Science.gov

Sample records for development nutrition study

  1. Nutrition and pubertal development

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is one of the most important factors affecting pubertal development. Puberty entails a progressive nonlinear process starting from prepubescent to full sexual maturity through the interaction and cooperation of biological, physical, and psychological changes. Consuming an adequate and balanced healthy diet during all phases of growth (infancy, childhood and puberty) appears necessary both for proper growth and normal pubertal development. Girls begin puberty at an earlier age compared to past decades. Excessive eating of many processed, high-fat foods, may be the cause of this phenomenon. Overweight or obese children are more likely to enter puberty early. Some evidence suggests that obesity can accelerate the onset of puberty in girls and may delay the onset of puberty in boys. Moreover, the progression of puberty is affected by nutrition. On the other hand, puberty triggers a growth spurt, which increases nutritional needs including macro and micronutrients. Increased caloric, protein, iron, calcium, zinc and folate needs have to be provided during this critical period of rapid growth. Severe primary or secondary malnutrition also can delay the onset and progression of puberty. The higher incidence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia in adolescents imposes a nutritional risk on pubertal development. Moreover, many environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) have been identified that can significantly impair the normal course of puberty. This mini-review sums up some important findings in this important complex that link nutrition and pubertal development. PMID:25538876

  2. Nutritional studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.; Wheeler, H. O.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed metabolic studies were conducted of the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 flight crews, and the results are presented in tabular form. Intake and absorption data are also included. Apollo nutrient intakes were found to be characteristically hypocaloric. Estimates of body composition changes from metabolic balance data, from preflight and postflight weights and volumes, and from total body water and potassium provide no evidence for diminished caloric requirements during a flight. As observed during the Gemini Program and during periods of bed rest, measurements of bone density and metabolic balance confirm a tendency toward loss of skeletal tissue in weightlessness. No evidence exists that any inflight metabolic anomaly, including hypokalemia, was induced by marginal or deficient nutrient intakes. In general, the Apollo crewmen were well nourished and exhibited normal gastroenterological functions, although appetite was somewhat diminished and the organoleptic response to food was somewhat modified during flight.

  3. The development of nutritional-supplement fact sheets for Irish athletes: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pumpa, Kate L; Madigan, Sharon M; Wood-Martin, Ruth E; Flanagan, Richelle; Roche, Noreen

    2012-06-01

    The use of sport supplements presents a dilemma for many of those involved in supporting athletes, including coaches, families, support staff, and the athletes themselves. Often the information that they source can be incorrect and promote a biased view regarding the use of nutritional supplements. The aim of this case study was to describe the process that occurred around the development of a series of targeted educational fact sheets on a range of nutritional supplements for Irish athletes. It describes the initiation and support of the process by the Irish Sports Council; one of its subgroups, the Food and Food Supplements Committee; and the Irish Institute of Sport. A needs assessment through questionnaires was carried out to establish the most commonly used sport nutrition supplements by athletes age 16 or over in Ireland. Respondents completed 105 questionnaires over a 4-mo period in 2008-09 that led to the production of 20 supplement fact sheets. These supplement fact sheets will enable Irish athletes to access high-quality, up-to-date, scientific information about the supplements they have reported consuming. Since personal reading had a strong influence over athletes' decision-making process for taking nutritional supplements, as did scientific research, fact sheets available on the Internet from a reliable source are an ideal way to educate Irish athletes.

  4. Skylab nutritional studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C. Jr; Rambaut, P. C.; Stadler, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    Precise nutritional specifications arising from both physiological and experimental requirements necessitated a comprehensive study of the chemical composition of the Skylab food supply. Each of the approximately seventy different food items was analyzed for digestible and non-digestible carbohydrate, and for protein, amino acids, fat, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. Menus were formulated to provide at least the National Research Council's Recommended Dietary Allowance of all essential nutrients and, in addition, to provide constant daily intakes of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium and protein. In general, the crew members adhered to their programmed menus. The ability to swallow and digest food was unaffected by prolonged weightlessness. Taste acuity also appeared to be undiminished in flight. The bone and muscle changes which occurred in previous flights were more pronounced in Skylab. It is concluded that these changes did not develop as a result of nutritional deficit. If such changes are nutritionally related, they point to the existence of nutritional requirements in weightlessness which differ quantitatively from those observed on earth.

  5. Skylab nutritional studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.; Stadler, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Precise nutritional specifications arising from both physiological and experimental requirements necessitated a comprehensive study of the chemical composition of the Skylab food supply. Each of the approximately 70 different food items was analyzed for digestible and nondigestible carbohydrate, and for protein, amino acids, fat, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals. Menus were formulated to provide at least the National Research Council's Recommended Dietary Allowance of all essential nutrients and, in addition, to provide constant daily intakes of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium and protein. In general, the crewmembers adhered to their programmed menus. The ability to swallow and digest food was unaffected by prolonged weightlessness. Taste acuity also appeared to be undiminished inflight. The bone and muscle changes which occurred in previous flights were more pronounced in Skylab. It is concluded that these changes did not develop as a result of nutritional deficit. If such changes are nutritionally related, they point to the existence of nutritional requirements in weightlessness which differ quantitatively from those observed on earth.

  6. Development of Home Economics Curriculum Materials and Their Use in a Field Study of Applied Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Margaret Virginia

    To improve students' food habits through teacher training in newer teaching methods as applied to nutrition, curriculum materials based on four basic nutrition concepts were developed, pilot tested, evaluated, and revised. Ten Louisiana home economics teachers were given inservice training, and they field tested the curriculum materials using 425…

  7. Study on utilization status of internet and needs assessment for developing nutrition education programs among elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yun; Kim, Kyung-Won

    2007-01-01

    This study was to investigate utilization status of internet, health/nutrition websites among children, and to assess the needs for developing nutrition websites and education programs for children. The survey questionnaire was administered to 5-6th grade students (n=434) at two elementary schools. About 32% used the internet every day while 19.5% used it whenever they needed, showing significant differences in internet usage by gender (p<0.01). Although the subjects used the internet frequently, those who used health/nutrition websites were 23.3%. The purpose of using these sites were mainly 'to obtain health/nutrition information' (55%), 'to get information regarding weight control' (17%). Fifty-six percent of the users were satisfied with the nutrition websites, but only 30% said that they were helpful. The preferred topics in developing nutrition websites were assessment of obesity, exercise methods, weight control methods, nutrition information (e.g., diet for stature growth), dietary assessment and food hygiene. Girls showed more interest in these topics than boys (p<0.05). For school nutrition education, girls showed more interest than boys in topics for cooking snacks (p<0.001) and selecting snacks (p<0.05). In nutrition websites, subjects wanted to have information and game/quiz, as well as getting information using Flash animation. The favorite colors for screen and text were slightly different by gender (p<0.01). In school nutrition education, 89.5% of subjects liked to have activities (e.g., cooking, exercise, game). They also liked materials using computers, video and internet than printed materials. If nutrition education was done at schools, subjects wanted to receive 5.7 times of education per semester on average (mean length: 42.6 min./session). This study suggests that nutrition websites and education programs for children should include the topics such as assessment of obesity or diet, weight control and special information (e.g., diet for growth

  8. Developing Comparative Bibliometric Indicators for Evaluating the Research Performance of Four Academic Nutrition Departments, 1992-1996: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Eric George

    This study develops a set of empirically and theoretically sound citation-based bibliometric indicators of scientific research performance and applies them in an exploratory comparative study of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville's (UTK's) Nutrition Department with three of its peer programs at the University of Florida, the University of…

  9. Nutrition and Mental Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crnic, Linda S.

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the effects of malnutrition on mental development are reviewed and the complexity of factors (such as alternatives in maternal behavior) surrounding malnutrition in animal studies is noted. Findings are cited which suggest that environmental stimulation may in part reverse the neurological effects and remediate some behavioral effects…

  10. Varying coefficient function models to explore interactions between maternal nutritional status and prenatal methylmercury toxicity in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Miranda L; Huang, Li-Shan; Cox, Christopher; Strain, J J; Myers, Gary J; Bonham, Maxine P; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M W; Duffy, Emeir M; Clarkson, Thomas W; Davidson, Philip W

    2011-01-01

    Maternal consumption of fish during the gestational period exposes the fetus to both nutrients, especially the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), believed to be beneficial for fetal brain development, as well as to the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg). We recently reported that nutrients present in fish may modify MeHg neurotoxicity. Understanding the apparent interaction of MeHg exposure and nutrients present in fish is complicated by the limitations of modeling methods. In this study we fit varying coefficient function models to data from the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS) cohort to assess the association of dietary nutrients and children's development. This cohort of mother-child pairs in the Republic of Seychelles had fish consumption averaging 9 meals per week. Maternal nutritional status was assessed for five different nutritional components known to be present in fish (n-3 LCPUFA, n-6 LCPUFA, iron status, iodine status, and choline) and associated with children's neurological development. We also included prenatal MeHg exposure (measured in maternal hair). We examined two child neurodevelopmental outcomes (Bayley Scales Infant Development-II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI)), each administered at 9 and at 30 months. The varying coefficient models allow the possible interactions between each nutritional component and MeHg to be modeled as a smoothly varying function of MeHg as an effect modifier. Iron, iodine, choline, and n-6 LCPUFA had little or no observable modulation at different MeHg exposures. In contrast the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had beneficial effects on the BSID-II PDI that were reduced or absent at higher MeHg exposures. This study presents a useful modeling method that can be brought to bear on questions involving interactions between covariates, and illustrates the continuing importance of viewing fish consumption during pregnancy as a case

  11. Varying coefficient function models to explore interactions between maternal nutritional status and prenatal methylmercury toxicity in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Miranda L.; Huang, Li-Shan; Cox, Christopher; Strain, J.J.; Myers, Gary J.; Bonham, Maxine P.; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Duffy, Emeir M.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Davidson, Philip W.

    2011-01-15

    Maternal consumption of fish during the gestational period exposes the fetus to both nutrients, especially the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), believed to be beneficial for fetal brain development, as well as to the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg). We recently reported that nutrients present in fish may modify MeHg neurotoxicity. Understanding the apparent interaction of MeHg exposure and nutrients present in fish is complicated by the limitations of modeling methods. In this study we fit varying coefficient function models to data from the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS) cohort to assess the association of dietary nutrients and children's development. This cohort of mother-child pairs in the Republic of Seychelles had fish consumption averaging 9 meals per week. Maternal nutritional status was assessed for five different nutritional components known to be present in fish (n-3 LCPUFA, n-6 LCPUFA, iron status, iodine status, and choline) and associated with children's neurological development. We also included prenatal MeHg exposure (measured in maternal hair). We examined two child neurodevelopmental outcomes (Bayley Scales Infant Development-II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI)), each administered at 9 and at 30 months. The varying coefficient models allow the possible interactions between each nutritional component and MeHg to be modeled as a smoothly varying function of MeHg as an effect modifier. Iron, iodine, choline, and n-6 LCPUFA had little or no observable modulation at different MeHg exposures. In contrast the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had beneficial effects on the BSID-II PDI that were reduced or absent at higher MeHg exposures. This study presents a useful modeling method that can be brought to bear on questions involving interactions between covariates, and illustrates the continuing importance of viewing fish consumption during pregnancy as a case

  12. Effects of integrated child development and nutrition interventions on child development and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Grantham-McGregor, Sally M; Fernald, Lia C H; Kagawa, Rose M C; Walker, Susan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of studies that examined the effect of interventions combining a child development component with a nutrition one; in some cases the nutrition interventions also included health-promotion components. Only papers with both child development and nutrition outcomes and rated as moderate-to-good quality were included. Eleven efficacy and two nonrandomized trials, and eight program evaluations were identified. Only six trials examined interventions separately and combined. The trials showed nutritional interventions usually benefited nutritional status and sometimes benefited child development. Stimulation consistently benefited child development. There was no significant loss of any effect when interventions were combined, but there was little evidence of synergistic interaction between nutrition and stimulation on child development. Only three trials followed up the children after intervention. All at-scale program evaluations were combined interventions. Five benefited child development, but one did not, and two showed deficits. There was generally little benefit of at-scale programs to nutritional status. We found no rigorous evaluations of adding stimulation to health and nutrition services at scale and there is an urgent need for them. There is also a need to establish quality-control mechanisms for existing scaled-up programs and to determine their long-term effects. There is also a need to determine if there are any sustained benefits for the children after programs finish.

  13. Metabolic Studies in Military Nutrition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    The Surgeon General’s Office over a period of years has undertaken an extensive research program into the chemistry, nutrition , and wholesomeness of...Research and Nutrition Laboratory has undertaken the studies of the wholesomeness of food preserved by ionizing radiation. Work on radiated food has been...physiological, metabolic, and nutritional research in normal young adult men has been going on making use of volunteer human test subjects.

  14. Nutrition, Development, and Social Behavior. Proceedings of the Conference on the Assessment of Tests of Behavior From Studies of Nutrition in the Western Hemisphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallen, David J., E.

    Contents of this book include the following papers, followed by discussion and comment: "Malnutrition and Animal Behavior," David A. Levitsky and Richard H. Barnes; "Malnutrition in Infants," Henry N. Ricciuti; "Nutrition and the Community," David J. Kallen; "A Methodological Note: The Development of Visual Attention in Infants," A. C.…

  15. A Pilot Study of an Online Workplace Nutrition Program: The Value of Participant Input in Program Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousineau, Tara; Houle, Brian; Bromberg, Jonas; Fernandez, Kathrine C.; Kling, Whitney C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Tailored nutrition Web programs constitute an emerging trend in obesity prevention. Initial investment in innovative technology necessitates that the target population be well understood. This pilot study's purpose was to determine the feasibility of a workplace nutrition Web program. Design: Formative research was conducted with gaming…

  16. Prenatal nutritional influence on skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Elizabeth; Cheah, Jonathan; Harvey, Nicholas C

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that prenatal nutritional factors may have long-term effects on the offspring. Osteoporosis is a worldwide public health problem leading to both morbidity and mortality, through associated bone fractures. Although in clinical practice most effort in fracture prevention is aimed at slowing the rate of age-related bone loss, there is accumulating evidence that peak bone mass, achieved in early adulthood, is an important factor in determining bone strength in later life. A variety of studies have shown that peak bone mass is influenced by early life events, including nutrition in the prenatal period. This chapter will use the example of bone development to consider the effects of maternal diet and nutritional status on the offspring.

  17. Developing Research Programs in Clinical and Translational Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Frederick A.; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Heyland, Daren K.; Marik, Paul E.; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Most clinicians believe that nutrition support therapy improves outcome in hospitalized patients. Unfortunately, few patients receive optimal nutrition management. A lack of strong, well-designed research studies may prevent the medical/surgical community from fully embracing the practice. More quality research is needed. This article discusses 3 potential strategies to improve research activity in clinical nutrition: increase funding of nutrition research, foster young physician training in nutrition and research, and attract nutrition researchers to our national nutrition society meetings. The best chance for this process to succeed is for the national nutrition societies to partner with medical and surgical subspecialty societies to develop larger scale clinical and translational research programs. PMID:21149841

  18. [Epidemiologic studies on role of nutrition in development of osteoarthrosis. Report 2. Actual consumption of food and risk assessment of their influence in development of osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Martinchik, A N; Khodyrev, V N; Peskova, E V

    2010-01-01

    We studied the actual consumption of specific food groups of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and analyzed the nutritional risk factors for OA in case-control study. Level of consumption of all types of dairy products was significantly lower in the group of patients with OA compared with controls. The relative risk of developing OA in the consumption of less than 573 g (median) of dairy products in terms of milk increases by 5-6 times.

  19. Nutritional development and the target weight debate.

    PubMed

    Hall, John B

    2013-11-01

    Postnatal nutrition has immediate and long-lasting effects on beef heifer reproductive efficiency, longevity, and productivity. This article reviews the effects of nutrients and nutritional management on reproduction in developing heifers. In addition, the current debate on the preferred target weight for heifers at breeding is discussed.

  20. Choline status and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years of age in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Strain, J J; McSorley, Emeir M; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Kobrosly, Roni W; Bonham, Maxine P; Mulhern, Maria S; McAfee, Alison J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Henderson, Juliette; Watson, Gene E; Thurston, Sally W; Wallace, Julie M W; Ueland, Per M; Myers, Gary J

    2013-07-28

    Choline is an essential nutrient that is found in many food sources and plays a critical role in the development of the central nervous system. Animal studies have shown that choline status pre- and postnatally can have long-lasting effects on attention and memory; however, effects in human subjects have not been well studied. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between plasma concentrations of free choline and its related metabolites in children and their neurodevelopment in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study, an ongoing longitudinal study assessing the development of children born to mothers with high fish consumption during pregnancy. Plasma concentrations of free choline, betaine, dimethylglycine (DMG), methionine and homocysteine and specific measures of neurodevelopment were measured in 210 children aged 5 years. The children's plasma free choline concentration (9·17 (sd 2·09) μmol/l) was moderately, but significantly, correlated with betaine (r 0·24; P= 0·0006), DMG (r 0·15; P= 0·03), methionine (r 0·24; P= 0·0005) and homocysteine (r 0·19; P= 0·006) concentrations. Adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that betaine concentrations were positively associated with Preschool Language Scale – total language scores (β = 0·066; P= 0·04), but no other associations were evident. We found no indication that free choline concentration or its metabolites, within the normal physiological range, are associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age. As there is considerable animal evidence suggesting that choline status during development is associated with cognitive outcome, the issue deserves further study in other cohorts.

  1. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  2. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in children exposed prenatally to maternal dental amalgam: the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gene E; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M T; McSorley, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Mulhern, Maria S; Yeates, Alison J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Strain, J J; Thurston, Sally W; Harrington, Donald; Zareba, Grazyna; Wallace, Julie M W; Myers, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Limited human data are available to assess the association between prenatal mercury vapor (Hg⁰)) exposure from maternal dental amalgam restorations and neurodevelopment of children. We evaluated the association between maternal dental amalgam status during gestation and children's neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Maternal amalgam status was determined prospectively in a longitudinal cohort study examining the associations of prenatal exposure to nutrients and methylmercury (MeHg) with neurodevelopment. A total of 236 mother-child pairs initially enrolled in the SCDNS in 2001 were eligible to participate. Maternal amalgam status was measured as number of amalgam surfaces (the primary metric) and number of occlusal points. The neurodevelopmental assessment battery was comprised of age-appropriate tests of cognitive, language, and perceptual functions, and scholastic achievement. Linear regression analysis controlled for MeHg exposure, maternal fatty acid status, and other covariates relevant to child development. Maternal amalgam status evaluation yielded an average of 7.0 surfaces (range 0-28) and 11.0 occlusal points (range 0-40) during pregnancy. Neither the number of maternal amalgam surfaces nor occlusal points were associated with any outcome. Our findings do not provide evidence to support a relationship between prenatal exposure to Hg⁰ from maternal dental amalgam and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age.

  3. NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES ON INFANT DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional requirements of infants and children reflect this population's unique needs for growth and developmental changes in organ function and body composition as well as their maintenance needs. Moreover, since the metabolic rate of infants and children is greater and the turnover of nutri...

  4. Marabou 2005: nutrition and human development.

    PubMed

    James, Philip

    2006-05-01

    Nutrition is now becoming once more of intense interest to biological and medical scientists working on the control of development and human health. It is also now of ever greater public health interest. Few scientists, however, recognize that the same interest for those involved in fundamental science and public health developed a century ago focusing on the way in which nutrition and specific micronutrients, as well as general energy and protein intakes, were crucial to infant growth and appropriate development. The discovery of vitamins was matched by the proposition that stunted children in poor communities in the Western world were suffering from poverty-related poor diets. The critical role of nutrition was established by feeding studies, which then led to major food and agricultural policy changes during the Second World War, when food supplies were scarce throughout Europe. The success of these wartime policies led to a revolution in governmental thinking and a cheap food policy, together with a major boost in national agricultural production as an issue of national security. Nutritionists transferred their scientific interest to the study of childhood malnutrition in the developing world. The promotion of intensive agriculture and the food industry led to a revolution in food supplies, with the intense promotion of meat, milk, butter, and sugar production and consumption. The resulting escalation in cardiovascular disease related to the dietary change slowly altered public health policies, but as cardiovascular deaths decreased in the developed world, obesity and diabetes progressively increased. Now the lower- and middle-income countries (i.e., the developing world) have far more cardiovascular disease as Western diets and cultural habits are imported. The remarkable escalation of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, particularly in populations currently and previously subjected to malnutrition, now reveals unusual susceptibility to these diseases. This

  5. Community nutrition programmes, globalization and sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Herrera, José Carlos

    2006-08-01

    On an international scale, the last seventy-five years have been a period of deep social, economic and political transformation for the developing countries. They have been especially influenced by the international phenomenon of globalization, the benefits of which have been unequally distributed among countries. In this context, the strategies used to improve the general nutritional health of the population of developing countries include broad approaches integrating nutritional interventions in a context of sustainable community development, while valuing the existing relations between fields as diverse as agriculture, education, sociology, economy, health, environment, hygiene and nutrition. The community nutrition programmes are emblematic of these initiatives. Nevertheless, in spite of the increasing evidence of the potential possibilities offered by these programmes to improve the nutritional status and contribute to the development and the self-sufficiency of the community, their success is relatively limited, due to the inappropriate planning, implementation and evaluation of the programmes. In the present article, I attempt to emphasie the importance of community participation of the population of developing countries in the community nutrition programmes within the context of globalization. This process is not only an ethical imperative, but a pragmatic one. It is a crucial step in the process of liberation, democratization and equality that will lead to true sustainable development.

  6. Nutrition and cancer. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, G K; Vail, D M

    1990-07-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome that results in involuntary weight loss, even in the face of adequate nutritional intake. The profound metabolic abnormalities associated with cancer cachexia affect a large percentage of animals with cancer even before any clinical signs are seen. This paraneoplastic syndrome results in alterations in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism that, if left untreated, decrease the animal's quality of life and lead to a poor response to cancer therapy. An understanding of the metabolic abnormalities associated with cancer cachexia is of paramount importance to the practicing veterinarian to determine an accurate prognosis and to choose the optimal type of intravenous fluids and nutritional therapy for each patient. Although research identifying the optimal diet for cancer-bearing dogs and cats is still underway, some general principles apply. The first is that the patient should receive nutritional elements orally whenever possible. When oral feeding is not possible, nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tube feeding are viable options. When feeding by the gastrointestinal tract is not possible, parenteral feeding is a practical alternative.

  7. Study on the effect of T-2 toxin combined with low nutrition diet on rat epiphyseal plate growth and development.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yun-fen; Kang, Peng-de; Li, Xing-bo; Yang, Jing; Shen, Bing; Zhou, Zong-ke; Pei, Fu-xing

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe early lesions of rat epiphyseal plates and metaphysis caused by T-2 toxin and T-2 toxin combined with a low nutrition diet to determine possible pathogenic factors of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Ninety Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Group A was fed with a normal diet as control; group B was fed with a normal diet and T-2 toxin; and group C was fed with a low nutrition diet and T-2 toxin. The left knee specimens were collected, fixed in formaldehyde solution, stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Masson. After two weeks, the epiphyseal plate showed necrosis of chondrocytes in groups B and C. After four weeks, more obvious chondrocyte necrosis appeared. The positive rate of Lamellar necrosis in group C was significantly higher than that in groups B and A (P < 0.01). Metaphyseal trabecular bone showed sparse disorder and disruption in group C. T-2 toxin combined with a low nutrition diet could lead to more serious chondrocyte necrosis in the epiphyseal plate and disturb metaphyseal trabecular bone formation.

  8. Interventions to prevent respiratory diseases - Nutrition and the developing world.

    PubMed

    Karim, Tasneem; Muhit, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam

    2017-03-01

    Malnutrition is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and nutrition plays a critical role in both acute and chronic respiratory conditions. Inadequacies in the nutritional requirements of a developing lung in utero and in early life can compromise the respiratory system integrity and result in poor lung function, reduced protection against infections, greater likelihood of acute illnesses in childhood and chronic illness in adulthood. Nutritional interventions harness great potential in reducing respiratory illness related morbidity and mortality in the developing world. In this review we have summarized the findings from published systematic reviews/meta-analysis, experimental and observational studies that looked into different nutritional interventions for preventing respiratory diseases in developing countries.

  9. Food, Nutrition and Development in Ecuador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masse-Raimbault, Anne-Marie, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This purpose of this journal is to document advances in the fields of health, education, food, diet, and development. Each issue contains an overview of a high-priority subject touching the everyday life of children, mothers, and families. This double issue describes the Andes project, a food, diet, nutrition, and development program conducted in…

  10. Managing nutritional programmes in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslam, R; Abdollahi, Z; Haghighi, F N

    2004-11-01

    Improving community nutrition in developing countries requires a detailed epidemiological picture of the prevalent nutritional problems in different regions and age groups. This makes it possible to identify priorities, sensitize policy-makers, establish political commitment and design appropriate community programmes for income generation and education for the best use of food resources. Experiences acquired from community-based nutritional programmes show that ownership of a programme by the community and using a tailor-made approach are essential factors in the successful implementation of programmes. A multifaceted approach is needed, involving a range of sectors-agriculture, commerce, education and health--and commitment at all levels from government to communities and individuals.

  11. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  12. Nutrition and Development: Considerations for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Ernesto; Gorman, Kathleen S.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to commentary on the Pollitt et al. study reported in this monograph. Posits that nutritional insults are sensitive to intervention. Discusses research methodology; methodological issues related to sex differences; the buffering influence of high SES and dietary supplementation against the adverse effects of poor diet and low SES,…

  13. Fundamental Approaches to the Study of Zebrafish Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephen A.; Powell, Mickie; D’Abramo, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    The value of the zebrafish model has been well established. However, culture variability within and among laboratories remains a concern, particularly as it relates to nutrition. Investigators using rodent models addressed this concern several decades ago and have developed strict nutritional regimes to which their models adhere. These investigators decreased the variability associated with nutrition in most studies by developing standardized reference and open formulation diets. Zebrafish investigators have not embraced this approach. In this article, we address the problems associated with the lack of nutritional information and standardization in the zebrafish research community. Based on the knowledge gained from studies of other animals, including traditional research models, other fish species, domesticated and companion animals, and humans, we have proposed an approach that seeks to standardize nutrition research in zebrafish. We have identified a number of factors for consideration in zebrafish nutrition studies and have suggested a number of proposed outcomes. The long term-goal of nutrition research will be to identify the daily nutritional requirements of the zebrafish and to develop appropriate standardized reference and open formulation diets. PMID:23382346

  14. The Development of Total Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Don K

    2017-01-01

    The first patient to receive complete nourishment of a patient by intravenous infusion independent of the alimentary tract was an infant girl born with near-total small bowel atresia. Total parenteral nutrition, the intravenous infusion of nutrients, has been attempted since Harvey's description of the circulatory system in the early 17th century. The modern era of parenteral nutrition began in the early 20th century, when infusions of glucose, plasma, and emulsified fat into humans proved feasible. Robert Elman, working in the 1930s and 1940s, demonstrated that carefully prepared protein hydrolysates could be safely infused intravenously and incorporated by the body. Stanley Dudrick and Douglas Wilmore, surgeon researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, worked through the many details of preparation, administration, and clinical monitoring in beagle puppies before testing them on adult patients malnourished from a variety of surgical complications and gastrointestinal conditions. They applied their techniques and formulations on a newborn wasting away from congenital absence of the small bowel, the baby growing and developing for several months while being nourished completely by total parenteral nutrition. Their techniques, inspired by patients with progressive malnutrition from devastating intestinal conditions and malformations, form the basis of the practice of intravenous nutrition practiced today.

  15. Virtues and challenges in using the community based participatory research (cbpr) approach by the delta nutrition research initiative (delta niri) in developing rural community walking studies to lower obesity risks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To discuss the CBPR approach in development, implementation, and evaluation of rural community walking and nutrition studies. Background: The current obesity epidemic, especially among rural and low-income minority populations, presents challenges in designing interventions that are effec...

  16. [Rural development, household food safety, and nutrition in western Honduras].

    PubMed

    Morris, S S; Medina Banegas, J M

    1999-09-01

    The authors studied the impact of a rural development project on household food security and nutrition. A quasi-experimental study design was used to compare the experience of members of thirteen Honduran small-holder farmers groups which had already received a year of credit and technical assistance, with another thirteen groups which had just joined the project, and thirteen control communities. All these communities were followed-up for one year (March/April 1997-March/April 1998). Farmers participating in the project showed a greater increase in maize stores than farmers in the control communities (p = 0.01), but did not increase their dietary energy consumption. There was, however, a small improvement in their dietary diversity (p = 0.01). The impact of the project on the nutritional status of under 5's was complex. The study underlined the importance of monitoring the impact of programs which may affect food and nutrition.

  17. Nutrition Education Today. A Curriculum Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    Nutrition Education Today is a state-funded curriculum project that addresses the behavioral aspects of nutrition as well as the nutritional knowledge of secondary school students in California. The curriculum design for the Nutrition Education Today project is a result of the efforts of a statewide task force of specialists in the area of…

  18. The development of android - based children's nutritional status monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanto, Agus; Paramita, Octavianti; Pribadi, Feddy Setio

    2017-03-01

    The calculation of BMI (Body Mass Index) is one of the methods to calculate the nutritional status of a person. The BMI calculation has not yet widely understood and known by the public. In addition, people should know the importance of progress in the development of child nutrition each month. Therefore, an application to determine the nutritional status of children based on Android was developed in this study. This study restricted the calculation for children with the age of 0-60 months. The application can run on a smartphone or tablet PC with android operating system due to the rapid development of a smartphone or tablet PC with android operating system and many people own and use it. The aim of this study was to produce a android app to calculate of nutritional status of children. This study was Research and Development (R & D), with a design approach using experimental studies. The steps in this study included analyzing the formula of the Body Mass Index (BMI) and developing the initial application with the help of a computer that includes the design and manufacture of display using Eclipse software. This study resulted in android application that can be used to calculate the nutritional status of children with the age 0-60 months. The results of MES or the error calculation analysis using body mass index formula was 0. In addition, the results of MAPE percentage was 0%. It shows that there is no error in the calculation of the application based on the BMI formula. The smaller value of MSE and MAPE leads to higher level of accuracy.

  19. Development of the Nutrition4Kids website.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle S

    2012-01-01

    According to the 2009 National Vital Statistics Report, cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the United States. Researchers have determined that consuming a diet low in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is a common risk factor associated with the risk of developing several types of cancer including stomach, colorectal, breast, and pancreatic. Currently, there are few websites devoted to increasing students' knowledge about the role of a healthy diet in cancer prevention. The Nutrition4Kids website is a unique health education tool that targets youth aged 10 to 14 years. The website content and design were based on the Health Belief Model, the Information-Motivation and Behavioral Skills Model, and the principles of health literacy. The information included on the website was based on recommendations from the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund. The website contains nutrition information, recipes that emphasize the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and interactive games. The primary objectives of the Nutrition4Kids website are to 1) increase students' knowledge of how poor dietary habits can affect their health, 2) increase students' knowledge of healthy dietary habits that can reduce their risk for cancer, 3) increase students' ability to prepare healthy, well-balanced meals and snacks, 4) increase students' ability to discuss healthy eating with their family and friends, and 5) increase students' knowledge of nutrients that have healthful benefits.

  20. Developing a formulary for enteral nutrition products.

    PubMed

    Hopefl, A W; Herrmann, V M

    1982-09-01

    A formulary for enteral nutrition products was developed at a university hospital. Advice was solicited from clinical dietetics and the medical staff. Reported important product variables were osmolality, caloric density, protein content and source, fat content and source, freedom from lactose, and, for oral supplements, available flavors. Data were also obtained from manufacturers regarding the composition of their products. Products were categorized as follows: liquid supplemental feedings, high calorie supplemental feedings, isotonic tube feedings, high caloric/high nitrogen tube feedings, high nitrogen tube feedings, and blenderized tube feedings. Bids were solicited in April 1981 (and annually thereafter) from manufacturers of the classified enteral nutrition products, and a contract was signed with the manufacturer in each category submitting the lowest bid. In contrast with previous experience, there was no loss from outdated products during the first year of the formulary. Categorizing enteral nutrition products into therapeutic categories appears to be a workable method to limit the number of products used in a hospital, thereby potentially decreasing inventory, waste, and hospital costs. The descriptive category titles also may encourage rational use of these products without promoting allegiance to a particular company or product.

  1. Development of clinical application for a nutritional prescription support system for total parenteral/enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Syuzo; Oka, Ryusho; Uwai, Koji; Matsuda, Yumi; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshito; Shoji, Tohru; Mihara, Chie; Takeshita, Mitsuhiro; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    One of the important roles of pharmacists as members of a nutrition support team is nutritional prescription support. We developed a nutritional prescription support system (NPSS) that facilitates prescription support and analysis and evaluated its usefulness in nutritional therapy. An NPSS for prescription support and the management of patient information was created. With this NPSS, the nutritional status was assessed, and, on the basis of the results, such variables as the total energy expenditure were calculated. This system allows prescription support for parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy, enteral nutrition (EN) therapy, and the transition period between them. This system was used for 2 representative patients and evaluated. In a malnourished patient receiving oral warfarin, EN solutions were compared by means of the NPSS, and an appropriate EN solution was selected. In addition, the prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was monitored, and favorable results were obtained regarding the adjustment of the warfarin dose and nutritional management. In a patient with aspiration pneumonia, continuous nutritional management to EN from PN therapy was straightforwardly performed with the NPSS. This NPSS allows rapid, comprehensive nutritional management during the transition period to EN from PN therapy, despite these therapies being considered separately in conventional nutritional management. The NPSS is useful for simplifying prescription support and facilitating information sharing among members of a nutrition support team.

  2. Boundary Development in the Field of International Nutrition Science12

    PubMed Central

    Centrone Stefani, Monique; Humphries, Debbie L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sociological approach that elaborates on key observations of institutional entrepreneurs in international nutrition, this paper explores institutional boundaries and boundary work in international nutrition. Sociological concepts of “boundary making” and “situated knowledge” are applied to the boundaries between the nutrition sciences and lay nutrition knowledge in nutrition intervention. These concepts allow an analysis of how nutrition science creates boundaries between its field and other sciences and between nutrition as a science and other nutrition practices, providing additional perspective on current challenges in global food security and malnutrition. Analysis of boundary processes in international nutrition can also illuminate the development of “implementation” or “delivery science” in the field of international nutrition as it attempts to strengthen effectiveness of global efforts to reduce malnutrition. Although some risk taking in the academic world is rewarded, the analysis indicates that there are underlying processes that may inhibit full partnership with local people in the course of intervention work that builds scientific nutrition knowledge. As nutrition science becomes increasingly central to development, the boundaries that are reinforced by digging in heels over the implementation of programs with little local input or softened by inviting local stakeholders to publicly consider the problems in global nutrition together are important to consider in helping to create directions that favor viable solutions. PMID:24618761

  3. Observing Protein & Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study was designed to assess dietary measurement error by comparing results from self-reported dietary intake data with four dietary biomarkers: doubly labeled water and urinary nitrogen, sodium, and potassium.

  4. Nutrition and bone growth and development.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Ann; Schoenmakers, Inez; Laskey, M Ann; de Bono, Stephanie; Ginty, Fiona; Goldberg, Gail R

    2006-11-01

    The growth and development of the human skeleton requires an adequate supply of many different nutritional factors. Classical nutrient deficiencies are associated with stunting (e.g. energy, protein, Zn), rickets (e.g. vitamin D) and other bone abnormalities (e.g. Cu, Zn, vitamin C). In recent years there has been interest in the role nutrition may play in bone growth at intakes above those required to prevent classical deficiencies, particularly in relation to optimising peak bone mass and minimising osteoporosis risk. There is evidence to suggest that peak bone mass and later fracture risk are influenced by the pattern of growth in childhood and by nutritional exposures in utero, in infancy and during childhood and adolescence. Of the individual nutrients, particular attention has been paid to Ca, vitamin D, protein and P. There has also been interest in several food groups, particularly dairy products, fruit and vegetables and foods contributing to acid-base balance. However, it is not possible at the present time to define dietary reference values using bone health as a criterion, and the question of what type of diet constitutes the best support for optimal bone growth and development remains open. Prudent recommendations (Department of Health, 1998; World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization, 2003) are the same as those for adults, i.e. to consume a Ca intake close to the reference nutrient intake, optimise vitamin D status through adequate summer sunshine exposure (and diet supplementation where appropriate), be physically active, have a body weight in the healthy range, restrict salt intake and consume plenty of fruit and vegetables.

  5. [Relation between nutritional status of adolescent mothers and neonatal development].

    PubMed

    Arcos Griffiths, E; Olivo Mardones, A; Romero Zambrano, J; Saldivia Sánchez, J; Cortez Quintana, J; Carretta Muñoz, L

    1995-06-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation and low birthweight--factors that strongly influence the physical and mental development of a child--are in turn affected by the nutritional status of the mother during pregnancy and, to a certain extent, by her pregestational nutritional status. Pregnant adolescents constitute a high-risk group for nutritional problems because their own bodies are still growing. In order to examine the correlation between several variables related to body composition and nutritional status in a group of pregnant adolescents and certain indicators of neonatal development, a prospective longitudinal study was carried out in Valdivia, Chile, from September 1988 to May 1992. The study cohort was made up of 184 pairs consisting of mothers under 17 years of age who had attended a prenatal monitoring program and their newborns. The following groups of variables were tested for correlation: indicators of maternal body composition before pregnancy (pregestational weight recorded by the mother, height measured during the first visit to the program, and body mass index [pregestational weight/(height upon entering the program)]; indicators of maternal body composition during pregnancy (weight and body mass index upon entering the program and before giving birth, weekly weight gain, and total weight gain); and indicators of neonatal development (weight and length at birth, gestational age, and cranial perimeter). The weight of the mother before giving birth was statistically significantly correlated with the gestational age, length, weight, and cranial perimeter of the newborn. The body mass index prior to giving birth was weakly correlated with the weight and length of the newborn, and a significant direct correlation was also observed between the weight of the pregnant adolescent upon entering the program and the weight of her child at birth. No correlation was found between the indicators of fetal development and those of maternal pregestational body

  6. Development of Core Competencies for Paraprofessional Nutrition Educators Who Deliver Food Stamp Nutrition Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan S.; Pearson, Meredith; Chipman, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the process used for the development of core competencies for paraprofessional nutrition educators in Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE). The development process included the efforts of an expert panel of state and multicounty FSNE leaders to draft the core competencies and the validation of those…

  7. Nutritionally mediated programming of the developing immune system.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Amanda C

    2011-09-01

    A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of a mother's nutrition from preconception through lactation in programming the emerging organ systems and homeostatic pathways of her offspring. The developing immune system may be particularly vulnerable. Indeed, examples of nutrition-mediated immune programming can be found in the literature on intra-uterine growth retardation, maternal micronutrient deficiencies, and infant feeding. Current models of immune ontogeny depict a "layered" expansion of increasingly complex defenses, which may be permanently altered by maternal malnutrition. One programming mechanism involves activation of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to nutritional stress. Fetal or neonatal exposure to elevated stress hormones is linked in animal studies to permanent changes in neuroendocrine-immune interactions, with diverse manifestations such as an attenuated inflammatory response or reduced resistance to tumor colonization. Maternal malnutrition may also have a direct influence, as evidenced by nutrient-driven epigenetic changes to developing T regulatory cells and subsequent risk of allergy or asthma. A 3rd programming pathway involves placental or breast milk transfer of maternal immune factors with immunomodulatory functions (e.g. cytokines). Maternal malnutrition can directly affect transfer mechanisms or influence the quality or quantity of transferred factors. The public health implications of nutrition-mediated immune programming are of particular importance in the developing world, where prevalent maternal undernutrition is coupled with persistent infectious challenges. However, early alterations to the immune system, resulting from either nutritional deficiencies or excesses, have broad relevance for immune-mediated diseases, such as asthma, and chronic inflammatory conditions like cardiovascular disease.

  8. Nutrition support practice: a study of factors inherent in the delivery of nutrition support services.

    PubMed

    Agriesti-Johnson, C; Dwyer, K; Steinbaugh, M

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of intercorrelation among dietitian, physician, and team nutrition support functions. Eight hundred and eighty dietitians and physicians were asked to respond to a questionnaire describing nutrition support functions as reported in the literature and validated by a panel of nutrition support physicians and dietitians. Two hundred and fifty-four completed questionnaires were included in the study, 84 from physicians and 170 from dietitians. Intercorrelations among function statements were subjected to factor analysis. The magnitude and consistency of factor loadings suggest that nutrition support is not perceived as independent components, but as a comprehensive pattern or structure. However, there was one important difference in perception. The sample tended to have an "enteral" orientation to the dietitian role and a "parenteral" orientation to the physician and team roles. The data support the contention that all members of nutrition support teams need a common core of knowledge and a set of highly developed process skills which can best be attained through an integrated, rather than segmented, approach to team training.

  9. Head size and intelligence, learning, nutritional status and brain development. Head, IQ, learning, nutrition and brain.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, Daniza M; Leiva, Boris P; Pérez, Hernán T; Olivares, Manuel G; Díaz, Nora S; Urrutia, María Soledad C; Almagià, Atilio F; Toro, Triana D; Miller, Patricio T; Bosch, Enrique O; Larraín, Cristián G

    2004-01-01

    This multifactorial study investigates the interrelationships between head circumference (HC) and intellectual quotient (IQ), learning, nutritional status and brain development in Chilean school-age children graduating from high school, of both sexes and with high and low IQ and socio-economic strata (SES). The sample consisted of 96 right-handed healthy students (mean age 18.0 +/- 0.9 years) born at term. HC was measured both in the children and their parents and was expressed as Z-score (Z-HC). In children, IQ was determined by means of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults-Revised (WAIS-R), scholastic achievement (SA) through the standard Spanish language and mathematics tests and the academic aptitude test (AAT) score, nutritional status was assessed through anthropometric indicators, brain development was determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and SES applying the Graffar modified method. Results showed that microcephalic children (Z-HC < or = 2 S.D.) had significantly lower values mainly for brain volume (BV), parental Z-HC, IQ, SA, AAT, birth length (BL) and a significantly higher incidence of undernutrition in the first year of life compared with their macrocephalic peers (Z-HC > 2S.D.). Multiple regression analysis revealed that BV, parental Z-HC and BL were the independent variables with the greatest explanatory power for child's Z-HC variance (r(2) = 0.727). These findings confirm the hypothesis formulated in this study: (1) independently of age, sex and SES, brain parameters, parental HC and prenatal nutritional indicators are the most important independent variables that determine HC and (2) microcephalic children present multiple disorders not only related to BV but also to IQ, SA and nutritional background.

  10. Nutritional Disorders and the Development of Young Children: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Joan Good

    This bibliography on nutritional disorders and child development is directed towards early childhood professionals outside the field of nutrition. The main topic covered pertains to malnutrition and undernutrition as it relates to mental/intellectual/cognitive development of children from the fetal stage through the early childhood years. Included…

  11. Challenges of molecular nutrition research 6: the nutritional phenotype database to store, share and evaluate nutritional systems biology studies

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, Jildau; Dragsted, Lars O.; Drevon, Christian A.; Elliott, Ruan; de Groot, Philip; Kaput, Jim; Mathers, John C.; Müller, Michael; Pepping, Fre; Saito, Jahn; Scalbert, Augustin; Radonjic, Marijana; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Travis, Anthony; Wopereis, Suzan; Evelo, Chris T.

    2010-01-01

    The challenge of modern nutrition and health research is to identify food-based strategies promoting life-long optimal health and well-being. This research is complex because it exploits a multitude of bioactive compounds acting on an extensive network of interacting processes. Whereas nutrition research can profit enormously from the revolution in ‘omics’ technologies, it has discipline-specific requirements for analytical and bioinformatic procedures. In addition to measurements of the parameters of interest (measures of health), extensive description of the subjects of study and foods or diets consumed is central for describing the nutritional phenotype. We propose and pursue an infrastructural activity of constructing the “Nutritional Phenotype database” (dbNP). When fully developed, dbNP will be a research and collaboration tool and a publicly available data and knowledge repository. Creation and implementation of the dbNP will maximize benefits to the research community by enabling integration and interrogation of data from multiple studies, from different research groups, different countries and different—omics levels. The dbNP is designed to facilitate storage of biologically relevant, pre-processed—omics data, as well as study descriptive and study participant phenotype data. It is also important to enable the combination of this information at different levels (e.g. to facilitate linkage of data describing participant phenotype, genotype and food intake with information on study design and—omics measurements, and to combine all of this with existing knowledge). The biological information stored in the database (i.e. genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, biomarkers, metabolomics, functional assays, food intake and food composition) is tailored to nutrition research and embedded in an environment of standard procedures and protocols, annotations, modular data-basing, networking and integrated bioinformatics. The dbNP is an evolving enterprise

  12. Development of a vinasse nutritive solution for hydroponics.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, José Darcy; Lopes da Silva, André Luís; da Luz Costa, Jefferson; Scheidt, Gessiel Newton; Novak, Alessandra Cristine; Sydney, Eduardo Bittencourt; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2013-01-15

    Vinasse is a residue that originates from the distillation of fuel alcohol. However, it contains a relative amount of nutrients. The aim of this work was to develop a nutritive solution using vinasse and to compare it with a commercial solution for the cultivation of lettuce, watercress and rocket. Vinasse obtained from juice must was decanted and filtered, followed by chemical analyses of the nutrients. A nutritive solution composed of 10% vinasse supplemented with nutrients was in agreement with the results of the chemical analyses (a similar amount of Furlani's solution). Experiments were then performed in an NFT (Nutrient film technique) system. The treatments used the vinasse solution and a commercial solution constituted from a Yara Fertilizantes(®) product. The height of the aerial part and the number of leaves of the crops were evaluated at 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days. In most crops, the results were very similar. The vinasse solution promoted a larger number of leaves in lettuce and the highest aerial part in watercress. For the rocket, there were no significant differences between the two solutions. In conclusion, a nutritive solution was developed using vinasse, and this solution provided suitable growth, which was higher in some cases, for the crops studied herein. This study shows the great potential of this technology as a rational alternative to vinasse disposal.

  13. Epidemiological and Clinical Studies of Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Todd M.; Ferrucci, Leah M.; Tangrea, Joseph A.; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we briefly summarize some of the key developments in nutritional epidemiology and cancer over the past two decades with a focus on the strengths and limitations of study designs and dietary assessment methods. We present the evidence on dietary fat, meat, fiber, antioxidant nutrients, and calcium in relation to carcinogenesis from large cohort studies and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and refer to the conclusions of the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research summary report. One prominent theme that emerged is the lack of concordance of results from RCTs and observational studies. There are multiple potential reasons for these discrepancies, including differences in study population, dose and timing of the exposure, adherence to an intervention, length of follow-up, and the primary endpoint. Therefore, null findings of RCTs do not necessarily indicate a lack of effect for the tested dietary factors on cancer risk, as some of these nutrients may have chemopreventive effects if given at the right time and in the right dose. It is likely that potential benefits from the diet are due to a combination of food constituents rather than single components acting in isolation. Future efforts need to recognize the integrative nature of dietary exposures and attempt to study nutrients in the larger context of the foods and diets in which they are consumed. PMID:20709210

  14. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development – Vitamin A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) project is designed to provide evidence-informed advice to anyone with an interest in the role of nutrition in health. Specifically, the BOND program provides state-of-the-art information and service with regard to selection, use, and interpretation...

  15. The Relationship of Nutrition to Brain Development and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Committee on International Nutrition Programs.

    The physical, chemical, and physiological development of the brain and consequent behavior in all species of higher animals evolves from the continuous interaction of genetic and numerous environmental factors. Among the latter are nutritional, disease, psychological, learning, and cultural variables. Of these, nutrition is concerned directly with…

  16. Developing an Online Certification Program for Nutrition Education Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christofferson, Debra; Christensen, Nedra; LeBlanc, Heidi; Bunch, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To develop an online certification program for nutrition education paraprofessionals to increase knowledge and confidence and to overcome training barriers of programming time and travel expenses. Design: An online interactive certification course based on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education and Expanded Food and…

  17. Development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtai...

  18. Development of the Mississippi communities for healthy living nutrition education toolkit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of our study was to develop a nutrition education toolkit for communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) with content that is current, evidence-based, culturally relevant, and user friendly. The Mississippi Communities for Fealthy Living (MCHL), an evidenced-based nutrition educa...

  19. Using Focus Groups to Develop a Nutrition Education Video for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Delores C. S.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Frazee, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Study used focus group interviews with ninth graders to help develop a nutrition education video and teacher's guide for Florida high schools. Students believed a video would be successful, expressed interest in 10 nutrition topics, recommended using teen actors with varying body types, and suggested no more than three or four topics per video.…

  20. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  1. Nutrition influences skeletal development from childhood to adulthood: a study of hip, spine, and forearm in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Matkovic, Velimir; Landoll, John D; Badenhop-Stevens, Nancy E; Ha, Eun-Yeong; Crncevic-Orlic, Zeljka; Li, Bin; Goel, Prem

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated the long-term efficacy of supplemental calcium and dairy products on bone mineral areal density of the hip and spine and on the bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density of the forearm in young females during late adolescence. The study was conducted among participants of a randomized double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial with calcium supplements and among participants of an observational study with higher consumption of dairy products. Hip and spine measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were done every 6 mo (dairy group every 12 mo) during last 3 y of the follow-up while peripheral quantitative computerized tomography of the forearm was done at the last visit. The results of the study show a positive influence of calcium supplementation and dairy products on bone mineral density of the hip and the forearm. Dairy products were also associated with a higher bone mineral density of the spine while calcium supplementation did not have an effect. Calcium exerts its action on bone accretion during growth primarily by influencing volumetric bone mineral density while milk may have an additional impact on bone growth and periosteal bone expansion.

  2. Promoting equity through integrated early child development and nutrition interventions.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable development, a foundation of the post-2015 global agenda, depends on healthy and productive citizens. The origins of adult health begin early in life, stemming from genetic-environmental interactions that include adequate nutrition and opportunities for responsive learning. Inequities associated with inadequate nutrition and early learning opportunities can undermine children's health and development, thereby compromising their productivity and societal contributions. Transactional theory serves as a useful framework for examining the associations that link early child development and nutrition because it emphasizes the interplay that occurs between children and the environment, mediated through caregiver interactions. Although single interventions targeting early child development or nutrition can be effective, there is limited evidence on the development, implementation, evaluation, and scaling up of integrated interventions. This manuscript introduces a special edition of papers on six topics central to integrated child development/nutrition interventions: (1) review of integrated interventions; (2) methods and topics in designing integrated interventions; (3) economic considerations related to integrated interventions; (4) capacity-building considerations; (5) examples of integrated interventions; and (6) policy implications of integrated interventions. Ensuring the health and development of infants and young children through integrated child development/nutrition interventions promotes equity, a critical component of sustainable development.

  3. Development of the New York State Nutrition Surveillance Program.

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, J M; Melnik, T A

    1993-01-01

    New York State established a Nutrition Surveillance Program (NSP) in 1984. Precedents for the program included the Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System of the Public Health Service's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and periodic food and nutrition surveys conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics and the Human Nutrition Information Service, Department of Agriculture. The first phase of NSP was connected to a new program, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which established support for more than 1,000 emergency food programs across the State. SNAP also expanded the home delivered meal program for the frail elderly and the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children. NSP provided information on the extent of unmet nutrition needs that was used to establish funding requests and provided data describing the characteristics of SNAP participants that were used in developing new SNAP program components. The second phase of NSP began in 1988. It identified populations that were thought to be at nutrition risk and compiled information about the extent of unmet need, the characteristics of the population, and the status of current nutrition programs to meet the needs. As a result of this review, NSP added a nutrition component to the Dental Survey of School Children; conducted a dietary survey; developed an inventory of information sources in all State agencies; and established an annual work plan using department of health objectives. The third phase of NSP is the policy and planning phase, monitoring the Year 2000 Objectives and the Five-Year Plan of the New York State Food and Nutrition Policy Council. PMID:8464981

  4. [Epigenetics and Nutrition: maternal nutrition impacts on placental development and health of offspring].

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Polina E; Lemaire, Marion; Fneich, Sara; Voisin, Sarah; Jouin, Mélanie; Junien, Claudine; Gabory, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The environment, defined broadly by all that is external to the individual, conditions the phenotype during development, particularly the susceptibility to develop non-communicable diseases. This notion, called Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD), is based on numerous epidemiological studies as well as animal models. Thus, parental nutrition and obesity can predispose the offspring to develop metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. The known underlying mechanisms include an altered development of tissues that adapt to maternal metabolic condition, and a placental dysfunction, which in turn impacts fetal growth and development. Epigenetic mechanisms modulate gene expression without affecting the DNA sequence itself. The main epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These marks are erased and set-up during gametogenesis and development in order to ensure cellular identity. Therefore, they can lead to a memorisation of early environment and induce long-term alteration of cell and tissue functions, which will condition the susceptibility to non-communicable diseases. The placenta is a programming agent of adult disease. The environment, such as smoking or psychosocial stress, is able to modify epigenetic processes in placenta, such as small RNA expression and DNA methylation. We showed that placenta is sensitive to maternal obesity and maternal nutrition, in terms of histology, transcription and epigenetic marks. A clear sexual dimorphism is remarkable in the placental response to maternal environment. In adulthood, the phenotype is also different between males and females. Epigenetic mechanisms could underlie this differential response of males and females to the same environment. The DOHaD can no longer be ignored in Biology of Reproduction. The prevention of non-communicable diseases must take this new paradigm into account. Research will allow a better comprehension of the mechanisms of this

  5. Understanding nutritional health in older adults. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Callen, Bonnie

    2004-01-01

    A pilot study of adults ages 65 and older admitted to an acute care setting was conducted to compare nutritional risk as measured by hospital dieticians with two Nutrition Screening Initiative tools, the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Checklist and the Level I Screen, and to elicit from patients their own perceptions of nutritional health. Ten community-living older adults were interviewed. Although all 10 were at nutritional risk as measured by both hospital assessment and nutritional risk screening tools, none of these patients believed themselves to be at risk. One conclusion of this pilot is that interventions and education need to be tailored to the perceptions of targeted individuals.

  6. Mother's nutritional miRNA legacy: Nutrition during pregnancy and its possible implications to develop cardiometabolic disease in later life.

    PubMed

    Casas-Agustench, Patricia; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Dávalos, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation influences the offspring's health in the long-term. Indeed, human epidemiological studies and animal model experiments suggest that either an excess or a deficit in maternal nutrition influence offspring development and susceptibility to metabolic disorders. Different epigenetic mechanisms may explain in part the way by which dietary factors in early critical developmental steps might be able to affect the susceptibility to develop metabolic diseases in adulthood. microRNAs are versatile regulators of gene expression and play a major role during tissue homeostasis and disease. Dietary factors have also been shown to modify microRNA expression. However, the role of microRNAs in fetal programming remains largely unstudied. This review evaluates in vivo studies conducted to analyze the effect of maternal diet on the modulation of the microRNA expression in the offspring and their influence to develop metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. In overall, the available evidence suggests that nutritional status during pregnancy influence offspring susceptibility to the development of cardiometabolic risk factors, partly through microRNA action. Thus, therapeutic modulation of microRNAs can open up new strategies to combat - later in life - the effects of nutritional insult during critical points of development.

  7. The Healthy Communities Study Nutrition Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Lorrene D.; Wakimoto, Patricia; Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Thompson, Frances E.; Loria, Catherine M.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Kao, Janice; Crawford, Patricia B.; Webb, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Multifaceted community interventions directed at improving food environments are emerging, but their impact on dietary change and obesity prevalence has not been documented adequately. The Healthy Communities Study (HCS) is seeking to identify characteristics and combinations of programs and policies that are associated with children’s diets and obesity-related outcomes in various types of communities across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used in 2013–2015 in the HCS to assess dietary intake, school nutrition environments, and other nutrition-related behaviors. The conceptual framework of the HCS is based on the socioecological model and behaviors shown in previous studies to be related to obesity in children-guided selection of domains. Nine domains were identified as essential measures of nutrition in the HCS: (1) intake of selected foods and beverages; (2) food patterns and behaviors; (3) social support; (4) home environment; (5) school environment; (6) community environment; (7) breastfeeding history; (8) household food insecurity; and (9) dieting behaviors and body image. Children’s dietary intake was assessed using a dietary screener and up to two automated 24-hour recalls. Dietary-related behaviors were assessed by a survey administered to the parent, child, or both, depending on child age. School nutrition measures were obtained from a combination of school staff surveys and researcher observations. Information from these measures is expected to contribute to a better understanding of “what is working” to improve the dietary behaviors that are likely to prevent obesity and improve health in children. PMID:26384936

  8. Development and evaluation of continuing education course in renal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Rana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Competent renal dietitians are crucial for better patient compliance and clinical outcomes, specifically in critical settings. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based course in renal dietetics for dietitians working in health care systems where dietetic specialization is absent. SUBJECTS/METHODS Fifteen licensed dietitians working with hemodialysis patients in Lebanon were randomly recruited to participate in the course. The latter was developed by the study's primary investigator, according to evidence-based practice guidelines, and focused on all aspects of renal nutrition. Total course duration was 28 hours spread over a 2 month period. Dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition was tested pre- and post-training through a 23-item questionnaire; the total score was expressed in percentage (< 60% score indicated insufficient knowledge). Paired-samples t test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS Overall knowledge of the dietitians significantly improved post-training and reached satisfactory levels (pre: 38.75 ± 17.20%, post: 62.08 ± 21.85%). Sub-analysis of the change in the knowledge showed significant and satisfactory improvement only in 3 topics: 1) correct body weight use in calculations, 2) energy estimation method and 3) phosphorus management. Knowledge in the fluid management significantly improved but did not achieve a satisfactory level. CONCLUSION The course significantly improved dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition. If adopted as part of the continuing education of dietitians in countries that lack dietetic specializations, it may serve the first step towards improving health care practice. PMID:26865922

  9. Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your diet. These include brightly colored and dark fruits and vegetables. Balance the food you eat ... can also order your free copy of Nutrition Matters and visit our Ask about Nutrition forum. << Back ...

  10. Early Nutritional Interventions for Brain and Cognitive Development in Preterm Infants: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Nora; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L.

