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Sample records for development reveals alterations

  1. Differential Proteomic Analysis Using iTRAQ Reveals Alterations in Hull Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhen; Chen, Wenyue; Xiao, Wenfei; Yang, Changdeng; Xin, Ya; Qiu, Jieren; Hu, Weimin; Ying, Wu; Fu, Yaping; Tong, Jianxin; Hu, Guocheng; Chen, Zhongzhong; Fang, Xianping; Yu, Hong; Lai, Wenguo; Ruan, Songlin; Ma, Huasheng

    2015-01-01

    Rice hull, the outer cover of the rice grain, determines grain shape and size. Changes in the rice hull proteome in different growth stages may reflect the underlying mechanisms involved in grain development. To better understand these changes, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitative (iTRAQ) MS/MS was used to detect statistically significant changes in the rice hull proteome in the booting, flowering, and milk-ripe growth stages. Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed to predict their potential functions during development. Gene ontology (GO) terms and pathways were used to evaluate the biological mechanisms involved in rice hull at the three growth stages. In total, 5,268 proteins were detected and characterized, of which 563 were differentially expressed across the development stages. The results showed that the flowering and milk-ripe stage proteomes were more similar to each other (r=0.61) than either was to the booting stage proteome. A GO enrichment analysis of the differentially expressed proteins was used to predict their roles during rice hull development. The potential functions of 25 significantly differentially expressed proteins were used to evaluate their possible roles at various growth stages. Among these proteins, an unannotated protein (Q7X8A1) was found to be overexpressed especially in the flowering stage, while a putative uncharacterized protein (B8BF94) and an aldehyde dehydrogenase (Q9FPK6) were overexpressed only in the milk-ripe stage. Pathways regulated by differentially expressed proteins were also analyzed. Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative] cyclase (Q9SDJ2), and two magnesium-chelatase subunits, ChlD (Q6ATS0), and ChlI (Q53RM0), were associated with chlorophyll biosynthesis at different developmental stages. The expression of Q9SDJ2 in the flowering and milk-ripe stages was validated by qRT-PCR. The 25 candidate proteins may be pivotal markers for controlling rice hull development at various

  2. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  3. Changes in Metabolically Active Bacterial Community during Rumen Development, and Their Alteration by Rhubarb Root Powder Revealed by 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuo; Elekwachi, Chijioke; Jiao, Jinzhen; Wang, Min; Tang, Shaoxun; Zhou, Chuanshe; Tan, Zhiliang; Forster, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this present study was to explore the initial establishment of metabolically active bacteria and subsequent evolution in four fractions: rumen solid-phase (RS), liquid-phase (RL), protozoa-associated (RP), and epithelium-associated (RE) through early weaning and supplementing rhubarb root powder in 7 different age groups (1, 10, 20, 38, 41, 50, and 60 d) during rumen development. Results of the 16S rRNA sequencing based on RNA isolated from the four fractions revealed that the potentially active bacterial microbiota in four fractions were dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes regardless of different ages. An age-dependent increment of Chao 1 richness was observed in the fractions of RL and RE. The principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) indicated that samples in four fractions all clustered based on different age groups, and the structure of the bacterial community in RE was distinct from those in other three fractions. The abundances of Proteobacteria decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with age, while increases in the abundances of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were noted. At the genus level, the abundance of the predominant genus Mannheimia in the Proteobacteria phylum decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after 1 d, while the genera Quinella, Prevotella, Fretibacterium, Ruminococcus, Lachnospiraceae NK3A20 group, and Atopobium underwent different manners of increases and dominated the bacterial microbiota across four fractions. Variations of the distributions of some specific bacterial genera across fractions were observed, and supplementation of rhubarb affected the relative abundance of various genera of bacteria. PMID:28223972

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of tomato carpel development reveals alterations in ethylene and gibberellin synthesis during pat3/pat4 parthenocarpic fruit set

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Laura; Blanca, Jose M; Cañizares, Joaquin; Nuez, Fernado

    2009-01-01

    Background Tomato fruit set is a key process that has a great economic impact on crop production. We employed the Affymetrix GeneChip Tomato Genome Array to compare the transcriptome of a non-parthenocarpic line, UC82, with that of the parthenocarpic line RP75/59 (pat3/pat4 mutant). We analyzed the transcriptome under normal conditions as well as with forced parthenocarpic development in RP75/59, emasculating the flowers 2 days before anthesis. This analysis helps to understand the fruit set in tomato. Results Differentially expressed genes were extracted with maSigPro, which is designed for the analysis of single and multiseries time course microarray experiments. 2842 genes showed changes throughout normal carpel development and fruit set. Most of them showed a change of expression at or after anthesis. The main differences between lines were concentrated at the anthesis stage. We found 758 genes differentially expressed in parthenocarpic fruit set. Among these genes we detected cell cycle-related genes that were still activated at anthesis in the parthenocarpic line, which shows the lack of arrest in the parthenocarpic line at anthesis. Key genes for the synthesis of gibberellins and ethylene, which were up-regulated in the parthenocarpic line were also detected. Conclusion Comparisons between array experiments determined that anthesis was the most different stage and the key point at which most of the genes were modulated. In the parthenocarpic line, anthesis seemed to be a short transitional stage to fruit set. In this line, the high GAs contends leads to the development of a parthenocarpic fruit, and ethylene may mimic pollination signals, inducing auxin synthesis in the ovary and the development of a jelly fruit. PMID:19480705

  5. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  6. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression.

  7. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection. PMID:27698715

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals altered metabolic pathways in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinping; Hu, Xiaomin; Shao, Wei; Ji, Tianhai; Yang, Wensheng; Zhuo, Huiqin; Jin, Zeyu; Huang, Huiying; Chen, Jiacheng; Huang, Caihua; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. Alterations in metabolic pathways are inextricably linked to GC progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis of sera derived from a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis, revealed significantly altered metabolic pathways correlated with the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. Rats were histologically classified into four pathological groups (gastritis, GS; low-grade gastric dysplasia, LGD; high-grade gastric dysplasia, HGD; GC) and the normal control group (CON). The metabolic profiles of the five groups were clearly distinguished from each other. Furthermore, significant inter-metabolite correlations were extracted and used to reconstruct perturbed metabolic networks associated with the four pathological stages compared with the normal stage. Then, significantly altered metabolic pathways were identified by pathway analysis. Our results showed that oxidative stress-related metabolic pathways, choline phosphorylation and fatty acid degradation were continually disturbed during gastric carcinogenesis. Moreover, amino acid metabolism was perturbed dramatically in gastric dysplasia and GC. The GC stage showed more changed metabolite levels and more altered metabolic pathways. Two activated pathways (glycolysis; glycine, serine and threonine metabolism) substantially contributed to the metabolic alterations in GC. These results lay the basis for addressing the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis and extend our understanding of GC progression. PMID:27527852

  9. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-02-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress.

  10. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Predominant Alterations in Lipid Metabolism Following Light Exposure in Broccoli Sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Baima, Simona; Morelli, Giorgio; Scaccini, Cristina; Langridge, James; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of vegetables belonging to the family Brassicaceae (e.g., broccoli and cauliflower) is linked to a reduced incidence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The molecular composition of such plants is strongly affected by growing conditions. Here we developed an unbiased metabolomics approach to investigate the effect of light and dark exposure on the metabolome of broccoli sprouts and we applied such an approach to provide a bird’s-eye view of the overall metabolic response after light exposure. Broccoli seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for five days in total darkness or with a light/dark photoperiod (16 h light/8 h dark cycle). We used an ultra-performance liquid-chromatography system coupled to an ion-mobility, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to profile the large array of metabolites present in the sprouts. Differences at the metabolite level between groups were analyzed using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and correlation analysis. Altered metabolites were identified by searching publicly available and in-house databases. Metabolite pathway analyses were used to support the identification of subtle but significant changes among groups of related metabolites that may have gone unnoticed with conventional approaches. Besides the chlorophyll pathway, light exposure activated the biosynthesis and metabolism of sterol lipids, prenol lipids, and polyunsaturated lipids, which are essential for the photosynthetic machinery. Our results also revealed that light exposure increased the levels of polyketides, including flavonoids, and oxylipins, which play essential roles in the plant’s developmental processes and defense mechanism against herbivores. This study highlights the significant contribution of light exposure to the ultimate metabolic phenotype, which might affect the cellular physiology and nutritional value of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential of an

  11. Cooperative genomic alteration network reveals molecular classification across 12 major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyi; Deng, Yulan; Zhang, Yong; Ping, Yanyan; Zhao, Hongying; Pang, Lin; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2017-01-25

    The accumulation of somatic genomic alterations that enables cells to gradually acquire growth advantage contributes to tumor development. This has the important implication of the widespread existence of cooperative genomic alterations in the accumulation process. Here, we proposed a computational method HCOC that simultaneously consider genetic context and downstream functional effects on cancer hallmarks to uncover somatic cooperative events in human cancers. Applying our method to 12 TCGA cancer types, we totally identified 1199 cooperative events with high heterogeneity across human cancers, and then constructed a pan-cancer cooperative alteration network. These cooperative events are associated with genomic alterations of some high-confident cancer drivers, and can trigger the dysfunction of hallmark associated pathways in a co-defect way rather than single alterations. We found that these cooperative events can be used to produce a prognostic classification that can provide complementary information with tissue-of-origin. In a further case study of glioblastoma, using 23 cooperative events identified, we stratified patients into molecularly relevant subtypes with a prognostic significance independent of the Glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (GCIMP). In summary, our method can be effectively used to discover cancer-driving cooperative events that can be valuable clinical markers for patient stratification.

  12. Cooperative genomic alteration network reveals molecular classification across 12 major cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyi; Deng, Yulan; Zhang, Yong; Ping, Yanyan; Zhao, Hongying; Pang, Lin; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic genomic alterations that enables cells to gradually acquire growth advantage contributes to tumor development. This has the important implication of the widespread existence of cooperative genomic alterations in the accumulation process. Here, we proposed a computational method HCOC that simultaneously consider genetic context and downstream functional effects on cancer hallmarks to uncover somatic cooperative events in human cancers. Applying our method to 12 TCGA cancer types, we totally identified 1199 cooperative events with high heterogeneity across human cancers, and then constructed a pan-cancer cooperative alteration network. These cooperative events are associated with genomic alterations of some high-confident cancer drivers, and can trigger the dysfunction of hallmark associated pathways in a co-defect way rather than single alterations. We found that these cooperative events can be used to produce a prognostic classification that can provide complementary information with tissue-of-origin. In a further case study of glioblastoma, using 23 cooperative events identified, we stratified patients into molecularly relevant subtypes with a prognostic significance independent of the Glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (GCIMP). In summary, our method can be effectively used to discover cancer-driving cooperative events that can be valuable clinical markers for patient stratification. PMID:27899621

  13. Does prenatal stress alter the developing connectome?

    PubMed Central

    Scheinost, Dustin; Sinha, Rajita; Cross, Sarah N.; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Sze, Gordon; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    Human neurodevelopment requires the organization of neural elements into complex structural and functional networks called the connectome. Emerging data suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress plays a role in the wiring, or miswiring, of the developing connectome. Stress-related symptoms are common in women during pregnancy and are risk factors for neurobehavioral disorders ranging from autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction, to major depression and schizophrenia. This review focuses on structural and functional connectivity imaging to assess the impact of changes in women's stress-based physiology on the dynamic development of the human connectome in the fetal brain. PMID:27673421

  14. Does prenatal stress alter the developing connectome?

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Sinha, Rajita; Cross, Sarah N; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Sze, Gordon; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2017-01-01

    Human neurodevelopment requires the organization of neural elements into complex structural and functional networks called the connectome. Emerging data suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress plays a role in the wiring, or miswiring, of the developing connectome. Stress-related symptoms are common in women during pregnancy and are risk factors for neurobehavioral disorders ranging from autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction, to major depression and schizophrenia. This review focuses on structural and functional connectivity imaging to assess the impact of changes in women's stress-based physiology on the dynamic development of the human connectome in the fetal brain.

  15. Insect Development in Altered Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1996-01-01

    When tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) larvae burrow underground (25-30 cm) to pupate, they reorient themselves to a relatively horizontal position indicating an ability to sense gravity. To evaluate their sensitivity to gravitational environment during metamorphosis, Manduca (pharate adults) were placed in a vertical (head-up) position. Distinct morphological changes, each one reflecting ensuing phases, were used to follow adult development. Five days after pupation, the vertical group showed accelerated (P less than 0.05) development and were nearly 4 phases ahead (P less than 0.0001) after 10 days. Differences in development in the vertical group were characterized further by increased (7-48%) hemolymph concentrations of 13 amino acids, but a decrease in cys and pro and no change in arg, his, met and val (trp, undetectable). Decreased (36%) turnover of injected H-3 - phenylalanine suggested slower utilization of amino acids contributed, at least partly, to the increased concentrations. Vertically-oriented Manduca also exhibited a greater (20 %, P less than 0.001) protein content in their flight muscles near the end of development. Analysis of hemolymph sugar levels showed a redistribution of sugars from the monosaccharide glucose to the disaccharide trehalose. Since injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone decreased (49%) turnover of H-3- phenylalanine in pharate adults and since ecdysteroids are known to increase flight muscle size and control adult development, these results are consistent with our measuring a greater (+80%, P less than 0.05) ecdysteroid titer in the vertically-oriented insects. These results suggest that gravity environment influences ecdysone output by the pharate adult. When we evaluated hemolymph flow in the head-up and control positions, we found that injected C-14-inulin was distributed somewhat more rapidly in the head-up group irrespective of the sight of injection (head or abdomen) likely because in the head-up position flow of the hemolymph is

  16. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-01-18

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0 · 05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings.

  18. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0·05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings. PMID:24801999

  19. Altered anatomical network in early blindness revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-09-28

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. Diffusion MRI studies have revealed the efficient small-world properties and modular structure of the anatomical network in normal subjects. However, no previous study has used diffusion MRI to reveal changes in the brain anatomical network in early blindness. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 17 early blind subjects and 17 age- and gender-matched sighted controls. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and sub-cortical regions using deterministic tractography. Compared with controls, early blind subjects showed a decreased degree of connectivity, a reduced global efficiency, and an increased characteristic path length in their brain anatomical network, especially in the visual cortex. Moreover, we revealed some regions with motor or somatosensory function have increased connections with other brain regions in the early blind, which suggested experience-dependent compensatory plasticity. This study is the first to show alterations in the topological properties of the anatomical network in early blindness. From the results, we suggest that analyzing the brain's anatomical network obtained using diffusion MRI data provides new insights into the understanding of the brain's re-organization in the specific population with early visual deprivation.

  20. High-resolution genomic profiling of chronic lymphocytic leukemia reveals new recurrent genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Jennifer; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Miller, Florian; Winkler, Dirk; Bühler, Andreas; Zenz, Thorsten; Bullinger, Lars; Kühn, Michael W M; Gerhardinger, Andreas; Bloehdorn, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Su, Xiaoping; Ma, Jing; Pounds, Stanley; Hallek, Michael; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan; Busch, Raymonde; Mertens, Daniel; Downing, James R; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Döhner, Hartmut

    2012-12-06

    To identify genomic alterations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism-array analysis using Affymetrix Version 6.0 on 353 samples from untreated patients entered in the CLL8 treatment trial. Based on paired-sample analysis (n = 144), a mean of 1.8 copy number alterations per patient were identified; approximately 60% of patients carried no copy number alterations other than those detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity was detected in 6% of CLL patients and was found most frequently on 13q, 17p, and 11q. Minimally deleted regions were refined on 13q14 (deleted in 61% of patients) to the DLEU1 and DLEU2 genes, on 11q22.3 (27% of patients) to ATM, on 2p16.1-2p15 (gained in 7% of patients) to a 1.9-Mb fragment containing 9 genes, and on 8q24.21 (5% of patients) to a segment 486 kb proximal to the MYC locus. 13q deletions exhibited proximal and distal breakpoint cluster regions. Among the most common novel lesions were deletions at 15q15.1 (4% of patients), with the smallest deletion (70.48 kb) found in the MGA locus. Sequence analysis of MGA in 59 samples revealed a truncating mutation in one CLL patient lacking a 15q deletion. MNT at 17p13.3, which in addition to MGA and MYC encodes for the network of MAX-interacting proteins, was also deleted recurrently.

  1. Transcriptomic profiling of urine extracellular vesicles reveals alterations of CDH3 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; González, Esperanza; Cortazar, Ana R.; Palomo, Laura; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Lacasa-Viscasillas, Isabel; Berdasco, Maria; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Martín-Martín, Natalia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Valcarcel-Jimenez, Lorea; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Tampan, Jorge; Cachi-Fuentes, Guido; Esteller, Manel; Aransay, Ana M.; Unda, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are emerging structures with promising properties for intercellular communication. In addition, the characterization of EV in biofluids is an attractive source of non-invasive diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Here we show that urinary EV (uEV) from prostate cancer (PCa) patients exhibit genuine and differential physical and biological properties compared to benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Importantly, transcriptomics characterization of uEVs led us to define the decreased abundance of Cadherin 3, type 1 (CDH3) transcript in uEV from PCa patients. Tissue and cell line analysis strongly suggested that the status of CDH3 in uEVs is a distal reflection of changes in the expression of this cadherin in the prostate tumor. CDH3 was negatively regulated at the genomic, transcriptional, and epigenetic level in PCa. Our results reveal that uEVs could represent a non-invasive tool to inform about the molecular alterations in PCa. PMID:26771841

  2. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-06

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly.

  3. BACULOVIRUS REPLICATION ALTERS HORMONE-REGULATED HOST DEVELOPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The baculovirus Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus interferes with insect larval development by altering the host's hormonal system. The level of haemolymph ecdysteroids, the insect moulting hormone, was found to be higher in virus-infected larvae than in uninfected cont...

  4. Biological invasion by Myrica faya alters ecosystem development in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Walker, Lawrence R.; Whiteaker, Louis D.; Mueller-Dombois, Dieter; Matson, Pamela A.

    1987-01-01

    The exotic nitrogen-fixing tree Myrica faya invades young volcanic sites where the growth of native plants is limited by a lack of nitrogen. Myrica quadruples the amount of nitrogen entering certain sites and increases the overall biological availability of nitrogen, thereby altering the nature of ecosystem development after volcanic eruptions.

  5. Super-resolution microscopy reveals altered desmosomal protein organization in pemphigus vulgaris patient tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Warren, Maxine F.; Feldman, Ron J.; Swerlick, Robert A.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease in which autoantibodies (IgG) are directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). In order to better understand how PV IgG alters desmosome morphology and function in vivo, PV patient biopsies were analyzed by structured illumination microscopy (SIM), a form of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. In patient tissue, desmosomal proteins were aberrantly clustered and localized to PV IgG-containing endocytic linear arrays. Patient IgG also colocalized with markers for lipid rafts and endosomes. Additionally, steady-state levels of Dsg3 were decreased and desmosomes were reduced in size in patient tissue. Desmosomes at blister sites were occasionally split, with PV IgG decorating the extracellular faces of split desmosomes. Desmosome splitting was recapitulated in vitro by exposing cultured keratinocytes both to PV IgG and to mechanical stress, demonstrating that splitting at the blister interface in patient tissue is due to compromised desmosomal adhesive function. These findings indicate that Dsg3 clustering and endocytosis are associated with reduced desmosome size and adhesion defects in PV patient tissue. Further, this study reveals that super-resolution optical imaging is powerful approach for studying epidermal adhesion structures in normal and diseased skin. PMID:26763424

  6. Super-Resolution Microscopy Reveals Altered Desmosomal Protein Organization in Tissue from Patients with Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Warren, Maxine F; Feldman, Ron J; Swerlick, Robert A; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease in which autoantibodies (IgG) are directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3. To better understand how PV IgG alters desmosome morphology and function in vivo, biopsies from patients with PV were analyzed by structured illumination microscopy, a form of superresolution fluorescence microscopy. In patient tissue, desmosomal proteins were aberrantly clustered and patient IgG colocalized with markers for lipid rafts and endosomes. Additionally, steady-state levels of desmoglein 3 were decreased and desmosomes were reduced in size in patient tissue. Desmosomes at blister sites were occasionally split, with PV IgG decorating the extracellular faces of split desmosomes. Desmosome splitting was recapitulated in vitro by exposing cultured keratinocytes both to PV IgG and to mechanical stress, demonstrating that splitting at the blister interface in patient tissue is due to compromised desmosomal adhesive function. These findings indicate that desmoglein 3 clustering and endocytosis are associated with reduced desmosome size and adhesion defects in tissue of patients with PV. Further, this study reveals that superresolution optical imaging is a powerful approach for studying epidermal adhesion structures in normal and diseased skin.

  7. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments.

    PubMed

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-19

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material.

  8. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material.

  9. Inflammation-related alterations of lipids after spinal cord injury revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamosaityte, Sandra; Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Koch, Maria; Later, Robert; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers several lipid alterations in nervous tissue. It is characterized by extensive demyelination and the inflammatory response leads to accumulation of activated microglia/macrophages, which often transform into foam cells by accumulation of lipid droplets after engulfment of the damaged myelin sheaths. Using an experimental rat model, Raman microspectroscopy was applied to retrieve the modifications of the lipid distribution following SCI. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and endogenous two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopies were used for the detection of lipid-laden inflammatory cells. The Raman mapping of CH2 deformation mode intensity at 1440 cm-1 retrieved the lipid-depleted injury core. Preserved white matter and inflammatory regions with myelin fragmentation and foam cells were localized by specifically addressing the distribution of esterified lipids, i.e., by mapping the intensity of the carbonyl Raman band at 1743 cm-1, and were in agreement with CARS/TPEF microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the inflammatory regions are notably rich in saturated fatty acids. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy enabled to specifically detect inflammation after SCI and myelin degradation products.

  10. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material. PMID:27194180

  11. Characterization of 4-HNE Modified L-FABP Reveals Alterations in Structural and Functional Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smathers, Rebecca L.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Galligan, James J.; Shearn, Colin T.; Reigan, Philip; Marks, Michael J.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde produced during oxidative stress and subsequent lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The reactivity of 4-HNE towards DNA and nucleophilic amino acids has been well established. In this report, using proteomic approaches, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is identified as a target for modification by 4-HNE. This lipid binding protein mediates the uptake and trafficking of hydrophobic ligands throughout cellular compartments. Ethanol caused a significant decrease in L-FABP protein (P<0.001) and mRNA (P<0.05), as well as increased poly-ubiquitinated L-FABP (P<0.001). Sites of 4-HNE adduction on mouse recombinant L-FABP were mapped using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry on apo (Lys57 and Cys69) and holo (Lys6, Lys31, His43, Lys46, Lys57 and Cys69) L-FABP. The impact of 4-HNE adduction was found to occur in a concentration-dependent manner; affinity for the fluorescent ligand, anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, was reduced from 0.347 µM to Kd1 = 0.395 µM and Kd2 = 34.20 µM. Saturation analyses revealed that capacity for ligand is reduced by approximately 50% when adducted by 4-HNE. Thermal stability curves of apo L-FABP was also found to be significantly affected by 4-HNE adduction (ΔTm = 5.44°C, P<0.01). Computational-based molecular modeling simulations of adducted protein revealed minor conformational changes in global protein structure of apo and holo L-FABP while more apparent differences were observed within the internal binding pocket, revealing reduced area and structural integrity. New solvent accessible portals on the periphery of the protein were observed following 4-HNE modification in both the apo and holo state, suggesting an adaptive response to carbonylation. The results from this study detail the dynamic process associated with L-FABP modification by 4-HNE and provide insight as to how alterations in structural integrity and ligand binding may a

  12. Comprehensive Plasma Metabolomic Analyses of Atherosclerotic Progression Reveal Alterations in Glycerophospholipid and Sphingolipid Metabolism in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vi T.; Huang, Aric; Zhong, Lexy H.; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of atherogenesis are not clear. In this study, comprehensive plasma metabolomics were used to investigate early-stage atherosclerotic development and progression in chow-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice at 5, 10 and 15 weeks of age. Comprehensive plasma metabolomic profiles, based on 4365 detected metabolite features, differentiate atherosclerosis-prone from atherosclerosis-resistant models. Metabolites in the sphingomyelin pathway were significantly altered prior to detectable lesion formation and at all subsequent time-points. The cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol pathway was up-regulated during stage I of atherosclerosis, while metabolites in the phosphatidylethanolamine and glycosphingolipid pathways were augmented in mice with stage II lesions. These pathways, involving glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, were also significantly affected during the course of atherosclerotic progression. Our findings suggest that distinct plasma metabolomic profiles can differentiate the different stages of atherosclerotic progression. This study reveals that alteration of specific, previously unreported pathways of glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism are associated with atherosclerosis. The clear difference in the level of several metabolites supports the use of plasma lipid profiling as a diagnostic tool of atherogenesis. PMID:27721472

  13. Thalamic alterations in preterm neonates and their relation to ventral striatum disturbances revealed by a combined shape and pose analysis.

    PubMed

    Lao, Yi; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Jie; Ceschin, Rafael; Nelson, Marvin D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Finding the neuroanatomical correlates of prematurity is vital to understanding which structures are affected, and to designing efficient prevention and treatment strategies. Converging results reveal that thalamic abnormalities are important indicators of prematurity. However, little is known about the localization of the abnormalities within the subnuclei of the thalamus, or on the association of altered thalamic development with other deep gray matter disturbances. Here, we aim to investigate the effect of prematurity on the thalamus and the putamen in the neonatal brain, and further investigate the associated abnormalities between these two structures. Using brain structural magnetic resonance imaging, we perform a novel combined shape and pose analysis of the thalamus and putamen between 17 preterm (41.12 ± 5.08 weeks) and 19 term-born (45.51 ± 5.40 weeks) neonates at term equivalent age. We also perform a set of correlation analyses between the thalamus and the putamen, based on the surface and pose results. We locate significant alterations on specific surface regions such as the anterior and ventral anterior (VA) thalamic nuclei, and significant relative pose changes of the left thalamus and the right putamen. In addition, we detect significant association between the thalamus and the putamen for both surface and pose parameters. The regions that are significantly associated include the VA, and the anterior and inferior putamen. We detect statistically significant surface deformations and pose changes on the thalamus and putamen, and for the first time, demonstrate the feasibility of using relative pose parameters as indicators for prematurity in neonates. Our methods show that regional abnormalities of the thalamus are associated with alterations of the putamen, possibly due to disturbed development of shared pre-frontal connectivity. More specifically, the significantly correlated regions in these two structures point to frontal

  14. Thin and thick primary cutaneous melanomas reveal distinct patterns of somatic copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Apollo, Alessandro; Pescucci, Chiara; Licastro, Danilo; Urso, Carmelo; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Luzzatto, Lucio; Stecca, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most aggressive type of skin tumor. Early stage melanoma can be often cured by surgery; therefore current management guidelines dictate a different approach for thin (<1mm) versus thick (>4mm) melanomas. We have carried out whole-exome sequencing in 5 thin and 5 thick fresh-frozen primary cutaneous melanomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) identified two groups corresponding to thin and thick melanomas. The most striking difference between them was the much greater abundance of SCNAs in thick melanomas, whereas mutation frequency did not significantly change between the two groups. We found novel mutations and focal SCNAs in genes that are embryonic regulators of axon guidance, predominantly in thick melanomas. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets provided further support for a potential role of Ephrin receptors in melanoma progression. In addition, we have identified a set of SCNAs, including amplification of BRAF and ofthe epigenetic modifier EZH2, that are specific for the group of thick melanomas that developed metastasis during the follow-up. Our data suggest that mutations occur early during melanoma development, whereas SCNAs might be involved in melanoma progression. PMID:27095580

  15. Exercise Challenge in Gulf War Illness Reveals Two Subgroups with Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rayhan, Rakib U.; Stevens, Benson W.; Raksit, Megna P.; Ripple, Joshua A.; Timbol, Christian R.; Adewuyi, Oluwatoyin; VanMeter, John W.; Baraniuk, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 30% of the approximately 700,000 military personnel who served in Operation Desert Storm (1990–1991) have developed Gulf War Illness, a condition that presents with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, debilitating fatigue and chronic widespread pain that implicate the central nervous system. A hallmark complaint of subjects with Gulf War Illness is post-exertional malaise; defined as an exacerbation of symptoms following physical and/or mental effort. To study the causal relationship between exercise, the brain, and changes in symptoms, 28 Gulf War veterans and 10 controls completed an fMRI scan before and after two exercise stress tests to investigate serial changes in pain, autonomic function, and working memory. Exercise induced two clinical Gulf War Illness subgroups. One subgroup presented with orthostatic tachycardia (n = 10). This phenotype correlated with brainstem atrophy, baseline working memory compensation in the cerebellar vermis, and subsequent loss of compensation after exercise. The other subgroup developed exercise induced hyperalgesia (n = 18) that was associated with cortical atrophy and baseline working memory compensation in the basal ganglia. Alterations in cognition, brain structure, and symptoms were absent in controls. Our novel findings may provide an understanding of the relationship between the brain and post-exertional malaise in Gulf War Illness. PMID:23798990

  16. Exercise challenge in Gulf War Illness reveals two subgroups with altered brain structure and function.

    PubMed

    Rayhan, Rakib U; Stevens, Benson W; Raksit, Megna P; Ripple, Joshua A; Timbol, Christian R; Adewuyi, Oluwatoyin; VanMeter, John W; Baraniuk, James N

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 30% of the approximately 700,000 military personnel who served in Operation Desert Storm (1990-1991) have developed Gulf War Illness, a condition that presents with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, debilitating fatigue and chronic widespread pain that implicate the central nervous system. A hallmark complaint of subjects with Gulf War Illness is post-exertional malaise; defined as an exacerbation of symptoms following physical and/or mental effort. To study the causal relationship between exercise, the brain, and changes in symptoms, 28 Gulf War veterans and 10 controls completed an fMRI scan before and after two exercise stress tests to investigate serial changes in pain, autonomic function, and working memory. Exercise induced two clinical Gulf War Illness subgroups. One subgroup presented with orthostatic tachycardia (n = 10). This phenotype correlated with brainstem atrophy, baseline working memory compensation in the cerebellar vermis, and subsequent loss of compensation after exercise. The other subgroup developed exercise induced hyperalgesia (n = 18) that was associated with cortical atrophy and baseline working memory compensation in the basal ganglia. Alterations in cognition, brain structure, and symptoms were absent in controls. Our novel findings may provide an understanding of the relationship between the brain and post-exertional malaise in Gulf War Illness.

  17. Mars 520-d mission simulation reveals protracted crew hypokinesis and alterations of sleep duration and timing.

    PubMed

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Mollicone, Daniel; Ecker, Adrian; Jones, Christopher W; Hyder, Eric C; Di Antonio, Adrian; Savelev, Igor; Kan, Kevin; Goel, Namni; Morukov, Boris V; Sutton, Jeffrey P

    2013-02-12

    The success of interplanetary human spaceflight will depend on many factors, including the behavioral activity levels, sleep, and circadian timing of crews exposed to prolonged microgravity and confinement. To address the effects of the latter, we used a high-fidelity ground simulation of a Mars mission to objectively track sleep-wake dynamics in a multinational crew of six during 520 d of confined isolation. Measurements included continuous recordings of wrist actigraphy and light exposure (4.396 million min) and weekly computer-based neurobehavioral assessments (n = 888) to identify changes in the crew's activity levels, sleep quantity and quality, sleep-wake periodicity, vigilance performance, and workload throughout the record-long 17 mo of mission confinement. Actigraphy revealed that crew sedentariness increased across the mission as evident in decreased waking movement (i.e., hypokinesis) and increased sleep and rest times. Light exposure decreased during the mission. The majority of crewmembers also experienced one or more disturbances of sleep quality, vigilance deficits, or altered sleep-wake periodicity and timing, suggesting inadequate circadian entrainment. The results point to the need to identify markers of differential vulnerability to hypokinesis and sleep-wake changes during the prolonged isolation of exploration spaceflight and the need to ensure maintenance of circadian entrainment, sleep quantity and quality, and optimal activity levels during exploration missions. Therefore, successful adaptation to such missions will require crew to transit in spacecraft and live in surface habitats that instantiate aspects of Earth's geophysical signals (appropriately timed light exposure, food intake, exercise) required for temporal organization and maintenance of human behavior.

