K. P.; Serre, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radon (222Rn) is a naturally occurring chemically inert, colorless, and odorless radioactive gas produced from the decay of uranium (238U), which is ubiquitous in rocks and soils worldwide. Exposure to 222Rn is likely the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking via inhalation; however, exposure through untreated groundwater is also a contributing factor to both inhalation and ingestion routes. A land use regression (LUR) model for groundwater 222Rn with anisotropic geological and 238U based explanatory variables is developed, which helps elucidate the factors contributing to elevated 222Rn across North Carolina. Geological and uranium based variables are constructed in elliptical buffers surrounding each observation such that they capture the lateral geometric anisotropy present in groundwater 222Rn. Moreover, geological features are defined at three different geological spatial scales to allow the model to distinguish between large area and small area effects of geology on groundwater 222Rn. The LUR is also integrated into the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) geostatistical framework to increase accuracy and produce a point-level LUR-BME model of groundwater 222Rn across North Carolina including prediction uncertainty. The LUR-BME model of groundwater 222Rn results in a leave-one out cross-validation of 0.46 (Pearson correlation coefficient= 0.68), effectively predicting within the spatial covariance range. Modeled results of 222Rn concentrations show variability among Intrusive Felsic geological formations likely due to average bedrock 238U defined on the basis of overlying stream-sediment 238U concentrations that is a widely distributed consistently analyzed point-source data.

  3. Development of immune memory to glial brain tumors after tumor regression induced by immunotherapeutic Toll-like receptor 7/8 activation.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Apostolis; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence M; Kruse, Carol; Jadus, Martin; Chen, Thomas C; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2012-05-01

    The efficacy of immunotherapeutic TLR7/8 activation by resiquimod (R848) was evaluated in vivo, in the CNS-1 rat glioma model syngeneic to Lewis rats. The immune treatment was compared with cytotoxic cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, and as well, was compared with the combination cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic treatments. We found that parenteral treatment with the TLR7/8 agonist, resiquimod, eventually induced complete tumor regression of CNS-1 glioblastoma tumors in Lewis rats. Cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment also resulted in dramatic CNS-1 remission, while the combined treatment showed similar antitumor effects. The resiquimod efficacy appeared not to be associated with direct injury to CNS-1 growth, while CY proved to exert tumoricidal cytotoxicity to the tumor cells. Rats that were cured by treatment with the innate immune response modifier resiquimod proved to be fully immune to secondary CNS-1 tumor rechallenge. They all remained tumor-free and survived. In contrast, rats that controlled CNS-1 tumor growth as a result of CY treatment did not develop immune memory, as demonstrated by their failure to reject a secondary CNS-1 tumor challenge; they showed a concomittant outgrowth of the primary tumor upon secondary tumor exposure. Rechallenge of rats that initially contained tumor growth by combination chemo-immunotherapy also failed to reject secondary tumor challenge, indicating that the cytotoxic effect of the CY likely extended to the endogenous memory immune cells as well as to the tumor. These data demonstrate strong therapeutic antitumor efficacy for the immune response modifier resiquimod leading to immunological memory, and suggest that CY treatment, although effective as chemotherapeutic agent, may be deleterious to maintenance of long-term antitumor immune memory. These data also highlight the importance of the sequence in which a multi-modal therapy is administered.

  4. Development of immune memory to glial brain tumors after tumor regression induced by immunotherapeutic Toll-like receptor 7/8 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos, Apostolis; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence M.; Kruse, Carol; Jadus, Martin; Chen, Thomas C.; Schijns, Virgil E.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of immunotherapeutic TLR7/8 activation by resiquimod (R848) was evaluated in vivo, in the CNS-1 rat glioma model syngeneic to Lewis rats. The immune treatment was compared with cytotoxic cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, and as well, was compared with the combination cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic treatments. We found that parenteral treatment with the TLR7/8 agonist, resiquimod, eventually induced complete tumor regression of CNS-1 glioblastoma tumors in Lewis rats. Cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment also resulted in dramatic CNS-1 remission, while the combined treatment showed similar antitumor effects. The resiquimod efficacy appeared not to be associated with direct injury to CNS-1 growth, while CY proved to exert tumoricidal cytotoxicity to the tumor cells. Rats that were cured by treatment with the innate immune response modifier resiquimod proved to be fully immune to secondary CNS-1 tumor rechallenge. They all remained tumor-free and survived. In contrast, rats that controlled CNS-1 tumor growth as a result of CY treatment did not develop immune memory, as demonstrated by their failure to reject a secondary CNS-1 tumor challenge; they showed a concomittant outgrowth of the primary tumor upon secondary tumor exposure. Rechallenge of rats that initially contained tumor growth by combination chemo-immunotherapy also failed to reject secondary tumor challenge, indicating that the cytotoxic effect of the CY likely extended to the endogenous memory immune cells as well as to the tumor. These data demonstrate strong therapeutic antitumor efficacy for the immune response modifier resiquimod leading to immunological memory, and suggest that CY treatment, although effective as chemotherapeutic agent, may be deleterious to maintenance of long-term antitumor immune memory. These data also highlight the importance of the sequence in which a multi-modal therapy is administered. PMID:22737605

  5. Development of variable pathlength UV-vis spectroscopy combined with partial-least-squares regression for wastewater chemical oxygen demand (COD) monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baisheng; Wu, Huanan; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2014-03-01

    To overcome the challenging task to select an appropriate pathlength for wastewater chemical oxygen demand (COD) monitoring with high accuracy by UV-vis spectroscopy in wastewater treatment process, a variable pathlength approach combined with partial-least squares regression (PLSR) was developed in this study. Two new strategies were proposed to extract relevant information of UV-vis spectral data from variable pathlength measurements. The first strategy was by data fusion with two data fusion levels: low-level data fusion (LLDF) and mid-level data fusion (MLDF). Predictive accuracy was found to improve, indicated by the lower root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) compared with those obtained for single pathlength measurements. Both fusion levels were found to deliver very robust PLSR models with residual predictive deviations (RPD) greater than 3 (i.e. 3.22 and 3.29, respectively). The second strategy involved calculating the slopes of absorbance against pathlength at each wavelength to generate slope-derived spectra. Without the requirement to select the optimal pathlength, the predictive accuracy (RMSEP) was improved by 20-43% as compared to single pathlength spectroscopy. Comparing to nine-factor models from fusion strategy, the PLSR model from slope-derived spectroscopy was found to be more parsimonious with only five factors and more robust with residual predictive deviation (RPD) of 3.72. It also offered excellent correlation of predicted and measured COD values with R(2) of 0.936. In sum, variable pathlength spectroscopy with the two proposed data analysis strategies proved to be successful in enhancing prediction performance of COD in wastewater and showed high potential to be applied in on-line water quality monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bifidobacterium Lactis sp. 420 up-regulates cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and down-regulates Cox-2 gene expression in a Caco-2 cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Jussi T; Puolakkainen, Pauli A; Rautonen, Nina E

    2005-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (Cox) -1 and -2 play important roles in gastrointestinal health; chronic overexpression of Cox-2 is associated with inflammatory and cancerous disease, whereas Cox-1 is expressed constitutively. We studied the effects of two probiotic (Bifidobacterium lactis sp. 420 and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and two control microorganisms (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and four microbial metabolites (acetate, butyrate, lactate and propionate) on the expression levels of the Cox isoforms in the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. Butyrate, which is anticarcinogenic, resulted in an 85% down-regulation of Cox-2 and a 37-fold increase in Cox-1 transcription. Propionate gave similar results (72% reduction of Cox-2, 23-fold induction of Cox-1), but lactate and acetate had no effect on Cox expression profile. Bifidobacterium sp. 420, which produces acetate and lactate but no butyrate or propionate, shared the Cox-1-increasing and Cox-2-silencing properties of butyrate and propionate, whereas L. acidophilus was similar to E. coli and S. enteritidis in having no effect on the Cox-1/Cox-2 ratio. For the first time, we therefore demonstrate evidence for a direct relationship between a probiotic bacterial strain and host Cox expression profile, suggesting that modulation of Cox expression may be an important factor in the potential anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of some probiotics.

  7. AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin; Chen, Xi; Jin, Shan; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Fathi, Amir T; Peterson, Randall T; Kung, Andrew L; Sweetser, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna

    2013-06-13

    Developing novel therapies that suppress self-renewal of leukemia stem cells may reduce the likelihood of relapses and extend long-term survival of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML1-ETO (AE) is an oncogene that plays an important role in inducing self-renewal of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to the development of leukemia stem cells. Previously, using a zebrafish model of AE and a whole-organism chemical suppressor screen, we have discovered that AE induces specific hematopoietic phenotypes in embryonic zebrafish through a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and β-catenin-dependent pathway. Here, we show that AE also induces expression of the Cox-2 gene and activates β-catenin in mouse bone marrow cells. Inhibition of COX suppresses β-catenin activation and serial replating of AE(+) mouse HSPCs. Genetic knockdown of β-catenin also abrogates the clonogenic growth of AE(+) mouse HSPCs and human leukemia cells. In addition, treatment with nimesulide, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, dramatically suppresses xenograft tumor formation and inhibits in vivo progression of human leukemia cells. In summary, our data indicate an important role of a COX/β-catenin-dependent signaling pathway in tumor initiation, growth, and self-renewal, and in providing the rationale for testing potential benefits from common COX inhibitors as a part of AML treatments.

  8. AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin; Chen, Xi; Jin, Shan; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Fathi, Amir T.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Developing novel therapies that suppress self-renewal of leukemia stem cells may reduce the likelihood of relapses and extend long-term survival of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML1-ETO (AE) is an oncogene that plays an important role in inducing self-renewal of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to the development of leukemia stem cells. Previously, using a zebrafish model of AE and a whole-organism chemical suppressor screen, we have discovered that AE induces specific hematopoietic phenotypes in embryonic zebrafish through a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and β-catenin–dependent pathway. Here, we show that AE also induces expression of the Cox-2 gene and activates β-catenin in mouse bone marrow cells. Inhibition of COX suppresses β-catenin activation and serial replating of AE+ mouse HSPCs. Genetic knockdown of β-catenin also abrogates the clonogenic growth of AE+ mouse HSPCs and human leukemia cells. In addition, treatment with nimesulide, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, dramatically suppresses xenograft tumor formation and inhibits in vivo progression of human leukemia cells. In summary, our data indicate an important role of a COX/β-catenin–dependent signaling pathway in tumor initiation, growth, and self-renewal, and in providing the rationale for testing potential benefits from common COX inhibitors as a part of AML treatments. PMID:23645839

  9. [Understanding logistic regression].

    PubMed

    El Sanharawi, M; Naudet, F

    2013-10-01

    Logistic regression is one of the most common multivariate analysis models utilized in epidemiology. It allows the measurement of the association between the occurrence of an event (qualitative dependent variable) and factors susceptible to influence it (explicative variables). The choice of explicative variables that should be included in the logistic regression model is based on prior knowledge of the disease physiopathology and the statistical association between the variable and the event, as measured by the odds ratio. The main steps for the procedure, the conditions of application, and the essential tools for its interpretation are discussed concisely. We also discuss the importance of the choice of variables that must be included and retained in the regression model in order to avoid the omission of important confounding factors. Finally, by way of illustration, we provide an example from the literature, which should help the reader test his or her knowledge.

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2 expression in dentigerous cyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Shafaee, Shahryar; Siadati, Sepideh; Moghaddam, Elham Alizadeh; Ghasemi, Nafiseh; Bijani, Ali; Najafi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an early response gene that is induced by growth factors, oncogenes and carcinogens and its expression is increased in various tumors. Increased expression of COX-2 plays a significant role in the development and growth of tumors by interfering in biological processes such as cell division, cellular immunity, cell adhesion, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of COX-2 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) in comparison with ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst with regards to different clinical behavior and histopathological features of these lesions. Materials and Methods: Paraffined blocks of 45 cases including 15 cases of dentigerous cyst, 15 cases of KOT and 15 cases of ameloblastoma were stained with immunohistochemical method for COX-2. Five high-power fields of each sample were evaluated to determine the percentage of stained cells and the intensity of staining. Degree of immunoreactivity was obtained from the sum of two. Statistical evaluation was performed by the Kruskal-Wallis and ANOVA Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05). Results: Overexpression of COX-2 in ameloblastoma and KOT was observed compared with dentigerous cyst (P < 0.001). However, no significant difference was observed between the expression of COX-2 in ameloblastoma and KOT (P = 0.148). Conclusion: The COX-2 expression in odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastoma and cystic neoplasm with aggressive behavior such as KOT increases. However, it does not seem that COX-2 affects the development and growth of cysts with noninvasive behavior like dentigerous cyst. PMID:26005470

  11. Practical Session: Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    An exercise is proposed to illustrate the logistic regression. One investigates the different risk factors in the apparition of coronary heart disease. It has been proposed in Chapter 5 of the book of D.G. Kleinbaum and M. Klein, "Logistic Regression", Statistics for Biology and Health, Springer Science Business Media, LLC (2010) and also by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr341.pdf). This example is based on data given in the file evans.txt coming from http://www.sph.emory.edu/dkleinb/logreg3.htm#data.

  12. Antinociceptive Effects of Prim-O-Glucosylcimifugin in Inflammatory Nociception via Reducing Spinal COX-2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liu-Qing; Li, Yu; Li, Yuan-Yan; Xu, Shi-Hao; Yang, Zong-Yong; Lin, Zheng; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    We measured anti-nociceptive activity of prim-o-glucosylcimifugin (POG), a molecule from Saposhnikovia divaricate (Turcz) Schischk. Anti-nociceptive or anti-inflammatory effects of POG on a formalin-induced tonic nociceptive response and a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inoculation-induced rat arthritis pain model were studied. Single subcutaneous injections of POG produced potent anti-nociception in both models that was comparable to indomethacin analgesia. Anti-nociceptive activity of POG was dose-dependent, maximally reducing pain 56.6% with an ED50 of 1.6 mg. Rats given POG over time did not develop tolerance. POG also time-dependently reduced serum TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in arthritic rats and both POG and indomethacin reduced spinal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Like indomethacin which inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, POG dose-dependently decreased spinal COX-2 content in arthritic rats. Additionally, POG, and its metabolite cimifugin, downregulated COX-2 expression in vitro. Thus, POG produced potent anti-nociception by downregulating spinal COX-2 expression.

  13. Does Cox analysis of a randomized survival study yield a causal treatment effect?

    PubMed

    Aalen, Odd O; Cook, Richard J; Røysland, Kjetil

    2015-10-01

    Statistical methods for survival analysis play a central role in the assessment of treatment effects in randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many other fields. The most common approach to analysis involves fitting a Cox regression model including a treatment indicator, and basing inference on the large sample properties of the regression coefficient estimator. Despite the fact that treatment assignment is randomized, the hazard ratio is not a quantity which admits a causal interpretation in the case of unmodelled heterogeneity. This problem arises because the risk sets beyond the first event time are comprised of the subset of individuals who have not previously failed. The balance in the distribution of potential confounders between treatment arms is lost by this implicit conditioning, whether or not censoring is present. Thus while the Cox model may be used as a basis for valid tests of the null hypotheses of no treatment effect if robust variance estimates are used, modeling frameworks more compatible with causal reasoning may be preferrable in general for estimation.

  14. Alternatives for logistic regression in cross-sectional studies: an empirical comparison of models that directly estimate the prevalence ratio

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Aluísio JD; Hirakata, Vânia N

    2003-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional studies with binary outcomes analyzed by logistic regression are frequent in the epidemiological literature. However, the odds ratio can importantly overestimate the prevalence ratio, the measure of choice in these studies. Also, controlling for confounding is not equivalent for the two measures. In this paper we explore alternatives for modeling data of such studies with techniques that directly estimate the prevalence ratio. Methods We compared Cox regression with constant time at risk, Poisson regression and log-binomial regression against the standard Mantel-Haenszel estimators. Models with robust variance estimators in Cox and Poisson regressions and variance corrected by the scale parameter in Poisson regression were also evaluated. Results Three outcomes, from a cross-sectional study carried out in Pelotas, Brazil, with different levels of prevalence were explored: weight-for-age deficit (4%), asthma (31%) and mother in a paid job (52%). Unadjusted Cox/Poisson regression and Poisson regression with scale parameter adjusted by deviance performed worst in terms of interval estimates. Poisson regression with scale parameter adjusted by χ2 showed variable performance depending on the outcome prevalence. Cox/Poisson regression with robust variance, and log-binomial regression performed equally well when the model was correctly specified. Conclusions Cox or Poisson regression with robust variance and log-binomial regression provide correct estimates and are a better alternative for the analysis of cross-sectional studies with binary outcomes than logistic regression, since the prevalence ratio is more interpretable and easier to communicate to non-specialists than the odds ratio. However, precautions are needed to avoid estimation problems in specific situations. PMID:14567763

  15. Modern Regression Discontinuity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a detailed discussion of the theory and practice of modern regression discontinuity (RD) analysis for estimating the effects of interventions or treatments. Part 1 briefly chronicles the history of RD analysis and summarizes its past applications. Part 2 explains how in theory an RD analysis can identify an average effect of…

  16. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive…

  17. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive…

  18. Multiple linear regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program rapidly selects best-suited set of coefficients. User supplies only vectors of independent and dependent data and specifies confidence level required. Program uses stepwise statistical procedure for relating minimal set of variables to set of observations; final regression contains only most statistically significant coefficients. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on NOVA 1200.

  19. Multiple linear regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program rapidly selects best-suited set of coefficients. User supplies only vectors of independent and dependent data and specifies confidence level required. Program uses stepwise statistical procedure for relating minimal set of variables to set of observations; final regression contains only most statistically significant coefficients. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on NOVA 1200.

  20. Modern Regression Discontinuity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a detailed discussion of the theory and practice of modern regression discontinuity (RD) analysis for estimating the effects of interventions or treatments. Part 1 briefly chronicles the history of RD analysis and summarizes its past applications. Part 2 explains how in theory an RD analysis can identify an average effect of…

  1. Developmental regression in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Al Backer, Nouf Backer

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of developmental regression in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most puzzling phenomena of this disorder. A little is known about the nature and mechanism of developmental regression in ASD. About one-third of young children with ASD lose some skills during the preschool period, usually speech, but sometimes also nonverbal communication, social or play skills are also affected. There is a lot of evidence suggesting that most children who demonstrate regression also had previous, subtle, developmental differences. It is difficult to predict the prognosis of autistic children with developmental regression. It seems that the earlier development of social, language, and attachment behaviors followed by regression does not predict the later recovery of skills or better developmental outcomes. The underlying mechanisms that lead to regression in autism are unknown. The role of subclinical epilepsy in the developmental regression of children with autism remains unclear.

  2. A novel animal model to investigate fractionated radiotherapy-induced alimentary mucositis: the role of apoptosis, p53, nuclear factor-kappaB, COX-1, and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Ann S J; Gibson, Rachel J; Yeoh, Eric E K; Bowen, Joanne M; Stringer, Andrea M; Giam, Kar A; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2007-08-01

    Radiation-induced mucositis is a common and serious side effect of radiotherapy. Molecular mechanisms of mucosal injury, however, are still poorly understood and extremely difficult to study in humans. A novel Dark Agouti rat model using fractionated radiotherapy to induce mucositis has been developed to investigate the occurrence of alimentary mucosal injury. Twenty-four Dark Agouti rats were randomly assigned to receive either fractionated radiotherapy or no radiotherapy. The irradiated rats received a fractionated course of abdominal radiotherapy at 45 Gy/18 fractions/6 weeks treating thrice weekly (i.e., at a radiation dose of 2.5 Gy per fraction). After each week of radiation, a group of irradiated rats was killed. Histomorphology and mucin distribution in the alimentary tract was investigated. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay was used to examine apoptosis in the colon and jejunum, and intestinal morphometry was used to assess villus length, crypt length, and mitotic crypt count. Immunohistochemistry of p53, nuclear factor-kappaB, cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, and COX-2 was also done. The fractionated radiotherapy course induced alimentary mucositis from week 1, with more severe injury seen in the small intestine. The hallmark appearance of apoptosis was present in the crypts of the small and large intestine. In the jejunum and colon, goblet cell disorganization and degeneration was obvious and crypt mitotic counts were severely depleted throughout the treatment. Expression of p53, nuclear factor-kappaB, COX-1, and COX-2 was increased in the irradiated intestinal sections. Fractionated radiation-induced alimentary mucositis has been effectively documented in the Dark Agouti rat for the first time. Further studies investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced mucositis are planned to ultimately achieve anti-mucotoxic-targeted therapies.

  3. Marginal regression of gaps between recurrent events.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijian; Chen, Ying Qing

    2003-09-01

    Recurrent event data typically exhibit the phenomenon of intra-individual correlation, owing to not only observed covariates but also random effects. In many applications, the population may be reasonably postulated as a heterogeneous mixture of individual renewal processes, and the inference of interest is the effect of individual-level covariates. In this article, we suggest and investigate a marginal proportional hazards model for gaps between recurrent events. A connection is established between observed gap times and clustered survival data with informative cluster size. We subsequently construct a novel and general inference procedure for the latter, based on a functional formulation of standard Cox regression. Large-sample theory is established for the proposed estimators. Numerical studies demonstrate that the procedure performs well with practical sample sizes. Application to the well-known bladder tumor data is given as an illustration.

  4. Development of a Regression Model for Estimating the Effects of Assumption Violations on Type I Error Rates in the Student's T-Test: Implications for Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Isadore; Hall, Rosalie J.; Fraas, John

    Multiple linear regression is used to model the effects of violating statistical assumptions on the likelihood of making a Type I error. This procedure is illustrated for the student's t-test (for independent groups) using data from previous Monte Carlo studies in which the actual alpha levels associated with violations of the normality…

  5. Replica analysis of overfitting in regression models for time-to-event data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, A. C. C.; Barrett, J. E.; Paga, P.; Perez-Vicente, C. J.