    2017-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is important for neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm-born infants. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge on nutritional interventions initiated during the hospital stay targeting brain and cognitive development benefits in preterm human infants. Studies can broadly be split in general dietary intervention studies and studies investigating specific nutrients or nutritional supplements. In general, mother’s breast milk was reported to be better for preterm infants’ neurodevelopment compared to infant formula. The differences in methodologies make it difficult to conclude any effects of interventions with individual nutrients. Only protein and iron level studies showed some consistent findings regarding optimal doses; however, confirmatory studies are needed. This review does not support some widely accepted associations, such as that between long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and visual development. Clear nutritional recommendations cannot be made based on this review. However, the type of infant nutrition (i.e., breast milk versus formula or donor milk), the timing of the nutritional intervention, and the dose of the nutrient/supplement have been found to be relevant factors in determining the success of nutritional intervention studies in preterm infants. PMID:28241501

  11. Nutritional Strategies Facing an Older Demographic: The Nutrition UP 65 Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The population of Portugal is aging. The lack of data on older adults’ nutritional status and the lack of nutrition knowledge amongst health professionals, caregivers, and older adults themselves, remains a challenge. Objective The Nutrition UP 65 study aims to reduce nutritional inequalities in the older Portuguese adult population and improve knowledge regarding older Portuguese adults’ nutritional status, specifically relating to undernutrition, obesity, sarcopenia, frailty, hydration, sodium, and vitamin D statuses. Methods A representative sample of older Portuguese adults was selected. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, functional, and clinical data were collected. Sodium excretion, hydration, and vitamin D statuses were assessed. Results Data collection (n=1500) took place between December, 2015 and June, 2016. Results will be disseminated in national and international scientific journals, and via Portuguese media. Conclusions Nutrition UP 65 results will provide evidence for the design and implementation of effective preventive public health strategies regarding the elderly. These insights may represent relevant health gains and costs savings. PMID:27628097

  12. Nutrition and socio-economic development in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Florentino, R F; Pedro, R A

    1992-05-01

    While most Third World countries, particularly in Africa and Latin America, have experienced a deterioration in child welfare as a result of the severe economic downturn in the 1980s, Southeast Asia in general managed to sustain improvements in the situation of its children because it has maintained satisfactory rates of economic growth. However, there were exceptions within Southeast Asia. The Philippines, Vietnam, Dem. Kampuchea and Laos had unsatisfactory growth rates and, consequently, unsustained nutritional gains from the 1970s through the 1980s. Economic factors exerted a big impact on the Philippine nutrition situation, particularly on the dietary status of the households and the nutritional status of children. As a result of the economic dislocation occurring in the country, the nutritional gains of 1978-82 were not maintained in succeeding years. Unlike the case of Thailand, it has been estimated that the solution to nutritional problems in the Philippines is far from being achieved in the immediate future (Villavieja et al. 1989). On the other hand, the nutrition improvements in Thailand have been as remarkable as the economic growth over the last decade. Long-term investments in health, nutrition and other social services in Thailand (as well as in Indonesia) have paid off according to the assessment by the United Nations (1990). It appears, therefore, that the nutrition situation in developing countries is highly dependent on the economic situation, globally and nationally (Cornia et al. 1987), as well as on investment in social services. Adjustment policies should, therefore, consider their implications on distribution and poverty in order that they could positively contribute to the improvement of the nutrition of the people.

  13. Modifying Choroidal Neovascularization Development with a Nutritional Supplement in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ivanescu, Alina Adriana; Fernández-Robredo, Patricia; Heras-Mulero, Henar; Sádaba-Echarri, Luis Manuel; García-García, Laura; Fernández-García, Vanessa; Moreno-Orduna, Maite; Redondo-Exposito, Aitor; Recalde, Sergio; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of nutritional supplements (modified Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS)-II formulation containing vitamins, minerals, lutein, resveratrol, and omega-3 fatty acids) on choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Supplements were administered alone and combined with intravitreal anti-VEGF in an early-CNV (diode laser-induced) murine model. Sixty mice were evenly divided into group V (oral vehicle, intravitreal saline), group S (oral supplement, intravitreal saline), group V + aVEGF (oral vehicle, intravitreal anti-VEGF), and group S + aVEGF (oral supplement, intravitreal anti-VEGF). Vehicle and nutritional supplements were administered daily for 38 days beginning 10 days before laser. Intravitreal injections were administered 48 h after laser. Fluorescein angiography (FA) and flat-mount CD31 staining evaluated leakage and CNV lesion area. Expression of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity, and NLRP3 were evaluated with RT-PCR, zymography, and western-blot. Leakage, CNV size, VEGF gene and protein expression were lower in groups V + aVEGF, S + aVEGF, and S than in V (all p < 0.05). Additionally, MMP-9 gene expression differed between groups S + aVEGF and V (p < 0.05) and MMP-9 activity was lower in S + aVEGF than in V and S (both p < 0.01). Levels of MMP-2 and NLRP3 were not significantly different between groups. Nutritional supplements either alone or combined with anti-VEGF may mitigate CNV development and inhibit retinal disease involving VEGF overexpression and CNV. PMID:26153682

  14. Growing children's bodies and minds: maximizing child nutrition and development.

    PubMed

    Engle, Patrice; Huffman, Sandra L

    2010-06-01

    For their optimal growth, and for greater long-term human capital development, children profit not only from improved nutrition but also from improved learning opportunities in the earliest years of life. This paper describes how actions to enhance optimal infant and young child nutrition can be linked with child development interventions for children under 3 years of age. In countries with high rates of malnutrition, linking these two components will result in synergies of program activities, and will bring about a greater impact at reduced cost than either activity conducted separately. New understanding of social marketing and communication strategies can increase effectiveness of linked interventions. Public-private partnerships to improve both child development and nutrition offer promise for sustainable interventions.

  15. Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on nutrition for long duration space missions. Nutritional requirements are affected by isolation, workloads, and cold as well as the psychological needs, metabolism, and fluid balance of an individual.

  16. The Link between Nutrition and Cognitive Development in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Center on Hunger, Poverty and Nutrition Policy.

    New findings about child nutrition and cognitive development indicate that undernourished children are typically fatigued and uninterested in their social environments. Such children are less likely to establish relationships or to explore and learn from their surroundings. Undernourished children are also more susceptible to illness and, thus,…

  17. Postweaning nutritional programming of ovarian development in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From weaning to breeding, nutritional management of replacement females is critical to their lifetime productivity. Traditionally, cereal grains have been used to develop replacement heifers to enter the breeding system at a younger age. Overfeeding heifers decreases the number of calves weaned, w...

  18. Executive summary: biomarkers of nutrition for development: building a consensus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to develop evidence-based clinical guidance and effective programs and policies to achieve global health promotion and disease prevention goals depends on the availability of valid and reliable data. With specific regard to the role of food and nutrition in achieving those goals, relevan...

  19. Developing the Nutritional Potential of Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes are the most consumed vegetable in the developed world and consumption is increasing in the developing world. Consequently, the phytonutrient content of potato can have a large impact on public health. Moreover, because of the high consumption even modest increases in tuber phytonutrient co...

  20. Growth and nutrition effects on gilt development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth and development of gilts are a component of their lifetime potential for productivity. Growth and development affects not only their ability to reach puberty, they also likely affect their reproductive performance through later parities and their physical soundness as they age. Because of...

  1. Child Nutrition Program Operations Study: First Year Report Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pierre, Robert; And Others

    Summarizing the first year report of a multi-year study of the Food and Nutrition Service's (Department of Agriculture) Child Nutrition Programs, this report describes the programs and methods of the study. Data were collected through telephone interviews with states and School Food Authorities (SFAs) between 1987 and 1992. Findings from 1987-1988…

  2. Nutritional and engineering aspects of microbial process development.

    PubMed

    Masurekar, Prakash S

    2008-01-01

    Today we use many drugs produced by microorganisms. However, when these drugs were discovered it was found that the yields were low and a substantial effort had to be put in to develop commercially viable processes. A key part of this endeavor was the studies of the nutritional and the engineering parameters. In this chapter, the basic principles of optimizing the nutritional and engineering aspect of the production process are described with appropriate examples. It was found that two critical components of nutritional medium, carbon and nitrogen source regulated the synthesis of the compounds of interest. Rapidly utilizable carbon source such as glucose supported the growth but led to catabolite repression and alternative carbon sources or methods of addition had to be devised. Inorganic nitrogen sources led to undesirable changes in pH of the medium. Organic nitrogen sources could influence the yields positively or negatively and had to be chosen carefully. Essential nutrients like phosphates often inhibited the synthesis and its concentration had to be maintained below the inhibitory levels. On many occasions, trace nutrients like metal ions and vitamins were found to be critical for good production. Temperature and pH were important environmental variables and their optimum values had to be determined. The media were designed and optimized initially with 'one variable at a time' approach and later with experimental design based on statistics. The latter approach is preferred because it is economical, considers interactions between medium components and allows rapid optimization of the process. The engineering aspects like aeration, agitation, medium sterilization, heat transfer, process monitoring and control, become critical as the process is scaled-up to the production size. Aeration and agitation are probably the most important variables. In many processes dissolved oxygen concentration had to be maintained above a critical value to obtain the best yields

  3. Nutritional interventions in primary mitochondrial disorders: Developing an evidence base.

    PubMed

    Camp, Kathryn M; Krotoski, Danuta; Parisi, Melissa A; Gwinn, Katrina A; Cohen, Bruce H; Cox, Christine S; Enns, Gregory M; Falk, Marni J; Goldstein, Amy C; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Gorman, Gráinne S; Hersh, Stephen P; Hirano, Michio; Hoffman, Freddie Ann; Karaa, Amel; MacLeod, Erin L; McFarland, Robert; Mohan, Charles; Mulberg, Andrew E; Odenkirchen, Joanne C; Parikh, Sumit; Rutherford, Patricia J; Suggs-Anderson, Shawne K; Tang, W H Wilson; Vockley, Jerry; Wolfe, Lynne A; Yannicelli, Steven; Yeske, Philip E; Coates, Paul M

    2016-11-01

    In December 2014, a workshop entitled "Nutritional Interventions in Primary Mitochondrial Disorders: Developing an Evidence Base" was convened at the NIH with the goals of exploring the use of nutritional interventions in primary mitochondrial disorders (PMD) and identifying knowledge gaps regarding their safety and efficacy; identifying research opportunities; and forging collaborations among researchers, clinicians, patient advocacy groups, and federal partners. Sponsors included the NIH, the Wellcome Trust, and the United Mitochondrial Diseases Foundation. Dietary supplements have historically been used in the management of PMD due to their potential benefits and perceived low risk, even though little evidence exists regarding their effectiveness. PMD are rare and clinically, phenotypically, and genetically heterogeneous. Thus patient recruitment for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has proven to be challenging. Only a few RCTs examining dietary supplements, singly or in combination with other vitamins and cofactors, are reported in the literature. Regulatory issues pertaining to the use of dietary supplements as treatment modalities further complicate the research and patient access landscape. As a preface to exploring a research agenda, the workshop included presentations and discussions on what PMD are; how nutritional interventions are used in PMD; challenges and barriers to their use; new technologies and approaches to diagnosis and treatment; research opportunities and resources; and perspectives from patient advocacy, industry, and professional organizations. Seven key areas were identified during the workshop. These areas were: 1) defining the disease, 2) clinical trial design, 3) biomarker selection, 4) mechanistic approaches, 5) challenges in using dietary supplements, 6) standards of clinical care, and 7) collaboration issues. Short- and long-term goals within each of these areas were identified. An example of an overarching goal is the enrollment

  4. Development and implementation of the guiding stars nutrition guidance program.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Leslie M; Sutherland, Lisa A; Kaley, Lori A; Fox, Tracy A; Hasler, Clare M; Nobel, Jeremy; Kantor, Mark A; Blumberg, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE . To describe the collaborative process between a grocery retailer and a panel of nutrition experts used to develop a nutrition guidance system (Guiding Stars) that evaluates the nutrient profile of all edible products in the supermarket, and to report the results of the food and beverage ratings. DESIGN . A collaboration between a private retailer and members of the scientific community that led to the development of a scoring algorithm used to evaluate the nutritional quality of foods and beverages. SETTING/SUBJECTS . Northeast supermarkets (n  =  160). MEASURES . Food and beverage nutrition ratings and distribution of stars across different grocery categories. ANALYSIS . Descriptive statistics for rating distributions were computed. T-tests were conducted to assess differences in mean nutrient values between foods with zero versus three stars or a dichotomized variable representing all foods with one to three stars. RESULTS . All edible grocery items (n  =  27,466) were evaluated, with 23.6% earning at least one star. Items receiving at least one star had lower mean levels of sodium, saturated fat, and sugars and higher amounts of fiber than products not earning stars. CONCLUSION . The Guiding Stars system rates edible products without regard to brand or manufacturer, and provides consumers with a simple tool to quickly identify more nutritious choices while shopping. The low percentage of products qualifying for stars reflects poorly on the food choices available to Americans.

  5. Development of Job Standards for Clinical Nutrition Therapy for Dyslipidemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Jae; Seo, Jung-Sook; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Mi-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hye; Ju, Dal-Lae; Wie, Gyung-Ah; Lee, Song-Mi; Cha, Jin-A

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemia has significantly contributed to the increase of death and morbidity rates related to cardiovascular diseases. Clinical nutrition service provided by dietitians has been reported to have a positive effect on relief of medical symptoms or reducing the further medical costs. However, there is a lack of researches to identify key competencies and job standard for clinical dietitians to care patients with dyslipidemia. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the job components of clinical dietitian and develop the standard for professional practice to provide effective nutrition management for dyslipidemia patients. The current status of clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients in hospitals with 300 or more beds was studied. After duty tasks and task elements of nutrition care process for dyslipidemia clinical dietitians were developed by developing a curriculum (DACUM) analysis method. The developed job standards were pretested in order to evaluate job performance, difficulty, and job standards. As a result, the job standard included four jobs, 18 tasks, and 53 task elements, and specific job description includes 73 basic services and 26 recommended services. When clinical dietitians managing dyslipidemia patients performed their practice according to this job standard for 30 patients the job performance rate was 68.3%. Therefore, the job standards of clinical dietitians for clinical nutrition service for dyslipidemia patients proposed in this study can be effectively used by hospitals. PMID:25954728

  6. Development of job standards for clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Jae; Seo, Jung-Sook; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Mi-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hye; Ju, Dal-Lae; Wie, Gyung-Ah; Lee, Song-Mi; Cha, Jin-A; Sohn, Cheong-Min

    2015-04-01

    Dyslipidemia has significantly contributed to the increase of death and morbidity rates related to cardiovascular diseases. Clinical nutrition service provided by dietitians has been reported to have a positive effect on relief of medical symptoms or reducing the further medical costs. However, there is a lack of researches to identify key competencies and job standard for clinical dietitians to care patients with dyslipidemia. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the job components of clinical dietitian and develop the standard for professional practice to provide effective nutrition management for dyslipidemia patients. The current status of clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients in hospitals with 300 or more beds was studied. After duty tasks and task elements of nutrition care process for dyslipidemia clinical dietitians were developed by developing a curriculum (DACUM) analysis method. The developed job standards were pretested in order to evaluate job performance, difficulty, and job standards. As a result, the job standard included four jobs, 18 tasks, and 53 task elements, and specific job description includes 73 basic services and 26 recommended services. When clinical dietitians managing dyslipidemia patients performed their practice according to this job standard for 30 patients the job performance rate was 68.3%. Therefore, the job standards of clinical dietitians for clinical nutrition service for dyslipidemia patients proposed in this study can be effectively used by hospitals.

  7. Plant nutrition for sustainable development and global health

    PubMed Central

    White, P. J.; Brown, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants require at least 14 mineral elements for their nutrition. These include the macronutrients nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S) and the micronutrients chlorine (Cl), boron (B), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni) and molybdenum (Mo). These are generally obtained from the soil. Crop production is often limited by low phytoavailability of essential mineral elements and/or the presence of excessive concentrations of potentially toxic mineral elements, such as sodium (Na), Cl, B, Fe, Mn and aluminium (Al), in the soil solution. Scope This article provides the context for a Special Issue of the Annals of Botany on ‘Plant Nutrition for Sustainable Development and Global Health’. It provides an introduction to plant mineral nutrition and explains how mineral elements are taken up by roots and distributed within plants. It introduces the concept of the ionome (the elemental composition of a subcellular structure, cell, tissue or organism), and observes that the activities of key transport proteins determine species-specific, tissue and cellular ionomes. It then describes how current research is addressing the problems of mineral toxicities in agricultural soils to provide food security and the optimization of fertilizer applications for economic and environmental sustainability. It concludes with a perspective on how agriculture can produce edible crops that contribute sufficient mineral elements for adequate animal and human nutrition. PMID:20430785

  8. Nutritional and lactational effects on follicular development in the pig.

    PubMed

    Quesnel, H

    2009-01-01

    In sows, follicular development is inhibited during lactation, and weaning the piglets allows recruitment and selection of follicles that will undergo preovulatory maturation and ovulate. Lactation inhibits GnRH secretion, and in turn LH secretion, through neuroendocrine stimuli induced by suckling. Pituitary response to GnRH and the sensitivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary unit to oestradiol positive feedback are also reduced. The impact of lactation on the reproductive axis is further complicated by the physiological and metabolic adaptations that are developed for milk production and that depend on nutrient intake, nutrient needs and body reserves. A strongly catabolic state during lactation amplifies the inhibition of LH secretion, thereby inducing a delay of oestrus and ovulation after weaning. Nevertheless, post-weaning ovulation is less delayed nowadays than in the 1970's or 80's. Nutritional deficiency has also deleterious effects on embryo survival, which are likely related to alterations in follicular growth and maturation. The physiological mechanisms by which information on the metabolic changes is transmitted to the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axis are not fully understood in the sow. Glucose, insulin and leptin are the most likely signals informing the hypothalamus of the metabolic state, yet their roles have not been definitely established. At the ovarian level, folliculogenesis is likely to be altered by the reduction in insulin and IGF-I concentrations induced by nutritional deficiency. More knowledge is needed at the intrafollicular level to better understand nutritional effects on follicular development, and also on occyte quality and embryo development.

  9. Development of a Nutrition Education Intervention for Food Bank Clients.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; Thompson, Deborah I; Svendsen-Sanchez, Ann; McNeill, Lorna Haughton; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtaining service from the Houston Food Bank (HFB). Participants were HFB and pantry staff and clients. Interview data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory approach. Themes were then identified. Quantitative data were analyzed for frequencies and descriptives. Data were used to tailor the curriculum to the target population. Six HFB staff, 49 pantry staff from 17 pantries, and 54 clients from 10 pantries participated in interviews and focus groups and completed questionnaires. The participants provided opinion on the current nutrition education provided via the food bank and made suggestions on strategies for development of an intervention. Their feedback was used to develop the six-session intervention curriculum to be delivered over 6 months. This research provides evidence that it is critical for members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant and appealing and target their needs and interests.

  10. Nutrition environment measures survey-vending: development, dissemination, and reliability.

    PubMed

    Voss, Carol; Klein, Susan; Glanz, Karen; Clawson, Margaret

    2012-07-01

    Researchers determined a need to develop an instrument to assess the vending machine environment that was comparably reliable and valid to other Nutrition Environment Measures Survey tools and that would provide consistent and comparable data for businesses, schools, and communities. Tool development, reliability testing, and dissemination of the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey-Vending (NEMS-V) involved a collaboration of students, professionals, and community leaders. Interrater reliability testing showed high levels of agreement among trained raters on the products and evaluations of products. NEMS-V can benefit public health partners implementing policy and environmental change initiatives as a part of their community wellness activities. The vending machine project will support a policy calling for state facilities to provide a minimum of 30% of foods and beverages in vending machines as healthy options, based on NEMS-V criteria, which will be used as a model for other businesses.

  11. [Psychology and nutrition in the ontogenetic development in the infant-adolescence years].

    PubMed

    Fuillerat Alfonso, R

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the psychic development and the nutritional condition from the fetal stage up to the teenage years is the innermost objective of this study. The importance of eating and having an adequate diet during the pregnancy period, the training of the future mother to breast feed in the first months of the baby's life and the subsequent application of the ablactación process and its relation with psychomotor development and the personality progression in the different stages of the psychological, physiological and social development of the infant-adolescent period. The results shown were obtained from various studies carried out in the Nutritional Clinical Service. They are related to the reinduction of breast feeding in children less than 4 months of age with protein energetic malnutrition, as well as other stages of the infant-juvenile obese and other chronic and genetic diseases related to the nourishment and nutrition (diabetes, fenilcetonuria, hiperamonemia, homocistinuria y fibrosis quística), in which the close relationship betweeen the Psychology, and the Nutrition stands, all through the Psychotherapeutic and educational treatments and based on the application of the clinic psychology in the prevention, promotion and treatment of the nutritional alterations and other chronic and genetic diseases related to nourishment and malnutrition. Aspects related to the psychological and social characterizations as well as the personality evolution of these patients and their relatives environment are established.

  12. CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN OLDER HAN WOMEN.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tao; Yuan, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Malnutrition is one of the most prevalent problems in older people, but there is little information about the nutritional status of the older women in China. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the nutritional status and clinically correlated factors for malnutrition in older Han women in China. In total, 2,556 hospital- and community-based Han women aged 60 years or older were recruited between May 2007 and December 2014. All women completed comprehensive geriatric assessment, and the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF) was used to assess the nutritional status. The clinically corre- lated factors for malnutrition were also analyzed, including social factors, health status, and dietary behavior. The average age of these women was 75.9 ± 9.4 years, and 63.8% women lived in urban areas. Of the total respondents, 344 and 716 women were classified as malnutrition and at risk of malnutrition, respectively. Five factors were independently and positively correlated with poor nutrition, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), gastrointestinal disease, depression, cognitive impairment, and comorbidity (≥ 2). Three factors were independently and negatively correlated with poor nutrition, including economic status, meat intake, and fish intake. The older Han women with these five health problems should be given more attention with regards to their nutritional status. Improving economic status, eating more meat and fish were recommended for preventing poor nutrition in older women.

  13. Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saur, Susan

    An elementary level nutrition unit provides teachers with student background information, suggested activities, and student worksheets. Part 1 focuses on the relationship of food to growth, health, and energy. In part 2, students learn about the four main food groups. Part 3 deals with nutrients and provides information about carbohydrates, fats,…

  14. Nutrition Planning and Policy for African Countries. Summary Report of a Seminar Held at the Institute for Development Studies (Nairobi, Kenya, June 2-19, 1976). Cornell International Nutrition Monograph Series, Number 5 (1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Michael C., Ed.; Westley, Sidney B., Ed.

    This paper is the summary report of a seminar which was held in Kenya at the Institute for Development Studies of the University of Nairobi from June 2-19, 1976. The seminar was sponsored by USAID through a contract to Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Ten English-speaking African countries, whose responsibilities are related to nutrition…

  15. The nutritional situation in Swedish nursing homes - a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Borgström Bolmsjö, Beata; Jakobsson, Ulf; Mölstad, Sigvard; Ostgren, Carl Johan; Midlöv, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Poor nutritional status is widespread among the elderly and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to longitudinally describe the nutritional status in elderly people living in nursing homes. Nutritional status was recorded longitudinally in elderly people living in 11 different nursing homes in Sweden. Participants were examined at baseline by specially trained nurses who also assisted with questionnaires and collected data for current medical treatment from patient records. Nutritional status was evaluated at baseline and after 24 months with the mini nutritional assessment (MNA). The study included 318 subjects. The mean age of the participants was 85.0 years (range 65-101). At baseline, 41.6% were well nourished, 40.3% at risk of malnutrition, and 17.7% malnourished according to the MNA. Survival was significantly lower in the malnourished group. After 24 months, almost half of the population had died. The group of participants who survived at 24 months represents a population of better nutritional state, where 10.6% were malnourished at baseline increasing to 24.6% after 24 months. After 24 months, 38.7% of the participants showed a decline in nutritional state. The group with deteriorating MNA scores had higher weight, BMI values, and a higher hospitalization rate. The prevalence of malnutrition in nursing home residents increased over time and it is important to evaluate nutritional state regularly. Nutritional interventions should be considered in better nourished groups, as well as in malnourished individuals, to prevent a decline in nutritional state.

  16. A School Based Intervention for Combating Food Insecurity and Promoting Healthy Nutrition in a Developed Country Undergoing Economic Crisis: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalma, A.; Veloudaki, A.; Petralias, A.; Mitraka, K.; Zota, D.; Kastorini, C.-M.; Yannakoulia, M.; Linos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aiming at reducing the rates of food insecurity and promoting healthy diet for children and adolescents, we designed and implemented the Program on Food Aid and Promotion of Healthy Nutrition-DIATROFI, a school-based intervention program including the daily provision of a free healthy mid-day meal in disadvantaged areas across…

  17. Development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist, a Screening Tool for Nutrition Risk and Swallowing Risk in People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses nutrition problems in people with intellectual disabilities, the need for nutrition risk screening, and the development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist in New South Wales. The checklist ensures carer involvement in identifying risks and an interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of nutrition and…

  18. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. Objectives To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. Methods A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG) [n = 27], Education Group (EG) [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG) [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC), biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count), CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination), as well as dependence during meals. Results The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), BMI (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), AC (H calc = 12.99, p =< 0.002), and AMC (H calc = 8.67, p =< 0.013) compared to the CG and EG. BMI of the EG was significantly greater compared to the CG. There were significant changes in total protein (H calc = 6.17, p =< 0.046), and total lymphocyte count in the SG compared to the other groups (H cal = 7.94, p = 0.019). Conclusion Oral nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status. PMID:21943331

  19. The impact of nutritional status, nutritional risk, and nutritional treatment on clinical outcome of 2248 hospitalized cancer patients: a multi-center, prospective cohort study in Chinese teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongming; Cai, Sanjun; Ji, Jiafu; Jiang, Zhiwei; Liang, Houjie; Lin, Feng; Liu, Xiyong

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of undernutrition, nutritional risk, and nutritional treatment on the clinical outcomes of hospitalized cancer patients in China, the authors conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional study with 2248 cancer patients from 20 hospitals from January to June 2010. The authors defined 19.7% and 26.8% patients as undernourished at baseline and reassessment, respectively. Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies had a higher rate of undernutrition than other patients. The nutritional risk rate was 24.6% and 40.2% at baseline and reassessment, respectively. For patients with nutritional risk, the relative risk (RR) of adverse events (AEs) significantly increased with and without nutritional treatment. In comparison with the nonnutritional treatment subgroup, patients who received enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) significantly reduced the RR of AE development. The RR of AEs for EN and TPN were 0.08 (95% CI: 0.01-0.62) and 0.56 (95% CI: 0.33-0.96), respectively. Separated nutrient infusion increased the risk of AEs. The authors concluded that undernutrition and nutritional risk are general problems that impact the outcomes of hospitalized cancer patients in China. Higher NRS2002 scores are related to AE risk but not weight loss. In nutritional treatment, EN and TPN can significantly reduce the risk of AEs.

  20. Integrating nutrition and child development interventions: scientific basis, evidence of impact, and implementation considerations.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Rao, Sylvia Fernandez

    2015-11-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have contributed to unprecedented reductions in poverty and improvement in the lives of millions of men, women, and children in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, hundreds of millions of children under 5 y of age are not reaching their developmental potential. This article reviews the scientific basis for early childhood nutrition and child development interventions, the impact of integrated interventions on children's linear growth and cognitive development, and implementation strategies for integrated nutrition and child development programs. Advances in brain science have documented that the origins of adult health and well-being are grounded in early childhood, from conception through age 24 mo (first 1000 d) and extending to age 5 y (second 1000 d). Young children with adequate nutrition, nurturant caregiving, and opportunities for early learning have the best chances of thriving. Evidence from adoption, experimental, and quasi-experimental studies has shown that stunting prevention is sensitive during the first 1000 d, and sensitivity to child development interventions extends through the second 1000 d. Cognitive development responds to interventions post–1000 d with effect sizes that are inversely associated with initial age and length of program exposure. Integrated interventions need governance structures that support integrated policies and programming, with attention to training, supervision, and monitoring. The MDGs have been replaced by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with targets for the next 15 y. Achievement of the SDGs depends on children receiving adequate nutrition, nurturant caregiving, and learning opportunities from conception through age 5.

  1. Parenteral nutrition support: Beyond gut feeling? Quality control study of parenteral nutrition practices in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Shankar, Bhuvaneshwari; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Daphnee, D. K.; Bharadwaj, Adithya; Venkataraman, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteral nutrition (EN) is preferred over parenteral nutrition (PN) in hospitalized patients based on International consensus guidelines. Practice patterns of PN in developing countries have not been documented. Objectives: To assess practice pattern and quality of PN support in a tertiary hospital setting in Chennai, India. Methods: Retrospective record review of patients admitted between February 2010 and February 2012. Results: About 351,008 patients were admitted to the hospital in the study period of whom 29,484 (8.4%) required nutritional support. About 70 patients (0.24%) received PN, of whom 54 (0.18%) received PN for at least three days. Common indications for PN were major gastrointestinal surgery (55.6%), intolerance to EN (25.9%), pancreatitis (5.6%), and gastrointestinal obstruction (3.7%). Conclusions: The proportion of patients receiving PN was very low. Quality issues were identified relating to appropriateness of indication and calories and proteins delivered. This study helps to introspect and improve the quality of nutrition support. PMID:26955215

  2. Pioneers in pediatric psychology: integrating nutrition and child development interventions.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M

    2015-05-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of Maureen Black's career as a pediatric psychologist. It traces the transition of the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) from a section of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA) to an independent division of APA, which occurred during my presidency of SPP. The article addresses three aspects of pediatric psychology that have been central to my career: pediatric nutritional problems, global child development, and the advancement of children's health and development through policy-related strategies. The article concludes with Lessons Learned and Recommendations for the future of pediatric psychology.

  3. Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology: Integrating Nutrition and Child Development Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of Maureen Black's career as a pediatric psychologist. It traces the transition of the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) from a section of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA) to an independent division of APA, which occurred during my presidency of SPP. The article addresses three aspects of pediatric psychology that have been central to my career: pediatric nutritional problems, global child development, and the advancement of children's health and development through policy-related strategies. The article concludes with Lessons Learned and Recommendations for the future of pediatric psychology. PMID:25619198

  4. Developments in clinical food and nutrition science in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Widjaja; Wibowo, Lindawati; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2016-12-01

    Indonesia, as a major population in the Asia Pacific region, threatened with food and health insecurity through climate change and rapid economic development, faces the challenge to build capacity among its science-based food and health professionals and institutions. The nutrition research agenda is now being more actively set within the region, rather than by external imposition. A series of papers emanating from a new generation of public health and clinical nutrition scientists is reported in this issue of APJCN. It draws attention to the importance of food patterns and background culture as contributors to the failure of the nutrient rather than a food, food system and socio-ecological approach to solve the region's intransigent nutritionally-related health problems. New understandings of human eco-social biology are providing opportunities to accelerate the resolution of these problems. The challenge is to transform the food-health construct from one which is not sufficiently concerned about the precarious state of ecologically dysfunctional health and its nutrient market drivers to one which strives for more sustainable and affordable solutions. The present reports address a range of options to these ends.

  5. Nutritional influences over the life course on lean body mass of individuals in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bharati; Hills, Andrew P; Byrne, Nuala M

    2014-03-01

    The double burden of childhood undernutrition and adult-onset adiposity in transitioning societies poses a significant public health challenge. The development of suboptimal lean body mass (LBM) could partly explain the link between these two forms of malnutrition. This review examines the evidence on both the role of nutrition in “developmental programming” of LBM and the nutritional influences that affect LBM throughout the life course. Studies from developing countries assessing the relationship of early nutrition with later LBM provide important insights. Overall, the evidence is consistent in suggesting a positive association of early nutritional status (indicated by birth weight and growth during first 2 years) with LBM in later life. Evidence on the impact of maternal nutritional supplementation during pregnancy on later LBM is inconsistent. In addition, the role of nutrients (protein, zinc, calcium, vitamin D) that can affect LBM throughout the life course is described. Promoting optimal intakes of these important nutrients throughout the life course is important for reducing childhood undernutrition as well as for improving the LBM of adults.

  6. Multi-school collaboration to develop and test nutrition computer modules for pediatric residents.

    PubMed

    Roche, Patricia L; Ciccarelli, Mary R; Gupta, Sandeep K; Hayes, Barbara M; Molleston, Jean P

    2007-09-01

    The provision of essential nutrition-related content in US medical education has been deficient, despite efforts of the federal government and multiple professional organizations. Novel and efficient approaches are needed. A multi-department project was developed to create and pilot a computer-based compact disc instructional program covering the nutrition topics of oral rehydration therapy, calcium, and vitamins. Funded by an internal medical school grant, the content of the modules was written by Department of Pediatrics faculty. The modules were built by School of Informatics faculty and students, and were tested on a convenience sampling of 38 pediatric residents in a randomized controlled trial performed by a registered dietitian/School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Master's degree candidate. The modules were reviewed for content by the pediatric faculty principal investigator and the registered dietitian/School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences graduate student. Residents completed a pretest of nutrition knowledge and attitude toward nutrition and Web-based instruction. Half the group was given three programs (oral rehydration therapy, calcium, and vitamins) on compact disc for study over 6 weeks. Both study and control groups completed a posttest. Pre- and postintervention objective test results in study vs control groups and attitudinal survey results before and after intervention in the study group were compared. The experimental group demonstrated significantly better posttrial objective test performance compared to the control group (P=0.0005). The study group tended toward improvement, whereas the control group performance declined substantially between pre- and posttests. Study group resident attitudes toward computer-based instruction improved. Use of these computer modules prompted almost half of the residents in the study group to independently pursue relevant nutrition-related information. This inexpensive, collaborative, multi

  7. Nutritional and safety assessment of foods and feeds nutritionally improved through biotechnology--case studies by the International Food Biotechnology Committee of ILSI.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Kevin C

    2008-01-01

    During the last two decades, the public and private sectors have made substantial research progress internationally toward improving the nutritional value of a wide range of food and feed crops. Nevertheless, significant numbers of people still suffer from the effects of undernutrition. As newly developed crops with nutritionally improved traits come closer to being available to producers and consumers, scientifically sound and efficient processes are needed to assess the safety and nutritional quality of these crops. In 2004, a Task Force of international scientific experts, convened by the International Food Biotechnology Committee (IFBiC) of ILSI, published recommendations for the safety and nutritional assessment of foods and feeds nutritionally improved through modern biotechnology (J. Food Science, 2004, 69:CRH62-CRH68). The comparative safety assessment process is a basic principle in this publication and is the starting point, not the conclusion, of the analysis. Significant differences in composition are expected to be observed in the case of nutritionally enhanced crops and must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. The Golden Rice 2 case study will be presented as an example of a food crop nutritionally enhanced through the application of modern biotechnology (i.e., recombinant DNA techniques) to illustrate how the 2004 recommendations provide a robust paradigm for the safety assessment of "real world" examples of improved nutrition crops.

  8. Nutritional Practices of Athletes in Oman: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Mostafa I.; Kilani, Hashem A.; Al-Busafi, Majid S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Adequate dietary intake is crucial for optimum training and performance of athletes. There is almost no available information related to dietary practices among Omani athletes, especially during the competition. This study aimed to assess the nutritional practices (nutritional knowledge, eating habits and daily nutrients intake) among Omani male handball athletes in Muscat city, Oman. Methods This is a cross sectional study including 35 male handball athletes involved in serious training for no less than three years. Data collection was done through personal interviews using a study questionnaire which enlisted questions relating to socio-demographic information, anthropometric measurements and nutritional practices. All the study participants declared no intake of anabolic steroids. Results The mean age of the study participants was 27 ± 3 years. Their anthropometric assessment revealed that their mean height was 166 ± 12 cm, mean weight was 75 ± 10 kg, and body mass index was 27 ± 3. Nutritional knowledge analysis revealed that 80% had no nutritional supervision by a nutritionist/dietitian. Their knowledge of nutritional requirements was only 23% correct for total energy intake, 63% for protein intake, 46% for carbohydrate intake, 11% for fat intake and 83% for water intake. Eating habits indicated that 55% had <3 meals/day, 51% had lunch as the principal meal, 51% always added extra salt to their food, 28% took protein supplements on a daily basis, and 51% used pre-competition glycogen load diet. However, none consumed vitamins or mineral supplements. The mean daily caloric intake was 3674 ± 265 kcal/day, which was roughly comprised of 596 ± 66 g carbohydrates, 147 ± 28 g of protein and 78 ± 20 g of total fat. Conclusion Professional nutritional supervision is needed in order to improve the nutritional knowledge and eating habits of Omani athletes, and therefore improve their athletic performance. PMID:24044066

  9. Psychiatric agriculture: systemic nutritional modification and mental health in the developing world.

    PubMed

    London, Douglas S; Stoll, Andrew L; Manning, Bruce B

    2006-01-01

    Modernization of agricultural systems to increase output causes changes to the nutritional content of food entire populations consume. Human nutritional needs differ from their "food", thus producing healthy agricultural products is not equivalent to providing agricultural products that are healthy for humans. Inclusion of the food production system as a factor in the increase of neuropsychiatric disorders and other chronic diseases helps explain negative trends in modern chronic diseases that remain unchecked despite stunning advances in modern medicine. Diseases in which our own technology plays a significant role include obesity and resulting disorders, such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke and arthritis. Modernization's lure leads to importation of modern agricultural practices into a nutritionally vulnerable, malnourished and sometimes starving developing world. Wealthier nations hedge their food portfolio by having access to a wider variety of foods. The developing world's reliance on staple foods means even a minor widespread nutritional modification of one key food can have profound effects. New agricultural techniques may improve or exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders through nutritional modification in regions where populations walk a nutritional tightrope with little margin for error. In most of the developing world western psychiatric interventions have failed to make inroads. People's consumption of fish has a demonstrated beneficial effect on their mental health and the omega-3 fatty acid content is a significant factor. Epidemiological, biological and agricultural studies implicate a lack of dietary omega-3s as a factor in certain mental disorders. Replenishing omega-3s has improved mental illnesses in controlled clinical trials. This article's detailed tilapia fish-farming model demonstrates how aquaculture/agriculture techniques can function as a public health intervention by increasing dietary omega-3s through creation of

  10. Adapting Agriculture Platforms for Nutrition: A Case Study of a Participatory, Video-Based Agricultural Extension Platform in India.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Suneetha; Morgan, Emily H; Cyriac, Shruthi; Margolies, Amy; Roopnaraine, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Successful integration of nutrition interventions into large-scale development programmes from nutrition-relevant sectors, such as agriculture, can address critical underlying determinants of undernutrition and enhance the coverage and effectiveness of on-going nutrition-specific activities. However, evidence on how this can be done is limited. This study examines the feasibility of delivering maternal, infant, and young child nutrition behaviour change communication through an innovative agricultural extension programme serving nutritionally vulnerable groups in rural India. The existing agriculture programme involves participatory production of low-cost videos promoting best practices and broad dissemination through village-level women's self-help groups. For the nutrition intervention, 10 videos promoting specific maternal, infant, and young child nutrition practices were produced and disseminated in 30 villages. A range of methods was used to collect data, including in-depth interviews with project staff, frontline health workers, and self-help group members and their families; structured observations of mediated video dissemination sessions; nutrition knowledge tests with project staff and self-help group members; and a social network questionnaire to assess diffusion of promoted nutrition messages. We found the nutrition intervention to be well-received by rural communities and viewed as complementary to existing frontline health services. However, compared to agriculture, nutrition content required more time, creativity, and technical support to develop and deliver. Experimentation with promoted nutrition behaviours was high, but sharing of information from the videos with non-viewers was limited. Key lessons learned include the benefits of and need for collaboration with existing health services; continued technical support for implementing partners; engagement with local cultural norms and beliefs; empowerment of women's group members to champion nutrition

  11. Adapting Agriculture Platforms for Nutrition: A Case Study of a Participatory, Video-Based Agricultural Extension Platform in India

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Suneetha; Morgan, Emily H.; Cyriac, Shruthi; Margolies, Amy; Roopnaraine, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Successful integration of nutrition interventions into large-scale development programmes from nutrition-relevant sectors, such as agriculture, can address critical underlying determinants of undernutrition and enhance the coverage and effectiveness of on-going nutrition-specific activities. However, evidence on how this can be done is limited. This study examines the feasibility of delivering maternal, infant, and young child nutrition behaviour change communication through an innovative agricultural extension programme serving nutritionally vulnerable groups in rural India. The existing agriculture programme involves participatory production of low-cost videos promoting best practices and broad dissemination through village-level women’s self-help groups. For the nutrition intervention, 10 videos promoting specific maternal, infant, and young child nutrition practices were produced and disseminated in 30 villages. A range of methods was used to collect data, including in-depth interviews with project staff, frontline health workers, and self-help group members and their families; structured observations of mediated video dissemination sessions; nutrition knowledge tests with project staff and self-help group members; and a social network questionnaire to assess diffusion of promoted nutrition messages. We found the nutrition intervention to be well-received by rural communities and viewed as complementary to existing frontline health services. However, compared to agriculture, nutrition content required more time, creativity, and technical support to develop and deliver. Experimentation with promoted nutrition behaviours was high, but sharing of information from the videos with non-viewers was limited. Key lessons learned include the benefits of and need for collaboration with existing health services; continued technical support for implementing partners; engagement with local cultural norms and beliefs; empowerment of women’s group members to champion

  12. Cost effectiveness of responsive stimulation and nutrition interventions on early child development outcomes in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Gowani, Saima; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Armstrong, Robert; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood programs are heralded as a way to improve children's health and educational outcomes. However, few studies in developing countries calculate the effectiveness of quality early childhood interventions. Even fewer estimate the associated costs of such interventions. The study here looks at the costs and effectiveness of a cluster-randomized effectiveness trial on children from birth to 24 months in rural Sindh, Pakistan. Responsive stimulation and/or enhanced nutrition interventions were integrated in the Lady Health Worker program in Pakistan. Outcomes suggest that children who receive responsive stimulation had significantly better development outcomes at 24 months than those who only received enhanced nutrition intervention. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the results verifies that early childhood interventions that include responsive stimulation are more cost effective than a nutrition intervention alone in promoting children's early development. Costs of a responsive stimulation intervention integrated in an existing community-based service providing basic health and nutrition care is approximately US$4 per month per child. We discuss these findings and make recommendations about scaling up and costs for future early child development programs.

  13. Formative research methods for designing culturally appropriate, integrated child nutrition and development interventions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Margaret E; Johnson, Susan L; Wasser, Heather; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Shroff, Monal; Fernandez Rao, Sylvia; Cunningham, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional and developmental insults in the first few years of life have profound public health implications, including substantial contributions to neonatal, infant, and early childhood morbidity and mortality, as well as longer term effects on cognitive development, school achievement, and worker productivity. Optimal development that can lead to the attainment of an individual's fullest potential, therefore, requires a combination of genetic capacity, adequate nutrition, psychosocial stimulation, and safe, clean physical environments. Researchers and policymakers have called for integrated child nutrition and development interventions for more than 20 years, yet there are only a handful of efficacy trials and even fewer examples of integrated interventions that have been taken to scale. While a critical component in the design of such interventions is formative research, there is a dearth of information in both the literature and policy arenas to guide this phase of the process. To move the field forward, this paper first provides an overview of formative research methods with a focus on qualitative inquiry, a description of the critical domains to be assessed (infant and young child feeding, responsive feeding, and child development), and currently available resources. Application of these methods is provided through a real-world case study--the design of an integrated nutrition and child development efficacy trial in Andhra Pradesh, India. Recommendations for next steps are discussed, the most important of which is the need for a comprehensive set of formative guidelines for designing locally tailored, culturally appropriate, integrated interventions.

  14. Developing a Nutrition and Health Education Program for Primary Schools in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jane; Muehlhoff, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    School-based health and nutrition interventions in developing countries aim at improving children's nutrition and learning ability. In addition to the food and health inputs, children need access to education that is relevant to their lives, of good quality, and effective in its approach. Based on evidence from the Zambia Nutrition Education in…

  15. The Healthy Communities Study Nutrition Assessments: Child Diet and the School Nutrition Environment.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Lorrene D; Wakimoto, Patricia; Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Thompson, Frances E; Loria, Catherine M; Wilson, Dawn K; Kao, Janice; Crawford, Patricia B; Webb, Karen L

    2015-10-01

    Multifaceted community interventions directed at improving food environments are emerging, but their impact on dietary change and obesity prevalence has not been adequately documented. The Healthy Communities Study (HCS) is seeking to identify characteristics and combinations of programs and policies that are associated with children's diets and obesity-related outcomes in various types of communities across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used in 2013-2015 in the HCS to assess dietary intake, school nutrition environments, and other nutrition-related behaviors. The conceptual framework of the HCS is based on the socioecological model and behaviors shown in previous studies to be related to obesity in children guided selection of domains. Nine domains were identified as essential measures of nutrition in the HCS: (1) intake of selected foods and beverages; (2) food patterns and behaviors; (3) social support; (4) home environment; (5) school environment; (6) community environment; (7) breastfeeding history; (8) household food insecurity; and (9) dieting behaviors and body image. Children's dietary intake was assessed using a dietary screener and up to two automated 24-hour recalls. Dietary-related behaviors were assessed by a survey administered to the parent, child, or both, depending on child age. School nutrition measures were obtained from a combination of school staff surveys and researcher observations. Information from these measures is expected to contribute to a better understanding of "what is working" to improve the dietary behaviors that are likely to prevent obesity and improve health in children.

  16. Comparative Ratings of Printed Nutrition Materials Developed by Industry and Government Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Cheryl Lynn; Bunda, Mary Anne

    1983-01-01

    A study investigated the quality of supplemental, printed nutrition materials sponsored by the food industry and government agencies and evaluated their appropriateness for classroom instruction. Materials were rated by teachers, curriculum specialists, and nutrition specialists. (Authors/PP)

  17. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology—Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut): An Extension of the STROBE Statement

    PubMed Central

    Hawwash, Dana; Ocké, Marga C.; Berg, Christina; Forsum, Elisabet; Sonestedt, Emily; Wirfält, Elisabet; Åkesson, Agneta; Kolsteren, Patrick; Byrnes, Graham; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Camp, John; Slimani, Nadia; Cevallos, Myriam; Egger, Matthias; Huybrechts, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology—Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut). Methods and Findings Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist. Conclusion When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health. PMID:27270749

  18. Development of supplemental nutrition care program for women, infants and children in Korea: NutriPlus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho-Il; Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Bok Hee; Lee, Haeng-Shin; Jang, Young-Ai

    2009-01-01

    Onto the world-fastest ageing of society, the world-lowest fertility rate prompted a development of various policies and programs for a betterment of the population in Korea. Since the vulnerability of young children of low socio-economic class to malnutrition was clearly shown at the in-depth analysis of the 2001 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, an effort to devise supplemental nutrition care program for pregnant/breastfeeding women, infants and preschool children was initiated. The program was designed to offer nutrition education tailored to fit the needs of the participants and special supplementary foods, using USDA WIC program as a benchmark. Based on the dietary intake of those age groups, target nutrients were selected and their major food sources were searched through nutrient content of foods and dietary pattern analysis. As a result, we developed 6 kinds of food packages using combinations of 11 different food items. The amount of each item in a food package was determined to supplement the intake deficit in target nutrients. Nutrition education in NutriPlus(+) aims to improve the nutrition knowledge, attitude, and dietary behaviors of the participants, and is provided through group lessons, individual counseling sessions and home visits. Breastfeeding is promoted with top priority in education for the health of both mother and baby. The eligibility guidelines were set for residency, household income, age, pregnancy/breastfeeding and nutritional risk such as anemia, stunting, underweight, and/or inadequate nutrient intake. Income eligibility was defined as household income less than 200 percent of the Korean poverty guidelines. A pilot study to examine the feasibility of program implementation was run in 3 public health centers in 2005 and expanded to 15 and 20 in the following 2 years. The result of 3-year pilot study will be reported separately along with the ultimate nationwide implementation of the NutriPlus(+) in 2008.

  19. Development and evaluation of a home enteral nutrition team.

    PubMed

    Dinenage, Sarah; Gower, Morwenna; Van Wyk, Joanna; Blamey, Anne; Ashbolt, Karen; Sutcliffe, Michelle; Green, Sue M

    2015-03-05

    The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF) at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN) can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1) prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2) effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3) balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient's home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  20. Curriculum Development for Instructing the Elderly in Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasswell, Anita B.; Curry, Katharine R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a pilot program designed to instruct the elderly in basic nutrition concepts. Results of the program indicate that the elderly are interested in and capable of learning new nutrition information. (MA)

  1. Development of patient-centric linguistically tailored psychoeducational messages to support nutrition and medication self-management in type 2 diabetes: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Rebecca J Bartlett; Connor, Ulla; Marshall, James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the feasibility of developing linguistically tailored educational messages designed to match the linguistic styles of patients segmented into types with the Descriptor™, and to determine patient preferences for tailored or standard messages based on their segments. Patients and methods Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were recruited from a diabetes health clinic. Participants were segmented using the Descriptor™, a language-based questionnaire, to identify patient types based on their control orientation (internal/external), agency (high/low), and affect (positive/negative), which are well studied constructs related to T2DM self-management. Two of the seven self-care behaviors described by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (healthy eating and taking medication) were used to develop standard messages and then linguistically tailored using features of the six different construct segment types of the Descriptor™. A subset of seven participants each provided feedback on their preference for standard or linguistically tailored messages; 12 comparisons between standard and tailored messages were made. Results Overall, the tailored messages were preferred to the standard messages. When the messages were matched to specific construct segment types, the tailored messages were preferred over the standard messages, although this was not statistically significant. Conclusion Linguistically tailoring messages based on construct segments is feasible. Furthermore, tailored messages were more often preferred over standard messages. This study provides some preliminary evidence for tailoring messages based on the linguistic features of control orientation, agency, and affect. The messages developed in this study should be tested in a larger more representative sample. The present study did not explore whether tailored messages were better understood. This research will serve as preliminary evidence to develop future studies

  2. The role of nutrition in integrated early child development in the 21st century: contribution from the Maternal and Child Nutrition journal.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Moran, Victoria Hall

    2017-01-01

    Even though it is widely recognized that early childhood development (ECD) is one of the most important predictors of future social capital and national productivity, the recently published ECD Lancet Series reports that about 250 million children under 5 years are at risk of not reaching their developmental potential, mainly as a result of poverty and social injustice. So why is this and what will it take to reverse this situation? The purpose of this special issue is to highlight important contributions from previously published articles in Maternal & Child Nutrition to the field of nutrition and ECD. The collection of papers presented in this special issue collectively indicates that although nutrition-specific interventions are essential for child development, they are not sufficient by themselves for children to reach their full developmental potential. This is because ECD is influenced by many other factors besides nutrition, including hand washing/sanitation, parenting skills, psychosocial stimulation, and social protection. Future research should focus on mixed-methods implementation science seeking to understand how best to translate evidence-based integrated ECD packages into effective intersectoral policies and programs on a large scale. In addition to health and nutrition, these programs need to consider and include responsive parenting (including responsive feeding), learning stimulation, education, and social protection. Future studies should also address if and how childhood obesity affects human physical, socioemotional, and cognitive development.

  3. Special considerations for nutritional studies in elderly.

    PubMed

    Riobó Serván, Pilar; Sierra Poyatos, Roberto; Soldo Rodríguez, Judith; Gómez-Candela, Carmen; García Luna, Pedro Pablo; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2015-02-26

    The elderly population is increasing and it is well documented that may present some health problems related to nutritional intake. Both mental and physical impairments in the elderly may need specific adaptations to dietary assessment methods. But all self-report approaches include systematic and random errors, and under-reporting of dietary energy intake is common. Biomarkers of protein intake, as 24 hours urinary Nitrogen, may not be useful in elderly patients because of incontinence problems. Some micronutrients, like vitamin B12, have special importance in the elderly population. Also, measurement of fluid intake is also critical because elderly population is prone to dehydration. A detailed malnutrition status assessment should be included in the geriatric dietary history, and assessment. Body mass index (BMI) is not useful in the elderly, and it is important to evaluate functional status. Gait speed, handgrip strength using hand dynamometry can be used. Body Shape Index (ABSI) appears to be an accurate measure of adiposity, and is associated with total mortality. Further research is needed to clarify the best and simple methods to accurately estimate food and beverage fluid intake in the elderly population, and to evaluate nutritional and hidration status.

  4. Relationship between nutritional status, psychosocial stimulation, and cognitive development in preschool children in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Warsito, Oktarina; Khomsan, Ali; Hernawati, Neti; Anwar, Faisal

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyze nutritional status, psychosocial stimulation, and factors affecting the cognitive development of preschool-age children. This study was conducted in the Village of Babakan, Sub-District of Dramaga, Bogor Regency, West Java. This cross-sectionally designed study was conducted with mothers who had preschool children aged 3-5 years as respondents. Fifty-eight children were included. The distribution of mother's educational level was quite diverse, and the largest percentage (44.8%) had senior high school education. Approximately 78% of the family income per capita was classified into the non-poor category and 22.4% into the poor category. The average mother's nutritional knowledge score was 76.7 ± 2.5 (moderate category). Most of the preschool children (84.4%) had psychosocial stimulation scores in the moderate category (30-45). The nutritional status of children showed that 15.5% were underweight, 5.2% were wasted, 3.4% were severely wasted, and 19% of the children were in the short and very short categories (stunted). The stepwise regression results showed that psychosocial stimulation (P < 0.001), participation in early childhood education (P = 0.002) and nutritional status based on the height index for age (P = 0.028) had a positive and significant effect on cognitive development of the preschool children (adjusted R(2), 0.434; P = 0.028).

  5. Exploring Pre-Operational and Concrete Operational Children's Thinking on Nutrition: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Corey H.; Chow, Tracy H. F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In this exploratory study, we observed the process in which children make food choices from a cognitive development perspective and the implications that these choices have on the areas of cognitive development and health and nutrition education. Design: This was a cross-sectional case study that involved an in-depth examination of the…

  6. Development and evaluation of a nutritionally enhanced multigrain tortilla snack.

    PubMed

    Islas-Rubio, Alma Rosa; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón; Molina-Jacott, Luis Enrique; Del Carmen Granados-Nevárez, María; Vasquez-Lara, Francisco

    2014-06-01

    An increased consumption of healthy foods to reduce chronic diseases risks is needed. We developed and evaluated a multigrain snack as a nutritive alternative to the highly consumed corn tortilla chips. Corn, wheat, and chickpea grains were boiled in 1% calcium oxide solution, steeped, washed, and ground before being mixed with soy protein isolate and oat flour to prepare the multigrain masa. Multigrain tortillas were moulded, baked, dried, and fried. Proximate composition, dietary fiber, protein quality, sensorial, and textural properties were evaluated. A commercial tortilla chip was used as control. The multigrain snack contained 153% more protein, 53% more dietary fiber, and 43 % less fat than commercial tortilla chips. Its lysine and isoleucine contents helped to increase the corrected-net protein utilization by 10%, while digestibility increased from 83.5 to 91.8% as compared to commercial tortilla chips. The mean breaking force was 6,082 g for the multigrain snack and 4,780 g for the commercial tortilla chips. The mean acceptability score for the multigrain snack was 12.1 (unstructured line scale 0-15 cm), and 82% of the panelists rated the snack as acceptable. In conclusion, a nutritionally enhanced multigrain tortilla snack was developed which provides significantly more dietary fiber and protein and less fat than traditional commercial corn tortilla chips, but with comparable appearance and high acceptability.

  7. Nutrition Education: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Revised Edition, 1978. Developed through an Inservice Program of the Nutrition Education Development Project. Administered by Luzerne Intermediate Unit 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan, Jane, Ed.; Armillay, Joy, Ed.

    This curriculum guide was developed to help teachers from pre-school through secondary grade levels provide an interdisciplinary approach to teaching nutrition. This guide begins with eleven instructional units, varying from two to twenty pages in length, on basic nutrition and other selected topics. Each unit includes some or all of the…

  8. Effect of improved nutrition during calfhood on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone concentrations, and on testicular development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Barth, Albert D; Rawlings, Norm C; Wilde, Randal E; Crews, Denny H; Mir, Priya S; Kastelic, John P

    2007-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of improved nutrition during calfhood on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins and testosterone concentrations, and on sexual development in bulls. Bulls received high (n=17) or control nutrition (n=16) diets from 10 to 30 week of age and the same control nutrition diet from 31 to 74 week of age. Improved nutrition during calfhood resulted in a more sustained period of elevated LH secretion (pulse frequency and total secretion in 10h) during the early gonadotropin rise. GnRH-stimulated LH secretion was not affected by diet, indicating that pituitary responsiveness was not altered; therefore, improved nutrition had direct effects on GnRH secretion by the hypothalamus. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations were greater during calfhood in bulls receiving high nutrition, indicating that these metabolic hormones might be involved in regulating GnRH and LH secretion. Improved nutrition also resulted in increased testosterone secretion that was associated with greater circulating IGF-I concentrations, suggesting a role for this metabolic hormone in regulating Leydig cell number and function. Furthermore, improved nutrition during calfhood resulted in greater testicular weight and sperm production in mature bulls, indicating that increased LH secretion during calfhood, and increased IGF-I and testosterone concentrations during calfhood and peripubertal period were associated with greater testicular cell proliferation and enhanced function.

  9. Biomarkers of nutrition for development--iodine review.

    PubMed

    Rohner, Fabian; Zimmermann, Michael; Jooste, Pieter; Pandav, Chandrakant; Caldwell, Kathleen; Raghavan, Ramkripa; Raiten, Daniel J

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) project is to provide state-of-the-art information and service with regard to selection, use, and interpretation of biomarkers of nutrient exposure, status, function, and effect. Specifically, the BOND project seeks to develop consensus on accurate assessment methodologies that are applicable to researchers (laboratory/clinical/surveillance), clinicians, programmers, and policy makers (data consumers). The BOND project is also intended to develop targeted research agendas to support the discovery and development of biomarkers through improved understanding of nutrient biology within relevant biologic systems. In phase I of the BOND project, 6 nutrients (iodine, vitamin A, iron, zinc, folate, and vitamin B-12) were selected for their high public health importance because they typify the challenges faced by users in the selection, use, and interpretation of biomarkers. For each nutrient, an expert panel was constituted and charged with the development of a comprehensive review covering the respective nutrient's biology, existing biomarkers, and specific issues of use with particular reference to the needs of the individual user groups. In addition to the publication of these reviews, materials from each will be extracted to support the BOND interactive Web site (http://www.nichd.nih.gov/global_nutrition/programs/bond/pages/index.aspx). This review represents the first in the series of reviews and covers all relevant aspects of iodine biology and biomarkers. The article is organized to provide the reader with a full appreciation of iodine's background history as a public health issue, its biology, and an overview of available biomarkers and specific considerations for the use and interpretation of iodine biomarkers across a range of clinical and population-based uses. The review also includes a detailed research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of iodine biology and assessment.

  10. The Sustainable Development Goals cannot be achieved without improving maternal and child nutrition.

    PubMed

    Baye, Kaleab

    2017-02-01

    Poor nutrition is a global pandemic with social, economic, and environmental causes and consequences. Of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), only SDG2 explicitly mentions nutrition. Turning the aspirations of the SDGs into reality will require recognition that good nutrition ensured through sustainable agriculture, is simultaneously an absolutely fundamental input and output. Because all of the other SDGs are directly or indirectly linked to improving nutrition, funding to improve nutrition is essential to success for many SDGs. Greater focus on cooperation across disciplines to advance the science of program delivery and to understand the full contribution of nutrition to many desirable outcomes as part of development are surely the ways forward. Missing today's opportunities to advance thinking and program implementation for more effectively improving nutrition for all, especially for women and children, will lead to a wider failure to meet the SDGs.