  18. Mars 520-d mission simulation reveals protracted crew hypokinesis and alterations of sleep duration and timing

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F.; Mollicone, Daniel; Ecker, Adrian; Jones, Christopher W.; Hyder, Eric C.; Di Antonio, Adrian; Savelev, Igor; Kan, Kevin; Goel, Namni; Morukov, Boris V.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    The success of interplanetary human spaceflight will depend on many factors, including the behavioral activity levels, sleep, and circadian timing of crews exposed to prolonged microgravity and confinement. To address the effects of the latter, we used a high-fidelity ground simulation of a Mars mission to objectively track sleep–wake dynamics in a multinational crew of six during 520 d of confined isolation. Measurements included continuous recordings of wrist actigraphy and light exposure (4.396 million min) and weekly computer-based neurobehavioral assessments (n = 888) to identify changes in the crew's activity levels, sleep quantity and quality, sleep–wake periodicity, vigilance performance, and workload throughout the record-long 17 mo of mission confinement. Actigraphy revealed that crew sedentariness increased across the mission as evident in decreased waking movement (i.e., hypokinesis) and increased sleep and rest times. Light exposure decreased during the mission. The majority of crewmembers also experienced one or more disturbances of sleep quality, vigilance deficits, or altered sleep–wake periodicity and timing, suggesting inadequate circadian entrainment. The results point to the need to identify markers of differential vulnerability to hypokinesis and sleep–wake changes during the prolonged isolation of exploration spaceflight and the need to ensure maintenance of circadian entrainment, sleep quantity and quality, and optimal activity levels during exploration missions. Therefore, successful adaptation to such missions will require crew to transit in spacecraft and live in surface habitats that instantiate aspects of Earth's geophysical signals (appropriately timed light exposure, food intake, exercise) required for temporal organization and maintenance of human behavior. PMID:23297197

  19. Altered Gravity and Early Heart Development in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Darrell J.; Lwigale, P.; Denning, J.

    1996-01-01

    The macromolecules comprising the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix of cells may be sensitive to gravitation. Since early development of organs depends on dynamic interactions across cell surfaces, altered gravity may disturb development. We investigated this possibility for heart development. Previous studies showed that the extracellular matrix glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn) is necessary for normal heart development. We cultured precardiac tissue explants in a high aspect ratio bioreactor vessel (HARV) to simulate microgravity. We observed tissue morphology, contraction, and Fn distribution by immunolocalization in HARV rotated and control (lxg) explants, cultured 18 hr. We also measured Fn amount by immunoassay. Explants in HARV were rotated at 6 rpm to achieve continuous freefall. Thirty-five of 37 control, but only 1 of 37 matched rotated explants exhibited contractions. Tissue architecture was identical. Immunolocalization of Fn showed remarkable differences which may be related to the development of contractions. The Fn staining in the HARV explants was less intense in all areas. Areas of linear staining along epithelia were present but shorter, and there was less intercellular staining in both mesenchymal tissue and myocardium. Initial immunoassay results of 5 matched pairs of explants showed a 22% reduction in total tissue Fn in the HARV rotated samples. Our results indicate that altered gravity in the HARV reduced the amount and distribution of Fn, as assessed by two independent criteria. This was correlated with a reduction in the development of contractile activity.

  20. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs: does exposure alter normal brain development?

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric D; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Porter, Brenda E

    2006-12-01

    Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affect brain development and have long-term neurological consequences. The specific molecular and cellular changes, the precise timing of their influence during brain development, and the full extent of the long-term consequences of seizures and AEDs exposure have not been established. This review critically assesses both the basic and clinical science literature on the effects of seizures and AEDs on the developing brain and finds that evidence exists to support the hypothesis that both seizures and antiepileptic drugs influence a variety of biological process, at specific times during development, which alter long-term cognition and epilepsy susceptibility. More research, both clinical and experimental, is needed before changes in current clinical practice, based on the scientific data, can be recommended.

  1. Cell proliferation and plant development under novel altered gravity environments.

    PubMed

    Herranz, R; Medina, F J

    2014-01-01

    Gravity is a key factor for life on Earth. It is the only environmental factor that has remained constant throughout evolution, and plants use it to modulate important physiological activities; gravity removal or alteration produces substantial changes in essential functions. For root gravitropism, gravity is sensed in specialised cells, which are capable of detecting magnitudes of the g vector lower than 10(-3) . Then, the mechanosignal is transduced to upper zones of the root, resulting in changes in the lateral distribution of auxin and in the rate of auxin polar transport. Gravity alteration has consequences for cell growth and proliferation rates in root meristems, which are the basis of the developmental programme of a plant, in which regulation via auxin is involved. The effect is disruption of meristematic competence, i.e. the strict coordination between cell proliferation and growth, which characterises meristematic cells. This effect can be related to changes in the transport and distribution of auxin throughout the root. However, similar effects of gravity alteration have been found in plant cell cultures in vitro, in which neither specialised structures for gravity sensing and signal transduction, nor apparent gravitropism have been described. We postulate that gravity resistance, a general mechanism of cellular origin for developing rigid structures in plants capable of resisting the gravity force, could also be responsible for the changes in cell growth and proliferation parameters detected in non-specialised cells. The mechanisms of gravitropism and graviresistance are complementary, the first being mostly sensitive to the direction of the gravity vector, and the second to its magnitude. At a global molecular level, the consequence of gravity alteration is that the genome should be finely tuned to counteract a type of stress that plants have never encountered before throughout evolution. Multigene families and redundant genes present an advantage in

  2. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  3. Integrated molecular analysis reveals complex interactions between genomic and epigenomic alterations in esophageal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Peng, DunFa; Guo, Yan; Chen, Heidi; Zhao, Shilin; Washington, Kay; Hu, TianLing; Shyr, Yu; El-Rifai, Wael

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is rapidly rising in the United States and Western countries. In this study, we carried out an integrative molecular analysis to identify interactions between genomic and epigenomic alterations in regulating gene expression networks in EAC. We detected significant alterations in DNA copy numbers (CN), gene expression levels, and DNA methylation profiles. The integrative analysis demonstrated that altered expression of 1,755 genes was associated with changes in CN or methylation. We found that expression alterations in 84 genes were associated with changes in both CN and methylation. These data suggest a strong interaction between genetic and epigenetic events to modulate gene expression in EAC. Of note, bioinformatics analysis detected a prominent K-RAS signature and predicted activation of several important transcription factor networks, including β-catenin, MYB, TWIST1, SOX7, GATA3 and GATA6. Notably, we detected hypomethylation and overexpression of several pro-inflammatory genes such as COX2, IL8 and IL23R, suggesting an important role of epigenetic regulation of these genes in the inflammatory cascade associated with EAC. In summary, this integrative analysis demonstrates a complex interaction between genetic and epigenetic mechanisms providing several novel insights for our understanding of molecular events in EAC. PMID:28102292

  4. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus.

    PubMed

    Hamanishi, Erin T; Thomas, Barb R; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-08-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar.

  5. Meloidogyne javanica chorismate mutase 1 alters plant cell development.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Kris N

    2003-02-01

    Root-knot nematodes are obligate plant parasites that alter plant cell growth and development by inducing the formation of giant cells for feeding. Nematodes inject secretions from their esophageal glands through their stylet and into plant cells to induce giant cell formation. Meloidogyne javanica chorismate mutase 1 (MjCM-1) is one such esophageal gland protein likely to be secreted from the nematode as giant cells form. MjCM-1 has two domains, an N-terminal chorismate mutase (CM) domain and a C-terminal region of unknown function. It is the N-terminal CM domain of the protein that is the predominant form produced in root-knot nematodes. Transgenic expression of MjCM-1 in soybean hairy roots results in a phenotype of reduced and aborted lateral roots. Histological studies demonstrate the absence of vascular tissue in hairy roots expressing MjCM-1. The phenotype of MjCM-1 expressed at low levels can be rescued by the addition of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indicating MjCM-1 overexpression reduces IAA biosynthesis. We propose MjCM-1 lowers IAA by causing a competition for chorismate, resulting in an alteration of chorismate-derived metabolites and, ultimately, in plant cell development. Therefore, we hypothesize that MjCM-1 is involved in allowing nematodes to establish a parasitic relationship with the host plant.

  6. Functional Connectivity Estimated from Resting-State fMRI Reveals Selective Alterations in Male Adolescents with Pure Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Zhou, Jian-Song; Zhang, Jiang; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yuan, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is characterized by a persistent pattern of antisocial behavior and aggression in childhood and adolescence. Previous task-based and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed widespread brain regional abnormalities in adolescents with CD. However, whether the resting-state networks (RSNs) are altered in adolescents with CD remains unknown. In this study, resting-state fMRI data were first acquired from eighteen male adolescents with pure CD and eighteen age- and gender-matched typically developing (TD) individuals. Independent component analysis (ICA) was implemented to extract nine representative RSNs, and the generated RSNs were then compared to show the differences between the CD and TD groups. Interestingly, it was observed from the brain mapping results that compared with the TD group, the CD group manifested decreased functional connectivity in four representative RSNs: the anterior default mode network (left middle frontal gyrus), which is considered to be correlated with impaired social cognition, the somatosensory network (bilateral supplementary motor area and right postcentral gyrus), the lateral visual network (left superior occipital gyrus), and the medial visual network (right fusiform, left lingual gyrus and right calcarine), which are expected to be relevant to the perceptual systems responsible for perceptual dysfunction in male adolescents with CD. Importantly, the novel findings suggested that male adolescents with pure CD were identified to have dysfunctions in both low-level perceptual networks (the somatosensory network and visual network) and a high-order cognitive network (the default mode network). Revealing the changes in the functional connectivity of these RSNs enhances our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of emotion and social cognition and the regulation of perception in adolescents with CD. PMID:26713867

  7. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  8. [The child's brain: normal (unaltered) development and development altered by perinatal injury].

    PubMed

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel

    2013-09-06

    In this study we analyse some of the morphological and functional aspects of normal and altered development (the latter due to perinatal injury) in the child's brain. Both normal and altered development are developmental processes that progressively interconnect the different regions. The neuropathological development of subpial and periventricular haemorrhages, as well as that of white matter infarct, are analysed in detail. Any kind of brain damage causes a local lesion with possible remote repercussions. All the components (neurons, fibres, blood capillaries and neuroglias) of the affected region undergo alterations. Those that are destroyed are eliminated by the inflammatory process and those that survive are transformed. The pyramidal neurons with amputated apical dendrites are transformed and become stellate cells, the axonal terminals and those of the radial glial cells are regenerated and the region involved is reinnervated and revascularised with an altered morphology and function (altered local corticogenesis). The specific microvascular system of the grey matter protects its neurons from infarction of the white matter. Although it survives, the grey matter is left disconnected from the afferent and efferent fibres, amputated by the infarct with alterations affecting its morphology and possibly its functioning (altered local corticogenesis). Any local lesion can modify the morphological and functional development of remote regions that are functionally interconnected with it (altered remote corticogenesis). We suggest that any local brain injury can alter the morphology and functioning of the regions that are morphologically and functionally interconnected with it and thus end up affecting the child's neurological and psychological development. These changes can cross different regions of the brain (epileptic auras) and, if they eventually reach the motor region, will give rise to the motor storm that characterises epilepsy.

  9. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals unsuspected molecular alterations in pemphigus foliaceus

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Danielle; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Roselino, Ana M; Araújo, Amélia G; Zago, Marco A; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by bullous skin lesions and the presence of antibodies against desmoglein 1. In this study we sought to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular processes in endemic PF, as the identification of factors that participate in the pathogenesis is a prerequisite for understanding its biological basis and may lead to novel therapeutic interventions. CD4+ T lymphocytes are central to the development of the disease. Therefore, we compared genome-wide gene expression profiles of peripheral CD4+ T cells of various PF patient subgroups with each other and with that of healthy individuals. The patient sample was subdivided into three groups: untreated patients with the generalized form of the disease, patients submitted to immunosuppressive treatment, and patients with the localized form of the disease. Comparisons between different subgroups resulted in 135, 54 and 64 genes differentially expressed. These genes are mainly related to lymphocyte adhesion and migration, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, cytotoxicity and antigen presentation. Several of these genes were differentially expressed when comparing lesional and uninvolved skin from the same patient. The chromosomal regions 19q13 and 12p13 concentrate differentially expressed genes and are candidate regions for PF susceptibility genes and disease markers. Our results reveal genes involved in disease severity, potential therapeutic targets and previously unsuspected processes involved in the pathogenesis. Besides, this study adds original information that will contribute to the understanding of PF's pathogenesis and of the still poorly defined in vivo functions of most of these genes. PMID:24813052

  10. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects.

  11. Postnatal Morphine Administration Alters Hippocampal Development in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M.; Tkac, Ivan; Ennis, Kathleen M.; Sutton, Leah M.; Mammel, Daniel M.; Rao, Raghavendra

    2011-01-01

    Morphine is frequently used as an analgesic and sedative in preterm infants. Adult rats exposed to morphine have altered hippocampal neurochemical profile and decreased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. To evaluate whether neonatal rats are similarly affected, rat pups were injected twice daily with 2 mg/kg of morphine or normal saline from postnatal days 3 to 7. On postnatal day 8, the hippocampal neurochemical profile was determined using in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy. The mRNA and protein concentrations of specific analytes were measured in hippocampus, and cell division in dentate gyrus was assessed using bromodeoxyuridine. The concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine and myo-insotol were decreased, while glutathione, phosphoethanolamine and choline-containing compounds concentrations were increased in morphine-exposed rats relative to control rats. Morphine decreased glutamic acid decarboxylase enzyme levels and myelin basic protein mRNA expression in the hippocampus. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling in the dentate gyrus was decreased by 60-70% in morphine-exposed rats. These results suggest that recurrent morphine administration during brain development alters hippocampal structure. PMID:21971612

  12. Postnatal morphine administration alters hippocampal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Traudt, Christopher M; Tkac, Ivan; Ennis, Kathleen M; Sutton, Leah M; Mammel, Daniel M; Rao, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Morphine is frequently used as an analgesic and sedative in preterm infants. Adult rats exposed to morphine have an altered hippocampal neurochemical profile and decreased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. To evaluate whether neonatal rats are similarly affected, rat pups were injected twice daily with 2 mg/kg morphine or normal saline from postnatal days 3 to 7. On postnatal day 8, the hippocampal neurochemical profile was determined using in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The mRNA and protein concentrations of specific analytes were measured in hippocampus, and cell division in dentate gyrus was assessed using bromodeoxyuridine. The concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, and myo-insotol were decreased, whereas concentrations of glutathione, phosphoethanolamine, and choline-containing compounds were increased in morphine-exposed rats relative to control rats. Morphine decreased glutamic acid decarboxylase enzyme levels and myelin basic protein mRNA expression in the hippocampus. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling in the dentate gyrus was decreased by 60-70% in morphine-exposed rats. These results suggest that recurrent morphine administration during brain development alters hippocampal structure.

  13. Altered development of Xenopus embryos in a hypogeomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Ying; Cooper, Helen M; He, Rong-Qiao

    2012-04-01

    The hypogeomagnetic field (HGMF; magnetic fields <200 nT) is one of the fundamental environmental factors of space. However, the effect of HGMF exposure on living systems remains unclear. In this article, we examine the biological effects of HGMF on the embryonic development of Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog). A decrease in horizontal third cleavage furrows and abnormal morphogenesis were observed in Xenopus embryos growing in the HGMF. HGMF exposure at the two-cell stage, but no later than the four-cell stage, is enough to alter the third cleavage geometry pattern. Immunofluorescent staining for α-tubulin showed reorientation of the spindle of four-cell stage blastomeres. These results indicate that a brief (2-h) exposure to HGMF is sufficient to interfere with the development of Xenopus embryos at cleavage stages. Also, the mitotic spindle could be an early sensor to the deprivation of the geomagnetic field, which provides a clue to the molecular mechanism underlying the morphological and other changes observed in the developing and/or developed embryos.

  14. Altered spontaneous activity in antisocial personality disorder revealed by regional homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Liu, Wangyong; Chen, Jingang; Liao, Jian; Hu, Dewen; Wang, Wei

    2013-08-07

    There is increasing evidence that antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) stems from brain abnormalities. However, there are only a few studies investigating brain structure in ASPD. The aim of this study was to find regional coherence abnormalities in resting-state functional MRI of ASPD. Thirty-two ASPD individuals and 34 controls underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan. The regional homogeneity (ReHo) approach was used to examine whether ASPD was related to alterations in resting-state neural activity. Support vector machine discriminant analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity/specificity characteristics of the ReHo index in discriminating between the ASPD individuals and controls. The results showed that, compared with controls, ASPD individuals show lower ReHo in the right cerebellum posterior lobe (Crus1) and the right middle frontal gyrus, as well as higher ReHo in the right middle occipital gyrus (BA 19), left inferior temporal gyrus (BA 37), and right inferior occipital gyrus (cuneus, BA 18). All alternation regions reported a predictive accuracy above 70%. To our knowledge, this study was the first to study the change in regional activity coherence in the resting brain of ASPD individuals. These results not only elucidated the pathological mechanism of ASPD from a resting-state functional viewpoint but also showed that these alterations in ReHo may serve as potential markers for the detection of ASPD.

  15. Arsenic exposure to killifish during embryogenesis alters muscle development.

    PubMed

    Gaworecki, Kristen M; Chapman, Robert W; Neely, Marion G; D'Amico, Angela R; Bain, Lisa J

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated arsenic exposure in drinking water with adverse developmental outcomes such as stillbirths, spontaneous abortions, neonatal mortality, low birth weight, delays in the use of musculature, and altered locomotor activity. Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were used as a model to help to determine the mechanisms by which arsenic could impact development. Killifish embryos were exposed to three different sodium arsenite concentrations and were collected at 32 h post-fertilization (hpf), 42 hpf, 168 hpf, or < 24 h post-hatch. A killifish oligo microarray was developed and used to examine gene expression changes between control and 25-ppm arsenic-exposed hatchlings. With artificial neural network analysis of the transcriptomic data, accurate prediction of each group (control vs. arsenic-exposed embryos) was obtained using a small subset of only 332 genes. The genes differentially expressed include those involved in cell cycle, development, ubiquitination, and the musculature. Several of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and muscle formation, such as fetuin B, cyclin D-binding protein 1, and CapZ, were differentially expressed in the embryos in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Examining muscle structure in the hatchlings showed that arsenic exposure during embryogenesis significantly reduces the average muscle fiber size, which is coupled with a significant 2.1- and 1.6-fold upregulation of skeletal myosin light and heavy chains, respectively. These findings collectively indicate that arsenic exposure during embryogenesis can initiate molecular changes that appear to lead to aberrant muscle formation.

  16. Nicotine alters bovine oocyte meiosis and affects subsequent embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Guang-Peng; White, Kenneth L; Rickords, Lee F; Sessions, Benjamin R; Aston, Kenneth I; Bunch, Thomas D

    2007-11-01

    The effects of nicotine on nuclear maturation and meiotic spindle dynamics of bovine oocytes and subsequent embryonic development were investigated. Maturation rates (85%-94%) derived from nicotine treatments at 0.01 to 1.0 mM were similar to the control (86%), but significantly decreased at 2.0 to 6.0 mM. Haploid complements of metaphase II oocytes in 0.01 to 1.0 mM nicotine (approximately 90%) were similar to the control, while lower (ranged from 63% to 76%, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) haploid oocytes were observed in the 2.0 to 6.0 mM nicotine groups. The majority of the PB1-free oocytes derived from 3.0 to 6.0 mM nicotine treatments were diploidy (2n = 60). Spindle microtubules changed from characteristically being asymmetrical in the controls to being equally distributed into two separate chromosome groups in the nicotine treatments. Nicotine disorganized the microfilament organization and inhibited the movement of anaphase or telophase chromosomes to the cortical area. The inhibited two chromosome groups became two spindles that either moved close in proximity or merged entirely together resulting in diploidy within the affected oocyte. Nicotine treatment significantly reduced the rate of cleavage and blastocyst development after parthenogenetic activation. Diploidy and cell number were drastically reduced in the resultant blastocysts. In conclusion, nicotine can alter the normal process of bovine oocyte meiosis and affects subsequent embryonic development.

  17. Electron cryotomography reveals ultrastructure alterations in platelets from patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Stone, Rebecca L; Kaelber, Jason T; Rochat, Ryan H; Nick, Alpa M; Vijayan, K Vinod; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Schmid, Michael F; Dong, Jing-Fei; Sood, Anil K; Chiu, Wah

    2015-11-17

    Thrombocytosis and platelet hyperreactivity are known to be associated with malignancy; however, there have been no ultrastructure studies of platelets from patients with ovarian cancer. Here, we used electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) to examine frozen-hydrated platelets from patients with invasive ovarian cancer (n = 12) and control subjects either with benign adnexal mass (n = 5) or free from disease (n = 6). Qualitative inspections of the tomograms indicate significant morphological differences between the cancer and control platelets, including disruption of the microtubule marginal band. Quantitative analysis of subcellular features in 120 platelet electron tomograms from these two groups showed statistically significant differences in mitochondria, as well as microtubules. These structural variations in the platelets from the patients with cancer may be correlated with the altered platelet functions associated with malignancy. Cryo-ET of platelets shows potential as a noninvasive biomarker technology for ovarian cancer and other platelet-related diseases.

  18. Prefrontal cortex shotgun proteome analysis reveals altered calcium homeostasis and immune system imbalance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Gattaz, Wagner F; Schmitt, Andrea; Rewerts, Christiane; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Turck, Christoph W

    2009-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease, likely to be caused by a combination of serial alterations in a number of genes and environmental factors. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's Area 46) is involved in schizophrenia and executes high-level functions such as working memory, differentiation of conflicting thoughts, determination of right and wrong concepts and attitudes, correct social behavior and personality expression. Global proteomic analysis of post-mortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from schizophrenia patients and non-schizophrenic individuals was performed using stable isotope labeling and shotgun proteomics. The analysis resulted in the identification of 1,261 proteins, 84 of which showed statistically significant differential expression, reinforcing previous data supporting the involvement of the immune system, calcium homeostasis, cytoskeleton assembly, and energy metabolism in schizophrenia. In addition a number of new potential markers were found that may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease.

  19. Active Collisions in Altered Gravity Reveal Eye-Hand Coordination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    White, Olivier; Lefèvre, Philippe; Wing, Alan M.; Bracewell, R. Martyn; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Most object manipulation tasks involve a series of actions demarcated by mechanical contact events, and gaze is usually directed to the locations of these events as the task unfolds. Typically, gaze foveates the target 200 ms in advance of the contact. This strategy improves manual accuracy through visual feedback and the use of gaze-related signals to guide the hand/object. Many studies have investigated eye-hand coordination in experimental and natural tasks; most of them highlighted a strong link between eye movements and hand or object kinematics. In this experiment, we analyzed gaze strategies in a collision task but in a very challenging dynamical context. Participants performed collisions while they were exposed to alternating episodes of microgravity, hypergravity and normal gravity. First, by isolating the effects of inertia in microgravity, we found that peak hand acceleration marked the transition between two modes of grip force control. Participants exerted grip forces that paralleled load force profiles, and then increased grip up to a maximum shifted after the collision. Second, we found that the oculomotor strategy adapted visual feedback of the controlled object around the collision, as demonstrated by longer durations of fixation after collision in new gravitational environments. Finally, despite large variability of arm dynamics in altered gravity, we found that saccades were remarkably time-locked to the peak hand acceleration in all conditions. In conclusion, altered gravity allowed light to be shed on predictive mechanisms used by the central nervous system to coordinate gaze, hand and grip motor actions during a mixed task that involved transport of an object and high impact loads. PMID:22984488

  20. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals widespread molecular alterations in human skin keratinocytes upon chronic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Pinto, Sneha M; Paul, Somnath; Raja, Remya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Syed, Nazia; Advani, Jayshree; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Prasad, T S Keshava; Giri, Ashok K; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with dermatological and nondermatological disorders. Consumption of arsenic-contaminated drinking water results in accumulation of arsenic in liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. Although arsenic is cleared from these sites, a substantial amount of residual arsenic is left in keratin-rich tissues including skin. Epidemiological studies suggest the association of skin cancer upon arsenic exposure, however, the mechanism of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is not completely understood. We developed a cell line based model to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic-mediated toxicity and carcinogenicity. Human skin keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, was chronically exposed to 100 nM sodium arsenite over a period of 6 months. We observed an increase in basal ROS levels in arsenic-exposed cells. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics approach resulted in identification of 2111 proteins of which 42 proteins were found to be overexpressed and 54 downregulated (twofold) upon chronic arsenic exposure. Our analysis revealed arsenic-induced overexpression of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2), aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 (AKR1C3), glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1) among others. We observed downregulation of several members of the plakin family including periplakin (PPL), envoplakin (EVPL), and involucrin (IVL) that are essential for terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. MRM and Western blot analysis confirmed differential expression of several candidate proteins. Our study provides insights into molecular alterations upon chronic arsenic exposure on skin.

  1. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse

    PubMed Central

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A.; García, Juan L.; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M.; Martín, Ana A.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; García-Sanz, Ramón; Miguel, Jesús F. San; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse. PMID:27811368

  2. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse.

    PubMed

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A; García, Juan L; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M; Martín, Ana A; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; Gutiérrez, Norma C

    2016-12-06

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse.

  3. Serum Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Metabolic Pathways in Patients with Post-traumatic Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lunzhao; Shi, Shuting; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Xia, Zi-an; Xing, Zhihua; Peng, Weijun; Wang, Zhe

    2016-02-17

    Cognitive impairment, the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related disability, adversely affects the quality of life of TBI patients, and exacts a personal and economic cost that is difficult to quantify. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is currently unknown, and an effective treatment of the disease has not yet been identified. This study aimed to advance our understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis; thus, metabolomics based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), coupled with multivariate and univariate statistical methods were used to identify potential biomarkers and the associated metabolic pathways of post-TBI cognitive impairment. A biomarker panel consisting of nine serum metabolites (serine, pyroglutamic acid, phenylalanine, galactose, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, citric acid, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyrate) was identified to be able to discriminate between TBI patients with cognitive impairment, TBI patients without cognitive impairment and healthy controls. Furthermore, associations between these metabolite markers and the metabolism of amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates were identified. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify several serum metabolite markers and investigate the altered metabolic pathway that is associated with post-TBI cognitive impairment. These markers appear to be suitable for further investigation of the disease mechanisms of post-TBI cognitive impairment.

  4. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; Sykes, Robert; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations in primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.

  5. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; ...

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations inmore » primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.« less

  6. Photosynthetic characterization of Rubisco transplantomic lines reveals alterations on photochemistry and mesophyll conductance.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Flexas, Jaume; Whitney, Spencer M

    2013-07-01

    Improving Rubisco catalysis is considered a promising way to enhance C3-photosynthesis and photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE) provided the introduced changes have little or no impact on other processes affecting photosynthesis such as leaf photochemistry or leaf CO2 diffusion conductances. However, the extent to which the factors affecting photosynthetic capacity are co-regulated is unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize the photochemistry and CO2 transport processes in the leaves of three transplantomic tobacco genotypes expressing hybrid Rubisco isoforms comprising different Flaveria L-subunits that show variations in catalysis and differing trade-offs between the amount of Rubisco and its activation state. Stomatal conductance (g s) in each transplantomic tobacco line matched wild-type, while their photochemistry showed co-regulation with the variations in Rubisco catalysis. A tight co-regulation was observed between Rubisco activity and mesophyll conductance (g m) that was independent of g s thus producing plants with varying g m/g s ratios. Since the g m/g s ratio has been shown to positively correlate with intrinsic WUE, the present results suggest that altering photosynthesis by modifying Rubisco catalysis may also be useful for targeting WUE.

  7. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-03-30

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as (1)H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations.

  8. Serum Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Metabolic Pathways in Patients with Post-traumatic Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lunzhao; Shi, Shuting; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Xia, Zi-an; Xing, Zhihua; Peng, Weijun; Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related disability, adversely affects the quality of life of TBI patients, and exacts a personal and economic cost that is difficult to quantify. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is currently unknown, and an effective treatment of the disease has not yet been identified. This study aimed to advance our understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis; thus, metabolomics based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), coupled with multivariate and univariate statistical methods were used to identify potential biomarkers and the associated metabolic pathways of post-TBI cognitive impairment. A biomarker panel consisting of nine serum metabolites (serine, pyroglutamic acid, phenylalanine, galactose, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, citric acid, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyrate) was identified to be able to discriminate between TBI patients with cognitive impairment, TBI patients without cognitive impairment and healthy controls. Furthermore, associations between these metabolite markers and the metabolism of amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates were identified. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify several serum metabolite markers and investigate the altered metabolic pathway that is associated with post-TBI cognitive impairment. These markers appear to be suitable for further investigation of the disease mechanisms of post-TBI cognitive impairment. PMID:26883691

  9. Urine proteomes of healthy aging humans reveal extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations and immune system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bakun, M; Senatorski, G; Rubel, T; Lukasik, A; Zielenkiewicz, P; Dadlez, M; Paczek, L

    2014-02-01

    Aging is a complex physiological process that poses considerable conundrums to rapidly aging societies. For example, the risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases and/or cancer steadily declines for people after their 60s, and other causes of death predominate for seniors older than 80 years of age. Thus, physiological aging presents numerous unanswered questions, particularly with regard to changing metabolic patterns. Urine proteomics analysis is becoming a non-invasive and reproducible diagnostic method. We investigated the urine proteomes in healthy elderly people to determine which metabolic processes were weakened or strengthened in aging humans. Urine samples from 37 healthy volunteers aged 19-90 years (19 men, 18 women) were analyzed for protein expression by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This generated a list of 19 proteins that were differentially expressed in different age groups (young, intermediate, and old age). In particular, the oldest group showed protein changes reflective of altered extracellular matrix turnover and declining immune function, in which changes corresponded to reported changes in cardiovascular tissue remodeling and immune disorders in the elderly. Thus, urinary proteome changes in the elderly appear to reflect the physiological processes of aging and are particularly clearly represented in the circulatory and immune systems. Detailed identification of "protein trails" creates a more global picture of metabolic changes that occur in the elderly.