    2017-09-01

    Overfitting, which happens when the number of parameters in a model is too large compared to the number of data points available for determining these parameters, is a serious and growing problem in survival analysis. While modern medicine presents us with data of unprecedented dimensionality, these data cannot yet be used effectively for clinical outcome prediction. Standard error measures in maximum likelihood regression, such as p-values and z-scores, are blind to overfitting, and even for Cox’s proportional hazards model (the main tool of medical statisticians), one finds in literature only rules of thumb on the number of samples required to avoid overfitting. In this paper we present a mathematical theory of overfitting in regression models for time-to-event data, which aims to increase our quantitative understanding of the problem and provide practical tools with which to correct regression outcomes for the impact of overfitting. It is based on the replica method, a statistical mechanical technique for the analysis of heterogeneous many-variable systems that has been used successfully for several decades in physics, biology, and computer science, but not yet in medical statistics. We develop the theory initially for arbitrary regression models for time-to-event data, and verify its predictions in detail for the popular Cox model.

  6. Multiple Imputation of a Randomly Censored Covariate Improves Logistic Regression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Atem, Folefac D; Qian, Jing; Maye, Jacqueline E; Johnson, Keith A; Betensky, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Randomly censored covariates arise frequently in epidemiologic studies. The most commonly used methods, including complete case and single imputation or substitution, suffer from inefficiency and bias. They make strong parametric assumptions or they consider limit of detection censoring only. We employ multiple imputation, in conjunction with semi-parametric modeling of the censored covariate, to overcome these shortcomings and to facilitate robust estimation. We develop a multiple imputation approach for randomly censored covariates within the framework of a logistic regression model. We use the non-parametric estimate of the covariate distribution or the semiparametric Cox model estimate in the presence of additional covariates in the model. We evaluate this procedure in simulations, and compare its operating characteristics to those from the complete case analysis and a survival regression approach. We apply the procedures to an Alzheimer's study of the association between amyloid positivity and maternal age of onset of dementia. Multiple imputation achieves lower standard errors and higher power than the complete case approach under heavy and moderate censoring and is comparable under light censoring. The survival regression approach achieves the highest power among all procedures, but does not produce interpretable estimates of association. Multiple imputation offers a favorable alternative to complete case analysis and ad hoc substitution methods in the presence of randomly censored covariates within the framework of logistic regression.

  7. Separating the effects of water physicochemistry and sediment contamination on Chironomus tepperi (Skuse) survival, growth and development: a boosted regression tree approach.

    PubMed

    Hale, Robin; Marshall, Stephen; Jeppe, Katherine; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    More comprehensive ecological risk assessment procedures are needed as the unprecedented rate of anthropogenic disturbances to aquatic ecosystems continues. Identifying the effects of pollutants on aquatic ecosystems is difficult, requiring the individual and joint effects of a range of natural and anthropogenic factors to be isolated, often via the analysis of large, complicated datasets. Ecotoxicologists have traditionally used multiple regression to analyse such datasets, but there are inherent problems with this approach and a need to consider other potentially more suitable methods. Sediment pollution can cause a range of negative effects on aquatic animals, and these are used as the basis for toxicity bioassays to measure the biological impact of pollution and the success of remediation efforts. However, experimental artefacts can also lead to sediments being incorrectly classed as toxic in such studies. Understanding the influence of potentially confounding factors will help more accurate assessments of sediment pollution. In this study, we analysed standardised sediment bioassays conducted using the chironomid Chironomus tepperi, with the aim of modelling the impact of sediment toxicants and water physico-chemistry on four endpoints (survival, growth, median emergence day, and number of emerging adults). We used boosted regression trees (BRT), a method that has a number of advantages over multiple regression, to model bioassay endpoints as a function of water chemistry, sediment quality and underlying geology. Endpoints were generally influenced most strongly by water quality parameters and nutrients, although some metals negatively influenced emergence endpoints. Sub-lethal endpoints were generally better predicted than lethal endpoints; median emergence day was the most sensitive endpoint examined in this study, while the number of emerging adults was the least sensitive. We tested our modelling results by experimentally manipulating sediment and

  8. Prevention of upper aerodigestive tract cancer in zinc-deficient rodents: inefficacy of genetic or pharmacological disruption of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Fong, Louise Y Y; Jiang, Yubao; Riley, Maurisa; Liu, Xianglan; Smalley, Karl J; Guttridge, Denis C; Farber, John L

    2008-03-01

    Zinc deficiency in humans is associated with an increased risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer. In rodents, zinc deficiency predisposes to carcinogenesis by causing proliferation and alterations in gene expression. We examined whether in zinc-deficient rodents, targeted disruption of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 pathway by the COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib or by genetic deletion prevent UADT carcinogenesis. Tongue cancer prevention studies were conducted in zinc-deficient rats previously exposed to a tongue carcinogen by celecoxib treatment with or without zinc replenishment, or by zinc replenishment alone. The ability of genetic COX-2 deletion to protect against chemically-induced forestomach tumorigenesis was examined in mice on zinc-deficient versus zinc-sufficient diet. The expression of 3 predictive biomarkers COX-2, nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B p65 and leukotriene A(4) hydrolase (LTA(4)H) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In zinc-deficient rats, celecoxib without zinc replenishment reduced lingual tumor multiplicity but not progression to malignancy. Celecoxib with zinc replenishment or zinc replenishment alone significantly lowered lingual squamous cell carcinoma incidence, as well as tumor multiplicity. Celecoxib alone reduced overexpression of the 3 biomarkers in tumors slightly, compared with intervention with zinc replenishment. Instead of being protected, zinc-deficient COX-2 null mice developed significantly greater tumor multiplicity and forestomach carcinoma incidence than wild-type controls. Additionally, zinc-deficient COX-2-/- forestomachs displayed strong LTA(4)H immunostaining, indicating activation of an alternative pathway under zinc deficiency when the COX-2 pathway is blocked. Thus, targeting only the COX-2 pathway in zinc-deficient animals did not prevent UADT carcinogenesis. Our data suggest zinc supplementation should be more thoroughly explored in human prevention clinical trials for UADT cancer.

  9. Development of land use regression models for nitrogen dioxide, ultrafine particles, lung deposited surface area, and four other markers of particulate matter pollution in the Swiss SAPALDIA regions.

    PubMed

    Eeftens, Marloes; Meier, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Phuleria, Harish; Ineichen, Alex; Davey, Mark; Ducret-Stich, Regina; Keidel, Dirk; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Tsai, Ming-Yi

    2016-04-18

    Land Use Regression (LUR) is a popular method to explain and predict spatial contrasts in air pollution concentrations, but LUR models for ultrafine particles, such as particle number concentration (PNC) are especially scarce. Moreover, no models have been previously presented for the lung deposited surface area (LDSA) of ultrafine particles. The additional value of ultrafine particle metrics has not been well investigated due to lack of exposure measurements and models. Air pollution measurements were performed in 2011 and 2012 in the eight areas of the Swiss SAPALDIA study at up to 40 sites per area for NO2 and at 20 sites in four areas for markers of particulate air pollution. We developed multi-area LUR models for biannual average concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance, PM10, PMcoarse, PNC and LDSA, as well as alpine, non-alpine and study area specific models for NO2, using predictor variables which were available at a national level. Models were validated using leave-one-out cross-validation, as well as independent external validation with routine monitoring data. Model explained variance (R(2)) was moderate for the various PM mass fractions PM2.5 (0.57), PM10 (0.63) and PMcoarse (0.45), and was high for PM2.5 absorbance (0.81), PNC (0.87) and LDSA (0.91). Study-area specific LUR models for NO2 (R(2) range 0.52-0.89) outperformed combined-area alpine (R (2)  = 0.53) and non-alpine (R (2)  = 0.65) models in terms of both cross-validation and independent external validation, and were better able to account for between-area variability. Predictor variables related to traffic and national dispersion model estimates were important predictors. LUR models for all pollutants captured spatial variability of long-term average concentrations, performed adequately in validation, and could be successfully applied to the SAPALDIA cohort. Dispersion model predictions or area indicators served well to capture the between area variance. For NO2, applying study

  10. Allan V. Cox: AGU President 1978”1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    When Allan V. Cox was presented AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal in 1969, John Verhoogen described Cox's work as “characterized by painstaking care, proper attention to and use of statistics, and great insight.” Those same thoughts were echoed on February 3, 1987, during the memorial service for Cox, who died in a bicycling accident on January 27. The Stanford Memorial Church was crowded with colleagues, students, and friends.The Fleming Medal was presented to Cox in recognition of his studies on the fluctuation of the geomagnetic field. These studies helped to confirm theories of continental drift and seafloor spreading. The medal is awarded annually by AGU for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences. In addition to the Fleming Medal, Cox received the Antarctic Service Medal in 1970, the Vetlesen Prize in 1971, and the Arthur L. Day Prize of the National Academy of Sciences in 1984. He was a Fellow of AGU and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

  11. Human COX20 cooperates with SCO1 and SCO2 to mature COX2 and promote the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bourens, Myriam; Boulet, Aren; Leary, Scot C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is one of the most common respiratory chain defects in patients presenting with mitochondrial encephalocardiomyopathies. CIV biogenesis is complicated by the dual genetic origin of its structural subunits, and assembly of a functional holoenzyme complex requires a large number of nucleus-encoded assembly factors. In general, the functions of these assembly factors remain poorly understood, and mechanistic investigations of human CIV biogenesis have been limited by the availability of model cell lines. Here, we have used small interference RNA and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to create knockdown and knockout human cell lines, respectively, to study the function of the CIV assembly factor COX20 (FAM36A). These cell lines exhibit a severe, isolated CIV deficiency due to instability of COX2, a mitochondrion-encoded CIV subunit. Mitochondria lacking COX20 accumulate CIV subassemblies containing COX1 and COX4, similar to those detected in fibroblasts from patients carrying mutations in the COX2 copper chaperones SCO1 and SCO2. These results imply that in the absence of COX20, COX2 is inefficiently incorporated into early CIV subassemblies. Immunoprecipitation assays using a stable COX20 knockout cell line expressing functional COX20-FLAG allowed us to identify an interaction between COX20 and newly synthesized COX2. Additionally, we show that SCO1 and SCO2 act on COX20-bound COX2. We propose that COX20 acts as a chaperone in the early steps of COX2 maturation, stabilizing the newly synthesized protein and presenting COX2 to its metallochaperone module, which in turn facilitates the incorporation of mature COX2 into the CIV assembly line.

  12. Design and synthesis of benzimidazole analogs endowed with oxadiazole as selective COX-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Ankita; Rahman, Mujeeb Ur; Siddiqui, Anees Ahamad; Ali, Abuzer; Shaharyar, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    New molecules of benzimidazole endowed with oxadiazole were designed and synthesized from 2-(2-((pyrimidin-2-ylthio)methyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl)acetohydrazide as 1-((5-substituted alkyl/aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)methyl)-2-((pyrimidin-2-ylthio)methyl)-1H-benzimidazoles (5a-r) with the aim to acquire selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitor activity. The synthesized compounds were screened by in vitro cyclooxygenase assays to determine COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory potency and the results showed that they had good-to-remarkable activity with an IC50 range of 11.6-56.1 µM. The most active compounds were further screened for their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by using the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. In vitro anticancer activities of the hybrid compounds were assessed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA, against 60 human cell lines, and the results showed a good spectrum. Compound 5l exhibited significant COX-2 inhibition with an IC50 value of 8.2 µM and a percent protection of 68.4%. Compound 5b evinced moderate cytotoxicity toward the UO-31 cell line of renal cancer. A docking study was performed using Maestro 9.0, to provide the binding mode into the binding sites of the cyclooxygenase enzyme. Hopefully, in the future, compound 5l could serve as a lead compound for developing new COX-2 inhibitors.

  13. Low Shear Stress Attenuates COX-2 Expression Induced by Resistin in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ping; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Chang, Hsin-I; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Lee, Ko-Chao; Lo, Chun-Min; Chang, Shun-Fu

    2017-06-01

    Low shear stress has been proposed to play a reparative role in modulating cartilage homeostasis. Recently, epidemiological studies have found a positive correlation between the resistin level in serum and synovial fluid and osteoarthritis (OA) severity in patients. However, the effect of moderate shear stress on the catabolic stimulation of resistin in OA chondrocytes remains unclear. Hence, this study was to investigate whether low shear stress could regulate resistin-induced catabolic cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in human OA chondrocytes and the underlying mechanism. Human OA chondrocytes and SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells were used in this study. Two modes of low shear stress (2 dyn/cm(2) ), pre-shear and post-shear, were applied to the chondrocytes. A specific activator and siRNAs were used to investigate the mechanism of low shear stress-regulated COX-2 expression of resistin induction. We found that human OA chondrocytes exposed to different modes of low shear stress elicit an opposite effect on resistin-induced COX-2 expression: pre-shear for a short duration attenuates the resistin effect by inhibiting the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB-p65 subunit and the cAMP response element binding protein; however, post-shear over a longer duration enhances the resistin effect by activating only the NF-κB-p65 subunit. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the regulation of both shear modes in resistin-stimulated COX-2 expression occurs through increasing AMP-activated protein kinase activation and then sirtuin 1 expression. This study elucidates the detailed mechanism of low shear stress regulating the resistin-induced catabolic COX-2 expression and indicates a possible reparative role of moderate shear force in resistin-stimulated OA development. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1448-1457, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ridge Regression: A Regression Procedure for Analyzing correlated Independent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is a technique used to ameliorate the problem of highly correlated independent variables in multiple regression analysis. This paper explains the fundamentals of ridge regression and illustrates its use. (JKS)

  15. Seizure following the Use of the COX-2 Inhibitor Etoricoxib

    PubMed Central

    Arnao, Valentina; Riolo, Marianna; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-01-01

    We describe a case of epileptic seizures occurring after the use of a COX-2 inhibitor. A 61-year-old man was admitted to our department because of a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. EEG showed generalized slowdown of the activity. Neuroimaging and blood samples studies did not evidence alterations, but a careful pharmacological history revealed that the patient had taken the COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib to treat lumbago few days before the onset of clinical symptoms. No seizures were reported after etoricoxib discontinuation and an EEG resulted to be normal two months after this. Conclusion. Knowing the pharmacological history of a patient is important for understanding the clinical presentation and selecting appropriate treatment. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of generalized seizures associated with the use of COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:28210513

  16. Anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, COX-1 inhibitory, and free radical scavenging effects of Rumex nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Raju; Karkhile, Kailas V; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Jachak, Sanjay M

    2010-10-01

    Evaluation of the topical anti-inflammatory activity of chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of RUMEX NEPALENSIS roots in a TPA-induced acute inflammation mouse model demonstrated a significant reduction in ear edema. The extracts were further tested on purified enzymes for COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition to elucidate their mechanism of action, and a strong inhibition was observed. Six anthraquinones and two naphthalene derivatives were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract. Among the isolated compounds, emodin was found to be a potent inhibitor with slight selectivity towards COX-2, and nepodin exhibited selectivity towards COX-1. Emodin, endocrocin, and nepodin also exhibited significant topical anti-inflammatory activity in mice. Interestingly, nepodin showed better radical scavenging activity than trolox and ascorbic acid against DPPH and ABTS radicals. The strong radical scavenging activity of chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts could be explained by the presence of nepodin as well as by the high phenolic content of the ethyl acetate extract. Thus, the anti-inflammatory effect of R. NEPALENSIS roots was assumed to be mediated through COX inhibition by anthraquinones and naphthalene derivatives and through the radical scavenging activities of naphthalene derivatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Arachidonic Acid-Derived Pentadienyl Radical Intermediate Complexes with COX-1 and COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Furse, Kristina E.; Pratt, Derek A.; Schneider, Claus; Brash, Alan R.; Porter, Ned A.; Lybrand, Terry P.

    2008-01-01

    The two cyclooxygenase enzymes, COX-1 and COX-2, are responsible for the committed step in prostaglandin biosynthesis, and are the targets of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin, ibuprofen and the COX-2 selective inhibitors, Celebrex™, Vioxx™ and Bextra™. The enzymes are remarkable in that they catalyze two dioxygenations and two cyclizations of the native substrate, arachidonic acid, with near absolute regio- and stereoselectivity. Several theories have been advanced to explain the nature of enzymatic control over this series of reactions, including suggestions of steric shielding and oxygen channeling. As proposed here, selective radical trapping and spin localization in the substrate-derived pentadienyl radical intermediate can also be envisioned. Herein we describe the results of explicit, 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations of both COX-1 and COX-2 with the substrate-derived pentadienyl radical intermediate bound in the active site. The enzymes’ influence on the conformation of the pentadienyl radical was investigated, along with the accessible space above and below the radical plane, and the width of several channels to the active site that could function as access routes for molecular oxygen. Additional simulations demonstrated the extent of molecular oxygen mobility within the active site. The results suggest that spin localization is unlikely to play a role in enzymatic control of this reaction. Instead, a combination of oxygen channeling, steric shielding and selective radical trapping appears to be responsible. This work adds a dynamic perspective to the strong foundation of static structural data available for these enzymes. PMID:16519515

  18. Multifocal Fixed Drug Eruption with COX-2 Inhibitor-Celecoxib.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Shikha; Sarkar, Rashmi; Garg, Vijay K; Singh, Avninder; Keisham, Chitralekha

    2013-03-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are rapidly becoming the first choice nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for various rheumatological and other painful conditions. However, they might not be as safe or free of side effects as they are considered to be. These COX-2inhibitors may cause a variety of dermatological and systemic side effects of which we should be aware to avoid their indiscriminate use. We hereby report a case of multifocal fixed drug eruption (FDE) with celecoxib which has not yet been reported in Indian settings.

  19. Novel COX-2 Inhibitor for Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    exothermic, chloroacetic acid (18.14 g, 192 mmol) was added portion wise, and the reaction mixture was re- fluxed for 5 h. This mixture was then poured into...arachadonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs) (Vane and Botting, 1998). Recent studies have shown that high levels of COX-2 are expressed in a large percentage...7.5 0 µM 3 µM 5 µM 8 µM Celebrex A Arachidonic acid (µM) Figure 9: Effect of substrate concentrations on the inactivation of COX-2 by Celebrex (A

  20. Physiological COX-2 expression in breast epithelium associates with COX-2 levels in ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer in young women.

    PubMed

    Fornetti, Jaime; Jindal, Sonali; Middleton, Kara A; Borges, Virginia F; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression is implicated in increased risk and poorer outcomes in breast cancer in young women. We investigated COX-2 regulation in normal premenopausal breast tissue and its relationship to malignancy in young women. Quantitative COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed on adjacent normal and breast cancer tissues from 96 premenopausal women with known clinical reproductive histories, and on rat mammary glands with distinct ovarian hormone exposures. COX-2 expression in the normal breast epithelium varied more than 40-fold between women and was associated with COX-2 expression levels in ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer. Normal breast COX-2 expression was independent of known breast cancer prognostic indicators, including tumor stage and clinical subtype, indicating that factors regulating physiological COX-2 expression may be the primary drivers of COX-2 expression in breast cancer. Ovarian hormones, particularly at pregnancy levels, were identified as modulators of COX-2 in normal mammary epithelium. However, serial breast biopsy analysis in nonpregnant premenopausal women suggested relatively stable baseline levels of COX-2 expression, which persisted independent of menstrual cycling. These data provide impetus to investigate how baseline COX-2 expression is regulated in premenopausal breast tissue because COX-2 levels in normal breast epithelium may prove to be an indicator of breast cancer risk in young women, and predict the chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors in this population.

  1. Physiological COX-2 Expression in Breast Epithelium Associates with COX-2 Levels in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ and Invasive Breast Cancer in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Fornetti, Jaime; Jindal, Sonali; Middleton, Kara A.; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression is implicated in increased risk and poorer outcomes in breast cancer in young women. We investigated COX-2 regulation in normal premenopausal breast tissue and its relationship to malignancy in young women. Quantitative COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed on adjacent normal and breast cancer tissues from 96 premenopausal women with known clinical reproductive histories, and on rat mammary glands with distinct ovarian hormone exposures. COX-2 expression in the normal breast epithelium varied more than 40-fold between women and was associated with COX-2 expression levels in ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer. Normal breast COX-2 expression was independent of known breast cancer prognostic indicators, including tumor stage and clinical subtype, indicating that factors regulating physiological COX-2 expression may be the primary drivers of COX-2 expression in breast cancer. Ovarian hormones, particularly at pregnancy levels, were identified as modulators of COX-2 in normal mammary epithelium. However, serial breast biopsy analysis in nonpregnant premenopausal women suggested relatively stable baseline levels of COX-2 expression, which persisted independent of menstrual cycling. These data provide impetus to investigate how baseline COX-2 expression is regulated in premenopausal breast tissue because COX-2 levels in normal breast epithelium may prove to be an indicator of breast cancer risk in young women, and predict the chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors in this population. PMID:24518566

  2. Simultaneous Targeting of COX-2 and AKT Using Selenocoxib-1-GSH to Inhibit Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Raghavendra; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly metastatic and deadly disease. An agent simultaneously targeting COX-2, PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling pathways that are deregulated in up to 70% of sporadic melanoma might be an effective treatment but no agent of this type exists. To develop a single drug inhibiting COX-2 and PI3K/Akt signaling (and increasing MAPK pathway activity to inhibitory levels as a result of Akt inhibition), a selenium-containing glutathione (GSH) analog of celecoxib, called selenocoxib-1-GSH was synthesized. It killed melanoma cells with an average IC50 of 7.66 µmol/L compared to control celecoxib at 55.6 µmol/L. The IC50 range for normal cells was 36.3–41.2 µmol/L compared to 7.66 µmol/L for cancer cells. Selenocoxib-1-GSH reduced xenografted tumor development by ~70% with negligible toxicity by targeting COX-2, like celecoxib, and having new inhibitory properties acting as a PI3K/Akt inhibitor (and MAPK pathway activator to inhibitory levels due to Akt inhibition). The consequence of this inhibitory activity was an ~80% decrease in cultured cell proliferation and a ~200% increase in apoptosis following 24 hours treatment with 15.5 µmol/L of drug. Thus, this study details development of selenocoxib-1-GSH, which is a non-toxic agent that targets the COX-2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in melanomas to inhibit tumor development. PMID:23112250

  3. Enhancing the pharmacodynamic profile of a class of selective COX-2 inhibiting nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Biava, Mariangela; Battilocchio, Claudio; Poce, Giovanna; Alfonso, Salvatore; Consalvi, Sara; Di Capua, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Sautebin, Lidia; Rossi, Antonietta; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Giordani, Antonio; Persiani, Stefano; Colovic, Milena; Dovizio, Melania; Patrignani, Paola; Anzini, Maurizio

    2014-01-15

    We report herein the development, synthesis, physicochemical and pharmacological characterization of a novel class of pharmacodynamic hybrids that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) isoform and present suitable nitric oxide releasing properties. The replacement of the ester moiety with the amide group gave access to in vivo more stable and active derivatives that highlighted outstanding pharmacological properties. In particular, the glycine derivative proved to be extremely active in suppressing hyperalgesia and edema. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition in horse blood by phenylbutazone, flunixin, carprofen and meloxicam: an in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Beretta, C; Garavaglia, G; Cavalli, M

    2005-10-01

    We report on the inhibitory activity of the NSAIDs meloxicam, carprofen, phenylbutazone and flunixin, on blood cyclooxygenases in the horse using in vitro enzyme-linked assays. As expected, comparison of IC50 indicated that meloxicam and carprofen are more selective inhibitors of COX-2 than phenylbutazone and flunixin; meloxicam was the most advantageous for horses of four NSAIDs examined. However at IC80, phenylbutazone (+134.4%) and flunixin (+29.7%) had greater COX-2 selectivity than at IC50, and meloxicam (-41.2%) and carprofen (-12.9%) had lower COX-2 selectivity than at IC50. We therefore propose that the selectivity of NSAIDs should be assessed at the 80% as well as 50% inhibition level.