  11. Children's Health and Nutrition as Educational Issues: A Case Study of the Ghana Partnership for Child Development's Intervention Research in the Volta Region of Ghana. Technical Paper No. 91. SD Publication Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James H.; Leherr, Kay

    As increasing numbers of children in developing nations survive to school age, practitioners, researchers, and policymakers are increasingly focusing on the health and well-being of school-age children and on the possibility of using the infrastructure of the school system to deliver health and nutrition interventions. This research, conducted in…

  12. Nutritional effects on oocyte and embryo development in mammals: implications for reproductive efficiency and environmental sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Cheryl J.; Toma, Luiza M.; Hunter, Morag G.

    2009-01-01

    The environment in which a breeding female lives prior to conception and during the early stages of her pregnancy has striking effects on oocytes developing in the ovarian follicle and on early embryos in the reproductive tract. Of the various environmental factors known to affect oocyte and embryo development, altered nutrition during this critical period has been particularly well studied. Alterations in the quantity of food consumed or the composition of the diet imposed solely during the pre-mating period affect oocyte maturity, blastocyst yield, prenatal survival and the number of offspring born alive. Importantly, nutrition at this time also affects the quality of embryos and resultant offspring, with increasing evidence from a variety of species showing that peri-conception nutrition can alter behaviour, cardiovascular function and reproductive function throughout post-natal life. In livestock species, it is important to devise nutritional strategies that improve reproductive efficiency and the quality of offspring but that do not add to the environmental footprint of the production system and which recognize likely changes in feedstuff availability arising from predicted changes in climate. PMID:19833647

  13. Development of farmed fish: a nutritionally necessary alternative to meat.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J R; Tacon, A G

    1999-05-01

    The projected stagnation in the catch from global fisheries and the continuing expansion of aquaculture is considered against the background that fishmeal and fish oil are major feed stocks for farmed salmon and trout, and also for marine fish. The dietary requirement of these farmed fish for high-quality protein, rich in essential amino acids, can be met by sources other than fishmeal. However, the highly-polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) present in high concentrations in fish oil are essential dietary constituents for marine fish and highly-desirable dietary constituents for salmonids. Currently, there is no feasible alternative source to fish oil for these nutrients in fish feeds. Vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid (18:2n-6) can partially substitute for 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in salmonid and marine-fish feeds. However, this is nutritionally undesirable for human nutrition because the health-promoting effects of fish-derived 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 reflect a very high intake of 18:2n-6 relative to linolenic acid (18:3n-3) in Western diets. If partial replacement of fish oils in fish feeds with vegetable oils becomes necessary in future, it is argued that 18:3n-3-rich oils, such as linseed oil, are the oils of choice because they are much more acceptable from a human nutritional perspective, especially given the innate ability of freshwater fish, including salmonids, to convert dietary 18:3n-3 to 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. In the meantime, a more judicious use of increasingly-expensive fish oil in aquaculture is recommended. High priorities in the future development of aquaculture are considered to be genetic improvement of farmed fish stocks with enhanced abilities to convert C18 to C20 and C22 n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, enhanced development of primary production of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 by single-cell marine organisms, and continuing development of new species.

  14. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: nutrition security in developing nations: sustainable food, water, and health.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Stacia M; Boyle, Marie; Kemmer, Teresa M

    2013-04-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that all people should have consistent access to an appropriately nutritious diet of food and water, coupled with a sanitary environment, adequate health services, and care that ensure a healthy and active life for all household members. The Academy supports policies, systems, programs, and practices that work with developing nations to achieve nutrition security and self-sufficiency while being environmentally and economically sustainable. For nations to achieve nutrition security, all people must have access to a variety of nutritious foods and potable drinking water; knowledge, resources, and skills for healthy living; prevention, treatment, and care for diseases affecting nutrition status; and safety-net systems during crisis situations, such as natural disasters or deleterious social and political systems. More than 2 billion people are micronutrient deficient; 1.5 billion people are overweight or obese; 870 million people have inadequate food energy intake; and 783 million people lack potable drinking water. Adequate nutrient intake is a concern, independent of weight status. Although this article focuses on nutritional deficiencies in developing nations, global solutions for excesses and deficiencies need to be addressed. In an effort to achieve nutrition security, lifestyles, policies, and systems (eg, food, water, health, energy, education/knowledge, and economic) contributing to sustainable resource use, environmental management, health promotion, economic stability, and positive social environments are required. Food and nutrition practitioners can get involved in promoting and implementing effective and sustainable policies, systems, programs, and practices that support individual, community, and national efforts.

  15. Controversies about population, clinical or basic research studies related with food, nutrition, physical activity and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Aranceta Bartrina, Javier; Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Alberdi Aresti, Goiuri; Varela Moreiras, Gregorio; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2015-02-26

    Nutritional studies including food and beverage consumption assessment are needed for different purposes in the field of nutrition, food supply monitoring, toxicology or in the context of intervention strategies that include changes in eating behaviors. Different methods have been used, each with strengths, weaknesses, biases and limitations that must be considered when choosing the most appropriate in each case. The development of new technologies offers exciting developments to improve the validity and accuracy of these methods, as well as their efficiency and commodity. The characteristics of the individuals under study, its environment and the resources available should be considered as well.

  16. The Change in Nutritional Status in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Retrospective Descriptive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masha'al, Dina A.

    There is a high prevalence in malnutrition among traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to the hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism which develop post injury. Traumatic brain injury patients are different, even among themselves, in their energy requirements and response to nutritional therapy. This implies that there are other factors that affect the energy intake of these patients and enhance the incidence of malnutrition. This dissertation study examines the nutritional status of TBI patients upon admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and during their hospital stay to describe baseline status, detect changes in nutritional status over 7 days, and identify the factors affecting the adequacy of energy intake and the change in nutritional status as a consequence. Anthropometric measurements, biomedical measurements, measures of severity of illness, daily health status, level of brain injury severity, and other data were collected from the medical records of 50 patients, who were ≥ 18 years old, mechanically ventilated in the first 24 hours of ICU admission, and had a Glasgow Coma Scale score between 3-12. These data were used to examine the previous relationships. Although there was no statistically significant change found in body mass index and weight, there was a significant change detected in other nutritional markers, including hemoglobin, albumin, and total lymphocyte levels over the 7 days of ICU and hospital stay. No significant relationship was found between the adequacy of energy intake and total prescribed energy, severity of illness, level of brain injury severity, daily health status, patient age, intracranial pressure, or time of feeding initiation. Findings may be used to develop and test interventions to improve nutritional status during the acute phase of TBI. This will lay a foundation for health care providers, including nurses, to establish standards for practice and nutrition protocols to assure optimal nutrition assessment and intervention in a

  17. Integrating Nutrition and Child Development Interventions: Scientific Basis, Evidence of Impact, and Implementation Considerations123

    PubMed Central

    Black, Maureen M; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Fernandez Rao, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have contributed to unprecedented reductions in poverty and improvement in the lives of millions of men, women, and children in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, hundreds of millions of children under 5 y of age are not reaching their developmental potential. This article reviews the scientific basis for early childhood nutrition and child development interventions, the impact of integrated interventions on children’s linear growth and cognitive development, and implementation strategies for integrated nutrition and child development programs. Advances in brain science have documented that the origins of adult health and well-being are grounded in early childhood, from conception through age 24 mo (first 1000 d) and extending to age 5 y (second 1000 d). Young children with adequate nutrition, nurturant caregiving, and opportunities for early learning have the best chances of thriving. Evidence from adoption, experimental, and quasi-experimental studies has shown that stunting prevention is sensitive during the first 1000 d, and sensitivity to child development interventions extends through the second 1000 d. Cognitive development responds to interventions post–1000 d with effect sizes that are inversely associated with initial age and length of program exposure. Integrated interventions need governance structures that support integrated policies and programming, with attention to training, supervision, and monitoring. The MDGs have been replaced by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with targets for the next 15 y. Achievement of the SDGs depends on children receiving adequate nutrition, nurturant caregiving, and learning opportunities from conception through age 5. PMID:26875208

  18. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND)-Zinc Review.

    PubMed

    King, Janet C; Brown, Kenneth H; Gibson, Rosalind S; Krebs, Nancy F; Lowe, Nicola M; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Raiten, Daniel J

    2016-03-09

    Zinc is required for multiple metabolic processes as a structural, regulatory, or catalytic ion. Cellular, tissue, and whole-body zinc homeostasis is tightly controlled to sustain metabolic functions over a wide range of zinc intakes, making it difficult to assess zinc insufficiency or excess. The BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) Zinc Expert Panel recommends 3 measurements for estimating zinc status: dietary zinc intake, plasma zinc concentration (PZC), and height-for-age of growing infants and children. The amount of dietary zinc potentially available for absorption, which requires an estimate of dietary zinc and phytate, can be used to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. PZCs respond to severe dietary zinc restriction and to zinc supplementation; they also change with shifts in whole-body zinc balance and clinical signs of zinc deficiency. PZC cutoffs are available to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. However, there are limitations in using the PZC to assess zinc status. PZCs respond less to additional zinc provided in food than to a supplement administered between meals, there is considerable interindividual variability in PZCs with changes in dietary zinc, and PZCs are influenced by recent meal consumption, the time of day, inflammation, and certain drugs and hormones. Insufficient data are available on hair, urinary, nail, and blood cell zinc responses to changes in dietary zinc to recommend these biomarkers for assessing zinc status. Of the potential functional indicators of zinc, growth is the only one that is recommended. Because pharmacologic zinc doses are unlikely to enhance growth, a growth response to supplemental zinc is interpreted as indicating pre-existing zinc deficiency. Other functional indicators reviewed but not recommended for assessing zinc nutrition in clinical or field settings because of insufficient information are the activity or amounts of zinc-dependent enzymes

  19. The School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study: Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Devaney, Barbara

    This publication, which is based on the School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study, describes the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (SBP), presents findings on the nutrients and foods provided in school meals, and describes the dietary intakes of the nation's students on a typical school day. Data were derived…

  20. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  1. Nutrition Education Development Project. ESEA Title IVC Project. Pamphlet File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzerne Intermediate Unit 18, Kingston, PA.

    This compilation of pamphlets and other educational materials on current issues in nutrition provides elementary and secondary teachers with a list of free or inexpensive materials to help them implement nutrition education into the existing curriculum. This list, organized in alphabetical order by topic, contains 293 entries and each one includes…

  2. The Effect of Maternal Nutrition on the Development of the Offspring: An International Symposium. Nutrition Reports International, Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeder, Lois M., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Contents of this symposium include the following papers: "Effect of Maternal Protein Malnutrition on Neonatal Lung Development and Mitochondrial Function," E. J. Hawrylewicz, J. Q. Kissane, W. H. Blair and C. A. Heppner; "Effect of the Level of Nutrition on Rates of Cell Proliferation and of RNA and Protein Syntheses in the Rat," L. M. Roeder;…

  3. Prospective study of nutritional support during pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Malcolm, A.W.; Bothe, A. Jr.; Valerio, D.; Blackburn, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    A prospective study of nutritional support during pelvic irradiation was carried out in 32 patients with a primary pelvic malignancy and prior weight loss. Both curative and palliative patients were eligible for the study. Seventeen patients were randomized to receive intravenous hyperalimentation (IVH) and fifteen patients served as controls who were maintained on their regular diet. Patients were stratified by percent body weight loss. Tolerance to therapy was assessed by evaluation of functional status and by using nutritional parameters of body weight change, change in serum protein levels, and response to delayed hypersensitivity skin tests. The curative IVH group tolerated therapy well by both functional and nutritional measurements. All curative IVH patients completed the planned radiation therapy without a treatment break and were fully active following treatment. Patients gained an average of 4.0 kg body weight during irradiation, which was significantly different from the curative control patients. They demonstrated a significant increase in serum transferrin reflecting an improvement in visceral protein. In addition, all showed a positive response to delayed hypersensitivity skin tests at the completion of irradiation. The palliative IVH patients often did poorly because of progression of disease and demonstrated only an elevation of serum transferrin during treatment. The results in the curative IVH group suggest a potential adjunctive role for intravenous hyperalimentation in the malnourished cancer patient undergoing pelvic irradiation. Clearly, further study of nutritional support during pelvic irradiation is needed using curative patients with a single tumor type and significant prior weight loss.

  4. Nutrition in pregnancy and early childhood and associations with obesity in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Huffman, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about the increasing rates of obesity in developing countries have led many policy makers to question the impacts of maternal and early child nutrition on risk of later obesity. The purposes of the review are to summarise the studies on the associations between nutrition during pregnancy and infant feeding practices with later obesity from childhood through adulthood and to identify potential ways for preventing obesity in developing countries. As few studies were identified in developing countries, key studies in developed countries were included in the review. Poor prenatal dietary intakes of energy, protein and micronutrients were shown to be associated with increased risk of adult obesity in offspring. Female offspring seem to be more vulnerable than male offspring when their mothers receive insufficient energy during pregnancy. By influencing birthweight, optimal prenatal nutrition might reduce the risk of obesity in adults. While normal birthweights (2500-3999 g) were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) as adults, they generally were associated with higher fat-free mass and lower fat mass compared with low birthweights (<2500 g). Low birthweight was associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome and central obesity in adults. Breastfeeding and timely introduction of complementary foods were shown to protect against obesity later in life in observational studies. High-protein intake during early childhood however was associated with higher body fat mass and obesity in adulthood. In developed countries, increased weight gain during the first 2 years of life was associated with a higher BMI in adulthood. However, recent studies in developing countries showed that higher BMI was more related to greater lean body mass than fat mass. It appears that increased length at 2 years of age was positively associated with height, weight and fat-free mass, and was only weakly associated with fat mass. The protective associations between breastfeeding

  5. Effects of Social Network Exposure on Nutritional Learning: Development of an Online Educational Platform

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Noa; Beskin, Daniel; Brezis, Mayer

    2015-01-01

    Background Social networking sites (SNSs) such as Facebook have the potential to enhance online public health interventions, in part, as they provide social exposure and reinforcement. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate whether social exposure provided by SNSs enhances the effects of online public health interventions. Methods As a sample intervention, we developed Food Hero, an online platform for nutritional education in which players feed a virtual character according to their own nutritional needs and complete a set of virtual sport challenges. The platform was developed in 2 versions: a "private version" in which a user can see only his or her own score, and a "social version" in which a user can see other players’ scores, including preexisting Facebook friends. We assessed changes in participants’ nutritional knowledge using 4 quiz scores and 3 menu-assembly scores. Monitoring feeding and exercising attempts assessed engagement with the platform. Results The 2 versions of the platform were randomly assigned between a study group (30 members receiving the social version) and a control group (33 members, private version). The study group's performance on the quizzes gradually increased over time, relative to that of the control group, becoming significantly higher by the fourth quiz (P=.02). Furthermore, the study group's menu-assembly scores improved over time compared to the first score, whereas the control group's performance deteriorated. Study group members spent an average of 3:40 minutes assembling each menu compared to 2:50 minutes in the control group, and performed an average of 1.58 daily sport challenges, compared to 1.21 in the control group (P=.03). Conclusions This work focused on isolating the SNSs' social effects in order to help guide future online interventions. Our results indicate that the social exposure provided by SNSs is associated with increased engagement and learning in an online nutritional educational platform

  6. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Radpay, Rojan; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. Materials and Methods: 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (p<0.005) indicating improved nutritional status in each groups. Conclusion: This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress. PMID:27403176

  7. Nutritional Status Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional Status Assessment (Nutrition) is the most comprehensive inflight study done by NASA to date of human physiologic changes during long-duration space flight; this includes measures of bone metabolism, oxidative damage, nutritional assessments, and hormonal changes. This study will impact both the definition of nutritional requirements and development of food systems for future space exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. This experiment will also help to understand the impact of countermeasures (exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutritional status and nutrient requirements for astronauts.

  8. Development and Testing of a Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist for EFNEP and FSNE Adult Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Traliece; Serrano, Elena L.; Cox, Ruby H.; Lambur, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess reliability and validity of the Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist to measure nutrition, food safety, and physical activity practices among adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Food Stamp Nutrition Education program (FSNE) participants. Methods: Test-retest…

  9. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  10. Calcium Nutrition Perceptions among Food Bank Users: A Canadian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Shanthi; Hawkins, Nicki

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the differences in the food bank users' perceptions related to calcium nutrition across sex and employment status using a cross-sectional, prospective design at a large food bank in Canada. A total of 197 individuals participated for a response rate of 97%. A structured survey was developed and pilot tested before it was…

  11. FDA Consumer Nutrition Knowledge Survey. Report II, 1975. A Nationwide Study of Food Shopper's Knowledge, Beliefs, Attitudes and Reported Behavior Regarding Food and Nutrition. Factors Related to Nutrition Labeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Herbert; And Others

    During 1973, a nationwide study for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was conducted which provided information on nutrition knowledge, beliefs about nutrition, and first reactions to nutrition labeling among food shoppers. This initial research provided a baseline measurement of nutrition knowledge and attitudes among consumers, and in 1975…

  12. Pilot study of a budget-tailored culinary nutrition education program for undergraduate food science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrison, Dorothy Adair

    The primary objective of this pilot study is to provide evidence that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program is both appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students both in everyday life as well as their future health careers. Two validated programs were combined into one program in order to evaluate their combined effects: Cooking With a Chef and Cooking Matters at the Store. The secondary objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the components and reliability of a questionnaire created specifically for this pilot study. A review of past literature was written, which included culinary nutrition as a source of primary prevention, the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition, and the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition. Based on the literature review, it was determined that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program was appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students interested in pursuing health-related careers. The pilot study design was a semi-crossover study: all four groups received the program, however, two groups were first treated as the control groups. All fifty-four participants received 5 sessions of culinary nutrition information from Cooking With a Chef, collaboratively delivered by a nutrition educator and a chef, and one session of information about shopping healthy on a budget from Cooking Matters at the Store in the form of a grocery store tour led by the nutrition educator. Three questionnaires were administered to the participants that evaluated culinary nutrition and price knowledge, cooking attitudes, and opinions of the programs' relevance to participants' everyday lives and careers. Two of the questionnaires, including a questionnaire developed specifically for the pilot study, were delivered as a pre- and post-test while the third questionnaire was delivered as a post-test. Eight random participants also partook in a focus group session led by the nutrition

  13. Food and nutrition studies for Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C., Jr.; Rambaut, P. C.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Wheeler, H. O.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been conducted on nutrient intake and absorption during the Apollo 16 mission. Results indicate that inflight intakes of all essential nutrients were adequate and that absorption of these materials occurred normally.

  14. A qualitative study of nutritional behaviors in adults with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plow, Matthew; Finlayson, Marcia

    2012-12-01

    Few studies have explored how people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) cope with impairments and disability to participate in nutritional behaviors, such as meal preparation and grocery shopping. Thus, we conducted a qualitative study among eight individuals with MS who experienced mobility impairments. The eight individuals participated in semistructured, face-to-face interviews that focused on obtaining narratives about day-to-day dietary habits, preparing food, grocery shopping, and going to restaurants. Interviews were analyzed using an inductive category and theme development approach. Overall themes were (a) "it's a lot of work," (b) "it's not just up to me," (c) sifting through nutritional information, and (d) "why I eat what I eat." Participants frequently reported fatigue and mobility impairments as barriers to engagement in nutritional behaviors and often described family members as the "gatekeepers" for food selection and preparation (i.e., providing tangible support). Future research should explore the effectiveness of nutritional interventions that target family dynamics and create a supportive social environment to promote healthy eating habits and nutritional autonomy.

  15. Epidemiological and nutrition transition in developing countries: impact on human health and development.

    PubMed

    Amuna, Paul; Zotor, Francis B

    2008-02-01

    Whereas common infectious and parasitic diseases such as malaria and the HIV/AIDS pandemic remain major unresolved health problems in many developing countries, emerging non-communicable diseases relating to diet and lifestyle have been increasing over the last two decades, thus creating a double burden of disease and impacting negatively on already over-stretched health services in these countries. Prevalence rates for type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD in sub-Saharan Africa have seen a 10-fold increase in the last 20 years. In the Arab Gulf current prevalence rates are between 25 and 35% for the adult population, whilst evidence of the metabolic syndrome is emerging in children and adolescents. The present review focuses on the concept of the epidemiological and nutritional transition. It looks at historical trends in socio-economic status and lifestyle and trends in nutrition-related non-communicable diseases over the last two decades, particularly in developing countries with rising income levels, as well as the other extreme of poverty, chronic hunger and coping strategies and metabolic adaptations in fetal life that predispose to non-communicable disease risk in later life. The role of preventable environmental risk factors for obesity and the metabolic syndrome in developing countries is emphasized and also these challenges are related to meeting the millennium development goals. The possible implications of these changing trends for human and economic development in poorly-resourced healthcare settings and the implications for nutrition training are also discussed.

  16. Development and implementation of client-centered nutrition education programs in a 4-stage framework.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Matthew G; Seth, Jennifer Greenberg; Atwood, Robin Dochen; Ray, Tara C

    2015-04-01

    The Texas Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) sought to engage the WIC staff and community in the implementation of relevant and effective client-centered nutrition education. The program was implemented in a 4-stage framework. The collaborative process of developing client-centered nutrition education allowed members to learn from one another, thus ensuring commitment to client-centered nutrition education from all levels of staff. The co-created materials and trainings developed during the implementation played a key role. Evaluation feedback started at the infancy of implementation and gave all community members a stake in developing client-centered nutrition education and an opportunity to be invested in its success, which led to increased execution at the local agency level over the implementation stages.

  17. Developing the School Physical Activity and Nutrition Environment Tool to Measure Qualities of the Obesogenic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Deborah H.; Gunter, Katherine; Jackson, Jennifer A.; Manore, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Practical tools are needed that reliably measure the complex physical activity (PA) and nutrition environments of elementary schools that influence children's health and learning behaviors for obesity prevention. The School Physical Activity and Nutrition-Environment Tool (SPAN-ET) was developed and beta tested in 6 rural Oregon…

  18. Infant Nutrition and 12 and 18 Months Secure Base Behavior: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Posada, German; Carbonell, Olga A.; Creed-Kanashiro, Hillary; Gurkas, Pinar

    2011-01-01

    A notable omission in studies of developmental links to early nutritional deficiencies is infant attachment. In those few studies investigating associations between infant nutrition and attachment, nutrition was defined solely by physical growth, and infants had moderate-severe growth retardation. In this study, we utilized multiple markers of…

  19. Nutrition advocacy and national development: the PROFILES programme and its application.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhalter, B. R.; Abel, E.; Aguayo, V.; Diene, S. M.; Parlato, M. B.; Ross, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Investment in nutritional programmes can contribute to economic growth and is cost-effective in improving child survival and development. In order to communicate this to decision-makers, the PROFILES nutrition advocacy and policy development programme was applied in certain developing countries. Effective advocacy is necessary to generate financial and political support for scaling up from small pilot projects and maintaining successful national programmes. The programme uses scientific knowledge to estimate development indicators such as mortality, morbidity, fertility, school performance and labour productivity from the size and nutritional condition of populations. Changes in nutritional condition are estimated from the costs, coverage and effectiveness of proposed programmes. In Bangladesh this approach helped to gain approval and funding for a major nutrition programme. PROFILES helped to promote the nutrition component of an early childhood development programme in the Philippines, and to make nutrition a top priority in Ghana's new national child survival strategy. The application of PROFILES in these and other countries has been supported by the United States Agency for International Development, the United Nations Children's Fund, the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the Micronutrient Initiative and other bodies. PMID:10361758

  20. Executive summary—Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development: Building a Consensus123

    PubMed Central

    Namasté, Sorrel; Brabin, Bernard; Combs, Gerald; L'Abbe, Mary R; Wasantwisut, Emorn; Darnton-Hill, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The ability to develop evidence-based clinical guidance and effective programs and policies to achieve global health promotion and disease prevention goals depends on the availability of valid and reliable data. With specific regard to the role of food and nutrition in achieving those goals, relevant data are developed with the use of biomarkers that reflect nutrient exposure, status, and functional effect. A need exists to promote the discovery, development, and use of biomarkers across a range of applications. In addition, a process is needed to harmonize the global health community's decision making about what biomarkers are best suited for a given use under specific conditions and settings. To address these needs, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, organized a conference entitled “Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development: Building a Consensus,” which was hosted by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Partners included key multilateral, US agencies and public and private organizations. The assembly endorsed the utility of this initiative and the need for the BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) project to continue. A consensus was reached on the requirement to develop a process to inform the community about the relative strengths or weaknesses and specific applications of various biomarkers under defined conditions. The articles in this supplement summarize the deliberations of the 4 working groups: research, clinical, policy, and programmatic. Also described are content presentations on the harmonization processes, the evidence base for biomarkers for 5 case-study micronutrients, and new frontiers in science and technology. PMID:21733880

  1. The role of nutrition in children's neurocognitive development, from pregnancy through childhood

    PubMed Central

    Nyaradi, Anett; Li, Jianghong; Hickling, Siobhan; Foster, Jonathan; Oddy, Wendy H.

    2013-01-01

    This review examines the current evidence for a possible connection between nutritional intake (including micronutrients and whole diet) and neurocognitive development in childhood. Earlier studies which have investigated the association between nutrition and cognitive development have focused on individual micronutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, folic acid, choline, iron, iodine, and zinc, and single aspects of diet. The research evidence from observational studies suggests that micronutrients may play an important role in the cognitive development of children. However, the results of intervention trials utilizing single micronutrients are inconclusive. More generally, there is evidence that malnutrition can impair cognitive development, whilst breastfeeding appears to be beneficial for cognition. Eating breakfast is also beneficial for cognition. In contrast, there is currently inconclusive evidence regarding the association between obesity and cognition. Since individuals consume combinations of foods, more recently researchers have become interested in the cognitive impact of diet as a composite measure. Only a few studies to date have investigated the associations between dietary patterns and cognitive development. In future research, more well designed intervention trials are needed, with special consideration given to the interactive effects of nutrients. PMID:23532379

  2. [Nutrition and population: study of three countries].

    PubMed

    1988-12-01

    The cases of Mexico, Kenya, and India are described to illustrate the difficulty of assuring national food supplies in the face of rapid population growth. In 1985, despite a world cereal surplus, some 700 million of the earth's poorest inhabitants lacked sufficient food to support a normal life, and some 17 million children died of malnutrition or diseases aggravated by malnutrition. 16% of today's Third World population lacks sufficient food to maintain health. Rapid population growth is a cause of hunger in both countries and households. In already densely populated countries such as Bangladesh, population growth reduces the availability of agricultural land for each rural family, causing rural incomes to decrease and worsening rural unemployment. Few developing countries have been able to avoid serious urban unemployment and underemployment. Unstable governments try to calm urban unrest by concentrating all social and economic investment in the cities, causing suffering and diminished production in the countryside. Today more than 60 countries have food deficits. The majority of them are poor and becoming poorer. India, Kenya, and Mexico have had relative success in balancing food production and population growth, but each still has malnutrition due to inadequate economic policies for most of the poor and to implacable population growth. India's population of 785 million is growing at a rate of 2.3%/year. 1984 per capita calorie consumption was 92% of the required minimum. The poorest 20% of the population shared 7% of total household income. Since 1950 food production in India has almost tripled, but population nearly doubled in the same years. Poor food distribution and unequal agricultural progress have meant that malnutrition continues to plague India. Approximately 45% of the population suffered some degree of malnutrition in 1986. It is unlikely that India's future agricultural progress will be as rapid as that of the past 3 decades. Erosion

  3. Highlighting the evidence gap: how cost-effective are interventions to improve early childhood nutrition and development?

    PubMed

    Batura, Neha; Hill, Zelee; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Lingam, Raghu; Colbourn, Timothy; Kim, Sungwook; Sikander, Siham; Pulkki-Brannstrom, Anni-Maria; Rahman, Atif; Kirkwood, Betty; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2015-07-01

    There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of early childhood interventions to improve the growth and development of children. Although, historically, nutrition and stimulation interventions may have been delivered separately, they are increasingly being tested as a package of early childhood interventions that synergistically improve outcomes over the life course. However, implementation at scale is seldom possible without first considering the relative cost and cost-effectiveness of these interventions. An evidence gap in this area may deter large-scale implementation, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We conduct a literature review to establish what is known about the cost-effectiveness of early childhood nutrition and development interventions. A set of predefined search terms and exclusion criteria standardized the search across five databases. The search identified 15 relevant articles. Of these, nine were from studies set in high-income countries and six in low- and middle-income countries. The articles either calculated the cost-effectiveness of nutrition-specific interventions (n = 8) aimed at improving child growth, or parenting interventions (stimulation) to improve early childhood development (n = 7). No articles estimated the cost-effectiveness of combined interventions. Comparing results within nutrition or stimulation interventions, or between nutrition and stimulation interventions was largely prevented by the variety of outcome measures used in these analyses. This article highlights the need for further evidence relevant to low- and middle-income countries. To facilitate comparison of cost-effectiveness between studies, and between contexts where appropriate, a move towards a common outcome measure such as the cost per disability-adjusted life years averted is advocated. Finally, given the increasing number of combined nutrition and stimulation interventions being tested, there is a significant need for evidence of cost

  4. Nutritional status assessment in semiclosed environments: ground-based and space flight studies in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Rice, B. L.; Nillen, J. L.; Gillman, P. L.; Block, G.

    2001-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical during long-term spaceflight, as is the ability to easily monitor dietary intake. A comprehensive nutritional status assessment profile was designed for use before, during and after flight. It included assessment of both dietary intake and biochemical markers of nutritional status. A spaceflight food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to evaluate intake of key nutrients during spaceflight. The nutritional status assessment protocol was evaluated during two ground-based closed-chamber studies (60 and 91 d; n = 4/study), and was implemented for two astronauts during 4-mo stays on the Mir space station. Ground-based studies indicated that the FFQ, administered daily or weekly, adequately estimated intake of key nutrients. Chamber subjects maintained prechamber energy intake and body weight. Astronauts tended to eat 40--50% of WHO-predicted energy requirements, and lost >10% of preflight body mass. Serum ferritin levels were lower after the chamber stays, despite adequate iron intake. Red blood cell folate concentrations were increased after the chamber studies. Vitamin D stores were decreased by > 40% on chamber egress and after spaceflight. Mir crew members had decreased levels of most nutritional indices, but these are difficult to interpret given the insufficient energy intake and loss of body mass. Spaceflight food systems can provide adequate intake of macronutrients, although, as expected, micronutrient intake is a concern for any closed or semiclosed food system. These data demonstrate the utility and importance of nutritional status assessment during spaceflight and of the FFQ during extended-duration spaceflight.

  5. Entrance Qualifications Affect the Performance of Nutrition Students at University: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu-Apenten, Richard; Xu, Wen Li

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of admissions qualifications on the subsequent academic performances of BSc nutrition students at a UK university. Entrance qualifications for three groups (Grp01, Grp02, Grp03) reading for a BSc(Hons) degree in, Dietetics, Food & Nutrition or Human Nutrition (n = 105) were determined from their UCAS…

  6. Is There a Relationship between Nutrition, Facial Development, and Crowding of the Teeth?

    PubMed

    Tyszkowski, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role, especially key vitamins D3 and K2 which are necessary for proper dentofacial development and food consistency influence on crowding and dental arches narrowing. Changes in our dentition and facial appearance are caused by changing our diet from primitive hunter gatherer to a more modern industrialized agriculture. Nutrition and its impact on epigeneticaly- mediated mechanisms continuously shape our phenotype which impacts overall health and can reverse the path for overall health and facial bone development. Orthodontics and nutrition both play a role in following nature's path to reestablishing facial balance and dental arches proportions to accommodate all 32 teeth.

  7. Comparison of Three Instructional Strategies in Food and Nutrition Education: Developing a Diet Plan for a Diabetic Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darabi, Aubteen; Pourafshar, Shirin; Suryavanshi, Rinki; Arrington, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the performance of dietitians-in-training on developing a diet plan for a diabetic patient either independently or after peer discussion. Participants (n = 58) from an undergraduate program in food and nutrition were divided into two groups based on their prior knowledge before being randomly assigned into three conditions: (1)…

  8. To Grow or Not to Grow: Nutritional Control of Development During Caenorhabditis elegans L1 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that larvae of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans arrest development by forming dauer larvae in response to multiple unfavorable environmental conditions. C. elegans larvae can also reversibly arrest development earlier, during the first larval stage (L1), in response to starvation. “L1 arrest” (also known as “L1 diapause”) occurs without morphological modification but is accompanied by increased stress resistance. Caloric restriction and periodic fasting can extend adult lifespan, and developmental models are critical to understanding how the animal is buffered from fluctuations in nutrient availability, impacting lifespan. L1 arrest provides an opportunity to study nutritional control of development. Given its relevance to aging, diabetes, obesity and cancer, interest in L1 arrest is increasing, and signaling pathways and gene regulatory mechanisms controlling arrest and recovery have been characterized. Insulin-like signaling is a critical regulator, and it is modified by and acts through microRNAs. DAF-18/PTEN, AMP-activated kinase and fatty acid biosynthesis are also involved. The nervous system, epidermis, and intestine contribute systemically to regulation of arrest, but cell-autonomous signaling likely contributes to regulation in the germline. A relatively small number of genes affecting starvation survival during L1 arrest are known, and many of them also affect adult lifespan, reflecting a common genetic basis ripe for exploration. mRNA expression is well characterized during arrest, recovery, and normal L1 development, providing a metazoan model for nutritional control of gene expression. In particular, post-recruitment regulation of RNA polymerase II is under nutritional control, potentially contributing to a rapid and coordinated response to feeding. The phenomenology of L1 arrest will be reviewed, as well as regulation of developmental arrest and starvation survival by various signaling pathways and gene regulatory

  9. Animal models of maternal nutrition and altered offspring bone structure--bone development across the lifecourse.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Stuart A; Bertram, Caroline; Cooper, Cyrus; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2011-11-24

    It is widely accepted that the likelihood of offspring developing heart disease, stroke, or diabetes in later life, is influenced by the their in utero environment and maternal nutrition. There is increasing epidemiological evidence that osteoporosis in the offspring may also be influenced by the mother's nutrition during pregnancy. This review provides evidence from a range of animal models that supports the epidemiological data; suggesting that lifelong bone development and growth in offspring is determined during gestation.

  10. Calcium Intake and Nutritional Adequacy in Spanish Children: The ANIVA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-López, Nuria; Llopis-González, Agustín; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2017-01-01

    Calcium is an important nutrient for child development. The main objective of this study was to assess calcium intake and its adequacy with dietary reference intake (DRI) in Spanish children. The ANIVA (Antropometría y Nutrición Infantil de Valencia) study is a descriptive cross-sectional study. During two academic years 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, 1176 schoolchildren aged 6–9 years were selected from 14 primary schools in Valencia (Spain). Three-day food records were used to assess dietary intake, completed by parents/guardian. Anthropometric data (weight and height) were evaluated in all subjects. Nutritional intake was compared to estimated average requirements (EARs) and adequate intake (AI) values to determine nutritional adequacy. A percentage of 25.77% had inadequate calcium intake, and a significantly higher prevalence was observed in girls (p = 0.006). Adequate calcium intake showed a positive association with the height z-score (p = 0.032). When assessing dietary patterns, schoolchildren with adequate calcium intakes had better nutritional adequacy in all nutrients, except cholesterol (p = 0.086) and fluorine (p = 0.503). These results suggest a public health problem that must be addressed through nutrition education programs to increase intake of calcium-rich food and to correct the associated dietary pattern. PMID:28230804

  11. A Study of Nutrition in Entry-Level Dental Hygiene Education Programs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deborah L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to document the extent of nutritional content in U.S. dental hygiene program curricula; identify program directors' opinions, perceptions, and barriers to expanding nutritional content; and evaluate if a proposed nutrition curriculum model would be beneficial. This mixed methods study involved quantitative and qualitative aspects. An invitation letter was sent to all 335 directors of entry-level U.S. dental hygiene programs. In response, 55 directors submitted nutrition course syllabi from their programs (16.4% of the total) for the quantitative analysis. In addition, 14 nutrition instructors and ten program directors were interviewed regarding their perceptions and opinions of nutrition education for dental hygiene students. All aspects of the content analysis results revealed that nutrition content in entry-level dental hygiene programs is diverse. Some programs did not include nutrition content, while others provided oral and systemic nutrition intervention subject matter. Some programs offered multiple clinical nutrition applications and patient contact opportunities while most required none. The interview results disclosed a variety of opinions and perceptions of dental hygienists' role in nutrition. Several interviewees viewed dental hygienists' role in nutrition to be an integral part of patient care, while others indicated no role or providing caries prevention counseling only. Although dental hygienists are expected to provide nutrition assessments and interventions, no standards or standardized competencies exist for nutrition in dental hygiene education. A standardized nutrition model could be beneficial for entry-level programs to ensure dental hygienists possess basic knowledge to perform nutrition assessments and intervention to address Healthy People 2020's intervention initiatives.

  12. A Study on Nutritional Status of Rural School going Children in Kavre District.

    PubMed

    Mansur, D I; Haque, M K; Sharma, K; Mehta, D K; Shakya, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood is a time of active growth in terms of physical size, mental, emotional and psychological development. Normal growth is dependent on adequate nutrition and encompasses major transformations from birth to adulthood. Nutrition is a focal point for health and well being; and has special significance in countries with disadvantages in socioeconomic and hygienic standards. Objective The objective of the present study was to assess the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness among rural school going children. Method The present study was cross-sectional study, conducted on 438 rural school going children (169 male and 259 female) with the age group 4-16 years, during the period from April 2014 to July 2014. Age was recorded in year; height and weight were measured in centimeter and kilogram respectively. BMI was calculated by using standard equation. Result The present study concluded that the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness were found to be 30.85%, 24.54% and 10.05% respectively among rural school going children of Kavre district. It was revealed that 37.87% was underweight, 29.59% was stunted and 11.25% was thinness among male children whereas in female children, 26.27% was underweight, 21.24% was stunted and 9.27% was thinness. Hence, high prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness were observed in male than in female children. Conclusion The present study has successfully documented the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness among the rural school going children of Kavre district. The results of the present study will be useful for policy makers in their endeavor to formulate various developmental and health care programs.

  13. Nutritional status in the HEMO Study cohort at baseline. Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V; Paranandi, Lata; Burrowes, Jerrilynn D; Cockram, David B; Dwyer, Johanna T; Kusek, John W; Leung, June; Makoff, Rhoda; Maroni, Bradley; Poole, Diane

    2002-02-01

    The nutritional status of the first 1,000 patients randomized into the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study was analyzed at baseline when they received their typical dialysis dose (equilibrated Kt/V = 1.30 +/- 0.22) and dialysis membrane. This is the largest study to date of the nutritional status of chronic hemodialysis patients. The mean (+/- SD) values for these parameters included a serum albumin level of 3.65 +/- 0.38 g/dL, a dietary energy intake of 22.9 +/- 8.4 kcal/kg/day, a dietary protein intake of 0.93 +/- 0.36 g/kg/day, and a double pool normalized protein catabolic rate (enPCR) of 1.00 +/- 0.25 g/kg/day. The percentage of patients below HEMO Study nutritional standards of care included 29% of patients with a serum albumin level less than 3.5 g/dL, 76% of patients with a dietary energy intake less than 28 kcal/kg/day, 61% of patients with a dietary protein intake less than 1.0 g/kg/day, and 52% of patients with an enPCR of less than 1.0 g/kg/day. There was a strong correlation between dietary protein intake and dietary energy intake (r = 0.74, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were also evident between serum albumin and double pool PCR and between dietary protein intake and double-pool PCR. Kt/V and membrane flux were not predictive of baseline dietary protein intake, dietary energy intake, or serum albumin level. Thus, a majority of patients in the HEMO Study had protein and energy intake levels and enPCR levels that were below National Kidney Foundation Kidney Dialysis Outcome Quality Improvement (NKF-K/DOQI) guidelines.

  14. Effects of growth hormone (GH) transgene and nutrition on growth and bone development in common carp.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tingbing; Zhang, Tanglin; Wang, Yaping; Chen, Yushun; Hu, Wei; Zhu, Zuoyan

    2013-10-01

    Limited information is available on effects of growth hormone transgene and nutrition on growth and development of aquatic animals. Here, we present a study to test these effects with growth-enhanced transgenic common carp under two nutritional conditions or feeding rations (i.e., 5% and 10% of fish body weight per day). Compared with the nontransgenic fish, the growth rates of the transgenic fish increased significantly in both feeding rations. The shape of the pharyngeal bone was similar among treatments, but the transgenic fish had relatively smaller and lighter pharyngeal bone compared with the nontransgenic fish. Calcium content of the pharyngeal bone of the transgenic fish was significantly lower than that of the nontransgenic fish. Feeding ration also affected growth rate but less of an effect on bone development. By manipulating intrinsic growth and controlling for both environment (e.g., feeding ration) and genetic background or genotype (e.g., transgenic or not), this study provides empirical evidence that the genotype has a stronger effect than the environment on pharyngeal bone development. The pharyngeal bone strength could be reduced by decreased calcium content and calcification in the transgenic carp.

  15. A critical period for omega-3 nutritional supplementation in the development of the rodent visual system.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, P C; Sandre, P C; Tavares Do Carmo, M G; Faria-Melibeu, A C; Campello-Costa, P; Ferraz, A C; Andrade Da Costa, B L S; Serfaty, C A

    2015-07-30

    Retinocollicular connections form precise topographical maps that are normally completed through the selective elimination of misplaced axons and the stabilization of topographically ordered axon terminals during early development. Omega-3 fatty acids, acquired exclusively through the diet, and its main metabolite, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are involved in brain development and synaptic maturation. We have previously shown that the nutritional restriction of omega-3/DHA results in abnormal retinocollicular topographical fine-tuning. Therefore, we studied the role of omega-3 fatty acids nutritional supplementation and the developmental time windows during which this postnatal supplementation would restore normal topographical maps in the visual system. Female rats and their litters were chronically fed with either control (soy oil) or restricted omega-3 (coconut oil) diets. Fish oil supplementation was introduced between either postnatal day (PND) 7-13, PND7-28 or PND21-42. At PND13, PND28 or PND42, animals received an anterograde eye injection of a neuronal tracer to visualize retinocollicular axons. Confirming previous observations we found that an omega-3/DHA deficiency resulted in an abnormally high innervation density of retinal axons at the visual layers of the superior colliculus (SC). Although a short-term fish oil supplementation between PND7-13 could not restore normal retinocollicular topography, an extended treatment between PND7-28 completely recovered normal innervation densities of retinotectal axons. However, a late onset supplementation protocol, between PND28-42, was no longer effective in the restoration of the abnormal topographical pattern induced by an early omega-3 nutritional malnutrition. The results suggest a critical period for omega3/DHA dietary intake for the proper development of visual topographical maps.

  16. Enhanced early-life nutrition promotes hormone production and reproductive development in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Dance, Alysha; Thundathil, Jacob; Wilde, Randy; Blondin, Patrick; Kastelic, John

    2015-02-01

    Holstein bull calves often reach artificial insemination centers in suboptimal body condition. Early-life nutrition is reported to increase reproductive performance in beef bulls. The objective was to determine whether early-life nutrition in Holstein bulls had effects similar to those reported in beef bulls. Twenty-six Holstein bull calves were randomly allocated into 3 groups at approximately 1 wk of age to receive a low-, medium-, or high-nutrition diet, based on levels of energy and protein, from 2 to 31 wk of age. Calves were on their respective diets until 31 wk of age, after which they were all fed a medium-nutrition diet. To evaluate secretion profiles and concentrations of blood hormones, a subset of bulls was subjected to intensive blood sampling every 4 wk from 11 to 31 wk of age. Testes of all bulls were measured once a month; once scrotal circumference reached 26cm, semen collection was attempted (by electroejaculation) every 2 wk to confirm puberty. Bulls were maintained until approximately 72 wk of age and then slaughtered at a local abattoir. Testes were recovered and weighed. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet were younger at puberty (high=324.3 d, low=369.3 d) and had larger testes for the entire experimental period than bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet also had an earlier and more substantial early rise in LH than those fed the low-nutrition diet and had increased concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) earlier than the bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Furthermore, we detected a temporal association between increased IGF-I concentrations and an early LH rise in bulls fed the high-nutrition diet. Therefore, we inferred that IGF-I had a role in regulating the early gonadotropin rise (in particular, LH) and thus reproductive development of Holstein bulls. Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Holstein bull calves fed a high-nutrition diet reach puberty earlier and have larger testes than

  17. Kindergarten food familiarization. An exploratory study of teachers' perspectives on food and nutrition in kindergartens.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    This exploratory study employed a netnographic approach (netnography being a research methodology that adopts the practices of ethnography in an Internet-based setting) to reveal opportunities for kindergarten food familiarization. The study analyses kindergarten teachers' discussions on seven Internet message boards regarding the various food and nutrition experiences in their classes. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted with seven kindergarten teachers to explore further the message board findings. Five opportunities for how food familiarization occurs in kindergartens emerged from the analysis. These opportunities were categorized as being either "overt": (1) nutrition lessons, (2) snack times, (3) cooking experiences, or "covert" (4) food as teaching materials, and (5) dramatic play centres. Overt refers to any opportunity centred on food, healthy eating, or nutrition, whereas covert refers to opportunities where food was involved but in a non-exclusive manner. The five opportunities are examined and discussed in terms of their implications for children's food preference development. Results should be useful for future researchers for two main reasons. First, the results demonstrate the wide variety of food and nutrition experiences kindergarten students encounter throughout the day, beyond healthy eating interventions or foods served during meals. And second, because the findings are preliminary they require further research using various methods of data collection and samples of teachers.

  18. Developing Nutrition Label Reading Skills: A Web-Based Practice Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Laurel A; Bergman, Jacqueline J; Wilson, Machelle D; Applegate, Elizabeth A; Gibson, Tanja N

    2017-01-01

    Background Nutrition labels offer the information needed to follow Dietary Guidelines for Americans, yet many individuals use labels infrequently or ineffectively due to limited comprehension and the effort required to use them. Objective The objective of our study was to develop and test a Web-based label-reading training tool to improve individuals’ ability to use labels to select more healthful foods. We were particularly interested in determining whether practice can lead to increased accuracy using labels as well as decreased effort, together reflecting greater efficiency. We compared a basic and an enhanced, prior-knowledge version of the tool that contained an additional component, a brief nutrition tutorial. Methods Participants were 140 college students with an average age of 20.7 (SD 2.1) years and education 14.6 (SD 1.2) years, who completed 3 sets of practice that were designed to teach them, through repetition and feedback, how to use nutrition labels to select more healthful products. Prior to training, participants in the prior-knowledge group viewed a multimedia nutrition presentation, which those in the basic group did not receive. Mixed-effects models tested for improvement in accuracy and speed with practice, and whether improvements varied by group. Results The training led to significant increases in average accuracy across the 3 practice sets (averaging 79% [19/24 questions], 92% [22/24], 96% [23/24] respectively, P<.001), as well as decreases in time to complete with mean (SD) values of 8.7 (2.8), 4.6 (1.8), and 4.1 (1.7) seconds, respectively. In block 3, the odds of a correct answer for the prior-knowledge group were 79% higher (odds ratio, OR=1.79, 95% CI 1.1-2.9) than those for the basic group (P=.02). There was no significant difference between the groups in block 2 (P=.89). Conclusions Practice led to improvements in nutrition label reading skills that are indicative of early stages of automatic processing. To the extent that

  19. Nutritional issues and status of older persons of the Philippines: the IUNS, CRONOS and other studies.

    PubMed

    Pedro, M R; Barba, C V

    2001-01-01

    The growing proportion of older persons in the Philippine population, with their potential contribution to development efforts as well as special needs for health and social services, presents an emerging demographic concern. The Philippines participated in the IUNS multicenter cross-cultural study of "Food Habits in Later Life" among urban elderly in three different care settings - elderly who lived with their families, those housed in government-operated homes for the aged, and older persons in private institutions. A second study employed the CRONOS protocol to differentiate nutritional and non-nutritional factors that affect the health and nutritional status of the Filipino elderly in urban and rural settings. Findings from the two studies revealed deficiencies in energy and protein intake among older persons. Those cared for by government social workers and care-givers had lowest protein-energy intakes and the highest proportion of underweight. Food habits of the urban elderly, particularly in terms of meal pattern, and use of table salt, sugar and fats were reported in the IUNS study. There was general perception of tiredness and limited social activity, network and support, but over-all self-rating of the elderly's health was good. The CRONOS study found significant association between later life status indicators, as well as between BMI and illness and physical activity scores. The paper included data from the 1993 National Nutrition Survey describing the nutritional situation of the elderly on a national scale: 30% of Filipino adults aged 60 y and over had a BMI <18.5 kg/m2 indicating chronic energy deficiency, 11% were obese with BMI >or=25 kg/m2, 41% were hypertensive and 45% anemic. Caring patterns were reflected in a 1984 four-country ASEAN study on the elderly which included the Philippines. While favorable, as the Filipino elderly generally lived in households where there was at least one adult female, the presence of other household members who

  20. The influence of postnatal nutrition on reproductive tract and endometrial gland development in dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Meghan L; McCoski, Sarah R; Geiger, Adam J; Akers, R Michael; Johnson, Sally E; Ealy, Alan D

    2017-02-01

    Uterine gland development occurs after birth in cattle and other mammals. The timeline of gland development has been described in various species, but little is known about how postnatal diet influences uterine gland development. This is especially concerning in dairy heifers, where a variety of milk replacer and whole milk nutrition options exist. Little work also exists in cattle to describe how early exposure to steroids influences reproductive tract and uterine gland development. The objective of this work was to determine the effects of early postnatal plane of nutrition and estrogen supplementation on uterine gland development in calves. In both studies, Holstein heifer calves were assigned to restricted milk replacer (R-MR) or enhanced milk replacer (EH-MR) diets. In study 1, calves (R-MR, n = 6; EH-MR, n = 5) were euthanized at 8 wk. In study 2, calves were weaned at 8 wk and administered estradiol (R-MR, n = 6; EH-MR, n = 6) or placebo (R-MR, n = 6; EH-MR, n = 5) for an additional 14 d before euthanasia. Average daily gain and final body weight was greater in both studies in heifers fed the enhanced diet. At 8 wk, EH-MR calves had a greater number of glands and a smaller average gland size, but total gland area was not different from the R-MR group. At 10 wk, uterine gland number and size were not affected by diet or estrogen. Expression profiles of several paracrine mediators of gland development were examined. Increases in transcript abundance for IGF1 and IGFBP3 and a decrease in abundance of WNT7A were detected in calves fed the enhanced diet at 8 wk of age. Plane of nutrition did not affect transcript profiles at 10 wk of age, but estradiol supplementation decreased MET and WNT7A transcript abundance. To conclude, heifer calves on a restricted diet exhibited a uterine morphology and transcript profile suggestive of delayed uterine gland development. These changes appear to be corrected by wk 10 of life. Also, this work provides evidence supporting the

  1. Nutritional status and economic development in sub-Saharan Africa, 1950-1980.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    How did nutritional status develop in sub-Saharan Africa during the second half of the 20th century, and what role did economic development play in nutrition and health? Aggregating data from more than 200,000 women in 28 sub-Saharan African countries, we use mean height as an indicator of net nutritional status and find that the nutritional status of 1960 birth cohorts was relatively high. This situation, however, was not sustained. In almost all countries examined, mean heights were stagnating or decreasing after the 1970 cohorts. Using regression analysis we model human growth from birth to maturity, and find that economic growth had a significant and robust influence on final adult height at two distinct periods of the life cycle: (1) in the first years of life and (2) at puberty. We conclude that the economic difficulties of the late 1970s and 1980s contributed to the decline or stagnation in heights.

  2. Nutrition components and assessment procedures of a university employee wellness program: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shovic, A C; Harris, P R

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the various nutrition components and data collection tools developed and implemented within the Montana State University Employee Wellness Program. Nutrition components included a variety of classes, seminars, follow-up support groups, and individual consultations. Tools included surveys and computerized data input cards. It is important for dietetic professionals to initiate the development and implementation of a quality nutrition component within university employee wellness programs.

  3. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Nubia Amparo; Aguilar, Nora Luz; Restrepo, Beatriz Elena; Vanegas, Marcela; Alzate, Sandra; Martínez, Mónica; Gamboa, Sonia Patricia; Castaño, Eliana; Barbosa, Janeth; Román, Juliana; Serna, Ángela María; Hoyos, Gloria Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, approach, kind of formula, and eight complications. Results: A total of 277 patients were evaluated; 83% received enteral nutrition and 17% received parenteral nutrition. Some 69.3% presented risk of malnourishment or severe malnourishment at admittance. About 35.4% of those receiving enteral nutrition and 39.6% of the ones who received parenteral nutrition had complications; no significant difference per support was found (p= 0.363). For the enteral nutrition, the most significant complication was the removal of the catheter (14%), followed by diarrhea (8.3%); an association between the duration of the enteral support with diarrhea, constipation and removal of the catheter was found (p < 0.05). For parenteral nutrition, hyperglycemia was the complication of highest incidence (22.9%), followed by hypophosphatemia (12.5%); all complications were associated with the duration of the support (p < 0.05). Nutritional support was suspended in 24.2% of the patients. Conclusions: Complications with nutritional support in hospital-ward patients were frequent, with the removal of the catheter and hyperglycemia showing the highest incidence. Duration of the support was the variable that revealed an association with complications. Strict application of protocols could decrease the risk for complications and boost nutritional support benefits. PMID:24893056

  4. Beneficial effects of the nutritional supplements on the development of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Increased oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators are implicated in the development of diabetic retinopathy, and in rats, its development can be prevented by antioxidants. Carotenoids are some of the powerful antioxidants, and diabetes decreases lutein and zeaxanthin levels in the serum and retina. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of carotenoid containing nutritional supplements (Nutr), which is in clinical trials for ‘Diabetes Vision Function’, on diabetic retinopathy. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (Wistar, male) were fed Purina 5001 supplemented with nutritional supplements containing zeaxanthin, lutein, lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients, or without any supplementation. Retinal function was analyzed at ~4 months of diabetes by electroretinography. After 11 months of diabetes, capillary cell apoptosis (TUNEL-staining) and histopathology (degenerative capillaries) were quantified in trypsin-digested retinal vasculature. Retina was also analyzed for mitochondrial damage (by quantifying gene expressions of mtDNA-encoded proteins of the electron transport chain), VEGF and inflammatory mediators, interleukin-1β and NF-kB. Results Diabetes impaired retinal function decreasing the amplitudes of both a- and b-waves. In the same animals, retinal capillary cell apoptosis and degenerative capillaries were increased by 3–4 fold. Gene expressions of mtDNA encoded proteins were decreased, and VEGF, interleukin-1β and NF-kB levels were elevated. Supplementation with the nutrients prevented increased capillary cell apoptosis and vascular pathology, and ameliorated these diabetes-induced retinal abnormalities. Conclusions Nutritional supplementation prevents diabetic retinopathy, and also maintains normal retinal function, mitochondrial homeostasis and inflammatory mediators. Thus, this supplementation could represent an achievable and inexpensive adjunct therapy to also inhibit retinopathy, a slow

  5. The application of near infrared spectroscopy in nutritional intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Philippa A.; Kennedy, David O.

    2013-01-01

    Functional near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique used to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) and by proxy neuronal activation. The use of NIRS in nutritional intervention studies is a relatively novel application of this technique, with only a small, but growing, number of trials published to date. These trials—in which the effects on CBF following administration of dietary components such as caffeine, polyphenols and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are assessed—have successfully demonstrated NIRS as a sensitive measure of change in hemodynamic response during cognitive tasks in both acute and chronic treatment intervention paradigms. The existent research in this area has been limited by the constraints of the technique itself however advancements in the measurement technology, paired with studies endeavoring increased sophistication in number and locations of channels over the head should render the use of NIRS in nutritional interventions particularly valuable in advancing our understanding of the effects of nutrients and dietary components on the brain. PMID:23964231

  6. The Porto Alegre Early Life Nutrition and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, Benjamin W.; Vitolo, Márcia Regina; Feldens, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood caries is a persistent worldwide problem. The etiologic contribution of feeding practices has been less frequently investigated in prospective studies of young children. The Porto Alegre Early Life Nutrition and Health Study has followed a birth cohort of 715 mother-child pairs, recruited from municipal health centers, originally involved in a cluster-randomized controlled trial of healthcare worker training. The birth cohort links prospectively collected socio-demographic, infant feeding, and general and oral health information. To date, oral health data, including caries status and oral health related quality of life, have been collected for 458 children at age 2-3 years. Studies are underway to investigate possible determinants and consequences of oral health among these children. PMID:25388499

  7. Use of cognitive interview techniques in the development of nutrition surveys and interactive nutrition messages for low-income populations.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Elena T; Campbell, Marci K; Honess-Morreale, Lauren

    2002-05-01

    The effectiveness of dietary surveys and educational messages is dependent in part on how well the target audience's information processing needs and abilities are addressed. Use of pilot testing is helpful; however, problems with wording and language are often not revealed. Cognitive interview techniques offer 1 approach to assist dietitians in understanding how audiences process information. With this method, respondents are led through a survey or message and asked to paraphrase items; discuss thoughts, feelings, and ideas that come to mind; and suggest alternative wording. As part of a US Department of Agriculture-funded nutrition education project, 23 cognitive interviews were conducted among technical community college students in North Carolina. Interview findings informed the development of tailored computer messages and survey questions. Better understanding of respondents' cognitive processes significantly improved the language and approach used in this intervention. Interview data indicated 4 problem areas: vague or ineffective instructions, confusing questions and response options, variable interpretation of terms, and misinterpretation of dietary recommendations. Interviews also provided insight into the meaning of diet-related stages of change. These findings concur with previous research suggesting that cognitive interview techniques are a valuable tool in the formative evaluation and development of nutrition surveys and materials.

  8. [Role of nutrition in development of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ciok, J; Dzieniszewski, J; Gabryelewicz, A; Długosz, J; Charzewska, J; Chwojnowska, Z

    1993-08-01

    The diet of 45 men with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in the period before the onset of the symptoms of the disease was studied. The dietary history was used as a tool in research of the dietary data. The diet of studied group was compared with the diet of 23 alcoholics without the symptoms of pancreatic injury and with the diet of 30 healthy men with similar age and social status. The energy intake and main nutrients content (especially protein and fats) was statistically higher in the studied group. High protein and fats consumption with high ethanol intake may promote the development of chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Nutrition and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Robert H.