  10. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as 1H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations. PMID:28358020

  11. Mode of Anisotropy Reveals Global Diffusion Alterations in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yoncheva, Yuliya N.; Somandepalli, Krishna; Reiss, Philip T.; Kelly, Clare; Di Martino, Adriana; Lazar, Mariana; Zhou, Juan; Milham, Michael P.; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can identify structural connectivity alterations in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Most ADHD DTI studies have concentrated on regional differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) despite its limited sensitivity to complex white matter architecture and increasing evidence of global brain differences in ADHD. Here, we examine multiple DTI metrics in separate samples of children and adults with and without ADHD with a principal focus on global between-group differences. Method Two samples: adults with ADHD (n = 42) and without (n = 65) and children with ADHD (n = 82) and without (n = 80) were separately group matched for age, sex, and head motion. Five DTI metrics (FA, axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, mean diffusivity, and mode of anisotropy) were analyzed via tract-based spatial statistics. Group analyses tested for diagnostic differences at the global (averaged across the entire white matter skeleton) and regional level for each metric. Results Robust global group differences in diffusion indices were found in adults, with the largest effect size for mode of anisotropy (MA; Cohen’s d = 1.45). Global MA also differed significantly between groups in the pediatric sample (d = 0.68). In both samples, global MA increased classification accuracy compared to the model with clinical Conners’ ADHD ratings alone. Regional diagnostic differences did not survive familywise correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Global DTI metrics, particularly the mode of anisotropy, which is sensitive to crossing fibers, capture connectivity abnormalities in ADHD across both pediatric and adult samples. These findings highlight potential diffuse white matter microarchitecture differences in ADHD. PMID:26802781

  12. Silicon isotopes reveal recycled altered oceanic crust in the mantle sources of Ocean Island Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Emily A.; Moynier, Frédéric; Savage, Paul S.; Jackson, Matthew G.; Moreira, Manuel; Day, James M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The study of silicon (Si) isotopes in Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) has the potential to discern between different models for the origins of geochemical heterogeneities in the mantle. Relatively large (∼several per mil per atomic mass unit) Si isotope fractionation occurs in low-temperature environments during biochemical and geochemical precipitation of dissolved Si, where the precipitate is preferentially enriched in the lighter isotopes relative to the dissolved Si. In contrast, only a limited range (∼tenths of a per mil) of Si isotope fractionation has been observed from high-temperature igneous processes. Therefore, Si isotopes may be useful as tracers for the presence of crustal material within OIB mantle source regions that experienced relatively low-temperature surface processes in a manner similar to other stable isotope systems, such as oxygen. Characterizing the isotopic composition of the mantle is also of central importance to the use of the Si isotope system as a basis for comparisons with other planetary bodies (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids). Here we present the first comprehensive suite of high-precision Si isotope data obtained by MC-ICP-MS for a diverse suite of OIB. Samples originate from ocean islands in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean basins and include representative end-members for the EM-1, EM-2, and HIMU mantle components. On average, δ30Si values for OIB (-0.32 ± 0.09‰, 2 sd) are in general agreement with previous estimates for the δ30Si value of Bulk Silicate Earth (-0.29 ± 0.07‰, 2 sd; Savage et al., 2014). Nonetheless, some small systematic variations are present; specifically, most HIMU-type (Mangaia; Cape Verde; La Palma, Canary Islands) and Iceland OIB are enriched in the lighter isotopes of Si (δ30Si values lower than MORB), consistent with recycled altered oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle in their mantle sources.

  13. MicroRNA Expression Is Altered in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model and Targeting miR-155 with Antagomirs Reveals Cellular Specificity.

    PubMed

    Plank, Maximilian W; Maltby, Steven; Tay, Hock L; Stewart, Jessica; Eyers, Fiona; Hansbro, Philip M; Foster, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are differentially regulated during development and in inflammatory diseases. A role for miRNAs in allergic asthma is emerging and further investigation is required to determine whether they may serve as potential therapeutic targets. We profiled miRNA expression in murine lungs from an ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease model, and compared expression to animals receiving dexamethasone treatment and non-allergic controls. Our analysis identified 29 miRNAs that were significantly altered during allergic inflammation. Target prediction analysis revealed novel genes with altered expression in allergic airways disease and suggests synergistic miRNA regulation of target mRNAs. To assess the impacts of one induced miRNA on pathology, we targeted miR-155-5p using a specific antagomir. Antagomir administration successfully reduced miR-155-5p expression with high specificity, but failed to alter the disease phenotype. Interestingly, further investigation revealed that antagomir delivery has variable efficacy across different immune cell types, effectively targeting myeloid cell populations, but exhibiting poor uptake in lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate that antagomir-based targeting of miRNA function in the lung is highly specific, but highlights cell-specificity as a key limitation to be considered for antagomir-based strategies as therapeutics.

  14. Microarray Analysis Reveals Higher Gestational Folic Acid Alters Expression of Genes in the Cerebellum of Mice Offspring—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Chadman, Kathryn K.; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA) in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development. PMID:25629700

  15. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  16. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  17. High throughput sequencing reveals alterations in the recombination signatures with diminishing Spo11 activity.

    PubMed

    Rockmill, Beth; Lefrançois, Philippe; Voelkel-Meiman, Karen; Oke, Ashwini; Roeder, G Shirleen; Fung, Jennifer C

    2013-10-01

    Spo11 is the topoisomerase-like enzyme responsible for the induction of the meiosis-specific double strand breaks (DSBs), which initiates the recombination events responsible for proper chromosome segregation. Nineteen PCR-induced alleles of SPO11 were identified and characterized genetically and cytologically. Recombination, spore viability and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation were decreased to varying extents in these mutants. Arrest by ndt80 restored these events in two severe hypomorphic mutants, suggesting that ndt80-arrested nuclei are capable of extended DSB activity. While crossing-over, spore viability and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation defects correlated, the extent of such defects was not predictive of the level of heteroallelic gene conversions (prototrophs) exhibited by each mutant. High throughput sequencing of tetrads from spo11 hypomorphs revealed that gene conversion tracts associated with COs are significantly longer and gene conversion tracts unassociated with COs are significantly shorter than in wild type. By modeling the extent of these tract changes, we could account for the discrepancy in genetic measurements of prototrophy and crossover association. These findings provide an explanation for the unexpectedly low prototroph levels exhibited by spo11 hypomorphs and have important implications for genetic studies that assume an unbiased recovery of prototrophs, such as measurements of CO homeostasis. Our genetic and physical data support previous observations of DSB-limited meioses, in which COs are disproportionally maintained over NCOs (CO homeostasis).

  18. Novel dose-dependent alterations in excitatory GABA during embryonic development associated with lead (Pb) neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Weber, Gregory J; Lee, Jang-Won; Cannon, Jason R; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2014-08-17

    Lead (Pb) is a heavy metal that is toxic to numerous physiological processes. Its use in industrial applications is widespread and results in an increased risk of human environmental exposure. The central nervous system (CNS) is most sensitive to Pb exposure during early development due to rapid cell proliferation and migration, axonal growth, and synaptogenesis. One of the key components of CNS development is the Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain. However, during development GABA acts as an excitatory neurotrophic factor which contributes to these cellular processes. Multiple studies report effects of Pb on GABA in the mature brain; however, little is known regarding the adverse effects of Pb exposure on the GABAergic system during embryonic development. To characterize the effects of Pb on the GABAergic system during development, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 10, 50, or 100 ppb Pb or a control treatment. Tissue up-take, gross morphological alterations, gene expression, and neurotransmitter levels were analyzed. Analysis revealed that alterations in gene expression throughout the GABAergic system and GABA levels were dose and developmental time point specific. These data provide a framework for further analysis of the effects of Pb on the GABAergic system during the excitatory phase and as GABA transitions to an inhibitory neurotransmitter during development.

  19. Metabolomics reveals trichloroacetate as a major contributor to trichloroethylene-induced metabolic alterations in mouse urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Krausz, Kristopher W; Tanaka, Naoki; Li, Fei; Qu, Aijuan; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE)-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis is believed to be mediated in part by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). However, the contribution of the two TCE metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) to the toxicity of TCE, remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the metabolite profiles in serum and urine upon exposure of mice to TCE, to aid in determining the metabolic response to TCE exposure and the contribution of DCA and TCA to TCE toxicity. C57BL/6 mice were administered TCE, TCA, or DCA, and urine and serum subjected to ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS)-based global metabolomics analysis. The ions were identified through searching metabolomics databases and by comparison with authentic standards, and quantitated using multiple reactions monitoring. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction of mRNA, biochemical analysis, and liver histology were also performed. TCE exposure resulted in a decrease in urine of metabolites involved in fatty acid metabolism, resulting from altered expression of PPARα target genes. TCE treatment also induced altered phospholipid homeostasis in serum, as revealed by increased serum lysophosphatidylcholine 18:0 and 18:1, and phosphatidylcholine metabolites. TCA administration revealed similar metabolite profiles in urine and serum upon TCE exposure, which correlated with a more robust induction of PPARα target gene expression associated with TCA than DCA treatment. These data show the metabolic response to TCE exposure and demonstrate that TCA is the major contributor to TCE-induced metabolite alterations observed in urine and serum.

  20. Dietary rescue of altered metabolism gene reveals unexpected Drosophila mating cues[S

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, François; Chauvel, Isabelle; Flaven-Pouchon, Justin; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    To develop and reproduce, animals need long-chain MUFAs and PUFAs. Although some unsaturated FAs (UFAs) can be synthesized by the organism, others must be provided by the diet. The gene, desat1, involved in Drosophila melanogaster UFA metabolism, is necessary for both larval development and for adult sex pheromone communication. We first characterized desat1 expression in larval tissues. Then, we found that larvae in which desat1 expression was knocked down throughout development died during the larval stages when raised on standard food. By contrast pure MUFAs or PUFAs, but not saturated FAs, added to the larval diet rescued animals to adulthood with the best effect being obtained with oleic acid (C18:1). Male and female mating behavior and fertility were affected very differently by preimaginal UFA-rich diet. Adult diet also strongly influenced several aspects of reproduction: flies raised on a C18:1-rich diet showed increased mating performance compared with flies raised on standard adult diet. Therefore, both larval and adult desat1 expression control sex-specific mating signals. A similar nutrigenetics approach may be useful in other metabolic mutants to uncover cryptic effects otherwise masked by severe developmental defects. PMID:26759364

  1. Gut Microbial Diversity Assessment of Indian Type-2-Diabetics Reveals Alterations in Eubacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bhute, Shrikant S; Suryavanshi, Mangesh V; Joshi, Suyog M; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes in India has distinct genetic, nutritional, developmental and socio-economic aspects; owing to the fact that changes in gut microbiota are associated with diabetes, we employed semiconductor-based sequencing to characterize gut microbiota of diabetic subjects from this region. We suggest consolidated dysbiosis of eubacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic components in the gut microbiota of newly diagnosed (New-DMs) and long-standing diabetic subjects (Known-DMs) compared to healthy subjects (NGTs). Increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes (p = 0.010) and Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) of Lactobacillus (p < 0.01) were observed in Known-DMs subjects along with the concomitant graded decrease in butyrate-producing bacterial families like Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae. Eukaryotes and fungi were the least affected components in these subjects but archaea, except Methanobrevibacter were significantly decreased in them. The two dominant archaea viz. Methanobrevibacater and Methanosphaera followed opposite trends in abundance from NGTs to Known-DMs subjects. There was a substantial reduction in eubacteria, with a noticeable decrease in Bacteroidetes phylum (p = 0.098) and an increased abundance of fungi in New-DMs subjects. Likewise, opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus, Candida were found to be enriched in New-DMs subjects. Analysis of eubacterial interaction network revealed disease-state specific patterns of ecological interactions, suggesting the distinct behavior of individual components of eubacteria in response to the disease. PERMANOVA test indicated that the eubacterial component was associated with diabetes-related risk factors like high triglyceride (p = 0.05), low HDL (p = 0.03), and waist-to-hip ratio (p = 0.02). Metagenomic imputation of eubacteria depict deficiencies of various essential functions such as carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism etc. in New-DMs subjects. Results presented here shows that in diabetes

  2. Gut Microbial Diversity Assessment of Indian Type-2-Diabetics Reveals Alterations in Eubacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Bhute, Shrikant S.; Suryavanshi, Mangesh V.; Joshi, Suyog M.; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes in India has distinct genetic, nutritional, developmental and socio-economic aspects; owing to the fact that changes in gut microbiota are associated with diabetes, we employed semiconductor-based sequencing to characterize gut microbiota of diabetic subjects from this region. We suggest consolidated dysbiosis of eubacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic components in the gut microbiota of newly diagnosed (New-DMs) and long-standing diabetic subjects (Known-DMs) compared to healthy subjects (NGTs). Increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes (p = 0.010) and Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) of Lactobacillus (p < 0.01) were observed in Known-DMs subjects along with the concomitant graded decrease in butyrate-producing bacterial families like Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae. Eukaryotes and fungi were the least affected components in these subjects but archaea, except Methanobrevibacter were significantly decreased in them. The two dominant archaea viz. Methanobrevibacater and Methanosphaera followed opposite trends in abundance from NGTs to Known-DMs subjects. There was a substantial reduction in eubacteria, with a noticeable decrease in Bacteroidetes phylum (p = 0.098) and an increased abundance of fungi in New-DMs subjects. Likewise, opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus, Candida were found to be enriched in New-DMs subjects. Analysis of eubacterial interaction network revealed disease-state specific patterns of ecological interactions, suggesting the distinct behavior of individual components of eubacteria in response to the disease. PERMANOVA test indicated that the eubacterial component was associated with diabetes-related risk factors like high triglyceride (p = 0.05), low HDL (p = 0.03), and waist-to-hip ratio (p = 0.02). Metagenomic imputation of eubacteria depict deficiencies of various essential functions such as carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism etc. in New-DMs subjects. Results presented here shows that in diabetes

  3. Tolerance development to cadmium-induced alteration of drug action.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A; Miya, T S; Schnell, R C

    1976-05-01

    Cadmium administration potentiates the duration of hexobarbital-induced hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal metabolism of this drug in the male rat. The threshold dose of cadmium required to produce these alterations in drug action is 0.84 mg Ck/kg. If subthreshold doses of cadmium (0.21 or 0.42 mg Cd/kg) are administered prior to the 0.84 mg Cd/kg dose, the cadmium-induced alterations in drug action are no longer observed.

  4. Altered sucrose metabolism impacts plant biomass production and flower development.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Beamish, Leigh; Reid, Anya; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) was transformed with three genes involved in sucrose metabolism, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase, EC 2.7.7.9), sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14). Plants harbouring the single transgenes were subsequently crossed to produce double and triple transgenic lines, including: 2 x 35S::UGPase x SPS, 4CL::UGPase x SPS, 2 x 35S::SuSy x SPS, 4CL::SuSy x SPS, 2 x 35S::UGPase x SuSy x SPS, and 4CL::UGPase x SuSy x SPS. The ultimate aim of the study was to examine whether it is possible to alter cellulose production through the manipulation of sucrose metabolism genes. While altering sucrose metabolism using UGPase, SuSy and SPS does not have an end effect on cellulose production, their simultaneous overexpression resulted in enhanced primary growth as seen in an increase in height growth, in some cases over 50%. Furthermore, the pyramiding strategy of simultaneously altering the expression of multiple genes in combination resulted in increased time to reproductive bud formation as well as altered flower morphology and foliar stipule formation in 4CL lines. Upregulation of these sucrose metabolism genes appears to directly impact primary growth and therefore biomass production in tobacco.

  5. Glucose or Altered Ceramide Biosynthesis Mediate Oxygen Deprivation Sensitivity Through Novel Pathways Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ladage, Mary L.; King, Skylar D.; Burks, David J.; Quan, Daniel L.; Garcia, Anastacia M.; Azad, Rajeev K.; Padilla, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes display metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, increased free fatty acids, insulin resistance, and altered ceramide levels, that contribute to vascular dysfunctions and compromised oxygen delivery. Caenorhabditis elegans fed a glucose-supplemented diet or with altered ceramide metabolism, due to a hyl-2 mutation, are sensitive to oxygen deprivation (anoxia). Our experiments showed that the combination of these factors further decreased the anoxia survival. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed to assess how a glucose-supplemented diet and/or a hyl-2 mutation altered the transcriptome. Comparison analysis of transcripts associated with anoxia-sensitive animals [hyl-2(tm2031) mutation or a glucose diet] revealed 199 common transcripts encoded by genes with known or predicted functions involving innate immunity, cuticle function (collagens), or xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system. Use of RNA interference (RNAi) to target gene products of the xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system (UDP-glycosyltransferase and Cytochrome p450 genes; ugt-15, ugt-18, ugt-19, ugt-41, ugt-63, cyp-13A12, cyp-25A1, and cyp-33C8) increased anoxia survival in wild-type animals fed a standard diet. Anoxia sensitivity of the hyl-2(tm2031) animals was suppressed by RNAi of cyp-25A1 or cyp-33C8 genes. A glucose diet fed to the P0 hermaphrodite decreased the anoxia survival of its F1 embryos; however, the RNAi of ugt-63 and cyp-33C8 suppressed anoxia sensitivity. These studies provide evidence that the detoxification system impacts oxygen deprivation responses and that C. elegans can be used to model the conserved detoxification system. PMID:27507791

  6. Glucose or Altered Ceramide Biosynthesis Mediate Oxygen Deprivation Sensitivity Through Novel Pathways Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ladage, Mary L; King, Skylar D; Burks, David J; Quan, Daniel L; Garcia, Anastacia M; Azad, Rajeev K; Padilla, Pamela A

    2016-10-13

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes display metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, increased free fatty acids, insulin resistance, and altered ceramide levels, that contribute to vascular dysfunctions and compromised oxygen delivery. Caenorhabditis elegans fed a glucose-supplemented diet or with altered ceramide metabolism, due to a hyl-2 mutation, are sensitive to oxygen deprivation (anoxia). Our experiments showed that the combination of these factors further decreased the anoxia survival. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed to assess how a glucose-supplemented diet and/or a hyl-2 mutation altered the transcriptome. Comparison analysis of transcripts associated with anoxia-sensitive animals [hyl-2(tm2031) mutation or a glucose diet] revealed 199 common transcripts encoded by genes with known or predicted functions involving innate immunity, cuticle function (collagens), or xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system. Use of RNA interference (RNAi) to target gene products of the xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system (UDP-glycosyltransferase and Cytochrome p450 genes; ugt-15, ugt-18, ugt-19, ugt-41, ugt-63, cyp-13A12, cyp-25A1, and cyp-33C8) increased anoxia survival in wild-type animals fed a standard diet. Anoxia sensitivity of the hyl-2(tm2031) animals was suppressed by RNAi of cyp-25A1 or cyp-33C8 genes. A glucose diet fed to the P0 hermaphrodite decreased the anoxia survival of its F1 embryos; however, the RNAi of ugt-63 and cyp-33C8 suppressed anoxia sensitivity. These studies provide evidence that the detoxification system impacts oxygen deprivation responses and that C. elegans can be used to model the conserved detoxification system.

  7. Advances in the translational genomics of neuroblastoma: From improving risk stratification and revealing novel biology to identifying actionable genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kristopher R; Maris, John M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal malignancy that commonly affects young children and is remarkably heterogenous in its malignant potential. Recently, the genetic basis of neuroblastoma has come into focus and not only has catalyzed a more comprehensive understanding of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis but also has revealed novel oncogenic vulnerabilities that are being therapeutically leveraged. Neuroblastoma is a model pediatric solid tumor in its use of recurrent genomic alterations, such as high-level MYCN (v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma-derived homolog) amplification, for risk stratification. Given the relative paucity of recurrent, activating, somatic point mutations or gene fusions in primary neuroblastoma tumors studied at initial diagnosis, innovative treatment approaches beyond small molecules targeting mutated or dysregulated kinases will be required moving forward to achieve noticeable improvements in overall patient survival. However, the clonally acquired, oncogenic aberrations in relapsed neuroblastomas are currently being defined and may offer an opportunity to improve patient outcomes with molecularly targeted therapy directed toward aberrantly regulated pathways in relapsed disease. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about neuroblastoma genetics and genomics, highlighting the improved prognostication and potential therapeutic opportunities that have arisen from recent advances in understanding germline predisposition, recurrent segmental chromosomal alterations, somatic point mutations and translocations, and clonal evolution in relapsed neuroblastoma.

  8. High-fat taste challenge reveals altered striatal response in women recovered from bulimia nervosa: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    RADELOFF, DANIEL; WILLMANN, KATHRIN; OTTO, LISA; LINDNER, MICHAEL; PUTNAM, KAREN; VAN LEEUWEN, SARA; KAYE, WALTER H; POUSTKA, FRITZ; WAGNER, ANGELA

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) tend to have disordered thinking and eating behaviours in regards to fat containing foods. This is the first study to investigate neuronal pathways that may contribute to altered fat consumption in eating disordered patients. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare responses to a high-fat cream stimulus, water, and a non-caloric viscous stimulus (CMC) to control for response to viscosity in individuals recovered from AN (N = 15), BN (N = 14) and a healthy control sample (CW, N = 18). Results An interaction analysis (ANOVAR) comparing the three groups (AN, BN, CW) and the three conditions (cream, CMC, water) revealed significant differences in the left anterior ventral striatum (AVS). A post hoc analysis displayed a higher magnitude of response for the contrast cream/water in BN compared to AN or CW and for the contrast CMC/water in BN compared to AN. Conclusions BN showed an exaggerated AVS response for the cream/water contrast in comparison to AN or CW. Moreover, BN showed an exaggerated AVS response for the CMC/water contrast in comparison to AN. These findings support the possibility that BN have an altered hedonic and/or motivational drive to consume fats. PMID:22540408

  9. In utero exposure to chloroquine alters sexual development in the male fetal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Clewell, Rebecca A. Pluta, Linda; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-06-15

    Chloroquine (CQ), a drug that has been used extensively for the prevention and treatment of malaria, is currently considered safe for use during pregnancy. However, CQ has been shown to disrupt steroid homeostasis in adult rats and similar compounds, such as quinacrine, inhibit steroid production in the Leydig cell in vitro. To explore the effect of in utero CQ exposure on fetal male sexual development, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a daily dose of either water or chloroquine diphosphate from GD 16-18 by oral gavage. Chloroquine was administered as 200 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16, followed by two maintenance doses of 100 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16 and 18. Three days of CQ treatment resulted in reduced maternal and fetal weight on GD 19 and increased necrosis and steatosis in the maternal liver. Fetal livers also displayed mild lipid accumulation. Maternal serum progesterone was increased after CQ administration. Fetal testes testosterone, however, was significantly decreased. Examination of the fetal testes revealed significant alterations in vascularization and seminiferous tubule development after short-term CQ treatment. Anogenital distance was not altered. Microarray and RT-PCR showed down-regulation of several genes associated with cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis in the fetal testes. This study indicates that CQ inhibits testosterone synthesis and normal testis development in the rat fetus at human relevant doses.

  10. Microbiota and metabolite profiling reveal specific alterations in bacterial community structure and environment in the cystic fibrosis airway during exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Kate B; Alston, Mark; An, Shi-Qi; O'Connell, Oisin J; McCarthy, Yvonne; Swarbreck, David; Febrer, Melanie; Dow, J Maxwell; Plant, Barry J; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic polymicrobial infections of the lung are the foremost cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The composition of the microbial flora of the airway alters considerably during infection, particularly during patient exacerbation. An understanding of which organisms are growing, their environment and their behaviour in the airway is of importance for designing antibiotic treatment regimes and for patient prognosis. To this end, we have analysed sputum samples taken from separate cohorts of CF and non-CF subjects for metabolites and in parallel, and we have examined both isolated DNA and RNA for the presence of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts by high-throughput sequencing of amplicon or cDNA libraries. This analysis revealed that although the population size of all dominant orders of bacteria as measured by DNA- and RNA- based methods are similar, greater discrepancies are seen with less prevalent organisms, some of which we associated with CF for the first time. Additionally, we identified a strong relationship between the abundance of specific anaerobes and fluctuations in several metabolites including lactate and putrescine during patient exacerbation. This study has hence identified organisms whose occurrence within the CF microbiome has been hitherto unreported and has revealed potential metabolic biomarkers for exacerbation.

  11. Early Disruption of Extracellular Pleiotrophin Distribution Alters Cerebellar Neuronal Circuit Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M M; Rey, S A; Hilber, P; Arabo, A; Collin, T; Vaudry, D; Burel, D

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellum is a structure of the central nervous system involved in balance, motor coordination, and voluntary movements. The elementary circuit implicated in the control of locomotion involves Purkinje cells, which receive excitatory inputs from parallel and climbing fibers, and are regulated by cerebellar interneurons. In mice as in human, the cerebellar cortex completes its development mainly after birth with the migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of granule cells. These cellular events are under the control of numerous extracellular matrix molecules including pleiotrophin (PTN). This cytokine has been shown to regulate the morphogenesis of Purkinje cells ex vivo and in vivo via its receptor PTPζ. Since Purkinje cells are the unique output of the cerebellar cortex, we explored the consequences of their PTN-induced atrophy on the function of the cerebellar neuronal circuit in mice. Behavioral experiments revealed that, despite a normal overall development, PTN-treated mice present a delay in the maturation of their flexion reflex. Moreover, patch clamp recording of Purkinje cells revealed a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in PTN-treated mice, associated with a decrease of climbing fiber innervations and an abnormal perisomatic localization of the parallel fiber contacts. At adulthood, PTN-treated mice exhibit coordination impairment on the rotarod test associated with an alteration of the synchronization gait. Altogether these histological, electrophysiological, and behavior data reveal that an early ECM disruption of PTN composition induces short- and long-term defaults in the establishment of proper functional cerebellar circuit.

  12. Proteomic profiling of neuromas reveals alterations in protein composition and local protein synthesis in hyper-excitable nerves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Lei; Cendan, Cruz-Miguel; Roza, Carolina; Okuse, Kenji; Cramer, Rainer; Timms, John F; Wood, John N

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic pain may arise following peripheral nerve injury though the molecular mechanisms associated with this are unclear. We used proteomic profiling to examine changes in protein expression associated with the formation of hyper-excitable neuromas derived from rodent saphenous nerves. A two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) profiling strategy was employed to examine protein expression changes between developing neuromas and normal nerves in whole tissue lysates. We found around 200 proteins which displayed a >1.75-fold change in expression between neuroma and normal nerve and identified 55 of these proteins using mass spectrometry. We also used immunoblotting to examine the expression of low-abundance ion channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8 and calcium channel α2δ-1 subunit in this model, since they have previously been implicated in neuronal hyperexcitability associated with neuropathic pain. Finally, S35methionine in vitro labelling of neuroma and control samples was used to demonstrate local protein synthesis of neuron-specific genes. A number of cytoskeletal proteins, enzymes and proteins associated with oxidative stress were up-regulated in neuromas, whilst overall levels of voltage-gated ion channel proteins were unaffected. We conclude that altered mRNA levels reported in the somata of damaged DRG neurons do not necessarily reflect levels of altered proteins in hyper-excitable damaged nerve endings. An altered repertoire of protein expression, local protein synthesis and topological re-arrangements of ion channels may all play important roles in neuroma hyper-excitability. PMID:18700027

  13. Connectivity and tissue microstructural alterations in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by diffusion spectrum imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemkaddem, Alia; Daducci, Alessandro; Kunz, Nicolas; Lazeyras, François; Seeck, Margitta; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Focal epilepsy is increasingly recognized as the result of an altered brain network, both on the structural and functional levels and the characterization of these widespread brain alterations is crucial for our understanding of the clinical manifestation of seizure and cognitive deficits as well as for the management of candidates to epilepsy surgery. Tractography based on Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows non-invasive mapping of white matter tracts in vivo. Recently, diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), based on an increased number of diffusion directions and intensities, has improved the sensitivity of tractography, notably with respect to the problem of fiber crossing and recent developments allow acquisition times compatible with clinical application. We used DSI and parcellation of the gray matter in regions of interest to build whole-brain connectivity matrices describing the mutual connections between cortical and subcortical regions in patients with focal epilepsy and healthy controls. In addition, the high angular and radial resolution of DSI allowed us to evaluate also some of the biophysical compartment models, to better understand the cause of the changes in diffusion anisotropy. Global connectivity, hub architecture and regional connectivity patterns were altered in TLE patients and showed different characteristics in RTLE vs LTLE with stronger abnormalities in RTLE. The microstructural analysis suggested that disturbed axonal density contributed more than fiber orientation to the connectivity changes affecting the temporal lobes whereas fiber orientation changes were more involved in extratemporal lobe changes. Our study provides further structural evidence that RTLE and LTLE are not symmetrical entities and DSI-based imaging could help investigate the microstructural correlate of these imaging abnormalities.

  14. Brain Connectivity Alterations Are Associated with the Development of Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Josie-Anne; McIntosh, Anthony R; Postuma, Ronald B; Kovacevic, Natasha; Latreille, Véronique; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Dementia affects a high proportion of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and poses a burden on caregivers and healthcare services. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a common nonevasive and nonexpensive technique that can easily be used in clinical settings to identify brain functional abnormalities. Only few studies had identified EEG abnormalities that can predict PD patients at higher risk for dementia. Brain connectivity EEG measures, such as multiscale entropy (MSE) and phase-locking value (PLV) analyses, may be more informative and sensitive to brain alterations leading to dementia than previously used methods. This study followed 62 dementia-free PD patients for a mean of 3.4 years to identify cerebral alterations that are associated with dementia. Baseline resting state EEG of patients who developed dementia (N = 18) was compared to those of patients who remained dementia-free (N = 44) and of 37 healthy subjects. MSE and PLV analyses were performed. Partial least squares statistical analysis revealed group differences associated with the development of dementia. Patients who developed dementia showed higher signal complexity and lower PLVs in low frequencies (mainly in delta frequency) than patients who remained dementia-free and controls. Conversely, both patient groups showed lower signal variability and higher PLVs in high frequencies (mainly in gamma frequency) compared to controls, with the strongest effect in patients who developed dementia. These findings suggest that specific disruptions of brain communication can be measured before PD patients develop dementia, providing a new potential marker to identify patients at highest risk of developing dementia and who are the best candidates for neuroprotective trials.

  15. GC-MS metabolomic analysis reveals significant alterations in cerebellar metabolic physiology in a mouse model of adult onset hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis K; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2011-02-04

    Although adult-onset hypothyroidism (AOH) has been connected to neural activity alterations, including movement, behavioral, and mental dysfunctions, the underlying changes in brain metabolic physiology have not been investigated in a systemic and systematic way. The current knowledge remains fragmented, referring to different experimental setups and recovered from various brain regions. In this study, we developed and applied a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics protocol to obtain a holistic view of the cerebellar metabolic physiology in a Balb/cJ mouse model of prolonged adult-onset hypothyroidism induced by a 64-day treatment with 1% potassium perchlorate in the drinking water of the animals. The high-throughput analysis enabled the correlation between multiple parallel-occurring metabolic phenomena; some have been previously related to AOH, while others implicated new pathways, designating new directions for further research. Specifically, an overall decline in the metabolic activity of the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid cerebellum was observed, characteristically manifested in energy metabolism, glutamate/glutamine metabolism, osmolytic/antioxidant capacity, and protein/lipid synthesis. These alterations provide strong evidence that the mammalian cerebellum is metabolically responsive to AOH. In light of the cerebellum core functions and its increasingly recognized role in neurocognition, these findings further support the known phenotypic manifestations of AOH into movement and cognitive dysfunctions.

  16. Alterations in seed development gene expression affect size and oil content of Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds.