  5. The CoxD protein, a novel AAA+ ATPase involved in metal cluster assembly: hydrolysis of nucleotide-triphosphates and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Tobias; Joseph, Stephanie; Mielke, Thorsten; Bürger, Jörg; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Meyer, Ortwin

    2012-01-01

    CoxD of the α-proteobacterium Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a membrane protein which is involved in the posttranslational biosynthesis of the [CuSMoO₂] cluster in the active site of the enzyme CO dehydrogenase. The bacteria synthesize CoxD only in the presence of CO. Recombinant CoxD produced in E. coli K38 pGP1-2/pETMW2 appeared in inclusion bodies from where it was solubilized by urea and refolded by stepwise dilution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed the presence of secondary structural elements in refolded CoxD. CoxD is a P-loop ATPase of the AAA-protein family. Refolded CoxD catalyzed the hydrolysis of MgATP yielding MgADP and inorganic phosphate at a 1∶1∶1 molar ratio. The reaction was inhibited by the slow hydrolysable MgATP-γ-S. GTPase activity of CoxD did not exceed 2% of the ATPase activity. Employing different methods (non linear regression, Hanes and Woolf, Lineweaver-Burk), preparations of CoxD revealed a mean K(M) value of 0.69±0.14 mM ATP and an apparent V(max) value of 19.3±2.3 nmol ATP hydrolyzed min⁻¹ mg⁻¹. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and gel filtration showed that refolded CoxD can exist in various multimeric states (2-mer, 4-mer or 6-mer), preferentially as hexamer or dimer. Within weeks the hexamer dissociates into the dimer, a process which can be reversed by MgATP or MgATP-γ-S within hours. Only the hexamers and the dimers exhibited MgATPase activity. Transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained CoxD preparations revealed distinct particles within a size range of 10-16 nm, which further corroborates the oligomeric organization. The 3D structure of CoxD was modeled with the 3D structure of BchI from Rhodobacter capsulatus as template. It has the key elements of an AAA+ domain in the same arrangement and at same positions as in BchI and displays the characteristic inserts of the PS-II-insert clade. Possible functions of CoxD in [CuSMoO₂] cluster assembly are discussed.

  6. The CoxD Protein, a Novel AAA+ ATPase Involved in Metal Cluster Assembly: Hydrolysis of Nucleotide-Triphosphates and Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Tobias; Joseph, Stephanie; Mielke, Thorsten; Bürger, Jörg; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Meyer, Ortwin

    2012-01-01

    CoxD of the α-proteobacterium Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a membrane protein which is involved in the posttranslational biosynthesis of the [CuSMoO2] cluster in the active site of the enzyme CO dehydrogenase. The bacteria synthesize CoxD only in the presence of CO. Recombinant CoxD produced in E. coli K38 pGP1-2/pETMW2 appeared in inclusion bodies from where it was solubilized by urea and refolded by stepwise dilution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed the presence of secondary structural elements in refolded CoxD. CoxD is a P-loop ATPase of the AAA-protein family. Refolded CoxD catalyzed the hydrolysis of MgATP yielding MgADP and inorganic phosphate at a 1∶1∶1 molar ratio. The reaction was inhibited by the slow hydrolysable MgATP-γ-S. GTPase activity of CoxD did not exceed 2% of the ATPase activity. Employing different methods (non linear regression, Hanes and Woolf, Lineweaver-Burk), preparations of CoxD revealed a mean KM value of 0.69±0.14 mM ATP and an apparent Vmax value of 19.3±2.3 nmol ATP hydrolyzed min−1 mg−1. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and gel filtration showed that refolded CoxD can exist in various multimeric states (2-mer, 4-mer or 6-mer), preferentially as hexamer or dimer. Within weeks the hexamer dissociates into the dimer, a process which can be reversed by MgATP or MgATP-γ-S within hours. Only the hexamers and the dimers exhibited MgATPase activity. Transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained CoxD preparations revealed distinct particles within a size range of 10–16 nm, which further corroborates the oligomeric organization. The 3D structure of CoxD was modeled with the 3D structure of BchI from Rhodobacter capsulatus as template. It has the key elements of an AAA+ domain in the same arrangement and at same positions as in BchI and displays the characteristic inserts of the PS-II-insert clade. Possible functions of CoxD in [CuSMoO2] cluster assembly are discussed. PMID:23077613

  7. Steganalysis using logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubenko, Ivans; Ker, Andrew D.

    2011-02-01

    We advocate Logistic Regression (LR) as an alternative to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers commonly used in steganalysis. LR offers more information than traditional SVM methods - it estimates class probabilities as well as providing a simple classification - and can be adapted more easily and efficiently for multiclass problems. Like SVM, LR can be kernelised for nonlinear classification, and it shows comparable classification accuracy to SVM methods. This work is a case study, comparing accuracy and speed of SVM and LR classifiers in detection of LSB Matching and other related spatial-domain image steganography, through the state-of-art 686-dimensional SPAM feature set, in three image sets.

  8. Ribosome-Associated Mba1 Escorts Cox2 from Insertion Machinery to Maturing Assembly Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Isotta; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Ronsör, Christin; Bareth, Bettina; Warscheid, Bettina; Dennerlein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The three conserved core subunits of the cytochrome c oxidase are encoded by mitochondria in close to all eukaryotes. The Cox2 subunit spans the inner membrane twice, exposing the N and C termini to the intermembrane space. For this, the N terminus is exported cotranslationally by Oxa1 and subsequently undergoes proteolytic maturation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Little is known about the translocation of the C terminus, but Cox18 has been identified to be a critical protein in this process. Here we find that the scaffold protein Cox20, which promotes processing of Cox2, is in complex with the ribosome receptor Mba1 and translating mitochondrial ribosomes in a Cox2-dependent manner. The Mba1-Cox20 complex accumulates when export of the C terminus of Cox2 is blocked by the loss of the Cox18 protein. While Cox20 engages with Cox18, Mba1 is no longer present at this stage. Our analyses indicate that Cox20 associates with nascent Cox2 and Mba1 to promote Cox2 maturation cotranslationally. We suggest that Mba1 stabilizes the Cox20-ribosome complex and supports the handover of Cox2 to the Cox18 tail export machinery. PMID:27550809

  9. COX-2 gene expression is correlated with cognitive function in recurrent depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gałecki, Piotr; Talarowska, Monika; Bobińska, Kinga; Szemraj, Janusz

    2014-02-28

    Cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) may be a key inflammatory enzyme involved in recurrent depressive disorder(rDD). In rDD group, COX-2 expression were higher and significant correlations occurred between COX-2 expression and cognitive functions. In controls there was no significant association between analysed variables. Thus, the COX-2 enzyme may be important for cognitive functioning in rDD.

  10. Regression Verification Using Impact Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, John; Person, Suzette J.; Rungta, Neha; Thachuk, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Regression verification techniques are used to prove equivalence of syntactically similar programs. Checking equivalence of large programs, however, can be computationally expensive. Existing regression verification techniques rely on abstraction and decomposition techniques to reduce the computational effort of checking equivalence of the entire program. These techniques are sound but not complete. In this work, we propose a novel approach to improve scalability of regression verification by classifying the program behaviors generated during symbolic execution as either impacted or unimpacted. Our technique uses a combination of static analysis and symbolic execution to generate summaries of impacted program behaviors. The impact summaries are then checked for equivalence using an o-the-shelf decision procedure. We prove that our approach is both sound and complete for sequential programs, with respect to the depth bound of symbolic execution. Our evaluation on a set of sequential C artifacts shows that reducing the size of the summaries can help reduce the cost of software equivalence checking. Various reduction, abstraction, and compositional techniques have been developed to help scale software verification techniques to industrial-sized systems. Although such techniques have greatly increased the size and complexity of systems that can be checked, analysis of large software systems remains costly. Regression analysis techniques, e.g., regression testing [16], regression model checking [22], and regression verification [19], restrict the scope of the analysis by leveraging the differences between program versions. These techniques are based on the idea that if code is checked early in development, then subsequent versions can be checked against a prior (checked) version, leveraging the results of the previous analysis to reduce analysis cost of the current version. Regression verification addresses the problem of proving equivalence of closely related program

  11. The Role of Inhibitory Control in the Development of Human Figure Drawing in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Kevin J.; Jolley, Richard P.; Simpson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of inhibitory control in young children's human figure drawing. We used the Bear-Dragon task as a measure of inhibitory control and used the classification system devised by Cox and Parkin to measure the development of human figure drawing. We tested 50 children aged between 40 and 64 months. Regression analysis showed…

  12. The Role of Inhibitory Control in the Development of Human Figure Drawing in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Kevin J.; Jolley, Richard P.; Simpson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of inhibitory control in young children's human figure drawing. We used the Bear-Dragon task as a measure of inhibitory control and used the classification system devised by Cox and Parkin to measure the development of human figure drawing. We tested 50 children aged between 40 and 64 months. Regression analysis showed…

  13. COX7A1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    COX7A1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIIa polypeptide 1 (muscle), is one of the polypeptide chains of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This polypeptide is present only in muscle tissues. Other polypeptides of subunit VIIa are present in both muscle and nonmuscle tissues, and are encoded by different genes.

  14. Genetic variants in COX-2, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and breast cancer risk: the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study.

    PubMed

    Brasky, Theodore M; Bonner, Matthew R; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B; Nie, Jing; Tao, Meng Hua; Edge, Stephen B; Trevisan, Maurizio; Shields, Peter G; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2011-02-01

    Chronic inflammation has been consistently associated with cancers of several sites, including the breast, and inhibition of inflammation through the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been inversely associated with risk. As NSAIDs bind with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), genetic variation in COX-2 may influence breast cancer risk by affecting inflammatory response and response to NSAID use. We identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for COX-2 and examined their association with risk of breast cancer in a population-based case-control study in Western New York. Cases had incident, first primary, histologically confirmed breast cancer (n = 1077). Controls (n = 1910) were randomly selected from NY Department of Motor Vehicles records (< 65) or Medicare rolls (≥ 65). Participants were queried on adult lifetime use of aspirin and recent use of ibuprofen. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). One SNP, rs2745559, was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03-1.46). Associations with other variants were not evident. Significant interaction (P interaction = 0.04) between recent aspirin use and rs4648261 was also observed. Variation in COX-2 was modestly associated with breast cancer risk, indicating that COX-2 may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Better understanding of the role of COX-2 genetic variation and interaction with NSAID use in breast carcinogenesis has potential to inform prevention strategies.

  15. Genetic variants in COX-2, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and breast cancer risk: the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Matthew R.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Nie, Jing; Tao, Meng Hua; Edge, Stephen B.; Trevisan, Maurizio; Shields, Peter G.; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been consistently associated with cancers of several sites, including the breast, and inhibition of inflammation through the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been inversely associated with risk. As NSAIDs bind with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), genetic variation in COX-2 may influence breast cancer risk by affecting inflammatory response and response to NSAID use. We identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for COX-2 and examined their association with risk of breast cancer in a population-based case–control study in Western New York. Cases had incident, first primary, histologically confirmed breast cancer (n = 1077). Controls (n = 1910) were randomly selected from NY Department of Motor Vehicles records (<65) or Medicare rolls (≥65). Participants were queried on adult lifetime use of aspirin and recent use of ibuprofen. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). One SNP, rs2745559, was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03–1.46). Associations with other variants were not evident. Significant interaction (P interaction = 0.04) between recent aspirin use and rs4648261 was also observed. Variation in COX-2 was modestly associated with breast cancer risk, indicating that COX-2 may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Better understanding of the role of COX-2 genetic variation and interaction with NSAID use in breast carcinogenesis has potential to inform prevention strategies. PMID:20676755

  16. Structural regression trees

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.

    1996-12-31

    In many real-world domains the task of machine learning algorithms is to learn a theory for predicting numerical values. In particular several standard test domains used in Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) are concerned with predicting numerical values from examples and relational and mostly non-determinate background knowledge. However, so far no ILP algorithm except one can predict numbers and cope with nondeterminate background knowledge. (The only exception is a covering algorithm called FORS.) In this paper we present Structural Regression Trees (SRT), a new algorithm which can be applied to the above class of problems. SRT integrates the statistical method of regression trees into ILP. It constructs a tree containing a literal (an atomic formula or its negation) or a conjunction of literals in each node, and assigns a numerical value to each leaf. SRT provides more comprehensible results than purely statistical methods, and can be applied to a class of problems most other ILP systems cannot handle. Experiments in several real-world domains demonstrate that the approach is competitive with existing methods, indicating that the advantages are not at the expense of predictive accuracy.

  17. Redox-regulated dynamic interplay between Cox19 and the copper-binding protein Cox11 in the intermembrane space of mitochondria facilitates biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Manuela; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Bohnert, Maria; van der Laan, Martin; Sommer, Frederik; Jung, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the twin Cx9C protein family constitute the largest group of proteins in the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria. Despite their conserved nature and their essential role in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, the molecular function of twin Cx9C proteins is largely unknown. We performed a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis to identify interaction partners of the conserved twin Cx9C protein Cox19. We found that Cox19 interacts in a dynamic manner with Cox11, a copper transfer protein that facilitates metalation of the Cu(B) center of subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase. The interaction with Cox11 is critical for the stable accumulation of Cox19 in mitochondria. Cox19 consists of a helical hairpin structure that forms a hydrophobic surface characterized by two highly conserved tyrosine-leucine dipeptides. These residues are essential for Cox19 function and its specific binding to a cysteine-containing sequence in Cox11. Our observations suggest that an oxidative modification of this cysteine residue of Cox11 stimulates Cox19 binding, pointing to a redox-regulated interplay of Cox19 and Cox11 that is critical for copper transfer in the IMS and thus for biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25926683

  18. Assessing the prediction accuracy of cure in the Cox proportional hazards cure model: an application to breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma

    2014-01-01

    A cure rate model is a survival model incorporating the cure rate with the assumption that the population contains both uncured and cured individuals. It is a powerful statistical tool for prognostic studies, especially in cancer. The cure rate is important for making treatment decisions in clinical practice. The proportional hazards (PH) cure model can predict the cure rate for each patient. This contains a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component to estimate the hazard for uncured patients. A measure for quantifying the predictive accuracy of the cure rate estimated by the Cox PH cure model is required, as there has been a lack of previous research in this area. We used the Cox PH cure model for the breast cancer data; however, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) could not be estimated because many patients were censored. In this study, we used imputation-based AUCs to assess the predictive accuracy of the cure rate from the PH cure model. We examined the precision of these AUCs using simulation studies. The results demonstrated that the imputation-based AUCs were estimable and their biases were negligibly small in many cases, although ordinary AUC could not be estimated. Additionally, we introduced the bias-correction method of imputation-based AUCs and found that the bias-corrected estimate successfully compensated the overestimation in the simulation studies. We also illustrated the estimation of the imputation-based AUCs using breast cancer data.

  19. [Driving force analysis of land use change in the developed area based on Probit regression model: A case study of Nanjing City, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Li, Yue-e; Wu, Qun; Shen, Jian-fen

    2015-07-01

    Based on the remote sensing image in 1996, 2002 and 2010, with the help of RS and GIS technology, and using the Probit regression model, this paper analyzed the characteristics of land use change in Nanjing City from 1996 to 2010, and the driving factors of land use change. The results showed that the cultivated land and woodland decreased, constructive land, garden plot and grassland continued to increase, and the comprehensive land use change rate was rising since 1996. The results of regression model for cultivated land and woodland change indicated that the change of cultivated land in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "distance to the nearest rural settlement" and "farmers' population density". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "distance to the rural settlement" and "distance to the nearest road". The change of woodland in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "the elevation" and "distance to the rural settlement". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "population density" and "distance to the nearest road". By comparison, the early driving factors of land use change were mainly natural factors, but in recent years, they were mainly social, economic and demographic factors.

  20. Potential interaction of natural dietary bioactive compounds with COX-2.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Rojas, Wilson; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2011-09-01

    Bioactive natural products present in the diet play an important role in several biological processes, and many have been involved in the alleviation and control of inflammation-related diseases. These actions have been linked to both gene expression modulation of pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and to an action involving a direct inhibitory binding on this protein. In this study, several food-related compounds with known gene regulatory action on inflammation have been examined in silico as COX-2 ligands, utilizing AutoDock Vina, GOLD and Surflex-Dock (SYBYL) as docking protocols. Curcumin and all-trans retinoic acid presented the maximum absolute AutoDock Vina-derived binding affinities (9.3 kcal/mol), but genistein, apigenin, cyanidin, kaempferol, and docosahexaenoic acid, were close to this value. AutoDock Vina affinities and GOLD scores for several known COX-2 inhibitors significatively correlated with reported median inhibitory concentrations (R² = 0.462, P < 0.001 and R² = 0.238, P = 0.029, respectively), supporting the computational reliability of the predictions made by our docking simulations. Moreover, docking analysis insinuate the synergistic action of curcumin on celecoxib-induced inhibition of COX-2 may occur allosterically, as this natural compound docks to a place different from the inhibitor binding site. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of some food-derived molecules could be the result of their direct binding capabilities to COX-2, and this process can be modeled using protein-ligand docking methodologies.

  1. Calculating a Stepwise Ridge Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Although methods for using ordinary least squares regression computer programs to calculate a ridge regression are available, the calculation of a stepwise ridge regression requires a special purpose algorithm and computer program. The correct stepwise ridge regression procedure is given, and a parallel FORTRAN computer program is described.…

  2. Orthogonal Regression: A Teaching Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A well-known approach to linear least squares regression is that which involves minimizing the sum of squared orthogonal projections of data points onto the best fit line. This form of regression is known as orthogonal regression, and the linear model that it yields is known as the major axis. A similar method, reduced major axis regression, is…

  3. Orthogonal Regression: A Teaching Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A well-known approach to linear least squares regression is that which involves minimizing the sum of squared orthogonal projections of data points onto the best fit line. This form of regression is known as orthogonal regression, and the linear model that it yields is known as the major axis. A similar method, reduced major axis regression, is…

  4. Modified Regression Correlation Coefficient for Poisson Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaengthong, Nattacha; Domthong, Uthumporn

    2017-09-01

    This study gives attention to indicators in predictive power of the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) which are widely used; however, often having some restrictions. We are interested in regression correlation coefficient for a Poisson regression model. This is a measure of predictive power, and defined by the relationship between the dependent variable (Y) and the expected value of the dependent variable given the independent variables [E(Y|X)] for the Poisson regression model. The dependent variable is distributed as Poisson. The purpose of this research was modifying regression correlation coefficient for Poisson regression model. We also compare the proposed modified regression correlation coefficient with the traditional regression correlation coefficient in the case of two or more independent variables, and having multicollinearity in independent variables. The result shows that the proposed regression correlation coefficient is better than the traditional regression correlation coefficient based on Bias and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE).

  5. Ridge regression processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Current navigation requirements depend on a geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) criterion. As long as the GDOP stays below a specific value, navigation requirements are met. The GDOP will exceed the specified value when the measurement geometry becomes too collinear. A new signal processing technique, called Ridge Regression Processing, can reduce the effects of nearly collinear measurement geometry; thereby reducing the inflation of the measurement errors. It is shown that the Ridge signal processor gives a consistently better mean squared error (MSE) in position than the Ordinary Least Mean Squares (OLS) estimator. The applicability of this technique is currently being investigated to improve the following areas: receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), coverage requirements, availability requirements, and precision approaches.