    Nutritional deficiencies and imbalances can influence learning directly or indirectly. Fatigue, boredom and low motivation may be the result of poor nutrition. Some vision problems, it is known, are related to deficiencies in vitamin A. A number of studies indicate that protein-caloric malnutrition affects intellectual and psychomotor development.…

  10. Nutrition and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Studies by Tufts University's Center on Hunger and Poverty show conclusive links between nutrition and children's cognitive development. Cognitive defects can result from complex interactions between malnutrition and "environmental insults" that come from living in poverty. Poor nutrition has longterm consequences. Print and web…

  11. Nutritional status survey of children with autism and typically developing children aged 4-6 years in Heilongjiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Caihong; Xia, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Li, Nannan; Zhao, Dong; Wu, Lijie

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disability that may affect nutritional management of children with autism. This study aimed to compare the nutritional status of children with autism with that of typically developing children (aged 4-6 years) in China. Nutritional status was assessed by means of nutritional data, anthropometric data, biochemical assessment, physical examination for nutrient deficiencies and providing a questionnaire to parents. A total of fifty-three children with autism and fifty-three typically developing children were enrolled in this study. The parents were asked to complete the questionnaire regarding the eating behaviour and gastrointestinal symptoms of their children. They were also asked to provide a 3 d food diary. Children with autism exhibited several abnormalities in terms of eating behaviour and gastrointestinal symptoms. The levels of vitamins A and B6, Zn and Ca intakes were <80 % of the dietary reference intakes in both groups. In addition, the proportions of vitamin C and Ca intake deficiencies in the autism group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Serum Zn level was less than the normal reference range in both the groups. Serum Ca, vitamin A and folate levels in children with autism were significantly lower when compared with children without autism. According to the anthropometric data, the mean BMI, weight-for-height Z-score (Z WH) and BMI for age Z-score (Z BMIA) of children with autism were significantly higher than those of the typically developing children. Thus, nutritional inadequacies were observed in children with autism and typically developing children in China, which were, however, more pronounced among children with autism.

  12. A Profile of Paraprofessionals Working with the Expanded Food and Nutrition Program in Pennsylvania. A Professional Paper in Extension Education. Extended Studies 60, May 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nease, Linda Jeanne

    The major purpose of the study was to develop a profile of nutrition paraprofessionals in Pennsylvania; a secondary purpose was to assess the personal benefit, if any, reported by the paraprofessionals as a result of working with the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). During December, 1974 and January, 1975, questionnaires were…

  13. [Development, adaptation and validation of silhouette scales for self-assessment of nutritional status: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Moraes, Cristiane; Anjos, Luiz Antonio dos; Marinho, Sandra Mara Silva de Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Self-assessment of body image is a multidimensional construction by which individuals describe the internal representations of their body structure and physical appearance in relation to themselves and others. Silhouette scales have been used to for self-assessment of nutritional status, due to their low cost and ease of administration, especially in field surveys. This study aimed to identify the various silhouette scales that have been developed or adapted since 1983 and to conduct a systematic review of the validation of such scales against objective measures of nutritional status. A total of 33 publications were found and showed moderate to good correlation between nutritional status and both adapted (0.66 to 0.87) and developed silhouette scales (0.59 to 0.94) in adults, but much lower correlation in children and adolescents. Most of the studies used inappropriate statistical analysis. The data indicated that silhouette scales should be used with caution to predict nutritional status with or without anthropometric measures.

  14. Microbiota and healthy ageing: observational and nutritional intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Brüssow, Harald

    2013-07-01

    Hundred years ago Metchnikoff associated human health and particularly healthy ageing with a specific type of gut microbiota. Classical culture methods associated a decrease in bifidobacteria and an increase in enterobacteria with ageing. Modern molecular methods blurred this simple picture and documented a substantial inter-individual variability for the gut microbiome even when stratifying the elderly subjects according to health status. Nutritional interventions with resistant starch showed consistent gut microbiota changes across studies from different geographical areas and prebiotic supplementation induced a 10-fold increase in gut bifidobacteria. However, in the ELDERMET study, microbiota changes do not precede, but follow the changes in health status of elderly subjects possibly as a consequence of diet changes.

  15. Formative assessment in the development of an obesity prevention component for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study conducted formative research (surveys, focus groups); to assess the nutrition education needs of clients in the Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program prior to curriculum revision. Current participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program from 3 Texas cities (...

  16. Rationale, design and methods of the HEALTHY study nutrition intervention component.

    PubMed

    Gillis, B; Mobley, C; Stadler, D D; Hartstein, J; Virus, A; Volpe, S L; El ghormli, L; Staten, M A; Bridgman, J; McCormick, S

    2009-08-01

    The HEALTHY study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter and middle school-based, multifaceted intervention designed to reduce risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. The study randomized 42 middle schools to intervention or control, and followed students from the sixth to the eighth grades. Here we describe the design of the HEALTHY nutrition intervention component that was developed to modify the total school food environment, defined to include the following: federal breakfast, lunch, after school snack and supper programs; a la carte venues, including snack bars and school stores; vending machines; fundraisers; and classroom parties and celebrations. Study staff implemented the intervention using core and toolbox strategies to achieve and maintain the following five intervention goals: (1) lower the average fat content of foods, (2) increase the availability and variety of fruits and vegetables, (3) limit the portion sizes and energy content of dessert and snack foods, (4) eliminate whole and 2% milk and all added sugar beverages, with the exception of low fat or nonfat flavored milk, and limit 100% fruit juice to breakfast in small portions and (5) increase the availability of higher fiber grain-based foods and legumes. Other nutrition intervention component elements were taste tests, cafeteria enhancements, cafeteria line messages and other messages about healthy eating, cafeteria learning laboratory (CLL) activities, twice-yearly training of food service staff, weekly meetings with food service managers, incentives for food service departments, and twice yearly local meetings and three national summits with district food service directors. Strengths of the intervention design were the integration of nutrition with the other HEALTHY intervention components (physical education, behavior change and communications), and the collaboration and rapport between the nutrition intervention study staff members and food service personnel at both school

  17. Rationale, design and methods of the HEALTHY study nutrition intervention component

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, B; Mobley, C; Stadler, DD; Hartstein, J; Virus, A; Volpe, SL; El ghormli, L; Staten, MA; Bridgman, J; McCormick, S

    2009-01-01

    The HEALTHY study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter and middle school-based, multifaceted intervention designed to reduce risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. The study randomized 42 middle schools to intervention or control, and followed students from the sixth to the eighth grades. Here we describe the design of the HEALTHY nutrition intervention component that was developed to modify the total school food environment, defined to include the following: federal breakfast, lunch, after school snack and supper programs; a la carte venues, including snack bars and school stores; vending machines; fundraisers; and classroom parties and celebrations. Study staff implemented the intervention using core and toolbox strategies to achieve and maintain the following five intervention goals: (1) lower the average fat content of foods, (2) increase the availability and variety of fruits and vegetables, (3) limit the portion sizes and energy content of dessert and snack foods, (4) eliminate whole and 2% milk and all added sugar beverages, with the exception of low fat or nonfat flavored milk, and limit 100% fruit juice to breakfast in small portions and (5) increase the availability of higher fiber grain-based foods and legumes. Other nutrition intervention component elements were taste tests, cafeteria enhancements, cafeteria line messages and other messages about healthy eating, cafeteria learning laboratory (CLL) activities, twice-yearly training of food service staff, weekly meetings with food service managers, incentives for food service departments, and twice yearly local meetings and three national summits with district food service directors. Strengths of the intervention design were the integration of nutrition with the other HEALTHY intervention components (physical education, behavior change and communications), and the collaboration and rapport between the nutrition intervention study staff members and food service personnel at both school

  18. Teams, strategies and networks: developments in nutritional support; a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Powell-Tuck, J

    2009-08-01

    Chris Pennington was an archetypal team player, strategist and networker. Clinical nutritional support has progressed remarkably since the 1970s and it has been a privilege to work in this field over this period during which teamwork, strategy development and networking have been crucial. British experience has been characterised by groups of individuals of differing professions and specialties coming together to enable progress to be made. This approach was initially in the form of nutrition support teams orientated to patient-centred ward-based care, then as hospital strategic committees and the concept of the 'patient journey'. Indeed, the formation of the British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (now known as BAPEN) in 1992 required the statesmanlike burying of jealousies as societies came together into a multiprofessional association. With the understanding that disease-related malnutrition was highly prevalent it became apparent that it must be managed on a broad and organised clinical front. In the Organisation of Food and Nutritional Support in Hospitals a group of professionals developed for BAPEN concepts of hospital-wide organisation to tackle malnutrition that were based on previous reports, both national and international, and were made easily accessible from the BAPEN website, especially the 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence nutrition guidelines. The coming together of six national clinical societies to develop evidence-based consensus guidelines for intravenous saline therapy (also on the BAPEN website) has shown that BAPEN can catalyse opinion well beyond its own nutritional constituency. In England Chris Pennington's Scottish lead is being followed by developing a patient-centred strategic framework for a managed home parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure national network. In research, education or clinical practice the engines of progress have been teams

  19. Acidosis and nutritional status in hemodialyzed patients. French Study Group for Nutrition in Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, P; Fouque, D; Combe, C; Laville, M; Canaud, B; Azar, R; Cano, N; Aparicio, M; Leverve, X

    2000-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of more than 30% of French dialysis patients (N = 7,123), we evaluated the relationships between predialysis plasma bicarbonate concentration and nutritional markers. Data including age, gender, cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), time on dialysis, body mass index (BMI), blood levels of midweek predialysis albumin, prealbumin, and bicarbonate were collected. Normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), dialysis adequacy parameters, and estimation of lean body mass (LBM) were computed from pre- and postbicarbonate-dialysis urea and creatinine levels according to the classical formulas of Garred. Average values (+/- 1 SD) were age 61 +/- 16 years, BMI 23.3 +/- 4.6 kg/m2, dialysis time 12.4 +/- 2.7 h/week, HCO3 22.8 +/- 3.5 mmol/L, albumin 38.7 +/- 5.3 g/L, prealbumin 340 +/- 90 mg/L, Kt/V 1.36 +/- 0.36, nPCR 1.13 +/- 0.32 g/kg BW/day, and LBM 0.86 +/- 0.21% of ideal LBM. A highly significant negative correlation was observed between predialysis bicarbonate levels (within a range of 16-30 mmol/L, 95% of this population) and nPCR confirmed by analysis of variance using bicarbonate classes (p < 0.0001). Bicarbonate was also negatively correlated with albumin, prealbumin, BMI, and LBM. No relationship was noted between bicarbonate and Kt/V despite a positive correlation between Kt/V and nPCR. It is likely that a persistent acidosis observed despite standard bicarbonate dialysis was caused by a high dietary protein intake which results in an increased acid load, but also overcomes the usual catabolic effects of acidosis.

  20. Food for thought: an exploratory study of how physicians experience poor workplace nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nutrition is often a casualty of the busy work day for physicians. We aimed to explore physicians' views of their nutrition in the workplace including their perceptions of the impact of inadequate nutrition upon their personal wellness and their professional performance. Methods This is a qualitative study of a sample of 20 physicians practicing in a large urban teaching hospital. Semi-structured open ended interviews were conducted to explore physicians' views of workplace nutrition. The same physicians had agreed to participate in a related nutrition based wellness intervention study that compared nutritional intake and cognitive function during a day of usual nutrition patterns against another day with scheduled nutrition breaks. A second set of interviews was conducted after the intervention study to explore how participation in the intervention impacted these views. Detailed interview content notes were transcribed and analyzed independently with differences reconciled by discussion. Results At initial interview, participants reported difficulty accessing adequate nutrition at work, linking this deficit with emotional (irritable and frustrated), physical (tired and hungry), and cognitive (difficulty concentrating and poor decision making) symptoms. In addition to identifying practical barriers such as lack of time to stop and eat, inconvenient access to food and poor food choices, the physicians described how their sense of professionalism and work ethic also hinder their work nutrition practices. After participating in the intervention, most physicians reported heightened awareness of their nutrition patterns and intentions to improve their workplace nutrition. Conclusions Physicians report that inadequate workplace nutrition has a significant negative impact on their personal wellness and professional performance. Given this threat to health care delivery, health care organizations and the medical profession need to address both the practical and

  1. Moving beyond hunger and nutrition: a systematic review of the evidence linking food insecurity and mental health in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lesley Jo; Hadley, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Food insecurity is a significant problem in the developing world, and one that is likely to increase given the current global food crisis spurred by rising oil prices, conversion of food to biofuels, and reduced harvests in the wake of natural disasters. The impacts of food insecurity on nutrition status, growth, and development are well substantiated; less is known about the non-nutritional impacts of food insecurity, such as its effects on mental health. This systematic review assesses current findings regarding the impacts of food insecurity on mental health in developing countries. Both qualitative and quantitative studies are considered. The results of the search reveal that little work has examined these issues directly, and serious methodological flaws are present in many of the existing studies. Gaps in the literature, implications, and research priorities are discussed.

  2. Nutritional deficiencies in the pediatric age group in a multicultural developed country, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Haimi, Motti; Lerner, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies are prevalent worldwide. Diseases and morbid conditions have been described to result from nutritional deficiencies. It is essential to address nutrient deficiencies as these may lead to chronic long-term health problems such as rickets, iron deficiency anemia, goiter, obesity, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer and osteoporosis. In the present review we surveyed the extent and severity of nutritional deficiencies in Israel through a selective and comprehensive Medline review of previous reports and studies performed during the last 40 years. Israeli populations have multiple nutritional deficiencies, including iron, calcium, zinc, folic acid, and vitamins B12, C, D and E, spanning all age groups, several minorities, and specific regions. In Israel, some of the nutrients are mandatorily implemented and many of them are implemented voluntarily by local industries. We suggest ways to prevent and treat the nutritional deficiencies, as a step to promote food fortification in Israel. PMID:24868510

  3. Building evidence for sustainability of food and nutrition intervention programs in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunny S; Rogers, Beatrice L; Coates, Jennifer; Gilligan, Daniel O; Sarriot, Eric

    2013-09-01

    After making large investments to put in place effective health and nutrition interventions, researchers, program implementers, policy makers, and donors all expect lasting effects. However, it is uncertain whether this is the case, and there is less certainty on how to approach the study of program sustainability. This symposium, "Building Evidence for Sustainability of Food and Nutrition Intervention Programs in Developing Countries," provided not only frameworks for conceptualizing sustainability but concrete evidence about the approaches and methods used as well as lessons on how they do or do not work in particular contexts. We presented the following findings: 1) sustainability of activities and impacts of Title II food aid programs in Bolivia and Kenya, 2) sustainability of impact in terms of adoption and consumption of a biofortified orange sweet potato in Uganda, and 3) lessons from incorporating pro-sustainability investment strategies in child survival programs in Guinea. Our symposium introduced a new important body of research on program sustainability to provide insights and stimulate innovative thinking in the design and planning of further applied research and future prosustainability intervention programs.

  4. Historical development of Chinese dietary patterns and nutrition from the ancient to the modern society.

    PubMed

    Chen, J D; Xu, H

    1996-01-01

    Actually, food, diet and diet therapy germinated together with the change of meal patterns and traditional Chinese medicine from very ancient China; they appeared in an embryonic form till the Shang and Zhou Dynasties and received great importance from the governors who arranged officials to manage their diets and banquets. Moreover, food, diet and meal patterns were replenished through the Zhou, Qin, Han and Jin Dynasties and epitomized and reached thriving and prosperous standards till the Tang Dynasty. They then became perfected, developed, and formed a complete theory in the dynasties of Song, Jin, Yuan, Ming and Qing. The basis of modern nutrition was made up until the end of 19th century and the beginning of 20th century, which was the time when natural science, including microbiology, chemistry, food industry, etc. were extended into China, yet it was not fully formed until the established of the People's Republic of China. Practicing, teaching, training and research activities started regularly in 1950. With a big population and poor economy basis, the first problem that the Chinese people has now been basically solved. Chinese nutritional scientists worked hard to find out the nutritional problems and status of the people. Through the broad-scale 'Nationwide Nutrition Survey', we now understand our main problems. On this basis, RDA, dietary goal and dietary guidance have been put forward. Although the problem of adequate food and clothing has been basically solved, the Chinese are still facing both the problem of nutrition insufficiency and nutrition excess. However, although nutrition insufficiency and deficiency still extensively exist, nutrition excess and imbalance are emerging in other sections of the population. There is still a shortage of qualified nutritional scientists and technicians, and the training of nutritionists is urgent. Food supplies, including milk, beef, green vegetables and fruit should be increased, especially for some rural and

  5. No Trade-Offs between Lipid Stores and Structural Growth in Juvenile Zebra Finches Undergoing Nutritional Stress during Development.

    PubMed

    Kriengwatana, Buddhamas; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional conditions during development can affect both structural growth and body fat deposition. Body size and body fat each have significant consequences for fitness, yet few studies have investigated how young birds balance resource allocation between structural growth and fat reserves. We raised zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in consistently high- or low-food conditions until posthatch day 35 (PHD 35). From this age until PHD 62, half of the birds in each condition were switched to the other treatment, while the rest were maintained on the same conditions. Body mass, lean mass, body fat, and tarsus length were measured before (PHD 25) and after (PHD 55) nutritional independence. Precise measures of body composition were obtained noninvasively at both ages using quantitative magnetic resonance analysis. At PHD 25, birds in the high treatment had more body mass and lean mass than birds in the low treatment, but nutritional treatments did not affect body fat at this age. Unexpectedly, the strategic response of birds that experienced deteriorating food availability was to maintain body mass by increasing body fat and decreasing lean mass. Birds that experienced an improvement in food availability significantly increased body mass by increasing lean mass and not body fat. Birds maintained on a low diet throughout did not significantly increase body mass, lean mass, or body fat. Tarsus length was not affected by nutritional manipulations. These findings indicate that nutritional stress did not affect the relationship between skeletal growth and body fat deposition because lean mass, body fat, and tarsus length can be independently regulated at different developmental periods depending on nutritional conditions.

  6. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Nutritional Indices in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Unckless, Robert L.; Rottschaefer, Susan M.; Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals are genetically variable for the way in which they process nutrients and in the effects of dietary content on reproductive success, immunity, and development. Here, we surveyed genetic variation for nutrient stores (glucose, glycogen, glycerol, protein, triglycerides, and wet weight) in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) after rearing the flies on either a low-glucose or high-glucose diet. We found significant genetic variation for these nutritional phenotypes and identified candidate genes that underlie that variation using genome-wide associations. In addition, we found several significant correlations between the nutritional phenotypes measured in this study and other previously published phenotypes, such as starvation stress resistance, oxidative stress sensitivity, and endoplasmic reticulum stress, which reinforce the notion that these lines can be used to robustly measure related phenotypes across distinct laboratories. PMID:25583649

  7. A genome-wide association study for nutritional indices in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Unckless, Robert L; Rottschaefer, Susan M; Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-01-12

    Individuals are genetically variable for the way in which they process nutrients and in the effects of dietary content on reproductive success, immunity, and development. Here, we surveyed genetic variation for nutrient stores (glucose, glycogen, glycerol, protein, triglycerides, and wet weight) in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) after rearing the flies on either a low-glucose or high-glucose diet. We found significant genetic variation for these nutritional phenotypes and identified candidate genes that underlie that variation using genome-wide associations. In addition, we found several significant correlations between the nutritional phenotypes measured in this study and other previously published phenotypes, such as starvation stress resistance, oxidative stress sensitivity, and endoplasmic reticulum stress, which reinforce the notion that these lines can be used to robustly measure related phenotypes across distinct laboratories.

  8. A perspective on nutrition communication in developing countries: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Smitasiri, Suttilak

    2003-01-01

    Though nutrition communities are still far from understanding how to bring science to bear in formulating effective policies and programs, the contributions of nutrition science have provided recommendations leading to ways and means to improve nutrition in developing countries. To transfer these recommendations into successful implementation, effective nutrition communication has played an important role in the development. Nevertheless, its success has been limited due to several factors including the fact that there is likely only a small proportion of professionals who consistently aim to use theory as a tool to guide action. This paper highlights the importance of using theoretical frameworks to guide the design and implementation. Based on Thailand's experience, social cognitive theory and social marketing are suggested for further applications in developing country context. It is proposed that the role of researchers/practitioners should be formed to facilitate nutrition implementation. Issues relating to the creation of supportive structures and environments i.e. quality personnel, capacity building, proper status and reasonable budgets, are also identified.

  9. Impact of Technology and Culture on Home Economics and Nutrition Science Education in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aburime, M. O.; Uhomoibhi, J. O.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine and report on the impact of technology and culture on home economics and nutrition science education in developing countries with a focus on Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach: Globally and most especially in developing countries, the advent of information and communication technologies has meant…

  10. Professional Development Portfolio: Perceptions of Nutrition and Dietetics Current Students and Recent Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouchilas, Gus; George, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    The Professional Development Portfolio (PDP) in family and consumer sciences nutrition and dietetics programs is a tool that can help students in their transition to professionals. Significant issues in the portfolio development process are: content selection, decision to create paper or online formatting, determination of proper timing to begin…

  11. A Nutrition Education Intervention to Combat Undernutrition: Experience from a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Zahid Khan, Ayesha; Rafique, Ghazala; Qureshi, Haneen; Halai Badruddin, Salma

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Undernutrition in children is a major public health concern in Pakistan. A number of interventions which focused only on providing nutrient supplementation have failed to change child undernutrition status during the last 2 decades. The present study aimed to assess the impact of nutrition education on the nutritional status of children living in resource-limited environments. Methods. Subjects were 586 children from Tando Jam and Quetta, Pakistan, aged from 6 months to 8 years. Children were characterized as mild, moderate, or severely wasted on Z-scores. Anthropometry and 24-hour dietary recall were used for nutritional assessment. Intervention strategy was nutrition counselling targeting mothers. Primary outcome was decrease in the severity of wasting and changes in the feeding practices. Results. Nearly 36% children in Tando Jam and 32% children in Quetta progressed to a normal nutritional status. There was a significant increase in the number of meals taken per day (Tando Jam—P ≤ 0.000/Quetta—P ≤ 0.025). In Tando Jam, significant increase was reported in the intake of high starch food items, vegetables, and fruits (P ≤ 0.000). In Quetta, significant increase was noted in the intake of plant protein (P ≤ 0.005), dairy foods (P ≤ 0.041), and vegetables (P ≤ 0.026). Conclusion. Nutrition education was successful in reducing undernutrition in food insecure households. PMID:24967253

  12. Independent and combined effect of nutrition and exercise on bone mass development.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán; Ezquerra, Juan; Mesana, María Isabel; Fernández-Alvira, Juan Miguel; Rey-López, Juan Pablo; Casajus, José Antonio; Moreno, Luis Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Food intake provides the necessary components for adequate metabolic functions in bone. Calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D, magnesium, proteins, and fluoride are some of the most important nutrients in this regard. These have different effects on bone mass. Additionally, exercise has been shown to elicit osteogenic responses in bone development; indeed, it seems to potentiate, for example, the effect of calcium supplementation on bone mass. However, the nutrition-exercise-bone mass relationship is complex and needs further in-depth investigation. As a first step, therefore, we reviewed current knowledge about the role of nutrition on the development of bone tissue and how physical activity affects the nutrient-bone relationship.

  13. Brain imaging and human nutrition: which measures to use in intervention studies?

    PubMed

    Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Babiloni, Claudio; Sijben, John W; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2013-09-01

    Throughout the life span, the brain is a metabolically highly active organ that uses a large proportion of total nutrient and energy intake. Furthermore, the development and repair of neural tissue depend on the proper intake of essential structural nutrients, minerals, and vitamins. Therefore, what we eat, or refrain from eating, may have an important impact on our cognitive ability and mental performance. Two of the key areas in which diet is thought to play an important role are in optimizing neurodevelopment in children and in preventing neurodegeneration and cognitive decline during aging. From early development to aging, brain imaging can detect structural, functional, and metabolic changes in humans and modifications due to altered nutrition or to additional nutritional supplementation. Inclusion of imaging measures in clinical studies can increase understanding with regard to the modification of brain structure, metabolism, and functional endpoints and may provide early sensitive measures of long-term effects. In this symposium, the utility of existing brain imaging technologies to assess the effects of nutritional intervention in humans is described. Examples of current research showing the utility of these markers are reviewed.

  14. [Maternal nutrition during pregnancy conditions the fetal pancreas development, hormonal status and diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome biomarkers at birth].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Gesteiro, E; Espárrago Rodilla, M; Rodríguez Bernal, B; Bastida, S

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is a vital period where several hyperplasic, hypertrophic processes together with metabolic adaptation and preparation for extra-uterine life take place. Present review accounts for central aspects of nutrition throughout gestation on the embryonic and fetal periods. It is centered in the major changes occurring in fetal pancreas, with special mention to the susceptibility of this main glucose homeostasis organ to support nutritional changes during maturation and development. Studies performed in animal models as human are commented considering the role of maternal nutrition on β-cell mass size, insulin and other pancreatic hormones production, and insulin sensitivity. Details of both the thrifty genotype and phenotype hypothesis are given, indicating that hypo/subnutrition causes metabolic adaptations that permit the future body to grow and develop itself in limited environmental and energetic conditions. The Barker hypothesis is considered suggesting that this metabolic hypothesis is a double-edged sword in the actual abundance World. Lastly the review, taking into account our own research and other papers, analyses less known aspects that relate maternal diet with insulin resistance/sensitivity markers at delivery. Particularly the role of the saturated fatty acid/carbohydrate and omega-6/omega-3 ratios in the frame of maternal diet is reviewed considering the quality of those diets under the Healthy Eating Index and the Adherence to Mediterranean Diet scores and the relationship with insulin resistance profile at birth. Present review ends indicating that nutritional habits should be strongly stated before gestation in order to assure a proper nutrition since the first moment of pregnancy. This will support an adequate fetal and pancreatic growth and development, and in turn, adequate glucose homeostasis during pregnancy and later in life, slowing down or preventing from degenerative diseases related with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

  15. Early childhood nutritional status in CARICOM countries: an overview with respect to five nutrition related millennium development goals.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Pamela S; Nielsen, Anders L; Willie, Douladel; Durant, Tara C

    2014-01-01

    Previous reviews of nutritional status in children under 5 years describe the Caribbean grouped with Latin America. This paper focuses specifically on the Caribbean and the goals and targets of the Millennium Declaration that have bearing on childhood development. The results indicate that CARICOM countries have made progress in terms of child health as assessed by gross health indicators. Yet, the millennium generation experiences coexistence of undernutrition and overweight in early childhood. The associations of GNI with markers such as poverty indices are somewhat inconsistent with traditional findings and highlight a need to reassess the causes of infant mortality and low birth weight. However, a lack of systematic local data has hampered progress on an individual country basis. Interventions that deal more pointedly with country specific needs are required including those targeting obesity if the MDGs are to be attained by all member states.

  16. Nutrition and Its Effects on the Hyperkinetic Child's Behavior and Learning: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Roberta L.

    This case study reviews the literature related to diet, behavior and learning and describes procedures and results of a change in the diet of an adolescent girl who had an extensive history of problems at home and at school. Studies of nutritional deficiency, nutritional imbalance, allergies, and synthetic food additives are briefly overviewed.…

  17. Test Selection, Adaptation, and Evaluation: A Systematic Approach to Assess Nutritional Influences on Child Development in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Elizabeth L.; Hartini, Sri; Rahmawati, Atik; Ismayani, Elfa; Hidayati, Astri; Hikmah, Nurul; Muadz, Husni; Apriatni, Mandri S.; Ullman, Michael T.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Alcock, Katherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the impact of nutrition interventions on developmental outcomes in developing countries can be challenging since most assessment tests have been produced in and for developed country settings. Such tests may not be valid measures of children's abilities when used in a new context. Aims: We present several principles for the…

  18. Shared Principles of Ethics for Infant and Young Child Nutrition in the Developing World

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The defining event in the area of infant feeding is the aggressive marketing of infant formula in the developing world by transnational companies in the 1970s. This practice shattered the trust of the global health community in the private sector, culminated in a global boycott of Nestle products and has extended to distrust of all commercial efforts to improve infant and young child nutrition. The lack of trust is a key barrier along the critical path to optimal infant and young child nutrition in the developing world. Discussion To begin to bridge this gap in trust, we developed a set of shared principles based on the following ideals: Integrity; Solidarity; Justice; Equality; Partnership, cooperation, coordination, and communication; Responsible Activity; Sustainability; Transparency; Private enterprise and scale-up; and Fair trading and consumer choice. We hope these principles can serve as a platform on which various parties in the in the infant and young child nutrition arena, can begin a process of authentic trust-building that will ultimately result in coordinated efforts amongst parties. Summary A set of shared principles of ethics for infant and young child nutrition in the developing world could catalyze the scale-up of low cost, high quality, complementary foods for infants and young children, and eventually contribute to the eradication of infant and child malnutrition in the developing world. PMID:20529339

  19. Formative research methods for designing culturally appropriate, integrated child nutrition and development interventions: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Margaret E.; Johnson, Susan L.; Wasser, Heather; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Shroff, Monal; Fernandez-Rao, Sylvia; Cunningham, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional and developmental insults in the first few years of life have profound public health implications, including substantial contributions to neonatal, infant, and early childhood morbidity and mortality, as well as longer term impacts on cognitive development, school achievement, and worker productivity. Optimal development that can lead to the attainment of the individual's fullest potential therefore requires a combination of genetic capacity, adequate nutrition, psychosocial stimulation, and safe, clean physical environments. Researchers and policymakers have called for integrated child nutrition and development interventions for more than twenty years, yet there are only a handful of efficacy trials and even fewer examples of integrated interventions that have been taken to scale. While a critical component to the design of such interventions is formative research, there is a dearth of information in both the literature and policy arenas to guide this phase of the process. To move the field forward, this paper first provides an overview of formative research methods with a focus on qualitative inquiry, a description of the critical domains to be assessed (infant and young child feeding, responsive feeding, and child development), and currently available resources. Application of these methods is provided through a real-world case study—the design of an integrated nutrition and child development efficacy trial in Andhra Pradesh, India. Recommendations for next steps are discussed, the most important of which is the need for a comprehensive set of formative guidelines for designing locally tailored, culturally appropriate integrated interventions. PMID:24673167

  20. Nutritional intervention in cognitively impaired geriatric trauma patients: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Eschbach, D; Kirchbichler, T; Wiesmann, T; Oberkircher, L; Bliemel, C; Ruchholtz, S; Buecking, B

    2016-01-01

    Background Most studies focusing on improving the nutritional status of geriatric trauma patients exclude patients with cognitive impairment. These patients are especially at risk of malnutrition at admission and of worsening during the perioperative fasting period. This study was planned as a feasibility study to identify the difficulties involved in including this high-risk collective of cognitively impaired geriatric trauma patients. Patients and methods This prospective intervention study included cognitively impaired geriatric patients (Mini–Mental State Examination <25, age >65 years) with hip-related fractures. We assessed Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS 2002), body mass index, calf circumference, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ classification, and Braden Scale. All patients received parenteral nutritional supplementation of 800 kcal/d for the 96-hour perioperative period. Serum albumin and pseudocholinesterase were monitored. Information related to the study design and any complications in the clinical course were documented. Results A total of 96 patients were screened, among whom eleven women (median age: 87 years; age range: 74–91 years) and nine men (median age: 82 years; age range: 73–89 years) were included. The Mini–Mental State Examination score was 9.5 (0–24). All patients were manifestly undernourished or at risk according to MNA and NRS 2002. The body mass index was 23 kg/m2 (13–30 kg/m2), the calf circumference was 29.5 cm (18–34 cm), and the mean American Society of Anesthesiologists’ classification status was 3 (2–4). Braden Scale showed 18 patients at high risk of developing pressure ulcers. In all, 12 patients had nonsurgical complications with 10% mortality. Albumin as well as pseudocholinesterase dropped significantly from admission to discharge. The study design proved to be feasible. Conclusion The testing of MNA and NRS 2002 was feasible. Cognitively impaired trauma patients

  1. Facultative apomixis and development of fruit in a deciduous shrub with medicinal and nutritional uses

    PubMed Central

    Mangla, Yash; Chaudhary, Manju; Gupta, Himshikha; Thakur, Rakesh; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, S. N.; Tandon, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of reproductive biology of plants is crucial to understand their natural mode of propagation, which may aid in conservation and crop improvement. The reproductive details are also crucial for beginning the cultivation of a potential crop on a commercial scale. Fruits of sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, are used in a variety of medicinal and nutritional products. So far, fruits are collected from the female plants in the wild. It is known that the species fruits profusely and also propagates by forming root suckers, but the details of sexual reproduction are not available. We investigated the mode of reproduction and development of fruits from natural populations of sea buckthorn. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were studied through resin-embedded sectioning and ovule-clearing methods, and fruit development through histochemistry. The study of mitosis and male meiosis showed that the plants at the site were diploid (2n = 2x = 24). The embryo sac may develop either through the monosporic pathway and differentiates into ‘Polygonum type’ or aposporously into ‘Panicum type’. The embryo may develop by sexual and adventitious pathways. Thus, sea buckthorn is a facultative apomict. The occurrence of diverse reproductive pathways assures the possibility of generation of novel genotypes through sexuality, while apomictic reproduction maintains adaptive genotypes and ensures reproduction in the absence of pollination. Anatomical details suggest that the fruit of sea buckthorn may be appropriately described as a pseudo-drupe. PMID:26286224

  2. Facultative apomixis and development of fruit in a deciduous shrub with medicinal and nutritional uses.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Yash; Chaudhary, Manju; Gupta, Himshikha; Thakur, Rakesh; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, S N; Tandon, Rajesh

    2015-08-17

    Knowledge of reproductive biology of plants is crucial to understand their natural mode of propagation, which may aid in conservation and crop improvement. The reproductive details are also crucial for beginning the cultivation of a potential crop on a commercial scale. Fruits of sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, are used in a variety of medicinal and nutritional products. So far, fruits are collected from the female plants in the wild. It is known that the species fruits profusely and also propagates by forming root suckers, but the details of sexual reproduction are not available. We investigated the mode of reproduction and development of fruits from natural populations of sea buckthorn. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were studied through resin-embedded sectioning and ovule-clearing methods, and fruit development through histochemistry. The study of mitosis and male meiosis showed that the plants at the site were diploid (2n = 2x = 24). The embryo sac may develop either through the monosporic pathway and differentiates into 'Polygonum type' or aposporously into 'Panicum type'. The embryo may develop by sexual and adventitious pathways. Thus, sea buckthorn is a facultative apomict. The occurrence of diverse reproductive pathways assures the possibility of generation of novel genotypes through sexuality, while apomictic reproduction maintains adaptive genotypes and ensures reproduction in the absence of pollination. Anatomical details suggest that the fruit of sea buckthorn may be appropriately described as a pseudo-drupe.

  3. Selecting Policy Indicators and Developing Simulation Models for the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. Final Report. Special Nutrition Programs Report Series. Special Nutrition Programs Report No. CN-10-PRED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragoset, Lisa; Gordon, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This report describes work using nationally representative 2005 data from the School Nutrition Dietary Assessment-III (SNDA-III) study to develop a simulation model to predict the potential implications of changes in policies or practices related to school meals and school food environments. The model focuses on three domains of outcomes: (1) the…

  4. The consequence of level of nutrition on heifer ovarian and mammary development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replacing cows in the herd is second only to nutrition as the single greatest input cost in cow/calf beef production. The increased availability of cereal grains for feeding livestock has allowed replacement heifers to enter the production system at younger ages. Many heifer development programs fe...

  5. The Development of a Model for Adult Education in Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Susan K.; Villano, Maurice W.

    Two nutrition education modules were developed on cardiovascular disease and fat-controlled diet consisting of a self-instruction leader's guide and teaching package to conduct learning sessions for the participants. The sessions consisted of an audio-visual presentation, situations related to the module topic, group discussion, role-playing,…

  6. Post-weaning nutritional programming of ovarian development in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From weaning to breeding, the nutritional management of replacement females is critical to their lifetime productivity. Traditionally, cereal grains have been used to develop replacement heifers to enter the breeding system at a younger age. However, overfeeding heifers decreased number of calves ...

  7. Nutrition and Mental Development. ERIC-IRCD Urban Disadvantaged Series, Number 36, February 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gussow, Joan Dye

    During the 1960's a growing body of experimental evidence suggesting that early malnutrition could affect the development and the functioning of the brain was translated into a concern that nutritional deprivation might be producing permanent mental retardation among "disadvantaged" children. The purpose of this paper is to show, through a review…

  8. Effect of nutrition during calfhood and peripubertal period on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins and testosterone concentrations, and on sexual development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Barth, Albert D; Rawlings, Norm C; Wilde, Randal E; Crews, Denny H; Mir, Priya S; Kastelic, John P

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the effects of nutrition on circulating concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone during sexual development in bulls. Nutrition regulated the hypothalamus-pituitary-testes axis through effects on the GnRH pulse generator in the hypothalamus and through direct effects on the testes. Pituitary function (gonadotropin secretion after GnRH challenge) was not affected by nutrition. However, nutrition affected LH pulse frequency and basal LH concentration during the early gonadotropin rise (10-26 weeks of age). There were close temporal associations between changes in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations and changes in LH pulse frequency, suggesting a role for IGF-I in regulating the early gonadotropin rise in bulls. The peripubertal increase in testosterone concentration was delayed in bulls with lesser serum IGF-I concentrations (low nutrition), suggesting a role for IGF-I in regulating Leydig cell function. Serum IGF-I concentrations accounted for 72 and 67% of the variation in scrotal circumference and paired-testes volume, respectively (at any given age), indicating that IGF-I may regulate testicular growth. Bulls with a more sustained elevated LH pulse frequency during the early gonadotropin rise (high nutrition) had greater testicular mass at 70 weeks of age relative to the control group (medium nutrition), despite no differences in metabolic hormone concentrations after 26 weeks of age. Therefore, gonadotropin-independent mechanism regulating testicular growth might be dependent on previous gonadotropin milieu.

  9. The School Meals Initiative Implementation Study. Second Year Report. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Sameer; Chattopadhyay, Manas; Montgomery, Margrethe; Steiger, Darby Miller; Daft, Lynn; Wilbraham, Brooke

    This report, authorized by the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, contains information on the School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children (SMI), a reform of school-meals programs aimed at upgrading the nutritional content of school meals. The purpose of the study was to describe and evaluate: (1) overall…

  10. The School Meals Initiative Implementation Study. Third Year Report. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Sameer; Chattopadhyay, Manas; Montgomery, Margrethe; Steiger, Darby Miller; Daft, Lynn; Wilbraham, Brooke

    This report, authorized by the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, contains information on the School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children (SMI), a reform of school-meals programs aimed at upgrading the nutritional content of school meals. The purpose of the study was to describe and evaluate: (1) overall…

  11. Maternal social capital and child nutritional status in four developing countries.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Mary J; Harpham, Trudy

    2007-06-01

    Social capital has been shown to be positively associated with a range of health outcomes, yet no studies have explored the association between maternal social capital and child nutritional status. Using data from the Young Lives study comprising 7242 1-year-old children from Peru, Ethiopia, Vietnam and the state of Andhra Pradesh in India, we find significant differences in the levels of, in particular, structural social capital (group membership and citizenship) between countries. While few associations were found between structural measures of social capital, support from individuals and cognitive social capital (e.g. trust, social harmony) displayed fairly consistent positive associations with child nutritional status across countries.

  12. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effects of a Nutrition Intervention on Nutrition Knowledge, Behaviors, and Efficacy Expectations in Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahlman, Mariane M.; Dake, Joseph A.; McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Background: This was a pilot study to determine the impact of the Michigan Model (MM) Nutrition Curriculum on nutrition knowledge, efficacy expectations, and eating behaviors in middle school students. Methods: The study was conducted in a large metropolitan setting and approved by the Institutional Review Board. The participants for this study…

  13. Estimating the Impact of Reducing Under-Nutrition on the Tuberculosis Epidemic in the Central Eastern States of India: A Dynamic Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Oxlade, Olivia; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Murray, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) and under-nutrition are widespread in many low and middle-income countries. Momentum to prioritize under-nutrition has been growing at an international level, as demonstrated by the "Scaling Up Nutrition" movement. Low body mass index is an important risk factor for developing TB disease. The objective of this study was to project future trends in TB related outcomes under different scenarios for reducing under-nutrition in the adult population in the Central Eastern states of India. Methods A compartmental TB transmission model stratified by body mass index was parameterized using national and regional data from India. We compared TB related mortality and incidence under several scenarios that represented a range of policies and programs designed to reduce the prevalence of under-nutrition, based on the experience and observed trends in similar countries. Results The modeled nutrition intervention scenarios brought about reductions in TB incidence and TB related mortality in the Central Eastern Indian states ranging from 43% to 71% and 40% to 68% respectively, relative to the scenario of no nutritional intervention. Modest reductions in under-nutrition averted 4.8 (95% UR 0.5, 17.1) million TB cases and 1.6 (95% UR 0.5, 5.2) million TB related deaths over a period of 20 years of intervention, relative to the scenario of no nutritional intervention. Complete elimination of under-nutrition in the Central Eastern states averted 9.4 (95% UR 1.5, 30.6) million TB cases and 3.2 (95% UR 0.7-, 10.1) million TB related deaths, relative to the scenario of no nutritional intervention. Conclusion Our study suggests that intervening on under-nutrition could have a substantial impact on TB incidence and mortality in areas with high prevalence of under-nutrition, even if only small gains in under-nutrition can be achieved. Focusing on under-nutrition may be an effective way to reduce both rates of TB and other diseases associated with under-nutrition

  14. Development of a Nutritional Delivery System to Feed Crew in a Pressurized Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, J. W.; Leonig, M. L.; Douglas, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    The contingency scenario for an emergency cabin depressurization event may require crewmembers to subsist in a pressurized suit for up to 144 hours. This scenario requires the capability for safe nutrition delivery through a helmet feed port against a 4 psi pressure differential to enable crewmembers to maintain strength and cognition to perform critical tasks. Two nutritional delivery prototypes were developed and analyzed for compatibility with the helmet feed port interface and for operational effectiveness against the pressure differential. The bag-in-bag (BiB) prototype, designed to equalize the suit pressure with the beverage pouch and enable a crewmember to drink normally, delivered water successfully to three different subjects in suits pressurized to 4 psi. The Boa restrainer pouch, designed to provide mechanical leverage to overcome the pressure differential, did not operate sufficiently. Guidelines were developed and compiled for contingency beverages that provide macro-nutritional requirements, a minimum one-year shelf life, and compatibility with the delivery hardware. Evaluation results and food product parameters have the potential to be used to improve future prototype designs and develop complete nutritional beverages for contingency events. These feeding capabilities would have additional use on extended surface mission EVAs, where the current in-suit drinking device may be insufficient.

  15. Influence of development factors on nutritional patterns in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Joseph, F G

    1981-01-01

    Looks at the general changes brought about by development, and how the nutritional habits of the Solomon Island communities have been affected by development. The development aspirations of Third World countries include the introduction of cash crops for foreign exchange; moving away from subsistence-type economy and self-reliance in feeding one's family to dependence on outside sources; employment of more people at salaried jobs, small industries and factories; and modernization. Many governments view these developmental approaches as a positive way of progressive development, despite the unfavorable changes that they bring. These changes need to be examined and studied by socio-political authorities. Before development, communities throughout the South Pacific islands lived on various root crops, other starches, such as bread fruit and bananas, and a variety of green leaves. Animal fats, oils, butter, and sauces were not used. The cooking process was superior to western methods because the nutrient content of food was preserved. Little meat or milk was eaten because of the absence of edible animals. Protein sources consisted of seafood and occasionally wild or domestic pig. Birds were eaten on some islands. Though no gross malnutrition was observed, studies have shown that dietary intake was borderline and there wre varying degrees of vitamin deficiencies. There was minimal high blood pressure, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, or bowel pathology. Development, however, brought new dietary patterns and cases of malnutrition have been seen. Though the situation is not serious, it is of concern because it is affecting school children. National policies which take into account human factors are needed to begin to solve such dietary problems. Communities should be encouraged to continue producing and consuming tuberous crops and unrefined plant starches. Laws should be created to moderate drinking and advertisements for foreign foods should be restricted. Unless

  16. Nutrition support in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2009-01-01

    This review article, the second in a series of articles to examine the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition support in surgical oncology patients. Cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may be indicated in malnourished cancer patients undergoing surgery, depending on individual patient characteristics. As with the first article in this series, this article provides background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients, as well as discusses the role of nutrition support in the care of surgical cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the clinical guidelines as they relate to recommendations made for surgical patients, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequently published studies.

  17. Mobile-Based Nutrition and Child Health Monitoring to Inform Program Development: An Experience From Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, Agnes; Bock, Ariella; Buback, Laura; Knittel, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Implementing complex nutrition and other public health projects and tracking nutrition interventions, such as women's diet and supplementation and infant and young child feeding practices, requires reliable routine data to identify potential program gaps and to monitor trends in behaviors in real time. However, current monitoring and evaluation practices generally do not create an environment for this real-time tracking. This article describes the development and application of a mobile-based nutrition and health monitoring system, which collected monitoring data on project activities, women's nutrition, and infant and young child feeding practices in real time. Program Description: The Liberia Agricultural Upgrading Nutrition and Child Health (LAUNCH) project implemented a nutrition and health monitoring system between April 2012 and June 2014. The LAUNCH project analyzed project monitoring and outcome data from the system and shared selected behavioral and programmatic indicators with program managers through a short report, which later evolved into a visual data dashboard, during program-update meetings. The project designed protocols to ensure representativeness of program participants. Findings: LAUNCH made programmatic adjustments in response to findings from the monitoring system; these changes were then reflected in subsequent quarterly trends, indicating that the availability of timely data allowed for the project to react quickly to issues and adapt the program appropriately. Such issues included lack of participation in community groups and insufficient numbers of food distribution points. Likewise, the system captured trends in key outcome indicators such as breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices, linking them to project activities and external factors including seasonal changes and national health campaigns. Conclusion: Digital data collection platforms can play a vital role in improving routine programmatic functions

  18. Use of Linear Programming to Develop Cost-Minimized Nutritionally Adequate Health Promoting Food Baskets

    PubMed Central

    Tetens, Inge; Dejgård Jensen, Jørgen; Smed, Sinne; Gabrijelčič Blenkuš, Mojca; Rayner, Mike; Darmon, Nicole; Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Background Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs) are developed to promote healthier eating patterns, but increasing food prices may make healthy eating less affordable. The aim of this study was to design a range of cost-minimized nutritionally adequate health-promoting food baskets (FBs) that help prevent both micronutrient inadequacy and diet-related non-communicable diseases at lowest cost. Methods Average prices for 312 foods were collected within the Greater Copenhagen area. The cost and nutrient content of five different cost-minimized FBs for a family of four were calculated per day using linear programming. The FBs were defined using five different constraints: cultural acceptability (CA), or dietary guidelines (DG), or nutrient recommendations (N), or cultural acceptability and nutrient recommendations (CAN), or dietary guidelines and nutrient recommendations (DGN). The variety and number of foods in each of the resulting five baskets was increased through limiting the relative share of individual foods. Results The one-day version of N contained only 12 foods at the minimum cost of DKK 27 (€ 3.6). The CA, DG, and DGN were about twice of this and the CAN cost ~DKK 81 (€ 10.8). The baskets with the greater variety of foods contained from 70 (CAN) to 134 (DGN) foods and cost between DKK 60 (€ 8.1, N) and DKK 125 (€ 16.8, DGN). Ensuring that the food baskets cover both dietary guidelines and nutrient recommendations doubled the cost while cultural acceptability (CAN) tripled it. Conclusion Use of linear programming facilitates the generation of low-cost food baskets that are nutritionally adequate, health promoting, and culturally acceptable. PMID:27760131

  19. Developing nutrition education resources for a multi-ethnic population in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Helen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Wharemate, Laurie; Funaki-Tahifote, Mafi; Lanumata, Tolotea; Rodgers, Anthony

    2009-08-01

    In New Zealand, the burden of nutrition-related disease is greatest among vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, including Maori and Pacific peoples. However, little research is currently available on effective ways to improve nutrition in these communities. This paper describes the development of six paper-based nutrition education resources for multi-ethnic participants in a large supermarket intervention trial. Six focus groups involving 15 Maori, 13 Pacific and 16 non-Maori, non-Pacific participants were held. A general inductive approach was applied to identify common themes around participants' understanding and thoughts on relevance and usefulness of the draft resources. Feedback from focus groups was used to modify resources accordingly. Five themes emerged across all focus groups and guided modification of the resources: (i) perceived higher cost of healthy food, (ii) difficulty in changing food-purchasing habits, (iii) lack of knowledge, understanding and information about healthy food, (iv) desire for personally relevant information that uses ethnically appropriate language and (v) other barriers to healthy eating, including limited availability of healthy food. Many issues affect the likelihood of purchase and consumption of healthy food. These issues should be taken into account when developing nutritional materials for New Zealanders and possibly other multi-ethnic populations worldwide.

  20. Developing nutrition education resources for a multi-ethnic population in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Helen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Wharemate, Laurie; Funaki-Tahifote, Mafi; Lanumata, Tolotea; Rodgers, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    In New Zealand, the burden of nutrition-related disease is greatest among vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, including Maori and Pacific peoples. However, little research is currently available on effective ways to improve nutrition in these communities. This paper describes the development of six paper-based nutrition education resources for multi-ethnic participants in a large supermarket intervention trial. Six focus groups involving 15 Maori, 13 Pacific and 16 non-Maori, non-Pacific participants were held. A general inductive approach was applied to identify common themes around participants' understanding and thoughts on relevance and usefulness of the draft resources. Feedback from focus groups was used to modify resources accordingly. Five themes emerged across all focus groups and guided modification of the resources: (i) perceived higher cost of healthy food, (ii) difficulty in changing food-purchasing habits, (iii) lack of knowledge, understanding and information about healthy food, (iv) desire for personally relevant information that uses ethnically appropriate language and (v) other barriers to healthy eating, including limited availability of healthy food. Many issues affect the likelihood of purchase and consumption of healthy food. These issues should be taken into account when developing nutritional materials for New Zealanders and possibly other multi-ethnic populations worldwide. PMID:18974069

  1. Influence of nutrition on male development and reproduction in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Ming, Qing-Lei; Cheng, Chao

    2012-08-01

    Tribolium beetles have evolved over several thousand years to colonize and exploit various food products that vary widely in their nutritional quality. Here Tribolium castaneum was used as a model organism to explore the effect of nutritional quality on male development and reproduction. The results showed, when tested across different qualities of nutritional diets, Tribolium males developed faster and their body size was larger on a high-quality diet, and there were significant correlations between male developmental traits. However, Tribolium males fed different nutritional diets did not show significant variation in olfactory attractiveness, mating rate, insemination rate, sperm defense (P1), sperm offense (P2), and reproductive success within a population context (RSPC). Moreover, there was no significant correlation of male reproductive performances except RSPC with developmental traits, and except for P2 and RSPC, no significant correlations between male reproductive performances. Therefore, although male developmental performance was significantly influenced by diet quality, reproductive performance was not. We discussed these findings and their sexual selection implications in light of its habitat.

  2. [Aspects of prenatal development of muscle and adipose tissue: principles, regulation, and influence of maternal nutrition].

    PubMed

    Kalbe, Claudia; Rehfeldt, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    During pregnancy the developing embryo/foetus is completely dependent on the supply with nutrients and the removal of metabolic by-products through the maternal organism. Therefore, each lasting inadequate nutrient supply may have serious consequences for foetal development. As a kind of "nutritional programming" resulting adaptive changes may be maintained until or manifested at adult age. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) may cause problems in animal health and result in poor animal performance. The relationships between prenatal development and the postnatal phenotypic appearance of muscle and fat are insufficiently investigated. The present paper provides selected aspects of the prenatal development of skeletal muscle (myogenesis) and adipose tissue (adipogenesis), refers to the importance of interactions between both tissues and is focussed on the influence of maternal nutrition on these processes.

  3. Interventional nutrition in cancer survivorship. A case study.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Gregory A

    2010-10-01

    Interventional nutrition is an emerging field in medicine that utilizes advanced laboratory technologies to identify a patient's clinically relevant biochemical uniqueness in order to treat the metabolic contributors to multifactorial symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia, and pain. This article presents a complex case in which a breast cancer patient's severe symptoms fit no clear disease pattern and prevented her from undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Specialized testing for metabolic, gastrointestinal, and immunologic function uncovered important nutritional deficiencies that could not be identified through isolated tests or addressed by supplementation with a daily multivitamin. Nutritional intervention based on specific measurements, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach to supplementation, resolved this patient's debilitating symptoms and restored her capacity to benefit from chemotherapy and radiation.

  4. Development and Evaluation of the School Cafeteria Nutrition Assessment Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krukowski, Rebecca A.; Philyaw Perez, Amanda G.; Bursac, Zoran; Goodell, Melanie; Raczynski, James M.; Smith West, Delia; Phillips, Martha M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Foods provided in schools represent a substantial portion of US children's dietary intake; however, the school food environment has proven difficult to describe due to the lack of comprehensive, standardized, and validated measures. Methods: As part of the Arkansas Act 1220 evaluation project, we developed the School Cafeteria…

  5. Health and Nutrition in Disadvantaged Children and Their Relationship with Intellectual Development. Collaborative Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, James; And Others

    Three groups of children (urban black, urban white, rural white) from Middle Tennessee who live in an Appalachian-type environment were studied to assess their health and nutritional status. In addition, some attempt was made to relate aspects of physical status to intellectual adequacy as measured by the Stanford-Binet or the Wechsler Preschool…

  6. Nutritional stunting.

    PubMed

    Hizli, Samil; Abaci, Ayhan; Büyükgebiz, Benal; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2007-03-01

    Nutritional stunting is a common problem of the pediatric population especially in developing countries. Although it is a resolvable problem, it continues to be an important health issue. Stunting can be diagnosed when a child's height falls more than two standard deviations below the mean height for age. Stunting may be caused by genetic, hormonal, pharmaceutical, psychosocial and nutritional factors. Before doing extensive laboratory tests, nutritional factors must be searched for at the time of diagnosis. If the etiology is nutritional deficiency, meticulous dietary regulation must be done. The results of treatment must be assessed for guiding the nutritional rehabilitation during follow up. Here we review the interaction of wasting and nutritional stunting; the prevalence of nutritional stunting; diet components and growth; the pathophysiology of stunting; periods of accelerated growth; the diagnosis and clinical assessment of nutritional stunting; the anthropometric and laboratory nutritional indices that can be used at the time of diagnosis and for follow-up purposes during rehabilitation and also the management of nutritional stunting.

  7. Using Formative Research to Develop a Nutrition Education Resource Aimed at Assisting Low-Income Households in South Africa Adopt a Healthier Diet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett-Murphy, K.; De Villiers, A.; Ketterer, E.; Steyn, K.

    2015-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive programme to prevent non-communicable disease in South Africa, there is a need to develop public education campaigns on healthy eating. Urban populations of lower socioeconomic status are a priority target population. This study involved formative research to guide the development of a nutrition resource appropriate to…

  8. Development and nutritional and sensory evaluation of cachapinta (Pseudoplatystoma sp) pâté

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Cátia Maria de Oliveira; Torrezan, Renata; de Furtado, Ângela Aparecida Lemos; Antoniassi, Rosemar; Freitas, Daniela De Grandi Castro; de Freitas, Sidinéa Cordeiro; Penteado, Ana Lúcia; de Oliveira, Cássia Soares; Junior, Carlos Adam Conte; Mársico, Eliane Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    This study developed a technique for the preparation of pâté from cachapinta (Pseudoplatystoma sp) waste. For this, frozen minced cachapinta fish was crushed in a mini cutter and homogenized with all other ingredients. The prepared pâté was stored in seamed and thermally treated cans (volume 170 g). Weight proportions of mean moisture, ash, protein, and lipid contents of the minced fish were 75.49, 1.00, 15.00, and 7.92 (g/100 g), respectively. The formulation of the developed pâté is in accordance with legislation for fish products. Cachapinta pâté is a product with high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids, low level of trans fat, and good indices of nutritional quality. Tests of sensory acceptance, purchase intent, and sensory attributes (except spreadability) averaged a score above 6.0, indicating acceptability of the product. Our study suggests that the potential of minced cachapinta for pâté production is high, and that it can contribute a value-added product to seafood consumption. PMID:25649424

  9. Maternal prenatal distress and poor nutrition – mutually influencing risk factors affecting infant neurocognitive development

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Catherine; Georgieff, Michael K.; Osterholm, Erin A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulating data from animal and human studies indicate that the prenatal environment plays a significant role in shaping children’s neurocognitive development. Clinical, epidemiologic, and basic science research suggests that two experiences relatively common in pregnancy — an unhealthy maternal diet and psychosocial distress — significantly affect children’s future neurodevelopment. These prenatal experiences exert their influence in the context of one another and yet, almost uniformly, are studied independently. Scope and Method of Review In this review, we suggest that studying neurocognitive development in children in relation to both prenatal exposures is ecologically most relevant, and methodologically most sound. To support this approach, we selectively review two research topics that demonstrate the need for dual exposure studies, including exemplar findings on (1) the associations between pregnant women’s inadequate maternal intake of key nutrients – protein, fat, iron, zinc, and choline – as well as distress in relation to overlapping effects on children’s neurocognitive development; and (2) cross-talk between the biology of stress and nutrition that can amplify each experience for the mother and fetus,. We also consider obstacles to this kind of study design, such as questions of statistical methods for ‘disentangling’ the exposure effects, and aim to provide some answers. Conclusion Studies that specifically include both exposures in their design can begin to determine the relative and/or synergistic impact of these prenatal experiences on developmental trajectories — and thereby contribute most fully to the understanding of the early origins of health and disease. PMID:23039359

  10. Nutritional indicators and their uses in ecology.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicole D; Hillebrand, Helmut; Wacker, Alexander; Frost, Paul C

    2013-04-01

    The nutrition of animal consumers is an important regulator of ecological processes due to its effects on their physiology, life-history and behaviour. Understanding the ecological effects of poor nutrition depends on correctly diagnosing the nature and strength of nutritional limitation. Despite the need to assess nutritional limitation, current approaches to delineating nutritional constraints can be non-specific and imprecise. Here, we consider the need and potential to develop new complementary approaches to the study of nutritional constraints on animal consumers by studying and using a suite of established and emerging biochemical and molecular responses. These nutritional indicators include gene expression, transcript regulators, protein profiling and activity, and gross biochemical and elemental composition. The potential applications of nutritional indicators to ecological studies are highlighted to demonstrate the value that this approach would have to future studies in community and ecosystem ecology.

  11. Optimising nutritional intake to promote growth and development in children.

    PubMed

    Burton-Shepherd, Alison

    2012-08-01

    Eating habits may be formed at a young age and once entrenched, tend to track across childhood and beyond (Tsuji et al, 2012). Although parents have a significant role in the development of their child's dietary intake (Clarke et al, 2007), Harris (2010) argues that the diets and feeding habits of young children are now no longer the sole responsibility of parents but other childcare professionals, including nannies and nursery staff. The aim of this article is to provide parents and professionals with guidance to help encourage parents, and other members of the multidisciplinary team, to provide children with a healthy diet.