  17. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tremaine, Mary; Hebert, Alexander S.; Myers, Kevin S.; Sardi, Maria; Dickinson, Quinn; Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P.; Landick, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism. PMID:27741250

  18. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sato, Trey K; Tremaine, Mary; Parreiras, Lucas S; Hebert, Alexander S; Myers, Kevin S; Higbee, Alan J; Sardi, Maria; McIlwain, Sean J; Ong, Irene M; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; McGee, Mick A; Dickinson, Quinn; La Reau, Alex; Xie, Dan; Tian, Mingyuan; Reed, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P; Landick, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  19. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients.

  20. Genomic Convergence Analysis of Schizophrenia: mRNA Sequencing Reveals Altered Synaptic Vesicular Transport in Post-Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Mudge, Joann; Miller, Neil A.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; May, Gregory D.; Huntley, Jim J.; Luo, Shujun; Zhang, Lu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Lewis, Sharon; Beavis, William D.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Virk, Selene M.; Black, C. Forrest; Myers, M. Kathy; Mader, Lar C.; Langley, Ray J.; Utsey, John P.; Kim, Ryan W.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Khalsa, Sat Kirpal; Garcia, Meredith; Ambriz-Griffith, Victoria; Harlan, Richard; Czika, Wendy; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Schroth, Gary P.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ. PMID:18985160

  1. Ibuprofen results in alterations of human fetal testis development

    PubMed Central

    Ben Maamar, Millissia; Lesné, Laurianne; Hennig, Kristin; Desdoits-Lethimonier, Christèle; Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Coiffec, Isabelle; Rolland, Antoine D.; Chevrier, Cécile; Kristensen, David M.; Lavoué, Vincent; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Mitchell, Rod T.; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Jégou, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Among pregnant women ibuprofen is one of the most frequently used pharmaceutical compounds with up to 28% reporting use. Regardless of this, it remains unknown whether ibuprofen could act as an endocrine disruptor as reported for fellow analgesics paracetamol and aspirin. To investigate this, we exposed human fetal testes (7–17 gestational weeks (GW)) to ibuprofen using ex vivo culture and xenograft systems. Ibuprofen suppressed testosterone and Leydig cell hormone INSL3 during culture of 8–9 GW fetal testes with concomitant reduction in expression of the steroidogenic enzymes CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and HSD17B3, and of INSL3. Testosterone was not suppressed in testes from fetuses younger than 8 GW, older than 10–12 GW, or in second trimester xenografted testes (14–17 GW). Ex vivo, ibuprofen also affected Sertoli cell by suppressing AMH production and mRNA expression of AMH, SOX9, DHH, and COL2A1. While PGE2 production was suppressed by ibuprofen, PGD2 production was not. Germ cell transcripts POU5F1, TFAP2C, LIN28A, ALPP and KIT were also reduced by ibuprofen. We conclude that, at concentrations relevant to human exposure and within a particular narrow ‘early window’ of sensitivity within first trimester, ibuprofen causes direct endocrine disturbances in the human fetal testis and alteration of the germ cell biology. PMID:28281692

  2. Growth and development alter susceptibility to acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Naito, Masayo; Lund, Steve R; Kim, Nayeon; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2008-09-01

    Many of the studies of acute renal injury have been conducted in young mice usually during their rapid growth phase; yet, the impact of age or growth stage on the degree of injury is unknown. To address this issue, we studied three forms of injury (endotoxemic-, glycerol-, and maleate-induced) in mice ranging in age from adolescence (3 weeks) to maturity (16 weeks). The severity of injury within each model significantly correlated with weight and age. We also noticed a progressive age-dependent reduction in renal cholesterol content, a potential injury modifier. As the animals grew and aged they also exhibited stepwise decrements in the mRNAs of HMG CoA reductase and the low density lipoprotein receptor, two key cholesterol homeostatic genes. This was paralleled by decreased amounts of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factor SREBP1/2 at the reductase and lipoprotein receptor gene loci as measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our study shows that the early phase of mouse growth can profoundly alter renal susceptibility to diverse forms of experimental acute renal injury.

  3. Sensory Development: Brief Visual Deprivation Alters Audiovisual Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lomber, Stephen G; Butler, Blake E

    2016-11-21

    Two recent studies have independently demonstrated that short periods of visual deprivation early in human development can have long-term functional consequences on sensory perception and on the balance between auditory and visual attention.

  4. A Mouse Model of Visual Perceptual Learning Reveals Alterations in Neuronal Coding and Dendritic Spine Density in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xian; Hu, Xu; Li, Yue; Lou, Shihao; Ma, Xiao; An, Xu; Liu, Hui; Peng, Jing; Ma, Danyi; Zhou, Yifeng; Yang, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) can improve spatial vision in normally sighted and visually impaired individuals. Although previous studies of humans and large animals have explored the neural basis of VPL, elucidation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remains a challenge. Owing to the advantages of molecular genetic and optogenetic manipulations, the mouse is a promising model for providing a mechanistic understanding of VPL. Here, we thoroughly evaluated the effects and properties of VPL on spatial vision in C57BL/6J mice using a two-alternative, forced-choice visual water task. Briefly, the mice underwent prolonged training at near the individual threshold of contrast or spatial frequency (SF) for pattern discrimination or visual detection for 35 consecutive days. Following training, the contrast-threshold trained mice showed an 87% improvement in contrast sensitivity (CS) and a 55% gain in visual acuity (VA). Similarly, the SF-threshold trained mice exhibited comparable and long-lasting improvements in VA and significant gains in CS over a wide range of SFs. Furthermore, learning largely transferred across eyes and stimulus orientations. Interestingly, learning could transfer from a pattern discrimination task to a visual detection task, but not vice versa. We validated that this VPL fully restored VA in adult amblyopic mice and old mice. Taken together, these data indicate that mice, as a species, exhibit reliable VPL. Intrinsic signal optical imaging revealed that mice with perceptual training had higher cut-off SFs in primary visual cortex (V1) than those without perceptual training. Moreover, perceptual training induced an increase in the dendritic spine density in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of V1. These results indicated functional and structural alterations in V1 during VPL. Overall, our VPL mouse model will provide a platform for investigating the neurobiological basis of VPL. PMID:27014004

  5. Sleep variability in adolescence is associated with altered brain development.

    PubMed

    Telzer, Eva H; Goldenberg, Diane; Fuligni, Andrew J; Lieberman, Matthew D; Gálvan, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    Despite the known importance of sleep for brain development, and the sharp increase in poor sleep during adolescence, we know relatively little about how sleep impacts the developing brain. We present the first longitudinal study to examine how sleep during adolescence is associated with white matter integrity. We find that greater variability in sleep duration one year prior to a DTI scan is associated with lower white matter integrity above and beyond the effects of sleep duration, and variability in bedtime, whereas sleep variability a few months prior to the scan is not associated with white matter integrity. Thus, variability in sleep duration during adolescence may have long-term impairments on the developing brain. White matter integrity should be increasing during adolescence, and so sleep variability is directly at odds with normative developmental trends.

  6. Martian Channels and their Geomorphologic Development as Revealed by MOLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, J. K.; Hebenstreit, R.; Jaumann, R.

    2000-08-01

    One of the most striking features of Mars are enormous channels and channel systems that shape its surface. Outflow channels more than 2000 km long and several 100 km wide reveal a vast amount of erosional landforms resembling terrestrial flood features. Runoff channels with dendritic networks and fretted channels with features resembling terrestrial rock glaciers show the variety of processes that shaped the landscape. Newly released Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) tracks give a detailed insight in the development of the shape of cross sections along those Martian channels. We have studied numerous such cross sections (sometimes more than 100 per channel!) looking for the processes involved in the evolution of the channels. The MOLA data also allowed the generation of longitudinal profiles, by extracting the deepest points of all cross sections as given by the MOLA tracks.Cross sections of runoff channels (e.g. Nirgal Vallis) showed a striking similarity with terrestrial channel networks that were formed by sapping. They are U-shaped in the upper parts of the channels and box-shaped in the lower parts. They generally increase in width and depth downstream but often stagnate over long distances. No inner channels were found, possibly because of the limited vertical resolution of the MOLA tracks. The longitudinal profile of Nirgal Vallis shows a continuous downstream slope as one would expect from a channel formed by sapping as well as by surface runoff. These observations currently are compared with MOLA tracks of the more dendritic type of runoff channels hoping to find similarities or differences that might reveal more about the evolution of those channels and the processes involved.

  7. Altered Breast Development in Young Girls from an Agricultural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Guillette, Elizabeth A.; Conard, Craig; Lares, Fernando; Aguilar, Maria Guadalupe; McLachlan, John; Guillette, Louis J.

    2006-01-01

    In several human populations, the age at which female breast development begins is reported to have declined over the last five decades. Much debate has occurred over whether this reported decline has actually occurred and what factors contribute to it. However, geographical patterns reflecting earlier developmental onset in some human populations suggest environmental factors influence this phenomenon. These factors include interactions between genetic makeup, nutrition, and possible cumulative exposure to estrogens, both endogenous as well as environmental beginning during in utero development. We examined the onset of breast development in a group of peripubertal girls from the Yaqui Valley of Sonora, Mexico. We observed that girls from valley towns, areas using modern agricultural practices, exhibited larger breast fields than those of girls living in the foothills who exhibited similar stature [e.g., weight, height, body mass index (BMI)], and genetic background. Further, girls from valley towns displayed a poorly defined relationship between breast size and mammary gland development, whereas girls from the Yaqui foothills, where traditional ranching occurs, show a robust positive relationship between breast size and mammary size. The differences noted were obtained by a medically based exam involving morphometric analysis and palpation of tissues, in contrast to visual staging alone. In fact, use of the Tanner scale, involving visual staging of breast development for puberty, detected no differences between the study populations. Mammary tissue, determined by palpation, was absent in 18.5% of the girls living in agricultural areas, although palpable breast adipose tissue was present. No relationship was seen between mammary diameter and weight or BMI in either population. These data suggest that future in-depth studies examining mammary tissue growth and fat deposition in breast tissue are required if we are to understand environmental influences on these

  8. Knockdown of Leptin A Expression Dramatically Alters Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Dalman, Mark; Chen, Yun; Akhter, Mashal; Brahmandam, Sravya; Patel, Yesha; Lowe, Josef; Thakkar, Mitesh; Gregory, Akil-Vuai; Phelps, Daryllanae; Riley, Caitlin; Londraville, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Using morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO) technology, we blocked leptin A or leptin receptor expression in embryonic zebrafish, and analyzed consequences of leptin knock-down on fish development. Embryos injected with leptin A or leptin receptor MOs (leptin A or leptin receptor morphants) had smaller bodies and eyes, undeveloped inner ear, enlarged pericardial cavity, curved body and/or tail and larger yolk compared to control embryos of the same stages. The defects persisted in 6-9 day old larvae. We found that blocking leptin A function had little effect on the development of early brain (1 day old), but differentiation of both the morphant dorsal brain and retinal cells was severely disrupted in older (2 day old) embryos. Despite the enlarged pericardial cavity, differentiation of cardiac cells appeared to be similar to control embryos. Formation of the morphants’ inner ear is also severely disrupted, which corroborates existing reports of leptin receptor expression in inner ear of both zebrafish and mammals. Co-injection of leptin A MO and recombinant leptin results in partial rescue of the wild-type phenotype. Our results suggest that leptin A plays distinct roles in zebrafish development. PMID:22841760

  9. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Wong, C. Shun; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS AND ALTERED MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: THE WINDOW OF SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Toxicants and Altered Mammary Gland Development: The window of susceptibility. Suzanne E. Fenton, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    There are several environm...

  11. Exciting fear in adolescence: Does pubertal development alter threat processing?

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Olino, Thomas M.; Forbes, Erika E.; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent development encompasses an ostensible paradox in threat processing. Risk taking increases dramatically after the onset of puberty, contributing to a 200% increase in mortality. Yet, pubertal maturation is associated with increased reactivity in threat-avoidance systems. In the first part of this paper we propose a heuristic model of adolescent affective development that may help to reconcile aspects of this paradox, which focuses on hypothesized pubertal increases in the capacity to experience (some) fear-evoking experiences as an exciting thrill. In the second part of this paper, we test key features of this model by examining brain activation to threat cues in a longitudinal study that disentangled pubertal and age effects. Pubertal increases in testosterone predicted increased activation to threat cues, not only in regions associated with threat avoidance (i.e., amygdala), but also regions associated with reward pursuit (i.e., nucleus accumbens). These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that puberty is associated with a maturational shift toward more complex processing of threat cues–which may contribute to adolescent tendencies to explore and enjoy some types of risky experiences. PMID:24548554

  12. New insights for male infertility revealed by alterations in spermatic function and differential testicular expression of thyroid-related genes.

    PubMed

    Romano, Renata Marino; Gomes, Samantha Nascimento; Cardoso, Nathalia Carolina Scandolara; Schiessl, Larissa; Romano, Marco Aurelio; Oliveira, Claudio Alvarenga

    2017-02-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) disorders on male reproductive biology has been a controversial issue for many years. Recently, we reported that hypothyroid male rats have a disruption of the seminiferous epithelium, which may compromise spermatogenesis. To improve the understanding of the reproductive pathogenesis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, male Wistar rats that developed these dysfunctions in adulthood were used as an experimental model. We evaluated the sperm production, reserves, transit time, morphology, and functionality (acrosome integrity, plasma membrane integrity, and mitochondrial activity), and the testicular expression of the TH receptors (Thra1 and Thra2, Thrb1, and Thrb2), deiodinases (Dio2 and Dio3), and the Mct8 transporter (Slc16a2) were assessed by reverse transcription followed by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results were evaluated statistically by ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (P < 0.05). Hypothyroidism decreased the total and daily sperm productions and increased the sperm transit time through the epididymis, while the sperm functionality was reduced in both thyroid dysfunctions. Regarding the modulation of gene expression in the testis, hypothyroidism increased the expression of Thra1 and decreased the expression of Dio3, and hyperthyroidism increased the expression of Slc16a2. The observed alterations in spermatic production and function and in the expression of the TH receptor, deiodinase, and the TH transporter are suggestive of TH participation in spermatogenesis in adulthood.

  13. Differential Cysteine Labeling and Global Label-Free Proteomics Reveals an Altered Metabolic State in Skeletal Muscle Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054. PMID:25181601

  14. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies.

  15. Differential cysteine labeling and global label-free proteomics reveals an altered metabolic state in skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Smith, Neil T; Brownridge, Philip; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2014-11-07

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054.

  16. Transcriptional Analysis of Vitiligo Skin Reveals the Alteration of WNT Pathway: A Promising Target for Repigmenting Vitiligo Patients.

    PubMed

    Regazzetti, Claire; Joly, Florence; Marty, Carine; Rivier, Michel; Mehul, Bruno; Reiniche, Pascale; Mounier, Carine; Rival, Yves; Piwnica, David; Cavalié, Marine; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Ballotti, Robert; Voegel, Johannes; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Vitiligo affects 1% of the worldwide population. Halting disease progression and repigmenting the lesional skin represent the two faces of therapeutic challenge in vitiligo. We performed transcriptome analysis on lesional, perilesional, and non-depigmented skin from vitiligo patients and on matched skin from healthy subjects. We found a significant increase in CXCL10 in non-depigmented and perilesional vitiligo skin compared with levels in healthy control skin; however, neither CXCL10 nor other immune factors were deregulated in depigmented vitiligo skin. Interestingly, the WNT pathway, which is involved in melanocyte differentiation, was altered specifically in vitiligo skin. We demonstrated that oxidative stress decreases WNT expression/activation in keratinocytes and melanocytes. We developed an ex vivo skin model and confirmed the decrease activation of the WNT pathway in human skin subjected to oxidative stress. Finally, using pharmacological agents that activate the WNT pathway, we treated ex vivo depigmented skin from vitiligo patients and successfully induced differentiation of resident stem cells into pre-melanocytes. Our results shed light on the previously unrecognized role of decreased WNT activation in the prevention of melanocyte differentiation in depigmented vitiligo skin. Furthermore, these results support further clinical exploration of WNT agonists to repigment vitiligo lesions.

  17. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies. PMID:24407431

  18. Temporal changes in milk proteomes reveal developing milk functions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinliu; McMahon, Robert J; Woo, Jessica G; Davidson, Barbara S; Morrow, Ardythe L; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-07-06

    Human milk proteins provide essential nutrition for growth and development, and support a number of vital developmental processes in the neonate. A complete understanding of the possible functions of human milk proteins has been limited by incomplete knowledge of the human milk proteome. In this report, we have analyzed the proteomes of whey from human transitional and mature milk using ion-exchange and SDS-PAGE based protein fractionation methods. With a larger-than-normal sample loading approach, we are able to largely extend human milk proteome to 976 proteins. Among them, 152 proteins are found to render significant regulatory changes between transitional milk and mature milk. We further found that immunoglobulins sIgA and IgM are more abundant in transitional milk, whereas IgG is more abundant in mature milk, suggesting a transformation in defense mechanism from newborns to young infants. Additionally, we report a more comprehensive view of a complement system and associated regulatory apparatus in human milk, demonstrating the presence and function of a system similar to that found in the circulation but prevailed by alternative pathway in complement activation. Proteins involved in various aspects of carbohydrate metabolism are also described, revealing either a transition in milk functionality to accommodate carbohydrate-rich secretions as lactation progresses, or a potentially novel way of looking at the metabolic state of the mammary tissue. Lately, a number of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are found to be in higher abundance in transitional milk and may be relevant to the development of infants' gastrointestinal tract in early life. In contrast, the ECM protein fibronectin and several of the actin cytoskeleton proteins that it regulates are more abundant in mature milk, which may indicate the important functional role for milk in regulating reactive oxygen species.

  19. SSRI antidepressants: altered psychomotor development following exposure in utero?

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) are sometimes prescribed to pregnant women. The potential consequences for the unborn child are gradually becoming clearer. In a case-control study of 298 children with autism and 1507 controls, 6.7% of mothers of autistic children had been prescribed an antidepressant during the year before delivery, compared to 3.3% of control mothers. The antidepressant was usually an SSRI. A dozen other small epidemiological studies of neurological development in children exposed to antidepressants in utero have provided mixed results. Two of these studies suggested a risk of psychomotor retardation. In practice, SSRI antidepressants should only be considered for pregnant women when non-drug measures fail and when symptoms are sufficiently serious to warrant drug therapy.

  20. Development of Gravity-Sensing Organs in Altered Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiederhold, M. L.; Gao, W. Y.; Harrison, J. L.; Hejl, R.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments are described in which the development of the gravity-sensing organs was studied in newt larvae reared in micro-g on the IML-2 mission and in Aplysia embryos and larvae reared on a centrifuge at 1 to 5 g. In Aplysia embryos, the statolith (single dense mass on which gravity and linear acceleration act) was reduced in size in a graded fashion at increasing g. In early post-metamorphic Aplysia or even in isolated statocysts from such animals, the number of statoconia produced is reduced at high gravity Newt larvae launched before any of the otoconia were formed and reared for 15 days in micro-gravity had nearly adult labyrinths at the end of the IML-2 mission. The otoliths of the saccule and utricle were the same size in flight and ground-reared larvae. However, the system of aragonitic otoconia produced in the endolymphatic sac in amphibians was much larger and developed earlier in the flight-reared larvae. At later developmental stages, the aragonitic otoconia enter and fill the saccule. One flight-reared larva was maintained for nine months post-flight and the size of the saccular otolith, as well as the volume of otoconia within the endolymphatic sac, were considerably larger than in age-matched, ground-reared newts. This suggests that rearing in micro-gravity initiates a process that continues for several months after introduction to 1-g, which greatly increases the volume of otoconia. The flight-reared animal had abnormal posture, pointing its head upward, whereas normal ground-reared newts always keep their head horizontal. This suggests that rearing for even a short period in micro-gravity can have lasting functional consequences in an animal subsequently reared in 1-g conditions on Earth.

  1. Development of gravity-sensing organs in altered gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiederhold, M. L.; Gao, W. Y.; Harrison, J. L.; Hejl, R.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments are described in which the development of the gravity-sensing organs was studied in newt larvae reared in microgravity on the IML-2 mission and in Aplysia embryos and larvae reared on a centrifuge at 1 to 5 g. In Aplysia embryos, the statolith (single dense mass on which gravity and linear acceleration act) was reduced in size in a graded fashion at increasing g. In early post-metamorphic Aplysia or even in isolated statocysts from such animals, the number of statoconia produced is reduced at high g. Newt larvae launched before any of the otoconia were formed and reared for 15 days in microgravity had nearly adult labyrinths at the end of the IML-2 mission. The otoliths of the saccule and utricle were the same size in flight and ground-reared larvae. However, the system of aragonitic otoconia produced in the endolymphatic sac in amphibians was much larger and developed earlier in the flight-reared larvae. At later developmental stages, the aragonitic otoconia enter and fill the saccule. One flight-reared larva was maintained for nine months post-flight and the size of the saccular otolith, as well as the volume of otoconia within the endolymphatic sac, were considerably larger than in age-matched, ground-reared newts. This suggests that rearing in microgravity initiates a process that continues for several months after introduction to 1-g, which greatly increases the volume of otoconia. The flight-reared animal had abnormal posture, pointing its head upward, whereas normal ground-reared newts always keep their head horizontal. This suggests that rearing for even a short period in microgravity can have lasting functional consequences in an animal subsequently reared in 1-g conditions on Earth.

  2. Music training alters the course of adolescent auditory development

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Adam T.; Krizman, Jennifer; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental changes in brain structure and function during adolescence are well-characterized, but the extent to which experience modulates adolescent neurodevelopment is not. Musical experience provides an ideal case for examining this question because the influence of music training begun early in life is well-known. We investigated the effects of in-school music training, previously shown to enhance auditory skills, versus another in-school training program that did not focus on development of auditory skills (active control). We tested adolescents on neural responses to sound and language skills before they entered high school (pretraining) and again 3 y later. Here, we show that in-school music training begun in high school prolongs the stability of subcortical sound processing and accelerates maturation of cortical auditory responses. Although phonological processing improved in both the music training and active control groups, the enhancement was greater in adolescents who underwent music training. Thus, music training initiated as late as adolescence can enhance neural processing of sound and confer benefits for language skills. These results establish the potential for experience-driven brain plasticity during adolescence and demonstrate that in-school programs can engender these changes. PMID:26195739

  3. Interstitial space and collagen alterations of the developing rat diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.; Sieck, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of growth on the relative interstitial space [%total cross-sectional area (CSA)] and collagen content of the rat diaphragm muscle was examined at postnatal ages of 0, 7, 14, and 21 days as well as in adult males. The proportion of interstitial space relative to total muscle CSA was determined by computerized image analysis of lectin-stained cross sections of diaphragm muscle. To assess collagen content and extent of collagen maturation (i.e., cross-linking), high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis was used to measure hydroxyproline concentration and the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP), respectively. At birth, interstitial space accounted for approximately 47% of total diaphragm muscle CSA. During postnatal growth, the relative contribution of interstitial space decreased such that by adulthood the interstitial space accounted for approximately 18% of total muscle CSA. The change in relative interstitial space occurred without a concomitant change in hydroxyproline concentration. However, the concentration of HP markedly increased with age such that the adult diaphragm contained approximately 17 times more HP than at birth. These results indicate that during development the relative CSA occupied by interstitial space decreases as muscle fiber size increases. However, the reduction in relative interstitial space is not associated with a change in collagen concentration. Thus collagen density in the interstitial space may increase with age. It is possible that the observed changes in relative interstitial space and collagen influence the passive length-force properties of the diaphragm.

  4. Music training alters the course of adolescent auditory development.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam T; Krizman, Jennifer; Kraus, Nina

    2015-08-11

    Fundamental changes in brain structure and function during adolescence are well-characterized, but the extent to which experience modulates adolescent neurodevelopment is not. Musical experience provides an ideal case for examining this question because the influence of music training begun early in life is well-known. We investigated the effects of in-school music training, previously shown to enhance auditory skills, versus another in-school training program that did not focus on development of auditory skills (active control). We tested adolescents on neural responses to sound and language skills before they entered high school (pretraining) and again 3 y later. Here, we show that in-school music training begun in high school prolongs the stability of subcortical sound processing and accelerates maturation of cortical auditory responses. Although phonological processing improved in both the music training and active control groups, the enhancement was greater in adolescents who underwent music training. Thus, music training initiated as late as adolescence can enhance neural processing of sound and confer benefits for language skills. These results establish the potential for experience-driven brain plasticity during adolescence and demonstrate that in-school programs can engender these changes.

  5. Evolution of development in the sea star genus Patiriella: clade-specific alterations in cleavage.

    PubMed

    Cerra, Anna; Byrne, Maria

    2004-01-01

    Examination of early development in five species of the Patiriella sea star species complex indicates that the ancestral-type radial holoblastic cleavage (Type I) is characteristic of P. regularis and P. exigua, whereas cleavage in species from the calcar clade followed multiple alternatives (Types II-IV) from holoblastic to meroblastic. Considering that invariant radial cleavage is thought to play a role in embryonic axis formation in echinoderms, we documented the details of blastomere formation in Patiriella sp. and followed development of the embryos. In Type II cleavage, the first and second cleavage planes appeared simultaneously at one pole of the embryo, dividing it directly into four equally sized blastomeres. In Type III cleavage, the first and second cleavage planes appeared simultaneously, followed promptly by the third cleavage plane, dividing the embryo directly into eight equally sized blastomeres. In Type IV cleavage, numerous furrows appeared simultaneously at one end of the embryo, dividing it into 32-40 equally sized blastomeres. Confocal sections revealed that embryos with cleavage Types II-IV were initially syncytial. The timing of karyokinesis in embryos with Types II and III cleavage was similar to that seen in clutch mates with Type I cleavage. Karyokinesis in embryos with Type IV cleavage, however, differed in timing compared with Type I clutch mates. Alteration in cleavage was not associated with polarized distribution of maternally provided nutrients. For each cleavage type, development was normal to the competent larval stage. Although variable blastomere configuration in the calcar clade may be linked to possession of a lecithotrophic development, other Patiriella species with this mode of development have typical cleavage. The presence of variable cleavage in all calcar clade species indicates that phylogenetic history has played a role in the distribution of this embryonic trait in Patiriella. The plasticity in early cleavage in these

  6. The development of gravity sensory systems during periods of altered gravity dependent sensory input.

    PubMed

    Horn, Eberhard R

    2003-01-01

    Gravity related behavior and the underlying neuronal networks are the most suitable model systems to study basic effects of altered gravitational input on the development of neuronal systems. A feature of sensory and motor systems is their susceptibility to modifications of their adequate physical and/or chemical stimuli during development. This discovery led to the formulation about critical periods, which defines the period of susceptibility during post-embryonal development. Critical periods can be determined by long-lasting modifications of the stimulus input for the gravity sensory system (GSS). Techniques include: (1) destruction of the gravity sense organ so that the gravity cannot be detected any longer and the central neuronal network of the GSS is deprived of gravity related information, (2) loading or deloading of parts of the body by weights or counterweights, respectively, which compensates for the gravitational pull, and (3) absence or augmentation of the gravitational environment per se by the exposure of organisms to microgravity during spaceflights or to hypergravity by centrifugation. Most data came from studies on compensatory eye or head movements in the clawed toad Xenopus laevis, the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus, and crickets (Acheta domesticus, Gryllus bimaculatus). The responses are induced by a roll or pitch stimulation of the gravity sense organs, but are also affected by sensory inputs from proprioreceptors and eyes. The development of these compensatory eye and head responses reveals species-specific time courses. Based on experiments using spaceflights, centrifugation, lesion and loading or deloading, all species revealed a significant susceptibility to modifications of the gravity sensory input during development. Behavioral responses were depressed (Xenopus) or augmented (Xenopus, Oreochronis) by microgravity, and depressed by hypergravity except in crickets. In Acheta, however, the sensitivity of its position sensitive neuron

  7. Carbon and Nitrogen Provisions Alter the Metabolic Flux in Developing Soybean Embryos1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Doug K.; Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) seeds store significant amounts of their biomass as protein, levels of which reflect the carbon and nitrogen received by the developing embryo. The relationship between carbon and nitrogen supply during filling and seed composition was examined through a series of embryo-culturing experiments. Three distinct ratios of carbon to nitrogen supply were further explored through metabolic flux analysis. Labeling experiments utilizing [U-13C5]glutamine, [U-13C4]asparagine, and [1,2-13C2]glucose were performed to assess embryo metabolism under altered feeding conditions and to create corresponding flux maps. Additionally, [U-14C12]sucrose, [U-14C6]glucose, [U-14C5]glutamine, and [U-14C4]asparagine were used to monitor differences in carbon allocation. The analyses revealed that: (1) protein concentration as a percentage of total soybean embryo biomass coincided with the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio; (2) altered nitrogen supply did not dramatically impact relative amino acid or storage protein subunit profiles; and (3) glutamine supply contributed 10% to 23% of the carbon for biomass production, including 9% to 19% of carbon to fatty acid biosynthesis and 32% to 46% of carbon to amino acids. Seed metabolism accommodated different levels of protein biosynthesis while maintaining a consistent rate of dry weight accumulation. Flux through ATP-citrate lyase, combined with malic enzyme activity, contributed significantly to acetyl-coenzyme A production. These fluxes changed with plastidic pyruvate kinase to maintain a supply of pyruvate for amino and fatty acids. The flux maps were independently validated by nitrogen balancing and highlight the robustness of primary metabolism. PMID:23314943

  8. Alteration of gene expression profile in maize infected with a double-stranded RNA fijivirus associated with symptom development.

    PubMed

    Jia, Meng-Ao; Li, Yongqiang; Lei, Lei; Di, Dianping; Miao, Hongqin; Fan, Zaifeng

    2012-04-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) is a major viral disease in China. It has been suggested that the viral infection of plants might cause distinct disease symptoms through the inhibition or activation of host gene transcription. We scanned the gene expression profile of RBSDV-infected maize through oligomer-based microarrays to reveal possible expression changes associated with symptom development. Our results demonstrate that various resistance-related maize genes and cell wall- and development-related genes, such as those for cellulose synthesis, are among the genes whose expression is dramatically altered. These results could aid in research into new strategies to protect cereal crops against viruses, and reveal the molecular mechanisms of development of specific symptoms in rough dwarf-related diseases.

  9. Alterations in sarcomere function modify the hyperplastic to hypertrophic transition phase of mammalian cardiomyocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Benjamin R.; Williams, Alexandra F.; Glennon, Michael S.; de Feria, Alejandro E.; Sebag, Sara C.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Becker, Jason R.

    2017-01-01

    It remains unclear how perturbations in cardiomyocyte sarcomere function alter postnatal heart development. We utilized murine models that allowed manipulation of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (MYBPC3) expression at critical stages of cardiac ontogeny to study the response of the postnatal heart to disrupted sarcomere function. We discovered that the hyperplastic to hypertrophic transition phase of mammalian heart development was altered in mice lacking MYBPC3 and this was the critical period for subsequent development of cardiomyopathy. Specifically, MYBPC3-null hearts developed evidence of increased cardiomyocyte endoreplication, which was accompanied by enhanced expression of cell cycle stimulatory cyclins and increased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Interestingly, this response was self-limited at later developmental time points by an upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. These results provide valuable insights into how alterations in sarcomere protein function modify postnatal heart development and highlight the potential for targeting cell cycle regulatory pathways to counteract cardiomyopathic stimuli. PMID:28239655

  10. Multi-Omics Reveals that Lead Exposure Disturbs Gut Microbiome Development, Key Metabolites, and Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Chi, Liang; Mahbub, Ridwan; Bian, Xiaoming; Tu, Pengcheng; Ru, Hongyu; Lu, Kun

    2017-03-16

    Lead exposure remains a global public health issue, and the recent Flint water crisis has renewed public concern about lead toxicity. The toxicity of lead has been well established in a variety of systems and organs. The gut microbiome has been shown to be highly involved in many critical physiological processes, including food digestion, immune system development, and metabolic homeostasis. However, despite the key role of the gut microbiome in human health, the functional impact of lead exposure on the gut microbiome has not been studied. The aim of this study is to define gut microbiome toxicity induced by lead exposure in C57BL/6 mice using multiomics approaches, including 16S rRNA sequencing, whole genome metagenomics sequencing, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics. 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that lead exposure altered the gut microbiome trajectory and phylogenetic diversity. Metagenomics sequencing and metabolomics profiling showed that numerous metabolic pathways, including vitamin E, bile acids, nitrogen metabolism, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and the defense/detoxification mechanism, were significantly disturbed by lead exposure. These perturbed molecules and pathways may have important implications for lead toxicity in the host. Taken together, these results demonstrated that lead exposure not only altered the gut microbiome community structures/diversity but also greatly affected metabolic functions, leading to gut microbiome toxicity.