  6. The Carboxyl-terminal End of Cox1 Is Required for Feedback Assembly Regulation of Cox1 Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Shingú-Vázquez, Miguel; Camacho-Villasana, Yolanda; Sandoval-Romero, Luisa; Butler, Christine A.; Fox, Thomas D.; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of the largest cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) subunit, Cox1, on yeast mitochondrial ribosomes is coupled to assembly of CcO. The translational activator Mss51 is sequestered in early assembly intermediate complexes by an interaction with Cox14 that depends on the presence of newly synthesized Cox1. If CcO assembly is prevented, the level of Mss51 available for translational activation is reduced. We deleted the C-terminal 11 or 15 residues of Cox1 by site-directed mutagenesis of mtDNA. Although these deletions did not prevent respiratory growth of yeast, they eliminated the assembly-feedback control of Cox1 synthesis. Furthermore, these deletions reduced the strength of the Mss51-Cox14 interaction as detected by co-immunoprecipitation, confirming the importance of the Cox1 C-terminal residues for Mss51 sequestration. We surveyed a panel of mutations that block CcO assembly for the strength of their effect on Cox1 synthesis, both by pulse labeling and expression of the ARG8m reporter fused to COX1. Deletion of the nuclear gene encoding Cox6, one of the first subunits to be added to assembling CcO, caused the most severe reduction in Cox1 synthesis. Deletion of the C-terminal 15 amino acids of Cox1 increased Cox1 synthesis in the presence of each of these mutations, except pet54. Our data suggest a novel activity of Pet54 required for normal synthesis of Cox1 that is independent of the Cox1 C-terminal end. PMID:20807763

  7. The carboxyl-terminal end of Cox1 is required for feedback assembly regulation of Cox1 synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Shingú-Vázquez, Miguel; Camacho-Villasana, Yolanda; Sandoval-Romero, Luisa; Butler, Christine A; Fox, Thomas D; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl

    2010-11-05

    Synthesis of the largest cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) subunit, Cox1, on yeast mitochondrial ribosomes is coupled to assembly of CcO. The translational activator Mss51 is sequestered in early assembly intermediate complexes by an interaction with Cox14 that depends on the presence of newly synthesized Cox1. If CcO assembly is prevented, the level of Mss51 available for translational activation is reduced. We deleted the C-terminal 11 or 15 residues of Cox1 by site-directed mutagenesis of mtDNA. Although these deletions did not prevent respiratory growth of yeast, they eliminated the assembly-feedback control of Cox1 synthesis. Furthermore, these deletions reduced the strength of the Mss51-Cox14 interaction as detected by co-immunoprecipitation, confirming the importance of the Cox1 C-terminal residues for Mss51 sequestration. We surveyed a panel of mutations that block CcO assembly for the strength of their effect on Cox1 synthesis, both by pulse labeling and expression of the ARG8(m) reporter fused to COX1. Deletion of the nuclear gene encoding Cox6, one of the first subunits to be added to assembling CcO, caused the most severe reduction in Cox1 synthesis. Deletion of the C-terminal 15 amino acids of Cox1 increased Cox1 synthesis in the presence of each of these mutations, except pet54. Our data suggest a novel activity of Pet54 required for normal synthesis of Cox1 that is independent of the Cox1 C-terminal end.

  8. Process modeling with the regression network.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, T; Barnard, E; van Deventer, J

    1995-01-01

    A new connectionist network topology called the regression network is proposed. The structural and underlying mathematical features of the regression network are investigated. Emphasis is placed on the intricacies of the optimization process for the regression network and some measures to alleviate these difficulties of optimization are proposed and investigated. The ability of the regression network algorithm to perform either nonparametric or parametric optimization, as well as a combination of both, is also highlighted. It is further shown how the regression network can be used to model systems which are poorly understood on the basis of sparse data. A semi-empirical regression network model is developed for a metallurgical processing operation (a hydrocyclone classifier) by building mechanistic knowledge into the connectionist structure of the regression network model. Poorly understood aspects of the process are provided for by use of nonparametric regions within the structure of the semi-empirical connectionist model. The performance of the regression network model is compared to the corresponding generalization performance results obtained by some other nonparametric regression techniques.

  9. Medullary carcinoma of the breast, prognostic importance of characteristic histopathological features evaluated in a multivariate Cox analysis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L; Holck, S; Schiødt, T; Zedeler, K; Mouridsen, H T

    1994-01-01

    In this study of 136 breast cancers with medullary features (MC), registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) from 1982 to 1987, we confirmed the prognostic importance of a new definition of medullary carcinoma of the breast (MC newdef) which was recently proposed by us, deduced from a previous study of a corresponding tumour material (DBCG 77-82). However, the individual histological criteria did not have the same prognostic importance as in our previous study, although prognostic trends were the same. To further improve and validate the diagnostic criteria, we combined the two populations and performed a multivariate Cox regression analysis. In the final Cox model, four histological parameters retained positive prognostic importance: (1) predominantly syncytial growth pattern, (2) no tubular component, (3) diffuse stromal infiltration with mononuclear cells and (4) sparse necrosis. We propose that these criteria are emphasized in the histological diagnosis of medullary carcinoma of the breast.

  10. Effects of Enriched Environment on COX-2, Leptin and Eicosanoids in a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nachat-Kappes, Rachida; Pinel, Alexandre; Combe, Kristell; Lamas, Bruno; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Rossary, Adrien; Goncalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Caldefie-Chezet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Basu, Samar

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer. This study investigated a possible link between COX-2 and adipokines in the development of mammary tumors. A model of environmental enrichment (EE), known to reduce tumor growth was used for a syngeneic murine model of mammary carcinoma. 3-week-old, female C57BL/6 mice were housed in standard environment (SE) or EE cages for 9 weeks and transplanted orthotopically with syngeneic EO771 adenocarcinoma cells into the right inguinal mammary fat pad. EE housing influenced mammary gland development with a decrease in COX-2 expressing cells and enhanced side-branching and advanced development of alveolar structures of the mammary gland. Tumor volume and weight were decreased in EE housed mice and were associated with a reduction in COX-2 and Ki67 levels, and an increase in caspase-3 levels. In tumors of SE mice, high COX-2 expression correlated with enhanced leptin detection. Non-tumor-bearing EE mice showed a significant increase in adiponectin levels but no change in those of leptin, F2-isoprostanes, PGF2α, IL-6, TNF-α, PAI-1, and MCP-1 levels. Both tumor-bearing groups (SE and EE housing) had increased resistin, IL-6, TNF-α, PAI-1 and MCP-1 levels irrespective of the different housing environment demonstrating higher inflammatory response due to the presence of the tumor. This study demonstrates that EE housing influenced normal mammary gland development and inhibited mammary tumor growth resulting in a marked decrease in intratumoral COX-2 activity and an increase in the plasma ratio of adiponectin/leptin levels. PMID:23272114

  11. A Novel Function of Pet54 in Regulation of Cox1 Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Juan Pablo; Camacho-Villasana, Yolanda; Shingú-Vázquez, Miguel; García-Villegas, Rodolfo; Zamudio-Ochoa, Angélica; García-Guerrero, Aldo E; Hernández, Greco; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl

    2016-04-22

    Cytochrome c oxidase assembly requires the synthesis of the mitochondria-encoded core subunits, Cox1, Cox2, and Cox3. In yeast, Pet54 protein is required to activate translation of the COX3 mRNA and to process the aI5β intron on the COX1 transcript. Here we report a third, novel function of Pet54 on Cox1 synthesis. We observed that Pet54 is necessary to achieve an efficient Cox1 synthesis. Translation of the COX1 mRNA is coupled to the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase by a mechanism that involves Mss51. This protein activates translation of the COX1 mRNA by acting on the COX1 5'-UTR, and, in addition, it interacts with the newly synthesized Cox1 protein in high molecular weight complexes that include the factors Coa3 and Cox14. Deletion of Pet54 decreased Cox1 synthesis, and, in contrast to what is commonly observed for other assembly mutants, double deletion of cox14 or coa3 did not recover Cox1 synthesis. Our results show that Pet54 is a positive regulator of Cox1 synthesis that renders Mss51 competent as a translational activator of the COX1 mRNA and that this role is independent of the assembly feedback regulatory loop of Cox1 synthesis. Pet54 may play a role in Mss51 hemylation/conformational change necessary for translational activity. Moreover, Pet54 physically interacts with the COX1 mRNA, and this binding was independent of the presence of Mss51. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. A novel sulindac derivative lacking COX-inhibitory activities suppresses carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Quealy, Emily; Gary, Bernard D.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Piazza, Gary A.; Lü, Junxuan

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including sulindac are well-documented to be highly effective for cancer chemoprevention. However, their cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activities cause severe gastrointestinal and cardiovascular toxicities, limiting their chronic use. Recent studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms may be responsible for the chemopreventive benefits of the NSAIDs, and support the potential for development of a novel generation of sulindac derivatives lacking COX inhibition for cancer chemoprevention. A prototypic sulindac derivative with a N,N-dimethylammonium substitution, referred to as sulindac sulfide amide (SSA) was recently identified to be devoid of COX inhibitory activity yet displays much more potent tumor cell growth inhibitory activity in vitro compared to sulindac sulfide. In this study, we investigated the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway as a potential target for its COX-independent antineoplastic mechanism and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy against prostate carcinogenesis using the TRAMP mouse model. The results showed that SSA significantly suppressed the growth of human and mouse prostate cancer cells expressing AR in strong association with G1 arrest, and decreased AR level and AR-dependent transactivation. Dietary SSA consumption from 6 to 24 weeks of age dramatically attenuated prostatic growth and suppressed AR-dependent glandular epithelial lesion progression via repressing cell proliferation in the TRAMP mice, whereas it did not significantly impact neuroendocrine carcinoma growth. Overall, the results suggest that SSA may be a chemopreventive candidate against prostate glandular epithelial carcinogenesis. PMID:20587701

  13. Novel harmonic regularization approach for variable selection in Cox's proportional hazards model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ge-Jin; Liang, Yong; Wang, Jia-Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Variable selection is an important issue in regression and a number of variable selection methods have been proposed involving nonconvex penalty functions. In this paper, we investigate a novel harmonic regularization method, which can approximate nonconvex Lq  (1/2 < q < 1) regularizations, to select key risk factors in the Cox's proportional hazards model using microarray gene expression data. The harmonic regularization method can be efficiently solved using our proposed direct path seeking approach, which can produce solutions that closely approximate those for the convex loss function and the nonconvex regularization. Simulation results based on the artificial datasets and four real microarray gene expression datasets, such as real diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DCBCL), the lung cancer, and the AML datasets, show that the harmonic regularization method can be more accurate for variable selection than existing Lasso series methods.

  14. A pairwise likelihood augmented Cox estimator for left-truncated data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Kim, Sehee; Qin, Jing; Saran, Rajiv; Li, Yi

    2017-08-29

    Survival data collected from a prevalent cohort are subject to left truncation and the analysis is challenging. Conditional approaches for left-truncated data could be inefficient as they ignore the information in the marginal likelihood of the truncation times. Length-biased sampling methods may improve the estimation efficiency but only when the underlying truncation time is uniform; otherwise, they may generate biased estimates. We propose a semiparametric method for left-truncated data under the Cox model with no parametric distributional assumption about the truncation times. Our approach is to make inference based on the conditional likelihood augmented with a pairwise likelihood, which eliminates the truncation distribution, yet retains the information about the regression coefficients and the baseline hazard function in the marginal likelihood. An iterative algorithm is provided to solve for the regression coefficients and the baseline hazard function simultaneously. By empirical process and U-process theories, it has been shown that the proposed estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal with a closed-form consistent variance estimator. Simulation studies show substantial efficiency gain of our estimator in both the regression coefficients and the cumulative baseline hazard function over the conditional approach estimator. When the uniform truncation assumption holds, our estimator enjoys smaller biases and efficiency comparable to that of the full maximum likelihood estimator. An application to the analysis of a chronic kidney disease cohort study illustrates the utility of the method. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  15. Cox Proportional Hazards Models for Modeling the Time to Onset of Decompression Sickness in Hypobaric Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Chhikara, Raj S.; Conkin, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we fit Cox proportional hazards models to a subset of data from the Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Databank. The data bank contains records on the time to decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) for over 130,000 person-exposures to high altitude in chamber tests. The subset we use contains 1,321 records, with 87% censoring, and has the most recent experimental tests on DCS made available from Johnson Space Center. We build on previous analyses of this data set by considering more expanded models and more detailed model assessments specific to the Cox model. Our model - which is stratified on the quartiles of the final ambient pressure at altitude - includes the final ambient pressure at altitude as a nonlinear continuous predictor, the computed tissue partial pressure of nitrogen at altitude, and whether exercise was done at altitude. We conduct various assessments of our model, many of which are recently developed in the statistical literature, and conclude where the model needs improvement. We consider the addition of frailties to the stratified Cox model, but found that no significant gain was attained above a model that does not include frailties. Finally, we validate some of the models that we fit.

  16. Free radical scavenging and COX-2 inhibition by simple colon metabolites of polyphenols: A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Amić, Ana; Marković, Zoran; Marković, Jasmina M Dimitrić; Jeremić, Svetlana; Lučić, Bono; Amić, Dragan

    2016-12-01

    Free radical scavenging and inhibitory potency against cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by two abundant colon metabolites of polyphenols, i.e., 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (3-HPAA) and 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (4-HPPA) were theoretically studied. Different free radical scavenging mechanisms are investigated in water and pentyl ethanoate as a solvent. By considering electronic properties of scavenged free radicals, hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) mechanisms are found to be thermodynamically probable and competitive processes in both media. The Gibbs free energy change for reaction of inactivation of free radicals indicates 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA as potent scavengers. Their reactivity toward free radicals was predicted to decrease as follows: hydroxyl>alkoxyls>phenoxyl≈peroxyls>superoxide. Shown free radical scavenging potency of 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA along with their high μM concentration produced by microbial colon degradation of polyphenols could enable at least in situ inactivation of free radicals. Docking analysis with structural forms of 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA indicates dianionic ligands as potent inhibitors of COX-2, an inducible enzyme involved in colon carcinogenesis. Obtained results suggest that suppressing levels of free radicals and COX-2 could be achieved by 3-HPAA and 4-HPPA indicating that these compounds may contribute to reduced risk of colon cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Apigenin inhibits COX-2, PGE2, and EP1 and also initiates terminal differentiation in the epidermis of tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Alex J; Soliman, Eman; Jenkins, Audrey; Van Dross, Rukiyah T

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in the United States. NMSC overexpresses cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). COX-2 synthesizes prostaglandins such as PGE2 which promote proliferation and tumorigenesis by engaging G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E receptors (EP). Apigenin is a bioflavonoid that blocks mouse skin tumorigenesis induced by the chemical carcinogens, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). However, the effect of apigenin on the COX-2 pathway has not been examined in the DMBA/TPA skin tumor model. In the present study, apigenin decreased tumor multiplicity and incidence in DMBA/TPA-treated SKH-1 mice. Analysis of the non-tumor epidermis revealed that apigenin reduced COX-2, PGE2, EP1, and EP2 synthesis and also increased terminal differentiation. In contrast, apigenin did not inhibit the COX-2 pathway or promote terminal differentiation in the tumors. Since fewer tumors developed in apigenin-treated animals which contained reduced epidermal COX-2 levels, our data suggest that apigenin may avert skin tumor development by blocking COX-2.

  18. Lactobacillus acidophilus 74-2 and butyrate induce cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 expression in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahkonen, Anna; Putaala, Heli; Mustonen, Harri; Rautonen, Nina; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) profile predicts prognosis of gastric cancer; COX-2 positive tumors are more often aggressive, and COX-2 suppression is protective against gastric cancer. In contrast, COX-1 suppression is harmful to the intestinal mucosa. The COX-1, COX-2, and COX-1ir expression profiles were measured with real-time PCR in primary (AGS) and metastatic (NCI-N87) gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines treated with butyrate, hyperosmolar medium, and, in the case of NCI-N87, cell-free supernatants of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus 74-2 and Bifidobacterium lactis 420. The cell lines showed differences in the profile when treated with either hyperosmolar medium or butyrate. In NCI-N87 COX-2 expression was higher but only COX-1 expression was significantly upregulated by butyrate. Similarly to butyrate, the cell-free supernatant of L. acidophilus 74-2 upregulated COX-1, while COX-2 expression remained unchanged. COX-1ir, including COX-3, was upregulated by probiotics and osmotic stress. In conclusion, consumption of L. acidophilus 74-2 could be beneficial for the expression of cytoprotective COX-1.

  19. An Investigation of Sleep Characteristics, EEG Abnormalities and Epilepsy in Developmentally Regressed and Non-Regressed Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannotti, Flavia; Cortesi, Flavia; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Miraglia, Daniela; Vagnoni, Cristina; Sebastiani, Teresa; Bernabei, Paola

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated sleep of children with autism and developmental regression and the possible relationship with epilepsy and epileptiform abnormalities. Participants were 104 children with autism (70 non-regressed, 34 regressed) and 162 typically developing children (TD). Results suggested that the regressed group had higher incidence of…

  20. An Investigation of Sleep Characteristics, EEG Abnormalities and Epilepsy in Developmentally Regressed and Non-Regressed Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannotti, Flavia; Cortesi, Flavia; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Miraglia, Daniela; Vagnoni, Cristina; Sebastiani, Teresa; Bernabei, Paola

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated sleep of children with autism and developmental regression and the possible relationship with epilepsy and epileptiform abnormalities. Participants were 104 children with autism (70 non-regressed, 34 regressed) and 162 typically developing children (TD). Results suggested that the regressed group had higher incidence of…

  1. Molecular docking studies of withanolides against Cox-2 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Yogeswaran; Dinakaran, Sathis Kumar; Macharala, Sravan Prasad; Ghosh, Somsubhra; Karanam, Sridevi Ranjitha; Kanthasamy, Naveena; Avasarala, Harani

    2012-07-01

    Withaniasomnifera (Ashwaganda) belonging to the family solanaceae is the subject of our present study. Withanoloides which are the major chemical constituents have been proved of interest because of their structural variations in the hybrids of different races. Docking is the process which brings the two structures together. In the present study we focus the extensive use of tool and graphical software for the identification of the binding energy of selected Withanolides like Withaferin -A, Withanolide-D from Withaniasomnifera and to screen the phytoconstituents that will dock/bind to the active sites of COX-2 enzyme. The relief from the symptoms of inflammation and pain can be by the Pharmacological inhibition of COX which involves the prediction of potential ligand for the treatment of inflammation. The energy value of docking between the target and the phytoconstituents under investigation and comparison with Diclofenac sodium was taken into consideration for coming into conclusion regarding the best pose and the binding ability.

  2. Fatal hyperkalemia related to combined therapy with a COX-2 inhibitor, ACE inhibitor and potassium rich diet.

    PubMed

    Hay, Emile; Derazon, Hashmonai; Bukish, Natalia; Katz, Leonid; Kruglyakov, Igor; Armoni, Michael

    2002-05-01

    We describe the case of a 77-year old mildly hypertensive woman with no underlying renal disease who was admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) in a comatose state with fever. The patient had been on low dose enalapril and a potassium rich diet. Five days before admission, rofecoxib, a new selective COX-2 inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), was added for leg pain. She was found to have severe hyperkalemia and died 90 min after her arrival. We cannot absolutely determine whether the COX-2 inhibitor was the dominant contributor to the development of hyperkalemia or the combination itself, with an intercurrent infection and some degree of dehydration. Physicians should be aware of this possible complication and only prescribe NSAIDs, including the new COX-2 drugs, to the elderly under close monitoring of kidney function and electrolyte tests.

  3. Development of a new meta-score for protein structure prediction from seven all-atom distance dependent potentials using support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Matsuyuki; Ishida, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2009-10-01

    An accurate scoring function is required for protein structure prediction. The scoring function should distinguish the native structure among model structures (decoys) and it also should have correlation with the quality of the decoys. However, we had observed the trade-off between the two requirements for seven all-atom distance dependent potentials in the previous study, where the native structure could be discriminated by examining the fine atomic details, whereas the correlation could be improved by examining coarse-grained interactions, To overcome this problem, in this study, we tried to make an improved scoring function by combining the seven potentials. First, the seven potentials were normalized by the expected energy values of the native and reference states of the target protein. Second, the relationship between the seven normalized energies and the quality (GDT_TS) of the structure were learned using support vector regression with the decoy sets of CASP6 as the training set. Then the meta-score was obtained as the predicted GDT_TS and it was tested with the decoys of the CASP7 experiment. The meta-score showed improvement in correlations with the GDT_TS and in the Z-score of the native structure. It also showed comparable performances in the GDT and enrichment criteria, with the best component potentials. The meta-score could be also used as the absolute quality of the structures. Our study suggests the benefit of combining several different scoring functions for model evaluation.

  4. Development of land use regression models for PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and O3 in Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Zhang, Can; Bi, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Ambient air pollution has been a global problem, especially in China. Comparing with other methods, Land Use Regression (LUR) models can obtain air pollutant concentration distribution at finer scale without the air pollution source data based on a few monitoring sites and predictors. However, limited LUR studies have been conducted on the basis of regular monitoring networks. Thus, we explored the applicability of conducting LUR models for four key air pollutants: PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and O3, on the basis of national monitoring networks which have good representation of areas with different characteristics in Nanjing, China. Fifty-nine potential predictor variables were considered, including land use type, population density, traffic emission, industrial emission, geographical coordinates, meteorology and topography. LUR models of these four air pollutants were with good explained variance for four key air pollutants. Adjusted explained variance of the LUR models was highest for NO2 (87%), followed by SO2 (83%), and was lower for PM2.5 (72%) and O3 (65%). Annual average distributions of pollutants in 2013 were obtained based on predicted values, which revealed that O3 in Nanjing was more heavily impacted by regional influences. This study would not only contribute to the wider use of LUR studies in China but also offer important reference for the application of regular monitoring network with high representativeness in LUR studies. These results would also support for air epidemiological studies in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Some functional limit theorems for compound Cox processes

    SciTech Connect

    Korolev, Victor Yu.; Chertok, A. V.; Korchagin, A. Yu.; Kossova, E. V.; Zeifman, Alexander I.

    2016-06-08

    An improved version of the functional limit theorem is proved establishing weak convergence of random walks generated by compound doubly stochastic Poisson processes (compound Cox processes) to Lévy processes in the Skorokhod space under more realistic moment conditions. As corollaries, theorems are proved on convergence of random walks with jumps having finite variances to Lévy processes with variance-mean mixed normal distributions, in particular, to stable Lévy processes.

  6. Some functional limit theorems for compound Cox processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Victor Yu.; Chertok, A. V.; Korchagin, A. Yu.; Kossova, E. V.; Zeifman, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    An improved version of the functional limit theorem is proved establishing weak convergence of random walks generated by compound doubly stochastic Poisson processes (compound Cox processes) to Lévy processes in the Skorokhod space under more realistic moment conditions. As corollaries, theorems are proved on convergence of random walks with jumps having finite variances to Lévy processes with variance-mean mixed normal distributions, in particular, to stable Lévy processes.