  12. Coconut oil and palm oil's role in nutrition, health and national development: A review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Laurene; Ansong, Richard; Owusu, William B; Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda

    2016-09-01

    Coconut and palm oils which were the major sources of dietary fats for centuries in most of West Africa have been branded as unhealthy highly saturated fats. Their consumption has been peddled to supposedly raise the level of blood cholesterol, thereby increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. This adverse view has led to a reduction in their consumption in West Africa and they have been substituted for imported vegetable oils. Recent information however, indicates some beneficial effects of these oils particularly their roles in nutrition, health and national development. There is the need for a better understanding of their effects on health, nutritional status and national development. This paper therefore attempts to review the roles which coconut and palm oils play in these respects in developing countries, as a means of advocating for a return to their use in local diets.

  13. Sustainable development in agriculture, food and nutrition--a patent analysis.

    PubMed

    Vani, Kohila P; Doble, Mukesh

    2011-05-01

    The paper discusses the patents that have been filed in the areas of sustainable development in agriculture, food and nutrition and use of natural resources in achieving this goal. A large number of patents deal with the production of fertilizers from animal manure, plant sources and other organic wastes, which are more sustainable that the chemical fertilizers that are being currently used. Sustainability in agriculture is achieved in developing processes for the manufacture of biopesticides/insecticides and bioactive agricultural products. Development of novel sustainable agricultural processes has also been the focus of researchers and technologists. Plant derived nutritious food products are sustainable and can cater for the growing population burden. This has been the focus of several patents. Processes for enhancing the nutrition in food also serve the purpose of catering for the under nourished population.

  14. Using Qualitative and Quantitative Formative Research to Develop Tailored Nutrition Intervention Materials for a Diverse Low-Income Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strolla, Leslie O.; Gans, Kim M.; Risica, Patricia M.

    2006-01-01

    More effective nutrition education to reach low-income and ethnic minority populations is needed. As part of a project to develop a tailored nutrition education intervention to meet the needs of low-income Hispanics and non-Hispanics, complementary, mixed methods of formative research were used to determine specific characteristics of the target…

  15. Development and Evaluation of Nutrition Education Competencies and a Competency-Based Resource Guide for Preschool-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Reed, Heather; Briggs, Marilyn; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate nutrition education competencies and a competency-based resource guide, Connecting the Dots...Healthy Foods, Healthy Choices, Healthy Kids (CTD), for preschool-aged children in California. Methods: Nutrition education experts and California Department of Education staff…

  16. Planning strategies for development of effective exercise and nutrition countermeasures for long-duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise and nutrition represent primary countermeasures used during space flight to maintain or restore maximal aerobic capacity, musculoskeletal structure, and orthostatic function. However, no single exercise, dietary regimen, or combination of prescriptions has proven entirely effective in maintaining or restoring cardiovascular and musculoskeletal functions to preflight levels after prolonged space flight. As human space flight exposures increase in duration, identification, assessment, and development of various effective exercise- and nutrition-based protective procedures will become paramount. The application of adequate dietary intake in combination with effective exercise prescription will be based on identification of basic physiologic stimuli that maintain normal function in terrestrial gravity, and understanding how specific combinations of exercise characteristics (e.g., duration, frequency, intensity, and mode) can be combined with minimal nutritional requirements that mimic the stimuli normally produced by living in Earth's gravity environment. This can be accomplished only with greater emphasis of research on ground-based experiments targeted at understanding the interactions between caloric intake and expenditure during space flight. Future strategies for application of nutrition and exercise countermeasures for long-duration space missions must be directed to minimizing crew time and the impact on life-support resources.

  17. The Interaction between Epigenetics, Nutrition and the Development of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Karen S.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the genome, the epigenome can be modified and hence some epigenetic risk markers have the potential to be reversed. Such modifications take place by means of drugs, diet or environmental exposures. It is widely accepted that epigenetic modifications take place during early embryonic and primordial cell development, but it is also important that we gain an understanding of the potential for such changes later in life. These “later life” epigenetic modifications in response to dietary intervention are the focus of this paper. The epigenetic modifications investigated include DNA methylation, histone modifications and the influence of microRNAs. The epigenotype could be used not only to predict susceptibility to certain cancers but also to assess the effectiveness of dietary modifications to reduce such risk. The influence of diet or dietary components on epigenetic modifications and the impact on cancer initiation or progression has been assessed herein. PMID:25647662

  18. Attrition in Long-Term Nutrition Research Studies: A Commentary by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Early Nutrition Research Working Group.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Mary S; Domellöf, Magnus; Hojsak, Iva; Hulst, Jessie M; Kennedy, Kathy; Koletzko, Berthold; Mihatsh, Walter; Stijnen, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of randomised trials and observational studies provide the best evidence presently available to assess long-term effects of nutrition, and such studies are an important component in determining optimal infant feeding practices. Attrition is, however, an almost inevitable occurrence with increasing age at follow-up. There is a common assumption that studies with <80% follow-up rates are invalid or flawed, and this criticism seems to be more frequently applied to follow-up studies involving randomised trials than observational studies. In this article, we explore the basis and evidence for this "80% rule" and discuss the need for greater consensus and clear guidelines for analysing and reporting results in this specific situation.

  19. Design of the South East Asian Nutrition Survey (SEANUTS): a four-country multistage cluster design study.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Anne; Deurenberg, Paul; Calame, Wim; van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; van Beusekom, Christien; Hautvast, Jo; Sandjaja; Bee Koon, Poh; Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa; Le Nguyen, Bao Khanh; Parikh, Panam; Khouw, Ilse

    2013-09-01

    Nutrition is a well-known factor in the growth, health and development of children. It is also acknowledged that worldwide many people have dietary imbalances resulting in over- or undernutrition. In 2009, the multinational food company FrieslandCampina initiated the South East Asian Nutrition Survey (SEANUTS), a combination of surveys carried out in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam, to get a better insight into these imbalances. The present study describes the general study design and methodology, as well as some problems and pitfalls encountered. In each of these countries, participants in the age range of 0·5-12 years were recruited according to a multistage cluster randomised or stratified random sampling methodology. Field teams took care of recruitment and data collection. For the health status of children, growth and body composition, physical activity, bone density, and development and cognition were measured. For nutrition, food intake and food habits were assessed by questionnaires, whereas in subpopulations blood and urine samples were collected to measure the biochemical status parameters of Fe, vitamins A and D, and DHA. In Thailand, the researchers additionally studied the lipid profile in blood, whereas in Indonesia iodine excretion in urine was analysed. Biochemical data were analysed in certified laboratories. Study protocols and methodology were aligned where practically possible. In December 2011, data collection was finalised. In total, 16,744 children participated in the present study. Information that will be very relevant for formulating nutritional health policies, as well as for designing innovative food and nutrition research and development programmes, has become available.

  20. Nutritional status of institutionalized elderly Brazilians: a study with the Mini Nutritional Assessment.

    PubMed

    Amorim Sena Pereira, Maria Luiza; de Almeida Moreira, Pricilla; Cunha de Oliveira, Carolina; Carneiro Roriz, Anna Karla; Teresópolis Reis Amaral, Magali; Lima Mello, Adriana; Barbosa Ramos, Lílian

    2014-10-04

    Objective: Evaluar el estado nutricional de los ancianos residentes en Hogares para Ancianos, en la ciudad de Salvador, Brasil y factores asociados. Métodos: Estudio transversal con 359 individuos mayores de 60 años, de ambos sexos y residentes en hogares de ancianos en la zona urbana de la ciudad de Salvador, Bahia, Brasil. Resultados: En cuanto al estado nutricional de acuerdo con Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), el 66,3% de los ancianos evaluados estaban desnutridos y en riesgo de desnutrición. La prevalencia de esta afección fue mayor entre los hombres (76,6%) en comparación con las mujeres (62,4%). Se ha observado, como resultado del análisis multivariado, que sólo la capacidad funcional variable para Actividades de la Vida Diaria (AVD) fue estadísticamente significativa. Hubo correlación moderada entre MNA y Mini Examen del Estado Mental (r = 0,454; p.

  1. [Nutrition education or managing social communication for nutrition?].

    PubMed

    Andrien, M; Beghin, I

    1993-12-01

    Seven years ago Hygie published an article on the limits of conventional nutrition education in urban Africa. Strategies and methods in communication for nutrition have since evolved, incorporating results of international research to develop innovative, highly participative approaches. In this article the authors provide an extensive analysis of the different methodologies used in nutrition education programmes, in particular the KAB, social marketing, and community participation models, indicating main areas where each method used separately has failed. Members of the African Nutritional Education Network (RENA) have studied the above mentioned approaches, modifying them or integrating certain elements to adopt a more effective approach, which they consider somewhat as the management of social communication for nutrition education. Needs assessments and programme planning are largely enhanced by a causal analysis component specific to nutrition education in a community setting which has been developed by the authors. Other classic elements of programme implementation such as community participation, diversity of methods and intervention, are then combined with a multi-level/multi-actor evaluation processes to produce what the authors esteem to be a more effective nutrition education programme. They conclude, however, with the warning that although behavioural modifications brought about by nutrition communication and education might be beneficial for public health, they could have different, possibly adverse effects on other aspects of society. Effective nutrition education must therefore be included in a more extensive field of health promotion by acting on the multiple factors which influence the nutrition and health state of vulnerable groups.

  2. Regulation of NR4A by nutritional status, gender, postnatal development and hormonal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sieira, S; López, M; Nogueiras, R; Tovar, S

    2014-03-03

    The NR4A is a subfamily of the orphan nuclear receptors (NR) superfamily constituted by three well characterized members: Nur77 (NR4A1), Nurr1 (NR4A2) and Nor 1 (NR4A3). They are implicated in numerous biological processes as DNA repair, arteriosclerosis, cell apoptosis, carcinogenesis and metabolism. Several studies have demonstrated the role of this subfamily on glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and energy balance. These studies have focused mainly in liver and skeletal muscle. However, its potential role in white adipose tissue (WAT), one of the most important tissues involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, is not well-studied. The aim of this work was to elucidate the regulation of NR4A in WAT under different physiological and pathophysiological settings involved in energy balance such as fasting, postnatal development, gender, hormonal deficiency and pregnancy. We compared NR4A mRNA expression of Nur77, Nurr1 and Nor 1 and found a clear regulation by nutritional status, since the expression of the 3 isoforms is increased after fasting in a leptin-independent manner and sex steroid hormones also modulate NR4A expression in males and females. Our findings indicate that NR4A are regulated by different physiological and pathophysiological settings known to be associated with marked alterations in glucose metabolism and energy status.

  3. Dietary patterns, nutrition knowledge and lifestyle: associations with blood pressure in a sample of Australian adults (the Food BP study).

    PubMed

    Khalesi, S; Sharma, S; Irwin, C; Sun, J

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the association between dietary patterns, nutrition knowledge and lifestyle with blood pressure (BP) in a sample of Australian adults. Adults with normal and high BP were included in a cross-sectional study. Dietary intake data was collected using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Nutrition knowledge and lifestyle surveys were included in the questionnaire. Dietary patterns were extracted using factor analysis followed by cluster analysis. Associations were analysed using logistic regression. Four hundred and seven participants were included. Three dietary patterns were identified: Western; Snack and alcohol; and Balanced. Participants with high BP had a higher intake of Western and a lower intake of Balanced dietary pattern. A significant and higher frequency of discretionary foods and oils consumption, as well as lower nutrition knowledge score and activity frequency, were observed in the high BP group. Regression analysis indicated that the intake of Western and Snack and alcohol dietary patterns increases the likelihood of having high BP by 2.40 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28-4.49) and 2.76 (95% CI: 1.52-5.00), respectively, when nutrition knowledge and lifestyle were controlled for as moderator variables. The likelihood of high BP was not associated with nutrition knowledge, but increased with physical inactivity. This study indicates that poor dietary patterns and inactivity are associated with increases in the likelihood of high BP, and the association is not influenced by nutrition knowledge. These findings indicate the importance of developing public health strategies with an emphasis on improving the dietary patterns of individuals to prevent and control high BP in Australian adults.

  4. The use of the comet assay in the study of human nutrition and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Gillian R; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J; Downes, C Stephen

    2008-05-01

    The influence of diet on carcinogenesis is a hugely complex area; not only is the consumption of major dietary factors such as meat, fat and fruits and vegetables associated with increased or decreased risk of a range of cancers but also an increasing number of specific nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals are being proposed as the next 'superfoods' to combat the development of cancer. As well as epidemiological studies to determine the association of these dietary factors with cancer risk, it is also essential to investigate the underlying mechanisms through which these factors may causally influence carcinogenesis. The comet assay provides a relatively simple, cheap and rapid method to examine DNA damage and repair and is, therefore, an ideal biomarker for the study of the effects of nutrition on cancer. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in studies involving human subjects or human cell lines, which investigate the effects of various nutrients on biomarkers relevant to carcinogenesis, and discusses the potential of the comet assay and its various modifications for use as cancer-related biomarkers suitable for use in nutritional studies.

  5. Adequacy of usual dietary intake and nutritional status among pregnant women in the context of nutrition transition: the DEPOSIT Study.

    PubMed

    Abu-Saad, Kathleen; Shahar, Danit R; Fraser, Drora; Vardi, Hillel; Friger, Michael; Bolotin, Arkardy; Freedman, Laurence S

    2012-11-28

    Bedouin Arabs in southern Israel are a traditionally semi-nomadic population undergoing the nutrition transition in a context of urbanisation. The effect of these changes on the nutritional status of pregnant women is unknown. The Dietary Exposures and Pregnancy Outcomes in a Society In Transition (DEPOSIT) study evaluated the adequacy of pregnant Bedouin women's usual dietary intake and their nutritional status. Dietary intake was assessed in a cross-sectional study design using repeat 24 h recall (24HR) questionnaires. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the usual intake of selected nutrients. The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) was used to evaluate nutrient intake adequacy. Measured weight and height data were used to calculate the participants' BMI. A total of 1109 24HR were obtained from 683 participants, of which 8 % contained no animal-source protein and an additional 43 % contained no haeme-Fe. Animal-source protein intake reached less than half of the EAR for most participants (71 %). Over 90 % had inadequate intakes of Ca, Fe, animal-source Zn, vitamin A and folate. The probability of consuming haeme-source Fe was higher among urban than rural participants (OR 1·68, 95 % CI 1·17, 2·41), and among those with employed v. unemployed husbands (OR 1·81, 95 % CI 1·27, 2·58). Only 14 % reported consuming home-produced animal products. According to pre-pregnancy BMI, 42 % were overweight or obese. The DEPOSIT study findings suggest that Bedouin Arab women are in need of interventions that address the co-existing problems of inadequate nutrient intakes and increased risk of obesity.

  6. EPEC-O Self-Study - Module 11 - Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  7. [Community Nutrition].

    PubMed

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  8. Relationships between prenatal medical and nutritional measures, pregnancy outcome, and early infant development in an urban poverty setting. I. The role of nutritional intake.

    PubMed

    Osofsky, H J

    1975-12-01

    Repeated nutritional assessments were made on 118 low-income women who registered at an urban hospital clinic prior to the twenty-eighth week of pregnancy and then on 122 comparable women who were provided with protein-mineral supplementation. Demographic and background information were obtained. Medical assessments were carried out throughout pregnancy, labor, delivery, and the postpartum period. The infants were assessed both medically and with Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scales. In spite of their low-income status, the subjects did not appear nutritionally deprived. Few significant relationships were obtained between maternal nutritional intake and measures of maternal or infant medical status or infant psychological status. A limited number of consistent relationships were obtained when the supplemented and nonsupplemented groups were compared. Although consistent infant medical and psychological benefits were not noted, mothers in the supplemented group developed fewer parameters of pre-eclampsia and had fewer complications during labor and delivery.

  9. Using social marketing principles to guide the development of a nutrition education initiative for preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Young, Laura; Anderson, Jennifer; Beckstrom, Leslie; Bellows, Laura; Johnson, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Within the field of nutrition education, social marketing has become a promising framework to systematically approach problems related to nutrition behavior. In 1997, the Colorado Nutrition Network began developing a social marketing campaign to promote healthful food choices among low-income Coloradans. A multifaceted formative evaluation plan that included focus groups, campaign concept pretesting, and a food frequency questionnaire was used to segment and scrutinize the target audience. The resulting pilot program was a blend of educational and marketing strategies targeting preschoolers that was implemented in Head Start classrooms. The 12-week intervention contained a narrow, behavior-based "try new foods" message, multiple nutrition education activities, and repeated opportunities to taste 13 novel foods. Key strategies used and findings from the formative evaluation process are presented herein in an effort to provide insight for nutrition educators interested in developing similar interventions.

  10. The Impact of Socioeconomic Development and Ecological Change on Health and Nutrition in Latin America. Cornell International Nutrition Monograph Series, Number 9 (1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solimano, Giorgio R.; Chapin, Georganne

    This monograph presents an examination of patterns which emerge from the interrelationship between development, environment, and health and nutrition in Latin America. First, the authors consider the components of this interrelationship, discussing the inseparability of health problems such as malnutrition, fecally-borne and parasitic diseases,…

  11. Nutritional and safety assessments of foods and feeds nutritionally improved through biotechnology: case studies: executive summary of a task force report by the International Life Sciences Institute, Washington, D.C.

    PubMed

    2007-11-01

    During the last 2 decades, the public and private sectors have made substantial international research progress toward improving the nutritional value of a wide range of food and feed crops. Nevertheless, significant numbers of people still suffer from the effects of undernutrition. In addition, the nutritional quality of feed is often a limiting factor in livestock production systems, particularly those in developing countries. As newly developed crops with nutritionally improved traits come closer to being available to producers and consumers, we must ensure that scientifically sound and efficient processes are used to assess the safety and nutritional quality of these crops. Such processes will facilitate deploying these crops to those world areas with large numbers of people who need them. This document describes 5 case studies of crops with improved nutritional value. These case studies examine the principles and recommendations published by the Intl. Life Sciences Inst. (ILSI) in 2004 for the safety and nutritional assessment of foods and feeds derived from nutritionally improved crops (ILSI 2004). One overarching conclusion that spans all 5 case studies is that the comparative safety assessment process is a valid approach. Such a process has been endorsed by many publications and organizations, including the 2004 ILSI publication. The type and extent of data that are appropriate for a scientifically sound comparative safety assessment are presented on a case-by-case basis in a manner that takes into account scientific results published since the 2004 ILSI report. This report will appear in the January issue of Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety.

  12. An observational study of consumers' accessing of nutrition information in chain restaurants.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Christina A; Agnew, Henry; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-05-01

    In this observational study, we determined how frequently consumers accessed on-premises nutrition information provided at chain restaurants. The number of patrons entering and accessing nutrition information was recorded at 8 locations that were part of 4 major restaurant chains (McDonald's, Burger King, Starbucks, and Au Bon Pain). Only 6 (0.1%) of 4311 patrons accessed on-premises nutrition information before purchasing food. This very small percentage suggests that such information should be more prominently displayed, such as on restaurant menu boards, to help customers make informed decisions.

  13. Development and Validation of a Nutritional Education Pamphlet for Low-Literacy Pediatric Oncology Caregivers in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa; Chismark, Elisabeth A.; Mosby, Terezie; Day, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background A culturally appropriate nutrition education pamphlet was developed and validated for low-literacy caregivers in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Methods The pamphlet was developed after a preliminary survey of pediatric oncology nurses in the 3 countries to assess the need for education materials, caregiver literacy levels, and local eating habits. Experts in nutrition and low-literacy patient education and nurses validated the pamphlet’s content and design. Results and Conclusions Nurses expressed the need for nutrition-related pamphlets in developing countries. The pamphlet was validated positively by experts and nurses and has been circulated to pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America. PMID:20300913

  14. [Prevalence and factors associated with non-nutritive sucking behavior. Cross sectional study among 5- to 6-year-old Senegalese children].

    PubMed

    Ngom, Papa Ibrahima; Diagne, Falou; Samba Diouf, Joseph; Ndiaye, Allé; Hennequin, Martine

    2008-06-01

    Sucking behaviours have been described in the literature under two facets i.e. nutritive and non nutritive. Nutritive sucking refers to breast feeding, bottle feeding or a combination of both. Non nutritive sucking habits are mentioned when children suck their thumb or another finger(s), a pacifier or any other object. Non nutritive sucking habits (NNSH) are suspected to potentially induce dentoalveolar anomalies and thus may constitute a public dental health problem. Anthropological and historical data suggest that non nutritive sucking habits are associated with modern pattern of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with NNSH in Senegalese children 5/6 years old. Data of this study were collected using a structured questionnaire administered by the investigators to mothers or caregivers of 443 children (231 boys and 212 girls) aged 5/6 years. Three types of data were collected: data on the social background of the children including place of residence (urban, suburban and rural) and the mother's occupation (workers, employee, executive, housewife), data regarding former and present sucking habits and information on the feeding pattern of the children when they were infants (breast feeding, bottle feeding or a combination of both). The results indicated a prevalence rate of 16.50% and 17.20% respectively for digit and pacifier sucking in this population. Also, a significant association was found between children's non nutritive sucking habits in one hand and the mothers' occupation and feeding pattern on the other hand. Breast fed children are less prone to develop a non nutritive sucking habit than bottle fed children. Longitudinal studies are necessary to verify the nature of these associations. The identification of factors associated with non nutritive sucking habits would permit to develop and target recommendations for the prevention of such habits.

  15. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  16. Increased maternal nutrition alters development of the appetite-regulating network in the brain.

    PubMed

    Muhlhausler, B S; Adam, C L; Findlay, P A; Duffield, J A; McMillen, I C

    2006-06-01

    Individuals exposed to an increased nutrient supply before birth have a high risk of becoming obese children and adults. It has been proposed that exposure of the fetus to high maternal nutrient intake results in permanent changes within the central appetite regulatory network. No studies, however, have investigated the impact of increased maternal nutrition on the appetite regulatory network in species in which this network develops before birth, as in the human. In the present study, pregnant ewes were fed a diet which provided 100% (control, n = 8) or approximately 160% (well-fed, n = 8) of metabolizable energy requirements. Ewes were allowed to lamb spontaneously, and lambs were sacrificed at 30 days of postnatal age. All fat depots were dissected and weighed, and expression of the appetite-regulating neuropeptides and the leptin receptor (OBRb) were determined by in situ hybridization. Lambs of well-fed ewes had higher glucose (Glc) concentrations during early postnatal life (F = 5.93, P<0.01) and a higher relative subcutaneous (s.c.) fat mass at 30 days of age (34.9+/-4.7 g/kg vs. 22.8+/-3.3 g/kg; P<0.05). The hypothalamic expression of pro-opiomelanocortin was higher in lambs of well-fed ewes (0.48+/-0.09 vs. 0.28+/-0.04, P<0.05). In lambs of overnourished mothers, but not in controls, the expression of OBRb was inversely related to total relative fat mass (r2 = 0.50, P = 0.05, n = 8), and the direct relationship between the expression of the central appetite inhibitor CART and fat mass was lost. The expression of neuropeptide Y and AGRP was inversely related to total relative fat mass (NPY, r2 = 0.28, P<0.05; agouti-related peptide, r2 = 0.39, P<0.01). These findings suggest that exposure to increased nutrition before birth alters the responses of the central appetite regulatory system to signals of increased adiposity after birth.

  17. Nutritional status and complementary feeding among HIV-exposed infants: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kamenju, Pili; Liu, Enju; Hertzmark, Ellen; Spiegelman, Donna; Kisenge, Rodrick; Kupka, Roland; Aboud, Said; Manji, Karim P; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2016-09-30

    Complementary feeding is crucial for improving child survival and promoting growth and development, particularly among HIV-exposed children who have higher risk of morbidity and mortality than their un-exposed peers. This prospective study employed an infant and child feeding index (ICFI) to measure complementary feeding and determine its association with nutritional status among 2092 HIV-exposed infants followed from 6 to 24 months of age in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The ICFI measured both quality and quantity of complementary feeding, including current breastfeeding status, food consistency, dietary diversity scores (DDS), food group frequency score, and meal frequency. The ICFI score ranged from 0 to 9; the median score was 6 (Inter-Quartile Range, IQR= 4-7). After adjusting for potential confounders, high ICFI scores were associated with reduced risk of stunting (high vs. low tertile hazard ratio, HR: 0.72; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.57, 0.91; P< 0.01) and underweight (high vs. low tertile HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.61, 1.02; P= 0.07). Low DDS were associated with higher risk of stunting (low vs. high tertile HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.07; P< 0.01) and underweight (low vs. high tertile HR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.96; P= 0.01). In this setting, high DDS and ICFI scores were protective of stunting and underweight. We recommend for nutrition programs in low-income countries to emphasize educating HIV-exposed children's caregivers on the importance of dietary diversity and optimal complementary feeding to improve nutritional status in this important subpopulation.

  18. Examining the Cultural Competence of Third- and Fourth-Year Nutrition Students: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hack, Rebekah; Hekmat, Sharareh; Ahmadi, Latifeh

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary Canadian research assessing nutrition students' cultural competence and to identify areas for future education initiatives in dietetic education that could ultimately improve dietitians' cultural competence. A mixed-methods study was conducted using a 24-item questionnaire that was administered to students enrolled in third- and fourth-year undergraduate nutrition classes (n = 133). In total, 115 questionnaires were analyzed for quantitative data, and 109 were analyzed for qualitative data. The students scored an overall medium-high level of cultural competence. Out of the 5 areas examined (skills, attitudes, awareness, desires, knowledge), students' multicultural knowledge scores were the lowest. It was found that a lower number of barriers to learning about other cultures were significantly associated with a higher overall cultural competence score, and taking a course in cultural foods significantly increased the students' knowledge and overall cultural competence (P ≤ 0.05). The qualitative data found that students felt the cultural competence curriculum had gaps and identified several ideas for improvement. In conclusion, this research data provides novel insights into the cultural competence of Canadian dietetic students and additionally supports future research and curriculum development to enhance cultural competence.

  19. Nuclear and isotopic techniques for addressing nutritional problems, with special reference to current applications in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Venkatesh

    2002-03-01

    Nuclear and isotopic techniques are valuable tools in human nutritional research studies. Isotopes, both radioactive and nonradioactive, enable detailed evaluations of nutrient intake, body composition, energy expenditure, status of micronutrients, and nutrient bioavailability. In recent times, isotopic methods have been widely used in a number of coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Nutrition Programme. The doubly labeled water technique combines the use of the stable isotopes oxygen-18 and hydrogen-2 (deuterium) to measure total energy expenditure in free-living human subjects, and to investigate the magnitude and causes of both undernutrition and the emergence of obesity in developing countries. The deuterium dilution technique is a reliable tool to measure breastmilk intake and thereby infant growth and development. In collaboration with the World Health Organization's Growth Monitoring Program, this technique is being used to generate new data on growth standards for children in developing countries. This technique is also used in the measurement of body composition by the estimation of lean body mass and fat mass in individuals. Stable isotopes of iron and zinc have been successfully used to assess the nutritional impact of several nationwide food supplementation-programs conducted on pregnant and lactating women and children in both industrialized and developing countries. Isotopic techniques are especially suitable for monitoring changes in body composition, energy metabolism, and mineral status (with particular reference to osteoporosis) in the elderly. Nuclear methods have also served to develop models for a physiological reference man in Asia in support of radiological health and safety issues, for establishing elemental composition of foods, and for measurement of pollutants in the environment.

  20. Early Child Development and Nutrition: A Review of the Benefits and Challenges of Implementing Integrated Interventions1234

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Kristen M; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Lopez-Boo, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Poor nutrition (substandard diet quantity and/or quality resulting in under- or overnutrition) and the lack of early learning opportunities contribute to the loss of developmental potential and life-long health and economic disparities among millions of children aged <5 y. Single-sector interventions representing either early child development (ECD) or nutrition have been linked to positive child development and/or nutritional status, and recommendations currently advocate for the development and testing of integrated interventions. We reviewed the theoretical and practical benefits and challenges of implementing integrated nutrition and ECD interventions along with the evidence for best practice and benefit-cost and concluded that the strong theoretical rationale for integration is more nuanced than the questions that the published empirical evidence have addressed. For example, further research is needed to 1) answer questions related to how integrated messaging influences caregiver characteristics such as well-being, knowledge, and behavior and how these influence early child nutrition and development outcomes; 2) understand population and nutritional contexts in which integrated interventions are beneficial; and 3) explore how varying implementation processes influence the efficacy, uptake, and cost-benefit of integrated nutrition and ECD interventions. PMID:26980819

  1. A reference growth curve for nutritional experiments in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and changes in whole body proteome during development.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Requeni, P; Conceição, L E C; Olderbakk Jordal, A-E; Rønnestad, I

    2010-12-01

    Zebrafish is one of the most used vertebrate model organisms in molecular and developmental biology, recently gaining popularity also in medical research. However, very little work has been done to assess zebrafish as a model species in nutritional studies in aquaculture in order to utilize the methodological toolbox that this species represents. As a starting point to acquire some baseline data for further nutritional studies, growth of a population of zebrafish was followed for 15 weeks. Furthermore, whole body proteome was screened during development by means of bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fish were reared under best practice laboratory conditions from hatching until 103 days post-fertilization (dpf) and regularly fed ad libitum with Artemia nauplii from 12 dpf. A growth burst occurred within 9-51 dpf, reaching a plateau after 65 dpf. Fork length and body weight were significantly lower in males than in females from 58 dpf onwards. Proteomics analysis showed 28 spot proteins differently expressed through development and according to sex. Of these proteins, 20 were successfully identified revealing proteins involved in energy production, muscle development, eye lens differentiation, and sexual maturation. In summary, zebrafish exhibited a rapid growth until approximately 50 dpf, when most individuals started to allocate part of the dietary energy intake for sexual maturation. However, proteomic analysis revealed that some individuals reached sexual maturity earlier and already from 30 dpf onwards. Thus, in order to design nutritional studies with zebrafish fed Artemia nauplii, it is recommended to select a period between 20 and 40 dpf, when fish allocate most of the ingested energy for non-reproductive growth purposes.

  2. Metabolic plasticity during mammalian development is directionally dependent on early nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Peter D; Lillycrop, Karen A; Vickers, Mark H; Pleasants, Anthony B; Phillips, Emma S; Beedle, Alan S; Burdge, Graham C; Hanson, Mark A

    2007-07-31

    Developmental plasticity in response to environmental cues can take the form of polyphenism, as for the discrete morphs of some insects, or of an apparently continuous spectrum of phenotype, as for most mammalian traits. The metabolic phenotype of adult rats, including the propensity to obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperphagia, shows plasticity in response to prenatal nutrition and to neonatal administration of the adipokine leptin. Here, we report that the effects of neonatal leptin on hepatic gene expression and epigenetic status in adulthood are directionally dependent on the animal's nutritional status in utero. These results demonstrate that, during mammalian development, the direction of the response to one cue can be determined by previous exposure to another, suggesting the potential for a discontinuous distribution of environmentally induced phenotypes, analogous to the phenomenon of polyphenism.

  3. Developing Suitable Methods of Nutritional Status Assessment: A Continuous Challenge123

    PubMed Central

    Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Meyer, Alexa L.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable information about the nutritional status is essential to identify potential critical nutrients and the population groups at risk of deficiency, as well as to develop effective public health policies to counteract unfavorable nutrition patterns that contribute to morbidity and mortality. In this review, the important role of biomarkers in the assessment of nutritional status is outlined, major strengths and limitations of established and new biomarkers are described, and important criteria for biomarker selection and development are discussed. Indeed, biomarkers offer a more objective assessment tool than pure dietary approaches that suffer from inadequate data reporting in particular, although biomarkers are often only measured in subsamples because of the higher costs and proband burden they entail. However, biomarkers are subject to individual variability and influences from other factors besides the nutrient of interest. Rapid turnover or tight control of nutrient concentrations in blood (homeostasis) limits their sensitivity as biomarkers, as in the case of many trace elements. The existence of different forms of a micronutrient in the body adds additional complexity. Functional biomarkers, such as enzyme activities, mirror long-term status better but are subject to confounding factors, and some are influenced by several micronutrients, not specific for only 1, so using a combination of biomarkers is advisable. Additionally, the applicability of a biomarker also depends on the existence of adequate reference values and cutoff points for the target population. Therefore, a careful selection is warranted, especially when biomarkers are to be used in larger samples. PMID:25469404

  4. Maternal nutrition during pregnancy influences offspring wool production and wool follicle development.

    PubMed

    Magolski, J D; Luther, J S; Neville, T L; Redmer, D A; Reynolds, L P; Caton, J S; Vonnahme, K A

    2011-11-01

    The effects of maternal nutrition on offspring wool production (quality and quantity) were evaluated. Primiparous Rambouillet ewes (n = 84) were randomly allocated to 1 of 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial design. Selenium treatment [adequate Se (ASe, 9.5 μg/kg of BW) vs. high Se (HSe, 81.8 μg/kg of BW)] was initiated at breeding, and maternal nutritional intake [control (CON, 100% of requirements) vs. restricted (60% of CON) vs. overfed (140% of CON)] was initiated at d 50 of gestation. Lamb birth weight was recorded at delivery, and all lambs were placed on the same diet immediately after birth to determine the effects of prenatal nutrition on postnatal wool production and follicle development. At 180 ± 2.2 d of age, lambs were necropsied and pelt weights were recorded. Wool samples were collected from the side and britch areas, whereas skin samples were collected from the side of each lamb only. Although Se status did not influence side staple length in males, female lambs born from ewes on the ASe treatment had a shorter staple length (P < 0.05) when compared with females from ewes on the HSe treatment. Maternal nutritional intake and Se status did not influence (P ≥ 0.23) wool characteristics on the britch. However, at the britch, wool from female lambs had a reduced comfort factor (P = 0.01) and a greater (P = 0.02) fiber diameter compared with wool from male lambs. Maternal Se supplementation, maternal nutritional plane, sex of the offspring, or their interactions had no effect (P > 0.13) on primary (29.10 ± 1.40/100 µm(2)) and secondary (529.84 ± 21.57/100 µm(2)) wool follicle numbers. Lambs from ASe ewes had a greater (P = 0.03) secondary:primary wool follicle ratio compared with lambs from HSe ewes (20.93 vs. 18.01 ± 1.00). Despite similar postnatal diets, wool quality was affected by maternal Se status and the maternal nutritional plane.

  5. Economic inequality in nutritional knowledge, attitude and practice of Iranian households: The NUTRI-KAP study

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Ramin; Salehi, Forouzan; Qorbani, Mostafa; Rostami, Mahsa; Shafiee, Gita; Ahadi, Zeinab; Khosravi, Shayesteh; Rezvani, Vahab; Sadeghi Ghotbabadi, Farzaneh; Ghaderpanahi, Maryam; Abdollahi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Improper nutritional knowledge is one of the most important causes of nutritional problems, which can affect practice and cause more complications. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nutritional knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of Iranian households with socioeconomic status (SES). Methods: The study population was 14,136 households (57 clusters of 8 individuals in each province) who lived in urban and rural regions of 31 provinces of Iran. The sample size of the study was selected using multistage cluster sampling technique. A structured questionnaire and interview with the qualified person in each family was used to collect data. The questionnaire included demographic, SES and nutritional KAP questions. Using principle component analysis, some variables including household assets, occupation and education level of the heads of the families and respondents and the number of family members were used to construct family SES. The SES was categorized as good, moderate and weak. Pearson’s Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables. Results: The percentage of knowledge about growing up, acquiring energy and being healthy as reasons for eating food was 24.1%, 44.8% and 54.7%, respectively. Only 69.7%, 60.5% and 52.5% of the participants had knowledge of identification of meat and legumes, grain and dairy group, respectively. More than 97% of the participants had a favorable attitude toward importance of nutrition in health. The nutritional knowledge linearly increased with increasing SES. Families with good SES significantly consumed more fruit, vegetable, dairy group, red meat, chicken and poultry, fish and egg while sugar consumption was significantly higher in families with weak SES (p<0.05). Conclusion: SES can influence the rate of nutritional KAP. Some policies should be considered to increase nutritional KAP especially in lower SES group in the society. PMID:28210591

  6. Maternal Perceptions of Nutrition, Stress, Time, and Assistance during Mealtimes: Similarities and Differences between Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Mothers of Children with Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Terry K.; Freeze, Brenna; Provost, Elizabeth; King, Lauriann; Sanders, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between mothers of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and mothers of preschool children with typical development (TD) in their perceptions of four mealtime outcomes: nutritional intake, stress, time, and assistance given. One group of 24 mothers of children with ASD and one…

  7. Modeling-Enabled Systems Nutritional Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Meghna; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Leber, Andrew; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Philipson, Casandra; Carbo, Adria; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the fundamental role of nutrition in the maintenance of health, the immune response, and disease prevention. Emerging global mechanistic insights in the field of nutritional immunology cannot be gained through reductionist methods alone or by analyzing a single nutrient at a time. We propose to investigate nutritional immunology as a massively interacting system of interconnected multistage and multiscale networks that encompass hidden mechanisms by which nutrition, microbiome, metabolism, genetic predisposition, and the immune system interact to delineate health and disease. The review sets an unconventional path to apply complex science methodologies to nutritional immunology research, discovery, and development through “use cases” centered around the impact of nutrition on the gut microbiome and immune responses. Our systems nutritional immunology analyses, which include modeling and informatics methodologies in combination with pre-clinical and clinical studies, have the potential to discover emerging systems-wide properties at the interface of the immune system, nutrition, microbiome, and metabolism. PMID:26909350

  8. Web Based Personal Nutrition Management Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Selen; Zayim, Neşe; Gülkesen, Kemal Hakan; Samur, Mehmet Kemal

    Internet is being used increasingly as a resource for accessing health-related information because of its several advantages. Therefore, Internet tailoring becomes quite preferable in health education and personal health management recently. Today, there are many web based health programs de-signed for individuals. Among these studies nutrition and weight management is popular because, obesity has become a heavy burden for populations worldwide. In this study, we designed a web based personal nutrition education and management tool, The Nutrition Web Portal, in order to enhance patients’ nutrition knowledge, and provide behavioral change against obesity. The present paper reports analysis, design and development processes of The Nutrition Web Portal.

  9. A meta-analysis of nutrition interventions on mental development of children under-two in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Larson, Leila Margaret; Yousafzai, Aisha K

    2017-01-01

    Interventions to improve nutritional status of young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) may have the added benefit of improving their mental and motor development. This meta-analysis updates and goes beyond previous ones by answering two important questions: (1) do prenatal and postnatal nutritional inputs improve mental development, and (2) are effects on mental development associated with two theoretically interesting mediators namely physical growth and motor development? The meta-analysis of articles on Medline, PsycINFO, Global Health and Embase was limited to randomized trials in LMICs, with mental development of children from birth to age two years as an outcome. The initial yield of 2689 studies was reduced to 33; 12 received a global quality rating of strong. Of the 10 prenatal and 23 postnatal nutrition interventions, the majority used zinc, iron/folic acid, vitamin A or multiple micronutrients, with a few evaluating macronutrients. The weighted mean effect size, Cohen's d (95% CI) for prenatal and postnatal nutrition interventions on mental development was 0.042 (-0.0084, 0.092) and 0.076 (0.019, 0.13), respectively. Postnatal supplements consisting of macronutrients yielded an effect size d (95% CI) of 0.14 (0.0067, 0.27), multiple micronutrients 0.082 (-0.012, 0.18) and single micronutrients 0.058 (-0.0015, 0.12). Motor development, but not growth status, effect sizes were significantly associated with mental development in postnatal interventions. In summary, nutrition interventions had small effects on mental development. Future studies might have greater effect if they addressed macronutrient deficiencies combined with child stimulation and hygiene and sanitation interventions.

  10. Exploring Australian women’s level of nutrition knowledge during pregnancy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bookari, Khlood; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2016-01-01

    Background The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) for pregnancy provides a number of food- and nutrition-related recommendations to assist pregnant women in optimizing their dietary behavior. However, there are limited data demonstrating pregnant women’s knowledge of the AGHE recommendations. This study investigated Australian pregnant women’s knowledge of the AGHE and related dietary recommendations for maintaining a healthy pregnancy. The variations in nutrition knowledge were compared with demographic characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional study assessed eight different nutrition knowledge domains and the demographic characteristics of pregnant women. Four hundred women across Australia completed a multidimensional online survey based on validated and existing measures. Results More than half of the pregnant women surveyed (65%) were not familiar with the AGHE recommendations. The basic recommendations to eat more fruit, vegetables, bread, and cereals but less meat were poorly understood. An in-depth investigation of knowledge of nutrition information revealed misconceptions in a range of areas, including standard serving size, nutrients content of certain foods, energy density of fat, and the importance of key nutrients in pregnancy. Univariate analysis revealed significant demographic variation in nutrition knowledge scores. Multiple regression analysis confirmed the significant independent effects on respondents’ nutrition knowledge score (P<0.000) of the education level, income, age, stage of pregnancy, language, and having a health/nutrition qualification. The model indicated that independent variables explained 33% (adjusted R2) of the variance found between respondents’ knowledge scores. Conclusion Australian pregnant women’s knowledge regarding AGHE for pregnancy and other key dietary recommendations is poor and varies significantly with their demographic profile. The setting of dietary guidelines is not sufficient to ensure

  11. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases.

  12. Energetic and nutritional constraints on infant brain development: implications for brain expansion during human evolution.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Crawford, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    The human brain confronts two major challenges during its development: (i) meeting a very high energy requirement, and (ii) reliably accessing an adequate dietary source of specific brain selective nutrients needed for its structure and function. Implicitly, these energetic and nutritional constraints to normal brain development today would also have been constraints on human brain evolution. The energetic constraint was solved in large measure by the evolution in hominins of a unique and significant layer of body fat on the fetus starting during the third trimester of gestation. By providing fatty acids for ketone production that are needed as brain fuel, this fat layer supports the brain's high energy needs well into childhood. This fat layer also contains an important reserve of the brain selective omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), not available in other primates. Foremost amongst the brain selective minerals are iodine and iron, with zinc, copper and selenium also being important. A shore-based diet, i.e., fish, molluscs, crustaceans, frogs, bird's eggs and aquatic plants, provides the richest known dietary sources of brain selective nutrients. Regular access to these foods by the early hominin lineage that evolved into humans would therefore have helped free the nutritional constraint on primate brain development and function. Inadequate dietary supply of brain selective nutrients still has a deleterious impact on human brain development on a global scale today, demonstrating the brain's ongoing vulnerability. The core of the shore-based paradigm of human brain evolution proposes that sustained access by certain groups of early Homo to freshwater and marine food resources would have helped surmount both the nutritional as well as the energetic constraints on mammalian brain development.

  13. [Community nutrition].

    PubMed

    Aranceta Bartrina, J; Pérez Rodrigo, C; Serra Majem, L I

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of scientific and epidemiological evidence indicates that diet and health are related: diet may be a risk factor or have potential protective effects. As a consequence, the focus of nutrition research has experienced a shift towards qualitative aspects of diet which could influence chronic disease, longevity, quality of life and physical and cognitive performance, leading to the development of Community Nutrition. The main undertakings in a Community Nutrition Unit are related to the identification, assessment and monitoring of nutrition problems at the community level and to planning, design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition intervention programs. Such programs combine a number of suitable strategies in a whole population approach, a high risk approach or an approach targeted at specific population groups, and are implemented in different settings, such as the work place, schools or community organizations. Community nutrition interventions aim to gradually achieve change in eating patterns towards a healthier profile. Community Nutrition programs require the use of a combination of strategies and a working group of people from different backgrounds. Many factors influence the nutritional status of an individual or a population. In order to gain effective work output, sound understanding of these patterns and a practical surveillance system are required.

  14. Family nutritional support improves survival, immune restoration and adherence in HIV patients receiving ART in developing country.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Charlotte; Laporte, Remi; Ide, Moussa; Nouhou, Yacouba; de Truchis, Pierre; Rouveix, Elisabeth; Adamou, Adiza; Pauly, Vanessa; Mattei, Jean-François; Gastaut, Jean-Albert

    2010-01-01

    In developing countries, access to antiretroviral treatment for persons living with HIV is still in progress. Malnutrition represents another cause of acquired immunodeficiency and premature death. This evaluation program estimated the impact of family nutritional support during the first year of antiretroviral treatment in West Africa's sub-Sahara region. Family nutritional support was proposed to patients with CD-4 cell count <200 /mm3 and/or developing a WHO stage III/IV or with body mass index <18.5 kg/m2 and receiving antiretroviral treatment. Follow-up of 62 patients receiving support was compared to 118 patients who had only received antiretroviral treatment the year before. Average body mass index, CD-4 cell count were 20.7 and 20.5, 217 and 191/mm3 respectively in supported and control groups (NS). Twenty-two (36%) and 56 (48%) were WHO stage III/IV (NS) respectively in supported and control groups. One patient who received support and twelve controls died (Mortality Ratio=0.19; p<0.05). Increase in CD-4 cell count was around 1.7 times higher (+ 114 vs. + 68 CD-4 cells/mm3 respectively in supported and control groups; p<0.05) and observance was improved in supported group (p<0.005). The evolutions of WHO stage and body mass index were not different but the study period was short. Family nutritional support for persons living with HIV initiating antiretroviral treatment in a developing country showed a positive impact after six months. This family intervention could be integrated into AIDS interventions as an effective and comprehensive community-based primary care.

  15. Diet Assessment Methods in the Nurses' Health Studies and Contribution to Evidence-Based Nutritional Policies and Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Ambika; Rimm, Eric B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Sampson, Laura; Rosner, Bernard; Camargo, Carlos A.; Stampfer, Meir; Willett, Walter C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHSs) to diet assessment methods and evidence-based nutritional policies and guidelines. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Results. Through periodic assessment of diet by validated dietary questionnaires over 40 years, the NHSs have identified dietary determinants of diseases such as breast and other cancers; obesity; type 2 diabetes; cardiovascular, respiratory, and eye diseases; and neurodegenerative and mental health disorders. Nutritional biomarkers were assessed using blood, urine, and toenail samples. Robust findings, from the NHSs, together with evidence from other large cohorts and randomized dietary intervention trials, have contributed to the evidence base for developing dietary guidelines and nutritional policies to reduce intakes of trans fat, saturated fat, sugar-sweetened beverages, red and processed meats, and refined carbohydrates while promoting higher intake of healthy fats and carbohydrates and overall healthful dietary patterns. Conclusions. The long-term, periodically collected dietary data in the NHSs, with documented reliability and validity, have contributed extensively to our understanding of the dietary determinants of various diseases, informing dietary guidelines and shaping nutritional policy. PMID:27459459

  16. Nutrition and lifestyle in european adolescents: the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luis A; Gottrand, Frédéric; Huybrechts, Inge; Ruiz, Jonatan R; González-Gross, Marcela; DeHenauw, Stefaan

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is a critical period, because major physical and psychologic changes occur during a very short period of time. Changes in dietary habits may induce different types of nutritional disorders and are likely to track into adulthood. The aim of this review is to describe the key findings related to nutritional status in European adolescents participating in the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study. We performed a cross-sectional study in 3528 (1845 females) adolescents aged 12.5–17.5 y. Birth weight was negatively associated with abdominal fat mass in adolescents and serum leptin concentrations (in female adolescents), providing additional evidence for a programming effect of birth weight on energy homeostasis control. Breakfast consumption was associated with lower body fat content and healthier cardiovascular profile. Adolescents eat half of the recommended amount of fruit and vegetables and less than two-thirds of the recommended amount of milk and milk products but consume more meat and meat products, fats, and sweets than recommended. For beverage consumption, sugar-sweetened beverages, sweetened milk, low-fat milk, and fruit juice provided the highest amount of energy. Although the intakes of saturated fatty acids (FAs) and salt were high, the intake of polyunsaturated FAs was low. Adolescents spent, on average, 9 h/d of their waking time (66–71% and 70–73% of the registered time in boys and girls, respectively) in sedentary activities. Factors associated with adolescents’ sedentary behavior included the following: 1) age; 2) media availability in the bedroom; 3) sleeping time; 4) breakfast consumption; and 5) season. Sedentary time was also associated with cardiovascular risk factors and bone mineral content. In European adolescents, deficient concentrations were identified for plasma folate (15%), vitamin D (15%), pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (5%), β-carotene (25%), and vitamin E (5%). Scientists and public

  17. Nutrition and Lifestyle in European Adolescents: The HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Study123

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luis A.; Gottrand, Frédéric; Huybrechts, Inge; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; González-Gross, Marcela; DeHenauw, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period, because major physical and psychologic changes occur during a very short period of time. Changes in dietary habits may induce different types of nutritional disorders and are likely to track into adulthood. The aim of this review is to describe the key findings related to nutritional status in European adolescents participating in the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study. We performed a cross-sectional study in 3528 (1845 females) adolescents aged 12.5–17.5 y. Birth weight was negatively associated with abdominal fat mass in adolescents and serum leptin concentrations (in female adolescents), providing additional evidence for a programming effect of birth weight on energy homeostasis control. Breakfast consumption was associated with lower body fat content and healthier cardiovascular profile. Adolescents eat half of the recommended amount of fruit and vegetables and less than two-thirds of the recommended amount of milk and milk products but consume more meat and meat products, fats, and sweets than recommended. For beverage consumption, sugar-sweetened beverages, sweetened milk, low-fat milk, and fruit juice provided the highest amount of energy. Although the intakes of saturated fatty acids (FAs) and salt were high, the intake of polyunsaturated FAs was low. Adolescents spent, on average, 9 h/d of their waking time (66–71% and 70–73% of the registered time in boys and girls, respectively) in sedentary activities. Factors associated with adolescents’ sedentary behavior included the following: 1) age; 2) media availability in the bedroom; 3) sleeping time; 4) breakfast consumption; and 5) season. Sedentary time was also associated with cardiovascular risk factors and bone mineral content. In European adolescents, deficient concentrations were identified for plasma folate (15%), vitamin D (15%), pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (5%), β-carotene (25%), and vitamin E (5%). Scientists and public

  18. The impact of child health and nutrition on education in developing countries: theory, econometric issues, and recent empirical evidence.

    PubMed

    Glewwe, Paul

    2005-06-01

    Analysis of the impact of child health and nutrition on subsequent school performance is hampered by many difficulties. Research using retrospective data is complicated by the possibility that unobserved factors may determine both nutrition and education outcomes, which will generate correlation between these two outcomes that is not necessarily causal. Randomized trials offer a clearer method for identifying causal relationships, but they are relatively rare and encounter several difficulties in practice. This paper examines theory, estimation strategies, and recent empirical evidence to assess the current state of knowledge on the impact of child health and nutrition on education outcomes in developing countries.

  19. Understanding the Role of Nutrition in the Brain & Behavioral Development of Toddlers and Preschool Children: Identifying and Overcoming Methodological Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Francisco J.; Reznick, J. Steven; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2009-01-01

    The pre-school years (i.e., 1–5 years of age) is a time of rapid and dramatic postnatal brain development, i.e., neural plasticity, and of fundamental acquisition of cognitive development i.e., working memory, attention and inhibitory control. Also, it is a time of transition from a direct maternal mediation/selection of diet-based nutrition to food selection that is more based on self-selection and self-gratification. However, there have been fewer published studies in pre-school children than in infants or school-aged children that examined the role of nutrition in brain/mental development (i.e., 125 studies vs. 232 and 303 studies, respectively during the last 28 years, Figure 1). This may arise because of age-related variability, in terms of individual differences in temperament, linguistic ability, and patterns of neural activity that may affect assessment of neural and cognitive development in pre-school children. In this review, we suggest several approaches for assessing brain function in children that can be refined. It would be desirable if the discipline developed some common elements to be included in future studies of diet and brain function, with the idea that they would complement more targeted measures based on time of exposure and understanding of data from animal models. Underlining this approach is the concepts of “window of sensitivity” during which nutrients may affect postnatal neural development: investigators and expert panels need to specifically look for region-specific changes and do so with understanding of the likely time window during which the nutrient was, or was not available. (244 words) PMID:19761650

  20. Nutritional and developmental status among 6- to 8-month-old children in southwestern Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Muhoozi, Grace K. M.; Atukunda, Prudence; Mwadime, Robert; Iversen, Per Ole; Westerberg, Ane C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Undernutrition continues to pose challenges to Uganda's children, but there is limited knowledge on its association with physical and intellectual development. Objective In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the nutritional status and milestone development of 6- to 8-month-old children and associated factors in two districts of southwestern Uganda. Design Five hundred and twelve households with mother–infant (6–8 months) pairs were randomly sampled. Data about background variables (e.g. household characteristics, poverty likelihood, and child dietary diversity scores (CDDS)) were collected using questionnaires. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (BSID III) and Ages and Stages questionnaires (ASQ) were used to collect data on child development. Anthropometric measures were used to determine z-scores for weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ), weight-for-length (WLZ), head circumference (HCZ), and mid-upper arm circumference. Chi-square tests, correlation coefficients, and linear regression analyses were used to relate background variables, nutritional status indicators, and infant development. Results The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting was 12.1, 24.6, and 4.7%, respectively. Household head education, gender, sanitation, household size, maternal age and education, birth order, poverty likelihood, and CDDS were associated (p<0.05) with WAZ, LAZ, and WLZ. Regression analysis showed that gender, sanitation, CDDS, and likelihood to be below the poverty line were predictors (p<0.05) of undernutrition. BSID III indicated development delay of 1.3% in cognitive and language, and 1.6% in motor development. The ASQ indicated delayed development of 24, 9.1, 25.2, 12.2, and 15.1% in communication, fine motor, gross motor, problem solving, and personal social ability, respectively. All nutritional status indicators except HCZ were positively and significantly associated with development domains. WAZ was the main predictor for

  1. Assessment of nutritional status in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: a single-center study from Iran.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Reza; Sanavi, Suzan; Izadi-Khah, Akram

    2007-09-01

    Malnutrition is a relatively common problem in patients on hemodialysis (HD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in affected patients. With the aid of subjective global assessment (SGA), a semi-quantitative scale for estimating nutritional status, the malnutrition score (MS), has been developed. The MS incorporates advantages of the SGA while extending the reliability and precision. This study was performed to assess the nutritional status in patients on HD at the Mostafa Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Based on the MS, which consists of seven components--weight change, dietary intake, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, functional capacity, comorbidity, subcutaneous fat, and muscle wasting--we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive-analytic study on 54 HD patients (35 males, 19 females) with age range of 18 to 82 years (mean 44.2 +/- 19.8 years). Each component of the MS has a score from one (normal) to five (very severe). Anthropometric measurements including triceps skin-fold thickness (TSF), mid-arm circumference (MAC) and mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) were taken on all patients. Also, the body mass index and TSF/MAC ratio were calculated. Relevant laboratory parameters were checked. The duration of HD of the study patients ranged between 5 and 36 months (mean 19.5 +/- 1.5 months). Data analysis was carried out using the SPSS, Pearson correlation, 't' test and regression. Based on the MS, 40.7% of patients had malnutrition (mean score 13.8 +/- 2.8). There were statistically significant correlations between TSF (p < 0.01), MAC (p = 0.02), MAMC (p = 0.01), TSF/MAC ratio (p < 0.001), BMI (p = 0.028), serum albumin concentration (p = 0.021) and MS. No statistically significant correlation was found between the MS and urea reduction ratio, protein catabolic rate, age, gender, or duration of dialysis. After 1 year, 20.4% of patients died because of dialysis-related complications. The mortality rate did not show significant correlation with

  2. Nutritional status of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs): a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case-control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD (n = 40) and TD (n = 113) children (aged 6-10 years) living in the same area. Body mass indices were below the 5th percentile in 20 % of ASD versus 8.85% of TD children. We found intakes were lower for fluoride (p = 0.017) and higher for vitamin E (p = 0.001). There was limited food variety and inadequacy of some intakes suggests that routine monitoring of ASD children should include assessment of their dietary habits, as well as anthropometric measurements.

  3. Longitudinal associations of nutritional factors with glycated hemoglobin in youth with type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study123

    PubMed Central

    Crandell, Jamie L; Jaacks, Lindsay M; Couch, Sarah C; Lawrence, Jean M; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improved glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1c) delays the progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We previously showed that higher baseline intakes of n–3 (ω-3) fatty acids and leucine are associated with preserved β cell function 2 y later in youth with T1D. Objective: In the current study, we extend this work to explore the longitudinal associations of nutritional factors with Hb A1c in youth with T1D. Design: We included 908 T1D youth with baseline and follow-up Hb A1c measurements. Nutritional factors assessed at baseline were as follows: breastfeeding status and timing of complimentary food introduction; intakes of leucine, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and fiber estimated from a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ); and plasma biomarkers for vitamins D and E, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid. We fit linear regression models adjusted for baseline Hb A1c, sociodemographic variables, diabetes-related variables, time between baseline and follow-up visits, saturated fat, physical activity, and for FFQ-derived nutrients, total calories. The vitamin D model was further adjusted for season and body mass index z score. Results: The mean ± SD age and diabetes duration at baseline was 10.8 ± 3.9 y and 10.1 ± 5.8 mo, respectively. A total of 9.3% of participants had poor Hb A1c (value ≥9.5%) at baseline, which increased to 18.3% during follow-up (P < 0.0001). Intakes of EPA (β = −0.045, P = 0.046), leucine (β = −0.031, P = 0.0004), and protein (β = −0.003, P = 0.0002) were significantly negatively associated with follow-up Hb A1c after adjustment for confounders. Intake of carbohydrates was significantly positively (β = 0.001, P = 0.003) associated with follow-up Hb A1c after adjustment for confounders. Conclusions: Several nutritional factors may be associated with Hb A1c during early stages of disease progression in youth recently diagnosed with T1D. In addition to

  4. A pre-post pilot study of peer nutritional counseling and food insecurity and nutritional outcomes among antiretroviral therapy patients in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Derose, Kathryn P.; Felician, Melissa; Han, Bing; Palar, Kartika; Ramírez, Blanca; Farías, Hugo; Martínez, Homero

    2015-01-01

    Background Food insecurity and poor nutrition are key barriers to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Culturally-appropriate and sustainable interventions that provide nutrition counseling for people on ART and of diverse nutritional statuses are needed, particularly given rising rates of overweight and obesity among people living with HIV (PLHIV). Methods As part of scale-up of a nutritional counseling intervention, we recruited and trained 17 peer counselors from 14 government-run HIV clinics in Honduras to deliver nutritional counseling to ART patients using a highly interactive curriculum that was developed after extensive formative research on locally available foods and dietary patterns among PLHIV. All participants received the intervention; at baseline and 2 month follow-up, assessments included: 1) interviewer-administered, in-person surveys to collect data on household food insecurity (15-item scale), nutritional knowledge (13-item scale), dietary intake and diversity (number of meals and type and number of food groups consumed in past 24 hours); and 2) anthropometric measures (body mass index or BMI, mid-upper arm and waist circumferences). We used multivariable linear regression analysis to examine changes pre-post in food insecurity and the various nutritional outcomes while controlling for baseline characteristics and clinic-level clustering. Results Of 482 participants at baseline, we had complete follow-up data on 356 (74%), of which 62% were women, median age was 39, 34% reported having paid work, 52% had completed primary school, and 34% were overweight or obese. In multivariate analyses adjusting for gender, age, household size, work status, and education, we found that between baseline and follow-up, household food insecurity decreased significantly among all participants (β=−0.47, p<.05) and among those with children under 18 (β=−1.16, p<.01), while nutritional knowledge and dietary intake and diversity also significantly improved

  5. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation.