  11. Neurodevelopmental alterations and seizures developed by mouse model of infantile hypophosphatasia are associated with purinergic signalling deregulation

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián-Serrano, Álvaro; Engel, Tobias; de Diego-García, Laura; Olivos-Oré, Luis A.; Arribas-Blázquez, Marina; Martínez-Frailes, Carlos; Pérez-Díaz, Carmen; Millán, José Luis; Artalejo, Antonio R.; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa; Henshall, David C.; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations in the gene encoding the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) enzyme, ALPL in human or Akp2 in mice, cause hypophosphatasia (HPP), an inherited metabolic bone disease also characterized by spontaneous seizures. Initially, these seizures were attributed to the impairment of GABAergic neurotransmission caused by altered vitamin B6 (vit-B6) metabolism. However, clinical cases in human newborns and adults whose convulsions are refractory to pro-GABAergic drugs but controlled by the vit-B6 administration, suggest that other factors are involved. Here, to evaluate whether neurodevelopmental alterations are underlying the seizures associated to HPP, we performed morphological and functional characterization of postnatal homozygous TNAP null mice, a model of HPP. These analyses revealed that TNAP deficient mice present an increased proliferation of neural precursors, an altered neuronal morphology, and an augmented neuronal activity. We found that these alterations were associated with a partial downregulation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Even though deficient P2X7R mice present similar neurodevelopmental alterations, they do not develop neonatal seizures. Accordingly, we found that the additional blockage of P2X7R prevent convulsions and extend the lifespan of mice lacking TNAP. In agreement with these findings, we also found that exogenous administration of ATP or TNAP antagonists induced seizures in adult wild-type mice by activating P2X7R. Finally, our results also indicate that the anticonvulsive effects attributed to vit-B6 may be due to its capacity to block P2X7R. Altogether, these findings suggest that the purinergic signalling regulates the neurodevelopmental alteration and the neonatal seizures associated to HPP. PMID:27466191

  12. Ectopic KNOX Expression Affects Plant Development by Altering Tissue Cell Polarity and Identity[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rebocho, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant development involves two polarity types: tissue cell (asymmetries within cells are coordinated across tissues) and regional (identities vary spatially across tissues) polarity. Both appear altered in the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Hooded mutant, in which ectopic expression of the KNOTTED1-like Homeobox (KNOX) gene, BKn3, causes inverted polarity of differentiated hairs and ectopic flowers, in addition to wing-shaped outgrowths. These lemma-specific effects allow the spatiotemporal analysis of events following ectopic BKn3 expression, determining the relationship between KNOXs, polarity, and shape. We show that tissue cell polarity, based on localization of the auxin transporter SISTER OF PINFORMED1 (SoPIN1), dynamically reorients as ectopic BKn3 expression increases. Concurrently, ectopic expression of the auxin importer LIKE AUX1 and boundary gene NO APICAL MERISTEM is activated. The polarity of hairs reflects SoPIN1 patterns, suggesting that tissue cell polarity underpins oriented cell differentiation. Wing cell files reveal an anisotropic growth pattern, and computational modeling shows how polarity guiding growth can account for this pattern and wing emergence. The inverted ectopic flower orientation does not correlate with SoPIN1, suggesting that this form of regional polarity is not controlled by tissue cell polarity. Overall, the results suggest that KNOXs trigger different morphogenetic effects through interplay between tissue cell polarity, identity, and growth. PMID:27553356

  13. Ectopic KNOX Expression Affects Plant Development by Altering Tissue Cell Polarity and Identity.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Annis Elizabeth; Rebocho, Alexandra B; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-08-23

    Plant development involves two polarity types: tissue cell (asymmetries within cells are coordinated across tissues) and regional (identities vary spatially across tissues) polarity. Both appear altered in the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Hooded mutant, in which ectopic expression of the KNOTTED1-like Homeobox (KNOX) gene, BKn3, causes inverted polarity of differentiated hairs and ectopic flowers, in addition to wing-shaped outgrowths. These lemma-specific effects allow the spatiotemporal analysis of events following ectopic BKn3 expression, determining the relationship between KNOXs, polarity, and shape. We show that tissue cell polarity, based on localization of the auxin transporter SISTER OF PINFORMED1 (SoPIN1), dynamically reorients as ectopic BKn3 expression increases. Concurrently, ectopic expression of the auxin importer LIKE AUX1 and boundary gene NO APICAL MERISTEM is activated. The polarity of hairs reflects SoPIN1 patterns, suggesting that tissue cell polarity underpins oriented cell differentiation. Wing cell files reveal an anisotropic growth pattern, and computational modeling shows how polarity guiding growth can account for this pattern and wing emergence. The inverted ectopic flower orientation does not correlate with SoPIN1, suggesting that this form of regional polarity is not controlled by tissue cell polarity. Overall, the results suggest that KNOXs trigger different morphogenetic effects through interplay between tissue cell polarity, identity, and growth.

  14. The dominance of cold and dry alteration processes on recent Mars, as revealed through pan-spectral orbital analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatore, M. R.; Mustard, J. F.; Head, J. W.; Rogers, A. D.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-10-01

    Classic low-albedo regions of the martian surface are investigated using combined reflectance and emission (“pan-spectral”) data to constrain the types of alteration mineral phases that are present at spectrally significant abundances (>10-15%). The lack of hydrated mineral species observed using near-infrared data suggests that anhydrous chemical alteration dominates at the regional scale. Spectral characteristics in the VNIR and TIR are consistent with those associated with weathering processes identified in the hyper-arid, hypo-thermal, and geologically stable McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, where oxidative weathering processes dominate and significant aqueous alteration does not occur. In addition, the spectral trends associated with oxidative weathering processes are similar to regional trends in VNIR spectral characteristics observed on Mars and potentially complicate the spectral interpretation of basaltic terrains. Collectively, these relationships suggest that the martian surface has been dominated by cold, dry, and stable conditions since the formation of these low-albedo regions. While significant at regional scales early in martian history, aqueous alteration appears to be predominantly absent from large-scale basaltic regions on Mars.

  15. Serum Proteome Alterations in Patients with Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qinghua; Zhang, Chunhu; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background. Cognitive impairment is the leading cause of traumatic brain injury- (TBI-) related disability; however, the underlying pathogenesis of this dysfunction is not completely understood. Methods. Using an isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation- (iTRAQ-) based quantitative proteomic approach, serum samples from healthy control subjects, TBI patients with cognitive impairment, and TBI patients without cognitive impairment were analysed to identify differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) related to post-TBI cognitive impairment. In addition, DEPs were further analysed using bioinformatic platforms and validated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Results. A total of 56 DEPs were identified that were specifically related to TBI-induced cognitive impairment. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that a wide variety of cellular and metabolic processes and some signaling pathways were involved in the pathophysiology of cognitive deficits following TBI. Five randomly selected DEPs were validated using ELISA in an additional 105 cases, and the results also supported the experimental findings. Conclusions. Despite limitations, our findings will facilitate further studies of the pathological mechanisms underlying TBI-induced cognitive impairment and provide new methods for the research and development of neuroprotective agents. However, further investigation on a large cohort is warranted. PMID:28251161

  16. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X.; Forlenza, Kimberly N.; Martin, Jorge H.; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions. PMID:28205584

  17. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X; Forlenza, Kimberly N; Martin, Jorge H; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K; Butler, Merlin G; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-02-16

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions.

  18. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Expression of Memory and Neurotransmission Associated Genes in the REM Sleep Deprived Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Narwade, Santosh C.; Mallick, Birendra N.; Deobagkar, Deepti D.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disorders are associated with cognitive impairment. Selective rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) deprivation (REMSD) alters several physiological processes and behaviors. By employing NGS platform we carried out transcriptomic analysis in brain samples of control rats and those exposed to REMSD. The expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly, methylation, learning, memory, regulation of synaptic transmission, neuronal plasticity and neurohypophysial hormone synthesis were altered. Increased transcription of BMP4, DBH and ATP1B2 genes after REMSD supports our earlier findings and hypothesis. Alteration in the transcripts encoding histone subtypes and important players in chromatin remodeling was observed. The mRNAs which transcribe neurotransmitters such as OXT, AVP, PMCH and LNPEP and two small non-coding RNAs, namely RMRP and BC1 were down regulated. At least some of these changes are likely to regulate REMS and may participate in the consequences of REMS loss. Thus, the findings of this study have identified key epigenetic regulators and neuronal plasticity genes associated to REMS and its loss. This analysis provides a background and opens up avenues for unraveling their specific roles in the complex behavioral network particularly in relation to sustained REMS-loss associated changes. PMID:28367113

  19. Integration of tissue metabolomics, transcriptomics and immunohistochemistry reveals ERG- and gleason score-specific metabolomic alterations in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Meller, Sebastian; Meyer, Hellmuth-A; Bethan, Bianca; Dietrich, Dimo; Maldonado, Sandra González; Lein, Michael; Montani, Matteo; Reszka, Regina; Schatz, Philipp; Peter, Erik; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Kamlage, Beate; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-12

    Integrated analysis of metabolomics, transcriptomics and immunohistochemistry can contribute to a deeper understanding of biological processes altered in cancer and possibly enable improved diagnostic or prognostic tests. In this study, a set of 254 metabolites was determined by gas-chromatography/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in matched malignant and non-malignant prostatectomy samples of 106 prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Transcription analysis of matched samples was performed on a set of 15 PCa patients using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Expression of several proteins was immunohistochemically determined in 41 matched patient samples and the association with clinico-pathological parameters was analyzed by an integrated data analysis. These results further outline the highly deregulated metabolism of fatty acids, sphingolipids and polyamines in PCa. For the first time, the impact of the ERG translocation on the metabolome was demonstrated, highlighting an altered fatty acid oxidation in TMPRSS2-ERG translocation positive PCa specimens. Furthermore, alterations in cholesterol metabolism were found preferentially in high grade tumors, enabling the cells to create energy storage. With this integrated analysis we could not only confirm several findings from previous metabolomic studies, but also contradict others and finally expand our concepts of deregulated biological pathways in PCa.

  20. Systematic tracking of altered haematopoiesis during sporozoite-mediated malaria development reveals multiple response points.

    PubMed

    Vainieri, Maria L; Blagborough, Andrew M; MacLean, Adam L; Haltalli, Myriam L R; Ruivo, Nicola; Fletcher, Helen A; Stumpf, Michael P H; Sinden, Robert E; Celso, Cristina Lo

    2016-06-01

    Haematopoiesis is the complex developmental process that maintains the turnover of all blood cell lineages. It critically depends on the correct functioning of rare, quiescent haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and more numerous, HSC-derived, highly proliferative and differentiating haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Infection is known to affect HSCs, with severe and chronic inflammatory stimuli leading to stem cell pool depletion, while acute, non-lethal infections exert transient and even potentiating effects. Both whether this paradigm applies to all infections and whether the HSC response is the dominant driver of the changes observed during stressed haematopoiesis remain open questions. We use a mouse model of malaria, based on natural, sporozoite-driven Plasmodium berghei infection, as an experimental platform to gain a global view of haematopoietic perturbations during infection progression. We observe coordinated responses by the most primitive HSCs and multiple HPCs, some starting before blood parasitaemia is detected. We show that, despite highly variable inter-host responses, primitive HSCs become highly proliferative, but mathematical modelling suggests that this alone is not sufficient to significantly impact the whole haematopoietic cascade. We observe that the dramatic expansion of Sca-1(+) progenitors results from combined proliferation of direct HSC progeny and phenotypic changes in downstream populations. We observe that the simultaneous perturbation of HSC/HPC population dynamics is coupled with early signs of anaemia onset. Our data uncover a complex relationship between Plasmodium and its host's haematopoiesis and raise the question whether the variable responses observed may affect the outcome of the infection itself and its long-term consequences on the host.

  1. Systematic tracking of altered haematopoiesis during sporozoite-mediated malaria development reveals multiple response points

    PubMed Central

    Vainieri, Maria L.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; MacLean, Adam L.; Haltalli, Myriam L. R.; Ruivo, Nicola; Fletcher, Helen A.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.; Sinden, Robert E.; Celso, Cristina Lo

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoiesis is the complex developmental process that maintains the turnover of all blood cell lineages. It critically depends on the correct functioning of rare, quiescent haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and more numerous, HSC-derived, highly proliferative and differentiating haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Infection is known to affect HSCs, with severe and chronic inflammatory stimuli leading to stem cell pool depletion, while acute, non-lethal infections exert transient and even potentiating effects. Both whether this paradigm applies to all infections and whether the HSC response is the dominant driver of the changes observed during stressed haematopoiesis remain open questions. We use a mouse model of malaria, based on natural, sporozoite-driven Plasmodium berghei infection, as an experimental platform to gain a global view of haematopoietic perturbations during infection progression. We observe coordinated responses by the most primitive HSCs and multiple HPCs, some starting before blood parasitaemia is detected. We show that, despite highly variable inter-host responses, primitive HSCs become highly proliferative, but mathematical modelling suggests that this alone is not sufficient to significantly impact the whole haematopoietic cascade. We observe that the dramatic expansion of Sca-1+ progenitors results from combined proliferation of direct HSC progeny and phenotypic changes in downstream populations. We observe that the simultaneous perturbation of HSC/HPC population dynamics is coupled with early signs of anaemia onset. Our data uncover a complex relationship between Plasmodium and its host's haematopoiesis and raise the question whether the variable responses observed may affect the outcome of the infection itself and its long-term consequences on the host. PMID:27335321

  2. IgH sequences in common variable immune deficiency reveal altered B cell development and selection**

    PubMed Central

    Roskin, Krishna M.; Simchoni, Noa; Liu, Yi; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Seo, Katie; Hoh, Ramona A.; Pham, Tho; Park, Joon H.; Furman, David; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; James, Judith A.; Nadeau, Kari C.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Boyd, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immune deficiency, affecting ∼1 in 25,000 persons. These patients suffer from impaired antibody responses, autoimmunity, and susceptibility to lymphoid cancers. To explore the cellular basis for these clinical phenotypes, we conducted high-throughput DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements from 93 CVID patients and 105 control subjects and sorted naïve and memory B cells from 13 of the CVID patients and 10 of the control subjects. CVID patients showed abnormal VDJ rearrangement and abnormal formation of complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3). We observed decreased selection against antibodies with long CDR3 regions in memory repertoires and decreased V gene replacement, offering possible mechanisms for increased patient autoreactivity. Our data indicate that patient immunodeficiency might derive both from decreased diversity of the naïve B cell pool and decreased somatic hypermutation in memory repertoires. CVID patients also exhibited abnormal clonal expansion of unmutated B cells relative to controls. Although impaired B cell germinal center activation is commonly viewed as causative in CVID, these data indicate that CVID B cells diverge from controls as early as the pro-B cell stage and suggest possible explanations for the increased incidence of autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and lymphoma CVID patients. PMID:26311730

  3. Vulnerability of conditional NCAM-deficient mice to develop stress-induced behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Bisaz, Reto; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies in rodents showed that chronic stress induces structural and functional alterations in several brain regions, including shrinkage of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, which are accompanied by cognitive and emotional disturbances. Reduced expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) following chronic stress has been proposed to be crucially involved in neuronal retraction and behavioral alterations. Since NCAM gene polymorphisms and altered expression of alternatively spliced NCAM isoforms have been associated with bipolar depression and schizophrenia in humans, we hypothesized that reduced expression of NCAM renders individuals more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of stress on behavior. Here, we specifically questioned whether mice in which the NCAM gene is inactivated in the forebrain by cre-recombinase under the control of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II promoter (conditional NCAM-deficient mice), display increased vulnerability to stress. We assessed the evolving of depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning and memory impairments following a subchronic stress protocol (2 weeks) that does not result in behavioral dysfunction, nor in altered NCAM expression, in wild-type mice. Indeed, while no behavioral alterations were detected in wild-type littermates after subchronic stress, conditional NCAM-deficient mice showed increased immobility in the tail suspension test and deficits in reversal spatial learning in the water maze. These findings indicate that diminished NCAM expression might be a critical vulnerability factor for the development of behavioral alterations by stress and further support a functional involvement of NCAM in stress-induced cognitive and emotional disturbances.

  4. Induction of antibodies reactive to cardiac myosin and development of heart alterations in cruzipain-immunized mice and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, L; Maldonado, C; Rivarola, H W; Iosa, D; Girones, N; Fresno, M; Gea, S

    2000-11-01

    Human and murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is usually accompanied by strong humoral and cellular immune response to cruzipain, a parasite immunodominant antigen. In the present study we report that the immunization of mice with cruzipain devoid of enzymatic activity, was able to induce antibodies which bind to a 223-kDa antigen from a mouse heart extract. We identified this protein as the mouse cardiac myosin heavy chain by sequencing analysis. The study of IgG isotype profile revealed the occurrence of all IgG isotypes against cruzipain and myosin. IgG1 showed the strongest reactivity against cruzipain, whereas IgG2a was the main isotype against myosin. Anti-cruzipain antibodies purified by immunoabsorption recognized the cardiac myosin heavy chain, suggesting cross-reactive epitopes between cruzipain and myosin. Autoimmune response in mice immunized with cruzipain was associated to heart conduction disturbances. In addition, ultrastructural findings revealed severe alterations of cardiomyocytes and IgG deposit on heart tissue of immunized mice. We investigated whether antibodies induced by cruzipain transferred from immunized mothers to their offsprings could alter the heart function in the pups. All IgG isotypes against cruzipain derived from transplacental crossing were detected in pups' sera. Electrocardiographic studies performed in the offsprings born to immunized mothers revealed conduction abnormalities. These results provide strong evidence for a pathogenic role of autoimmune response induced by a purified T. cruzi antigen in the development of experimental Chagas' disease.

  5. Altering the trajectory of early postnatal cortical development can lead to structural and behavioural features of autism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Autism is a behaviourally defined neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown etiology. Recent studies in autistic children consistently point to neuropathological and functional abnormalities in the temporal association cortex (TeA) and its associated structures. It has been proposed that the trajectory of postnatal development in these regions may undergo accelerated maturational alterations that predominantly affect sensory recognition and social interaction. Indeed, the temporal association regions that are important for sensory recognition and social interaction are one of the last regions to mature suggesting a potential vulnerability to early maturation. However, direct evaluation of the emerging hypothesis that an altered time course of early postnatal development can lead to an ASD phenotype remains lacking. Results We used electrophysiological, histological, and behavioural techniques to investigate if the known neuronal maturational promoter valproate, similar to that in culture systems, can influence the normal developmental trajectory of TeA in vivo. Brain sections obtained from postnatal rat pups treated with VPA in vivo revealed that almost 40% of cortical cells in TeA prematurely exhibited adult-like intrinsic electrophysiological properties and that this was often associated with gross cortical hypertrophy and a reduced predisposition for social play behaviour. Conclusions The co-manifestation of these functional, structural and behavioural features suggests that alteration of the developmental time course in certain high-order cortical networks may play an important role in the neurophysiological basis of autism. PMID:20723245

  6. Comprehensive genomic profiling of inflammatory breast cancer cases reveals a high frequency of clinically relevant genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Ali, Siraj M; Wang, Kai; Khaira, Depinder; Palma, Norma A; Chmielecki, Juliann; Palmer, Gary A; Morosini, Deborah; Elvin, Julia A; Fernandez, Sandra V; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that carries a worse prognosis relative to non-IBC breast cancer even when matched for standard biomarkers (ER/PR/HER2). The objective of this study was to identify opportunities for benefit from targeted therapy, which are not currently identifiable in the standard workup for advanced breast cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling on 53 IBC formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens (mean, 800× + coverage) using the hybrid capture-based FoundationOne assay. Academic and community oncology clinics. From a series of 2208 clinical cases of advanced/refractory invasive breast cancers, 53 cases with IBC were identified. The presence of clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGA) in IBC and responses to targeted therapies. CRGA were defined as genomic alterations (GA) associated with on label targeted therapies and targeted therapies in mechanism-driven clinical trials. For the 44 IBCs with available biomarker data, 19 (39 %) were ER-/PR-/HER2- (triple-negative breast cancer, TNBC). For patients in which the clinical HER2 status was known, 11 (25 %) were HER2+ with complete (100 %) concordance with ERBB2 (HER2) amplification detected by the CGP assay. The 53 sequenced IBC cases harbored a total of 266 GA with an average of 5.0 GA/tumor (range 1-15). At least one alteration associated with an FDA approved therapy or clinical trial was identified in 51/53 (96 %) of cases with an average of 2.6 CRGA/case. The most frequently altered genes were TP53 (62 %), MYC (32 %), PIK3CA (28 %), ERBB2 (26 %), FGFR1 (17 %), BRCA2 (15 %), and PTEN (15 %). In the TNBC subset of IBC, 8/19 (42 %) showed MYC amplification (median copy number 8X, range 7-20) as compared to 9/32 (28 %) in non-TNBC IBC (median copy number 7X, range 6-21). Comprehensive genomic profiling uncovered a high frequency of GA in IBC with 96 % of cases harboring at least 1 CRGA. The clinical benefit of selected targeted

  7. High throughput lipidomic profiling of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder brain tissue reveals alterations of free fatty acids, phosphatidylcholines, and ceramides.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Emanuel; Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Whitfield, Phil; Major, Hilary; Leweke, F M; Koethe, Dagmar; McKenna, Peter; Bahn, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    A mass spectrometry based high throughput approach was employed to profile white and gray matter lipid levels in the prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9) of 45 subjects including 15 schizophrenia and 15 bipolar disorder patients as well as 15 controls samples. We found statistically significant alterations in levels of free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine in gray and white matter of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder samples compared to controls. Also, ceramides were identified to be significantly increased in white matter of both neuropsychiatric disorders as compared to control levels. The patient cohort investigated in this study includes a number of drug naive as well as untreated patients, allowing the assessment of drug effects on lipid levels. Our findings indicate that while gray matter phosphatidylcholine levels were influenced by antipsychotic medication, this was not the case for phosphatidylcholine levels in white matter. Changes in free fatty acids or ceramides in either white or gray matter also did not appear to be influenced by antipsychotic treatment. To assess lipid profiles in the living patient, we also profiled lipids of 40 red blood cell samples, including 7 samples from drug naive first onset patients. We found significant alterations in the concentrations of free fatty acids as well as ceramide. Overall, our findings suggest that lipid abnormalities may be a disease intrinsic feature of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder reflected by significant changes in the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues.

  8. cDNA microarray reveals the alterations of cytoskeleton-related genes in osteoblast under high magneto-gravitational environment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Airong; Di, Shengmeng; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Zongcheng; Li, Jingbao; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Pengfei; Yin, Dachuan; Shang, Peng

    2009-07-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  9. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS. D.K. Tarka*1,2, J.D. Suarez*2, N.L. Roberts*2, J.M. Rogers*1,2, M.P. Hardy3, and G.R. Klinefelter1,2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC; 2USEPA,...

  10. Further Development in Social Reasoning Revealed in Discourse Irony Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippova, Eva; Astington, Janet Wilde

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the development of social reasoning in school-age children. An irony task is used to assess 5-, 7-, and 9-year-olds' (N = 72) and adults' (N = 24) recursive understanding of others' minds. Guttman scale analysis demonstrates that in order to understand a speaker's communicative intention, a child needs to recognize the…

  11. Comprehensive Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Regulatory Programs during Early Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Richard J; Csukasi, Fabiana; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; van der Knaap, Esther; Catalá, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Fruit formation and early development involve a range of physiological and morphological transformations of the various constituent tissues of the ovary. These developmental changes vary considerably according to tissue type, but molecular analyses at an organ-wide level inevitably obscure many tissue-specific phenomena. We used laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of ovaries and fruit tissues of the wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium. This laser-capture microdissection-high-throughput RNA sequencing approach allowed quantitative global profiling of gene expression at previously unobtainable levels of spatial resolution, revealing numerous contrasting transcriptome profiles and uncovering rare and cell type-specific transcripts. Coexpressed gene clusters linked specific tissues and stages to major transcriptional changes underlying the ovary-to-fruit transition and provided evidence of regulatory modules related to cell division, photosynthesis, and auxin transport in internal fruit tissues, together with parallel specialization of the pericarp transcriptome in stress responses and secondary metabolism. Analysis of transcription factor expression and regulatory motifs indicated putative gene regulatory modules that may regulate the development of different tissues and hormonal processes. Major alterations in the expression of hormone metabolic and signaling components illustrate the complex hormonal control underpinning fruit formation, with intricate spatiotemporal variations suggesting separate regulatory programs.

  12. Deregulation of the pRb-E2F4 axis alters epidermal homeostasis and favors tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Clotilde; Santos, Mirentxu; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Lorz, Corina; Lázaro, Sara; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    E2F/RB activity is altered in most human tumors. The retinoblastoma family of proteins plays a key role in regulating the progression of the cell cycle from the G1 to S phases. This is achieved through negative regulation of E2F transcription factors, important positive regulators of cell cycle entry. E2F family members are divided into two groups: activators (E2F1-E2F3a) and repressors (E2F3b-E2F8). E2F4 accounts for a large part of the E2F activity and is a main E2F repressor member in vivo. Perturbations in the balance from quiescence towards proliferation contribute to increased mitotic gene expression levels frequently observed in cancer. We have previously reported that combined Rb1-Rbl1 or Rb1-E2f1 ablation in epidermis produces important alterations in epidermal proliferation and differentiation, leading to tumor development. However, the possible roles of E2F4 in this context are still to be determined. Here, we show the absence of any discernible phenotype in the skin of mice lacking of E2f4. In contrast, the inducible loss of Rb1 in the epidermis of E2F4-null mice produced multiple skin abnormalities including altered differentiation and proliferation, spontaneous wounds, carcinoma in situ development and stem cell perturbations. All these phenotypic alterations are associated with extensive gene expression changes, the induction of c-myc and the Akt activation. Moreover the whole transcriptome analyses in comparison with previous models generated also revealed extensive changes in multiple repressive complexes and in transcription factor activity. These results point to E2F4 as a master regulator in multiple steps of epidermal homeostasis in Rb1 absence. PMID:27708231

  13. Cross-Species Integrative Functional Genomics in GeneWeaver Reveals a Role for Pafah1b1 in Altered Response to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Bubier, Jason A.; Wilcox, Troy D.; Jay, Jeremy J.; Langston, Michael A.; Baker, Erich J.; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the biological substrates of complex neurobehavioral traits such as alcohol dependency pose a tremendous challenge given the diverse model systems and phenotypic assessments used. To address this problem we have developed a platform for integrated analysis of high-throughput or genome-wide functional genomics studies. A wealth of such data exists, but it is often found in disparate, non-computable forms. Our interactive web-based software system, Gene Weaver (http://www.geneweaver.org), couples curated results from genomic studies to graph-theoretical tools for combinatorial analysis. Using this system we identified a gene underlying multiple alcohol-related phenotypes in four species. A search of over 60,000 gene sets in GeneWeaver's database revealed alcohol-related experimental results including genes identified in mouse genetic mapping studies, alcohol selected Drosophila lines, Rattus differential expression, and human alcoholic brains. We identified highly connected genes and compared these to genes currently annotated to alcohol-related behaviors and processes. The most highly connected gene not annotated to alcohol was Pafah1b1. Experimental validation using a Pafah1b1 conditional knock-out mouse confirmed that this gene is associated with an increased preference for alcohol and an altered thermoregulatory response to alcohol. Although this gene has not been previously implicated in alcohol-related behaviors, its function in various neural mechanisms makes a role in alcohol-related phenomena plausible. By making diverse cross-species functional genomics data readily computable, we were able to identify and confirm a novel alcohol-related gene that may have implications for alcohol use disorders and other effects of alcohol. PMID:26834590

  14. Salamander-like development in a seymouriamorph revealed by palaeohistology.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Sophie; Klembara, Jozef; Castanet, Jacques; Steyer, J Sébastien

    2008-08-23

    The amniotes generally lay eggs on land and are thereby differentiated from lissamphibians (salamanders, frogs and caecilians) by their developmental pattern. Although a number of 330-300-Myr old fossils are regarded as early tetrapods placed close to amniotes on the basis of anatomical data, we still do not know whether their developmental pattern was more similar to those of lissamphibians or amniotes. Here we report palaeohistological and skeletochronological evidence supporting a salamander-like development in the seymouriamorph Discosauriscus. Its long-bone growth pattern, slow diaphyseal growth rate and delayed sexual maturity (at more than 10 years old) are more comparable with growth features of extant salamanders rather than extant amniotes, even though they are mostly hypothesized to be phylogenetically closer to living amniotes than salamanders.

  15. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    James, Emma L.; Lane, James A. E.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Karoly, Edward D.; Parkinson, E. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease. PMID:27924925

  16. NMR-based metabolomics reveals brain region-specific metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Lin, Qiuting; Wang, Dan; Xu, Pengtao; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can result in cognitive dysfunction, but its potential metabolic mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the metabolite profiling in eight different brain regions of the normal rats and the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats accompanied by cognitive dysfunction using a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach. A mixed linear model analysis was performed to assess the effects of DM, brain region and their interaction on metabolic changes. We found that different brain regions in rats displayed significant metabolic differences. In addition, the hippocampus was more susceptible to DM compared with other brain regions in rats. More interestingly, significant interaction effects of DM and brain region were observed on alanine, creatine/creatine-phosphate, lactate, succinate, aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glycine, choline, N-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol and taurine. Based on metabolic pathway analysis, we speculate that cognitive dysfunction in the STZ-induced diabetic rats may be associated with brain region-specific metabolic alterations involving energy metabolism, neurotransmitters, membrane metabolism and osmoregulation.

  17. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism.

    PubMed

    James, Emma L; Lane, James A E; Michalek, Ryan D; Karoly, Edward D; Parkinson, E Kenneth

    2016-12-07

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease.

  18. Mutations altering the interplay between GkDnaC helicase and DNA reveal an insight into helicase unwinding.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Hua; Liu, Shih-Wei; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Li, Hung-Wen; Lizz, Hung-Wen; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2011-01-01

    Replicative helicases are essential molecular machines that utilize energy derived from NTP hydrolysis to move along nucleic acids and to unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Our earlier crystal structure of the hexameric helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC) in complex with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) suggested several key residues responsible for DNA binding that likely play a role in DNA translocation during the unwinding process. Here, we demonstrated that the unwinding activities of mutants with substitutions at these key residues in GkDnaC are 2-4-fold higher than that of wild-type protein. We also observed the faster unwinding velocities in these mutants using single-molecule experiments. A partial loss in the interaction of helicase with ssDNA leads to an enhancement in helicase efficiency, while their ATPase activities remain unchanged. In strong contrast, adding accessory proteins (DnaG or DnaI) to GkDnaC helicase alters the ATPase, unwinding efficiency and the unwinding velocity of the helicase. It suggests that the unwinding velocity of helicase could be modulated by two different pathways, the efficiency of ATP hydrolysis or protein-DNA interaction.