  7. Cox models survival analysis based on breast cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Alireza; Yavari, Parvin; Dehghani-Arani, Monireh; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghasemi, Erfan; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Bajdik, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between different treatments and survival time of breast cancer patients using either standard Cox model or stratified Cox model. The study was conducted on 15830 women diagnosed with breast cancer in British Columbia, Canada. They were divided into eight groups according to patients' ages and stage of disease Either Cox's PH model or stratified Cox model was fitted to each group according to the PH assumption and tested using Schoenfeld residuals. The data show that in the group of patients under age 50 years old and over age 50 with stage I cancer, the highest hazard was related to radiotherapy (HR= 3.15, CI: 1.85-5.35) and chemotherapy (HR= 3, CI: 2.29- 3.93) respectively. For both groups of patients with stage II cancer, the highest risk was related to radiotherapy (HR=3.02, CI: 2.26-4.03) (HR=2.16, CI:1.85-2.52). For both groups of patients with stage III cancer, the highest risk was for surgery (HR=0.49, CI: 0.33-0.73), (HR=0.45, CI: 0.36-0.57). For patients of age 50 years or less with stage IV cancer, none of the treatments were statistically significant. In group of patients over age 50 years old with stage IV cancer, the highest hazard was related to surgery (HR=0.64, CI: 0.53-0.78). The results of this study show that for patients with stage I and II breast cancer, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had the highest hazard; for patients with stage III and IV breast cancer, the highest hazard was associated with treatment surgery.

  8. Regression of prostate tumors upon combination of hormone ablation therapy and celecoxib in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abedinpour, Parisa; Baron, Véronique T; Welsh, John; Borgström, Per

    2011-06-01

    Hormonal ablation is the standard of treatment for advanced androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Although tumor regression is usually achieved at first, the cancer inevitably evolves toward androgen-independence, in part because of the development of mechanisms of resistance and in part because at the tissue level androgen withdrawal is not fully attained. Current research efforts are focused on new therapeutic strategies that will increase the effectiveness of androgen withdrawal and delay recurrence. We used a syngeneic pseudo-orthotropic mouse model of prostate cancer to test the efficacy of combining androgen withdrawal with FDA-approved COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. GFP-tagged TRAMP-C2 cells were co-implanted with prostate tissue in the dorsal chamber model and tumors were allowed to establish and vascularize. Tumor growth and angiogenesis were monitored in real-time using fluorescent intravital microscopy (IVM). Androgen withdrawal in mice was achieved using surgical castration or chemical hormonal ablation, alone or in combination with celecoxib (15 mg/kg, twice daily). Celecoxib alone decreased the growth of prostate tumors mostly by inducing mitotic failure, which resulted in increased apoptosis. Surprisingly, celecoxib did not possess significant angiostatic activity. Surgical or chemical castration prevented the growth of prostate tumors and this, on the other hand, was associated with disruption of the tumor vasculature. Finally, androgen withdrawal combined with celecoxib caused tumor regression through decreased angiogenesis and increased mitosis arrest and apoptosis. Celecoxib, a relatively safe COX-2-selective anti-inflammatory drug, significantly increases the efficacy of androgen withdrawal in vivo and warrants further investigation as a complement therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Log Gaussian Cox processes and spatially aggregated disease incidence data.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Brown, Patrick; Gesink, Dionne C; Rue, Håvard

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a methodology for modeling aggregated disease incidence data with the spatially continuous log-Gaussian Cox process. Statistical models for spatially aggregated disease incidence data usually assign the same relative risk to all individuals in the same reporting region (census areas or postal regions). A further assumption that the relative risks in two regions are independent given their neighbor's risks (the Markov assumption) makes the commonly used Besag-York-Mollié model computationally simple. The continuous model proposed here uses a data augmentation step to sample from the posterior distribution of the exact locations at each step of an Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, and models the exact locations with an log-Gaussian Cox process. A simulation study shows the log-Gaussian Cox process model consistently outperforming the Besag-York-Mollié model. The method is illustrated by making inference on the spatial distribution of syphilis risk in North Carolina. The effect of several known social risk factors are estimated, and areas with risk well in excess of that expected given these risk factors are identified.

  10. [New studies of COX-inhibitors, yet issues remain].

    PubMed

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2003-09-18

    Advantages and risks related to the use of selective COX-2 inhibitors when treating arthritis are currently being scrutinized by authorities and public. The discussion tends towards exaggerated claims for or against their usefulness. The issue of cardiovascular safety is still not finally settled. In an experimental study using patients with severe coronary disease, administration of celecoxib resulted in improved endothelial function together with reduced CRP levels. Gastrointestinal tolerance was studied in patients who had recently recovered from peptic ulcer bleeding. In this group of high risk patients, celecoxib was as safe as combined therapy using omeprazol and diclofenac when given for 6 months. However, both COX inhibitors caused hypertension and adverse renal effects. The second generation of selective inhibitors is being launched. Etoricoxib--related to rofecoxib--was shown to be as potent as indomethacin in the treatment of acute gout, but it caused fewer adverse reactions. In general, however, any advantage of second generation as compared to first generation COX-2 inhibitors remains to be proven. The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care, in its "SBU Alert", has published an appraisal of celecoxib and rofecoxib, in which the need for further long-term safety studies is emphasized.

  11. Hyperalgesia and Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial with Perioperative COX-2 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    van Helmond, Noud; Steegers, Monique A.; Filippini-de Moor, Gertie P.; Vissers, Kris C.; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent pain is a challenging clinical problem after breast cancer treatment. After surgery, inflammatory pain and nociceptive input from nerve injury induce central sensitization which may play a role in the genesis of persistent pain. Using quantitative sensory testing, we tested the hypothesis that adding COX-2 inhibition to standard treatment reduces hyperalgesia after breast cancer surgery. A secondary hypothesis was that patients developing persistent pain would exhibit more postoperative hyperalgesia. Methods 138 women scheduled for lumpectomy/mastectomy under general anesthesia with paravertebral block were randomized to COX-2 inhibition (2x40mg parecoxib on day of surgery, thereafter 2x200mg celecoxib/day until day five) or placebo. Preoperatively and 1, 5, 15 days and 1, 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively, we determined electric and pressure pain tolerance thresholds in dermatomes C6/T4/L1 and a 100mm VAS score for pain. We calculated the sum of pain tolerance thresholds and analyzed change in these versus preoperatively using mixed models analysis with factor medication. To assess hyperalgesia in persistent pain patients we performed an additional analysis on patients reporting VAS>30 at 12 months. Results 48 COX-2 inhibition and 46 placebo patients were analyzed in a modified intention to treat analysis. Contrary to our primary hypothesis, change in the sum of tolerance thresholds in the COX-2 inhibition group was not different versus placebo. COX-2 inhibition had an effect on pain on movement at postoperative day 5 (p<0.01). Consistent with our secondary hypothesis, change in sum of pressure pain tolerance thresholds in 11 patients that developed persistent pain was negative versus patients without pain (p<0.01) from day 5 to 1 year postoperatively. Conclusions Perioperative COX-2 inhibition has limited value in preventing sensitization and persistent pain after breast cancer surgery. Central sensitization may play a role in the genesis of

  12. Developmental regression in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sally J

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of developmental regression in autism is one of the more puzzling features of this disorder. Although several studies have documented the validity of parental reports of regression using home videos, accumulating data suggest that most children who demonstrate regression also demonstrated previous, subtle, developmental differences. Counter to clinical intuition, the earlier development of social, language, and attachment behaviors followed by regression does not seem to support later recovery of skills or better developmental outcomes compared to children who never had speech or typical social responsivity. In fact, this regressive group may have somewhat greater developmental impairment than the nonregressive group, though the two groups do not appear to present different behavioral phenotypes. Although autism is not the only condition in which regression occurs, it appears to be the most frequent condition. Other disorders that demonstrate an early regression with no known etiology include total blindness from birth and childhood disintegrative disorder, both of which demonstrate behavioral relations to autism. In addition, two biological conditions with known etiologies also involve regression with some behaviors resembling autism behavioral phenotype: Rett syndrome (a genetic disorder; see Glaze, this issue) and Landau-Kleffner syndrome (see McVicar and Shinnar, this issue), which involves a seizure disorder.

  13. [Caudal regression syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hortelano, M; Palencia, J; García, J; Reig, C; Herrera, M; Romero, M D; Cuadrado, P

    1998-10-01

    The regression caudal syndrome includes a spectrum of malformations which vary from the symptomless coccygeal agenesis until thoracic vertebrae and sacrococcygeal agenesis with severe neurological deficit; it is associated sometimes with malformations in other organs and systems. We present a case of partial agenesis of sacro and coccix with neuromuscular, sphincter and orthopedist alterations. A 4-year-old patient consults because of walk alterations, with daytime and nocturnal enuresis and urinary incontinence, constipation/encopresis and rectal prolapse. Familiar and personnel precedents are uninteresting. She began to walk at normal age, referring only rectal prolapse with constipation from nursing and urinary tract infections and encopresis when she was 3 years old, with normal complementary explorations (digestive and nephrourologyc). She presents in lumbosacral X-rays four lumbar vertebrae, a dysplasic sacro and absence of coccix. Hypoplasy of sacro with bilateral stenosis of the pelvis and coxa vara in both femurs are seen in the lumbar CT. In RMI is observed agenesis of sacro and coccix vertebrae. There are a wide variety of sacrococcygeal agenesis, which are classified by Renshaw and modified by Pang. As etiologics factors we find the gestational diabetes, in addition to genetic factors. The clinic exploration guides us toward a flaccid paraparesia/areflexia, with orthopaedist alterations, sometimes of artrogripotyc type. With image techniques (X-rays, CT, MRI) we can accomplish the diagnosis and we can discard or demonstrate associated medullary anomalies. We concluded that in all patient with alterations of walk and/or lack of sphincters control we should explore the lumbosacral region searching for medulodiysplasic or vertebral alterations.

  14. Constitutively expressed COX-2 in osteoblasts positively regulates Akt signal transduction via suppression of PTEN activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Ju; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2011-02-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is thought to be an inducible enzyme, but increasing reports indicate that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in several organs. The status of COX-2 expression in bone and its physiological role remains undefined. Non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective COX-2 inhibitors, which commonly suppress COX-2 activity, were reported to suppress osteoblast proliferation via Akt/FOXO3a/p27(Kip1) signaling, suggesting that COX-2 may be the key factor of the suppressive effects of NSAIDs on proliferation. Although Akt activation correlates with PTEN deficiency and cell viability, the role of COX-2 on PTEN/Akt regulation remains unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that COX-2 may be constitutively expressed in osteoblasts and regulate PTEN/Akt-related proliferation. We examined the localization and co-expression of COX-2 and p-Akt in normal mouse femurs and in cultured mouse (mOBs) and human osteoblasts (hOBs). Our results showed that osteoblasts adjacent to the trabeculae, periosteum and endosteum in mouse femurs constitutively expressed COX-2, while COX-2 co-expressed with p-Akt in osteoblasts sitting adjacent to trabeculae in vivo, and in mOBs and hOBs in vitro. We further used COX-2 siRNA to test the role of COX-2 in Akt signaling in hOBs; COX-2 silencing significantly inhibited PTEN phosphorylation, enhanced PTEN activity, and suppressed p-Akt level and proliferation. However, replenishment of the COX-2 enzymatic product, PGE2, failed to reverse COX-2-dependent Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, transfection with recombinant human COX-2 (rhCOX-2) significantly reversed COX-2 siRNA-suppressed PTEN phosphorylation, but this effect was reduced when the enzymatic activity of rhCOX-2 was blocked. This finding indicated that the effect of COX-2 on PTEN/Akt signaling is not related to PGE2 but still dependent on COX-2 enzymatic activity. Conversely, COX-1 silencing did not affect PTEN/Akt signaling. Our findings provide

  15. Recursive Algorithm For Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, S. V.

    1988-01-01

    Order of model determined easily. Linear-regression algorithhm includes recursive equations for coefficients of model of increased order. Algorithm eliminates duplicative calculations, facilitates search for minimum order of linear-regression model fitting set of data satisfactory.

  16. Development of a predictive model for lead, cadmium and fluorine soil-water partition coefficients using sparse multiple linear regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kengo; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Komai, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we applied sparse multiple linear regression (SMLR) analysis to clarify the relationships between soil properties and adsorption characteristics for a range of soils across Japan and identify easily-obtained physical and chemical soil properties that could be used to predict K and n values of cadmium, lead and fluorine. A model was first constructed that can easily predict the K and n values from nine soil parameters (pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, total carbon, soil organic matter from loss on ignition and water holding capacity, the ratio of sand, silt and clay). The K and n values of cadmium, lead and fluorine of 17 soil samples were used to verify the SMLR models by the root mean square error values obtained from 512 combinations of soil parameters. The SMLR analysis indicated that fluorine adsorption to soil may be associated with organic matter, whereas cadmium or lead adsorption to soil is more likely to be influenced by soil pH, IL. We found that an accurate K value can be predicted from more than three soil parameters for most soils. Approximately 65% of the predicted values were between 33 and 300% of their measured values for the K value; 76% of the predicted values were within ±30% of their measured values for the n value. Our findings suggest that adsorption properties of lead, cadmium and fluorine to soil can be predicted from the soil physical and chemical properties using the presented models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of temporally refined land-use regression models predicting daily household-level air pollution in a panel study of lung function among asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Markey; Macneill, Morgan; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Nethery, Elizabeth; Xu, Xiaohong; Dales, Robert; Rasmussen, Pat; Wheeler, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory monitoring data and land-use regression (LUR) models have been widely used for estimating individual exposure to ambient air pollution in epidemiologic studies. However, LUR models lack fine-scale temporal resolution for predicting acute exposure and regulatory monitoring provides daily concentrations, but fails to capture spatial variability within urban areas. This study coupled LUR models with continuous regulatory monitoring to predict daily ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and particulate matter (PM(2.5)) at 50 homes in Windsor, Ontario. We compared predicted versus measured daily outdoor concentrations for 5 days in winter and 5 days in summer at each home. We also examined the implications of using modeled versus measured daily pollutant concentrations to predict daily lung function among asthmatic children living in those homes. Mixed effect analysis suggested that temporally refined LUR models explained a greater proportion of the spatial and temporal variance in daily household-level outdoor NO(2) measurements compared with daily concentrations based on regulatory monitoring. Temporally refined LUR models captured 40% (summer) and 10% (winter) more of the spatial variance compared with regulatory monitoring data. Ambient PM(2.5) showed little spatial variation; therefore, daily PM(2.5) models were similar to regulatory monitoring data in the proportion of variance explained. Furthermore, effect estimates for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) based on modeled pollutant concentrations were consistent with effects based on household-level measurements for NO(2) and PM(2.5). These results suggest that LUR modeling can be combined with continuous regulatory monitoring data to predict daily household-level exposure to ambient air pollution. Temporally refined LUR models provided a modest improvement in estimating daily household-level NO(2) compared with regulatory monitoring data alone, suggesting that this

  18. PET radiotracer [¹⁸F]-P6 selectively targeting COX-1 as a novel biomarker in ovarian cancer: preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Malerba, Paola; Uddin, Md Jashim; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Crews, Brenda C; Daniel, Cristina K; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Nickels, Mike; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Manning, H Charles; Marnett, Lawrence J; Scilimati, Antonio

    2014-06-10

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), but not COX-2, is expressed at high levels in the early stages of human epithelial ovarian cancer where it seems to play a key role in cancer onset and progression. As a consequence, COX-1 is an ideal biomarker for early ovarian cancer detection. A series of novel fluorinated COX-1-targeted imaging agents derived from P6 was developed by using a highly selective COX-1 inhibitor as a lead compound. Among these new compounds, designed by structural modification of P6, 3-(5-chlorofuran-2-yl)-5-(fluoromethyl)-4-phenylisoxazole ([(18/19)F]-P6) is the most promising derivative [IC50 = 2.0 μM (purified oCOX-1) and 1.37 μM (hOVCAR-3 cell COX-1)]. Its tosylate precursor was also prepared and, a method for radio[(18)F]chemistry was developed and optimized. The radiochemistry was carried out using a carrier-free K(18)F/Kryptofix 2.2.2 complex, that afforded [(18)F]-P6 in good radiochemical yield (18%) and high purity (>95%). In vivo PET/CT imaging data showed that the radiotracer [(18)F]-P6 was selectively taken up by COX-1-expressing ovarian carcinoma (OVCAR 3) tumor xenografts as compared with the normal leg muscle. Our results suggest that [(18)F]-P6 might be an useful radiotracer in preclinical and clinical settings for in vivo PET-CT imaging of tissues that express elevated levels of COX-1.

  19. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

  20. Using cluster analysis and a classification and regression tree model to developed cover types in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona [Abstract

    Treesearch

    Jose M. Iniguez; Joseph L. Ganey; Peter J. Daugherty; John D. Bailey

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rule based cover type classification system for the forest and woodland vegetation in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona. In order to develop such system we qualitatively and quantitatively compared a hierarchical (Ward’s) and a non-hierarchical (k-means) clustering method. Ecologically, unique groups and plots...

  1. Using cluster analysis and a classification and regression tree model to developed cover types in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona

    Treesearch

    Jose M. Iniguez; Joseph L. Ganey; Peter J. Daughtery; John D. Bailey

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rule based cover type classification system for the forest and woodland vegetation in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona. In order to develop such a system we qualitatively and quantitatively compared a hierarchical (Ward’s) and a non-hierarchical (k-means) clustering method. Ecologically, unique groups represented by...

  2. Assessment of the Relative Contribution of COX-1 and COX-2 Isoforms to Ischemia-induced Oxidative Damage and Neurodegeneration Following Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; González-Falcón, Armando; García-Cabrera, Michel; Álvarez, Dalia; Al-Dalain, Said; Martínez, Gregorio; Sonia León, Olga; Springer, Joe E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the relative contribution of COX-1 and/or COX-2 to oxidative damage, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and hippocampal CA1 neuronal loss in a model of 5 min transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Our results revealed a biphasic and significant increase in PGE2 levels after 2 and 24-48 h of reperfusion. The late increase in PGE2 levels (24 h) was more potently reduced by the highly selective COX-2 inhibitor Rofecoxib (20 mg/kg) relative to the COX-1 inhibitor Valeryl Salicylate (20 mg/kg). The delayed rise in COX catalytic activity preceded the onset of histopathological changes in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Post-ischemia treatment with Rofecoxib (starting 6 h after restoration of blood flow) significantly reduced measures of oxidative damage (glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation) seen at 48 h after the initial ischemic episode, indicating that the late increase in COX-2 activity is involved in the delayed occurrence of oxidative damage in the hippocampus after global ischemia. Interestingly, selective inhibition of COX-2 with Rofecoxib or inhibition of COX-1 with Valeryl Salicylate significantly increased the number of healthy neurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector even when the treatment began 6 h after ischemia. These results provide the first evidence that both COX isoforms are involved in the progression of neuronal damage following global cerebral ischemia, and have important implications for the potential therapeutic use of COX inhibitors in cerebral ischemia. PMID:12859668

  3. Assessment of the relative contribution of COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms to ischemia-induced oxidative damage and neurodegeneration following transient global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; González-Falcón, Armando; García-Cabrera, Michel; Alvarez, Dalia; Al-Dalain, Said; Martínez, Gregorio; León, Olga Sonia; Springer, Joe E

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the relative contribution of COX-1 and/or COX-2 to oxidative damage, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and hippocampal CA1 neuronal loss in a model of 5 min transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Our results revealed a biphasic and significant increase in PGE2 levels after 2 and 24-48 h of reperfusion. The late increase in PGE2 levels (24 h) was more potently reduced by the highly selective COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib (20 mg/kg) relative to the COX-1 inhibitor valeryl salicylate (20 mg/kg). The delayed rise in COX catalytic activity preceded the onset of histopathological changes in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Post-ischemia treatment with rofecoxib (starting 6 h after restoration of blood flow) significantly reduced measures of oxidative damage (glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation) seen at 48 h after the initial ischemic episode, indicating that the late increase in COX-2 activity is involved in the delayed occurrence of oxidative damage in the hippocampus after global ischemia. Interestingly, either selective inhibition of COX-2 with rofecoxib or inhibition of COX-1 with valeryl salicylate significantly increased the number of healthy neurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector even when the treatment began 6 h after ischemia. These results provide the first evidence that both COX isoforms are involved in the progression of neuronal damage following global cerebral ischemia, and have important implications for the potential therapeutic use of COX inhibitors in cerebral ischemia.

  4. Effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens D.C. (devil's claw) on COX-1, COX-2 activity and nitric oxide production on whole-blood assay.

    PubMed

    Anauate, Maria Cecilia; Torres, Luce Maria; de Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw) on cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) activities and NO production using a whole blood assay. The activity of COX-1 was quantified as platelet thromboxane B(2) production in blood clotting and COX-2 as prostaglandin E(2) production in LPS-stimulated whole blood. Total NO(2) (-)/NO(3) (-) concentration was determined by Griess reaction in LPS stimulated blood. Assays were performed by incubation of isolated fractions obtained by flash chromatography monitored with HPLC, TLC and identified by (1)HNMR, containing different amounts of harpagoside with blood from healthy donors. Indomethacin and etoricoxib were the positive controls of COX-1 and COX-2 Inhibition. Data shows that fraction containing the highest concentration of harpagoside inhibited indistinctively COX-1 and COX-2 (37.2 and 29.5% respectively) activity and greatly inhibited NO production (66%). In contrast the fraction including iridoid pool increased COX-2 and did not alter NO and COX-1 activities. The fraction containing cinnamic acid was able to reduce only NO production (67%). Our results demonstrated that the harpagoside fraction is the main responsible for the effect of devils claw on these enzyme activities. However, other components from devil's claw crude extract could antagonize or increase the synthesis of inflammatory mediators.