  6. Insights From the Diabetes in India Nutrition Guidelines Study

    PubMed Central

    Trostler, Naomi; Varsha, V.; Voet, Hillary

    2017-01-01

    This 12-month prospective randomized cluster trial of 20 dietitians in India compared usual care (UC) and evidence-based nutrition practice guideline (EBNPG) care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Baseline, 6-month, and 12-month data from 238 patients were analyzed. EBNPG implementation was evaluated using the Ottawa Model for Knowledge Transfer. EBNPG and UC groups achieved significant hemoglobin A1C improvements. EBNPG-treated participants were significantly more likely to meet low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride goals at 6 or 12 months. Dietitian dropout, implementation barriers, and undetermined EBNPG intervention fidelity are limitations. Future research should assess barriers/supports and degree of EBNPG use. PMID:28232773

  7. Nutritional ecology beyond the individual: a conceptual framework for integrating nutrition and social interactions.

    PubMed

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Buhl, Jerome; Charleston, Michael A; Sword, Gregory A; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Over recent years, modelling approaches from nutritional ecology (known as Nutritional Geometry) have been increasingly used to describe how animals and some other organisms select foods and eat them in appropriate amounts in order to maintain a balanced nutritional state maximising fitness. These nutritional strategies profoundly affect the physiology, behaviour and performance of individuals, which in turn impact their social interactions within groups and societies. Here, we present a conceptual framework to study the role of nutrition as a major ecological factor influencing the development and maintenance of social life. We first illustrate some of the mechanisms by which nutritional differences among individuals mediate social interactions in a broad range of species and ecological contexts. We then explain how studying individual- and collective-level nutrition in a common conceptual framework derived from Nutritional Geometry can bring new fundamental insights into the mechanisms and evolution of social interactions, using a combination of simulation models and manipulative experiments.

  8. Nutritional ecology beyond the individual: a conceptual framework for integrating nutrition and social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Buhl, Jerome; Charleston, Michael A; Sword, Gregory A; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, modelling approaches from nutritional ecology (known as Nutritional Geometry) have been increasingly used to describe how animals and some other organisms select foods and eat them in appropriate amounts in order to maintain a balanced nutritional state maximising fitness. These nutritional strategies profoundly affect the physiology, behaviour and performance of individuals, which in turn impact their social interactions within groups and societies. Here, we present a conceptual framework to study the role of nutrition as a major ecological factor influencing the development and maintenance of social life. We first illustrate some of the mechanisms by which nutritional differences among individuals mediate social interactions in a broad range of species and ecological contexts. We then explain how studying individual- and collective-level nutrition in a common conceptual framework derived from Nutritional Geometry can bring new fundamental insights into the mechanisms and evolution of social interactions, using a combination of simulation models and manipulative experiments. PMID:25586099

  9. Key Strategies for Improving School Nutrition: A Case Study of Three School Nutrition Program Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacheck, Jennifer M.; Morgan, Emily H.; Wilde, Parke; Griffin, Timothy; Nahar, Elizabeth; Economos, Christina D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This case study identified common elements of three diverse New England school districts that were real-world models of improving school meals. Methods: School districts that had greater than 1,000 students, [greater than or equal to]3 schools, and [greater than or equal to]40% of students who qualified for free- or…

  10. Design and development of a meal system for the elderly. [public health - nutrition/diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Food preference surveys (taste tests) were performed for 95 food items (which were selected from an original list of 150 items), and 21 menus were developed from the survey results. Each menu contains an entree, two side dishes, dessert, and a beverage. Food manufacturing specifications for freeze dried foods, frozen foods, and beverages are examined, and product labeling and packaging requirements are discussed. The nutritional value of the various foods is listed in tabular form, and sample product labels are shown. Cost estimates per serving are also included.

  11. Effects of Poor Maternal Nutrition during Gestation on Bone Development and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Activity in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Sambhu M.; Sereda, Nicole H.; Hoffman, Maria L.; Valley, Ellen V.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Park, Young-Ki; Lee, Ji-Young; Zinn, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Poor maternal nutrition impairs overall growth and development of offspring. These changes can significantly impact the general health and production efficiency of offspring. Specifically, poor maternal nutrition is known to reduce growth of bone and muscle, and increase adipose tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent stem cells which contribute to development of these tissues and are responsive to changes in the maternal environment. The main objective was to evaluate the effects of poor maternal nutirtion during gestation on bone and MSC function in offspring. Thirty-six ewes were fed 100%, 60%, or 140% of energy requirements [NRC, 1985] beginning at day 31 ± 1.3 of gestation. Lambs from ewes fed 100% (CON), 60% (RES) and 140% (OVER) were euthanized within 24 hours of birth (1 day; n = 18) or at 3 months of age (n = 15) and bone and MSC samples were collected. Dual X-ray absorptiometry was performed on bones obtained from day 1 and 3 months. Proliferation, differentiation, and metabolic activity were determined in the MSC isolated from lambs at day 1. Data were analyzed using mixed procedure in SAS. Maternal diet negatively affected offspring MSC by reducing proliferation 50% and reducing mitochondrial metabolic activity. Maternal diet did not alter MSC glycolytic activity or differentiation in culture. Maternal diet tended to decrease expression of P2Y purinoreceptor 1, but did not alter expression of other genes involved in MSC proliferation and differentiation. Maternal diet did not alter bone parameters in offspring. In conclusion, poor maternal diet may alter offspring growth through reduced MSC proliferation and metabolism. Further studies evaluating the potential molecular changes associated with altered proliferation and metabolism in MSC due to poor maternal nutrition are warranted. PMID:27942040

  12. Development of norms for executive functions in typically-developing Indian urban preschool children and its association with nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Sumithra; Thomas, Tinku; Shetty, Priya; Thennarasu, K; Raman, Vijaya; Khanna, Deepti; Mehra, Ruchika; Kurpad, Anura V; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2016-12-01

    Executive functions (EFs) are essential and important for achieving success in children's everyday lives and play a fundamental role in children's cognitive, academic, social, emotional and behavioral functioning. A cross-sectional study was carried out to develop age- and sex-specific norms for EFs using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function - Preschool Version (BRIEF-P) among 2- to 5-year-olds from urban Bangalore, India. In addition, the association between EFs and anthropometric measures, a marker of nutritional status, is also examined. Primary caregivers of 412 children, equally distributed by age and sex, participated. Raw scores for each domain and indices were converted to standard t-scores and percentiles were computed. A t-score at or above 63 corresponding to the 90th percentile was considered as the cutoff for executive dysfunction in this sample. The prevalence of executive dysfunction is 10% based on the Global Executive Composite score of the BRIEF-P. The cutoff score for identifying executive dysfunction using existing United States (US) norms is higher compared to the cutoff score obtained in the current study. Therefore, using US norms for Indian children could result in the prevalence of executive dysfunction been underestimated. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that stunted and underweight children have significantly elevated EF scores after adjusting for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES; p < .01). A greater understanding of EFs in preschool children is important for the early identification of executive dysfunction and implementing interventions to improve their future prospects. This study also shows that undernourished children are more likely to have executive dysfunction.

  13. Malnutrition and nutritional therapy of chronic kidney disease in developing countries: the Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Varsha, P; Mathew, Milly; Sairam, Velore K; Gupta, Amit

    2003-07-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence and clinical consequences of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) in the chronic renal failure, maintenance dialysis, and renal transplant population in developing countries. Malnutrition, which is reported to be present in 42% to 77% of the end-stage renal disease population in developing countries, is strongly associated with morbidity and mortality. Many religious practices in developing countries promote abstinence from meat, fish, and eggs. Both a vegetarian dietary pattern, which is being adopted by an increasing number of people, and ingestion of inadequate protein and calories in the diet to arrest the progression of chronic renal failure, may lead to malnutrition. The attendant complications of PEM, malaise, wasting, anemia, and decreased immunity, may predispose these patients to infections. This is commonly seen in both the maintenance hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis population and may decrease their survival. There is an urgent need for nutritional counseling by a dietitian to contain the damage of malnutrition and to provide important nutritional information to the patient. Consultation with a dietitian should take place at least 3 times yearly and, in malnourished patients, more often, as needed. Dietetic documentation should include reports of food intake, subjective global assessment, anthropometric measurements, estimation of the nPNA, serum albumin, and prealbumin, the serum lipid profile, sodium and potassium intake, calcium and phosphorus status, and any changes in body weight.

  14. The nutrition of salmonid fishes. I. Chemical and histological studies of wild and domestic fish.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.; Woodall, A.N.; Halver, J.E.

    1957-01-01

    The salmon fishing industry of the Pacific Coast is dependent on the survival and propagation of 5 species of salmon which spawn in rivers of that portion of the North American continent extending from California to Alaska. The development of these rivers for power, irrigation, flood control and other projects has drastically reduced the natural spawning areas available to salmon. To prevent the extinction of these fish and the concurrent losses to the fishing industry, various State and Federal agencies have initiated a major program of artificial propagation. This area of animal husbandry has received little attention from nutritional workers and there is a paucity of information on the nutritional requirements of salmon. To supply this essential information the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service established the Salmon Nutrition Laboratory at Cook, Washington in 1952. This report represents the first of a series which will be presented from the laboratory.

  15. Formative research to develop a mass media campaign to increase physical activity and nutrition in a multiethnic state.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Jay E; Silbanuz, Alice; Reger-Nash, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Poor nutrition and physical inactivity are the second leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States. Mass media campaigns have tremendous promise for reaching large segments of the population to influence these behaviors. There is still insufficient evidence in the literature, however, to recommend mass marketing campaigns for physical activity and nutrition. Successful mass media campaigns should have a formative research base that includes conducting preproduction research with the target audience, using theory as a conceptual foundation of the campaign, segmenting the audience into meaningful subgroups, and using a message approach that is targeted to and likely will be effective with the audience segment. In this study, these formative research steps were addressed to develop a mass media campaign based on the Theory of Planned Behavior to increase physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption in 35-55-year-old adults in the state of Hawaii. For the walking campaign, our results identified time, a control belief, as the major barrier. For fruits and vegetable, the data suggested social norm (if others around me ate them) and control (if they were available). These data then were used to develop a mass media campaign based on these principals.

  16. Implementation of Mandatory Nutritional Guidelines in South Australian Primary School Canteens: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abery, Elizabeth; Drummond, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Primary schools are identified as being in a primary position to offer nutrition education. Moreover, primary schools can offer an environment which is conducive to the promotion of healthy eating while influencing eating behaviours of children to benefit their health, well-being and academic development and performance. School canteens are one…

  17. A Sociological Perspective on Nutrition Research among the Elderly: Toward Conceptual Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calasanti, Toni M.; Hendricks, Jon

    1986-01-01

    Discusses social factors influencing nutrition among the elderly. Argues that to maximize dietary intervention, efficient functioning of federally sponsored nutrition programs, and subsequent research, greater attention to the conceptual foundation of nutrition-related variables is warranted. Offers suggestions for redirection. (Author/ABB)

  18. Nutrition and fertility.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, G; Tagliabue, A

    2007-12-01

    The first studies about fertility and nutrition date back to the 70ies and already showed a strict relation among female fertility, weight and body composition. However, the mechanisms of this connection started to be explained only after leptin's discovery. According to some authors' opinion, leptin could interact with reproductive axis at multiple sites with stimulatory effects at the hypothalamus and pituitary and stimulatory or inhibitory actions at the gonads. Leptin could play a role in other physiologic processes such as menstruation and pregnancy, and could initiate the complex process of puberty. It has been showed that conditions in which nutritional status is suboptimal, such as eating disorders, exercise induced amenhorrea, functional hypothalamic amenhorrea and polycystic ovarian syndrome, are associated with abnormal leptin levels. These conditions, are characterized by severe changes in body composition and dietary habits. Since leptin is regulated by body composition and dietary factors, (such as energy intake and macronutrient composition), a strict connection between nutritional intake and fertility regulated by leptin is confirmed. This review focuses on the current knowledge about nutritional factors that influence leptin levels. Since clinical and subclinical nutritional imbalance can determine the development and the maintenance of neuroendocrine and metabolic aberrations, studies on fertility need a deeper attention about dietary habits and nutritional status.

  19. Gamma-irradiated ExtraVit M nutritive supplement studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrişor, Dina; Damian, Grigore; Simon, Simion

    2008-04-01

    An unirradiated and γ-irradiated nutritive supplement named ExtraVit M was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to detect stable paramagnetic species following improvement of hygienic quality by γ-radiation. Free radicals were induced by γ-radiation in the studied samples from low absorbed doses, showing a certain sensibility of these samples to the radiation treatment. The EPR spectrum of irradiated ExtraVit M is typical for drugs or nutritive supplements containing high levels of sugars, vitamin C and cellulose.

  20. The consequence of level of nutrition on heifer ovarian and mammary development.

    PubMed

    Freetly, H C; Vonnahme, K A; McNeel, A K; Camacho, L E; Amundson, O L; Forbes, E D; Lents, C A; Cushman, R A

    2014-12-01

    Replacing cows in the herd is second only to nutrition as the single greatest input cost in cow/calf beef production. The increased availability of cereal grains for feeding livestock has allowed replacement heifers to enter the production system at younger ages. Many heifer development programs feed to ensure heifers reach puberty before the time that they are mated to calve at 2 yr of age. Nutrition level during development has been associated with altered milk production and stayability. We hypothesized that heifers exposed to a lower nutrition level during the peripubertal period would have less methylation of the DNA in the mammary gland and ovarian cortex. We also hypothesized that the ovarian reserve would decrease in heifers fed for rapid growth compared to heifers fed for slow growth during puberty. At 257±1 d of age, heifers in the Stair-Step treatment (n=6) received 157 kcal ME/BW kg0.75 for 84 d and heifers in the Conventional treatment (n=6) were offered 228 kcal ME/BW kg0.75. At d 84, heifers were fed for an additional 83 d. Stair-Step heifers were offered 277 kcal ME/BW kg0.75, and heifers on the Conventional treatment received 228 kcal ME/BW kg0.75. Mammary weights (P=0.43), capillary area density (P=0.74), and capillary surface density (P=0.18) did not differ between treatments and neither did alveolar number (P=0.55) and alveolar density (P=0.49). Reproductive tract weights (P=0.69) and ovarian weight (P=0.68) and ovarian size (P>0.75) did not differ between treatments. In histological sections, Stair-Step heifers had more primordial follicles than Conventional heifers (P=0.02), but primary (P=0.59) and secondary (P=0.15) follicles did not differ. Global methylation of parenchymal tissue (P=0.82), mammary fat pad (P=0.45), and ovarian cortex (P=0.14) did not differ between treatments. Anterior pituitary weight did not differ between treatments (P=0.16). Our hypothesis that modifying peripubertal nutrition modifies global methylation of the

  1. Review of American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Clinical Guidelines for Nutrition Support in Cancer Patients: nutrition screening and assessment.

    PubMed

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2008-01-01

    It is clear that cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may or may not be indicated in these patients depending on individual patient characteristics. This review article, the first in a series of articles to examine the A.S.P.E.N. Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients Cancer Guidelines, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in cancer patients. This first article will provide background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients as well as discuss the role of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in the care of cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the Clinical Guidelines, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequent published studies. Future articles will explore the guidelines related to nutrition support in oncology patients receiving anticancer therapies.

  2. Recent developments in minimal processing: a tool to retain nutritional quality of food.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Imran; Saeed, Farhan; Sultan, M Tauseef; Khan, Moazzam Rafiq; Rohi, Madiha

    2014-01-01

    The modernization during the last century resulted in urbanization coupled with modifications in lifestyles and dietary habits. In the same era, industrial developments made it easier to meet the requirements for processed foods. However, consumers are now interested in minimally processed foods owing to increase in their awareness to have fruits and vegetables with superior quality, and natural integrity with fewer additives. The food products deteriorate as a consequence of physiological aging, biochemical changes, high respiration rat,e and high ethylene production. These factors contribute substantially to discoloration, loss of firmness, development of off-flavors, acidification, and microbial spoilage. Simultaneously, food processors are using emerging approaches to process perishable commodities, along with enhanced nutritional and sensorial quality. The present review article is an effort to utilize the modern approaches to minimize the processing and deterioration. The techniques discussed in this paper include chlorination, ozonation, irradiation, photosensitization, edible coating, natural preservative use, high-pressure processing, microwave heating, ohmic heating, and hurdle technology. The consequences of these techniques on shelf-life stability, microbial safety, preservation of organoleptic and nutritional quality, and residue avoidance are the limelight of the paper. Moreover, the discussion has been made on the feasibility and operability of these techniques in modern-day processing.

  3. The FRD3 citrate effluxer promotes iron nutrition between symplastically disconnected tissues throughout Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Séguéla-Arnaud, Mathilde; Briat, Jean-François; Vert, Grégory; Curie, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    We present data supporting a general role for FERRIC REDICTASE DEFECTIVE3 (FRD3), an efflux transporter of the efficient iron chelator citrate, in maintaining iron homeostasis throughout plant development. In addition to its well-known expression in root, we show that FRD3 is strongly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana seed and flower. Consistently, frd3 loss-of-function mutants are defective in early germination and are almost completely sterile, both defects being rescued by iron and/or citrate supply. The frd3 fertility defect is caused by pollen abortion and is associated with the male gametophytic expression of FRD3. Iron imaging shows the presence of important deposits of iron on the surface of aborted pollen grains. This points to a role for FRD3 and citrate in proper iron nutrition of embryo and pollen. Based on the findings that iron acquisition in embryo, leaf, and pollen depends on FRD3, we propose that FRD3 mediated-citrate release in the apoplastic space represents an important process by which efficient iron nutrition is achieved between adjacent tissues lacking symplastic connections. These results reveal a physiological role for citrate in the apoplastic transport of iron throughout development, and provide a general model for multicellular organisms in the cell-to-cell transport of iron involving extracellular circulation.

  4. Changes in stature, weight, and nutritional status with tourism-based economic development in the Yucatan.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, Thomas L; Goodman, Alan H; Stillman, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Over the past 40 years, tourism-based economic development has transformed social and economic conditions in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We address how these changes have influenced anthropometric indicators of growth and nutritional status in Yalcoba, a Mayan farming community involved in the circular migration of labor in the tourist economy. Data are presented on stature and weight for children measured in 1938 in the Yucatan Peninsula and from 1987 to 1998 in the Mayan community of Yalcoba. In addition, stature, weight and BMI are presented for adults in Yalcoba based on clinic records. Childhood stature varied little between 1938 and 1987. Between 1987 and 1998 average male child statures increased by 2.6cm and female child statures increased by 2.7cm. Yet, 65% of children were short for their ages. Between 1987 and 1998, average child weight increased by 1.8kg. Child BMIs were similar to US reference values and 13% were considered to be above average for weight. Forty percent of adult males and 64% of females were overweight or obese. The anthropometric data from Yalcoba suggest a pattern of stunted children growing into overweight adults. This pattern is found elsewhere in the Yucatan and in much of the developing world where populations have experienced a nutrition transition toward western diets and reduced physical activity levels.

  5. Invited review: Role of livestock in human nutrition and health for poverty reduction in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Randolph, T F; Schelling, E; Grace, D; Nicholson, C F; Leroy, J L; Cole, D C; Demment, M W; Omore, A; Zinsstag, J; Ruel, M

    2007-11-01

    Livestock keeping is critical for many of the poor in the developing world, often contributing to multiple livelihood objectives and offering pathways out of poverty. Livestock keeping also affects an indispensable asset of the poor, their human capital, through its impact on their own nutrition and health. This paper outlines the linkages between livestock keeping and the physical well-being of the poor, and examines a number of commonly held beliefs that misrepresent livestock development issues related to these linkages. These beliefs limit the scope of intervention programs to promote livestock and limit their potential contribution to poverty reduction. Recognition of the complexity of the role livestock play in household decision-making and of the opportunities foregone due to these misconceptions can enhance the ability of livestock to contribute to human well-being in the developing world.

  6. Nutritional evaluation and shelf life studies of papads prepared from wheat-legume composite flours.

    PubMed

    Garg, R; Dahiya, S

    2003-01-01

    The present study was carried out to develop papads from wheat and legume blends and to analyze them for organoleptic acceptability, nutritional quality, and keeping quality. Papad is a dehydrated product prepared from dhals or rice. A firm but pliable dough is made from the flours of dhals or rice with addition of suitable seasoning. It is shaped into balls, rolled out thin, dried and toasted over open fire so as to give a light, crisp product. Mung flour papads were kept as control and wheat flour, chickpea flour, and pea flour were used to supplement mung flour papads. Three different proportions (10, 20, 30%) of each flour were used to supplement Mung flour. Papads with wheat flour (10%), chickpea flour (20%), and pea flour (10%) level of supplementation were found to be most acceptable and these papads were subjected to nutritional evaluation. Protein content significantly increased on supplementation with legume flours at all levels. Fat content was significantly higher in chickpea flour supplemented papads. Ash content varied significantly from 10.17 to 10.78% in papads. Total carbohydrates decreased significantly on supplementation with chickpea flour. Copper content increased significantly on supplementation. A significant decrease in phytic acid and trypsin inhibitor of supplemented papads was found. In vitro protein digestibility significantly increased on supplementation but a significant decrease in in vitro starch digestibility was found in supplemented papads. Storage studies showed that chickpea flour and pea flour supplemented papads can be stored safely for 60 days and wheat flour supplemented papads for 30 days both at room and refrigeration temperatures.

  7. Development of a Website Providing Evidence-Based Information About Nutrition and Cancer: Fighting Fiction and Supporting Facts Online

    PubMed Central

    Beijer, Sandra; Adriaans, Anika Maria Alberdina; Vogel-Boezeman, Jeanne; Kampman, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Although widely available, the general public, cancer patients, and cancer survivors have difficulties accessing evidence-based information on nutrition and cancer. It is challenging to distinguish myths from facts, and sometimes conflicting information can be found in different places. The public and patients would benefit from evidence-based, correct, and clear information from an easily recognizable source. Objective The aim of this project is to make scientific information available for the general public, cancer patients, and cancer survivors through a website. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate the development of the website as well as related statistics 1st year after its launch. Methods To develop the initial content for the website, the website was filled with answers to frequently asked questions provided by cancer organizations and the Dutch Dietetic Oncology Group, and by responding to various fiction and facts published in the media. The website was organized into 3 parts, namely, nutrition before (prevention), during, and after cancer therapy; an opportunity for visitors to submit specific questions regarding nutrition and cancer was included. The website was pretested by patients, health care professionals, and communication experts. After launching the website, visitors’ questions were answered by nutritional scientists and dieticians with evidence- or eminence-based information on nutrition and cancer. Once the website was live, question categories and website statistics were recorded. Results Before launch, the key areas for improvement, such as navigation, categorization, and missing information, were identified and adjusted. In the 1st year after the launch, 90,111 individuals visited the website, and 404 questions were submitted on nutrition and cancer. Most of the questions were on cancer prevention and nutrition during the treatment of cancer. Conclusions The website provides access to evidence- and eminence

  8. Learning Method and Its Influence on Nutrition Study Results Throwing the Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samsudin; Nugraha, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to know the difference between playing and learning methods of exploratory learning methods to learning outcomes throwing the ball. In addition, this study also aimed to determine the effect of nutritional status of these two learning methods mentioned above. This research was conducted at SDN Cipinang Besar Selatan 16 Pagi East…

  9. Random and correlated errors in gold standards used in nutritional epidemiology: implications for validation studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement error correction de-attenuation factor was estimated from two studies using recovery biomarkers. One study, the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN), was unable to adequately account for within-person variation in protein and energy intake estimated by recovery biomarkers, ...

  10. Ageing and COPD affect different domains of nutritional status: the ECCE study.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, S; Spatafora, M; Paglino, G; Pedone, C; Corsonello, A; Scichilone, N; Antonelli-Incalzi, R; Bellia, V

    2011-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and ageing may contribute to malnutrition. We aimed to explore whether COPD and ageing determine malnutrition in different manners. 460 stable COPD outpatients (376 males and 84 females) from the Extrapulmonary Consequences of COPD in the Elderly (ECCE) study database were investigated (age 75.0±5.9 yrs; forced expiratory volume in 1 s 54.7±18.3% predicted). Nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment® (MNA) questionnaire. From the MNA, three scores exploring the domains of the nutritional status were calculated: body composition, energy intake and body functionality scores. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages were negatively correlated with five MNA items exploring mobility, patient's perception of own nutrition and health status, and arm and calf circumferences (lowest Spearman's rho (rs)=-0.011; highest p=0.039). GOLD stages were independently correlated with body composition and body functionality scores (model r2=0.073). Age was negatively correlated with four MNA items exploring loss of appetite, fluid intake, mobility and autonomy in daily life (lowest rs=-0.013; highest p=0.030). Age was independently correlated with body functionality score (model r2=0.037). Severe COPD and ageing are independent and probably concurrent conditions leading to malnutrition. The MNA questionnaire allows a valuable insight into the complexity of components of nutritional status and may provide useful clues for treatment strategies.

  11. Age versus nutritional state in the development of central leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Pétervári, Erika; Rostás, Ildikó; Soós, Szilvia; Tenk, Judit; Mikó, Alexandra; Füredi, Nóra; Székely, Miklós; Balaskó, Márta

    2014-06-01

    Leptin, a catabolic adiposity signal acts in the hypothalamus via suppressing food intake and inducing hypermetabolism. Age and obesity are accompanied by leptin resistance. The present study aimed to clarify which components of the catabolic leptin effects are influenced most strongly by aging and which ones by nutritional state-induced alterations in body composition. In our biotelemetric study the effects of a 7-day intracerebroventricular leptin infusion on various parameters of energy balance (food intake, body weight, oxygen consumption, heart rate and body temperature) were analyzed in male Wistar rats of different age-groups (from 3 to 24 months) and nutritional states (normally fed, diet-induced obese and calorie-restricted). Leptin resistance of older animals affected hypermetabolic actions, whereas leptin induced anorexia in all age-groups. Weight reducing effect of leptin diminished in middle-aged and aging animals to become significant again in the oldest group. In diet-induced obese rats leptin-induced hypermetabolism of the young rats and hypermetabolism plus anorexia of the aging ones were suppressed. Calorie-restriction reduced body weight and fat mass to a similar extent in all age-groups. It strongly enhanced leptin-induced hypermetabolism at all ages and prevented the manifestation of anorexigenic actions of leptin with the exception of the oldest group. This latter finding suggests an unexpected increase of responsiveness to anorexigenic leptin actions in old rats. Accordingly, anorexia and hypermetabolism change in disparate ways with aging. Nutritional state predominantly influences hypermetabolic leptin actions. Resistance to both hypermetabolic and anorexigenic actions were promoted by obesity, while calorie-restriction enhanced responsiveness to leptin, especially in old rats.

  12. Standardization of the Food Composition Database Used in the Latin American Nutrition and Health Study (ELANS).

    PubMed

    Kovalskys, Irina; Fisberg, Mauro; Gómez, Georgina; Rigotti, Attilio; Cortés, Lilia Yadira; Yépez, Martha Cecilia; Pareja, Rossina G; Herrera-Cuenca, Marianella; Zimberg, Ioná Z; Tucker, Katherine L; Koletzko, Berthold; Pratt, Michael

    2015-09-16

    Between-country comparisons of estimated dietary intake are particularly prone to error when different food composition tables are used. The objective of this study was to describe our procedures and rationale for the selection and adaptation of available food composition to a single database to enable cross-country nutritional intake comparisons. Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health (ELANS) is a multicenter cross-sectional study of representative samples from eight Latin American countries. A standard study protocol was designed to investigate dietary intake of 9000 participants enrolled. Two 24-h recalls using the Multiple Pass Method were applied among the individuals of all countries. Data from 24-h dietary recalls were entered into the Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R) program after a harmonization process between countries to include local foods and appropriately adapt the NDS-R database. A food matching standardized procedure involving nutritional equivalency of local food reported by the study participants with foods available in the NDS-R database was strictly conducted by each country. Standardization of food and nutrient assessments has the potential to minimize systematic and random errors in nutrient intake estimations in the ELANS project. This study is expected to result in a unique dataset for Latin America, enabling cross-country comparisons of energy, macro- and micro-nutrient intake within this region.

  13. Standardization of the Food Composition Database Used in the Latin American Nutrition and Health Study (ELANS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovalskys, Irina; Fisberg, Mauro; Gómez, Georgina; Rigotti, Attilio; Cortés, Lilia Yadira; Yépez, Martha Cecilia; Pareja, Rossina G.; Herrera-Cuenca, Marianella; Zimberg, Ioná Z.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Koletzko, Berthold; Pratt, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Between-country comparisons of estimated dietary intake are particularly prone to error when different food composition tables are used. The objective of this study was to describe our procedures and rationale for the selection and adaptation of available food composition to a single database to enable cross-country nutritional intake comparisons. Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health (ELANS) is a multicenter cross-sectional study of representative samples from eight Latin American countries. A standard study protocol was designed to investigate dietary intake of 9000 participants enrolled. Two 24-h recalls using the Multiple Pass Method were applied among the individuals of all countries. Data from 24-h dietary recalls were entered into the Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R) program after a harmonization process between countries to include local foods and appropriately adapt the NDS-R database. A food matching standardized procedure involving nutritional equivalency of local food reported by the study participants with foods available in the NDS-R database was strictly conducted by each country. Standardization of food and nutrient assessments has the potential to minimize systematic and random errors in nutrient intake estimations in the ELANS project. This study is expected to result in a unique dataset for Latin America, enabling cross-country comparisons of energy, macro- and micro-nutrient intake within this region. PMID:26389952

  14. Nutrition policy process challenges in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goshtaei, Massomeh; Ravaghi, Hamid; Sari, Ali Akbari; Abdollahi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nutrition transition is occurring rapidly in the world, especially in developing countries. The nutrition transition occurred in Iran very fast due to urbanization and changes in the lifestyle of people, leading to overweight and obesity. However, nutritional deficiencies are still detected due to economic factors and low nutritional knowledge. Nutrition policies do not adequately respond to the nutrition challenges in Iran. This study was conducted to evaluate and analyze the nutrition policy process challenges in Iran. Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 59 policy makers and nutrition experts of medical universities across Iran. Interviews were continued until data saturation was achieved. Data were supplemented with surveys and documentary analysis. Thematic analysis was guided by the propositions of the stages heuristic framework. Results The results were categorized into four main themes and eight sub-themes. The main themes were 1) nutrition problem definition, 2) policy formulation, 3) implementation of the policies, and 4) evaluation of the policies. However, the multi-faceted nature of the nutritional problem makes it difficult to deal with, so a multi-sectoral approach is needed. Conclusion Nutrition policies have been implemented in Iran with varying degrees of success and with different levels of cross-sectoral collaboration. The nutrition policies sometimes have not been able to respond to the nutritional problems. One of the important reasons is that nutrition is not a priority for policy makers. Many policies suffer from a lack of adequate and appropriate resource allocation. Cooperation mechanisms to resolve nutritional problems are sometimes ineffective and inefficient. PMID:27053992

  15. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilty, F. M.; Teleki, A.; Krumeich, F.; Büchel, R.; Hurrell, R. F.; Pratsinis, S. E.; Zimmermann, M. B.

    2009-11-01

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe2O4) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  16. Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Stephen J.; Hilborn, Ray; Andrew, Neil L.; Allison, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines two strands of discourse on wild capture fisheries; one that focuses on resource sustainability and environmental impacts, another related to food and nutrition security and human well-being. Available data and research show that, for countries most dependent on fish to meet the nutritional requirements of their population, wild capture fisheries remain the dominant supplier. Although, contrary to popular narratives, the sustainability of these fisheries is not always and everywhere in crisis, securing their sustainability is essential and requires considerable effort across a broad spectrum of fishery systems. An impediment to achieving this is that the current research and policy discourses on environmental sustainability of fisheries and food security remain only loosely and superficially linked. Overcoming this requires adoption of a broader sustainability science paradigm to help harness synergies and negotiate tradeoffs between food security, resource conservation, and macroeconomic development goals. The way society chooses to govern fisheries is, however, an ethical choice, not just a technical one, and we recommend adding an ethical dimension to sustainability science as applied to fisheries. PMID:23671089

  17. Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stephen J; Hilborn, Ray; Andrew, Neil L; Allison, Edward H

    2013-05-21

    This article examines two strands of discourse on wild capture fisheries; one that focuses on resource sustainability and environmental impacts, another related to food and nutrition security and human well-being. Available data and research show that, for countries most dependent on fish to meet the nutritional requirements of their population, wild capture fisheries remain the dominant supplier. Although, contrary to popular narratives, the sustainability of these fisheries is not always and everywhere in crisis, securing their sustainability is essential and requires considerable effort across a broad spectrum of fishery systems. An impediment to achieving this is that the current research and policy discourses on environmental sustainability of fisheries and food security remain only loosely and superficially linked. Overcoming this requires adoption of a broader sustainability science paradigm to help harness synergies and negotiate tradeoffs between food security, resource conservation, and macroeconomic development goals. The way society chooses to govern fisheries is, however, an ethical choice, not just a technical one, and we recommend adding an ethical dimension to sustainability science as applied to fisheries.

  18. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications.

    PubMed

    Hilty, F M; Teleki, A; Krumeich, F; Büchel, R; Hurrell, R F; Pratsinis, S E; Zimmermann, M B

    2009-11-25

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe2O4) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  19. Nutritional solutions to major health problems of preschool children: how to optimise growth and development.

    PubMed

    Branca, Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Despite major economic development in the last few decades, childhood nutrition remains a great challenge for the human species. A combination of undernutrition, overnutrition, and poor dietary quality affect to a variable extent all of the world's populations, and are often combined in the same areas and even in the same families. Malnutrition is part of the life of many individuals since conception and is transmitted by 1 generation to the next. Countries with lower income per capita and poor socioeconomic strata are mainly affected and, in turn, malnutrition hampers their development. The eradication of child malnutrition is crucial in the fight against poverty. This article examines whether this goal will be achieved within the time frame the United Nations has set.

  20. Cultural and historical trends and influences of food, nutrition and cuisine on health and development.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Rita

    2004-01-01

    The distinctive qualities of the cuisine of Hangzhou are the result of its geographical situation, which provided good soils, reliable rainfall, a lake that has been a water source and renowned beauty spot for centuries. The rich water-sources facilitated the development of gastronomy, agriculture, trade and administration, especially after it became the capital of the Southern Sung Dynasty. Hangzhou's food sources are especially diverse, notably for fish, green vegetables, fungi, and tofu, and have been since early records. As capital, it became a leader in cuisine, and in the development of the restaurant industry. The strength of food traditions has been reinforced constantly by the cultural, medicinal, nutritional, and social values of food and cooking, by the interest of Chinese scholars in food and wine, and by the narrative that accompanies specific dishes.

  1. Plant Biotechnology Can Enhance Food Security and Nutrition in the Developing World Part 1.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Maureen; Montgomery, Jill

    2004-03-01

    The world’s demand for food production will increase markedly in the coming years. Meeting this demand will require that we employ all manner of approaches, including the use of biotechnology, to produce results that cannot be achieved using traditional methods. This 2-part article reviews ongoing experiences in developing countries where crop biotechnology is being used to enhance the availability and/or nutritional value of local crops. In part 1, the authors describe strategies that seek to enhance yields of staples and to improve the yields of indigenous nutritious foods. In Part 2 of this article, the authors describe strategies that seek to enhance the nutrient density of foods that can increase net income to resource-poor farmers in developing countries.

  2. Policy councils on food, nutrition and physical activity: the UK as a case study.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tim; Rayner, Geof; Rayner, Mike; Barling, David; Millstone, Erik

    2005-02-01

    International experience of Policy Councils on food and nutrition has developed over recent decades but they have not received the attention that is due to them. The 1992 International Conference on Nutrition recommended that governments create Food Policy Councils but few have been created. There has been more experience in local and sub-national policy councils, particularly in North America. Developing country experience of attempting to improve food policy integration stems from the 1970s. The UK's House of Commons' (Parliamentary) Health Committee, in its 2004 report on obesity, reviewed current policy determinants of the rise in obesity, concluding that national food and health policy lacked coherence, integration and effectiveness. To address this vacuum, it proposed the creation of a new 'Council of Nutrition and Physical Activity to improve co-ordination and inject independent thinking into strategy'. The case for creating such a Council in the UK is reviewed, as are possible organisational options, functions and remit. A Council could be created under the forthcoming Public Health Act. The purpose of the new Council would be to provide independent advice and strategic advice as well as monitor the linkages between policies on food, nutrition and physical activity, noting their environmental implications.

  3. Comparative ontogenetic development of two marine teleosts, gilthead seabream and European sea bass: New insights into nutrition and immunity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Héctor; Guzmán-Villanueva, Laura T; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Arizcun, Marta; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, María A

    2016-12-01

    Gilthead seabream and European sea bass are two of the most commonly farmed fish species. Larval development is critical to ensure high survival rates and thus avoid unacceptable economic losses, while nutrition and immunity are also important factors. For this reason this paper evaluates the ontogenetic development of seabream and sea bass digestive and immune systems from eggs to 73 days post-fertilisation (dpf) by assessing the expression levels of some nutrition-relevant (tryp, amya, alp and pept1) and immune-relevant (il1b, il6, il8, tnfa, cox2, casp1, tf, nccrp1, ighm and ight) genes. The results point to similar ontogenetic development trends for both species as regard nutrition and differences in some immunity related genes.

  4. Study on the Interactions of Nutrition and Infection. Progress Report 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narangwal Rural Health Research Centre (India).

    This document reports progress made by the Narangwal Rural Health Research Center in understanding the interactions of nutrition and infection in India. As part of a longitudinal study, 11 Punjab villages were divided into groups and received health care, nurtitional supplements or a combination of both. A control group received only symptomatic…

  5. A Focus Group Study of Child Nutrition Professionals' Attitudes about Food Allergies and Current Training Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yee Ming; Kwon, Junehee; Sauer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore child nutrition professionals' (CNPs) attitudes about food allergies, current practices of food allergy training, and operational issues related to food allergy training in school foodservice operations. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 CNPs with managerial…

  6. Trash Tells a Tale: School Studies of Food Waste as a Tool for Nutrition Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Gail G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The article presents recent data on food waste in the United States, shows how several schools have built upon these data and on student interest in the subject, and suggests ways to utilize the study of food waste to stimulate learning in nutrition and in critical thinking about societal issues. (Author/AJ)

  7. Knowledge Transfer: A Case Study of a Community Nutrition Education Program at a Land-Grant University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Ghaffar Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the process of knowledge transfer. The setting is a health and nutrition educational program at University of Minnesota Extension. The main research question was how is Knowledge Transfer being implemented in Extension, specifically Educational Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program? A case study,…

  8. Homemaker Reaction to EFNEP/Food Stamp Pilot Nutrition Education Project. A 1983 Pennsylvania and Massachusetts Survey. Extension Studies 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Polly P.; And Others

    Between 1982 and 1983, more than 750 homemakers from Pennsylvania and Massachusetts participated in a national study to test selected methods of delivering nutrition education to low-income families. The study, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Food Stamp Pilot Project, was conducted through the EFNEP in 10 states. At the…

  9. Effect of a nutrition education program on nutrition-related knowledge of English-as-second-language elementary school students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lascurain, Maria C; Kicklighter, Jana R; Jonnalagadda, Satya S; Boudolf, Erin Atkerson; Duchon, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Nutrition programs that target English-as-Second-Language (ESL) students can potentially improve their nutrition knowledge. This pilot study evaluated the effect of a Food Guide Pyramid (FGP) lesson on nutrition knowledge of ESL students (ages 9-12 years) in a refugee after-school program. A pre- and post-FGP lesson one group design was used. A 12-item knowledge questionnaire was administered to students (N = 15) and their opinions about the lesson were obtained. Overall FGP lesson mean knowledge scores did not increase significantly from pretest to posttest; however, scores that measured specific objectives on the ability to identify food groups and the number of servings for food groups increased, while scores on the ability to identify the importance of each food group for health decreased. Overall, students liked the nutrition lesson, described learning mainly about the FGP, and reported no confusing aspects. Findings suggest that nutrition education targeted to ESL students should emphasize foods versus nutrients and promote active learner involvement.

  10. Development of Smartphone Applications for Nutrition and Physical Activity Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Amelia; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background Young adults (aged 18 to 35) are a population group at high risk for weight gain, yet we know little about how to intervene in this group. Easy access to treatment and support with self-monitoring of their behaviors may be important. Smartphones are gaining in popularity with this population group and software applications (“apps”) used on these mobile devices are a novel technology that can be used to deliver brief health behavior change interventions directly to individuals en masse, with potentially favorable cost-utility. However, existing apps for modifying nutrition or physical activity behaviors may not always reflect best practice guidelines for weight management. Objective This paper describes the process of developing four apps aimed at modifying key lifestyle behaviors associated with weight gain during young adulthood, including physical activity, and consumption of take-out foods (fast food), fruit and vegetables, and sugar-sweetened drinks. Methods The development process involved: (1) deciding on the behavior change strategies, relevant guidelines, graphic design, and potential data collection; (2) selecting the platform (Web-based versus native); (3) creating the design, which required decisions about the user interface, architecture of the relational database, and programming code; and (4) testing the prototype versions with the target audience (young adults aged 18 to 35). Results The four apps took 18 months to develop, involving the fields of marketing, nutrition and dietetics, physical activity, and information technology. Ten subjects provided qualitative feedback about using the apps. The slow running speed of the apps (due to a reliance on an active Internet connection) was the primary issue identified by this group, as well as the requirement to log in to the apps. Conclusions Smartphone apps may be an innovative medium for delivering individual health behavior change intervention en masse, but researchers must give

  11. Maternal and paternal height and BMI and patterns of fetal growth: the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Wills, Andrew K; Chinchwadkar, Manoj C; Joglekar, Charudatta V; Natekar, Asit S; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Fall, Caroline H D; Kinare, Arun S

    2010-09-01

    We examined the differential associations of each parent's height and BMI with fetal growth, and examined the pattern of the associations through gestation. Data are from 557 term pregnancies in the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study. Size and conditional growth outcomes from 17 to 29 weeks to birth were derived from ultrasound and birth measures of head circumference, abdominal circumference, femur length and placental volume (at 17 weeks only). Parental height was positively associated with fetal head circumference and femur length. The associations with paternal height were detectible earlier in gestation (17-29 weeks) compared to the associations with maternal height. Fetuses of mothers with a higher BMI had a smaller mean head circumference at 17 weeks, but caught up to have larger head circumference at birth. Maternal but not paternal BMI, and paternal but not maternal height, were positively associated with placental volume. The opposing associations of placenta and fetal head growth with maternal BMI at 17 weeks could indicate prioritisation of early placental development, possibly as a strategy to facilitate growth in late gestation. This study has highlighted how the pattern of parental-fetal associations varies over gestation. Further follow-up will determine whether and how these variations in fetal/placental development relate to health in later life.

  12. Sports Nutrition Knowledge Assessment of Physical Educators and Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conkle, M. Terence; Tishler, Anne G.

    This study assessed the sports nutrition knowledge of current and prospective physical educators/coaches (HPEs) to determine the need for improved education in this area and to compare the nutrition knowledge of HPEs with that of foods and nutrition students (FNSs) and general college students (GENs). A researcher-developed 4-point Likert-type…

  13. Iron, folate, and vitamin B12 nutrition in pregnancy: a study of 1 000 women from southern India*

    PubMed Central

    Yusufji, D.; Mathan, V. I.; Baker, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    As part of a WHO collaborative programme the prevalence of anaemia was studied and the serum concentrations of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 were measured in 1 000 pregnant women from southern India. The results of the study show a high prevalence of anaemia, resulting from iron and folate deficiency with iron deficiency predominating. Interrelationships between these nutrients and their effect on pregnancy and the fetus were investigated. The results indicate that, in comparison with populations in developed countries, there was a high prevalence of iron and vitamin B12 deficiency in the community, but the state of folate nutrition was similar to that found elsewhere. PMID:4541142

  14. Fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Franz W.; Turshen, Meredeth

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that ”small-for-dates” infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960. Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy. PMID:5314013

  15. Fetal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, F W; Turshen, M

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that "small-for-dates" infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960.Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy.

  16. Nutritional endoderm in a direct developing frog: a potential parallel to the evolution of the amniote egg.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Daniel R; Singamsetty, Srikanth; Karadge, Uma; Williamson, Sean; Langer, Carrie E; Elinson, Richard P

    2007-05-01

    The egg of the direct-developing frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, has 20 x the volume as that of the model amphibian, Xenopus laevis. Increased egg size led to the origin of nutritional endoderm, a novel cell type that provides nutrition but does not differentiate into digestive tract tissues. As the E. coqui endoderm develops, a distinct boundary exists between differentiating intestinal cells and large yolky cells, which persists even when yolk platelets are depleted. The yolky cells do not become tissues of the digestive tract and are lost, as shown by histology and lineage tracing. EcSox17, an endodermal transcriptional factor, did not distinguish these two cell types, however. When cleavage of the yolky cells was inhibited, embryogenesis continued, indicating that some degree of incomplete cleavage can be tolerated. The presence of cellularized nutritional endoderm in E. coqui may parallel changes that occurred in the evolution of the amniote egg 360 million years ago.

  17. Modification of the school cafeteria environment can impact childhood nutrition. Results from the Wise Mind and LA Health studies.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Martin, Corby K; Newton, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Recent changes in nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs assume that modification of the nutritional serving practices of school cafeterias will result in improved childhood nutrition in the school environment. The primary aim of this paper is to summarize the findings from two recent cluster randomized controlled trials (Wise Mind and LA Health) that tested the hypothesis that modification of school cafeteria environments, including changes in nutrition standards, would yield beneficial changes in childhood nutrition and healthy eating in the school lunch environment. A secondary aim was to investigate the association of participant characteristics and changes in nutrition and healthy eating. A third aim was to investigate the relationships between the food intake of children and: (1) foods selected by the children and (2) food that was uneaten during the lunch meal (plate waste). The studies used similar approaches for modifying the school cafeteria environment and both studies used the digital photography method to measure changes in food intake, food selection, and plate waste. Both studies reported significant improvements in childhood nutrition, and the LA Health study reported improved healthy eating, following introduction of the cafeteria modification program in comparison to baseline and/or control arms. These studies confirm the hypothesis that interventions that modify the school cafeteria environment can beneficially impact childhood nutrition.

  18. Comparison of three instructional strategies in food and nutrition education: developing a diet plan for a diabetic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, Aubteen; Pourafshar, Shirin; Suryavanshi, Rinki; `Logan'Arrington, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the performance of dietitians-in-training on developing a diet plan for a diabetic patient either independently or after peer discussion. Participants (n = 58) from an undergraduate program in food and nutrition were divided into two groups based on their prior knowledge before being randomly assigned into three conditions: (1) peer discussion with just-in-time information (JIT information), (2) peer discussion without JIT information), and (3) independent performers. The learners' performance in the three conditions was analyzed. The results presented here describe the role of prior knowledge and JIT information across the conditions and the interaction of the two factors as well as the instructional implications of the findings.

  19. The role of cost-effectiveness analysis in developing nutrition policy.

    PubMed

    Cobiac, Linda J; Veerman, Lennert; Vos, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the overconsumption of unhealthy foods is growing worldwide. With high global rates of noncommunicable diseases related to poor nutrition and projections of more rapid increases of rates in low- and middle-income countries, it is vital to identify effective but low-cost interventions. Cost-effectiveness studies show that individually targeted dietary interventions can be effective and cost-effective, but a growing number of modeling studies suggest that population-wide approaches may bring larger and more sustained benefits for population health at a lower cost to society. Mandatory regulation of salt in processed foods, in particular, is highly recommended. Future research should focus on lacunae in the current evidence base: effectiveness of interventions addressing the marketing, availability, and price of healthy and unhealthy foods; modeling health impacts of complex dietary changes and multi-intervention strategies; and modeling health implications in diverse subpopulations to identify interventions that will most efficiently and effectively reduce health inequalities.

  20. Impact of foods nutritionally enhanced through biotechnology in alleviating malnutrition in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Nasim, Anwar

    2007-01-01

    According to United Nations (UN) projections, the world's population will grow from 6.1 billion in 2000 to 8 billion in 2025 and 9.4 billion in 2050. Most (93%) of the increase will take place in developing countries. The rapid population growth in developing countries creates major challenges for governments regarding food and nutrition security. According to current World Health Organization estimates, more than 3 billion people worldwide, especially in developing countries, are malnourished in essential nutrients. Malnutrition imposes severe costs on a country's population due to impaired physical and cognitive abilities and reduced ability to work. Little progress has been made in improving malnutrition over the past few decades. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN would like to see more nutrient-rich foods introduced into these countries, because supplements are expensive and difficult to distribute widely. Biofortification of staple crops through modern biotechnology can potentially help in alleviating malnutrition in developing countries. Several genetically modified crops, including rice, potatoes, oilseeds, and cassava, with elevated levels of essential nutrients (such as vitamin A, iron, zinc, protein and essential amino acids, and essential fatty acids); reduced levels of antinutritional factors (such as cyanogens, phytates, and glycoalkaloid); and increased levels of factors that influence bioavailability and utilization of essential nutrients (such as cysteine residues) are advancing through field trial stage and regulatory processes towards commercialization. The ready availability and consumption of the biofortified crops would have a significant impact in reducing malnutrition and the risk of chronic disease in developing countries.

  1. A Study to Determine the Best Method of Delivering Nutrition Education Services at Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    University Graduate Program in Darnall, Army Comm. Hospital N/A Health Care Administration 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City...Services .................... 52 III. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS ......................... 54 APPENDIX A. NUTRITION CARE DIVISION ORGANIZATION...53 ii I. INTRODUCTION Conditions Which Prompted The Study The mission of the Army hospital Nutrition Care Division (NCD) is "to provide

  2. Space Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  3. Role of dietary factors and food habits in the development of childhood obesity: a commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Carlo; Braegger, Christian; Decsi, Tamas; Kolacek, Sanja; Koletzko, Berthold; Mihatsch, Walter; Moreno, Luis A; Puntis, John; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Turck, Dominique; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2011-06-01

    This Comment by the Committee on Nutrition of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition aims to provide a summary of the role of nutrition-related factors on obesity prevention in children ages 2 to 18 years. This Comment emphasizes that dietary interventions should be incorporated into a multidisciplinary strategy for obesity prevention. No single nutrient has been unequivocally associated with the development of obesity. Methodological limitations in study design and the complex nature of obesity must be taken into account when interpreting the association with reported dietary factors. Energy intake should be individually determined, taking into account energy expenditure and growth. Preferential intake of slowly absorbed carbohydrates and limiting the ingestion of rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and simple sugars should be promoted. No specific recommendations for macronutrient intakes to prevent obesity can be made. Plant foods can be used as the main food contributors to a well-balanced diet with adequate monitoring of nutrient intake. Plain water should be promoted as the main source of fluids for children instead of sugar-sweetened beverages. Children should eat at least 4 meals, including breakfast, every day. Regular family meals should be encouraged. Regular consumption of fast food with large portion sizes and high energy density should be avoided. Healthy food options should be promoted for snacking. Food portion sizes should be appropriate for age and body size. Nutrition and lifestyle education aimed at the prevention of obesity should be included in the routine care of children by health care professionals.

  4. A Study on the Dietary Intake and the Nutritional Status among the Pancreatic Cancer Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Seong; Yoon, Dong Sup; Kim, Woo Jeong; Chung, Hae-yun

    2016-01-01

    The adequate dietary intake is important to maintain the nutritional status of the patients after pancreatic cancer surgery. This prospective study was designed to investigate the dietary intake and the nutritional status of the patients who had pancreatic cancer surgery. Thirty-one patients (15 men, 16 women) were enrolled and measured body weight, body mass index (BMI), nutritional risk index (NRI), and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST). Actual oral intake with nutritional impact symptoms recorded on the clinical research foam at every meal and medical information were collected from electronic medical charts. The rates of malnutrition at admission were 45.1% (14/31) and 28.9% (9/31) by NRI and MUST method, respectively, but those were increased to 87% (27/31) and 86.6% (26/31) after operation on discharge. The median values of daily intake of energy, carbohydrates, fat, and protein were 588.1 kcal, 96.0 g, 11.8 g, and 27.0 g, respectively. Most patients (n = 20, 64.5%) experienced two or more symptoms such as anorexia, abdominal bloating and early satiety. There were negative correlations between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and the intake of total energy, protein, fat, and zinc. The rates of malnutrition were increased sharply after surgery and the dietary intake also influenced the inflammatory indicators. The results suggested that need of considering special therapeutic diets for the patients who received pancreatic surgery. PMID:27812517

  5. Case study: nutrition challenges of a marathon runner with a gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    A new type of athlete is appearing in the offices of sports dietitians: formerly obese people who have undergone gastric bypass surgery and now aspire to be marathoners, triathletes, and other types of endurance athletes. The standard nutrition advice offered to bypass patients is contrary to the standard sports advice given to athletes. Bypass athletes need to limit carbohydrates, fluids, and energy intake and consume a protein-based diet. This case study describes the sport nutrition concerns of a woman who, after having gastric bypass surgery, trained to run a marathon (42 km). Because of her limited ability to consume food and fluids, she experienced difficulty preventing fatigue and dehydration during her long training runs and the marathon itself. She learned through trial and error how to survive the nutritional challenges and complete the marathon. Health professionals need to be aware of the potential medical risks associated with endurance exercise in gastric bypass patients. Research is needed to determine the best sports nutrition practices for bypass patients. Only then can sport dietitians better educate this small but growing contingent of endurance athletes so the athletes can meet their training and performance goals and reduce their risk of experiencing serious health consequences.

  6. Improving human micronutrient nutrition through biofortification in the soil-plant system: China as a case study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-E; Chen, Wen-Rong; Feng, Ying

    2007-10-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition is a major health problem in China. According to a national nutritional survey, approximately 24% of all Chinese children suffer from a serious deficiency of iron (Fe) (anemia), while over 50% show a sub-clinical level of zinc (Zn) deficiency. More than 374 million people in China suffer from goiter disease, which is related to iodine (I) deficiency, and approximately 20% of the Chinese population are affected by selenium (Se) deficiency. Micronutrient malnutrition in humans is derived from deficiencies of these elements in soils and foods. In China, approximately 40% of the total land area is deficient in Fe and Zn. Keshan and Kaschin-Beck diseases always appear in regions where the soil content of Se in low. The soil-plant system is instrumental to human nutrition and forms the basis of the "food chain" in which there is micronutrient cycling, resulting in an ecologically sound and sustainable flow of micronutrients. Soil-plant system strategies that have been adopted to improve human micronutrient nutrition mainly include: (1) exploiting micronutrient-dense crop genotypes by studying the physiology and genetics of micronutrient flow from soils to the edible parts of crops; (2) improving micronutrient bioavailability through a better knowledge of the mechanisms of the enhancers' production and accumulation in edible parts and its regulation through soil-plant system; (3) improving our knowledge of the relationship between the content and bioavailability of micronutrients in soils and those in edible crop products for better human nutrition; (4) developing special micronutrient fertilizers and integrated nutrient management technologies for increasing both the density of the micronutrients in the edible parts of plants and their bioavailability to humans.

  7. [Nutritional guidelines and standards in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Volkert, D

    2011-04-01

    Nutritional problems and deficiencies are widespread in geriatric institutions. On the other hand, benefits of different interventions to improve the nutritional situation of elderly people--from amelioration of mealtime ambience to the use of artificial nutrition--have been shown in many studies. In recent years, several guidelines and standards have been developed to facilitate the transfer of this scientific knowledge into practice. These are in particular the medical Guidelines for Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Geriatrics (DGEM/DGG and ESPEN), the DNQP Expert Standard for qualified nurses, the DGE Quality Standards for dietetic personnel, and the interdisciplinary BUKO-QS Standard. These guidelines and standards provide recommendations for adequate nutritional care and assistance for the institutionalized elderly person based on the scientific state of the art. They should be used as the basis for the development of local instructions for the management of nutritional problems and malnutrition. Elderly people will only profit, if these guidelines are used in daily routine.

  8. Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), environmental enteropathy, nutrition, and early child development: making the links.

    PubMed

    Ngure, Francis M; Reid, Brianna M; Humphrey, Jean H; Mbuya, Mduduzi N; Pelto, Gretel; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    There is scarce research and programmatic evidence on the effect of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions of the physical environment on early child cognitive, sensorimotor, and socioemotional development. Furthermore, many common WASH interventions are not specifically designed to protect babies in the first 3 years of life, when gut health and linear growth are established. We review evidence linking WASH, anemia, and child growth, and highlight pathways through which WASH may affect early child development, primarily through inflammation, stunting, and anemia. Environmental enteropathy, a prevalent subclinical condition of the gut, may be a key mediating pathway linking poor hygiene to developmental deficits. Current early child development research and programs lack evidence-based interventions to provide a clean play and infant feeding environment in addition to established priorities of nutrition, stimulation, and child protection. Solutions to this problem will require appropriate behavior change and technologies that are adapted to the social and physical context and conducive to infant play and socialization. We propose the concept of baby WASH as an additional component of early childhood development programs.

  9. A qualitative study of beliefs about food relating to child nutrition in the Lower Jimi Valley.

    PubMed

    Keeble, Jessica; Keeble, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A previous study that we carried out confirmed that malnutrition is a problem amongst the young child population in the Lower Jimi Valley. This study begins to explore the cultural and traditional food beliefs in order to target the interventions of health services in reducing childhood malnutrition. The study was undertaken during maternal and child health clinics conducted on a foot patrol from Koinambe Health Centre in the villages of Kompiai, Komengwai, Kupeng, Injim and Kwiama. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with small groups of women to uncover beliefs regarding nutrition and feeding during pregnancy, infancy and childhood. This study has highlighted practices that nutritionally disadvantage young children. The four most significant are late weaning, restriction of foods, infrequency of feeding and the low priority given to children during meal times. It is suggested that it is the use, control and distribution of food, rather than its shortage, that contribute most significantly to the problem of childhood malnutrition in this area.