  19. Altered mitochondrial morphology and defective protein import reveal novel roles for Bax and/or Bak in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Iqbal, Sobia; O'Leary, Michael F N; Menzies, Keir J; Saleem, Ayesha; Ding, Shuzhe; Hood, David A

    2013-09-01

    The function Bax and/or Bak in constituting a gateway for mitochondrial apoptosis in response to apoptotic stimuli has been unequivocally demonstrated. However, recent work has suggested that Bax/Bak may have unrecognized nonapoptotic functions related to mitochondrial function in nonstressful environments. Wild-type (WT) and Bax/Bak double knockout (DKO) mice were used to determine alternative roles for Bax and Bak in mitochondrial morphology and protein import in skeletal muscle. The absence of Bax and/or Bak altered mitochondrial dynamics by regulating protein components of the organelle fission and fusion machinery. Moreover, DKO mice exhibited defective mitochondrial protein import, both into the matrix and outer membrane compartments, which was consistent with our observations of impaired membrane potential and attenuated expression of protein import machinery (PIM) components in intermyofibrillar mitochondria. Furthermore, the cytosolic chaperones heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) were markedly increased with the deletion of Bax/Bak, indicating that the cytosolic environment related to protein folding may be changed in DKO mice. Interestingly, endurance training fully restored the deficiency of protein import in DKO mice, likely via the upregulation of PIM components and through improved cytosolic chaperone protein expression. Thus our results emphasize novel roles for Bax and/or Bak in mitochondrial function and provide evidence, for the first time, of a curative function of exercise training in ameliorating a condition of defective mitochondrial protein import.

  20. Morphological analysis of seed shape in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals altered polarity in mutants of the ethylene signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Robert, Céline; Noriega, Arturo; Tocino, Angel; Cervantes, Emilio

    2008-06-16

    The shape of Arabidopsis thaliana dry seed is described here as a prolate spheroid. The accuracy of this approximation is discussed. Considering its limitations, it allows a geometric approximation to the analysis of changes occurring in seed shape during imbibition prior to seed germination as well as the differences in shape between genotypes and their changes during imbibition. The triple mutant ein2-1, ers1-2, etr1-7 presents notable alterations in seed shape. In addition, seeds of this and other mutants in the ethylene signaling pathway (ctr1-1, eto1-1, etr1-1, ein2-1) show different response to imbibition than the wild type. Imbibed seeds of the wild type increase their asymmetry compared with the dry seeds. This is detected by the relative changes in the curvature values in both poles. Thus, during imbibition of the wild-type seeds, the reduction in curvature values observed in the basal pole gives them an ovoid shape. In contrast, in the seeds of the ethylene mutants, reduction in curvature values occurs in both basal and apical poles, and its shape remains as a prolate spheroid. Our data indicate that the ethylene signaling pathway is involved, in general, in the complex regulation of seed shape and, in particular, in the establishment of polarity in seeds, controlling curvature values in the seed poles.

  1. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs.

  2. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

  3. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    NELSON, T. A.; HOLMES, S.; ALEKSEYENKO, A. V.; SHENOY, M.; DESANTIS, T.; WU, C. H.; ANDERSEN, G. L.; WINSTON, J.; SONNENBURG, J.; PASRICHA, P. J.; SPORMANN, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Methods Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Key Results Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. Conclusions & Inferences The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS. PMID:21129126

  4. Altering carbon allocation in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata) impacts cell wall growth and development.

    PubMed

    Unda, Faride; Kim, Hoon; Hefer, Charles; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2016-12-20

    Galactinol synthase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the synthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) that function as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, as storage compounds in sink tissues and as soluble metabolites that combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. Hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata) overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana GolS3 (AtGolS3) gene showed clear effects on development; the extreme overexpressing lines were stunted and had cell wall traits characteristic of tension wood, whereas lines with only moderate up-regulation grew normally and had moderately altered secondary cell wall composition and ultrastructure. Stem cross-sections of the developing xylem revealed a significant increase in the number of vessels, as well as the clear presence of a G-layer in the fibres. Furthermore, AtGolS3-OE lines possessed higher cellulose and lower lignin contents, an increase in cellulose crystallinity, and significantly altered hemicellulose-derived carbohydrates, notably manifested by their mannose and xylose contents. In addition, the transgenic plants displayed elevated xylem starch content. Transcriptome interrogation of the transgenic plants showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of myo-inositol, along with genes involved in sucrose degradation. The results suggest that the overexpression of GolS and its product galactinol may serve as a molecular signal that initiates metabolic changes, culminating in a change in cell wall development and potentially the formation of tension wood.

  5. The ecological limits of hydrologic alteration (ELOHA): A new framework for developing regional environmental flow standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poff, N.L.; Richter, B.D.; Arthington, A.H.; Bunn, S.E.; Naiman, R.J.; Kendy, E.; Acreman, M.; Apse, C.; Bledsoe, B.P.; Freeman, Mary C.; Henriksen, J.; Jacobson, R.B.; Kennen, J.G.; Merritt, D.M.; O'Keeffe, J. H.; Olden, J.D.; Rogers, K.; Tharme, R.E.; Warner, A.

    2010-01-01

    The flow regime is a primary determinant of the structure and function of aquatic and riparian ecosystems for streams and rivers. Hydrologic alteration has impaired riverine ecosystems on a global scale, and the pace and intensity of human development greatly exceeds the ability of scientists to assess the effects on a river-by-river basis. Current scientific understanding of hydrologic controls on riverine ecosystems and experience gained from individual river studies support development of environmental flow standards at the regional scale. 2. This paper presents a consensus view from a group of international scientists on a new framework for assessing environmental flow needs for many streams and rivers simultaneously to foster development and implementation of environmental flow standards at the regional scale. This framework, the ecological limits of hydrologic alteration (ELOHA), is a synthesis of a number of existing hydrologic techniques and environmental flow methods that are currently being used to various degrees and that can support comprehensive regional flow management. The flexible approach allows scientists, water-resource managers and stakeholders to analyse and synthesise available scientific information into ecologically based and socially acceptable goals and standards for management of environmental flows. 3. The ELOHA framework includes the synthesis of existing hydrologic and ecological databases from many rivers within a user-defined region to develop scientifically defensible and empirically testable relationships between flow alteration and ecological responses. These relationships serve as the basis for the societally driven process of developing regional flow standards. This is to be achieved by first using hydrologic modelling to build a 'hydrologic foundation' of baseline and current hydrographs for stream and river segments throughout the region. Second, using a set of ecologically relevant flow variables, river segments within the

  6. The xipotl Mutant of Arabidopsis Reveals a Critical Role for Phospholipid Metabolism in Root System Development and Epidermal Cell Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; López-Bucio, José; Ramírez-Pimentel, Gabriel; Zurita-Silva, Andrés; Sánchez-Calderon, Lenin; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; González-Ortega, Emmanuel; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Phosphocholine (PCho) is an essential metabolite for plant development because it is the precursor for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is the major lipid component in plant cell membranes. The main step in PCho biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is the triple, sequential N-methylation of phosphoethanolamine, catalyzed by S-adenosyl-l-methionine:phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEAMT). In screenings performed to isolate Arabidopsis mutants with altered root system architecture, a T-DNA mutagenized line showing remarkable alterations in root development was isolated. At the seedling stage, the mutant phenotype is characterized by a short primary root, a high number of lateral roots, and short epidermal cells with aberrant morphology. Genetic and biochemical characterization of this mutant showed that the T-DNA was inserted at the At3g18000 locus (XIPOTL1), which encodes PEAMT (XIPOTL1). Further analyses revealed that inhibition of PCho biosynthesis in xpl1 mutants not only alters several root developmental traits but also induces cell death in root epidermal cells. Epidermal cell death could be reversed by phosphatidic acid treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that molecules produced downstream of the PCho biosynthesis pathway play key roles in root development and act as signals for cell integrity. PMID:15295103

  7. Alterations in lymphocyte phenotype and function in children with shigellosis who develop complications.

    PubMed Central

    Azim, T; Sarker, M S; Hamadani, J; Khanum, N; Halder, R C; Salam, M A; Albert, M J

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to see whether alterations occur in peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotype and function in children with Shigella dysenteriae 1 infection with complications (leukemoid reaction and/or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) and whether there are any alterations prior to the development of complications. The following groups of children (ages, 12 to 60 months) were compared: children without any infection (n = 51), children with uncomplicated shigellosis (n = 65), children admitted with complicated shigellosis (leukemoid reaction and/or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) (n = 29), and children with shigellosis who developed complications after enrollment (subsequently complicated shigellosis) (n = 12). Tests for the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotype (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD57 [corrected], CD20, and CD25), spontaneous proliferation, and the proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and the lipopolysaccharide of S. dysenteriae 1 were performed, as were skin tests for delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). Children who subsequently developed complications differed from other groups of children as follows: (i) the numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ cells were lower than in uninfected children (P < 0.05), (ii) the CD4/CD8 ratio was lower than in children with uncomplicated shigellosis (P < 0.05) and in uninfected children (P < 0.05), and (iii) the levels of spontaneous proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were higher and DTH responses were lower than those in children with uncomplicated shigellosis (P < 0.05 and P < 0.017, respectively). Children with complications differed by having (i) increased numbers of CD3- CD57- [corrected] CD20- cells (P < 0.05) compared with those in other groups of children and (ii) lower CD4/CD8 ratios (P < 0.05), higher levels of spontaneous proliferation (P < 0.05), and lower DTH responses (P = 0.005) than children with uncomplicated shigellosis. Three to five days after enrollment, the number of CD4

  8. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Camilla C.; Dallabona, Cristina; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Dusi, Sabrina; Tosi, Elena; Tiranti, Valeria; Goffrini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases. PMID:28357284

  9. Altered cytokine network in gestational diabetes mellitus affects maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Lauren; Belkacemi, Louiza

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an altered inflammatory profile, compared to the non-pregnant state with an adequate balance between pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines needed for normal development. Cytokines are small secreted proteins expressed mainly in immunocompetent cells in the reproductive system. From early developmental stages onward, the secretory activity of placenta cells clearly contributes to increase local as well as systemic levels of cytokines. The placental production of cytokines may affect mother and fetus independently. In turn because of this unique position at the maternal fetal interface, the placenta is also exposed to the regulatory influence of cytokines from maternal and fetal circulations, and hence, may be affected by changes in any of these. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an overall alteration of the cytokine network. This review discusses the changes that occur in cytokines post GDM and their negative effects on maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

  10. IGE RECEPTOR-MEDIATED ALTERATION OF MEMBRANE-CYTOSKELETAL INTERACTIONS REVEALED BY MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF DETERGENT-RESISTANT MEMBRANES†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xuemei; Smith, Norah L.; Sil, Dwaipayan; Holowka, David A.; McLafferty, Fred W.; Baird, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    these changes are independent of fatty acid chain length. Our mass spectrometric analyses provide a detailed accounting of receptor-activated alterations in the plasma membrane that are regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:19496615

  11. Sperm phosphoproteome profiling by ultra performance liquid chromatography followed by data independent analysis (LC-MS(E)) reveals altered proteomic signatures in asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Parte, Priyanka P; Rao, Parimala; Redij, Shweta; Lobo, Vivian; D'Souza, Serena J; Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kulkarni, Vijay

    2012-10-22

    Sperm motility is an important prerequisite for successful fertilization and is regulated by cyclic AMP activated protein kinase A which phosphorylates flagella proteins like axonemal dynein and initiates motility. Increase in calcium influx reverses this process by dephosphorylation that is mediated by calcineurin. Analyzing the phosphoenriched fractions of spermatozoa lysates from eight normozoospermic-, and asthenozoospermic-samples, respectively, by Nano UPLC-MS(E), the present study investigates the phosphoproteins involved in sperm motility in an attempt to identify the key pathways regulating sperm motility and likely to be altered in spermatozoa of asthenozoospermic individuals. 66 phosphoproteins were differentially regulated in asthenozoospermia. The deregulated proteins comprised predominantly the HSPs, cytoskeletal proteins, proteins associated with the fibrous sheath, and those associated with energy metabolism. EM analysis of these spermatozoa demonstrated significant defects in mitochondria, and fibrous sheath and these defects could be correlated with the altered proteome. Pathway analysis revealed that carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cAMP mediated PKA signaling, PI3K/AKT signaling and pathway regulating actin based motility by Rho were significantly altered indicating that motility in spermatozoa is regulated through the concerted effort of these pathways. The data identified signature molecules that have the potential as biomarkers for diagnosing etiology of asthenozoospermia.

  12. Transcriptomics and physiological analyses reveal co-ordinated alteration of metabolic pathways in Jatropha curcas drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sapeta, Helena; Lourenço, Tiago; Lorenz, Stefan; Grumaz, Christian; Kirstahler, Philipp; Barros, Pedro M; Costa, Joaquim Miguel; Sohn, Kai; Oliveira, M Margarida

    2016-02-01

    Jatropha curcas, a multipurpose plant attracting a great deal of attention due to its high oil content and quality for biofuel, is recognized as a drought-tolerant species. However, this drought tolerance is still poorly characterized. This study aims to contribute to uncover the molecular background of this tolerance, using a combined approach of transcriptional profiling and morphophysiological characterization during a period of water-withholding (49 d) followed by rewatering (7 d). Morphophysiological measurements showed that J. curcas plants present different adaptation strategies to withstand moderate and severe drought. Therefore, RNA sequencing was performed for samples collected under moderate and severe stress followed by rewatering, for both roots and leaves. Jatropha curcas transcriptomic analysis revealed shoot- and root-specific adaptations across all investigated conditions, except under severe stress, when the dramatic transcriptomic reorganization at the root and shoot level surpassed organ specificity. These changes in gene expression were clearly shown by the down-regulation of genes involved in growth and water uptake, and up-regulation of genes related to osmotic adjustments and cellular homeostasis. However, organ-specific gene variations were also detected, such as strong up-regulation of abscisic acid synthesis in roots under moderate stress and of chlorophyll metabolism in leaves under severe stress. Functional validation further corroborated the differential expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in chlorophyll metabolism, which correlates with the metabolite content of this pathway.

  13. 520-d Isolation and confinement simulating a flight to Mars reveals heightened immune responses and alterations of leukocyte phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yi, B; Rykova, M; Feuerecker, M; Jäger, B; Ladinig, C; Basner, M; Hörl, M; Matzel, S; Kaufmann, I; Strewe, C; Nichiporuk, I; Vassilieva, G; Rinas, K; Baatout, S; Schelling, G; Thiel, M; Dinges, D F; Morukov, B; Choukèr, A

    2014-08-01

    During interplanetary exploration, chronic stress caused by long term isolation and confinement in the spacecraft is one of the major concerns of physical and psychological health of space travelers. And for human on Earth, more and more people live in an isolated condition, which has become a common social problem in modern western society. Collective evidences have indicated prolonged chronic stress could bring big influence to human immune function, which may lead to a variety of health problems. However, to what extent long-term isolation can affect the immune system still remains largely unknow. A simulated 520-d Mars mission provided an extraordinary chance to study the effect of prolonged isolation. Six healthy males participated in this mission and their active neuroendocrine and immune conditions were studied with saliva and blood samples from all participants on chosen time points during the isolation period. As a typical neuroendocrine parameter, stress hormone cortisol was measured in the morning saliva samples. Immune phenotype changes were monitored through peripheral leukocyte phenotype analysis. Using an ex vivo viral infection simulation assay we assessed the immune response changes characterized by the ability to produce representative endogenous pro-inflammatory cytokines. The results of this study revealed elevated cortisol levels, increased lymphocyte amount and heightened immune responses, suggesting that prolonged isolation acting as chronic stressors are able to trigger leukocyte phenotype changes and poorly controlled immune responses.

  14. Genome Alignment Spanning Major Poaceae Lineages Reveals Heterogeneous Evolutionary Rates and Alters Inferred Dates for Key Evolutionary Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiyin; Wang, Jingpeng; Jin, Dianchuan; Guo, Hui; Lee, Tae-Ho; Liu, Tao; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-06-01

    Multiple comparisons among genomes can clarify their evolution, speciation, and functional innovations. To date, the genome sequences of eight grasses representing the most economically important Poaceae (grass) clades have been published, and their genomic-level comparison is an essential foundation for evolutionary, functional, and translational research. Using a formal and conservative approach, we aligned these genomes. Direct comparison of paralogous gene pairs all duplicated simultaneously reveal striking variation in evolutionary rates among whole genomes, with nucleotide substitution slowest in rice and up to 48% faster in other grasses, adding a new dimension to the value of rice as a grass model. We reconstructed ancestral genome contents for major evolutionary nodes, potentially contributing to understanding the divergence and speciation of grasses. Recent fossil evidence suggests revisions of the estimated dates of key evolutionary events, implying that the pan-grass polyploidization occurred ∼96 million years ago and could not be related to the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction as previously inferred. Adjusted dating to reflect both updated fossil evidence and lineage-specific evolutionary rates suggested that maize subgenome divergence and maize-sorghum divergence were virtually simultaneous, a coincidence that would be explained if polyploidization directly contributed to speciation. This work lays a solid foundation for Poaceae translational genomics.

  15. Prenatal arsenic exposure alters the programming of the glucocorticoid signaling system during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Katharine E; Labrecque, Matthew T; Solomon, Benjamin R; Ali, Abdulmehdi; Allan, Andrea M

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid system, which plays a critical role in a host of cellular functions including mood disorders and learning and memory, has been reported to be disrupted by arsenic. In previous work we have developed and characterized a prenatal moderate arsenic exposure (50ppb) model and identified several deficits in learning and memory and mood disorders, as well as alterations within the glucocorticoid receptor signaling system in the adolescent mouse. In these present studies we assessed the effects of arsenic on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) pathway in both the placenta and the fetal brain in response at two critical periods, embryonic days 14 and 18. The focus of these studies was on the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2) which play a key role in glucorticoid synthesis, as well as the expression and set point of the GR negative feedback regulation. Negative feedback regulation is established early in development. At E14 we found arsenic exposure significantly decreased expression of both protein and message in brain of GR and the 11β-HSD1, while 11β-HSD2 enzyme protein levels were increased but mRNA levels were decreased in the brain. These changes in brain protein continued into the E18 time point, but mRNA levels were no longer significantly altered. Placental HSD11B2 mRNA was not altered by arsenic treatment but protein levels were elevated at E14. GR placental protein levels were decreased at E18 in the arsenic exposed condition. This suggests that arsenic exposure may alter GR expression levels as a consequence of a prolonged developmental imbalance between 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 protein expression despite decreased 11HSDB2 mRNA. The suppression of GR and the failure to turn down 11β-HSD2 protein expression during fetal development may lead to an altered set point for GR signaling throughout adulthood. To our knowledge, these studies are the first to demonstrate that gestational exposure to moderate levels of

  16. Prenatal arsenic exposure alters the programming of the glucocorticoid signaling system during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Katharine E.; Labrecque, Matthew T.; Solomon, Benjamin R.; Ali, Abdulmehdi; Allan, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid system, which plays a critical role in a host of cellular functions including mood disorders and learning and memory, has been reported to be disrupted by arsenic. In previous work we have developed and characterized a prenatal moderate arsenic exposure (50 ppb) model and identified several deficits in learning and memory and mood disorders, as well as alterations within the glucocorticoid receptor signaling system in the adolescent mouse. In these present studies we assessed the effects of arsenic on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) pathway in both the placenta and the fetal brain in response at two critical periods, embryonic days 14 and 18. The focus of these studies was on the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2) which play a key role in glucorticoid synthesis, as well as the expression and set point of the GR negative feedback regulation. Negative feedback regulation is established early in development. At E14 we found arsenic exposure significantly decreased expression of both protein and message in brain of GR and the 11β-HSD1, while 11β-HSD2 enzyme protein levels were increased but mRNA levels were decreased in the brain. These changes in brain protein continued into the E18 time point, but mRNA levels were no longer significantly altered. Placental HSD11B2 mRNA was not altered by arsenic treatment but protein levels were elevated at E14. GR placental protein levels were decreased at E18 in the arsenic exposed condition. This suggests that arsenic exposure may alter GR expression levels as a consequence of a prolonged developmental imbalance between 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 protein expression despite decreased 11HSDB2 mRNA. The suppression of GR and the failure to turn down 11β-HSD2 protein expression during fetal development may lead to an altered set point for GR signaling throughout adulthood. To our knowledge, these studies are the first to demonstrate that gestational exposure to moderate levels of

  17. Delayed development and lifespan extension as features of metabolic lifestyle alteration in C. elegans under dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Udranszky, Ingrid A; Kozak, Elena; Sunga, June; Kim, Stuart K; Jacobson, Lewis A; Conley, Catharine A

    2006-10-01

    Studies of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans have almost exclusively utilized growth on a bacterial diet. Such culturing presents a challenge to automation of experimentation and introduces bacterial metabolism as a secondary concern in drug and environmental toxicology studies. Axenic cultivation of C. elegans can avoid these problems, yet past work suggests that axenic growth is unhealthy for C. elegans. Here we employ a chemically defined liquid medium to culture C. elegans and find development slows, fecundity declines, lifespan increases, lipid and protein stores decrease, and gene expression changes relative to that on a bacterial diet. These changes do not appear to be random pathologies associated with malnutrition, as there are no developmental delays associated with starvation, such as L1 or dauer diapause. Additionally, development and reproductive period are fixed percentages of lifespan regardless of diet, suggesting that these alterations are adaptive. We propose that C. elegans can exist as a healthy animal with at least two distinct adult life histories. One life history maximizes the intrinsic rate of population increase, the other maximizes the efficiency of exploitation of the carrying capacity of the environment. Microarray analysis reveals increased transcript levels of daf-16 and downstream targets and past experiments demonstrate that DAF-16 (FOXO) acting on downstream targets can influence all of the phenotypes we see altered in maintenance medium. Thus, life history alteration in response to diet may be modulated by DAF-16. Our observations introduce a powerful system for automation of experimentation on healthy C. elegans and for systematic analysis of the profound impact of diet on animal physiology.

  18. Phenotype-dependent alteration of pathways and networks reveals a pure synergistic mechanism for compounds treating mouse cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-qian; Li, Bing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ying-ying; Yu, Ya-nan; Zhang, Xiao-xu; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Zhi-li; Wu, Hong-li; Li, Hai-xia; Dang, Hai-xia; Guo, Shan-shan; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Our previous studies have showed that ursodeoxycholic acid (UA) and jasminoidin (JA) effectively reduce cerebral infarct volume in mice. In this study we explored the pure synergistic mechanism of these compounds in treatment of mouse cerebral ischemia, which was defined as synergistic actions specific for phenotype variations after excluding interference from ineffective compounds. Methods: Mice with focal cerebral ischemia were treated with UA, JA or a combination JA and UA (JU). Concha margaritifera (CM) was taken as ineffective compound. Cerebral infarct volume of the mice was determined, and the hippocampi were taken for microarray analysis. Particular signaling pathways and biological functions were enriched based on differentially expressed genes, and corresponding networks were constructed through Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results: In phenotype analysis, UA, JA, and JU significantly reduced the ischemic infarct volume with JU being superior to UA or JA alone, while CM was ineffective. As a result, 4 pathways enriched in CM were excluded. Core pathways in the phenotype-positive groups (UA or JA) were involved in neuronal homeostasis and neuropathology. JU-contributing pathways included all UA-contributing and the majority (71.7%) of JA-contributing pathways, and 10 new core pathways whose effects included inflammatory immunity, apoptosis and nervous system development. The functions of JU group included all functions of JA group, the majority (93.1%) of UA-contributing functions, and 3 new core functions, which focused on physiological system development and function. Conclusion: The pure synergism between UA and JA underlies 10 new core pathways and 3 new core functions, which are involved in inflammation, immune responses, apoptosis and nervous system development. PMID:25960134

  19. Expression of OsMATE1 and OsMATE2 alters development, stress responses and pathogen susceptibility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Manish; Sharma, Deepika; Singh, Munna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and Toxic compound Extrusion proteins (MATE) are a group of secondary active transporters with ubiquitous occurrences in all domains of life. This is a newly characterized transporter family with limited functional knowledge in plants. In this study, we functionally characterised two members of rice MATE gene family, OsMATE1 and OsMATE2 through expression in heterologous system, Arabidopsis. Expression of OsMATEs in Arabidopsis altered growth and morphology of transgenic plants. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed modulation of genes involved in plant growth, development and biotic stress in transgenic lines. Transgenic plants displayed sensitivity for biotic and abiotic stresses. Elevated pathogen susceptibility of transgenic lines was correlated with reduced expressions of defence related genes. Promoter and cellular localization studies suggest that both MATEs express in developing and reproductive organs and are plasma-membrane localised. Our results reveal that OsMATE1 and OsMATE2 regulate plant growth and development as well as negatively affect disease resistance. PMID:24492654

  20. Excessive Sensory Stimulation during Development Alters Neural Plasticity and Vulnerability to Cocaine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ravinder, Shilpa; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early life experiences affect the formation of neuronal networks, which can have a profound impact on brain function and behavior later in life. Previous work has shown that mice exposed to excessive sensory stimulation during development are hyperactive and novelty seeking, and display impaired cognition compared with controls. In this study, we addressed the issue of whether excessive sensory stimulation during development could alter behaviors related to addiction and underlying circuitry in CD-1 mice. We found that the reinforcing properties of cocaine were significantly enhanced in mice exposed to excessive sensory stimulation. Moreover, although these mice displayed hyperactivity that became more pronounced over time, they showed impaired persistence of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. These behavioral effects were associated with alterations in glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Together, these findings suggest that excessive sensory stimulation in early life significantly alters drug reward and the neural circuits that regulate addiction and attention deficit hyperactivity. These observations highlight the consequences of early life experiences and may have important implications for children growing up in today’s complex technological environment. PMID:27588306

  1. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs.

    PubMed

    Herring, M J; Putney, L F; St George, J A; Avdalovic, M V; Schelegle, E S; Miller, L A; Hyde, D M

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O3) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA+O3) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA+O3 alters the development process in the lung alveoli.

  2. Alteration of Rat Fetal Cerebral Cortex Development after Prenatal Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Naveau, Elise; Pinson, Anneline; Gérard, Arlette; Nguyen, Laurent; Charlier, Corinne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Parent, Anne-Simone

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants that persist in environment and human tissues. Perinatal exposure to these endocrine disruptors causes cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in children. These effects may involve their ability to interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action. We tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to PCBs can concomitantly alter TH levels and TH-regulated events during cerebral cortex development: progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit and neuron migration. Pregnant rats exposed to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 ended gestation with reduced total and free serum thyroxine levels. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 increased cell cycle exit of the neuronal progenitors and delayed radial neuronal migration in the fetal cortex. Progenitor cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation rate were not altered by prenatal exposure to PCBs. Given that PCBs remain ubiquitous, though diminishing, contaminants in human systems, it is important that we further understand their deleterious effects in the brain. PMID:24642964

  3. Alteration of rat fetal cerebral cortex development after prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Naveau, Elise; Pinson, Anneline; Gérard, Arlette; Nguyen, Laurent; Charlier, Corinne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Zoeller, R Thomas; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Parent, Anne-Simone

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants that persist in environment and human tissues. Perinatal exposure to these endocrine disruptors causes cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in children. These effects may involve their ability to interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action. We tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to PCBs can concomitantly alter TH levels and TH-regulated events during cerebral cortex development: progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit and neuron migration. Pregnant rats exposed to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 ended gestation with reduced total and free serum thyroxine levels. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 increased cell cycle exit of the neuronal progenitors and delayed radial neuronal migration in the fetal cortex. Progenitor cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation rate were not altered by prenatal exposure to PCBs. Given that PCBs remain ubiquitous, though diminishing, contaminants in human systems, it is important that we further understand their deleterious effects in the brain.

  4. Prenatal exposure to methylmercury alters development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral sympathetic target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Orband, L.; Cowdery, T.; Kavlock, R.J.; Bartolome, J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on sympathetic neurotransmission, effects on development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral tissues was evaluated. In the liver, methylmercury produced a dose-dependent increase in alpha/sub 1/, alpha/sub 2/, and beta-receptor binding of radioliganda throughout the first 5 weeks of postnatal life. Similarly, renal alpha-receptor subtypes showed increased binding capabilities, but binding to alpha-receptor sites was reduced. At least some of the changes in receptors appear to be of functional significance, as physiological reactivity to adrenergic stimulation is altered in the same directions in these two tissues. The actions of methylmercury displayed tissue specificity in that the same receptor populations were largely unaffected in other tissues (lung, heart). These results suggest that methylmercury exposure in utero alters adrenergic responses through targeted effects on postsynaptic receptor populations in specific tissues.

  5. Periconceptional growth hormone treatment alters fetal growth and development in lambs.

    PubMed

    Koch, J M; Wilmoth, T A; Wilson, M E

    2010-05-01

    Research in the area of fetal programming has focused on intrauterine growth restriction. Few studies have attempted to examine programming mechanisms that ultimately lead to lambs with a greater potential for postnatal growth. We previously demonstrated that treatment of ewes with GH at the time of breeding led to an increase in birth weight. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effects of a single injection of sustained-release GH given during the periconceptional period on fetal growth and development and to determine if the GH axis would be altered in these offspring. Estrus was synchronized using 2 injections of PGF(2alpha); at the time of the second injection, ewes assigned to treatment were also given an injection of sustained-release GH. A maternal jugular vein sample was taken weekly to analyze IGF-I as a proxy for GH to estimate the duration of the treatment effect. In ewes treated with GH, IGF-I increased (P < 0.05) by wk 1 and remained elevated until wk 4 postinjection. Lambs were weighed, crown-rump length and abdominal girth were determined, and a plasma sample was collected. In a subset of male lambs, liver, heart, and brain weights were obtained, as well as left and right ventricular wall thicknesses. On postnatal d 100, a subset of ewe lambs were weighed and challenged with an intravenous injection of GHRH. Lambs from treated ewes had increased (P < 0.05) birth weight and abdominal girth compared with control lambs; however, there was no difference in crown-rump length. Expression of GH receptor and IGF-I were increased (P < 0.05) in lambs gestated by GH-treated ewes compared with control ewes. The left ventricular wall was thinner (P < 0.05) from lambs in the GH-treated group compared with control lambs. On postnatal d 100, those ewe lambs born to ewes treated with GH continued to be heavier (P < 0.05) and had no IGF-I response to GHRH challenge. In conclusion, treating ewes with a single injection of GH appeared to alter

  6. Maternal vitamin D deficiency alters fetal brain development in the BALB/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Jazmin E; Tesic, Dijana; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Zosky, Graeme R; Smith, Jeremy T; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to vitamin D is thought to be critical for optimal fetal neurodevelopment, yet vitamin D deficiency is apparent in a growing proportion of pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine whether a mouse model of vitamin D-deficiency alters fetal neurodevelopment. Female BALB/c mice were placed on either a vitamin D control (2,195 IU/kg) or deficient (0 IU/kg) diet for 5 weeks prior to and during pregnancy. Fetal brains were collected at embryonic day (E) 14.5 or E17.5 for morphological and gene expression analysis. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy reduced fetal crown-rump length and head size. Moreover, lateral ventricle volume was reduced in vitamin D-deficient foetuses. Expression of neurotrophin genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) was altered, with Bdnf reduced at E14.5 and increased at E17.5 following vitamin D deficiency. Brain expression of forkhead box protein P2 (Foxp2), a gene known to be important in human speech and language, was also altered. Importantly, Foxp2 immunoreactive cells in the developing cortex were reduced in vitamin D-deficient female foetuses. At E17.5, brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression was reduced in females, as was TH protein localization (to identify dopamine neurons) in the substantia nigra of vitamin D-deficient female foetuses. Overall, we show that prenatal vitamin D-deficiency leads to alterations in fetal mouse brain morphology and genes related to neuronal survival, speech and language development, and dopamine synthesis. Vitamin D appears to play an important role in mouse neurodevelopment.