  5. Expression of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1, COX-2) in some benign salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Lipari, L; Mauro, A; Gallina, S; Tortorici, S; Buscemi, M; Tete, S; Gerbino, A

    2012-01-01

    Salivary gland tumors, most of which are rare benign tumors, represent a histologically heterogenous group with the greatest diversity of morphological and cellular features. The aim of this study is to analyse the expression and possible interactions between gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1, COX-2) in some benign salivary gland tumors. We investigated the expression of gelatinases and cyclooxigenases in control salivary gland, Pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin's tumor through immunohistochemistry and Reverse Transcription - Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We identified the expression of both classes of enzyme in normal samples and in the two types of pathological samples without any quantitative differences. From the present data no significant differences emerge in the expression of these enzymes among the different pathologies examined. Nevertheless, due to the small number of samples included in this study, general statements regarding correlation between the degree of severity of the tumoral pathology and the quantitative expression of these potential tumoral markers can not be made.

  6. Structure Based Library Design (SBLD) for new 1,4-dihydropyrimidine scaffold as simultaneous COX-1/COX-2 and 5-LOX inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lokwani, Deepak; Azad, Rajaram; Sarkate, Aniket; Reddanna, Pallu; Shinde, Devanand

    2015-08-01

    The various scaffolds containing 1,4-dihydropyrimidine ring were designed by considering the environment of the active site of COX-1/COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. The structure-based library design approach, including the focused library design (Virtual Combinatorial Library Design) and virtual screening was used to select the 1,4-dihydropyrimidine scaffold for simultaneous inhibition of both enzyme pathways (COX-1/COX-2 and 5-LOX). The virtual library on each 1,4-dihydropyrimidine scaffold was enumerated in two alternative ways. In first way, the chemical reagents at R groups were filtered by docking of scaffold with single position substitution, that is, only at R1, or R2, or R3, … Rn on COX-2 enzyme using Glide XP docking mode. The structures that do not dock well were removed and the library was enumerated with filtered chemical reagents. In second alternative way, the single position docking stage was bypassed, and the entire library was enumerated using all chemical reagents by docking on the COX-2 enzyme. The entire library of approximately 15,629 compounds obtained from both ways after screening for drug like properties, were further screened for their binding affinity against COX-1 and 5-LOX enzymes using Virtual Screening Workflow. Finally, 142 hits were obtained and divided into two groups based on their binding affinity for COX-1/COX-2 and for both enzyme pathways (COX-1/COX-2 and 5-LOX). The ten molecules were selected, synthesized and evaluated for their COX-1, COX-2 and 5-LOX inhibiting activity.

  7. EGF receptor and COX-1/COX-2 enzyme proteins as related to corresponding mRNAs in human per-operative biopsies of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclooxygenase (COX) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activities promote progression of colorectal cancer. Combined treatment against these targets has not been more effective than single treatments alone. Therefore, our aim was to analyze relationships between COX and EGFR in peroperative colorectal tumor biopsies. Method Tumor and colon mucosa tissue were collected at primary intended curative operations in patients according to well-recognized statistical distributions of tumor stages in colorectal cancer. COX-1, COX-2 and EGFR content in tumor and colon mucosa tissue were quantified by western blot and Q-PCR. Results COX-2 protein appeared as two bands, one at 66 kDa in almost all tumor and mucosa samples and one at 74 kDa in 73% of the tumors and in 23% of the mucosa samples. Tumor COX-2 mRNA was not different from the content in mucosa samples, while COX-2 protein was increased in tumor tissue (p < 0.0003). A correlation between 74 kDa COX-2 protein and COX-2 mRNA occurred in tumor tissue, with significantly increasing COX-2 mRNA across tumor stages. EGFR mRNA content was lower in tumor tissue (p < 0.0001), while EGFR protein was similar in tumor and mucosa samples. COX-2 and EGFR proteins showed a positive correlation in mucosa, while a negative correlation occurred in tumor tissue. Tumor tissue with high COX-2 74 kDa protein lacked EGFR protein. Conclusion Our present results are compatible with the theory that COX-2 and EGFR signalling pathways are inversely related in colorectal cancer tissue. This may explain why combinatorial clinical treatments have been less rewarding. PMID:24171795

  8. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor. PMID:26734017

  9. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor.

  10. Analysis of COX2 mutants reveals cytochrome oxidase subassemblies in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase catalyses the reduction of oxygen to water. The mitochondrial enzyme contains up to 13 subunits, 11 in yeast, of which three, Cox1p, Cox2p and Cox3p, are mitochondrially encoded. The assembly pathway of this complex is still poorly understood. Its study in yeast has been so far impeded by the rapid turnover of unassembled subunits of the enzyme. In the present study, immunoblot analysis of blue native gels of yeast wild-type and Cox2p mutants revealed five cytochrome oxidase complexes or subcomplexes: a, b, c, d and f; a is likely to be the fully assembled enzyme; b lacks Cox6ap; d contains Cox7p and/or Cox7ap; f represents unassembled Cox1p; and c, observed only in the Cox2p mutants, contains Cox1p, Cox3p, Cox5p and Cox6p and lacks the other subunits. The identification of these novel cytochrome oxidase subcomplexes should encourage the reexamination of other yeast mutants. PMID:15921494

  11. Semiparametric Regression in Size-Biased Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying Qing

    2009-01-01

    Summary Size-biased sampling arises when a positive-valued outcome variable is sampled with selection probability proportional to its size. In this article, we propose a semiparametric linear regression model to analyze size-biased outcomes. In our proposed model, the regression parameters of the covariates are of major interest, while the distribution of random errors is unspecified. Under the proposed model, we discover that the regression parameters are invariant regardless of size-biased sampling. Following this invariance property, we develop a simple estimation procedure for inferences. Our proposed methods are evaluated in simulation studies and applied to two real data analyses. PMID:19432792

  12. [Iris movement mediates pupillary membrane regression].

    PubMed

    Morizane, Yuki

    2007-11-01

    In the course of mammalian lens development, a transient capillary meshwork called as the pupillary membrane (PM) forms. It is located in the pupil area to nourish the anterior surface of the lens, and then regresses to clear the optical path. Although the involvement of the apoptotic process has been reported in PM regression, the initiating factor remains unknown. We initially found that regression of the PM coincided with the development of iris motility, and that iris movement caused cessation and resumption of blood flow within the PM. Therefore, we investigated whether the development of the capacity of the iris to constrict and dilate can function as an essential signal that induces apoptosis in the PM. Continuous inhibition of iris movement with mydriatic agents suppressed apoptosis of the PM and resulted in the persistence of PM in rats. The distribution of apoptotic cells in the regressing PM was diffuse and showed no apparent localization. These results indicated that iris movement induced regression of the PM by changing the blood flow within it. This study suggests the importance of the physiological interactions between tissues-in this case, the iris and the PM-as a signal to advance vascular regression during organ development.

  13. Application of nonparametric regression and statistical testing to identify the impact of oil and natural gas development on local air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Pekney, Natalie J.; Cheng, Hanqi; Small, Mitchell J.

    2015-11-05

    Abstract: The objective of the current work was to develop a statistical method and associated tool to evaluate the impact of oil and natural gas exploration and production activities on local air quality.

  14. Regression model development and computational procedures to support estimation of real-time concentrations and loads of selected constituents in two tributaries to Lake Houston near Houston, Texas, 2005-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Michael T.; Asquith, William H.; Oden, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Houston, Texas, began collecting discrete water-quality samples for nutrients, total organic carbon, bacteria (Escherichia coli and total coliform), atrazine, and suspended sediment at two USGS streamflow-gaging stations that represent watersheds contributing to Lake Houston (08068500 Spring Creek near Spring, Tex., and 08070200 East Fork San Jacinto River near New Caney, Tex.). Data from the discrete water-quality samples collected during 2005–9, in conjunction with continuously monitored real-time data that included streamflow and other physical water-quality properties (specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen), were used to develop regression models for the estimation of concentrations of water-quality constituents of substantial source watersheds to Lake Houston. The potential explanatory variables included discharge (streamflow), specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and time (to account for seasonal variations inherent in some water-quality data). The response variables (the selected constituents) at each site were nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, E. coli, atrazine, and suspended sediment. The explanatory variables provide easily measured quantities to serve as potential surrogate variables to estimate concentrations of the selected constituents through statistical regression. Statistical regression also facilitates accompanying estimates of uncertainty in the form of prediction intervals. Each regression model potentially can be used to estimate concentrations of a given constituent in real time. Among other regression diagnostics, the diagnostics used as indicators of general model reliability and reported herein include the adjusted R-squared, the residual standard error, residual plots, and p-values. Adjusted R-squared values for the Spring Creek models ranged

  15. Almost efficient estimation of relative risk regression

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Arriaga, Alex; Sinha, Debajyoti; Greenberg, Caprice; Gawande, Atul A.

    2014-01-01

    Relative risks (RRs) are often considered the preferred measures of association in prospective studies, especially when the binary outcome of interest is common. In particular, many researchers regard RRs to be more intuitively interpretable than odds ratios. Although RR regression is a special case of generalized linear models, specifically with a log link function for the binomial (or Bernoulli) outcome, the resulting log-binomial regression does not respect the natural parameter constraints. Because log-binomial regression does not ensure that predicted probabilities are mapped to the [0,1] range, maximum likelihood (ML) estimation is often subject to numerical instability that leads to convergence problems. To circumvent these problems, a number of alternative approaches for estimating RR regression parameters have been proposed. One approach that has been widely studied is the use of Poisson regression estimating equations. The estimating equations for Poisson regression yield consistent, albeit inefficient, estimators of the RR regression parameters. We consider the relative efficiency of the Poisson regression estimator and develop an alternative, almost efficient estimator for the RR regression parameters. The proposed method uses near-optimal weights based on a Maclaurin series (Taylor series expanded around zero) approximation to the true Bernoulli or binomial weight function. This yields an almost efficient estimator while avoiding convergence problems. We examine the asymptotic relative efficiency of the proposed estimator for an increase in the number of terms in the series. Using simulations, we demonstrate the potential for convergence problems with standard ML estimation of the log-binomial regression model and illustrate how this is overcome using the proposed estimator. We apply the proposed estimator to a study of predictors of pre-operative use of beta blockers among patients undergoing colorectal surgery after diagnosis of colon cancer. PMID

  16. A plant flavonoid fisetin induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells by inhibition of COX2 and Wnt/EGFR/NF-κB-signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and uncontrolled wingless and Int (Wnt)-signaling pathway have long been suggested to play crucial roles in colorectal cancer. Studies show that selective COX2 inhibitors possess great potential as chemopreventive agents for colon cancer. Recent studies suggest that targeting COX2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may provide better therapeutic strategy than inhibiting either single target and that this may alleviate the problem of COX2 inhibitor-associated side effects. Therefore, there have been intensive efforts to develop novel dietary substances that target COX2 and EGFR activation. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid commonly found in various vegetables and fruits. We found that the treatment of COX2-overexpressing HT29 human colon cancer cells with fisetin (30–120 μM) resulted in induction of apoptosis, downregulation of COX2 protein expression without affecting COX1 and inhibited the secretion of prostaglandin E2. Treatment of cells with fisetin also inhibited Wnt-signaling activity through downregulation of β-catenin and T cell factor 4 and decreased the expression of target genes such as cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase 7. Fisetin treatment of cells also inhibited the activation of EGFR and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Finally, the formation of colonies in soft agar was suppressed by fisetin treatment. Taken together, we provide evidence that the plant flavonoid fisetin can induce apoptosis and suppress the growth of colon cancer cells by inhibition of COX2- and Wnt/EGFR/NF-κB-signaling pathways. We suggest that fisetin could be a useful agent for prevention and treatment of colon cancer. PMID:19037088

  17. Aggravation of Alzheimer's disease due to the COX-2-mediated reciprocal regulation of IL-1β and Aβ between glial and neuron cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Guan, Pei-Pei; Wang, Tao; Yu, Xin; Guo, Jian-Jun; Wang, Zhan-You

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and displays the characteristics of chronic neurodegenerative disorders; amyloid plaques (AP) that contain amyloid β-protein (Aβ) accumulate in AD, which is also characterized by tau phosphorylation. Epidemiological evidence has demonstrated that long-term treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) markedly reduces the risk of AD by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Although the levels of COX-2 and its metabolic product prostaglandin (PG)E2 are elevated in the brain of AD patients, the mechanisms for the development of AD remain unknown. Using human- or mouse-derived glioblastoma and neuroblastoma cell lines as model systems, we delineated the signaling pathways by which COX-2 mediates the reciprocal regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Aβ between glial and neuron cells. In glioblastoma cells, COX-2 regulates the synthesis of IL-1β in a PGE2 -dependent manner. Moreover, COX-2-derived PGE2 signals the activation of the PI3-K/AKT and PKA/CREB pathways via cyclic AMP; these pathways transactivate the NF-κB p65 subunit via phosphorylation at Ser 536 and Ser 276, leading to IL-1β synthesis. The secretion of IL-1β from glioblastoma cells in turn stimulates the expression of COX-2 in human or mouse neuroblastoma cells. Similar regulatory mechanisms were found for the COX-2 regulation of BACE-1 expression in neuroblastoma cells. More importantly, Aβ deposition mediated the inflammatory response of glial cells via inducing the expression of COX-2 in glioblastoma cells. These findings not only provide new insights into the mechanisms of COX-2-induced AD but also initially define the therapeutic targets of AD.

  18. Linear regression in astronomy. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, Takashi; Feigelson, Eric D.; Akritas, Michael G.; Babu, Gutti Jogesh

    1990-01-01

    Five methods for obtaining linear regression fits to bivariate data with unknown or insignificant measurement errors are discussed: ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression of Y on X, OLS regression of X on Y, the bisector of the two OLS lines, orthogonal regression, and 'reduced major-axis' regression. These methods have been used by various researchers in observational astronomy, most importantly in cosmic distance scale applications. Formulas for calculating the slope and intercept coefficients and their uncertainties are given for all the methods, including a new general form of the OLS variance estimates. The accuracy of the formulas was confirmed using numerical simulations. The applicability of the procedures is discussed with respect to their mathematical properties, the nature of the astronomical data under consideration, and the scientific purpose of the regression. It is found that, for problems needing symmetrical treatment of the variables, the OLS bisector performs significantly better than orthogonal or reduced major-axis regression.

  19. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism via COX-1 and COX-2 contributes to the endothelial dysfunction of penile arteries from obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, A; Contreras, C; Villalba, N; Martínez, P; Martínez, AC; Bríones, A; Salaíces, M; García-Sacristán, A; Hernández, M; Prieto, D

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism via cyclooxygenase (COX) in the endothelial dysfunction of penile arteries from pre-diabetic, obese Zucker rats (OZR). Experimental approach: Penile arteries from OZR and from lean Zucker rats (LZR) were mounted in microvascular myographs to assess vascular function and COX expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Key results: Acetylcholine (ACh) and AA elicited relaxations that were impaired in arteries from OZR. Inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2 reduced the relaxant effects of ACh and AA in LZR but not in OZR. Inhibitors of COX-1 and of the TXA2/PGH2 (TP) receptor enhanced the relaxations induced by AA in both LZR and OZR, whereas COX-2 inhibition enhanced these responses only in OZR. TP receptor blockade did not restore ACh relaxant responses in arteries from OZR. Inhibition of COX-1 increased basal tension in OZR and this contraction was blunted by TP receptor blockade. The vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline were augmented by indomethacin and by COX-2 inhibition in LZR but not in OZR. Immunohistochemical staining showed that both COX-1 and COX-2 are expressed in the endothelium of penile arteries from both LZR and OZR. Conclusions and implications: Vasoactive prostanoids were formed via constitutively active COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in normal rat penile arteries. Under conditions of insulin resistance, the release and/or effects of vasodilator prostanoids were impaired, contributing to the blunted endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and to the enhanced vasoconstriction. PMID:20082610

  20. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  1. Evaluating differential effects using regression interactions and regression mixture models

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This paper focuses on understanding regression mixture models, a relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their formulation, and their assumptions are compared using Monte Carlo simulations and real data analysis. The capabilities of regression mixture models are described and specific issues to be addressed when conducting regression mixtures are proposed. The paper aims to clarify the role that regression mixtures can take in the estimation of differential effects and increase awareness of the benefits and potential pitfalls of this approach. Regression mixture models are shown to be a potentially effective exploratory method for finding differential effects when these effects can be defined by a small number of classes of respondents who share a typical relationship between a predictor and an outcome. It is also shown that the comparison between regression mixture models and interactions becomes substantially more complex as the number of classes increases. It is argued that regression interactions are well suited for direct tests of specific hypotheses about differential effects and regression mixtures provide a useful approach for exploring effect heterogeneity given adequate samples and study design. PMID:26556903

  2. Cox Models Survival Analysis Based on Breast Cancer Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Alireza; Yavari, Parvin; Dehghani-Arani, Monireh; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghasemi, Erfan; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Bajdik, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between different treatments and survival time of breast cancer patients using either standard Cox model or stratified Cox model. Methods The study was conducted on 15830 women diagnosed with breast cancer in British Columbia, Canada. They were divided into eight groups according to patients’ ages and stage of disease Either Cox’s PH model or stratified Cox model was fitted to each group according to the PH assumption and tested using Schoenfeld residuals. Results The data show that in the group of patients under age 50 years old and over age 50 with stage I cancer, the highest hazard was related to radiotherapy (HR= 3.15, CI: 1.85-5.35) and chemotherapy (HR= 3, CI: 2.29- 3.93) respectively. For both groups of patients with stage II cancer, the highest risk was related to radiotherapy (HR=3.02, CI: 2.26-4.03) (HR=2.16, CI:1.85-2.52). For both groups of patients with stage III cancer, the highest risk was for surgery (HR=0.49, CI: 0.33-0.73), (HR=0.45, CI: 0.36-0.57). For patients of age 50 years or less with stage IV cancer, none of the treatments were statistically significant. In group of patients over age 50 years old with stage IV cancer, the highest hazard was related to surgery (HR=0.64, CI: 0.53-0.78). Conclusion The results of this study show that for patients with stage I and II breast cancer, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had the highest hazard; for patients with stage III and IV breast cancer, the highest hazard was associated with treatment surgery. PMID:25250162

  3. The cardiac copper chaperone proteins Sco1 and CCS are up-regulated, but Cox 1 and Cox4 are down-regulated, by copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Getz, Jean; Lin, Dingbo; Medeiros, Denis M

    2011-10-01

    Copper is ferried in a cell complexed to chaperone proteins, and in the heart much copper is required for cytochrome c oxidase (Cox). It is not completely understood how copper status affects the levels of these proteins. Here we determined if dietary copper deficiency could up- or down-regulate select copper chaperone proteins and Cox subunits 1 and 4 in cardiac tissue of rats. Sixteen weanling male Long-Evans rats were randomized into treatment groups, one group receiving a copper-deficient diet (<1 mg Cu/kg diet) and one group receiving a diet containing adequate copper (6 mg Cu/kg diet) for 5 weeks. Hearts were removed, weighed, and non-myofibrillar proteins separated to analyze for levels of CCS, Sco1, Ctr1, Cox17, Cox1, and Cox4 by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. No changes were observed in the concentrations of CTR1 and Cox17 between copper-adequate and copper-deficient rats. CCS and Sco1 were up-regulated and Cox1 and Cox4 were both down-regulated as a result of copper deficiency. These data suggest that select chaperone proteins and may be up-regulated, and Cox1 and 4 down-regulated, by a dietary copper deficiency, whereas others appear not to be affected by copper status.