  10. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND)—Zinc Review12345

    PubMed Central

    King, Janet C; Brown, Kenneth H; Gibson, Rosalind S; Krebs, Nancy F; Lowe, Nicola M; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Raiten, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is required for multiple metabolic processes as a structural, regulatory, or catalytic ion. Cellular, tissue, and whole-body zinc homeostasis is tightly controlled to sustain metabolic functions over a wide range of zinc intakes, making it difficult to assess zinc insufficiency or excess. The BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) Zinc Expert Panel recommends 3 measurements for estimating zinc status: dietary zinc intake, plasma zinc concentration (PZC), and height-for-age of growing infants and children. The amount of dietary zinc potentially available for absorption, which requires an estimate of dietary zinc and phytate, can be used to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. PZCs respond to severe dietary zinc restriction and to zinc supplementation; they also change with shifts in whole-body zinc balance and clinical signs of zinc deficiency. PZC cutoffs are available to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. However, there are limitations in using the PZC to assess zinc status. PZCs respond less to additional zinc provided in food than to a supplement administered between meals, there is considerable interindividual variability in PZCs with changes in dietary zinc, and PZCs are influenced by recent meal consumption, the time of day, inflammation, and certain drugs and hormones. Insufficient data are available on hair, urinary, nail, and blood cell zinc responses to changes in dietary zinc to recommend these biomarkers for assessing zinc status. Of the potential functional indicators of zinc, growth is the only one that is recommended. Because pharmacologic zinc doses are unlikely to enhance growth, a growth response to supplemental zinc is interpreted as indicating pre-existing zinc deficiency. Other functional indicators reviewed but not recommended for assessing zinc nutrition in clinical or field settings because of insufficient information are the activity or amounts of zinc-dependent enzymes

  11. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) alters histiotrophic nutrition pathways and epigenetic processes in the developing conceptus

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Karilyn E.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Jilek, Joseph L.; Shay, Brian J.; Harris, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Histiotrophic nutrition pathways (HNPs) are processes by which the organogenesis-stage conceptus obtains nutrients, amino acids, vitamins, and cofactors required for protein biosynthesis and metabolic activities. Nutrients are captured from the maternal milieu as whole proteins and cargoes via receptor-mediated endocytosis in the visceral yolk sac (VYS), degraded by lysosomal proteolysis, and delivered to the developing embryo (EMB). Several nutrients obtained by HNPs are required substrates for one-carbon (C1) metabolism and supply methyl groups required for epigenetic processes, including DNA and histone methylation. Increased availability of methyl donors has been associated with reduced risk for neural tube defects (NTDs). Here we show that mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) treatment (100 or 250 µM) alters HNPs, C1 metabolism, and epigenetic programming in the organogenesis-stage conceptus. Specifically, 3 h MEHP treatment of mouse embryos in whole culture resulted in dose dependent reduction of HNP activity in the conceptus. To observe nutrient consequences of decreased HNP function, C1 components and substrates and epigenetic outcomes were quantified at 24 h. Treatment with 100 µM MEHP resulted in decreased dietary methyl donor concentrations, while treatment with 100 or 250 µM MEHP resulted in dose-dependent elevated C1 products and substrates. In MEHP-treated EMBs with NTDs, H3K4 methylation was significantly increased, while no effects were seen in treated VYS. DNA methylation was reduced in MEHP-treated EMB with and without NTDs. This research suggests that environmental toxicants such as MEHP decrease embryonic nutrition in a time-dependent manner, and that epigenetic consequences of HNP disruption may be exacerbated in EMB with NTDs. PMID:26507544

  12. Industry Approach to Nutrition-Based Product Development and Reformulation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Vlassopoulos, Antonis; Masset, Gabriel; Leroy, Fabienne; Spieldenner, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years there has been a proliferation of initiatives to classify food products according to their nutritional composition (e.g., high in fat/sugar) to better guide consumer choices and regulate the food environment. This global trend, lately introduced in Asia as well, utilizes nutrient profiling (NP) to set compositional criteria for food products. Even though the use of NP to set targets for product reformulation has been proposed for years, to date only two NP systems have been specifically developed for that purpose. The majority of the NP applications, especially in Asia, focus on marketing and/or health claim regulation, as well as front-of-pack labeling. Product reformulation has been identified, by the World Health Organization and other official bodies, as a key tool for the food industry to help address public health nutrition priorities and provide support towards the reduction of excessive dietary sugar, salt and fats. In the United Kingdom, the Responsibility Deal is an excellent example of a public-private collaborative initiative that successfully reduced the salt content of products available in the supermarkets by 20-30%, resulting in an estimated 10% reduction in salt intake at the population level. Validation of NP systems targeted towards reformulation supports the hypothesis that, by adopting them, the industry can actively support existing policies in the direction of lowering consumptions in public health-sensitive nutrients. The symposium presented a discussion on the current NP landscape in Asia, the importance of reformulation for public health and the Nestlé approach to improve the food environment in Asia through NP.

  13. Development and Evaluation of Activity-Oriented Nutrition Classes for Pregnant and Parenting Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Darcy; Kendall, Patricia; Wilken, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Compared to 10 controls, pregnant or parenting teens (n=60) who attended nutrition workshops significantly increased their knowledge; 87% reported improvements in nutrition behavior. There were no significant improvements in dietary intake, possibly due to lack of control of food purchasing and preparation or lack of readiness to change. (SK)

  14. Maintaining Enteral Nutrition in the Severely Ill using a Newly Developed Nasojejunal Feeding Tube with Gastric Decompression Function.

    PubMed

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel; Nishihara, Kazuki; Murata, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    For nutritional support of critically ill patients, the enteral route is preferred over the parenteral route. Although nasojejunal feeding can be superior to gastric feeding when gastrointestinal symptoms occur, it does not necessarily solve the problem of large gastric residual volumes. We report the successful use of a newly developed nasojejunal feeding tube with gastric decompression function in an 84-year-old man with severe pneumonia. After gastric feeding was considered not well tolerated, the use of this tube improved the delivery of nutrition until the patient was stable enough to undergo percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  15. Maintaining Enteral Nutrition in the Severely Ill using a Newly Developed Nasojejunal Feeding Tube with Gastric Decompression Function

    PubMed Central

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Nishihara, Kazuki; Murata, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    For nutritional support of critically ill patients, the enteral route is preferred over the parenteral route. Although nasojejunal feeding can be superior to gastric feeding when gastrointestinal symptoms occur, it does not necessarily solve the problem of large gastric residual volumes. We report the successful use of a newly developed nasojejunal feeding tube with gastric decompression function in an 84-year-old man with severe pneumonia. After gastric feeding was considered not well tolerated, the use of this tube improved the delivery of nutrition until the patient was stable enough to undergo percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. PMID:27746430

  16. English/Spanish Glossary of Health and Nutrition Terms. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint Series R-54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This glossary was developed to aid English-speaking health workers in Guatemala in translating health and nutrition terms from English to Spanish. Because Guatemala is renowned for its extensive vocabulary of "modismos", or slang, a column has been added to facilitate adaptation of the glossary to regional variations. The terms in the…

  17. Stepping up to the challenge: the development, implementation, and assessment of a statewide, regional, leadership program for school nutrition directors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Jacqueline J; Briggs, Marilyn M; Beall, Deborah L; Curwood, Sandy; Gray, Pilar; Soiseth, Scott; Taylor, Rodney K; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2015-01-01

    A statewide professional development program was developed and implemented throughout California for school nutrition directors with the goal of creating healthy school environments and regional networks for collaboration and healthy school environment sustainability. Needs of school nutrition directors were identified through a needs assessment questionnaire. Results of the needs assessment questionnaire (n = 256) identified (a) planning cost-effective menus; (b) reducing calories, sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat in menus; and (c) using U.S. Department of Agriculture foods cost-effectively as the most useful topics. Highest rated topics informed the content of the professional development program. A post-professional development questionnaire identified key "insights, inspirations, and strategies" as (a) marketing of school foods program, (b) expansion of salad bars, and (c) collaboration with community partners. A 6-month follow-up questionnaire identified that 86% of participants made progress toward implementing at least one of their five insights, inspirations, and strategies in their school districts. Most common areas that were implemented were marketing and branding (32%), revamping salad bars (18%), and motivating staff (16%). School and Community Actions for Nutrition survey analysis showed a significant increase in the use of marketing methods in school nutrition programs from baseline to 6-month post-program implementation (p = .024).

  18. Use of Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Nutrition Messages for Low-Income Mothers of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Alicie H.; Wilson, Judy F.; Burns, Adam; Blum-Kemelor, Donna; Singh, Anita; Race, Patricia O.; Soto, Valery; Lockett, Alice F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To develop and test nutrition messages and supporting content with low-income mothers for use with theory-based interventions addressing fruit and vegetable consumption and child-feeding practices. Design: Six formative and 6 evaluative focus groups explored message concepts and tested messages, respectively. Setting: Research…

  19. Effects of gestational plane of nutrition and selenium supplementation on mammary development and colostrum quality in pregnant ewe lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine effects of nutritional plane and selenium (Se) supplementation on colostrum quality and mammary development, individually fed, pregnant Rambouillet ewe lambs were allotted randomly to 1 of 6 treatments in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement. Main effects included dietary Se level which began at...

  20. Development of nutritionally at-risk young children is predicted by malaria, anemia, and stunting in Pemba, Zanzibar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritionally at-risk children suffer delays in physical growth and motor and language development. Infectious diseases such as malaria pose an additional risk. We examined the cross-sectional relationships among malaria infection, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ), motor ...

  1. Improving nutrition and physical activity in the workplace: a meta-analysis of intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Amanda D; Wilson, Carlene

    2012-06-01

    A comprehensive search of the literature for studies examining physical activity or nutrition interventions in the workplace, published between 1999 and March 2009, was conducted. This search identified 29 relevant studies. Interventions were grouped according to the theoretical framework on which the interventions were based (e.g. education, cognitive-behavioural, motivation enhancement, social influence, exercise). Weighted Cohen's d effect sizes, percentage overlap statistics, confidence intervals and fail safe Ns were calculated. Most theoretical approaches were associated with small effects. However, large effects were found for some measures of interventions using motivation enhancement. Effect sizes were larger for studies focusing on one health behaviour and for randomized controlled trials. The workplace is a suitable environment for making modest changes in the physical activity, nutrition and health of employees. Further research is necessary to determine whether these changes can be maintained in the long term.

  2. Metabolic control of oocyte development: linking maternal nutrition and reproductive outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honglin; Gu, Xi; Boots, Christina; Moley, Kelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes, and related metabolic disorders are major health issues worldwide. As the epidemic of metabolic disorders continues, the associated medical comorbidities, including the detrimental impact on reproduction, increase as well. Emerging evidence suggests that the effects of maternal nutrition on reproductive outcomes are likely to be mediated, at least in part, by oocyte metabolism. Well-balanced and timed energy metabolism is critical for optimal development of oocytes. To date, much of our understanding of oocyte metabolism comes from the effects of extrinsic nutrients on oocyte maturation. In contrast, intrinsic regulation of oocyte development by metabolic enzymes, intracellular mediators, and transport systems is less characterized. Specifically, decreased acid transport proteins levels, increased glucose/lipid content and elevated reactive oxygen species in oocytes have been implicated in meiotic defects, organelle dysfunction and epigenetic alteration. Therefore, metabolic disturbances in oocytes may contribute to the diminished reproductive potential experienced by women with metabolic disorders. In-depth research is needed to further explore the underlying mechanisms. This review also discusses several approaches for metabolic analysis. Metabolomic profiling of oocytes, the surrounding granulosa cells, and follicular fluid will uncover the metabolic networks regulating oocyte development, potentially leading to the identification of oocyte quality markers and prevention of reproductive disease and poor outcomes in offspring. PMID:25280482

  3. Enteral nutrition in malnutrition following gastric resection and cephalic pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Kornowski, A; Cosnes, J; Gendre, J P; Quintrec, Y

    1992-02-01

    Nutritional recovery was studied during continuous enteral nutrition in 29 patients who had developed malnutrition after gastric surgery. Patients were divided into three groups according to the type of surgery involved: total gastrectomy (n = 10), partial gastrectomy (n = 12), or cephalic pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 7). The evolution of anthropometric and biological nutritional parameters in each group was compared with that observed in a control group of 10 nonoperated anorectic patients. Significant gains in body weight, arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold, serum transferrin and global nutritional status were observed after 3 to 4 weeks of enteral nutrition in each group, while serum albumin, serum cholesterol, hemoglobin, and total lymphocyte count did not change significantly. No significant difference was observed between the groups. However, weight gain tended to be slower in patients with cephalic pancreaticoduodenectomy. This study confirms that enteral nutrition is an effective method of nutritional repletion after gastrectomy. Enteral nutrition can be used in undernourished gastrectomized patients when dietary measures alone have proven inadequate.

  4. Developing and Implementing an Effective Nutrition and Fitness Program for Kindergarten/First-Grade Students through Hands-On and Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Brenda M.

    A practicum developed and implemented a nutrition and fitness program for 90 kindergarten and first-grade students in an urban elementary school. The program was designed to make parents, teachers, and students more aware of nutrition and physical fitness requirements for proper growth and development. The 33-week program included: (1) pretest…

  5. Nutrition and Child Growth and Development in Tunisia. Interim Progress Report, (September 1, 1972--February 28, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Harben Boutourline

    This interim report of the Yale Project describes the progress made on the nutrition and growth study of Tunisian children from September 1, 1972 through February 28, 1973. A major part of the report is devoted to the organizational and data collection problems of the longitudinal study, discussed under the following categories: biomedics,…

  6. Development and validity of a questionnaire to test the knowledge of primary care personnel regarding nutrition in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of its epidemic proportions in developed and developing countries, obesity is considered a serious public health issue. In order to increase knowledge concerning the ability of health care professionals in caring for obese adolescents and adopt more efficient preventive and control measures, a questionnaire was developed and validated to assess non-dietitian health professionals regarding their Knowledge of Nutrition in Obese Adolescents (KNOA). Methods The development and evaluation of a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of primary care practitioners with respect to nutrition in obese adolescents was carried out in five phases, as follows: 1) definition of study dimensions 2) development of 42 questions and preliminary evaluation of the questionnaire by a panel of experts; 3) characterization and selection of primary care practitioners (35 dietitians and 265 non-dietitians) and measurement of questionnaire criteria by contrasting the responses of dietitians and non-dietitians; 4) reliability assessment by question exclusion based on item difficulty (too easy and too difficult for non-dietitian practitioners), item discrimination, internal consistency and reproducibility index determination; and 5) scoring the completed questionnaires. Results Dietitians obtained higher scores than non-dietitians (Mann–Whitney U test, P < 0.05), confirming the validity of the questionnaire criteria. Items were discriminated by correlating the score for each item with the total score, using a minimum of 0.2 as a correlation coefficient cutoff value. Item difficulty was controlled by excluding questions answered correctly by more than 90% of the non-dietitian subjects (too easy) or by less than 10% of them (too difficult). The final questionnaire contained 26 of the original 42 questions, increasing Cronbach’s α value from 0.788 to 0.807. Test-retest agreement between respondents was classified as good to very good (Kappa test, >0.60). Conclusion The

  7. Nutritional status and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Merli, Manuela; Giusto, Michela; Giannelli, Valerio; Lucidi, Cristina; Riggio, Oliviero

    2011-12-01

    Chronic liver disease has a profound effect on nutritional status and undernourishment is almost universally present in patients with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the last decades, due to epidemiological changes, a trend showing an increase in patients with end-stage liver disease and associated obesity has also been reported in developed countries. Nutrition abnormalities may influence the outcome after transplantation therefore, the importance to carefully assess the nutritional status in the work-up of patients candidates for liver transplantation is widely accepted. More attention has been given to malnourished patients as they represent the greater number. The subjective global nutritional assessment and anthropometric measurements are recognized in current guidelines to be adequate in identifying those patients at risk of malnutrition. Cirrhotic patients with a depletion in lean body mass and fat deposits have an increased surgical risk and malnutrition may impact on morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. For this reason an adequate calorie and protein intake should always be ensured to malnourished cirrhotic patient either through the diet, or using oral nutritional supplements or by enteral or parenteral nutrition although studies supporting the efficacy of nutritional supplementation in improving the clinical outcomes after transplantation are still scarce. When liver function is restored, an amelioration in the nutritional status is expected. After liver transplantation in fact dietary intake rapidly normalizes and fat mass is progressively regained while the recovery of muscle mass can be slower. In some patients unregulated weight gain may lead to over-nutrition and may favor metabolic disorders (hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia). This condition, defined as 'metabolic syndrome', may play a negative role on the overall survival of liver transplant patients. In this report we review

  8. Linking Supermarket Sales Data To Nutritional Information: An Informatics Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Brinkerhoff, Kristina M.; Brewster, Philip J.; Clark, Edward B.; Jordan, Kristine C.; Cummins, Mollie R.; Hurdle, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Grocery sales are a data source of potential value to dietary assessment programs in public health informatics. However, the lack of a computable method for mapping between nutrient and food item information represents a major obstacle. We studied the feasibility of linking point-of-sale data to USDA-SR nutrient database information in a sustainable way. We analyzed 2,009,533 de-identified sales items purchased by 32,785 customers over a two-week period. We developed a method using the item category hierarchy in the supermarket’s database to link purchased items to records from the USDA-SR. We describe our methodology and its rationale and limitations. Approximately 70% of all items were mapped and linked to the SR; approximately 90% of all items could be mapped with an equivalent expenditure of additional effort. 100% of all items were mapped to USDA standard food groups. We conclude that mapping grocery sales data to nutritional information is feasible. PMID:22195115

  9. Utilizing Talking Circles as a Means of Gathering American Indian Stories for Developing a Nutrition and Physical Activity Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Brandenburger, Shelly J; Wells, Karlys; Stluka, Suzanne

    2016-11-18

    This qualitative study used a focus group approach (talking circles) to elicit tribal elder insight on important concepts for the purpose of creating a curriculum to teach tribal youth in South Dakota about nutrition and physical activity in culturally appropriate ways. The focus groups were part of a larger project that is exploring mechanisms for creating culturally relevant nutrition and physical activity education for American Indian youth. A series of "Eat Smart, Play Hard" posters, created by South Dakota State University Extension, served as the starting point for talking circle conversations with tribal elders about teaching nutrition and physical activity to children. Data from the talking circles were analyzed using qualitative content analysis for themes in elder dialogs. In open-ended conversations, elders discussed barriers and success in achieving good nutrition and physical activity, important aspects of the Siouan food culture, and historical relationships with food. They shared insights on food ingredients and methods of obtaining and preparing food that were and are currently important to their communities. These data were used to better understand the Native cultural perspectives on nutrition and physical activity and to create effective educational material for Native youth that could be used to teach them in culturally relevant ways.

  10. Child Nutrition. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline; Eastman, Wayne; Aird, Laura Dutil; McCrea, Nadine L.

    2002-01-01

    Four workshops focus on nutrition for infants and children in child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Nutrition and Child Development: Global Perspectives" (Jacqueline Hayden); (2) "Working with Families around Nutritional Issues" (Wayne Eastman); (3) "Breastfeeding Promotion in Child Care" (Laura Dutil Aird); and (4) "Food as Shared…

  11. A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Wendy E.; Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Dinsdale, Elsa C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that “nutritional programming” of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health. PMID:27187422

  12. A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health.

    PubMed

    Ward, Wendy E; Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Dinsdale, Elsa C

    2016-05-11

    Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that "nutritional programming" of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health.

  13. Measuring Nutrition Literacy in Breast Cancer Patients: Development of a Novel Instrument.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Heather D; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Befort, Christie; Gajewski, Byron; Kennett, Amy R; Yu, Qing; Christifano, Danielle; Sullivan, Debra K

    2016-09-01

    No nutrition literacy instruments have been tested in breast cancer survivors, yet nutrition is a critical lifestyle factor for optimizing weight and improving quality of life in breast cancer survival. Our objectives were to adapt our Nutrition Literacy Assessment Instrument for breast cancer populations and to pilot test its validity and reliability. We modified the instrument based on review by content experts in cancer and nutrition and cognitive interviews with 18 cancer survivors. The modified instrument (Nutrition Literacy Assessment Instrument for Breast Cancer, NLit-BCa) was pilot-tested with 17 high-risk women and 55 breast cancer survivors. We conducted the NLit-BCa on two separate occasions 4 weeks apart and assessed reliability by confirmatory factor analysis. Construct validity was evaluated by comparing results of the NLit-BCa to a Healthy Eating Index score derived from two separate 24-h dietary recalls. Content validity of the NLit-BCa was acceptable (0.93). Entire reliability for three instrument domains was substantial (>0.80), while remaining domains demonstrated fair or moderate reliability. Significant relationships were found between five of the six domains of nutrition literacy and diet quality (P < 0.05). The NLit-BCa is content valid and demonstrates promising reliability and construct validity related to diet quality, through a larger sample size, and removal of non-discriminating items is needed to confirm these findings. Thus, the NLit-BCa demonstrates potential for comprehensively measuring nutrition literacy in breast cancer populations.

  14. Intermittent iron supplementation for improving nutrition and development in children under 12 years of age

    PubMed Central

    De-Regil, Luz Maria; Jefferds, Maria Elena D; Sylvetsky, Allison C; Dowswell, Therese

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 600 million children of preschool and school age are anaemic worldwide. It is estimated that half of the cases are due to iron deficiency. Consequences of iron deficiency anaemia during childhood include growth retardation, reduced school achievement, impaired motor and cognitive development, and increased morbidity and mortality. The provision of daily iron supplements is a widely used strategy for improving iron status in children but its effectiveness has been limited due to its side effects, which can include nausea, constipation or staining of the teeth. As a consequence, intermittent iron supplementation (one, two or three times a week on nonconsecutive days) has been proposed as an effective and safer alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the effects of intermittent iron supplementation, alone or in combination with other vitamins and minerals, on nutritional and developmental outcomes in children from birth to 12 years of age compared with a placebo, no intervention or daily supplementation. Search methods We searched the following databases on 24 May 2011: CENTRAL (2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1948 to May week 2, 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 20), CINAHL (1937 to current), POPLINE (all available years) and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). On 29 June 2011 we searched all available years in the following databases: SCIELO, LILACS, IBECS and IMBIOMED. We also contacted relevant organisations (on 3 July 2011) to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials with either individual or cluster randomisation. Participants were children under the age of 12 years at the time of intervention with no specific health problems. The intervention assessed was intermittent iron supplementation compared with a placebo, no intervention or daily supplementation. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies

  15. Feeding the brain and nurturing the mind: Linking nutrition and the gut microbiota to brain development

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Manu S.; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains a microbial community composed of tens of trillions of organisms that normally assemble during the first 2–3 y of postnatal life. We propose that brain development needs to be viewed in the context of the developmental biology of this “microbial organ” and its capacity to metabolize the various diets we consume. We hypothesize that the persistent cognitive abnormalities seen in children with undernutrition are related in part to their persistent gut microbiota immaturity and that specific regions of the brain that normally exhibit persistent juvenile (neotenous) patterns of gene expression, including those critically involved in various higher cognitive functions such as the brain’s default mode network, may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of microbiota immaturity in undernourished children. Furthermore, we postulate that understanding the interrelationships between microbiota and brain metabolism in childhood undernutrition could provide insights about responses to injury seen in adults. We discuss approaches that can be used to test these hypotheses, their ramifications for optimizing nutritional recommendations that promote healthy brain development and function, and the potential societal implications of this area of investigation. PMID:26578751

  16. Advancing the nutrition and early childhood development agenda: indicators and guidance.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David; Neuman, Michelle J

    2014-01-01

    The importance of early childhood development (ECD) is scientifically established and is increasingly recognized by governments and international organizations. However, progress in protecting and improving ECD is constrained by multisectoral influences on ECD, the multiple sectors and venues for delivering services, the lack of a common fiscal and policy space, and weak or fragmented data and monitoring systems. This paper describes two tools and strategies to strengthen multisectoral, system-wide policy environments for ECD. One is the Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER)-ECD framework for tracking progress toward an integrated ECD system. Developed by the World Bank, SABER-ECD assists governments and their partners to take stock of their existing ECD policies and programs, analyze strengths and areas for improvement using common metrics, and learn from international examples. The other tool is an Agenda-Setting and Commitments framework, based on research in global health and nutrition that can guide national-level actors in their advocacy and strategic efforts to strengthen the integrated ECD system. These represent practical and research-based tools to translate scientific evidence concerning ECD into effective and large-scale actions.

  17. Feeding the brain and nurturing the mind: Linking nutrition and the gut microbiota to brain development.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manu S; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-11-17

    The human gut contains a microbial community composed of tens of trillions of organisms that normally assemble during the first 2-3 y of postnatal life. We propose that brain development needs to be viewed in the context of the developmental biology of this "microbial organ" and its capacity to metabolize the various diets we consume. We hypothesize that the persistent cognitive abnormalities seen in children with undernutrition are related in part to their persistent gut microbiota immaturity and that specific regions of the brain that normally exhibit persistent juvenile (neotenous) patterns of gene expression, including those critically involved in various higher cognitive functions such as the brain's default mode network, may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of microbiota immaturity in undernourished children. Furthermore, we postulate that understanding the interrelationships between microbiota and brain metabolism in childhood undernutrition could provide insights about responses to injury seen in adults. We discuss approaches that can be used to test these hypotheses, their ramifications for optimizing nutritional recommendations that promote healthy brain development and function, and the potential societal implications of this area of investigation.

  18. Need for and Interest in a Sports Nutrition Mobile Device Application Among Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Krystle E; Downey, Darcy L; McCluskey, Ryan; Rivers, Carley

    2017-02-01

    The majority of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) programs do not have a sports nutritionist, leaving athletes to gather information from resources that vary in reputability. The objective of this study was to identify a need for the development of accessible and reputable resources of nutrition information by assessing the current use of nutrition information resources, dietary habits, and sports nutrition knowledge among Division I collegiate athletes. Seventy-two athletes across eight sports completed questionnaires concerning nutrition resources used, dietary habits, and sports nutrition knowledge. In addition, interest levels in a mobile device application for delivery of nutrition information and tools were assessed. Primary sources for nutrition information included parents and family, athletic trainers (AT), and the internet/media, and athletes felt most comfortable discussing nutrition with parents and family, ATs, and strength and conditioning specialists. Performance on a sports nutrition knowledge questionnaire indicated a general lack of nutrition knowledge, and the high frequency of "unsure" responses suggested a lack of confidence in nutrition knowledge. Athletes conveyed a high likelihood that they would use a mobile device application as a nutrition resource, but were more interested in access to nutrition topics than tools such as a food log. We found that college athletes possess minimal sports nutrition knowledge, obtain nutrition information from nonprofessional resources, and were interested in utilizing a mobile device application as a resource. Further research is needed to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of alternative resources, such as a mobile device application, to deliver nutrition information and improve nutrition knowledge.

  19. Nutritional Status in Adults with Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: KNOW-CKD Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adverse changes in nutrition are prevalent and are strong indicators of adverse outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM) proposed a common nomenclature and diagnostic criteria to identify protein-energy wasting (PEW) in CKD patients. We examined the nutritional status in 1,834 adults with predialysis CKD enrolled in the KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. As there was a need for further understanding of nutritional status and associated factors in CKD, we evaluated the prevalence and associated factors of PEW in adults with predialysis CKD. The prevalence of PEW was about 9.0% according to ISRNM criteria and tended to increase with advanced stage in predialysis CKD. Those who concurrently had PEW, inflammation, and CVD were a small proportion (0.4%). In multivariate logistic regression model, PEW was independently associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96–0.99), total CO2 (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87–0.99), physical activity (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26–0.69), comorbid diabetes (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.09–2.59), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01–1.06). Our study suggests that PEW increases with advanced CKD stage. PEW is independently associated with renal function, low total CO2, low physical activity, comorbid diabetes, and increased hs-CRP in adults with predialysis CKD. PMID:28049236

  20. Mini-nutritional assessment (MNA) is useful for assessing the nutritional status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Min-Fang; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Han-Pin; Wang, Jiun-Yi; Tsai, Alan C

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is often neglected in clinical practice. This study examined the usefulness of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) for assessing the nutritional status of patients with COPD. We recruited 83 patients with COPD in stable condition from the pulmonary rehabilitation unit of a medical center in northern Taiwan. Each patient was interviewed with a structured questionnaire to elicit personal and health-related data, and measured for anthropometric and blood biochemical indicators. Nutritional status was rated with two Taiwanese-specific versions of the MNA, MNA-T1 and MNA-T2. Fat-free mass was measured with bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and exercise capacity indicators with the 6-Minute Walk Test. The two MNA versions showed high agreement (kappa = 0.949) in predicting the nutritional risk, and both versions predicted the FFMI well (area under the curve of the Receiver Operating Characteristics = 0.804, p < 0.001 for MNA-T1; and 0.813, p < 0.001 for MNA-T2). MNA scores decreased with increasing disease severity and were highly correlated with FFMI, BMI, mid-arm circumference, calf circumference, and oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise (all p < 0.01). The MNA score was positively correlated with FEV1, FVC and 6-minute walking distance, and negatively correlated with GOLD stages (all p < 0.05). However, the MNA score was not significantly correlated with blood biochemical indicators, perhaps due to inflammatory status associated with COPD. The MNA appears appropriate for rating the nutritional risk of patients with COPD. Routine use of the MNA may help reduce the risk of malnutrition in patients with COPD.

  1. Integrated Child Development Services scheme (ICDS) and its impact on nutritional status of children in India and recent initiatives.

    PubMed

    Kapil, U; Pradhan, R

    1999-01-01

    Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) scheme is the largest national programme for the promotion of the mother and child health and their development in the world. The beneficiaries include children below 6 years, pregnant and lactating mothers, and other women in the age group of 15 to 44 years. The package of services provided by the ICDS scheme includes supplementary nutrition, immunization, health check-up, referral services, nutrition and health education, and pre-school education. The distribution of iron and folic acid tablets and megadose of vitamin A is also undertaken, to prevent iron deficiency anaemia and xerophthalmia respectively. The scheme services are rendered essentially through the Anganwadi worker (AWW) at a village centre called "Anganwadi". The ICDS had led to (i) reduction in prevalence of severe grades of malnutrition and (ii) better utilization of services of national nutritional anaemia prophylaxis programme and the national programme for prevention of nutritional blindness due to vitamin A deficiency by ICDS beneficiaries. The ICDS scheme is being modified continuously to strengthen the programme.

  2. A content analysis of nutrition education curricula used with low-income audiences: implications for questionnaire development.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Garbanzo, Yenory; Griffin, Sarah; Cason, Katherine L; Loberger, Ginger; Williams, Joel; Baker, Susan; Coffee, Aubrey; Linton, Brittney; Hall, Trisha; Hayden, Victoria

    2013-07-01

    In developing recommendations for core measures/items for the evaluation of the Youth Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), three nutrition education curricula, implemented by land grant universities, were content analyzed. Selection criteria included the following: Curriculum content must include all EFNEP core content areas and must be implemented in more than one state with school children in third through fifth grades. Content analysis strategies were employed to identify and describe common areas/themes and mediators of behaviors addressed across the selected curricula. Content analysis coding was based on a list of behavioral mediators, which have empirical associations with nutrition, physical activity, and food safety. The most evident approaches identified across the three curricula were to enhance motivation, teach cognitive knowledge, and practice behavioral skills. The presence of self-regulation and environmental theory-based strategies was limited in all three curricula. In addition, multiple themes for nutrition, physical activity, and food safety were commonly addressed across curricula with multiple educational strategies. Based on these findings, recommendations for developing content appropriate measures and items for an outcome evaluation tool for Youth EFNEP are provided.

  3. Cross-sectional study of nutritional markers in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Subhadra; Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Yadav, Manisha; Usha, B. R.; Kumar, Sunesh; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To note the value of serum Vitamin B12, folic acid, and ferritin in normal and high-risk pregnancies (HRPs) in patients attending antenatal clinic at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS). Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study where a total of 282 patients attending Gynaecology Outpatient Department at AIIMS, New Delhi, India were recruited. Among the 282 subjects, 251 were pregnant, and 31 were controls. The serum was tested for serum Vitamin B12, serum folic acid, and serum ferritin levels using Beckman Coulter Access 2 immunoassay. Results: The median value of serum folic acid level in pregnant women was 12 pg/ml with range being 2–20 pg/ml in contrast to 8 pg/ml with range being 3–20 pg/ml in nonpregnant female. This difference was statistically significant. (P = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the median level of serum Vitamin B12 and serum ferritin in pregnant and nonpregnant group. Serum Vitamin B12 level was lower in the third trimester (127 pg/ml) than in first trimester (171 pg/ml) and the difference is statistically significant (P = 0.03). Serum ferritin levels were also significantly lower in the second trimester (16.4 pg/ml) than third trimester (24.55 pg/ml). Although the median serum folic acid level was lower in the first trimester (9.84 pg/ml) than in second trimester (10.8 pg/ml) and in the third trimester (13.18 pg/ml) but the difference was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in Vitamin B12 level in HRPs (median value 134 pg/ml) as compared to low-risk pregnancies (149.5 pg/ml). Conclusion: Serum folic acid levels are significantly higher during pregnancy as compared to nonpregnant state. However, there was no significant difference in the median level of serum Vitamin B12 and serum ferritin in pregnant and nonpregnant group. Serum folic acid level and ferritin level were significantly higher in HRPs compared to low-risk pregnancies. PMID:27867887

  4. [Quality, Innovation and Technological Development in Enteral Nutrition in the XXI Century].

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2015-05-07

    This work synthesis the quality evolution as well as innovation and technological advances that have been proven in healthcare area and specifically in enteral nutrition field. Clarifying the most relevant landmarks and the best representative characteristics of these advances.

  5. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Baspınar, Osman; Kocer, Derya; Dursun, Zehra Bestepe; Avcı, Deniz; Karakükcü, Cigdem; Çelik, İlhami; Gundogan, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient’s admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40), 46.6% (n = 29), 39.7% (n = 27), 35.3% (n = 24), 14.1% (n = 9), respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission. PMID:26938553

  6. Helminthic Infection and Nutritional Studies among Orang Asli Children in Sekolah Kebangsaan Pos Legap, Perak

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Weng Kin; Foo, Phiaw Chong; Roze, Mohamad Noor Mohamad; Pim, Chau Dam; Subramaniam, Puvaneswari; Lim, Boon Huat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Orang Asli (aborigine) children are susceptible to soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections due to their lifestyle and substandard sanitation system. Objectives. This study aimed to examine the helminthic and nutritional status of Orang Asli school children in Sekolah Kebangsaan Pos Legap, a remote primary school at Kuala Kangsar District in the state of Perak, Malaysia. In addition, the sensitivities of four STH stool examination techniques were also compared. Methods. Demography and anthropometry data were collected by one-to-one interview session. Collected stools were examined with four microscopy techniques, namely, direct wet mount, formalin ether concentration (FEC), Kato-Katz (KK), and Parasep™. Results. Anthropometry analysis showed that 78% (26/33) of children in SK Pos Legap were malnourished and 33% (11/33) of them were stunted. Stool examinations revealed almost all children (97%) were infected by either one of the three commonest STHs. FEC was the most sensitive method in detection of the three helminth species. Conclusion. This study revealed that STH infections and nutritional status still remain a health concern among the Orang Asli children. These communal problems could be effectively controlled by regular monitoring of STH infection loads, administration of effective antihelminthic drug regimen, and also implementation of effective school nutritional programs. PMID:27366156

  7. The Effects of Nutritional Juice Supplementation on the Extent of Climacteric Symptoms: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, Ursula; Richartz, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate the effect of daily dietary nutritional supplement on somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms in postmenopausal women. Material and Methods. In this study 28 healthy, symptomatic, peri- and postmenopausal women of 47–67 years of age were allocated to use the nutritional supplement JuicePLUS+®. Primary research parameters: Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) was used to assess menopausal symptoms at baseline and after 8 and 16 weeks of treatment. Secondary parameters: proliferation behaviour of vaginal smear was scored at baseline and after treatment. Results. Treatment with the supplement resulted in a reduction of somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms. The overall MRS score showed an average improvement of 44.01%. Most benefits were observed for the psychological symptoms irritability (60.55%) and physical and mental exhaustion (49.08%); modest effects were observed for hot flashes (44.86%) and sleeping problems (35.56%). There was a minor improvement in sexual problems; 6 women reported an increased libido. No statistically significant effect was found in vaginal dryness and proliferation behaviour of vaginal mucosa. No adverse effects were observed. Conclusion. Dietary nutritional supplement may constitute an effective alternative therapy to conventional alternative medicine for somatic, psychological, and sexual symptoms. PMID:27668002

  8. The Impact of Nutrition Education Interventions on the Dietary Habits of College Students in Developed Nations: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Lua, Pei Lin; Wan Putri Elena, Wan Dali

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of studies on the effectiveness nutrition education interventions used by college students. Electronic databases such as Medline, Science Direct, CINAHL (EBSCOhost), and Google Scholar were explored for articles that involved nutrition education interventions for college students and that were published between 1990 and 2011. Fourteen studies, which involved a total of 1668 college students as respondents, were identified and met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that there were 3 major forms of nutrition education interventions: web-based education, lectures, and supplement provisions. Dietary intake measures were used in almost all studies and were primarily collected with food records, recall, food frequency questionnaires, and dietary habit questionnaires. The outcome measures varied among the studies, with indicators such as consumption of food, nutrition knowledge, dietary habits, physical activity, and quality of life. Methodological issues were also identified. In general, college students experienced significant changes in their dietary habits after the interventions were employed. The highlighted methodological issues should be considered to improve the quality of similar research in future. PMID:22977369

  9. Fecal Nitrogen Concentration as a Nutritional Quality Indicator for European Rabbit Ecological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Jiménez, Esperanza; Villamuelas, Miriam; Serrano, Emmanuel; Delibes, Miguel; Fernández, Néstor

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the quality of the nutritional resources available to wild herbivores is critical to understanding trophic regulation processes. However, the direct assessment of dietary nutritional characteristics is usually difficult, which hampers monitoring nutritional constraints in natural populations. The feeding ecology of ruminant herbivores has been often assessed by analyzing fecal nitrogen (FN) concentrations, although this method has been less evaluated in other taxa. This study analyzed the suitability of FN as an indicator of ingesta quality in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), which is a keystone lagomorph species in Mediterranean ecosystems and of great conservation interest. Firstly, domestic O. cuniculus were used to evaluate under experimental conditions the accuracy of total FN and the metabolic FN as diet quality indicators of forages with characteristics similar to those available under natural conditions. Secondly, the accuracy of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to calculate FN was tested using partial least squares regression. Thirdly, a pilot field study was conducted to monitor FN dynamics from wild O. cuniculus in three different habitats during wet and drought periods. A strong association was found between diet type and total FN and metabolic FN (Pseudo-R2 ≥ 0.89). It was also found that NIRS calibrations were accurate for depicting nitrogen concentrations (R2 > 0.98 between NIRS and chemical results). Finally, the seasonal FN dynamics measured in the field were consistent with current knowledge on vegetation dynamics and forage limitations in the three habitats. The results support the use of NIRS methods and FN indices as a reliable and affordable approach to monitoring the nutritional quality of rabbit habitats. Potential applications include the assessment of the mechanistic relationships between resource limitations and population abundance, e.g., in relation to natural drought cycles and to habitat interventions aimed at

  10. The impact of nutritional labels and socioeconomic status on energy intake. An experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Rachel A; Jebb, Susan A; Hankins, Matthew; Marteau, Theresa M

    2014-10-01

    There is some evidence for paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake particularly amongst restrained eaters and those with a higher body mass index (BMI) resulting in greater consumption of energy from foods with a positive health message (e.g. "low-fat") compared with the same foods, unlabelled. This study aimed to investigate, in a UK general population sample, the likelihood of paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake. Participants (n = 287) attended a London cinema and were offered a large tub of salted or toffee popcorn. Participants were randomised to receive their selected flavour with one of three labels: a green low-fat label, a red high-fat label or no label. Participants watched two film clips while completing measures of demographic characteristics, emotional state and taste of the popcorn. Following the experiment, popcorn consumption was measured. There were no main effects of nutritional labelling on consumption. Contrary to predictions neither BMI nor weight concern moderated the effect of label on consumption. There was a three-way interaction between low-fat label, weight concern and socioeconomic status (SES) such that weight-concerned participants of higher SES who saw a low-fat label consumed more than weight unconcerned participants of similar SES (t = -2.7, P = .04). By contrast, weight-concerned participants of lower SES seeing either type of label, consumed less than those seeing no label (t = -2.04, P = .04). Nutritional labelling may have different effects in different socioeconomic groups. Further studies are required to understand fully the possible contribution of food labelling to health inequalities.

  11. Fecal nitrogen concentration as a nutritional quality indicator for European rabbit ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Gil-Jiménez, Esperanza; Villamuelas, Miriam; Serrano, Emmanuel; Delibes, Miguel; Fernández, Néstor

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the quality of the nutritional resources available to wild herbivores is critical to understanding trophic regulation processes. However, the direct assessment of dietary nutritional characteristics is usually difficult, which hampers monitoring nutritional constraints in natural populations. The feeding ecology of ruminant herbivores has been often assessed by analyzing fecal nitrogen (FN) concentrations, although this method has been less evaluated in other taxa. This study analyzed the suitability of FN as an indicator of ingesta quality in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), which is a keystone lagomorph species in Mediterranean ecosystems and of great conservation interest. Firstly, domestic O. cuniculus were used to evaluate under experimental conditions the accuracy of total FN and the metabolic FN as diet quality indicators of forages with characteristics similar to those available under natural conditions. Secondly, the accuracy of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to calculate FN was tested using partial least squares regression. Thirdly, a pilot field study was conducted to monitor FN dynamics from wild O. cuniculus in three different habitats during wet and drought periods. A strong association was found between diet type and total FN and metabolic FN (Pseudo-R(2) ≥ 0.89). It was also found that NIRS calibrations were accurate for depicting nitrogen concentrations (R(2) > 0.98 between NIRS and chemical results). Finally, the seasonal FN dynamics measured in the field were consistent with current knowledge on vegetation dynamics and forage limitations in the three habitats. The results support the use of NIRS methods and FN indices as a reliable and affordable approach to monitoring the nutritional quality of rabbit habitats. Potential applications include the assessment of the mechanistic relationships between resource limitations and population abundance, e.g., in relation to natural drought cycles and to habitat interventions

  12. Nutritional care and support among adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tafese, Zelalem; Birhan, Yifru; Abebe, Hiwot

    2013-11-01

    Background Improving nutritional care and support for people living with HIV (PLHIV) is an integral part of comprehensive HIV treatment according to the National Nutritional Strategy of Ethiopia. However, there is no adequate published study that assesses the nutritional care and support services for adult people living with HIV/ AIDS (PLHIV) in this setting. Objective The objective of the study was to identify the existing nutritional care and support services and determine the challenges facing adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital in southern Ethiopia. Methods A qualitative study was carried out using focus group discussions (FGDs), in-depth interviews and participant observation. Four FDGs were held and five in-depth interviews were conducted. A two-week participant observation was also conducted by trained nurses. All interviews and FDGs were tape-recorded and transcribed; those conducted in Amharic were translated back to English. Finally thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed. Results Most of the FDG participants were unsatisfied with their nutritional care and support services and expressed difficulty with disclosing their HIV status for fear of stigma and discrimination. The in-depth interviews and participant observation showed results similar to those of the FDG. Some key informants expressed a fear that such poor nutritional care and support may threaten the quality of life of people living with HIV and suggested that all stakeholders work on improving the services. Conclusion Current nutritional care and support services for people living with HIV are not well coordinated. They focus mainly on monthly supplementation of antiretroviral drugs and occasional handouts of food. The need to provide health education on antiretroviral drugs and nutrition, and to emphasise strategies aimed at improving the nutritional status of peoples living with HIV is critical. Furthermore, the study recommended strengthening the initiatives of some

  13. Can Postoperative Nutrition be Favourably Maintained by Oral Diet in Patients with Emergency Temporary Ileostomy? A Tertiary Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Debabrata; Dey, Ramprasad; Choudhury, Krishnangshu Bhanja; Das, Gautam; Bhattacharya, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporary ileostomy is an emergency procedure performed in cases having septic peritonitis in presence of perforation or obstruction or gangrene of small intestine. These patients usually suffer from gross malnutrition following surgery. Aim To measure nutritional status of patients with emergency temporary ileostomy and to determine whether their postoperative nutrition can be favourably maintained by oral diet alone. Materials and Methods Sixty patients were enrolled for the study on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria during the study period from January 2012 to December 2013. Oral feeding was started as soon as ileostomy started functioning and patients expressed hunger, about 48-72 hours postoperatively. An individualized diet chart was formulated for each patient using Harris Benedict Equation. Nutritional assessment was done on 1) 1st day of oral feeding, 2) After 7 days of oral feeding, 3). After three months of oral feeding. Nutritional parameters (anthropometric, biochemical) employed were tabulated and statistically analysed with SPSS v 17, Chicago. Results Out of 60 patients, 36 males and 24 females were enrolled in the study. The patients were in the age group of 20-60 years with a mean age of 45 years. After 7 days of oral nutrition the nutritional status deteriorated with a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001) and serum haemoglobin (p <0.001). However, at the end of the study, the patients had their nutritional status restored satisfactorily with normalization of basic parameters like bodyweight, haemoglobin and serum albumin (p<0.001). Conclusion Proper dietary advice and oral nutrition were found to be sufficient for gradual restoration and maintenance of satisfactory nutritional status in the postoperative period. PMID:26816941

  14. Comparison of nutritional status between children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children in the Mediterranean Region (Valencia, Spain).

    PubMed

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales Suárez-Varela, Maria

    2017-04-01

    This case-control study investigated nutrient intake, healthy eating index with 10 items on foods and nutrients, on 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements in 105 children with autism spectrum disorder and 495 typically developing children (6-9 years) in Valencia (Spain). Children with autism spectrum disorder were at a higher risk for underweight, eating more legumes, vegetables, fiber, and some micronutrients (traditional Mediterranean diet) but fewer dairy and cereal products, and less iodine, sodium, and calcium than their typically developing peers. Differences existed in total energy intake but healthy eating index and food variety score differences were not significant. Autism spectrum disorder group failed to meet dietary recommendations for thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin C, or calcium. Risk of inadequate intake of fiber, vitamin E, and sodium was lower in children with autism spectrum disorder than typically developing children. Results suggest that (1) risk of inadequate intake of some micronutrients in children with autism spectrum disorder and (2) cultural patterns and environment may influence food intake and anthropometric characteristics in autism spectrum disorder. Primary care should include anthropometric and nutritional surveillance in this population to identify intervention on a case-by-case basis. Future research should explore dietary patterns and anthropometric characteristics in different autism spectrum disorder populations in other countries, enhancing our understanding of the disorder's impact.

  15. Nutritional knowledge of UK coaches.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-04-10

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice.

  16. The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: rationale, study protocol, and baseline results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Child and adolescent obesity predisposes individuals to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality from a range of lifestyle diseases. Although there is some evidence to suggest that rates of pediatric obesity have leveled off in recent years, this has not been the case among youth from low socioeconomic backgrounds. The purpose of this paper is to report the rationale, study design and baseline findings of a school-based obesity prevention program for low-active adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods/Design The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) intervention will be evaluated using a group randomized controlled trial. NEAT Girls is a 12-month multi-component school-based intervention developed in reference to Social Cognitive Theory and includes enhanced school sport sessions, interactive seminars, nutrition workshops, lunch-time physical activity (PA) sessions, PA and nutrition handbooks, parent newsletters, pedometers for self-monitoring and text messaging for social support. The following variables were assessed at baseline and will be completed again at 12- and 24-months: adiposity, objectively measured PA, muscular fitness, time spent in sedentary behaviors, dietary intake, PA and nutrition social-cognitive mediators, physical self-perception and global self-esteem. Statistical analyses will follow intention-to-treat principles and hypothesized mediators of PA and nutrition behavior change will be explored. Discussion NEAT Girls is an innovative intervention targeting low-active girls using evidence-based behavior change strategies and nutrition and PA messages and has the potential to prevent unhealthy weight gain and reduce the decline in physical activity and poor dietary habits associated with low socio-economic status. Few studies have reported the long-term effects of school-based obesity prevention programs and the current study has the potential to make an important contribution to the

  17. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions. PMID:23914151

  18. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions.

  19. Effect of reduced heifer nutrition during in utero and post-weaning development on glucose and acetate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Richard C; Roberts, Andrew J; Geary, Thomas W; Grings, Elaine E; Alexander, Leeson J; MacNeil, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Energetic efficiency was evaluated in composite bred heifers born from dams receiving 1·8 or 1·2 kg/d winter supplementation for approximately 80 d before parturition. Heifers were then developed post-weaning and randomly assigned to heifer development treatments of either control (100 %; ad libitum; n 8/year) or restricted (80 %; fed 80 % of supplementation fed to controls adjusted to a common body weight: n 8/year) in a 2-year study. A glucose tolerance test (GTT) and acetate irreversible loss test (AILT) were administered to heifers at the termination of a 140 d development period when the heifers were approximately 403 d of age and consumed a silage-based diet, and again at 940 d of age when pregnant with their second calf and grazing dormant forage. No differences were measured (P>0·08) for dam winter nutrition or heifer development treatment for baseline serum metabolites or measures in either the GTT or the AILT. However, changes in baseline serum concentrations (P>0·05) were different between metabolic challenges, which occurred at different stages of development. No difference in acetate disappearance (P = 0·18) and half-life (P = 0·66) was measured between the two metabolic challenges. A trend for glucose half-life to be shorter in heifers born from dams receiving in utero winter treatments that supplied 1·2 kg/d of winter supplementation was observed (P = 0·083). Heifers developed with lower total DM intake during a 140 d development period had similar glucose and acetate incorporation rates as ad libitum-fed heifers when evaluated at two different production stages.

  20. Nutrition in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J.; Rice, B. L.; Lane, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review studies conducted to define nutritional requirements for astronauts during space flight and to assess nutrition before, during, and after space flight. Topics include space food systems, research and limitations on spacecraft, physiological adaptation to weightlessness, energy requirements, dietary intake during space flight, bone demineralization, gastrointestinal function, blood volume, and nutrition requirements for space flight. Benefits of space-related nutrition research are highlighted.

  1. “Smart” RCTs: Development of a Smartphone App for Fully Automated Nutrition-Labeling Intervention Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nicole; Dunford, Elizabeth; Eyles, Helen; Crino, Michelle; Michie, Jo; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial interest in the effects of nutrition labels on consumer food-purchasing behavior. However, conducting randomized controlled trials on the impact of nutrition labels in the real world presents a significant challenge. Objective The Food Label Trial (FLT) smartphone app was developed to enable conducting fully automated trials, delivering intervention remotely, and collecting individual-level data on food purchases for two nutrition-labeling randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in New Zealand and Australia. Methods Two versions of the smartphone app were developed: one for a 5-arm trial (Australian) and the other for a 3-arm trial (New Zealand). The RCT protocols guided requirements for app functionality, that is, obtaining informed consent, two-stage eligibility check, questionnaire administration, randomization, intervention delivery, and outcome assessment. Intervention delivery (nutrition labels) and outcome data collection (individual shopping data) used the smartphone camera technology, where a barcode scanner was used to identify a packaged food and link it with its corresponding match in a food composition database. Scanned products were either recorded in an electronic list (data collection mode) or allocated a nutrition label on screen if matched successfully with an existing product in the database (intervention delivery mode). All recorded data were transmitted to the RCT database hosted on a server. Results In total approximately 4000 users have downloaded the FLT app to date; 606 (Australia) and 1470 (New Zealand) users met the eligibility criteria and were randomized. Individual shopping data collected by participants currently comprise more than 96,000 (Australia) and 229,000 (New Zealand) packaged food and beverage products. Conclusions The FLT app is one of the first smartphone apps to enable conducting fully automated RCTs. Preliminary app usage statistics demonstrate large potential of such technology, both for

  2. Lessons Learned from the Development and Implementation of a Parent Nutrition Education Program with Low-Income Latina Mothers in an Urban School District Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thai, Chan Le; Prelip, Michael; Erausquin, Jennifer Toller; Slusser, Wendelin

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the steps involved in the development and implementation of a parent nutrition education workshop series for a low-income, primarily Spanish-speaking population in an urban school district setting. Overall, those parents who participated in the nutrition education workshops showed positive changes in their knowledge,…

  3. Nutrition Education for Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasswell, Anita B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study of three hospitals' family medicine residents' knowledge of and interest in nutrition education revealed large gaps in residents' knowledge of nutritional aspects of certain conditions likely to arise in general practice. Previous medical school nutrition courses had little influence on residents' perceived knowledge. (MSE)

  4. Much Ado About Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deringer, Shirley K.

    1973-01-01

    A school nurse describes her participation in a new school-wide study of nutrition. Purposely choosing to work with young children (kindergarten and first grade) she held discussions on the nutritional need of babies and pets, planned and evaluated menus with the children, and played a nutrition game wherein children played the part of different…

  5. Effect of tailored dietary guidance for pregnant women on nutritional status: a double-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Megumi; Shiraishi, Mie; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Yatsuki, Yuko; Yeo, SeonAe

    2016-11-29

    This double cohort study aimed to evaluate the effect of tailored dietary guidance for pregnant women on dietary intake, nutritional status, and infant birth weight. Healthy pregnant women were recruited at an antenatal clinic during two phases over 2 years. The historical controls were analyzed a year prior to the intervention group. In both groups, data were collected at 19-26 gestational weeks (baseline) and at 34-37 gestational weeks (outcome measurement). The intervention included the following: (a) assessments of maternal dietary nutritional intake using the brief self-administered diet history questionnaire, (b) individual feedback based on the assessments of maternal nutritional status, (c) tailored guidance for a healthy diet, (d) original cooking recipes, and (e) goal sharing. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the outcome data between the groups. Of the 378 eligible women, 309 women had follow-up questionnaire data. Blood samples were obtained from 202 women. Despite a lack of improvement in reported dietary intake, plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (p = .002), docosahexaenoic acid (p < .001), arachidonic acid (p < .001), and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (p < .001) concentrations as well as maternal weight gain (p = .019) were significantly higher in the intervention group. However, serum folate (p = .031) concentration was significantly lower in the intervention group, and there were no significant differences between the groups in 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, blood count, average birth weight, and rate of low birth weight infants. Assessment-based tailored guidance individualized to maternal dietary intake might partially contribute to improved nutrition in pregnant women.

  6. [Gestational weight gain and nutritional state of the newborn: a descriptive study].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Kelen Cristina Ramos; Muraro, Luana Oliveira; Witkowski, Maria Carolina; Breigeirond, Márcia Koja

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to characterize puerperal women in relation to gestational weight gain and their newborns in accordance with the nutritional state at birth. This is a descriptive, quantitative and retrospective study approved by the Ethics Committee at the institution responsible. The collection of data was from December 2012 to May 2013. The sample was composed of 24 puerperal women and their children. The participants presented an average age of 26.5 (DP=5.4) years, 79.2% white; 91.7% married; 58.3% multiparous; 75% with a level of education between secondary school and higher education; 58.3% with a low family income; 54.1% presented an altered pre-gestational nutritional state and 75% obtained an inadequate gestational weight gain. 79.2% of the newborns were classified as Adequate for Gestational Age (AIG). The newborns classified as Large for Gestational Age (GIG) were from pregnant women that had excessive weight gain or were overweight. It was concluded that health professionals should be attentive to nutritional deviations with the intention of avoiding complications for maternal/fetal health.

  7. Case study: nutritional strategies of a cyclist with celiac disease during an ultraendurance race.

    PubMed

    Black, Katherine Elizabeth; Skidmore, Paula; Brown, Rachel Clare

    2012-08-01

    Food intolerance is becoming increasingly prevalent, and increasing numbers of athletes have celiac disease. This poses challenges as dietary recommendations for exercise are largely based on gluten-containing carbohydrate-rich foods. The K4 cycle race covers 384 km around the Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand. Lack of sleep, darkness, and temperature variations pose a number of nutritional challenges. Limited food choices present those with celiac disease with even greater challenges. This case study describes the intakes of one such athlete during training and competing in the K4. Nutritional intakes were obtained during training using weighed-food records and during the race via dietary recall and the weighing of foods pre- and post-race. As simple substitution of gluten-containing foods for gluten-free foods leads to increased energy intake, alternatives need to be considered. During the race, insufficient energy was consumed to meet the nutritional guidelines for endurance performance. This was probably due to the nature of the course, racing conditions, the consistency of gluten-free food, and, toward the end of the race, sensory-specific satiety.

  8. Early nasogastric feeding versus parenteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yulong; Tang, Chengwu; Feng, Wenming; Bao, Ying; Yu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of early nasogastric enteral nutrition (EN) with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods: From July 2008 to July 2014,185 patients with SAP admitted to our centre were enrolled in this retrospective study. They were divided into EN group (n=89) and TPN group (n=96) based on the nutrition support modes. Patients in EN group received nasogastric EN support, while patients in TPN group received TPN support within 72 hours of disease onset. The medical records were reviewed and clinical factors were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between two groups. EN group had significantly lower incidence of pancreatic infections (P=0.0333) and extrapancreatic infections (P=0.0431). Significantly shorter hospital stay (P=0.0355) and intensive-care stay (P=0.0313) were found in EN group. TPN group was found to have significantly greater incidence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (P=0.0338) and mortality (P=0.0382). Moreover, the incidence of hyperglycemia was significantly higher in TPN group (P=0.0454). Conclusions: Early nasogastric EN was feasible and significantly decreased the incidence of infectious complications as well as the frequency of MODS and mortality caused by SAP. PMID:28083056

  9. The relationship between international trade and non-nutritional health outcomes: A systematic review of quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Burns, Darren K; Jones, Andrew P; Suhrcke, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Markets throughout the world have been reducing barriers to international trade and investment in recent years. The resulting increases in levels of international trade and investment have subsequently generated research interest into the potential population health impact. We present a systematic review of quantitative studies investigating the relationship between international trade, foreign direct investment and non-nutritional health outcomes. Articles were systematically collected from the SCOPUS, PubMed, EconLit and Web of Science databases. Due to the heterogeneous nature of the evidence considered, the 16 included articles were subdivided into individual level data analyses, selected country analyses and international panel analyses. Articles were then quality assessed using a tool developed as part of the project. Nine of the studies were assessed to be high quality, six as medium quality, and one as low quality. The evidence from the quantitative literature suggests that overall, there appears to be a beneficial association between international trade and population health. There was also evidence of the importance of foreign direct investment, yet a lack of research considering the direction of causality. Taken together, quantitative research into the relationship between trade and non-nutritional health indicates trade to be beneficial, yet this body of research is still in its infancy. Future quantitative studies based on this foundation will provide a stronger basis on which to inform relevant national and international institutions about the health consequences of trade policies.