  7. Maternal body weight gain and fetus development of rats fed a moderately altered olive oil.

    PubMed

    López-Varela, S; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Pérez-Granados, A M; Cuesta, C

    1998-03-01

    The present study examines whether the consumption of a moderately altered olive oil influenced body weight gain and food efficiency ratio of pregnant rats as well as placental and fetal development. Olive oil used for frying 15 times undergoes a relatively slight alteration involving a statistically significant increase in polar content (9.0+/-0.1 mg/100 mg oil vs 2.0+/-0.1 mg/100 mg oil; p < 0.001). The methyl ester content also increased (5.1+/-0.8 mg/100 mg oil vs 1.8+/-0.5 mg/100 mg oil; p < 0.02), while the linoleic acid and oleic acid contents decreased significantly (6.2+/-0.6% oil vs 7.2+/-0.2% oil and 75.8+/-0.6% vs 78.9+/-0.2%, respectively, both p < 0.05). Wistar rats were divided into four groups, two of which included pregnant rats (P1 and P2) and the other two, non-pregnant rats (NP1 and NP2). Groups NP1 and P1 received a diet containing 15% of fat as unused olive oil, while groups NP2 and P2 were fed a diet with a fat content of 15% as the olive oil used in 15 fryings. Pregnancy increased food intake, body weight, weight gain and food efficiency ratio (P1 vs NP1, and P2 vs NP1), while consumption of the used olive oil diet with respect to the unused oil diet did not alter food intake, body weight, weight gain and food efficiency ratio, placental weight, fetal weight and the number of fetuses in P2 rats with respect to P1 ones. These results suggest that in pregnant rats consumption of olive oil with a moderate level of alteration, as the only dietary fat source, exerts no detrimental effects on the mother weight gain or conceptus development.

  8. Multi-omics analyses reveal metabolic alterations regulated by hepatitis B virus core protein in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Fan, Fengxu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Xu, Zhongwei; Zhai, Linhui; Qi, Yingzi; Ye, Bingyu; Zhang, Yao; Basu, Sumit; Zhao, Zhihu; Wu, Junzhu; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-23

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is partly responsible for hepatitis, fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV core protein (HBc), encoded by the HBV genome, may play a significant role in HBV life cycle. However, the function of HBc in the occurrence and development of liver disease is still unclear. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, HBc-transfected HCC cells were characterized by multi-omics analyses. Combining proteomics and metabolomics analyses, our results showed that HBc promoted the expression of metabolic enzymes and the secretion of metabolites in HCC cells. In addition, glycolysis and amino acid metabolism were significantly up-regulated by HBc. Moreover, Max-like protein X (MLX) might be recruited and enriched by HBc in the nucleus to regulate glycolysis pathways. This study provides further insights into the function of HBc in the molecular pathogenesis of HBV-induced diseases and indicates that metabolic reprogramming appears to be a hallmark of HBc transfection.

  9. Multi-omics analyses reveal metabolic alterations regulated by hepatitis B virus core protein in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Fan, Fengxu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Xu, Zhongwei; Zhai, Linhui; Qi, Yingzi; Ye, Bingyu; Zhang, Yao; Basu, Sumit; Zhao, Zhihu; Wu, Junzhu; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is partly responsible for hepatitis, fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV core protein (HBc), encoded by the HBV genome, may play a significant role in HBV life cycle. However, the function of HBc in the occurrence and development of liver disease is still unclear. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, HBc-transfected HCC cells were characterized by multi-omics analyses. Combining proteomics and metabolomics analyses, our results showed that HBc promoted the expression of metabolic enzymes and the secretion of metabolites in HCC cells. In addition, glycolysis and amino acid metabolism were significantly up-regulated by HBc. Moreover, Max-like protein X (MLX) might be recruited and enriched by HBc in the nucleus to regulate glycolysis pathways. This study provides further insights into the function of HBc in the molecular pathogenesis of HBV-induced diseases and indicates that metabolic reprogramming appears to be a hallmark of HBc transfection. PMID:28112229

  10. Suppressing Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Alters Chloroplast Development and Triggers Sterol-Dependent Induction of Jasmonate- and Fe-Related Responses.

    PubMed

    Manzano, David; Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Altabella, Teresa; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) catalyzes the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes (FPS1 and FPS2) encoding FPS. Single fps1 and fps2 knockout mutants are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, while fps1/fps2 double mutants are embryo lethal. To assess the effect of FPS down-regulation at postembryonic developmental stages, we generated Arabidopsis conditional knockdown mutants expressing artificial microRNAs devised to simultaneously silence both FPS genes. Induction of silencing from germination rapidly caused chlorosis and a strong developmental phenotype that led to seedling lethality. However, silencing of FPS after seed germination resulted in a slight developmental delay only, although leaves and cotyledons continued to show chlorosis and altered chloroplasts. Metabolomic analyses also revealed drastic changes in the profile of sterols, ubiquinones, and plastidial isoprenoids. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction transcriptomic analysis showed that a reduction in FPS activity levels triggers the misregulation of genes involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses, the most prominent one being the rapid induction of a set of genes related to the jasmonic acid pathway. Down-regulation of FPS also triggered an iron-deficiency transcriptional response that is consistent with the iron-deficient phenotype observed in FPS-silenced plants. The specific inhibition of the sterol biosynthesis pathway by chemical and genetic blockage mimicked these transcriptional responses, indicating that sterol depletion is the primary cause of the observed alterations. Our results highlight the importance of sterol homeostasis for normal chloroplast development and function and reveal important clues about how isoprenoid and sterol metabolism is integrated within plant physiology and development.

  11. Alterations in Seed Development Gene Expression Affect Size and Oil Content of Arabidopsis Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds. PMID:24014578

  12. Prenatal exposure to BPA alters the epigenome of the rat mammary gland and increases the propensity to neoplastic development.

    PubMed

    Dhimolea, Eugen; Wadia, Perinaaz R; Murray, Tessa J; Settles, Matthew L; Treitman, Jo D; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) may play a causal role in the increased breast cancer incidence which has been observed in Europe and the US over the last 50 years. The xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) leaches from plastic food/beverage containers and dental materials. Fetal exposure to BPA induces preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the adult rat mammary gland. Previous results suggest that BPA acts through the estrogen receptors which are detected exclusively in the mesenchyme during the exposure period by directly altering gene expression, leading to alterations of the reciprocal interactions between mesenchyme and epithelium. This initiates a long sequence of altered morphogenetic events leading to neoplastic transformation. Additionally, BPA induces epigenetic changes in some tissues. To explore this mechanism in the mammary gland, Wistar-Furth rats were exposed subcutaneously via osmotic pumps to vehicle or 250 µg BPA/kg BW/day, a dose that induced ductal carcinomas in situ. Females exposed from gestational day 9 to postnatal day (PND) 1 were sacrificed at PND4, PND21 and at first estrus after PND50. Genomic DNA (gDNA) was isolated from the mammary tissue and immuno-precipitated using anti-5-methylcytosine antibodies. Detection and quantification of gDNA methylation status using the Nimblegen ChIP array revealed 7412 differentially methylated gDNA segments (out of 58207 segments), with the majority of changes occurring at PND21. Transcriptomal analysis revealed that the majority of gene expression differences between BPA- and vehicle-treated animals were observed later (PND50). BPA exposure resulted in higher levels of pro-activation histone H3K4 trimethylation at the transcriptional initiation site of the alpha-lactalbumin gene at PND4, concomitantly enhancing mRNA expression of this gene. These results show that fetal BPA exposure triggers changes in the postnatal and adult mammary gland epigenome and alters gene expression patterns

  13. Genomic Profiling Reveals Unique Molecular Alterations in Hepatoblastomas and Adjacent Hepatocellular Carcinomas in B6C3F1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhusari, Sachin; Pandiri, Arun R; Nagai, Hiroaki; Wang, Yu; Foley, Julie; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Ton, Thai-Vu; DeVito, Michael; Shockley, Keith R; Peddada, Shyamal D; Gerrish, Kevin E; Malarkey, David E; Hooth, Michelle J; Sills, Robert C; Hoenerhoff, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The cell of origin of hepatoblastoma (HB) in humans and mice is unknown; it is hypothesized to be a transformed hepatocyte, oval cell, or hepatic progenitor cell. In mice, current dogma is that HBs arise from preexisting hepatocellular neoplasms as a result of further neoplastic transformation. However, there is little evidence supporting this direct relationship. To better understand the relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and HB and determine molecular similarities between mouse and human HB, global gene expression analysis and targeted mutation analysis were performed using HB, HCC, and adjacent liver from the same animals in a recent National Toxicology Program bioassay. There were significant differences in Hras and Ctnnb1 mutation spectra, and by microarray, HBs showed dysregulation of embryonic development, stem cell pluripotency, and genomic imprinting compared to HCC. Meta-analysis showed similarities between HB, early mouse embryonic liver, and hepatocyte-derived stem/progenitor cells compared to HCC. Our data show that there are striking differences between HB and HCC and suggest that HB is a significantly different entity that may arise from a hepatic precursor cell. Furthermore, mouse HB is similar to the human disease at the pathway level and therefore is likely a relevant model for evaluating human cancer hazard.

  14. Quantitative proteomic changes during post myocardial infarction remodeling reveals altered cardiac metabolism and Desmin aggregation in the infarct region.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kaberi; Basak, Trayambak; Varshney, Swati; Sengupta, Shantanu; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2017-01-30

    Myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of cardiac dysfunction, failure and sudden death. Post infarction cardiac remodeling presents a poor prognosis, with 30%-45% of patients developing heart failure, in a period of 5-25years. Oxidative stress has been labelled as the primary causative factor for cardiac damage during infarction, however, the impact it may have during the process of post infarction remodeling has not been well probed. In this study, we have implemented iTRAQ proteomics to catalogue proteins and functional processes, participating both temporally (early and late phases) and spatially (infarct and remote zones), during post myocardial infarction remodeling of the heart as functions of the differential oxidative stress manifest during the remodeling process. Cardiac metabolism was the dominant network to be affected during infarction and the remodeling time points considered in this study. A distinctive expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins was also observed with increased remodeling time points. Further, it was found that the cytoskeletal protein Desmin, aggregated in the infarct zone during the remodeling process, mediated by the protease Calpain1. Taken together, all of these data in conjunction may lay the foundation to understand the effects of oxidative stress on the remodeling process and elaborate the mechanism behind the compromised cardiac function observed during post myocardial infarction remodeling.

  15. Performances of survival, feeding behavior, and gene expression in aphids reveal their different fitness to host alteration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Yang, Pengcheng; Xu, Yongyu; Luo, Lan; Zhu, Junjie; Cui, Na; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-13

    Insect populations feeding on different plant species are under selection pressure to adapt to these differences. A study integrating elements of the ecology, behavior, and gene expression of aphids on different host plants has not yet been well-explored. The present study explores the relationship between host fitness and survival, feeding behavior, and salivary gland gene expression of a pea (Pisum sativum) host race of Acyrthosiphon pisum feeding on a common host Vicia faba and on three genetically-related hosts (Vicia villosa, Medicago truncatula, and Medicago sativa). Life table data indicated that aphids on non-favored hosts exhibited small size, low reproduction rate, slow population increase and individual development, and long lifespan. Electrical penetration graph results showed that the aphids spent significantly less time in passive ingestion of phloem sap on all non-preferred host plants before acclimation. After a period of acclimation on M. truncatula and V. villosa, pea host race individuals showed improved feeding behavior. No individuals of the pea host race completed its life history on M. sativa. Interestingly, the number of host-specific differentially-expressed salivary gland genes was negatively correlated with the fitness of aphids on this host plant. This study provided important cues in host plant specialization in aphids.

  16. High resolution mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate data analysis revealing plasma lipidomic alteration in ovarian cancer in Asian women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Liu, Yingying; Li, Lin; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most common cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in women. The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers for the early detection of this deadly disease is critical for reducing the mortality rate of OC. Plasma lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels were increased from OC patients vs. healthy controls. Therefore, lipidomics may represent an excellent developing prospect for the discovery of diagnostic biomarkers of OC. In this study, a nontargeted lipidomics approach based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-QTOF-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) combined with multivariate data analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA) and (orthogonal) partial least squared discriminant analysis [(O)PLS-DA] was applied for the investigation of potential diagnostic biomarkers in plasma of OC patients. Patients with OC could be distinguished from healthy individuals and patients with benign gynecological tumor disease by this method, which shows a significant lipid perturbation in this disease. With the assistance of high resolution and high accuracy of MS and MS/MS data, the potential markers including lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs), phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and triacylglycerols (TGs) with specific fatty acid chains, were identified. Interestingly, LPCs were up-regulated and PCs and TGs were down-regulated, compared OC group with benign tumor and normal control groups, and the glycerophospholipid metabolism emerged as a key pathway, in particular, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme activity, that was disregulated in the disease. This study may provide new insight into underlying mechanisms for OC and proves that MS-based lipidomics is a powerful method in discovering new potential clinical biomarkers for diseases.

  17. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  18. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  19. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Jesus, Eliane C; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Rocha, Rafael M; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C; Silva, Israel T; Nunes, Diana N; Setubal, João C; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  20. 6-Dimethylaminopurine and cyclohexamide are mutagenic and alter reproductive performance and intrauterine development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R J; Mantovani, M S; Pesarini, J R; Mauro, M O; da Silva, A F; Souza, T R; Ribeiro, L R

    2015-02-02

    The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) and cyclohexamide (CHX) are currently used to stimulate the development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer in the production of cloned mammals with a great deal success. This study investigated the effects of 6-DMAP and CHX in vivo using biological assays to evaluate reproductive performance in females, teratogenesis, and mutagenesis. The results of this study demonstrated that the activating agents of oocyte cytoplasm, 6-DMAP and CHX, altered the reproductive performance of the experimental animals, as well as increased the rate malformations. In addition to these adverse effects, the administration of these compounds in pregnant females resulted in genotoxic and mutagenic toxicity, as determined by comet and micronucleus assays carried out in peripheral blood samples, respectively. Based on these findings and that alterations in DNA are important, morpho-functional teratogenesis and diminished embryonic viability, suggesting that 6-DMAP and CHX, which are utilized during the cloning of mammals, are responsible for the fact that embryos produced by nuclear transfer show low viability after implantation in utero or after birth because of congenital malformations and/or alterations in their DNA.

  1. Fetal alcohol exposure alters neurosteroid levels in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Jerri C; Wu, Yan; Mameli, Manuel; Purdy, Robert H; Li, Pui-Kai; Akwa, Yvette; Savage, Daniel D; Engen, John R; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2004-09-01

    Neurosteroids are modulators of neuronal function that may play important roles in brain maturation. We determined whether chronic prenatal ethanol exposure altered neurosteroid levels in the developing brain. Rat dams were exposed to: (i) a 5% ethanol-containing liquid diet that produces peak maternal blood alcohol levels near the legal intoxication limit (approximately 0.08 g/dL); (ii) an isocaloric liquid diet containing maltose-dextrin instead of ethanol with pair-feeding; (iii) rat chow ad libitum. Neurosteroid levels were assessed in offspring brains using radioimmunoassay or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. A prenatal ethanol exposure-induced increase in pregnenolone sulfate levels, but not dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels, was evident at the earliest time point studied (embryonic day 14). This effect lasted until post-natal day 5. Levels of other neurosteroids were assessed at embryonic day 20; pregnenolone levels, but not allopregnanolone levels, were elevated. Pregnenolone sulfate levels were not altered in the maternal brain. Neither pregnenolone nor pregnenolone sulfate levels were significantly altered in the fetal liver, placenta and maternal blood, indicating that the effect of ethanol is not secondary to accumulation of peripherally-produced steroids. Fetal ethanol exposure has been shown to decrease both cellular and behavioral responsiveness to neurosteroids, and our findings provide a plausible explanation for this effect.

  2. Acute alcohol exposure during mouse gastrulation alters lipid metabolism in placental and heart development: Folate prevention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingda

    2016-01-01

    Background Embryonic acute exposure to ethanol (EtOH), lithium, and homocysteine (HCy) induces cardiac defects at the time of exposure; folic acid (FA) supplementation protects normal cardiogenesis (Han et al., 2009, 2012; Serrano et al., 2010). Our hypothesis is that EtOH exposure and FA protection relate to lipid and FA metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation. Methods On the morning of conception, pregnant C57BL/6J mice were placed on either of two FA‐containing diets: a 3.3 mg health maintenance diet or a high FA diet of 10.5 mg/kg. Mice were injected a binge level of EtOH, HCy, or saline on embryonic day (E) 6.75, targeting gastrulation. On E15.5, cardiac and umbilical blood flow were examined by ultrasound. Embryonic cardiac tissues were processed for gene expression of lipid and FA metabolism; the placenta and heart tissues for neutral lipid droplets, or for medium chain acyl‐dehydrogenase (MCAD) protein. Results EtOH exposure altered lipid‐related gene expression on E7.5 in comparison to control or FA‐supplemented groups and remained altered on E15.5 similarly to changes with HCy, signifying FA deficiency. In comparison to control tissues, the lipid‐related acyl CoA dehydrogenase medium length chain gene and its protein MCAD were altered with EtOH exposure, as were neutral lipid droplet localization in the heart and placenta. Conclusion EtOH altered gene expression associated with lipid and folate metabolism, as well as neutral lipids, in the E15.5 abnormally functioning heart and placenta. In comparison to controls, the high FA diet protected the embryo and placenta from these effects allowing normal development. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:749–760, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296863

  3. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A.; Avdalovic, M.V.; Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A.; Hyde, D.M.

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  4. Alterations in transcription clusters underlie development of bladder cancer along papillary and nonpapillary pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jai-Hyun; Tuziak, Tomasz; Hu, Limei; Wang, Zhi; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Kim, Misook; Fuller, Gregory; Dinney, Colin; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Baggerly, Keith; Zhang, Wei; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2005-04-01

    Bladder cancer develops in the urothelial lining from intraurothelial preneoplasia via two pathways, papillary and nonpapillary, which correspond to nonaggressive and aggressive forms of the disease. Because these two forms of cancer may develop via distinct molecular events, we examined the gene expression patterns in the development of bladder cancer from preneoplasia along papillary and nonpapillary pathways. The expression profiles of 19 pairs of RNA samples from adjacent urothelium and tumors were analyzed using cDNA microarrays. For selected genes their expressions were verified on a cohort of 251 bladder cancer patients using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry and were related to clinicopathological parameters including follow-up data. We identified alterations in seven gene clusters controlling proliferation, differentiation, and programmed cell death that were common for papillary and nonpapillary cancer. In contrast, genes controlling cellular and stromal interactions were altered in the nonpapillary cancer. The expression levels of only two genes from this group could be used to define an aggressive form of the disease. Tumors characterized by the low expression of e-cadherin and the high expression of DNA alpha-topoisomerase II had a high propensity for distant metastasis and were associated with poor survival.

  5. The role of developing breast cancer in alteration of serum lipid profile

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Kamal Eldin A.; Hassan, Ikhlas K.; Sadig, Isam A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The major aim of this study is to examine the role of alterations in lipid profile in women developing breast cancer. This study was carried out between May 2009 and December 2010. Background: The relationship between lipids and breast cancer is undistinguished. Until now, conflicting results have been reported on the association between lipids and risk of breast cancer development in women. Materials and Methods: Plasma lipids (i.e., total cholesterol [TC], high-density lipoprotein [HDL], low-density lipoprotein [LDL], and triglycerides [TG] were analyzed from 60 controls and 120 untreated breast cancer patients with clinical and histopathological evidence, under aseptic conditions. Venous blood was drawn from the cases and controls and estimations of lipid profile were done utilizing the standard procedures. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent sample t-test to compare the mean serum levels of lipid profile and TC/HDL ratio between patients and controls. Results: A significant rise in serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and ratio of total cholesterol: high density lipoprotein cholesterol values, whereas high density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol were not affected significantly by the breast cancer. Conclusions: The developing breast cancer might be considered as one of the factors in alterations in lipid profile levels. PMID:23626635

  6. Maternal caffeine exposure alters neuromotor development and hippocampus acetylcholinesterase activity in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Claudia; Souza, Andressa; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; De Oliveira, Carla; Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bonan, Carla D; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L S

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal caffeine intake on the neuromotor development of rat offspring and on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in the hippocampus of 14-day-old infant rats. Rat dams were treated with caffeine (0.3g/L) throughout gestation and lactation until the pups were 14 days old. The pups were divided into three groups: (1) control, (2) caffeine, and (3) washout caffeine. The washout group received a caffeine solution until the seventh postnatal day (P7). Righting reflex (RR) and negative geotaxis (NG) were assessed to evaluate postural parameters as an index of neuromotor reflexes. An open-field (OF) test was conducted to assess locomotor and exploratory activities as well as anxiety-like behaviors. Caffeine treatment increased both RR and NG latency times. In the OF test, the caffeine group had fewer outer crossings and reduced locomotion compared to control, while the washout group showed increased inner crossings in relation to the other groups and fewer rearings only in comparison to the control group. We found decreased AChE activity in the caffeine group compared to the other groups, with no alteration in AChE transcriptional regulation. Chronic maternal exposure to caffeine promotes important alterations in neuromotor development. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere with cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development.

  7. Does Instruction Alter the Naturalistic Pattern of Pragmatic Development? A Case of Request Speech Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko; Naganuma, Naeko; Budding, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of explicit instruction on the development of pragmatic competence in L2 English. The study is based on Taguchi's (2012) study conducted in an English-medium university in Japan, which revealed patterns of change in Japanese EFL students' production of requests in high- and low-imposition situations. Students showed…

  8. Development and assessment of indices to determine stream fish vulnerability to climate change and habitat alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sievert, Nicholas A.; Paukert, Craig P.; Tsang, Yin-Phan; Infante, Dana M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the future impacts of climate and land use change are critical for long-term biodiversity conservation. We developed and compared two indices to assess the vulnerability of stream fish in Missouri, USA based on species environmental tolerances, rarity, range size, dispersal ability and on the average connectivity of the streams occupied by each species. These two indices differed in how environmental tolerance was classified (i.e., vulnerability to habitat alteration, changes in stream temperature, and changes to flow regimes). Environmental tolerance was classified based on measured species responses to habitat alteration, and extremes in stream temperatures and flow conditions for one index, while environmental tolerance for the second index was based on species’ traits. The indices were compared to determine if vulnerability scores differed by index or state listing status. We also evaluated the spatial distribution of species classified as vulnerable to habitat alteration, changes in stream temperature, and change in flow regimes. Vulnerability scores were calculated for all 133 species with the trait association index, while only 101 species were evaluated using the species response index, because 32 species lacked data to analyze for a response. Scores from the trait association index were greater than the species response index. This is likely due to the species response index's inability to evaluate many rare species, which generally had high vulnerability scores for the trait association index. The indices were consistent in classifying vulnerability to habitat alteration, but varied in their classification of vulnerability due to increases in stream temperature and alterations to flow regimes, likely because extremes in current climate may not fully capture future conditions and their influence on stream fish communities. Both indices showed higher mean vulnerability scores for listed species than unlisted species, which provided a coarse

  9. Human-chimpanzee differences in a FZD8 enhancer alter cell-cycle dynamics in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Boyd, J Lomax; Skove, Stephanie L; Rouanet, Jeremy P; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Bepler, Tristan; Gordân, Raluca; Wray, Gregory A; Silver, Debra L

    2015-03-16

    The human neocortex differs from that of other great apes in several notable regards, including altered cell cycle, prolonged corticogenesis, and increased size [1-5]. Although these evolutionary changes most likely contributed to the origin of distinctively human cognitive faculties, their genetic basis remains almost entirely unknown. Highly conserved non-coding regions showing rapid sequence changes along the human lineage are candidate loci for the development and evolution of uniquely human traits. Several studies have identified human-accelerated enhancers [6-14], but none have linked an expression difference to a specific organismal trait. Here we report the discovery of a human-accelerated regulatory enhancer (HARE5) of FZD8, a receptor of the Wnt pathway implicated in brain development and size [15, 16]. Using transgenic mice, we demonstrate dramatic differences in human and chimpanzee HARE5 activity, with human HARE5 driving early and robust expression at the onset of corticogenesis. Similar to HARE5 activity, FZD8 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing neocortex [17-19]. Chromosome conformation capture assays reveal that HARE5 physically and specifically contacts the core Fzd8 promoter in the mouse embryonic neocortex. To assess the phenotypic consequences of HARE5 activity, we generated transgenic mice in which Fzd8 expression is under control of orthologous enhancers (Pt-HARE5::Fzd8 and Hs-HARE5::Fzd8). In comparison to Pt-HARE5::Fzd8, Hs-HARE5::Fzd8 mice showed marked acceleration of neural progenitor cell cycle and increased brain size. Changes in HARE5 function unique to humans thus alter the cell-cycle dynamics of a critical population of stem cells during corticogenesis and may underlie some distinctive anatomical features of the human brain.

  10. Alterations in zebrafish development induced by simvastatin: Comprehensive morphological and physiological study, focusing on muscle.

    PubMed

    Campos, Laise M; Rios, Eduardo A; Guapyassu, Livia; Midlej, Victor; Atella, Georgia C; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Benchimol, Marlene; Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel L

    2016-11-01

    The cholesterol synthesis inhibitor simvastatin, which is used to treat cardiovascular diseases, has severe collateral effects. We decided to comprehensively study the effects of simvastatin in zebrafish development and in myogenesis, because zebrafish has been used as a model to human diseases, due to its handling easiness, the optical clarity of its embryos, and the availability of physiological and structural methodologies. Furthermore, muscle is an important target of the drug. We used several simvastatin concentrations at different zebrafish developmental stages and studied survival rate, morphology, and physiology of the embryos. Our results show that high levels of simvastatin induce structural damage whereas low doses induce minor structural changes, impaired movements, and reduced heart beating. Morphological alterations include changes in embryo and somite size and septa shape. Physiological changes include movement reduction and slower heartbeat. These effects could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. Moreover, we quantified the total cell number during zebrafish development and demonstrated a large reduction in cell number after statin treatment. Since we could classify the alterations induced by simvastatin in three distinct phenotypes, we speculate that simvastatin acts through more than one mechanism and could affect both cell replication and/or cell death and muscle function. Our data can contribute to the understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the mechanisms of action of simvastatin.

  11. Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636 Alters Phytophthora infestans Growth and Late Blight Development.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher K; Arseneault, Tanya; Novinscak, Amy; Filion, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, one of the most devastating diseases affecting potato production. Alternative approaches for controlling late blight are being increasingly sought due to increasing environmental concerns over the use of chemical pesticides and the increasing resistance of P. infestans to fungicides. Our research group has isolated a new strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens (LBUM636) of biocontrol interest producing the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). Wild-type LBUM636 was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of Phytophthora infestans in in vitro confrontational assays whereas its isogenic mutant (phzC-; not producing PCA) only slightly altered the pathogen's growth. Wild-type LBUM636 but not the phzC- mutant also completely repressed disease symptom development on tubers. A pot experiment revealed that wild-type LBUM636 can significantly reduce P. infestans populations in the rhizosphere and in the roots of potato plants, as well as reduce in planta disease symptoms due to PCA production. The expression of eight common plant defense-related genes (ChtA, PR-1b, PR-2, PR-5, LOX, PIN2, PAL-2, and ERF3) was quantified in tubers, roots, and leaves by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and revealed that the biocontrol observed was not associated with the induction of a plant defense response by LBUM636. Instead, a direct interaction between P. infestans and LBUM636 is required and PCA production appears to be a key factor for LBUM636's biocontrol ability.

  12. Gene expression in developing fibres of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) was massively altered by domestication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding the evolutionary genetics of modern crop phenotypes has a dual relevance to evolutionary biology and crop improvement. Modern upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) was developed following thousands of years of artificial selection from a wild form, G. hirsutum var. yucatanense, which bears a shorter, sparser, layer of single-celled, ovular trichomes ('fibre'). In order to gain an insight into the nature of the developmental genetic transformations that accompanied domestication and crop improvement, we studied the transcriptomes of cotton fibres from wild and domesticated accessions over a developmental time course. Results Fibre cells were harvested between 2 and 25 days post-anthesis and encompassed the primary and secondary wall synthesis stages. Using amplified messenger RNA and a custom microarray platform designed to interrogate expression for 40,430 genes, we determined global patterns of expression during fibre development. The fibre transcriptome of domesticated cotton is far more dynamic than that of wild cotton, with over twice as many genes being differentially expressed during development (12,626 versus 5273). Remarkably, a total of 9465 genes were diagnosed as differentially expressed between wild and domesticated fibres when summed across five key developmental time points. Human selection during the initial domestication and subsequent crop improvement has resulted in a biased upregulation of components of the transcriptional network that are important for agronomically advanced fibre, especially in the early stages of development. About 15% of the differentially expressed genes in wild versus domesticated cotton fibre have no homology to the genes in databases. Conclusions We show that artificial selection during crop domestication can radically alter the transcriptional developmental network of even a single-celled structure, affecting nearly a quarter of the genes in the genome. Gene expression during fibre development

  13. Metabolomics using GC-TOF-MS followed by subsequent GC-FID and HILIC-MS/MS analysis revealed significantly altered fatty acid and phospholipid species profiles in plasma of smokers.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel C; Degen, Christian; Scherer, Gerhard; Jahreis, Gerhard; Niessner, Reinhard; Scherer, Max

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is an ideal tool for investigations of the metabolome in human plasma. To investigate the impact of smoking on the human metabolome, we performed an untargeted metabolic fingerprinting using GC-TOF-MS with EDTA-plasma samples from 25 smokers and 25 non-smokers. The observed elevated levels in the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in smokers were verified by a targeted analysis using GC-FID, which revealed also significantly alterations in saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids in smokers (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). Since the main fraction of fatty acids in plasma is esterified to phospholipids, we analyzed phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) species composition in the plasma samples of the same subjects. The profiles of 39 PC and 40 PE species were analyzed with a newly developed and validated HILIC-ESI-MS/MS method. We were able to baseline separate the two lipid classes (PC from PE) by maintaining co-elution of individual lipid species of each class. The method shows a linear range from 0.5μM to 2000μM and an inter- and intraday coefficient of variation (CV)<20% across all analytes. Application of the validated method to the plasma samples of smokers and non-smokers, derived from a diet-controlled smoking study, revealed significantly elevated levels of PC and PE species containing MUFAs in smokers. In summary, we could demonstrate that there is a significantly altered total fatty acid profile, with increased MUFAs, in the plasma of smokers compared to non-smokers. Results obtained with the new HILIC-MS/MS method indicate that the altered fatty acid profile is also reflected in the PC and PE profile of smokers.