  4. Longitudinal regression analysis of spatial-temporal growth patterns of geometrical diffusion measures in early postnatal brain development with diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Zhu, Hongtu; Jewells, Valerie; Armao, Diane; Shen, Dinggang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili

    2011-10-15

    Although diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has provided substantial insights into early brain development, most DTI studies based on fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) may not capitalize on the information derived from the three principal diffusivities (e.g. eigenvalues). In this study, we explored the spatial and temporal evolution of white matter structures during early brain development using two geometrical diffusion measures, namely, linear (Cl) and planar (Cp) diffusion anisotropies, from 71 longitudinal datasets acquired from 29 healthy, full-term pediatric subjects. The growth trajectories were estimated with generalized estimating equations (GEE) using linear fitting with logarithm of age (days). The presence of the white matter structures in Cl and Cp was observed in neonates, suggesting that both the cylindrical and fanning or crossing structures in various white matter regions may already have been formed at birth. Moreover, we found that both Cl and Cp evolved in a temporally nonlinear and spatially inhomogeneous manner. The growth velocities of Cl in central white matter were significantly higher when compared to peripheral, or more laterally located, white matter: central growth velocity Cl=0.0465±0.0273/log(days), versus peripheral growth velocity Cl=0.0198±0.0127/log(days), p<10⁻⁶. In contrast, the growth velocities of Cp in central white matter were significantly lower than that in peripheral white matter: central growth velocity Cp=0.0014±0.0058/log(days), versus peripheral growth velocity Cp=0.0289±0.0101/log(days), p<10⁻⁶. Depending on the underlying white matter site which is analyzed, our findings suggest that ongoing physiologic and microstructural changes in the developing brain may exert different effects on the temporal evolution of these two geometrical diffusion measures. Thus, future studies utilizing DTI with correlative histological analysis in the study of early brain development are warranted. Copyright

  5. Bootstrapping a change-point Cox model for survival data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gongjun; Sen, Bodhisattva; Ying, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the (in)-consistency of various bootstrap methods for making inference on a change-point in time in the Cox model with right censored survival data. A criterion is established for the consistency of any bootstrap method. It is shown that the usual nonparametric bootstrap is inconsistent for the maximum partial likelihood estimation of the change-point. A new model-based bootstrap approach is proposed and its consistency established. Simulation studies are carried out to assess the performance of various bootstrap schemes. PMID:25400719

  6. Multivariate product-shot-noise Cox point process models.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Mateu, Jorge; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a new multivariate product-shot-noise Cox process which is useful for modeling multi-species spatial point patterns with clustering intra-specific interactions and neutral, negative, or positive inter-specific interactions. The auto- and cross-pair correlation functions of the process can be obtained in closed analytical forms and approximate simulation of the process is straightforward. We use the proposed process to model interactions within and among five tree species in the Barro Colorado Island plot. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  7. Association between COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism and gastrointestinal cancer risk: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jun; Jiang, Yu-Xing; Chen, Yu-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To perform a meta-analysis to investigate the association between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) -1195G>A gene polymorphism and gastrointestinal cancers. METHODS Publications related to the COX-2 -1195G>A gene polymorphism and gastrointestinal cancers published before July 2016 were retrieved from PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, China Biological Medicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and CQVIP Database. Meta-analysis was performed using Stata11.0 software. The strength of the association was evaluated by calculating the combined odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95%CIs. The retrieved publications were excluded or included one by one for sensitivity analysis. In addition, the funnel plot, Begg’s rank correlation test, and Egger’s linear regression method were applied to analyse whether the included publications had publication bias. RESULTS A total of 24 publications related to the COX-2 -1195G>A gene polymorphism were included, including 28 studies involving 11043 cases and 18008 controls. The meta-analysis results showed that the COX-2 -1195G>A gene polymorphism significantly correlated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers, particularly gastric cancer (A vs G: OR = 1.35; AA/AG vs GG: OR = 1.54; AA vs GG/AG: OR = 1.43; AA vs GG: OR = 1.80; AG vs GG: OR = 1.35). Compared to the Caucasian population in America and Europe, the COX-2 -1195G>A gene polymorphism in the Asian population (A vs G: OR = 1.30; AA/AG vs GG: OR = 1.50; AA vs GG/AG: OR = 1.35; AA vs GG: OR = 1.71; AG vs GG: OR = 1.37) significantly increased gastrointestinal cancer risk. The sensitivity analysis (P < 0.05) and the false positive report probability (P < 0.2) confirmed the reliability of the results. CONCLUSION The results showed that the COX-2 -1195G>A gene polymorphism might be a potential risk factor for gastrointestinal cancers. Further validation by a large homogeneous study is warranted. PMID:28405152

  8. COX-2-dependent stabilization of survivin in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Krysan, Kostyantyn; Merchant, Farrukh H; Zhu, Li; Dohadwala, Mariam; Luo, Jie; Lin, Ying; Heuze-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Põld, Mehis; Seligson, David; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Wang, Hejing; Strieter, Robert; Sharma, Sherven; Dubinett, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Elevated tumor cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression is associated with increased angiogenesis, tumor invasion and promotion of tumor cell resistance to apoptosis. The mechanism(s) by which COX-2 exerts its cytoprotective effects are not completely understood but may be due to an imbalance of pro- and anti-apoptotic gene expression. To analyze COX-2-dependent gene expression and apoptosis, we created cell lines constitutively expressing COX-2 cDNA in sense and antisense orientations. Whereas COX-2 sense cells have significantly heightened resistance to radiation and drug-induced apoptosis, COX-2 antisense cells are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction. We found that the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin correlated positively with COX-2 expression. A COX-2-dependent modulation of survivin ubiquitination led to its stabilization in COX-2 overexpressing cells, and this effect was replicated by exogenous PGE2 treatment of parental tumor cells. In contrast to previous studies in other cell types, in nonsmall cell lung cancer cells survivin was expressed in a cell cycle-independent manner. When established in SCID mice in vivo, COX-2 antisense-derived tumors had significantly decreased survivin levels while COX-2 sense-derived tumors demonstrated elevated levels compared with controls. In accord with these findings, survivin and COX-2 were frequently upregulated and co-expressed in human lung cancers in situ.

  9. Mixed-Phase Icing Simulation and Testing at the Cox Icing Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel; Irani, Eddie; Miller, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A new capability was developed for indoor simulation of snow and mixed-phase icing conditions. This capability is useful for year-round testing in the Cox closed-loop Icing Wind Tunnel. Certification of aircraft for flight into these types of icing conditions is only required by the JAA in Europe. In an effort to harmonize certification requirements, the FAA in the US sponsored a preliminary program to study the effects of mixed-phase and fully glaciated icing conditions on the performance requirements of thermal ice protection systems. This paper describes the test program and the associated results.

  10. A critical appraisal of COX-2 selective inhibition and analgesia: how good so far?

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Pedro F; Herrero, Juan F

    2003-09-01

    The development of COX-2 selective inhibitors has opened a new era of clinical investigation in NSAIDs. Discussion of the established concepts of inflammation and therapeutical uses of these drugs has changed the rationale for its clinical use and therapeutic labeling of these drugs. A comprehensive discussion across basic science and clinical areas involved in each of these concepts is presented. This led to a remarkable re-evaluation of our insights on their traditionally proposed mechanisms of analgesia, their side-effects, and the clinical indication of NSAIDs as "over the counter" pain killers. This may shift physicians toward a more rational use of this drug class.

  11. Design and synthesis of a biotinylated probe of COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide analog JCC76.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bo; Lama, Rati; Smith, Kerri M; Xu, Yan; Su, Bin

    2011-09-15

    JCC76 is a derivative of cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) selective inhibitor nimesulide and exhibits potent anti-breast cancer activity. It selectively induces apoptosis of Her2 positive breast cancer cells. However, the specific molecular targets of JCC76 still remain unclear, which significantly withdraw the further drug development of JCC76. To identify the molecular targets of JCC76, a six carbon linker and biotin conjugated JCC76 probe was designed and synthesized. The anti-proliferation activity of the probe and its analogs was evaluated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  13. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  14. Coupled variable selection for regression modeling of complex treatment patterns in a clinical cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmann, I; Elsäßer, A; Weinmann, A; Binder, H

    2014-12-30

    For determining a manageable set of covariates potentially influential with respect to a time-to-event endpoint, Cox proportional hazards models can be combined with variable selection techniques, such as stepwise forward selection or backward elimination based on p-values, or regularized regression techniques such as component-wise boosting. Cox regression models have also been adapted for dealing with more complex event patterns, for example, for competing risks settings with separate, cause-specific hazard models for each event type, or for determining the prognostic effect pattern of a variable over different landmark times, with one conditional survival model for each landmark. Motivated by a clinical cancer registry application, where complex event patterns have to be dealt with and variable selection is needed at the same time, we propose a general approach for linking variable selection between several Cox models. Specifically, we combine score statistics for each covariate across models by Fisher's method as a basis for variable selection. This principle is implemented for a stepwise forward selection approach as well as for a regularized regression technique. In an application to data from hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the coupled stepwise approach is seen to facilitate joint interpretation of the different cause-specific Cox models. In conditional survival models at landmark times, which address updates of prediction as time progresses and both treatment and other potential explanatory variables may change, the coupled regularized regression approach identifies potentially important, stably selected covariates together with their effect time pattern, despite having only a small number of events. These results highlight the promise of the proposed approach for coupling variable selection between Cox models, which is particularly relevant for modeling for clinical cancer registries with their complex event patterns. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Error bounds in cascading regressions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cascading regressions is a technique for predicting a value of a dependent variable when no paired measurements exist to perform a standard regression analysis. Biases in coefficients of a cascaded-regression line as well as error variance of points about the line are functions of the correlation coefficient between dependent and independent variables. Although this correlation cannot be computed because of the lack of paired data, bounds can be placed on errors through the required properties of the correlation coefficient. The potential meansquared error of a cascaded-regression prediction can be large, as illustrated through an example using geomorphologic data. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  16. Toward the understanding of the molecular basis for the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 by phenolic compounds present in Uruguayan propolis and grape pomace.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Margot; Alvareda, Elena; Iribarne, Federico; Miranda, Pablo; Espinosa, Victoria; Aguilera, Sara; Pardo, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Propolis and grape pomace have significant amounts of phenols which can take part in anti-inflammatory mechanisms. As the cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2) are involved in said mechanisms, the possibility for a selective inhibition of COX-2 was analyzed in vitro and in silico. Propolis and grape pomace from Uruguayan species were collected, extracted in hydroalcoholic mixture and analyzed. Based on phenols previously identified, and taking as reference the crystallographic structures of COX-1 and COX-2 in complex with the commercial drug Celecoxib, a molecular docking procedure was devised to adjust 123 phenolic molecular models at the enzyme-binding sites. The most important results of this work are that the extracts have an overall inhibition activity very similar in COX-1 and COX-2, i.e. they do not possess selective inhibition activity for COX-2. Nevertheless, 10 compounds of the phenolic database turned out to be more selective and 94 phenols resulted with similar selectivity than Celecoxib, an outcome that accounts for the overall experimental inhibition measures. Binding site environment observations showed increased polarity in COX-2 as compared with COX-1, suggesting that polarity is the key for selectivity. Accordingly, the screening of molecular contacts pointed to the residues: Arg106, Gln178, Leu338, Ser339, Tyr341, Tyr371, Arg499, Ala502, Val509, and Ser516, which would explain, at the atomic level, the anti-inflammatory effect of the phenolic compounds. Among them, Gln178 and Arg499 appear to be essential for the selective inhibition of COX-2.

  17. A simulation study of finite-sample properties of marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models.

    PubMed

    Westreich, Daniel; Cole, Stephen R; Schisterman, Enrique F; Platt, Robert W

    2012-08-30

    Motivated by a previously published study of HIV treatment, we simulated data subject to time-varying confounding affected by prior treatment to examine some finite-sample properties of marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models. We compared (a) unadjusted, (b) regression-adjusted, (c) unstabilized, and (d) stabilized marginal structural (inverse probability-of-treatment [IPT] weighted) model estimators of effect in terms of bias, standard error, root mean squared error (MSE), and 95% confidence limit coverage over a range of research scenarios, including relatively small sample sizes and 10 study assessments. In the base-case scenario resembling the motivating example, where the true hazard ratio was 0.5, both IPT-weighted analyses were unbiased, whereas crude and adjusted analyses showed substantial bias towards and across the null. Stabilized IPT-weighted analyses remained unbiased across a range of scenarios, including relatively small sample size; however, the standard error was generally smaller in crude and adjusted models. In many cases, unstabilized weighted analysis showed a substantial increase in standard error compared with other approaches. Root MSE was smallest in the IPT-weighted analyses for the base-case scenario. In situations where time-varying confounding affected by prior treatment was absent, IPT-weighted analyses were less precise and therefore had greater root MSE compared with adjusted analyses. The 95% confidence limit coverage was close to nominal for all stabilized IPT-weighted but poor in crude, adjusted, and unstabilized IPT-weighted analysis. Under realistic scenarios, marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models performed according to expectations based on large-sample theory and provided accurate estimates of the hazard ratio.

  18. Development of an Agent-Based Model (ABM) to Simulate the Immune System and Integration of a Regression Method to Estimate the Key ABM Parameters by Fitting the Experimental Data.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xuming; Chen, Jinghang; Miao, Hongyu; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABM) and differential equations (DE) are two commonly used methods for immune system simulation. However, it is difficult for ABM to estimate key parameters of the model by incorporating experimental data, whereas the differential equation model is incapable of describing the complicated immune system in detail. To overcome these problems, we developed an integrated ABM regression model (IABMR). It can combine the advantages of ABM and DE by employing ABM to mimic the multi-scale immune system with various phenotypes and types of cells as well as using the input and output of ABM to build up the Loess regression for key parameter estimation. Next, we employed the greedy algorithm to estimate the key parameters of the ABM with respect to the same experimental data set and used ABM to describe a 3D immune system similar to previous studies that employed the DE model. These results indicate that IABMR not only has the potential to simulate the immune system at various scales, phenotypes and cell types, but can also accurately infer the key parameters like DE model. Therefore, this study innovatively developed a complex system development mechanism that could simulate the complicated immune system in detail like ABM and validate the reliability and efficiency of model like DE by fitting the experimental data.

  19. Development of an Agent-Based Model (ABM) to Simulate the Immune System and Integration of a Regression Method to Estimate the Key ABM Parameters by Fitting the Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xuming; Chen, Jinghang; Miao, Hongyu; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABM) and differential equations (DE) are two commonly used methods for immune system simulation. However, it is difficult for ABM to estimate key parameters of the model by incorporating experimental data, whereas the differential equation model is incapable of describing the complicated immune system in detail. To overcome these problems, we developed an integrated ABM regression model (IABMR). It can combine the advantages of ABM and DE by employing ABM to mimic the multi-scale immune system with various phenotypes and types of cells as well as using the input and output of ABM to build up the Loess regression for key parameter estimation. Next, we employed the greedy algorithm to estimate the key parameters of the ABM with respect to the same experimental data set and used ABM to describe a 3D immune system similar to previous studies that employed the DE model. These results indicate that IABMR not only has the potential to simulate the immune system at various scales, phenotypes and cell types, but can also accurately infer the key parameters like DE model. Therefore, this study innovatively developed a complex system development mechanism that could simulate the complicated immune system in detail like ABM and validate the reliability and efficiency of model like DE by fitting the experimental data. PMID:26535589

  20. Targeting pain mediators induced by injured nerve-derived COX2 and PGE2 to treat neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiya; St-Jacques, Bruno; Duarte, Pedro Cruz

    2012-06-01

    Neuropathic pain (NeP) is an intractable chronic pain condition which severely deteriorates the quality of life of 6% of the population. Caused by direct physical damage or diseases of the nervous system responsible for pain generation and transmission, NeP is manifested as spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Its treatment is a challenging and unmet medical need. It is generally accepted that inflammatory mediators over-produced in injured nerves play a crucial role in the initiation and maintenance of NeP. Among numerous inflammatory mediators, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and its end product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are persistently up-regulated in infiltrating macrophages and Schwann cells in injured nerves and contribute to the development of NeP. In a NeP rat model and an ex vivo model of sensory ganglion explant culture, injured nerve-derived COX2 and PGE2 facilitate the synthesis of pain mediators including neuropeptides, ion channels, cytokines and neurotrophins in primary sensory neurons. Stimulating the synthesis of pain mediators in primary sensory neurons is a novel mechanism underlying the contribution of injured nerve-derived COX2 and PGE2 to the genesis of NeP. Targeting COX2/PGE2/EP signaling in injured nerves through local administration could open a novel therapeutic avenue to treat this debilitating disease.

  1. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles inhibit human T cell responses via induction of monocyte COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hock, Barry D; McKenzie, Judith L; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2017-06-01

    The modulation of T cell responses by Helicobacter pylori is thought to potentiate both H. pylori persistence and development of gastric pathologies including cancer. Release of outer membrane vesicles (OMV) by H. pylori provides a potential vehicle for modulation of the immune system. Although OMV are thought to have T cell suppressive activity, this has not yet been demonstrated. Their suppressive activity was investigated in this study using the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to T cell stimuli as a readout. We demonstrate that addition of OMV to PBMC significantly inhibits subsequent T cell proliferation in a cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent manner. Addition of OMV did not significantly modulate PBMC apoptosis, but induced strong expression of COX-2 by the monocytes present and significantly increased levels of PGE2 and IL-10. These effects were independent of vacuolating cytotoxin expression. Together, these findings demonstrate that OMV can suppress human T cell responses and that the predominant mechanism is not through a direct effect on the T cells but results from the induction of COX-2 expression in monocytes. This increased COX-2 activity may modulate not only H. pylori-directed immune responses but also wider immune responses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cox26 is a novel stoichiometric subunit of the yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Maria; Wuttke, Jan-Moritz; Römpler, Katharina; Schmidt, Bernhard; Neifer, Klaus; Juris, Lisa; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. The complex accepts electrons from cytochrome c and passes them onto molecular oxygen. This process contributes to energy capture in the form of a membrane potential across the inner membrane. The enzyme complex assembles in a stepwise process from the three mitochondria-encoded core subunits Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, which associate with nuclear-encoded subunits and cofactors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytochrome c oxidase associates with the bc1-complex into supercomplexes, allowing efficient energy transduction. Here we report on Cox26 as a protein found in respiratory chain supercomplexes containing cytochrome c oxidase. Our analyses reveal Cox26 as a novel stoichiometric structural subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. A loss of Cox26 affects cytochrome c oxidase activity and respirasome organization.

  3. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage--from a developmental model to first results of tissue and scaffold expression.

    PubMed

    Brochhausen, Christoph; Zehbe, Rolf; Gross, Ulrich; Libera, Jeanette; Schubert, Helmut; Nüsing, Rolf M; Klaus, Günter; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering of articular cartilage remains an ongoing challenge. Since tissue regeneration recapitulates ontogenetic processes the growth plate can be regarded as an innovative model to target suitable signalling molecules and growth factors for the tissue engineering of cartilage. In the present study we analysed the expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) in a short-term chondrocyte culture in gelatin-based scaffolds and in articular cartilage of rats and compared it with that in the growth plate. Our results demonstrate the strong cellular expression of COX-1 but only a focal weak expression of COX-2 in the seeded scaffolds. Articular cartilage of rats expresses homogeneously COX-1 and COX-2 with the exception of the apical cell layer. Our findings indicate a functional role of COX in the metabolism of articular chondrocytes. The expression of COX in articular cartilage and in the seeded scaffolds opens interesting perspectives to improve the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes in scaffold materials by addition of specific receptor ligands of the COX system.

  4. Investigation factors affecting the first recurrence of coronary artery disease in patients undergone angioplasty using cox survival model

    PubMed Central

    Nasseryan, Javad; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Rasekhi, Aliakbar; Ahangar, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of restenosis in patients suffering from coronary artery disease after undergoing angioplasty is of paramount importance. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate factors affecting the time of the first incidence of restenosis in patients undergone angioplasty in the city of Zanjan, Iran. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 421 patients who referred to Ayatollah Musavi hospital in Zanjan for angioplasty during 2009 to 2012. The time of the incidence of restenosis after angioplasty constituted the dependent variable of the study. Independent variables of the study included signs of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, kidney disease, carotid stenosis, lung disease, anemia, angina history, and MI. The Cox regression model with the significance level of 0.05 was deployed for the statistical analysis. Results: According to the Cox regression model, hazard ratio of the first incidence of restenosis in patients with hypertension and angina was 22.8% and 29.5% less than other patients, respectively. However, hazard ratio of the first incidence of restenosis was 7.4 times more in patients suffering from carotid stenosis than other patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that as time goes on, the risk of the incidence of restenosis in angioplasty patients increases such that patients’ survival decreases dramatically after a year. To determine the role of effective factors on the incidence of restenosis, conducting a prospective interventional study is highly recommended. PMID:28210606

  5. Computed statistics at streamgages, and methods for estimating low-flow frequency statistics and development of regional regression equations for estimating low-flow frequency statistics at ungaged locations in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southard, Rodney E.

    2013-01-01

    The weather and precipitation patterns in Missouri vary considerably from year to year. In 2008, the statewide average rainfall was 57.34 inches and in 2012, the statewide average rainfall was 30.64 inches. This variability in precipitation and resulting streamflow in Missouri underlies the necessity for water managers and users to have reliable streamflow statistics and a means to compute select statistics at ungaged locations for a better understanding of water availability. Knowledge of surface-water availability is dependent on the streamflow data that have been collected and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey for more than 100 years at approximately 350 streamgages throughout Missouri. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, computed streamflow statistics at streamgages through the 2010 water year, defined periods of drought and defined methods to estimate streamflow statistics at ungaged locations, and developed regional regression equations to compute selected streamflow statistics at ungaged locations. Streamflow statistics and flow durations were computed for 532 streamgages in Missouri and in neighboring States of Missouri. For streamgages with more than 10 years of record, Kendall’s tau was computed to evaluate for trends in streamflow data. If trends were detected, the variable length method was used to define the period of no trend. Water years were removed from the dataset from the beginning of the record for a streamgage until no trend was detected. Low-flow frequency statistics were then computed for the entire period of record and for the period of no trend if 10 or more years of record were available for each analysis. Three methods are presented for computing selected streamflow statistics at ungaged locations. The first method uses power curve equations developed for 28 selected streams in Missouri and neighboring States that have multiple streamgages on the same streams. Statistical

  6. Logistic Regression: Concept and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokluk, Omay

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of logistic regression analysis is classification of individuals in different groups. The aim of the present study is to explain basic concepts and processes of binary logistic regression analysis intended to determine the combination of independent variables which best explain the membership in certain groups called dichotomous…

  7. Discriminative Elastic-Net Regularized Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Shao, Ling; Wu, Jian; Xie, Guo-Sen

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we aim at learning compact and discriminative linear regression models. Linear regression has been widely used in different problems. However, most of the existing linear regression methods exploit the conventional zero-one matrix as the regression targets, which greatly narrows the flexibility of the regression model. Another major limitation of these methods is that the learned projection matrix fails to precisely project the image features to the target space due to their weak discriminative capability. To this end, we present an elastic-net regularized linear regression (ENLR) framework, and develop two robust linear regression models which possess the following special characteristics. First, our methods exploit two particular strategies to enlarge the margins of different classes by relaxing the strict binary targets into a more feasible variable matrix. Second, a robust elastic-net regularization of singular values is introduced to enhance the compactness and effectiveness of the learned projection matrix. Third, the resulting optimization problem of ENLR has a closed-form solution in each iteration, which can be solved efficiently. Finally, rather than directly exploiting the projection matrix for recognition, our methods employ the transformed features as the new discriminate representations to make final image classification. Compared with the traditional linear regression model and some of its variants, our method is much more accurate in image classification. Extensive experiments conducted on publicly available data sets well demonstrate that the proposed framework can outperform the state-of-the-art methods. The MATLAB codes of our methods can be available at http://www.yongxu.org/lunwen.html.

  8. Regression-kriging for characterizing soils with remotesensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yufeng; Thomasson, J. Alex; Sui, Ruixiu; Wooten, James

    2011-09-01

    In precision agriculture regression has been used widely to quantify the relationship between soil attributes and other environmental variables. However, spatial correlation existing in soil samples usually violates a basic assumption of regression: sample independence. In this study, a regression-kriging method was attempted in relating soil properties to the remote sensing image of a cotton field near Vance, Mississippi, USA. The regression-kriging model was developed and tested by using 273 soil samples collected from the field. The result showed that by properly incorporating the spatial correlation information of regression residuals, the regression-kriging model generally achieved higher prediction accuracy than the stepwise multiple linear regression model. Most strikingly, a 50% increase in prediction accuracy was shown in soil sodium concentration. Potential usages of regression-kriging in future precision agriculture applications include real-time soil sensor development and digital soil mapping.