  10. Nutritionally driven differential gene expression leads to heterochronic brain development in honeybee castes.

    PubMed

    Moda, Lívia Maria; Vieira, Joseana; Guimarães Freire, Anna Cláudia; Bonatti, Vanessa; Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The differential feeding regimes experienced by the queen and worker larvae of the honeybee Apis mellifera shape a complex endocrine response cascade that ultimately gives rise to differences in brain morphologies. Brain development analyzed at the morphological level from the third (L3) through fifth (L5) larval instars revealed an asynchrony between queens and workers. In the feeding phase of the last larval instar (L5F), two well-formed structures, pedunculi and calyces, are identifiable in the mushroom bodies of queens, both of which are not present in workers until a later phase (spinning phase, L5S). Genome-wide expression analyses and normalized transcript expression experiments monitoring specific genes revealed that this differential brain development starts earlier, during L3. Analyzing brains from L3 through L5S1 larvae, we identified 21 genes with caste-specific transcription patterns (e.g., APC-4, GlcAT-P, fax, kr-h1 and shot), which encode proteins that are potentially involved in the development of brain tissues through controlling the cell proliferation rate (APC4, kr-h1) and fasciculation (GlcAT-P, fax, and shot). Shot, whose expression is known to be required for axon extension and cell proliferation, was found to be transcribed at significantly higher levels in L4 queens compared with worker larvae. Moreover, the protein encoded by this gene was immunolocalized to the cytoplasm of cells near the antennal lobe neuropiles and proximal to the Kenyon cells in the brains of L4 queens. In conclusion, during the larval period, the brains of queens are larger and develop more rapidly than workers' brains, which represents a developmental heterochrony reflecting the effect of the differential feeding regime of the two castes on nervous system development. Furthermore, this differential development is characterized by caste-specific transcriptional profiles of a set of genes, thus pointing to a link between differential nutrition and differential

  11. Identifying critically ill patients who benefit the most from nutrition therapy: the development and initial validation of a novel risk assessment tool

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To develop a scoring method for quantifying nutrition risk in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods A prospective, observational study of patients expected to stay > 24 hours. We collected data for key variables considered for inclusion in the score which included: age, baseline APACHE II, baseline SOFA score, number of comorbidities, days from hospital admission to ICU admission, Body Mass Index (BMI) < 20, estimated % oral intake in the week prior, weight loss in the last 3 months and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Approximate quintiles of each variable were assigned points based on the strength of their association with 28 day mortality. Results A total of 597 patients were enrolled in this study. Based on the statistical significance in the multivariable model, the final score used all candidate variables except BMI, CRP, PCT, estimated percentage oral intake and weight loss. As the score increased, so did mortality rate and duration of mechanical ventilation. Logistic regression demonstrated that nutritional adequacy modifies the association between the score and 28 day mortality (p = 0.01). Conclusions This scoring algorithm may be helpful in identifying critically ill patients most likely to benefit from aggressive nutrition therapy. PMID:22085763

  12. Impact of Chemotherapy on Diet and Nutritional Status of Women with Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Isis Danyelle Dias; Marinho, Eduarda da Costa; Gontijo, Cristiana Araújo; Pereira, Taísa Sabrina Silva; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Maia, Yara Cristina de Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Certain food groups are often rejected during chemotherapy (CT) due to the side effects of treatment, which may interfere with adequate diet and nutritional status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment impact on the diet and nutritional status of women with breast cancer (BC). In this prospective longitudinal study, conducted in 2014-2015, 55 women diagnosed with BC, with a mean age 51.5±10.1 years, were followed and data were collected at three different times. Anthropometric and dietary assessments were performed, the latter by applying nine 24h dietary recalls, by using the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised (BHEI-R), and calculating the prevalence of inadequacy by the EAR cut-off point method. Regarding the BHEI-R analysis, the majority of women had a "diet requires modification', both at the beginning (T0, 58.2%, n = 32) and during treatment (T1, 54.5%, n = 30). However, after the end of the CT, the greater percentage of patients (T2, 49.1%, n = 27) were classified as having an "inadequate diet", since the Total Fruit consumption as well as the Dark Green and Orange Vegetable and Legume consumption decreased significantly during treatment (p = 0.043 and p = 0.026, respectively). There was a significant reduction in the intake of macro and micronutrients, with a high prevalence of inadequacy, of up to 100%, for calcium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamin B6, vitamin C and zinc. Assessment of the nutritional status indicated that 56% (n = 31) of patients were overweight at these three different times. Weight, BMI and Waist Circumference increased significantly, indicating a worse nutritional status, and there was a correlation between poor diet quality and higher values for BMI, Waist-Hip Ratio and Waist-to-Height Ratio. Chemotherapy interferes in the patients' diet generating a negative impact on the quality and intake of micro and macronutrients, as well as an impact on their nutritional status, with an

  13. Impact of Chemotherapy on Diet and Nutritional Status of Women with Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, Cristiana Araújo; Pereira, Taísa Sabrina Silva; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Certain food groups are often rejected during chemotherapy (CT) due to the side effects of treatment, which may interfere with adequate diet and nutritional status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment impact on the diet and nutritional status of women with breast cancer (BC). In this prospective longitudinal study, conducted in 2014–2015, 55 women diagnosed with BC, with a mean age 51.5±10.1 years, were followed and data were collected at three different times. Anthropometric and dietary assessments were performed, the latter by applying nine 24h dietary recalls, by using the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised (BHEI-R), and calculating the prevalence of inadequacy by the EAR cut-off point method. Regarding the BHEI-R analysis, the majority of women had a “diet requires modification’, both at the beginning (T0, 58.2%, n = 32) and during treatment (T1, 54.5%, n = 30). However, after the end of the CT, the greater percentage of patients (T2, 49.1%, n = 27) were classified as having an "inadequate diet", since the Total Fruit consumption as well as the Dark Green and Orange Vegetable and Legume consumption decreased significantly during treatment (p = 0.043 and p = 0.026, respectively). There was a significant reduction in the intake of macro and micronutrients, with a high prevalence of inadequacy, of up to 100%, for calcium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamin B6, vitamin C and zinc. Assessment of the nutritional status indicated that 56% (n = 31) of patients were overweight at these three different times. Weight, BMI and Waist Circumference increased significantly, indicating a worse nutritional status, and there was a correlation between poor diet quality and higher values for BMI, Waist-Hip Ratio and Waist-to-Height Ratio. Chemotherapy interferes in the patients’ diet generating a negative impact on the quality and intake of micro and macronutrients, as well as an impact on their nutritional status, with

  14. Nutrient profiling can help identify foods of good nutritional quality for their price: a validation study with linear programming.

    PubMed

    Maillot, Matthieu; Ferguson, Elaine L; Drewnowski, Adam; Darmon, Nicole

    2008-06-01

    Nutrient profiling ranks foods based on their nutrient content. They may help identify foods with a good nutritional quality for their price. This hypothesis was tested using diet modeling with linear programming. Analyses were undertaken using food intake data from the nationally representative French INCA (enquête Individuelle et Nationale sur les Consommations Alimentaires) survey and its associated food composition and price database. For each food, a nutrient profile score was defined as the ratio between the previously published nutrient density score (NDS) and the limited nutrient score (LIM); a nutritional quality for price indicator was developed and calculated from the relationship between its NDS:LIM and energy cost (in euro/100 kcal). We developed linear programming models to design diets that fulfilled increasing levels of nutritional constraints at a minimal cost. The median NDS:LIM values of foods selected in modeled diets increased as the levels of nutritional constraints increased (P = 0.005). In addition, the proportion of foods with a good nutritional quality for price indicator was higher (P < 0.0001) among foods selected (81%) than among foods not selected (39%) in modeled diets. This agreement between the linear programming and the nutrient profiling approaches indicates that nutrient profiling can help identify foods of good nutritional quality for their price. Linear programming is a useful tool for testing nutrient profiling systems and validating the concept of nutrient profiling.

  15. The Role of Family and Community Involvement in the Development and Implementation of School Nutrition and Physical Activity Policy

    PubMed Central

    Kehm, Rebecca; Davey, Cynthia S.; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there are several evidence-based recommendations directed at improving nutrition and physical activity standards in schools, these guidelines have not been uniformly adopted throughout the United States. Consequently, research is needed to identify facilitators promoting schools to implement these recommendations. Therefore, this study analyzed the 2008 School Health Profiles Principal Survey (Profiles) to explore the role of family and community involvement in school nutrition and physical activity standards. METHODS Survey data on nutrition and physical activity policies, as well as family and community involvement, were available for 28 states, representing 6732 secondary schools. One-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), 2-sample t-tests, Pearson’s chi-square tests, and multiple logistic and linear regression models were employed in this analysis. RESULTS Family and community involvement were associated with schools more frequently utilizing healthy eating strategies and offering students healthier food options. Further, involvement was associated with greater support for physical education staff and more intramural sports opportunities for students. CONCLUSIONS Though family and community involvement have the potential to have a positive influence on school nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, involvement remains low in schools. Increased efforts are needed to encourage collaboration among schools, families, and communities to ensure the highest health standards for all students. PMID:25564977

  16. Evaluation of nutritional and sub-acute toxicological study of plant based supplement of Achyranthes aspera.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nudrat; Dar, Nabeela G; Imran, Hina; Sohail, Tehmina; Asghar, Uzma; Yaqeen, Zahra; Syed, Shazia; Jamil, Khalid

    2014-09-01

    The present study was conducted for the nutritional, microbiological and toxicological evaluation of test compound having main ingredient Achyranthes aspera. Nutritional value assessment, microbiological analysis and toxicological studies were conducted according to the standard reported methods which exhibited that A. aspera contains moisture 4.05%, proteins 20.54%, fats 0.903%, ash 20.25%, carbohydrates 54,26% and energy 294 Kcal. Vitamin profile was found to be B(1) 0.27mg/100g, B(2) 0.28mg/100g, B(3) 0.58mg/100g, B(6) 0.27mg/100g and B(9) 39μg/100g. The content of sodium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, chloride and phosphorus was found to be 1119.67, 5385.23, 5446.08, 1343.6, 675880.73 and 1447.5mg/kg respectively and trace metals i.e. iron, copper, zinc, manganese and aluminum were detected as 283.05, 8.062, 48.37, 16.12 and 9.853 mg/kg respectively. The microbiological result indicated that the compound qualifies the international standards of microbial limit and was found free from Salmonella species. The toxicological study was conducted to find safe use of Achyranthes aspera compound in human as a nutritive supplement in blood disorders. The toxicity studies exhibited that the test compound has a good effect on general health as an increase in body weights of animals of test group was noticed as compared to that of control group. Blood parameters before and after the study were monitored which confirms our hypothesis by showing an increase in hemoglobin from 9.133 to 10.96, RBC count from 3.11 to 3.6, WBC count from 5.68 to 5.73 and platelets from 245 to 319.

  17. Identifying components of advanced-level clinical nutrition practice: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The dietetics profession lacks a comprehensive definition of advanced-level practice. Using a three-round Delphi study with mailed surveys, expert consensus on four dimensions of advanced-level practice that define advanced practice registered dietitians (RDs) in clinical nutrition was explored. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDs who met advanced-level practice criteria. In round 1, experts rated the essentiality of statements on a 7-point ordinal scale and generated open-ended practice activity statements regarding the following four dimensions of advanced-level practice: professional knowledge, abilities and skills, approaches to practice, roles and relationships, and practice behaviors. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 was neutral, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. In rounds 2 and 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus by evaluating their previous responses, group median rating, and comments. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to a statement was ≤2.0. Eighty-five experts enrolled (72.6%); 76 (89.4%) completed all rounds. In total, 233 statements were rated, with 100% achieving consensus; 211 (90.6%) were essential to advanced practice RD clinical practice. Having a master's degree; completing an advanced practice residency; research coursework; and advanced continuing education were essential, as were having 8 years of experience; clinical nutrition knowledge/expertise; specialization; participation in research activities; and skills in technology and communication. Highly essential approaches to practice were systematic yet adaptable and used critical thinking and intuition and highly essential values encompassed professional growth and service to patients. Roles emphasized patient care and leadership. Essential practice activities within the nutrition care process included provision of complex patient-centered nutrition care using application of advanced knowledge/expertise and

  18. Engineer Professional Development Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    ENGINEER PROFESSIONAL DEVEL0 PHENT STUDY by / p Cs Colonel Robert A. Days EN Colonel Gene A. Schneebaeck& EN ~ Y Lieutenant Colonel Dennis P. Butler...4. TITLE (mid Subtitle) S, TYPE OP REPORtT &PKRIOD COVERED 414 GINEER T-ROPESSIONAL D~EVELOPMENT STUID’f 411 S. pKRORNING Oxa . Alkill NUMBER 7...encerdb ieapotleml.ayer.eu ~~fi1IiBlY ABSTRACT A•THOR(IS): Dennis F. Butler, LTC, EN Gene A. Schneebeck, COL, EN Robert A, Day, COL, EN Michael Ward, LTC

  19. Determinants of infant nutritional status in Dabat district, North Gondar, Ethiopia: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Wubante, Amarech Asratie

    2017-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is the top cause of global burden of disease, disability and mortality among infants. Over two-thirds of deaths of children globally occur during the first year of life (infancy). Malnutrition among infants is substantially high in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study is aimed to assess determinants of infant nutritional status. Methods A community based nested case-control study was conducted from February to June 2013 in Dabat district. A total of 80 cases and 320 controls (1:4 ratios) were studied. Relevant data was extracted from the community based survey data set. Anthroplus software was used to identify cases and controls. Determinants of infant nutritional status were identified using multivariate analysis. Results Among the total of 80 cases and 320 controls, more than half (52.5%) of the cases and the controls (53.8%) were males and females, respectively. Breast Feeding (BF) was started immediately after birth in only 43.8% of the cases. Nearly 94% of the mothers of the cases had no breast feeding information as part of Ante Natal Care (ANC) follow up. Maternal age (AOR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.11–0.76), having radio (AOR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22–0.82), lack of toilet facility (AOR: 2.24; 95% CI: 1.16–4.33), deprivation of colostrum (AOR: 1.76; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06) and method of complementary feeding (AOR: 2.82; 95% CI: 1.33–5.99) were associated with wasting. Conclusions This study has found that inappropriate infant feeding; nutritional information gap and lack of toilet facility as significant predictors of malnutrition. Hence, joint interventions, including counseling of mothers about benefits of colostrum feeding and use of appropriate feeding method, toilet utilization and mass media such as radio possession, are needed to address the problem in Dabat district. PMID:28346497

  20. The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study: rationale and methods.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bonnie J; Giesbrecht, Gerald F; Leung, Brenda M Y; Field, Catherine J; Dewey, Deborah; Bell, Rhonda C; Manca, Donna P; O'Beirne, Maeve; Johnston, David W; Pop, Victor J; Singhal, Nalini; Gagnon, Lisa; Bernier, Francois P; Eliasziw, Misha; McCargar, Linda J; Kooistra, Libbe; Farmer, Anna; Cantell, Marja; Goonewardene, Laki; Casey, Linda M; Letourneau, Nicole; Martin, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their offspring and many of their partners). The primary aims of the APrON study were to determine the relationships between maternal nutrient intake and status, before, during and after gestation, and (1) maternal mood; (2) birth and obstetric outcomes; and (3) infant neurodevelopment. We have collected comprehensive maternal nutrition, anthropometric, biological and mental health data at multiple points in the pregnancy and the post-partum period, as well as obstetrical, birth, health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of these pregnancies. The study continues to follow the infants through to 36 months of age. The current report describes the study design and methods, and findings of some pilot work. The APrON study is a significant resource with opportunities for collaboration.

  1. Changing the home nutrition environment: effects of a nutrition and media literacy pilot intervention.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alexandra E; Dave, Jayna; Tanner, Andrea; Duhe, Sonya; Condrasky, Margaret; Wilson, Dawn; Griffin, Sarah; Palmer, Meredith; Evans, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The specific aim for this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nutrition and media literacy intervention targeting elementary students and their parents. The purpose of the intervention was to increase child fruit and vegetables (FV) consumption and change the home nutrition environment (measured with FV availability and accessibility and parental social support). During the intervention, students learned about nutrition, the role media plays in shaping values concerning nutrition, and developed a media campaign for their parents. A quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The media intervention was effective in changing the home environment.

  2. Development and application of a web-based nutritional management program to improve dietary behaviors for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon; Lee, Min June; Kang, Hee Cheol; Lee, Mee Sook; Yoon, Sun

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based nutritional management program for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and to evaluate how the program affects health-related behaviors and the health status of office workers with metabolic syndrome risk factors. For the pilot test of the Web-based nutritional management program, 29 employees (19 males, 10 females) with more than one metabolic syndrome risk factor participated in the Web-based nutritional management program for 16 weeks. Participants visited the Web site more than two times per week and completed customized assessments of health status, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, dietary habits, food intake, ideal body weight, energy requirements, and exercise. Subjects had a significant decrease in body weight, waist circumference, body mass index (P < .01 in males, P < .05 in females), and body fat (P < .01 in males). The frequency of dietary habits such as eating snacks, eating out, and dining with others decreased, whereas the frequency of intake of foods such as whole grains, seaweed, fruit, and low-fat milk increased after intervention. After 16 weeks, program satisfaction was evaluated using a Web evaluation questionnaire, and most of the participants were highly satisfied with Web site components such as the loading speed, configuration, privacy, design, functionality, and contents.

  3. A comparative study on dietary behavior, nutritional knowledge and life stress between Korean and Chinese female high school students

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sohwan; Ro, Yoona; Hyun, Hwajin; Lee, Hongmie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Dietary behavior and life stress in adolescence is related to growth rate and learning ability. This study was conducted to identify the relations between dietary habits, dietary attitude nutritional knowledge and life stress among high school girls in Korea and China. SUBJECTS/METHODS The subjects of this study were 221 high school girls in Korea and 227 high school girls in China. The questionnaire were about dietary habits, dietary attitude, nutritional knowledge and life stress. RESULTS The dietary habits of chinese girls were healthier than those of Korean girls with a significant difference (P < .001). There was no significant difference in dietary attitude between Korean girls and Chinese girls. Korean girls had more nutritional knowledge than Chinese girls with a significant difference (P < .001). Korean girls did less physical exercise but spent more time watching TV and using PCs, compared to Chinese girls. Korean girls' degree of confidence in nutrition information that they had learned and their performance in their real lives were low. Also, they had a low level of awareness of the need for nutritional education. There was no significant difference in life stress between the two groups. Dietary habits had a significantly negative correlation with life stress in both Korean and Chinese girls (P < .01, P < .001). As for Chinese students, dietary attitude had a negative correlation with life stress with a significant difference (P < .05). As for Korean girls, nutritional knowledge had a negative correlation with life stress with a significant difference (P < .05), which means as life stress was less, dietary habits were better. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that effective nutrition education programs should include components that encourage application of learned nutrition information to real life, increase physical exercise and reduce life stress. PMID:24741406

  4. The nutrition transition in amazonia: rapid economic change and its impact on growth and development in Ribeirinhos.

    PubMed

    Piperata, Barbara A; Spence, Jennifer E; Da-Gloria, Pedro; Hubbe, Mark

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this longitudinal study was to assess the impact of economic change and increased market integration on subsistence strategies, living conditions, growth, and nutritional status of Ribeirinhos living in the rural Amazon, Brazil. Data on weight, height, skinfolds, and circumferences, as well as data on economic strategies and living conditions were collected from 469 individuals in 2002 and 429 in 2009. Of these, 204 individuals were measured on both occasions. Independent and paired t-tests were used to identify changes in nutritional status over time in the larger sample and smaller, longitudinal subsample, respectively. Multiple linear regressions were used to examine the relationship between changes in economic/living conditions and nutritional status in the longitudinal subsample. Results indicate modest improvements in linear growth (HAZ) and among male children the observed increase was related to enrollment in the Brazilian conditional cash transfer program, Bolsa Família (P = 0.03). In terms of short-term measures of nutritional status, we found a significant increase in ZTSF and a reduction in ZUMA in most age/sex groups. Among subadults, there was a negative relationship between ZUMA and access to electricity (P = 0.01) and positive relationship between ZUMA and the sale of the açaí fruit (P = 0.04). Significant changes in weight and BMI (P < 0.01) were found among adult females and both were negatively related to household cash income (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). Despite significant changes in economic strategies and lifestyle, changes in nutritional status were modest which may be explained by increased food insecurity documented during this early stage of transition.

  5. Childhood Obesity Study: A Pilot Study of the Effect of the Nutrition Education Program "Color My Pyramid"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Oh, Kyeung Mi; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-01-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, "Color My Pyramid", on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest,…

  6. Nutrient intakes, nutritional patterns and the risk of liver cirrhosis: an explorative case-control study.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Bagnardi, Vinccnzo; Aricò, Sarino; Loguercio, Carmelina; D'Amicis, Amleto

    2004-01-01

    Several experimental studies have suggested that specific nutrients might play a role on the risk of liver damage. Nevertheless, few epidemiological studies have evaluated the role of diet on the risk of symptomatic liver cirrhosis, giving contradictory results. To evaluate the role of the intake of nutritional factors and dietary patterns on the risk of symptomatic liver cirrhosis and to examine their combined action with alcohol consumption we used data from the Italian Study on Liver Cirrhosis Determinants project. From 1994 to 1998 all the consecutive cirrhotic inpatients admitted to 19 Italian collaborative hospitals for signs of liver decompensation in whom the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis was made for the first time (259 cases) and one or two gender, age and area of residence matched individuals (416 controls) were recruited. Data on lifetime alcohol intake, usual consumption of 191 food items and on markers of hepatitis B and C viral infection were collected. The analysis of principal components identified a nutritional pattern positively correlated with vegetable and fruit intakes and negatively with animal and no-fruit sugar products. With respect to abstainers, relative risks in consumers of use < or = 25 and > or = 51 g/day of alcohol increased from 0.4 [95% confidence interval 0.0, 5.9] to 9.3 [1.3, 69.0] and from 2.1 [1.1, 4.2] to 18.1 [2.8, 118.3] for the lowest and the highest value of this nutritional pattern, respectively. Diet might therefore modulate the damaging effect of alcohol on the liver.

  7. Development of the Physical activity and Your Nutrition for Cancer (PYNC) smartphone app for preventing breast cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Besenyi, Gina M.; Bowen, Deborah; De Leo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Background In the U.S., breast cancer accounts for more cancer deaths in women than any site other than lung cancer. Based upon attributable risks, about 30–35% of breast cancers could potentially be prevented by addressing obesity, physical inactivity, increased alcohol consumption, and carcinogenic exposures such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We need methods of reducing women’s risks of this disease that are attractive and easy to use, widely accessible to diverse women, and able to be easily amended to account for new research. Methods The overall objective of this 12-month project is to develop and test a smartphone app to provide women with information about how they can reduce their risk of breast cancer through healthy behaviors such as physical activity, weight management, restricting caloric intake, consuming a healthy diet and proper nutrition, engaging in regular physical activity, and avoiding carcinogenic exposures such as HRT and alcohol. The specific aims are: (I) to develop a smartphone app for breast cancer prevention using a behavioral framework; (II) to ensure interconnectivity with commercially available products (Fitbit device for monitoring physical activity and the LoseIt! smartphone app for monitoring and tracking diet and nutrition); and (III) to ensure that the mHealth intervention is suitable for women with varying levels of health literacy and eHealth literacy. Results The app, referred to as Physical activity and Your Nutrition for Cancer (PYNC), is being coded on an iOS platform. Users will be able to access the breast cancer prevention app using their smartphone or tablet. The app’s design will ensure interconnectivity with commercially available products for monitoring and tracking physical activity, caloric intake, diet and nutrition. Using the app, it will be feasible for users to connect and sync their Fitbit and LoseIt! accounts so that information collected about physical activity, caloric intake, diet, and

  8. Intestinal development of bovine foetuses during gestation is affected by foetal sex and maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gionbelli, T R S; Rotta, P P; Veloso, C M; Valadares Filho, S C; Carvalho, B C; Marcondes, M I; Ferreira, M F L; Souza, J V F; Santos, J S A A; Lacerda, L C; Duarte, M S; Gionbelli, M P

    2016-08-03

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of maternal nutrition (MN) and foetal sex on the intestinal development of bovine foetuses throughout different days of gestation (DG). Forty-four multiparous, dry Holstein × Gyr cows with average initial body weight of 480 ± 10 kg were fed the same diet of either restricted feeding at 1.15% of body weight (CO, n = 24) or fed ad libitum (overnourished, ON, n = 20). Six cows from CO group and five cows from ON group were slaughtered at 139, 199, 241 and 268 DG, and foetuses were necropsied to evaluate the intestinal development. The mass, length and density of foetal intestines were not affected by MN (p ≥ 0.260). An interaction between MN and DG was observed for the villi length of jejunum (p = 0.006) and ileum (p < 0.001). Villi length of jejunum and ileum was higher (p < 0.10) in foetuses from ON-fed cows than in foetuses from CO-fed cows at 139 DG. However, at 199 DG, the villi length of jejunum and ileum of foetuses from CO-fed cows was higher than in foetuses from ON-fed cows. Despite these differences, MN did not affect the villi length of jejunum and ileum at 268 DG (p > 0.10). Female foetuses had greater small intestine mass (p = 0.093), large intestine mass (p = 0.022), small intestine mass in proportion to body mass (p = 0.017) and large intestine mass in proportion to body mass (p < 0.001) than male foetuses. Female foetuses had also longer small intestine (p = 0.077) and greater small intestine density (p = 0.021) and villi length of jejunum (p = 0.001) and ileum (p = 0.010) than males. We conclude that MN affects the pathway for the development of foetal villi length throughout the gestation in bovine foetuses without changing the final villi length. Female foetuses had higher intestinal mass, density and villi length than males during the foetal phase in bovines.

  9. Nutrition and Aging: Assessment and Treatment of Compromised Nutritional Status in Frail Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jennie L; Dumbrell, Andrea C

    2006-01-01

    Nutrition is an important determinant of health in persons over the age of 65. Malnutrition in the elderly is often underdiagnosed. Careful nutritional assessment is necessary for both the successful diagnosis and development of comprehensive treatment plans for malnutrition in this population. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an educational overview of this essential but often underecognized aspect of geriatric assessment. This article will review some common issues in nutrition for the elderly in both hospital and community settings. The complexity and impact of multiple comorbidities on the successful nutritional assessment of elderly patients is highlighted by using case scenarios to discuss nutritional issues common to elderly patients and nutritional assessment tools. Three case studies provide some context for an overview of these issues, which include the physiology of aging, weight loss, protein undernutrition, impaired cognition, malnutrition during hospitalization, screening procedures, and general dietary recommendations for patients 65 years of age and older. PMID:18047259

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Nutritional Smartphone Application for Making Smart and Healthy Choices in Grocery Shopping

    PubMed Central

    López, Desiree; Torres, Michelle; Vélez, Jammy; Grullon, Jhensen; Negrón, Edwin; Pérez, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study developed a smartphone nutritional application (app) for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores and tested its feasibility, usability, satisfaction and acceptability. Methods “MyNutriCart” was developed following the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model. The goals of the app were to improve food selection when purchasing foods in the grocery stores based on a pre-defined budget, to improve dietary patterns based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and to improve weight status. It was evaluated within a pilot randomized trial using a convenient sample of 26 overweight or obese adults aged 21–45 years for 8 weeks. Results The developed app provided a grocery list of healthy foods to meet the individual requirements of all family members within a budget following the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The average use of the app was 75% on each purchase and only 37% of the recommended products were purchased. The main reasons for not purchasing the recommended items were that participants did not like these (28.5%) and that the item was unavailable in the supermarket (24.3%). Over 50% of participants considered the app as feasible, usable, satisfactory, and acceptable (p < 0.05). Conclusions “MyNutriCart” is the first available app for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores. This app could be used as a tool to translate recommendations into a practical grocery list that meet the needs of a family within a budget. PMID:28261527

  11. The effects of poor maternal nutrition during gestation on postnatal growth and development of lambs.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M L; Peck, K N; Forella, M E; Fox, A R; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A

    2016-02-01

    Poor maternal nutrition can affect the growth and development of offspring, which may lead to negative consequences in adult life. We hypothesized that lambs born to poorly nourished ewes would have reduced growth rate and increased fat deposition, with corresponding changes in the somatotropic axis, and leptin, insulin and glucose concentrations. Ewes ( = 36; 12/treatment) were assigned 1 of 3 diets; 100% (CON), 60% (RES), or 140% (OVER) of NRC requirements for TDN at d 31 of gestation until parturition. One lamb per ewe ( = 35; 11 to 12 per treatment) was used; 18 lambs were euthanized at d 1, and 17 were fed the same diet for 3 mo and then euthanized. Lamb crown rump length (CRL), heart girth, BW, and BCS were measured, and blood samples were collected at d 1 and then at weekly intervals until euthanasia. Averaged from d 1 until 3 mo, lambs from OVER ewes were larger compared with lambs born to CON ewes (BW [16.97 vs. 15.44 kg ± 0.60; = 0.09], ADG [0.23 vs. 0.21 ± 0.01 kg/d; = 0.01], and CRL [68.9 vs. 66.1 ± 0.80 cm; = 0.02]). On a BW basis, heart weight from lambs from RES (0.18 kg ± 0.03; = 0.03) ewes was greater than that of CON lambs (0.15 kg ± 0.03). Backfat thickness was reduced in RES lambs (0.11 ± 0.06; ≤ 0.04) compared with CON (0.20 ± 0.06) and OVER (0.26 ± 0.06) lambs. Concentrations of IGF-I at 3 mo and IGFBP-3 from weaning (d 56 of age) to 3 mo of age tended to be greater ( ≤ 0.06) in OVER lambs (334 ± 66 ng/mL and 175 ± 11 arbitrary units [AU], respectively) than CON lambs (149 ± 66 ng/mL and 140 ± 11 AU, respectively). At 3 mo, leptin was greater in OVER lambs compared with RES lambs (1.24 vs. 0.78 ± 0.13 ng/mL; < 0.05). Over time, average insulin concentrations were greater in OVER and RES lambs than CON lambs (0.49 and 0.49 vs. 0.33 ± 0.05 ng/mL; ≤ 0.02). However, concentrations of GH, IGFBP-2, glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol were not different ( > 0.10) between treatment groups. During in vivo glucose tolerance

  12. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    PubMed Central

    Paquette-Warren, Jann; Vingilis, Evelyn; Greenslade, Jaimi; Newnam, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting. PMID:17041680

  13. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed.

  14. Parallels between Nutrition and Physical Activity: Research Questions in Development of Peak Bone Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle choices are attributed to 40% to 60% of adult peak bone mass. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) sought to update its 2000 consensus statement on peak bone mass and partnered with the American Society for Nutrition, which, in turn, charged a 9-member writing committee with using a systematic review approach to update the previous…

  15. Development of a beetroot-based nutritional gel containing high content of bioaccessible dietary nitrate and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Marina; de Oliveira, Gustavo Vieira; Vasconcellos, Julia; Monteiro, Maria Lucia; Conte-Junior, Carlos; Pierucci, Anna Paola Trindade Rocha; Alvares, Thiago Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Beetroot, a food rich in nitrate and antioxidants has gained attention because of its potential effect on improving cardiovascular health and exercise performance. This work had the purpose of developing a beetroot-based nutritional gel (BG) and estimating the in vitro bioaccessibility of the nitrate, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total phenolic (TP) and potassium content, as compared to beetroot juice (BJ). Nitrate was assessed by a high-performance liquid chromatography system, TAC was assessed using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay and TP was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu method before and after an in vitro digestion. Significantly higher values of nitrate, TEAC, TP and potassium before and after digestion were observed in BG as compared to BJ. The results suggest a new nutritional strategy to give high contents of bioaccessible nutrients (nitrate, antioxidants and potassium) that are potentially relevant to improve cardiovascular health and exercise performance.

  16. Phytase Production and Development of an Ideal Dephytinization Process for Amelioration of Food Nutrition Using Microbial Phytases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Jinender; Singh, Bijender

    2016-10-29

    Development of an ideal process for reduction of food phytates using microbial phytases is a demanding task by all food and feed industries all over the world. Phytase production by Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis JJBS250 isolated from soil sample was optimized in submerged fermentation using statistical tools. Among all the culture variables tested, sucrose, sodium phytate and Tween-80 were identified as the most significant variables using the Placket-Burman design. Further optimization of these variables resulted in a 6.79-fold improvement in phytase production (7170 U/L) as compared to unoptimized medium. Supplementation of microbial phytases (fungal and bacterial) resulted in improved bioavailability of nutritional components with the concomitant liberation of inorganic phosphorus, reducing sugar, soluble protein and amino acids, thus mitigating anti-nutritional properties of phytic acid.

  17. Diabetes prevention in Indian country: developing nutrition models to tell the story of food-system change.

    PubMed

    Conti, Kibbe M

    2006-07-01

    The disruption of the traditional food systems of Native Americans is generally believed to have contributed to the epidemic levels of type 2 diabetes and obesity present on U.S. Indian reservations today. Tribes are increasingly engaged in disease prevention and health promotion efforts including restoring components of their traditional food system. This article discusses the development of nutrition models for tribes in two regions; California and the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota. Each nutrition model tells the story of food system change and its health consequences through narrative and cultural imagery. Ultimately the models suggest ways to eat that reflect the traditional food pattern by using contemporary and traditional foods available today.

  18. The historical development and nutritional importance of olive and olive oil constituted an important part of the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Uylaşer, Vildan; Yildiz, Gökçen

    2014-01-01

    The olive tree (Olea europaea) is widely cultivated for the production of both oil and table olives and very significant because of its economic value. Olive and olive oil, a traditional food product with thousands of years of history, are the essential components of the Mediterranean diet and are largely consumed in the world. Beside of their economical contribution to national economy, these are an important food in terms of their nutritional value. Olive and olive oil may have a role in the prevention of coronary heart disease and certain cancers because of their high levels of monosaturated fatty acids and phenolic compounds. In addition, olives (Olea europaea L.) and olive oils provide a rich source of natural antioxidants. These make them both fairly stable against auto-oxidation and suitable for human health. The aim of this paper is to define the historical development and nutritional importance of olive and olive oil constituted an important part of the Mediterranean diet.

  19. The effect of nutrition and metabolic status on the development of follicles, oocytes and embryos in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Dupont, J; Scaramuzzi, R J; Reverchon, M

    2014-07-01

    The impact of nutrition and energy reserves on the fertility of ruminants has been extensively described. However, the metabolic factors and the molecular mechanisms involved in the interactions between nutrition and ovarian function are still poorly understood. These factors could be hormonal (either reproductive and/or metabolic) and/or dietary and metabolic (glucose, amino acids and fatty acids). In this review, we briefly summarize the impact of those nutrients (fatty acids, glucose and amino acids) and metabolic hormones (insulin/IGF-I, growth hormone, T3/4, ghrelin, apelin and the adipokines (leptin, adiponectin and resistin)) implicated in the development of ovarian follicles, oocytes and embryos in ruminants. We then discuss the current hypotheses on the mechanisms of action of these factors on ovarian function. We particularly describe the role of some energy sensors including adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the ovarian cells.

  20. Case study: Nutrition and training periodization in three elite marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerf, Trent

    2012-10-01

    Laboratory-based studies demonstrate that fueling (carbohydrate; CHO) and fluid strategies can enhance training adaptations and race-day performance in endurance athletes. Thus, the aim of this case study was to characterize several periodized training and nutrition approaches leading to individualized race-day fluid and fueling plans for 3 elite male marathoners. The athletes kept detailed training logs on training volume, pace, and subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) for each training session over 16 wk before race day. Training impulse/load calculations (TRIMP; min × RPE = load [arbitrary units; AU]) and 2 central nutritional techniques were implemented: periodic low-CHO-availability training and individualized CHO- and fluid-intake assessments. Athletes averaged ~13 training sessions per week for a total average training volume of 182 km/wk and peak volume of 231 km/wk. Weekly TRIMP peaked at 4,437 AU (Wk 9), with a low of 1,887 AU (Wk 16) and an average of 3,082 ± 646 AU. Of the 606 total training sessions, ~74%, 11%, and 15% were completed at an intensity in Zone 1 (very easy to somewhat hard), Zone 2 (at lactate threshold) and Zone 3 (very hard to maximal), respectively. There were 2.5 ± 2.3 low-CHO-availability training bouts per week. On race day athletes consumed 61 ± 15 g CHO in 604 ± 156 ml/hr (10.1% ± 0.3% CHO solution) in the following format: ~15 g CHO in ~150 ml every ~15 min of racing. Their resultant marathon times were 2:11:23, 2:12:39 (both personal bests), and 2:16:17 (a marathon debut). Taken together, these periodized training and nutrition approaches were successfully applied to elite marathoners in training and competition.

  1. Functioning and health in patients with cancer on home-parenteral nutrition: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cancer. One possible strategy to prevent malnutrition and further deterioration is to administer home-parenteral nutrition (HPN). While the effect on survival is still not clear, HPN presumably improves functioning and quality of life. Thus, patients' experiences concerning functioning and quality of life need to be considered when deciding on the provision of HPN. Currently used quality of life measures hardly reflect patients' perspectives and experiences. The objective of our study was to investigate the perspectives of patients with cancer on their experience of functioning and health in relation to HPN in order to get an item pool to develop a comprehensive measure to assess the impact of HPN in this population. Methods We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed to identify categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) addressed by patients' statements. Patients were consecutively included in the study until an additional patient did not yield any new information. Results We extracted 94 different ICF-categories from 16 interviews representing patient-relevant aspects of functioning and health (32 categories from the ICF component 'Body Functions', 10 from 'Body Structures', 32 from 'Activities & Participation', 18 from 'Environmental Factors'). About 8% of the concepts derived from the interviews could not be linked to specific ICF categories because they were either too general, disease-specific or pertained to 'Personal Factors'. Patients referred to 22 different aspects of functioning improving due to HPN; mainly activities of daily living, mobility, sleep and emotional functions. Conclusions The ICF proved to be a satisfactory framework to standardize the response of patients with cancer on HPN. For most aspects reported by the patients, a matching concept and ICF category could be found. The

  2. Development of Standard Reference Materials to support assessment of iodine status for nutritional and public health purposes.

    PubMed

    Long, Stephen E; Catron, Brittany L; Boggs, Ashley Sp; Tai, Susan Sc; Wise, Stephen A

    2016-09-01

    The use of urinary iodine as an indicator of iodine status relies in part on the accuracy of the analytical measurement of iodine in urine. Likewise, the use of dietary iodine intake as an indicator of iodine status relies in part on the accuracy of the analytical measurement of iodine in dietary sources, including foods and dietary supplements. Similarly, the use of specific serum biomarkers of thyroid function to screen for both iodine deficiency and iodine excess relies in part on the accuracy of the analytical measurement of those biomarkers. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been working with the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements for several years to develop higher-order reference measurement procedures and Standard Reference Materials to support the validation of new routine analytical methods for iodine in foods and dietary supplements, for urinary iodine, and for several serum biomarkers of thyroid function including thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin, total and free thyroxine, and total and free triiodothyronine. These materials and methods have the potential to improve the assessment of iodine status and thyroid function in observational studies and clinical trials, thereby promoting public health efforts related to iodine nutrition.

  3. Molecular nutrition research: the modern way of performing nutritional science.

    PubMed

    Norheim, Frode; Gjelstad, Ingrid Merethe Fange; Hjorth, Marit; Vinknes, Kathrine J; Langleite, Torgrim M; Holen, Torgeir; Jensen, Jørgen; Dalen, Knut Tomas; Karlsen, Anette S; Kielland, Anders; Rustan, Arild C; Drevon, Christian A

    2012-12-03

    In spite of amazing progress in food supply and nutritional science, and a striking increase in life expectancy of approximately 2.5 months per year in many countries during the previous 150 years, modern nutritional research has a great potential of still contributing to improved health for future generations, granted that the revolutions in molecular and systems technologies are applied to nutritional questions. Descriptive and mechanistic studies using state of the art epidemiology, food intake registration, genomics with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, advanced biostatistics, imaging, calorimetry, cell biology, challenge tests (meals, exercise, etc.), and integration of all data by systems biology, will provide insight on a much higher level than today in a field we may name molecular nutrition research. To take advantage of all the new technologies scientists should develop international collaboration and gather data in large open access databases like the suggested Nutritional Phenotype database (dbNP). This collaboration will promote standardization of procedures (SOP), and provide a possibility to use collected data in future research projects. The ultimate goals of future nutritional research are to understand the detailed mechanisms of action for how nutrients/foods interact with the body and thereby enhance health and treat diet-related diseases.

  4. Fortifying food in the field to boost nutrition: case studies from Afghanistan, Angola, and Zambia.

    PubMed

    van den Briel, Tina; Cheung, Edith; Zewari, Jamshid; Khan, Rose

    2007-09-01

    Deficiencies in micronutrients such as iron, vitamin A, and iodine affect billions of people worldwide, causing death, disease, and disability. The UN World Food Programme (WFP) has long been recognised for its ability to deliver food to some of the most remote locations, under the toughest conditions: refugees in border camps, populations cut off by conflict, extremely poor and marginalised people like ethnic minorities, orphans, and widows. Relatively little, however, is known about its efforts to ensure that the food it delivers not only provides enough calories for immediate survival but also provides the vitamins and minerals needed for healthy growth and development. Much of the food delivered by WFP is fortified with iron, vitamin A, and other micronutrients before being shipped. But there are several reasons to mill and fortify food as close to the beneficiaries as possible. For instance, milling and fortifying food locally helps to overcome the problems of the short shelf-life of whole fortified maizemeal. It also enhances the nutritional value of locally procured cereals. And it can foster demand for fortified foods among local consumers beyond WFP beneficiaries, thus nurturing an industry with potentially significant benefits for the health of entire communities. This paper outlines three approaches by WFP to fortifying cereals in Afghanistan, Angola, and Zambia. It examines the challenges faced and the outcomes achieved in an effort to share this knowledge with others dedicated to improving the nutritional status of poor and food-insecure people. In Afghanistan, attempts to mill and fortify wheat flour using small-scale chakki mills were successful but much larger-scale efforts would be needed to promote demand and reach the level of consumption required to address serious iron deficiencies across the country. In Angola, maize has been fortified to combat the persistent occurrence of pellagra, a micronutrient deficiency disease found among people whose

  5. A retrospective study on the influence of nutritional status on pain management in cancer patients using the transdermal fentanyl patch.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Chiba, Takeshi; Tairabune, Tomohiko; Kimura, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Go; Takahashi, Katsuo; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether nutritional status influences pain intensity in cancer patients receiving a transdermal fentanyl patch (FP). This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status is associated with pain intensity and to evaluate the influence of changes in nutritional status on pain intensity in cancer patients receiving transdermal FP treatment. We included 92 patients receiving transdermal FP treatment for the first time with switching from oxycodone. The patients were classified into low- and normal-nutrition groups based on their nutritional status, which was assessed according to the Nutrition Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) parameters. The pain intensity of each patient was evaluated by a numeric rating scale (11-point scale from 0 to 10). NRS 2002 score and pain intensity were obtained on day 3 after the FP was applied to the skin. Pain intensities were significantly higher among patients in the low-nutrition group than among patients in the normal-nutrition group. NRS 2002 scores showed a significant positive correlation with the pain intensities. In 52 of 92 patients, who were evaluated using the NRS 2002 score and pain intensity on day 30 after FP application, the changes in NRS 2002 scores were significantly related to changes in pain intensities (odds ratio, 30.0; 95% confidence interval, 4.48-200.97; p=0.0005). These results suggest that an increase in the NRS 2002 score is a risk factor for an increase in pain intensity in cancer patients receiving FP treatment. Malnutrition may lead to poor pain management in cancer patients receiving FP treatment.

  6. [Nutritional therapy of gout].

    PubMed

    Nickolai, Beate; Kiss, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition and nutritional behaviours have been found to play a major role in the development of gout. Studies show that body mass index (BMI), as well as excessive intake of alcoholic beverages, meat, soft drinks and fruit juices increase the risk of developing gout. Similarly, dairy products and coffee have been seen to decrease the risk of hyperuricemia and gout, as they increase the excretion of uric acid. Flares of gout are often caused by large meals and high alcohol consumption. Each additional intake of meat portion per day increases the risk of gout by 21 %. Taking total alcohol consumption into account, the risk of gout increases after one to two standard drinks. In contrast to previous assumptions purine-rich plant foods like legumes and vegetables do not increase the risk of gout. The current dietary guidelines take into account nutritional factors, which not only consider purine intake, but also their endogenous production and their influence on renal excretion. A balanced diet based on the Swiss healthy eating guideline pyramid as well as the Mediterranean diet is appropriate for this patient population. The treatment of gout is multi-faceted, since this patient population presents other comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Collectively, these risk factors are diet dependent and require a treatment strategy that is centered on modifying one's nutrition and nutritional behaviours. The aim of such therapy is to educate the patient as well as treat the accompanying comorbidities with the goal of decreasing serum uric acid values. Motivated patients require consultation and follow-up care in order to be able to actively decrease the serum uric acid.

  7. Comparative study of the nutritional composition and toxic elements of farmed and wild Chanodichthys mongolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haifeng; Cheng, Xiaofei; Geng, Longwu; Tang, Shizhan; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Information of the difference in quality between farmed and wild fish is central to better ensuring fish products produced in aquaculture meet regulatory and consumer requirements. Proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid profiles, and toxic elements contents of farmed and wild C. mongolicus were established and compared. Significantly higher crude protein content while lower moisture content in farmed fish compared to wild fish were observed (P <0.05). The percentages of total amino acids (TAA), total essential amino acids (TEAA), total non-essential amino acids (TNEAA) and total delicious amino acids (TDAA) in farmed fish were all significantly higher than those in the wild equivalent (P <0.05). Compared to the FAO/WHO recommended reference values, the ratios of TEAA/TAA (39.84%-40.33%) were comparable to 40% and TEAA / TNEAA (66.22%-67.60%) were above 60%. Fatty acid profiles in both farmed and wild C. mongolicus were dominated by monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), with farmed fish contained much more MUFA content compared to wild counterpart (P <0.05). Notably, wild fish exhibited significantly higher levels of total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) than farmed fish (P <0.05). The EPA (C20:5n3) and linoleic acid (C18: 2n6) were the predominant PUFA in wild and farmed C. mongolicus, respectively. Moreover, farmed fish displayed an overall lower toxic element levels (As, Cd, Pb and Hg) in comparison with wild fish, and both were far lower than the established limit standard. In conclusion, our results suggest that the nutritional quality of farmed C. mongolicus was inferior to their wild counterpart with respect to fatty acids nutrition, and therefore further studies should focus on the improving C. mongolicus diet in order to enhance the overall nutritional composition.

  8. Oral Health, Obesity Status and Nutritional Habits in Turkish Children and Adolescents: An Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesim, Servet; Çiçek, Betül; Aral, Cüneyt Asım; Öztürk, Ahmet; Mazıcıoğlu, Mümtaz Mustafa; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2016-01-01

    , significant differences between the frequencies of the BMI groups at the age of 16 (boys only) and 17 (girls only) were seen (p<0.05). Conclusion: Periodontal and dental status appears to correlate with nutritional habits and obesity. Obesity and dental/periodontal diseases are multifactorial diseases that follow similar risk patterns and develop from an interaction between chronic conditions originating early in life. It is important for all health professionals to educate patients at risk about the progression of periodontal and dental diseases and the importance of proper oral hygiene. PMID:27403385

  9. Effects of exercise intensity and nutrition advice on myocardial function in obese children and adolescents: a multicentre randomised controlled trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Katrin A; Coombes, Jeff S; Green, Daniel J; Gomersall, Sjaan R; Keating, Shelley E; Tjonna, Arnt Erik; Hollekim-Strand, Siri Marte; Hosseini, Mansoureh Sadat; Ro, Torstein Baade; Haram, Margrete; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Peter S W; Cain, Peter A; Leong, Gary M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of paediatric obesity is increasing, and with it, lifestyle-related diseases in children and adolescents. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has recently been explored as an alternate to traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in adults with chronic disease and has been shown to induce a rapid reversal of subclinical disease markers in obese children and adolescents. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effects of HIIT with MICT on myocardial function in obese children and adolescents. Methods and analysis Multicentre randomised controlled trial of 100 obese children and adolescents in the cities of Trondheim (Norway) and Brisbane (Australia). The trial will examine the efficacy of HIIT to improve cardiometabolic outcomes in obese children and adolescents. Participants will be randomised to (1) HIIT and nutrition advice, (2) MICT and nutrition advice or (3) nutrition advice. Participants will partake in supervised exercise training and/or nutrition sessions for 3 months. Measurements for study end points will occur at baseline, 3 months (postintervention) and 12 months (follow-up). The primary end point is myocardial function (peak systolic tissue velocity). Secondary end points include vascular function (flow-mediated dilation assessment), quantity of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, myocardial structure and function, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, autonomic function, blood biochemistry, physical activity and nutrition. Lean, healthy children and adolescents will complete measurements for all study end points at one time point for comparative cross-sectional analyses. Ethics and dissemination This randomised controlled trial will generate substantial information regarding the effects of exercise intensity on paediatric obesity, specifically the cardiometabolic health of this at-risk population. It is expected that communication of results will allow for the development of

  10. Outcome of maternal nutritional supplementation: a comprehensive review of the Bacon Chow study.

    PubMed

    Adair, L S; Pollitt, E

    1985-05-01

    In a double blind controlled intervention, two groups of nutritionally at-risk rural Taiwanese women were given a nutrient-rich dietary supplement (group A, n = 114) or a placebo (group B, n = 111) beginning after the birth of one child and continuing through the lactation period for a subsequent child. Outcome variables assessed include infant birth measurements postnatal physical growth, motor, mental, and dental development, morbidity, and maternal weight and skinfold changes during pregnancy and lactation. While few A-B differences in mean values of outcome variables were found, there were significant responses in subgroups of the sample. Comparisons of infants born after a nutrient-supplemented pregnancy (A2) versus an unsupplemented pregnancy (A1) showed that A2 male infants weighed more than A1 males at birth, and A1-A2 sibling correlations in birth measurements, especially Rohrer's index (wt/l3) were significantly reduced. Important mediators of supplement effects included sex of the offspring, season of birth, maternal body size, and birth of a previous infant characterized by dysmorphic prenatal growth. The limited effects of supplementation on the population as a whole may reflect the operation of long term adaptations which allow women to maintain reproductive success despite their apparent marginal nutritional status.

  11. The Bacon Chow study: maternal nutrition supplementation and birth weight of offspring.

    PubMed

    McDonald, E C; Pollitt, E; Mueller, W; Hsueh, A M; Sherwin, R

    1981-10-01

    This study is a randomized controlled double-blind trial on the effects of nutrition supplement of pregnant and lactating women on their offspring. The study was conducted by the late Dr. Bacon Chow in 14 villages in Sui-Lin township, a farming area about 180 miles from Taipei, Taiwan. Two hundred ninety-four women were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. The daily supplement for one group provided 800 kcal and 40 g of protein/day; for the other group it only provided 80 kcal/day. Supplementation began after 3 wk of the delivery of a first study infant, continued throughout lactation, and through the pregnancy and lactation of a second study infant. Between group comparisons on the birth weight, number of low birth weight infants, or incidence of fetal deaths showed no statistically significant findings. However, the birth weight of the second study infant was statistically different and higher than that of the first study infant in the high supplement group. Moreover, in the low supplement group there was a correlation of 0.22 (p = 0.06) between the change scores for birth weight from the first to the second study infant and the quantity of supplements consumed during the last trimester of pregnancy. There was also in this same group a significant slope in a linear regression of birth weight on total daily caloric intake during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy for the male second study infants. These findings are partly in agreement with findings from three other large supplementation studies in Colombia, Guatemala, and New York. In this study the findings indicate that caloric supplementation does result in a small yet statistically meaningful increment in birth weight within a population which is not nutritionally at risk.

  12. Calcium Chloride in Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition: Compatibility Studies Using Laser Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Robert K.; Christensen, J. Mark; Karnpracha, Chanida; Rosa, Jill E.; Clark, Sara M.; Migaki, Evelyn A.; Wu, YingXing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We have previously reported results of precipitation studies for neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions containing calcium chloride and sodium phosphate using visual methods to determine compatibility. The purpose of this study was to do further testing of compatibility for solutions containing calcium chloride using more sensitive methods. Methods Solutions of Trophamine (Braun Medical Inc, Irvine, CA) and Premasol (Baxter Pharmaceuticals, Deerfield, IL) were compounded with calcium chloride and potassium phosphate. Controls contained no calcium or phosphate. After incubation at 37° for 24 hours solutions without visual precipitation were analyzed to determine mean particle size using dynamic light scattering from a laser light source. Results Particle sizes were similar for control solutions and those without visual precipitation and a mean particle size <1000 nm. Compatible solutions were defined as those with added calcium and phosphate with no visual evidence of precipitation and mean particle size <1000 nm. In solutions containing 2.5–3% amino acids and 10 mmol/L of calcium chloride the maximum amount of potassium phosphate that was compatible was 7.5 mmol/L. Conclusion Maximum amounts of phosphate that could be added to parenteral nutrition solutions containing Trophamine and calcium chloride were about 7.5–10 mmol/L less for a given concentration of calcium based upon laser methodology compared to visual techniques to determine compatibility. There were minor differences in compatibility when adding calcium chloride and potassium phosphate to Premasol versus Trophamine. PMID:25192060

  13. Nutrition, Epigenetics, and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence suggests that maternal nutrition and environmental exposure early in development play an important role in susceptibility to disease in later life. In addition, these disease outcomes seem to pass through subsequent generations. Epigenetic modifications provide a potential link between the nutrition status during critical periods in development and changes in gene expression that may lead to disease phenotypes. An increasing body of evidence from experimental animal studies supports the role of epigenetics in disease susceptibility during critical developmental periods, including periconceptional period, gestation, and early postnatal period. The rapid improvements in genetic and epigenetic technologies will allow comprehensive investigations of the relevance of these epigenetic phenomena in human diseases. PMID:24527414

  14. The New Mexico aging process study (1979-2003). A longitudinal study of nutrition, health and aging.

    PubMed

    Garry, P J; Wayne, S J; Vellas, B

    2007-01-01

    In 1979, Dr. James S. Goodwin, M.D., assisted by Philip J. Garry, Ph.D., submitted a grant proposal to the United States Public Health Service/ National Institute on Aging (NIA) entitled, "A prospective study of nutrition in the elderly". This study was approved and funded by the NIA beginning in 1979. Initially, approximately 300 men and women over 65 years of age with no known medical illnesses and no prescription medications were selected for this study. The primary purpose of this multi disciplinary study, known in the literature as the New Mexico Aging Process Study (NMAPS), was to examine the role of nutrition and resultant changes in body composition and organ function in relation to the aging process and health status of the elderly. This was accomplished by following prospectively healthy elderly volunteers, obtaining in-depth information about dietary habits, lifestyle, body composition, organ function, cognitive status, vitamin metabolism, genetic markers, and biochemical measures of nutritional status and then examining these data in relationship to age and health status and changes in health status. Some of the specific aims of the study were modified over the course of this longitudinal study because of availability of University of New Mexico School of Medicine faculty with expertise in different areas of aging research. In 1988, Dr. Bruno Vellas from the University Hospital in Toulouse, France became an on-going visiting professor at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. From 1988, until the study was terminated in 2003, Dr. Vellas has collaborated with the faculty involved in the NMAPS on a number of research projects. In this article, we provide information about the studies overall design and briefly describe some of the major finding of the NMAPS.

  15. The development of an unconventional food regeneration process: Quantifying the nutritional components of a model methylotrophic yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Stokes, B. O.

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid chemical/biological approach to unconventional food regeneration is discussed. Carbon dioxide and water, the major wastes of human metabolism would be converted to methanol by one of several physiochemical processes available (thermal, photocatalytic, etc.). Methanol is then used to supply carbon and energy for the culture of microorganisms which in turn produce biological useful basic food stuffs for human nutrition. Our work has focused on increasing the carbohydrate levels of a candidate methylotrophic yeast to more nearly coincide with human nutritional requirements. Yeasts were chosen due to their high carbohydrate levels compared to bacteria and their present familiarity in the human diet. The initial candidate yeast studied was a thermotolerant strain of Hansenula polymor pha, DL-1. The quantitative results that permit an evaluation of the overall efficiency in hybrid chemical/biological food production schemes are discussed. A preliminary evaluation of the overall efficiency of such schemes is also discussed.

  16. Translating research into action: a case study on trans fatty acid research and nutrition policy in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán; Lindsay, Ana C; Monge-Rojas, Rafael; Greaney, Mary L; Campos, Hannia; Peterson, Karen E

    2007-11-01

    Mounting epidemiologic evidence worldwide has fostered policy regulation of industrially made trans fatty acids (TFA) in several developed countries. Despite country-specific evidence about the effects of TFA on cardiovascular disease in Costa Rica, policy regulation has yet to occur. This qualitative study uses a conceptual framework to identify factors that may impede or promote the process of translation of scientific evidence about TFA into policy in the specific context of Costa Rica. We used single case-study methodology to integrate two sources of data: review of relevant internal documents and in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 21 respondents purposively sampled from three sectors: the cooking oil and food industries, research and academia, and government entities. Content analysis, guided by a conceptual framework of research utilization, revealed 68 emergent themes divided across four categories of analysis. In brief, study participants perceived the political context suitable for discussing policies related to healthy fats. Nevertheless, TFA regulation was not part of the Costa Rican political agenda. Barriers perceived by respondents that impede knowledge translation included: (1) lack of awareness of in-country scientific studies on health effects of TFA; (2) lack of consensus or information about policy options (nutrition labelling, dietary guidelines, legislative mandates); (3) perceived distrust and disparate attitudes between sectors, believed by study participants to result in (4) limited collaboration across sectors. Commissioned task forces and other mechanisms to foster research engagement and facilitate sustained interaction and systematic collaboration among government, food industry and researcher sectors appear crucial in the consideration and adoption of nutrition policy in Costa Rica and other emerging economies.

  17. Development of a Drinkable, Peanut-Based Dietary Supplement and Comparison of Its Nutritional and Microbiological Qualities with Commercial Products.

    PubMed

    Klu, Yaa Asantewaa Kafui; Phillips, Robert D; Chen, Jinru

    2016-05-01

    This study was undertaken to formulate, using peanuts as a major ingredient, a beverage which will benefit older adults who are at a high risk of protein-energy malnutrition and other health complications, and to compare its nutritional and microbiological qualities to commercial products. Peanuts, rice flour, and flaxseed meal in a ratio of 48.0:49.8:2.2 were mixed with water (20% solids) and cooked into gruel which was sequentially treated with BAN(®) , (480 KNU-B/g, 75 °C 1 h), Alcalase(®) (2.4 AU-A/g, 60 °C 1 h), and Flavourzyme(®) (1000 LAPU/g, 55 °C 1 h) to predigest starch and protein, respectively. The degree of hydrolysis and product viscosity during hydrolysis was measured. The nutritional and microbiological qualities of the product were compared to 10 commercial products. Results indicate that 60% of starch was hydrolyzed while a total of 1.62% protein hydrolysis was observed. Product viscosity reduced from 228.55 to 3.60 cP at the end of hydrolysis. The formulation had no cholesterol and low sodium which was a functional property that was absent in the commercial products. Results of this study suggest that the formulation can be further optimized into a unique product that could cater for the protein needs and other nutritional requirements of older adults.

  18. Nutritional Knowledge and Eating Behaviors of Female, Collegiate Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jennifer; Morris, Chad; Schaefer, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    Background Female athletes often have inadequate diets due to lack of nutritional knowledge and nutritional misconceptions. Poor nutrition may lead to an increased chance of developing the Female Athlete Triad, a trio of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mass. Physical therapists, as part of a healthcare team, must be prepared to address nutritional issues, recognize signs and symptoms of the female athlete triad, and make the appropriate intervention or referral. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the nutritional knowledge of female collegiate swimmers and how effectively they apply their nutritional knowledge to their everyday eating habits. Methods Eighty-five female collegiate swimmers from six Michigan universities completed a nutritional</