  9. MicroRNA-144 is regulated by CP2 and decreases COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in mouse ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiawei; Lei, Bin; Li, Huanan; Zhu, Lihua; Wang, Lei; Tao, Hu; Mei, Shuqi; Li, Fenge

    2017-02-09

    Mammalian folliculogenesis is a complex process in which primordial follicles develop into pre-ovulatory follicles, followed by ovulation to release mature oocytes. In this study, we explored the role of miR-144 in ovulation. miR-144 was one of the differentially expressed microRNAs, which showed 5.59-fold changes, in pre-ovulatory ovarian follicles between Large White and Chinese Taihu sows detected by Solexa deep sequencing. We demonstrated that overexpression of miR-144 significantly decreased the luciferase reporter activity under the control of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) or mothers against decapentaplegic homologue 4 (Smad4) 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and suppressed COX-2 and Smad4 expression. In contrast, a miR-144 inhibitor increased COX-2 and Smad4 expression in mouse granulosa cells (mGCs). Meanwhile, Smad4 upregulated COX-2 expression, but this effect was abolished when the mGCs were treated with the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway inhibitor SB431542. Moreover, luciferase reporter, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay results showed that the transcription factor CP2 upregulated miR-144 expression, which partially contributed to the suppression of COX-2 in mGCs. Both CP2 and miR-144 alter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by regulating COX-2 expression. In addition, miR-144 regulated mGC apoptosis and affected follicular atresia, but these activities did not appear to be through COX-2 and Smad4. Taken together, we revealed an important CP2/miR-144/COX-2/PGE2/ovulation pathway in mGCs.

  10. Targeting COX-2 expression by natural compounds: a promising alternative strategy to synthetic COX-2 inhibitors for cancer chemoprevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Sobolewski, Cyril; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-12-15

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is a pro-inflammatory immediate early response protein, chronically up-regulated in many pathological conditions. In autoimmune diseases, it is responsible for degenerative effects whereas in cancer, it correlates with poor prognosis. A constitutive expression of COX-2 is triggered since the earliest steps of carcinogenesis. Consequently, strategies aimed at inhibiting COX-2 enzymatic activity have been clinically applied for the treatment of autoimmune disorders; in addition, the same approaches are currently investigated for anti-cancer purposes. However, COX-2 protein inhibitors (i.e., NSAIDs and COXIBs) are not amenable to prolonged administration since they may cause severe side effects, and efforts are underway to identify alternative approaches for chemoprevention/therapy. COX-2 expression is a multi-step process, highly regulated at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Defects in the modulation of one or both of these steps may be found in pathological conditions. Targeting COX-2 expression may therefore represent a promising strategy, by which the same preventive and therapeutic benefits may be gained while avoiding the severe side effects of COX-2 enzymatic inhibition. Naturally occurring compounds derived from plants/organisms represent a huge source of biologically active molecules, that remains largely unexplored. Derived from plants/organisms used in traditional forms of medicine or as dietary supplements, these compounds have been experimentally investigated for their anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer potential. In this review, we will analyze how natural compounds may modulate the multistep regulation of COX-2 gene expression and discuss their potential as a new generation of COX-2 targeting agents alternative to the synthetic COX-2 inhibitors.

  11. Diaryl-Substituted (Dihydro)pyrrolo[3,2,1-hi]indoles, a Class of Potent COX-2 Inhibitors with Tricyclic Core Structure.

    PubMed

    Laube, Markus; Gassner, Cemena; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Günther, Robert; Pigorsch, Arne; König, Jonas; Köckerling, Martin; Wuest, Frank; Pietzsch, Jens; Kniess, Torsten

    2015-06-05

    A new compound class of diaryl-substituted heterocycles with tricyclic dihydropyrrolo[3,2,1-hi]indole and pyrrolo[3,2,1-hi]indole core structures has been designed and was synthesized by a modular sequence of Friedel-Crafts acylation, amide formation, and McMurry cyclization. This synthesis route represents a novel and versatile access toward dihydropyrrolo[3,2,1-hi]indoles and is characterized by good chemical yields and high modularity. From a set of 19 derivatives, 11 candidates were selected for determination of their COX inhibition potency and were found to be selective inhibitors with high affinity to COX-2 (IC50 ranging from 20-2500 nM and negligible inhibition of COX-1). The binding mode of the novel inhibitors in the active side of COX-2 was calculated in silico using the protein-ligand docking program GOLD by application of the molecular structures of two compounds derived from X-ray crystallography. Two novel compounds with high affinity to COX-2 (6k = 70 nM, 8e = 60 nM) have a fluoro substituent, making them promising candidates for the development of (18)F-radiolabeled COX-2 inhibitors for imaging purposes with positron emission tomography (PET).

  12. -765G > C COX-2 polymorphism may be a susceptibility marker for gastric adenocarcinoma in patients with atrophy or intestinal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina; Sousa, Hugo; Ferreira, Paula; Fragoso, Maria; Moreira-Dias, Luís; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the -765G > C COX-2 polymorphism and the development of different gastric lesions: atrophy or intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed involving 320 Portuguese individuals (210 without evidence of neoplastic disease, 73 patients with gastric adenocarcinomas and 37 with atrophy or intestinal metaplasia) using a PCR-RFLP method. RESULTS: -765C allele was overrepresented in the patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (51%) when compared either with the control group (38%) or patients with atrophy or intestinal metaplasia (27%). Callele was found to be very common in our population (0.22), and a multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed nearly 3-fold increased risk for the progression to gastric adenocarcinoma in patients with atrophy or intestinal metaplasia carrying the -765C allele (OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.03-6.93; P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: -765C carrier status should be considered as another susceptibility marker for gastric adenocarcinoma development in patients with atrophy or intestinal metaplasia. PMID:17006983

  13. The Role of COX-2 in the Inflammatory and Fibrotic Response in the Lung Following Exposure to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, Brian C.

    Exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has been demonstrated to exacerbate airway inflammation and fibrosis in allergen-challenged mouse model. These data have led to concern that individuals with asthma could represent a susceptible population to adverse health effects following exposure to MWCNT, and possibly other engineered nanoparticles. Asthma pathogenesis is caused by the interaction of a complex genetic predisposition and environmental exposures. Because chronic airway inflammation is common to all asthma phenotypes, it is logical to investigate genes that are involved in inflammatory pathways in order to understand the genetic basis of asthma. The metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is the rate-determining step in the synthesis of prostanoids, which are biologically active lipids that are important modulators of inflammation. Based on the role of COX enzymes in inflammatory pathways, we sought to investigate how COX enzymes are involved in the inflammatory response following MWCNT exposure in asthmatic airways. We report that MWCNT significantly exacerbated allergen-induced airway inflammation and mucus cell metaplasia in COX-2 deficient mice compared to wild type mice. In addition, MWCNTs significantly enhanced allergen-induced cytokines involved in Th2 (IL-13, IL-5), Th1 (CXCL10), and Th17 (IL-17A) inflammatory responses in COX-2 deficient mice but not in WT mice. We conclude that exacerbation of allergen-induced airway inflammation and mucus cell metaplasia by MWCNTs is enhanced by deficiency in COX-2 and associated with activation of a mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 immune response. Based on our observation that COX-2 deficient mice developed a mixed Th immune response following MWCNT exposure, we sought to evaluate how cytokines associated with different Th immune responses alter COX expression following MWCNT exposure. For this study, a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) was used because MWCNT were largely sequestered

  14. COX-2 inhibitors: a story of greed, deception and death.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Georges M

    2005-01-01

    In 1999, drug manufacturers introduced a class of NSAIDs called COX-2 inhibitors or coxibs. The drugs were avidly promoted directly to the consumers and became bestsellers from the start. Arthritis sufferers were eager to take medications that eased joint pain with less risk of causing gastrointestinal pain, bleeding and other side-effects. In the year after their introduction, doctors wrote over 100 million prescriptions for celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx). Celebrex is the sixth best-selling drug, with sales of more than US$ 4 billion since its debut in 1999. Vioxx had sales of US$ 2.6 billion in 2001. However, the coxibs increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, and their price, in the USA, is obscene. The manufacturers faced a possibly complicit, toothless and bloodless FDA, and used every maneuvering to fleece the patients. We must now reflect on attitudes that we thought only belong to the tobacco industry. Fortunately, safe and active alternatives exist.

  15. Gaussian estimation for discretely observed Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chao; Shu, Huisheng; Liu, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the parameter estimation problem for Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model based on discrete observation. First, a new discretized process is built based on the Euler-Maruyama scheme. Then, the parameter estimators are obtained by employing the maximum likelihood method and the explicit expressions of the error of estimation are given. Subsequently, the consistency property of all parameter estimators are proved by applying the law of large numbers for martingales, Holder's inequality, B-D-G inequality and Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Finally, a numerical simulation example for estimators and the absolute error between estimators and true values is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the estimation approach used in this paper.

  16. Rank regression: an alternative regression approach for data with outliers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Tang, Wan; Lu, Ying; Tu, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Linear regression models are widely used in mental health and related health services research. However, the classic linear regression analysis assumes that the data are normally distributed, an assumption that is not met by the data obtained in many studies. One method of dealing with this problem is to use semi-parametric models, which do not require that the data be normally distributed. But semi-parametric models are quite sensitive to outlying observations, so the generated estimates are unreliable when study data includes outliers. In this situation, some researchers trim the extreme values prior to conducting the analysis, but the ad-hoc rules used for data trimming are based on subjective criteria so different methods of adjustment can yield different results. Rank regression provides a more objective approach to dealing with non-normal data that includes outliers. This paper uses simulated and real data to illustrate this useful regression approach for dealing with outliers and compares it to the results generated using classical regression models and semi-parametric regression models.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects and gastrointestinal safety of NNU-hdpa, a novel dual COX/5-LOX inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Lin; Liu, Fei; Ao, Gui-Zhen; He, Shu-Ying; Ju, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xue, Ting

    2009-06-02

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with a risk of serious adverse events. Now, the development of dual inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) has become a hot area in searching for safer NSAIDs. NNU-hdpa, 2-(4-hydroxylphenyl)-3-(3,5-dihydroxylphenyl) propenoic acid, a newly synthesized compound, is expected to have COX/5-LOX dual inhibition with an improved gastrointestinal profile. In this study, NNU-hdpa was subjected to in vitro and in vivo experiment protocols. In vitro COX/5-LOX inhibition assays showed that NNU-hdpa exhibits a dual inhibitory activity against the COX and 5-LOX enzymes. Anti-inflammatory activity in vivo was evaluated using two animal edema model tests. Pretreatment with NNU-hdpa (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats respectively. In gastric lesion test, NNU-hdpa was gastric-sparing in that it elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions as compared to the stomach lesions caused by aspirin in rats. In further studies, NNU-hdpa was found to significantly inhibit the productions of PGE(2) and LTB(4) in LPS-challenged RAW 264.7, which is parallel to its prevention of the nuclear translocation of the NF-kappaB p50 and p65 subunits. These data indicate that NNU-hdpa comprises a novel class of dual inhibitors of COX and 5-LOX having therapeutic potential with an enhanced gastric safety profile.

  18. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  19. Characterization of the Cytochrome C Oxidase Assembly Factor Cox19 of 'Saccharomyces Cerevisiae'

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, K.; Zhang, L.; Cobine, P.A.; George, G.N.; Winge, D.R.; /Utah U. /Saskatchewan U.

    2007-07-12

    Cox19 is an important accessory protein in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase in yeast. The protein is functional when tethered to the mitochondrial inner membrane, suggesting its functional role within the intermembrane space. Cox19 resembles Cox17 in having a twin CX{sub 9}C sequence motif that adopts a helical hairpin in Cox17. The function of Cox17 appears to be a Cu(I) donor protein in the assembly of the copper centers in cytochrome c oxidase. Cox19 also resembles Cox17 in its ability to coordinate Cu(I). Recombinant Cox19 binds 1 mol eq of Cu(I) per monomer and exists as a dimeric protein. Cox19 isolated from the mitochondrial intermembrane space contains variable quantities of copper, suggesting that Cu(I) binding may be a transient property. Cysteinyl residues important for Cu(I) binding are also shown to be important for the in vivo function of Cox19. Thus, a correlation exists in the ability to bind Cu(I) and in vivo function.

  20. COX-2 mRNA expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and effect by NSAID.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Li, P; Zhang, S-T; You, H; Jia, J-D; Yu, Z-L

    2008-01-01

    To investigate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) on it, in order to explore the mechanism of COX-2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) carcinogenesis and the ability of NSAID to prevent or treat ESCC. Frozen specimens of human ESCC and adjacent normal esophageal squamous epithelium pairs (n = 22) were examined for COX-2 mRNA expression by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After incubation with aspirin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or Nimesulide (a selective COX-2 inhibitor), the proliferation status of two human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines, EC-9706 and EC-109, was quantified by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The expression of COX-2 mRNA in these cells was detected by RT-PCR. COX-2 mRNA was expressed in 12 of 22 (54.5%) ESCC tissue samples, but it was undetectable in all the specimens of adjacent normal esophageal squamous epithelium COX-2 mRNA expression. Both aspirin (5-20 mmol/L) and Nimesulide (0.1-0.8 mmol/L) inhibited EC-9706 cell line proliferation and suppressed its COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently. However, only aspirin (5-20 mmol/L) could inhibit proliferation in the EC-109 cell line and suppress COX-2 mRNA expression. Nimesulide (0.1-0.8 mmol/L) could neither inhibit EC-109 cell growth nor suppress COX-2 mRNA expression. COX-2 mRNA expression is a frequent phenomenon in human ESCC tissue samples and plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. NSAID may be useful in the chemoprevention and therapy of human ESCC and its effects are likely to be mediated by modulating COX-2 activity.

  1. Usefulness of selective COX-2 inhibitors as therapeutic agents against canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Teruyoshi; Tamura, Dai; Asano, Ryuji

    2014-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key enzyme for converting arachidonic acids to prostanoids, which are known to be induced during inflammation and cancer initiation. Previously, it has been reported that COX inhibitors, such as aspirin, reduce the incidence of human colorectal cancer; therefore, it is widely believed that COX-2 is a potential therapeutic and chemoprevention target for several types of human cancer. However, whether selective COX-2 inhibitors have antitumor effects against canine mammary tumor cells remains unclear. In the present study, to elucidate the antitumor effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors against canine mammary tumors, we investigated the antitumor effects of meloxicam, etodolac and celecoxib using COX-2-expressing canine mammary tumor (CF33) cells. We analyzed the effects of selective COX-2 inhibitors on COX-2 protein expression levels in CF33 cells. Celecoxib (100 µM) was found to induce downregulation of COX-2 protein expression. We examined the effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors on CF33 cell proliferation. All the selective COX-2 inhibitors suppressed CF33 cell growth. Specifically, etodolac and celecoxib inhibited cell proliferation via a decrease in S-phase cells and an increase in G0/G1 arrest. We examined the apoptotic effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors on CF33 cells. Our data suggested that etodolac and celecoxib induced apoptosis in CF33 cells. In particular, celecoxib led to apoptosis mediated by the activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, including the upregulation of BAX expression, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression and activation of caspase-3/7. Furthermore, celecoxib increased the percentages of cells in both early apoptosis and late apoptosis. Our results revealed that celecoxib induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in CF33 cells. The data suggested that celecoxib is the most viable candidate as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of canine mammary tumors. Furthermore, our findings provide the first

  2. Prognostic relevance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in Chinese patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bin, Wu; He, Wang; Feng, Zhang; Xiangdong, Lu; Yong, Chen; Lele, Kou; Hongbin, Zhang; Honglin, Guo

    2011-02-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, has been reported to be correlated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. The present study was designed to investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of COX-2 in Chinese patients with prostate cancer. Firstly, RT-PCR and Western blot assays were performed to detect the expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in prostate cancer cell lines and 20 tissue samples (tumor or corresponding non-tumor). Next, immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of COX-2 protein in 88 prostate cancer tissue samples. Finally, the correlation between COX-2 expression and clinicopathological factors and patient survival was evaluated. We found that the expression levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein showed significant difference among four prostate cancer cell lines. Moreover, the levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein were significantly higher in prostate cancer tissues than in corresponding non-tumor tissues. COX-2 staining was positive in the cytoplasm of prostate cancer cells. High-COX-2 expression was correlated with the Gleason score (P=0.009), tumor stage (P=0.012), and lymph-node status (P=0.036). Furthermore, patients with high-COX-2 expression showed lower disease-free (P=0.014) and overall survival (P=0.047) rates than those with low-COX-2 expression. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that the status of COX-2 protein expression was an independent prognostic indicator for patients' survival. Taken together, higher COX-2 protein expression might provide an independent prognostic marker for Chinese patients with prostate cancer who have undergone surgery.

  3. Parametric regression model for survival data: Weibull regression model as an example

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Weibull regression model is one of the most popular forms of parametric regression model that it provides estimate of baseline hazard function, as well as coefficients for covariates. Because of technical difficulties, Weibull regression model is seldom used in medical literature as compared to the semi-parametric proportional hazard model. To make clinical investigators familiar with Weibull regression model, this article introduces some basic knowledge on Weibull regression model and then illustrates how to fit the model with R software. The SurvRegCensCov package is useful in converting estimated coefficients to clinical relevant statistics such as hazard ratio (HR) and event time ratio (ETR). Model adequacy can be assessed by inspecting Kaplan-Meier curves stratified by categorical variable. The eha package provides an alternative method to model Weibull regression model. The check.dist() function helps to assess goodness-of-fit of the model. Variable selection is based on the importance of a covariate, which can be tested using anova() function. Alternatively, backward elimination starting from a full model is an efficient way for model development. Visualization of Weibull regression model after model development is interesting that it provides another way to report your findings. PMID:28149846

  4. Sleepiness and prediction of driver impairment in simulator studies using a Cox proportional hazard approach.

    PubMed

    Vadeby, Anna; Forsman, Asa; Kecklund, Göran; Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Sandberg, David; Anund, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Cox proportional hazard models were used to study relationships between the event that a driver is leaving the lane caused by sleepiness and different indicators of sleepiness. In order to elucidate different indicators' performance, five different models developed by Cox proportional hazard on a data set from a simulator study were used. The models consisted of physiological indicators and indicators from driving data both as stand alone and in combination. The different models were compared on two different data sets by means of sensitivity and specificity and the models' ability to predict lane departure was studied. In conclusion, a combination of blink indicators based on the ratio between blink amplitude and peak closing velocity of eyelid (A/PCV) (or blink amplitude and peak opening velocity of eyelid (A/POV)), standard deviation of lateral position and standard deviation of lateral acceleration relative road (ddy) was the most sensitive approach with sensitivity 0.80. This is also supported by the fact that driving data only shows the impairment of driving performance while blink data have a closer relation to sleepiness. Thus, an effective sleepiness warning system may be based on a combination of lane variability measures and variables related to eye movements (particularly slow eye closure) in order to have both high sensitivity (many correct warnings) and acceptable specificity (few false alarms). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Clinical research XXII. From clinical judgment to Cox proportional hazards model].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Talavera, Juan O

    2014-01-01

    Survival analyses are commonly used to determine the time of an event (for example, death). However, they can be used also for other clinical outcomes on the condition that these are dichotomous, for example healing time. These analyses only consider the relationship of one variable. However, Cox proportional hazards model is a multivariate analysis of the survival analysis, in which other potentially confounding covariates of the effect of the main maneuver studied, such as age, gender or disease stage, are taken into account. This analysis can include both quantitative and qualitative variables in the model. The measure of association used is called hazard ratio (HR) or relative risk ratio, which is not the same as the relative risk or odds ratio (OR). The difference is that the HR refers to the possibility that one of the groups develops the event before it is compared with the other group. The proportional hazards multivariate model of Cox is the most widely used in medicine when the phenomenon is studied in two dimensions: time and event.

  6. Abstract Expression Grammar Symbolic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korns, Michael F.

    This chapter examines the use of Abstract Expression Grammars to perform the entire Symbolic Regression process without the use of Genetic Programming per se. The techniques explored produce a symbolic regression engine which has absolutely no bloat, which allows total user control of the search space and output formulas, which is faster, and more accurate than the engines produced in our previous papers using Genetic Programming. The genome is an all vector structure with four chromosomes plus additional epigenetic and constraint vectors, allowing total user control of the search space and the final output formulas. A combination of specialized compiler techniques, genetic algorithms, particle swarm, aged layered populations, plus discrete and continuous differential evolution are used to produce an improved symbolic regression sytem. Nine base test cases, from the literature, are used to test the improvement in speed and accuracy. The improved results indicate that these techniques move us a big step closer toward future industrial strength symbolic regression systems.

  7. Multiple Regression and Its Discontents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.; Marsh, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression is part of a larger statistical strategy originated by Gauss. The authors raise questions about the theory and suggest some changes that would make room for Mandelbrot and Serendipity.

  8. Multiple Regression and Its Discontents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.; Marsh, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression is part of a larger statistical strategy originated by Gauss. The authors raise questions about the theory and suggest some changes that would make room for Mandelbrot and Serendipity.

  9. Revisiting Regression in Autism: Heller's "Dementia Infantilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, Alexander; Schelinski, Stefanie; Volkmar, Fred; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Heller first described a severe regression of adaptive function in normally developing children, something he termed dementia infantilis, over one 100 years ago. Dementia infantilis is most closely related to the modern diagnosis, childhood disintegrative disorder. We translate Heller's paper, Uber Dementia Infantilis, and discuss…

  10. Revisiting Regression in Autism: Heller's "Dementia Infantilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, Alexander; Schelinski, Stefanie; Volkmar, Fred; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Heller first described a severe regression of adaptive function in normally developing children, something he termed dementia infantilis, over one 100 years ago. Dementia infantilis is most closely related to the modern diagnosis, childhood disintegrative disorder. We translate Heller's paper, Uber Dementia Infantilis, and discuss…

  11. Clinical features, survival times and COX-1 and COX-2 expression in cats with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder treated with meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Bommer, Nicholas X; Hayes, Alison M; Scase, Timothy J; Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A

    2012-08-01

    Records of 11 cats with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, which had been treated with meloxicam, were reviewed for sig