  14. Role of Altered Structure and Function of NMDA Receptors in Development of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, József; Kolok, Sándor; Boros, András; Dezső, Péter

    2005-01-01

    Long-term alcohol exposure gives rise to development of physical dependence on alcohol in consequence of changes in certain neurotransmitter functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system, especially the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptors is a particularly important site of ethanol’s action, since ethanol is a potent inhibitor of the NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and prolonged ethanol exposition leads to a compensatory “upregulation” of NMDAR mediated functions supposedly contributing to the occurrence of ethanol tolerance, dependence as well as the acute and delayed signs of ethanol withdrawal. Recently, expression of different types of NMDAR subunits was found altered after long-term ethanol exposure. Especially, the expression of the NR2B and certain splice variant forms of the NR1 subunits were increased in primary neuronal cultures treated intermittently with ethanol. Since NMDA ion channels with such an altered subunit composition have increased permeability for calcium ions, increased agonist sensitivity, and relatively slow closing kinetics, the abovementioned alterations may underlie the enhanced NMDAR activation observed after long-term ethanol exposure. In accordance with these changes, the inhibitory potential of NR2B subunit-selective NMDAR antagonists is also increased, demonstrating excellent potency against alcohol withdrawal-induced in vitro cytotoxicity. Although in vivo data are few with these compounds, according to the effectiveness of the classic NMDAR antagonists in attenuation, not only the physical symptoms, but also some affective and motivational components of alcohol withdrawal, novel NR2B subunit selective NMDAR antagonists may offer a preferable alternative in the pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence. PMID:18369402

  15. A fully validated GC-TOF-MS method for the quantification of fatty acids revealed alterations in the metabolic profile of fatty acids after smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard; Pluym, Nikola; Scherer, Gerhard; Scherer, Max

    2017-01-15

    We developed and validated an efficient and robust method for the simultaneous quantification of 44 fatty acid species in human plasma via GC-TOF-MS. The method is characterized by its robustness, accuracy and precision covering a wide range of fatty acid species with various saturation degrees including short chain fatty acids (beginning with FA 4:0) and long chain fatty acids (up to FA 32:0). The fatty acids were methylated prior to analyses and subsequently detected as fatty acid methyl esters by means of GC-TOF-MS. A highly substituted polar column allowed the separation of geometrical and positional isomers of fatty acid species. The method was applied to plasma samples of a strictly diet controlled clinical smoking cessation study including 39 smokers followed over the course of three months after having quit. Statistical significant alterations within the fatty acid profile were observed when comparing the baseline (subjects still smoking) with one week, one month and three months of smoking cessation. After 3 months of smoking cessation, a partial recovery of alterations in the fatty acid profile evoked by smoking was observed. In conclusion, the developed fatty acid profiling method using GC-TOF-MS has proven as a reliable tool for the quantitative determination of 44 individual fatty acid species within clinical studies.

  16. Lymph node biopsy analysis reveals an altered immunoregulatory balance already during the at‐risk phase of autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H.; Hähnlein, Janine; Maijer, Karen I.; van Boven, Leonard J.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    The balance between proinflammatory and regulatory CD4+ T cells is tightly controlled in lymphoid organs. In autoimmune diseases this balance is altered in the periphery and target tissue of patients. However, not much is known about the balance initiated in lymphoid organs during the development of disease. Since systemic autoimmunity is present years before the clinical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is possible to study the immunoregulatory balance during the earliest (preclinical) phases of disease. Here, we report for the first time the frequency and phenotype of proinflammatory and regulatory CD4+ T cells in lymph node biopsies obtained from autoantibody positive individuals at risk for developing RA, patients with established disease and healthy controls. The frequency of proinflammatory LN Th1 cells was increased in RA patients compared with HCs, while the frequency of regulatory T cells was lower in LN biopsies of RA‐risk individuals. Upon in vitro stimulation LN CD4+ T cells produced lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, IFN‐γ and IL‐17A, in both RA‐risk individuals and early RA patients. This study shows that already during the earliest phases of systemic autoimmunity the immunoregulatory balance between proinflammatory and regulatory CD4+ T cells is altered in LN tissue. PMID:27645315

  17. Precocial rodents as new experimental model to study the effects of altered gravitational conditions on fetal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulić, Slobodan; Božić, Ksenija; Bozić, Aleksandar; Borota, Jelena; Ćulić, Milka

    2006-09-01

    So far the experiments in altered gravitational conditions on the prenatal development have used altricial rodent species. The aim of this study is to explore the differences in the intrauterine development of locomotor system in precocial (guinea pig, spiny mouse) and altricial (rat, mouse, and golden hamster) rodent species and to determine which of these mammalian groups represent a better study model to conduct research on the influence of altered gravitational conditions on human fetal development. Findings suggest that the influence of altered gravitational conditions on development of locomotor system significantly vary according to the maturity of mammals. By the characteristics of maturity at birth precocial rodents are more similar to a human than altricial species. Since precocial species have similar maturity of locomotor system to human, the changes caused by altered gravity among them should be similar as opposed to altricial species.

  18. Rhyolite genesis at the Picabo Volcanic Center of the Snake River Plain: Progressive recycling of hydrothermally altered rhyolites revealed by high resolution analysis of individual zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, D.; Bindeman, I. N.; Watts, K. E.; Schmitt, A. K.; McCurry, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Picabo eruptive center of the Snake River Plain (SRP) produced a series of normal and low δ18O rhyolites from 10.44 Ma to 6.62 Ma, providing the first evidence of progressive recycling of hydrothermally altered rhyolites during the formation of a caldera complex. In this study we present a characterization of ignimbrites and associated lavas based on U-Pb ages and δ18O compositions of individual zircon cores measured by ion microprobe, phenocryst δ18O values measured by laser fluorination, whole rock 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd compositions, and whole rock geochemistry. Our data define rhyolite genesis at the Picabo volcanic center through time and have implications for the transition between volcanic centers. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44 ± 0.27 Ma Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned unit with a normal δ18Omelt value (8.15‰), very high 87Sr/86Sr (up to 0.734430) and very low ɛNd (-18). Eruptions continued with the ~9.1 Ma Two-and-a-Half-Mile Rhyolite (Kellogg et al., 1988), a unit significant in that it has an even lower ɛNd than the TAV and a normal δ18Omelt value (8.10‰). This low ɛNd of -23, of the Two-and-a-Half-Mile Rhyolite, reveals that greater than 40% of Archean crust was assimilated. These normal δ18O eruptions were followed by a series of lower δ18O eruptions distinguishable by Sr and Nd isotopes and whole rock chemistry. The 8.25 ± 0.26 Ma Rhyolite of West Pocatello has the lowest δ18Omelt value (3.34‰) of these eruptions, and based on nearly identical age, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, and whole rock chemistry, we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff (present in the INEL drillcore). Along with a distinct decrease in δ18O, from the TAV to the Rhyolite of West Pocatello, there is a corresponding increase in δ18Ozircon heterogeneity from the TAV (1‰ variation) to the low δ18O units with the greatest δ18Ozircon diversity (up to 5‰). Although morphological evidence for

  19. Embryonic critical windows: changes in incubation temperature alter survival, hatchling phenotype, and cost of development in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Eme, John; Manzon, Richard G; Somers, Christopher M; Boreham, Douglas R; Wilson, Joanna Y

    2015-04-01

    The timing, success and energetics of fish embryonic development are strongly influenced by temperature. However, it is unclear if there are developmental periods, or critical windows, when oxygen use, survival and hatchling phenotypic characteristics are particularly influenced by changes in the thermal environment. Therefore, we examined the effects of constant incubation temperature and thermal shifts on survival, hatchling phenotype, and cost of development in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) embryos. We incubated whitefish embryos at control temperatures of 2, 5, or 8 °C, and shifted embryos across these three temperatures at the end of gastrulation or organogenesis. We assessed hatch timing, mass at hatch, and yolk conversion efficiency (YCE). We determined cost of development, the amount of oxygen required to build a unit of mass, for the periods from fertilization-organogenesis, organogenesis-fin flutter, fin flutter-hatch, and for total development. An increase in incubation temperature decreased time to 50 % hatch (164 days at 2 °C, 104 days at 5 °C, and 63 days at 8 °C), survival decreased from 55 % at 2 °C, to 38 % at 5 °C, and 17 % at 8 °C, and hatchling yolk-free dry mass decreased from 1.27 mg at 2 °C to 0.61 mg at 8 °C. Thermal shifts altered time to 50 % hatch and hatchling yolk-free dry mass and revealed a critical window during gastrulation in which a temperature change reduced survival. YCE decreased and cost of development increased with increased incubation temperature, but embryos that hatched at 8 °C and were incubated at colder temperatures during fertilization-organogenesis had reduced cost. The relationship between cost of development and temperature was altered during fin flutter-hatch, indicating it may be a critical window during which temperature has the greatest impact on energetic processes. The increase in cost of development with an increase in temperature has not been documented in other fishes and suggests

  20. Optical Cryoimaging Reveals a Heterogeneous Distribution of Mitochondrial Redox State in ex vivo Guinea Pig Hearts and Its Alteration During Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Mohammad Masoudi; Salehpour, Fahimeh; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Heisner, James S.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of substrates to generate ATP in mitochondria is mediated by redox reactions of NADH and FADH2. Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We hypothesize that IR alters the metabolic heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state of the heart that is only evident in the 3-D optical cryoimaging of the perfused heart before, during, and after IR. The study involved four groups of hearts: time control (TC: heart perfusion without IR), global ischemia (Isch), global ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) and TC with PCP (a mitochondrial uncoupler) perfusion. Mitochondrial NADH and FAD autofluorescence signals were recorded spectrofluorometrically online in guinea pig ex vivo-perfused hearts in the Langendorff mode. At the end of each specified protocol, hearts were rapidly removed and snap frozen in liquid N2 for later 3-D optical cryoimaging of the mitochondrial NADH, FAD, and NADH/FAD redox ratio (RR). The TC hearts revealed a heterogeneous spatial distribution of NADH, FAD, and RR. Ischemia and IR altered the spatial distribution and caused an overall increase and decrease in the RR by 55% and 64%, respectively. Uncoupling with PCP resulted in the lowest level of the RR (73% oxidation) compared with TC. The 3-D optical cryoimaging of the heart provides novel insights into the heterogeneous distribution of mitochondrial NADH, FAD, RR, and metabolism from the base to the apex during ischemia and IR. This 3-D information of the mitochondrial redox state in the normal and ischemic heart was not apparent in the dynamic spectrofluorometric data. PMID:27574574

  1. Phytoestrogens alter the reproductive organ development in the mink (Mustela vison)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoekkynen, Ari . E-mail: ryokkyne@cc.joensuu.fi; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykoenen, Teija; Asikainen, Juha; Haenninen, Sari; Mononen, Jaakko; Kukkonen, Jussi V.K.

    2005-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reproductive effects of two perorally applied phytoestrogens, genistein (8 mg/kg/day) and {beta}-sitosterol (50 mg/kg/day), on the mink (Mustela vison) at human dietary exposure levels. Parental generations were exposed over 9 months to these phytoestrogens and their offspring were exposed via gestation and lactation. Parents and their offspring were sampled 21 days after the birth of the kits. Sex hormone levels, sperm quality, organ weights, and development of the kits were examined. The exposed females were heavier than the control females at the 1st postnatal day (PND). The control kits were heavier than the exposed kits from the 1st to the 21st PND. Phytoestrogens did not affect the organ weights of the adult minks, but the relative testicular weight of the exposed kits was higher than in the control kits. The relative prostate weight was higher and the relative uterine weight lower in the {beta}-sitosterol-exposed kits than in the control kits. Moreover, the plasma dihydrotestosterone levels were lower in the genistein-exposed male kits compared to the control male kits. This study could not explain the mechanisms behind these alterations. The results indicate that perinatal phytoestrogen exposures cause alterations in the weight of the reproductive organs of the mink kits.

  2. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE ALTERS GENE EXPRESSION IN THE DEVELOPING MURINE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horn, Kristin H.; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of passive smoke exposures on the developing brain. Objective The purpose of the current study was to identify changes in gene expression in the murine hippocampus as a consequence of in utero exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke (an experimental equivalent of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS)) at exposure levels that do not result in fetal growth inhibition. Methods A whole body smoke inhalation exposure system was utilized to deliver ETS to pregnant C57BL/6J mice for six hours/day from gestational days 6–17 (gd 6–17) [for microarray] or gd 6–18.5 [for fetal phenotyping]. Results There were no significant effects of ETS exposure on fetal phenotype. However, 61 “expressed” genes in the gd 18.5 fetal hippocampus were differentially regulated (up- or down-regulated by 1.5 fold or greater) by maternal exposure to ETS. Of these 61 genes, 25 genes were upregulated while 36 genes were downregulated. A systems biology approach, including computational methodologies, identified cellular response pathways, and biological themes, underlying altered fetal programming of the embryonic hippocampus by in utero cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions Results from the present study suggest that even in the absence of effects on fetal growth, prenatal smoke exposure can alter gene expression during the “early” period of hippocampal growth and may result in abnormal hippocampal morphology, connectivity, and function. PMID:19969065

  3. Encapsulation altered starch digestion: toward developing starch-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2014-01-30

    Starch is an abundant biomaterial that forms a vital energy source for humans. Altering its digestion, e.g. increasing the proportions of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS), would revolutionize starch utility in addressing a number of health issues related to glucose absorption, glycemic index and colon health. The research reported in this article is based on my hypothesis that water channels present in the B-type starch crystalline matrix, particularly in tuber starches, can embed guest molecules such as nutraceuticals, drugs, flavor compounds and vitamins leading to altered starch digestion. Toward this goal, potato starch has been chosen as the model tuber starch, and ibuprofen, benzocaine, sulfapyridine, curcumin, thymol and ascorbic acid as model guest molecules. X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR analyses clearly suggest the incorporation of guest molecules in the water channels of potato starch. Furthermore, the in vitro digestion profiles of complexes are intriguing with major variations occurring after 60 min of starch digestion and finally at 120 min. These changes are concomitantly reflected in the SDS and RS amounts, with about 24% decrease in SDS for benzocaine complex and 6% increase in RS for ibuprofen complex, attesting the ability of guest molecule encapsulation in modulating the digestion properties of potato starch. Overall, this research provides an elegant opportunity for the design and development of novel starch-based stable carriers that not only bestow tailored glucose release rates but could also transport health promoting and disease preventing compounds.

  4. Maternal perinatal undernutrition alters postnatal development of chromaffin cells in the male rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Laborie, Christine; Scarpa, Maria Cristina; Montel, Valérie; Vieau, Didier; Breton, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Numerous data suggest that the development of the sympathoadrenal system is highly sensitive to the perinatal environment. We previously reported that maternal perinatal food restriction by 50% (FR50) altered chromaffin cell (CC) organization and activity in offspring at weaning. This study investigated the effects of FR50 on the postnatal time course of CC functional and structural adaptations. FR50 pups exhibited smaller and more abundant scattered clusters of noradrenergic CCs as early as postnatal day 7 (P7), indicating that morphological changes took place earlier during development. At birth, the adrenaline release was defective in FR50 pups, suggesting that maternal FR50 impaired the non-neurogenic control of catecholamine release. At P4, the catecholamine release in response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia was also absent in FR50 pups. This was associated with the reduction of adrenal catecholamine contents, indicating that the failure to synthesize catecholamine might lead to impaired secretion. We hypothesized that maternal FR50 accelerated the functional connections between CCs and splanchnic nerve endings, leading to the premature loss of the non-neurogenic response. Acetylcholine-containing synaptic endings seemed more precociously functional in FR50 pups, as suggested by increased levels of acetylcholine esterase activity at P14. At P7, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia caused preferential adrenaline release associated with increased catecholamine contents in both groups. However, the response was accentuated in FR50 pups. At P14, the insulin challenge increased plasma levels of adrenaline in control rats, whereas it markedly enhanced the circulating level of both catecholamines in FR50 pups. We demonstrated that maternal FR50 leads to developmentally impaired noradrenergic CC aggregation and advanced splanchnic neurotransmission maturation associated with altered medulla activity in response to metabolic stress. This might contribute to the long

  5. Metabolic alterations in developing brain after injury – knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.; Scafidi, Susanna; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is a highly orchestrated complex process. The developing brain utilizes many substrates including glucose, ketone bodies, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids for energy, cell division and the biosynthesis of nucleotides, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is crucial to provide energy for all cellular processes required for brain development and function including ATP formation, synaptogenesis, synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters, maintaining ionic gradients and redox status, and myelination. The rapidly growing population of infants and children with neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments and life-long disability resulting from developmental brain injury is a significant public health concern. Brain injury in infants and children can have devastating effects because the injury is superimposed on the high metabolic demands of the developing brain. Acute injury in the pediatric brain can derail, halt or lead to dysregulation of the complex and highly regulated normal developmental processes. This paper provides a brief review of metabolism in developing brain and alterations found clinically and in animal models of developmental brain injury. The metabolic changes observed in three major categories of injury that can result in life-long cognitive and neurological disabilities, including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, pediatric traumatic brain injury, and brain injury secondary to prematurity are reviewed. PMID:26148530

  6. High-fat diet alters the dopamine and opioid systems: effects across development

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, T M

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet has been linked to obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Less well appreciated are adverse effects on the brain and behavior. Recent research has shown that consumption of a high-fat diet can alter gene expression within the brain, and the dopamine and opioid neurotransmitter systems appear to be vulnerable to dysregulation. This review will focus on recent reports in both humans and animal models that describe adverse effects of high-fat diet consumption on the central reward circuitry. In addition, the importance of different development windows will be discussed, with effects observed in both the prenatal/perinatal time period and with chronic high-fat diet consumption in adulthood. PMID:27152150

  7. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  8. Overexpression of SlREV alters the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone and fruit formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guojian; Fan, Jing; Xian, Zhiqiang; Huang, Wei; Lin, Dongbo; Li, Zhengguo

    2014-12-01

    Versatile roles of REVOLUTA (REV), a Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) transcription factor, have been depicted mainly in Arabidopsis and Populus. In this study, we investigated the functions of its tomato homolog, namely SlREV. Overexpression of a microRNA166-resistant version of SlREV (35S::REV(Ris)) not only resulted in vegetative abnormalities such as curly leaves and fasciated stems, but also caused dramatic reproductive alterations including continuous production of flowers at the pedicel abscission zone (AZ) and ectopic fruit formation on receptacles. Microscopic analysis showed that meristem-like structures continuously emerged from the exodermises of the pedicel AZs and that ectopic carpels formed between the first and second whorl of floral buds in 35S::REV(Ris) plants. Transcriptional data suggest that SlREV may regulate genes related to meristem maintenance and cell differentiation in the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone, and modulate genes in homeodomain and MADS-box families and hormone pathways during fruit formation. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles of SlREV in tomato flower development and fruit formation.

  9. Analysis of gelsolin expression pattern in developing chicken embryo reveals high GSN expression level in tissues of neural crest origin.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Antonina Joanna; Morosan-Puopolo, Gabriela; Makowiecka, Aleksandra; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria; Nowak, Dorota; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Gelsolin is one of the most intensively studied actin-binding proteins. However, in the literature comprehensive studies of GSN expression during development have not been performed yet in all model organisms. In zebrafish, gelsolin is a dorsalizing factor that modulates bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathways, whereas knockout of the gelsolin coding gene, GSN is not lethal in murine model. To study the role of gelsolin in development of higher vertebrates, it is crucial to estimate GSN expression pattern during development. Here, we examined GSN expression in the developing chicken embryo. We applied numerous methods to track GSN expression in developing embryos at mRNA and protein level. We noted a characteristic GSN expression pattern. Although GSN transcripts were present in several cell types starting from early developmental stages, a relatively high GSN expression was observed in eye, brain vesicles, midbrain, neural tube, heart tube, and splanchnic mesoderm. In older embryos, we observed a high GSN expression in the cranial ganglia and dorsal root ganglia. A detailed analysis of 10-day-old chicken embryos revealed high amounts of gelsolin especially within the head region: in the olfactory and optic systems, meninges, nerves, muscles, presumptive pituitary gland, and pericytes, but not oligodendrocytes in the brain. Obtained results suggest that GSN is expressed at high levels in some tissues of ectodermal origin including all neural crest derivatives. Additionally, we describe that silencing of GSN expression in brain vesicles leads to altered morphology of the mesencephalon. This implies gelsolin is crucial for chicken brain development.

  10. Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex-Type Mutations Alter the Dynamics of the Keratin Cytoskeleton and Reveal a Contribution of Actin to the Transport of Keratin SubunitsD⃞V⃞

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Nicola Susann; Windoffer, Reinhard; Strnad, Pavel; Grund, Christine; Leube, Rudolf Eberhard; Magin, Thomas Michael

    2004-01-01

    Dominant keratin mutations cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex by transforming keratin (K) filaments into aggregates. As a first step toward understanding the properties of mutant keratins in vivo, we stably transfected epithelial cells with an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein-tagged K14R125C mutant. K14R125C became localized as aggregates in the cell periphery and incorporated into perinuclear keratin filaments. Unexpectedly, keratin aggregates were in dynamic equilibrium with soluble subunits at a half-life time of <15 min, whereas filaments were extremely static. Therefore, this dominant-negative mutation acts by altering cytoskeletal dynamics and solubility. Unlike previously postulated, the dominance of mutations is limited and strictly depends on the ratio of mutant to wild-type protein. In support, K14R125C-specific RNA interference experiments resulted in a rapid disintegration of aggregates and restored normal filaments. Most importantly, live cell inhibitor studies revealed that the granules are transported from the cell periphery inwards in an actin-, but not microtubule-based manner. The peripheral granule zone may define a region in which keratin precursors are incorporated into existing filaments. Collectively, our data have uncovered the transient nature of keratin aggregates in cells and offer a rationale for the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa simplex by using short interfering RNAs. PMID:14668478

  11. Analysis of transcription profile to reveal altered signaling pathways following the overexpression of human desumoylating isopeptidase 2 in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Yin; Kang, Yu-Huan; Shen, Cong-Cong; Wang, Rui-Xue; Yu, Lin; Li, Xin-Yue; Cui, Dan-Dan; Yang, Jin-Liang; Yao, Yu-Qin; Gou, Lan-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Human desumoylating isopeptidase 2 (DESI-2) is a member of the DESI family and contains a conserved PPPDE1 domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that DESI-2 overexpression may induce cell apoptosis. In the present study, differentially expressed genes were analyzed using a transcription microarray in DESI-2 overexpressing PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. A total of 45,033 genes were examined by microarray, which identified 1,766 upregulated and 1,643 downregulated genes. A series of altered signaling pathways were analyzed, in which certain essential signaling factors, including retinoid X receptor (RXR), BH3 interacting-domain death agonist, Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and Rho-associated protein kinase, were further investigated at the protein level. The release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3 were also detected by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry further revealed the expression features of RXR and RhoA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues with various DESI-2 expression levels. The results serve as a valuable reference for the further elucidation of the functions of DESI-2 in pancreatic cancer. PMID:28105175

  12. Sperm DNA methylation analysis in swine reveals conserved and species-specific methylation patterns and highlights an altered methylation at the GNAS locus in infertile boars.

    PubMed

    Congras, Annabelle; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine; Pinton, Alain; Vignoles, Florence; Liaubet, Laurence; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Acloque, Hervé

    2014-12-01

    Male infertility is an increasing health issue in today's society for both human and livestock populations. In livestock, male infertility slows the improvement of animal selection programs and agricultural productivity. There is increasing evidence that epigenetic marks play an important role in the production of good-quality sperm. We therefore screened for specific or common epigenetic signatures of livestock infertility. To do so, we compared DNA methylation level in sperm DNA from fertile and infertile boars. We evaluated first the global level of sperm DNA methylation and found no difference between the two groups of boars. We then selected 42 loci of interest, most of them known to be imprinted in human or mice, and assessed the imprinting status of five of them not previously described in swine tissues: WT1, CNTN3, IMPACT, QPCT, and GRB10. DNA methylation level was then quantified in fertile and infertile boars at these 42 loci. Results from fertile boars indicated that the methylation level of the selected loci is highly conserved between pig, human, and mice, with a few exceptions, including the POU5F1 (OCT4) promoter and RTL1. Comparison between fertile and infertile boars revealed that one imprinted region, the GNAS locus, shows an increase in sperm DNA methylation in three out of eight infertile boars with low semen quality. This increase in DNA methylation is associated with an altered expression of the genes belonging to the GNAS locus, suggesting a new role for GNAS in the proper formation of functional gametes.

  13. Ion-Current-Based Temporal Proteomic Profiling of Influenza-A-Virus-Infected Mouse Lungs Revealed Underlying Mechanisms of Altered Integrity of the Lung Microvascular Barrier.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shichen; Li, Jun; Hilchey, Shannon; Shen, Xiaomeng; Tu, Chengjian; Qiu, Xing; Ng, Andrew; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Wu, Hulin; Zand, Martin S; Qu, Jun

    2016-02-05

    Investigation of influenza-A-virus (IAV)-infected lung proteomes will greatly promote our understanding on the virus-host crosstalk. Using a detergent-cocktail extraction and digestion procedure and a reproducible ion-current-based method, we performed the first comprehensive temporal analysis of mouse IAV infection. Mouse lung tissues at three time points post-inoculation were compared with controls (n = 4/group), and >1600 proteins were quantified without missing value in any animal. Significantly changed proteins were identified at 4 days (n = 144), 7 days (n = 695), and 10 days (n = 396) after infection, with low false altered protein rates (1.73-8.39%). Functional annotation revealed several key biological processes involved in the systemic host responses. Intriguingly, decreased levels of several cell junction proteins as well as increased levels of tissue metalloproteinase MMP9 were observed, reflecting the IAV-induced structural breakdown of lung epithelial barrier. Supporting evidence of MMP9 activation came from immunoassays examining the abundance and phosphorylation states of all MAPKs and several relevant molecules. Importantly, IAV-induced MMP gelatinase expression was suggested to be specific to MMP9, and p38 MAPK may contribute predominantly to MMP9 elevation. These findings help to resolve the long-lasting debate regarding the signaling pathways of IAV-induced MMP9 expression and shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying pulmonary capillary-alveolar leak syndrome that can occur during influenza infection.

  14. Constitutive expression of the Poplar FD-like basic leucine zipper transcription factor alters growth and bud development.

    PubMed

    Parmentier-Line, Cécile M; Coleman, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    In poplar, the CO/FT regulatory module mediates seasonal growth cessation. Although FT interacts with the basic leucine zipper transcription factor FD, surprisingly little is known about the possible role of FD in bud development and growth cessation in trees. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of the poplar FD homolog, PtFD1, during short-day (SD)-induced bud development, and the consequences of overexpressing PtFD1 on bud development and shoot growth. PtFD1 was primarily expressed in apical and axillary buds and exhibited a transient increase in expression during the initial stages of SD-induced bud development. This transient increase declined with continued SD treatment. When PtFD1 was overexpressed in poplar, SD-induced growth cessation and bud formation were abolished. PTFD1 overexpression also resulted in precocious flowering of juvenile plants in long-day (LD) photoperiods. Because the phenotypes associated with overexpression of PtFD1 are similar to those observe when poplar FT1 is overexpressed (Science, 312, 2006, 1040), the expression and diurnal patterns of expression of both poplar FT1 and FT2 were characterized in PtFD1 overexpression poplars and found to be altered. DNA microarray analysis revealed few differences in gene expression between PtFD1 overexpressing poplars in LD conditions while extensive levels of differential gene expression occur in SD-treated plants. These results enforce the connection between the regulation of flowering and the regulation of growth cessation and bud development in poplar.

  15. In vivo tungsten exposure alters B-cell development and increases DNA damage in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Alexander D R; Lemaire, Maryse; Young, Yoon Kow; Eustache, Jules H; Guilbert, Cynthia; Molina, Manuel Flores; Mann, Koren K

    2013-02-01

    High environmental tungsten levels were identified near the site of a childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster; however, a causal link between tungsten and leukemogenesis has not been established. The major site of tungsten deposition is bone, the site of B-cell development. In addition, our in vitro data suggest that developing B lymphocytes are susceptible to tungsten-induced DNA damage and growth inhibition. To extend these results, we assessed whether tungsten exposure altered B-cell development and induced DNA damage in vivo. Wild-type mice were exposed to tungsten in their drinking water for up to 16 weeks. Tungsten concentration in bone was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and correlated with B-cell development and DNA damage within the bone marrow. Tungsten exposure resulted in a rapid deposition within the bone following 1 week, and tungsten continued to accumulate thereafter albeit at a decreased rate. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a transient increase in mature IgD(+) B cells in the first 8 weeks of treatment, in animals of the highest and intermediate exposure groups. Following 16 weeks of exposure, all tungsten groups had a significantly greater percentage of cells in the late pro-/large pre-B developmental stages. DNA damage was increased in both whole marrow and isolated B cells, most notably at the lowest tungsten concentration tested. These findings confirm an immunological effect of tungsten exposure and suggest that tungsten could act as a tumor promoter, providing leukemic "hits" in multiple forms to developing B lymphocytes within the bone marrow.

  16. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities

    PubMed Central

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents’ lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2+/−) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2+/− mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2+/− mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a and p19Arf or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2+/− mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation. PMID:17272307

  17. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents' lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2(+/-)) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2(+/-) mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2(+/-) mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15(Ink4b), p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2(+/-) mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation.

  18. Methamphetamine exposure during brain development alters the brain acetylcholine system in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jessica A; Park, Byung S; Raber, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Children exposed to methamphetamine during brain development as a result of maternal drug use have long-term hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairments, but the mechanisms underlying these impairments are not understood. The acetylcholine system plays an important role in cognitive function and potential methamphetamine-induced acetylcholine alterations may be related to methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairments. In this study, we investigated the potential long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development on the acetylcholine system in adolescence mice on postnatal day 30 and in adult mice on postnatal day 90. Methamphetamine exposure increased the density of acetylcholine neurons in regions of the basal forebrain and the area occupied by acetylcholine axons in the hippocampus in adolescent female mice. In contrast, methamphetamine exposure did not affect the density of GABA cells or total neurons in the basal forebrain. Methamphetamine exposure also increased the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus of adolescent male and female mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development affects the acetylcholine system in adolescent mice and that these changes are more profound in females than males.

  19. DWARF overexpression induces alteration in phytohormone homeostasis, development, architecture and carotenoid accumulation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xie; Yin, Ling-Ling; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Xu, Chang-Jie; Chen, Kun-Song; Liu, Chao-Chao; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2016-03-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play a critical role in plant growth, development and stress response; however, genetic evidence for the BR-mediated integrated regulation of plant growth still remains elusive in crop species. Here, we clarified the function of DWARF (DWF), the key BR biosynthetic gene in tomato, in the regulation of plant growth and architecture, phytohormone homeostasis and fruit development by comparing wild type, d^(im), a weak allele mutant impaired in DWF, and DWF-overexpressing plants in tomato. Results showed that increases in DWF transcripts and endogenous BR level resulted in improved germination, lateral root development, CO2 assimilation and eventually plant growth as characterized by slender and compact plant architecture. However, an increase in DWF transcript down-regulated the accumulation of gibberellin, which was associated with decreases in leaf size and thickness. BRs positively regulated lateral bud outgrowth, which was associated with decreased transcript of Aux/IAA3, and the ethylene-dependent petiole bending and fruit ripening. Notably, overexpression of DWF did not significantly alter fruit yield per plant; however, increases by 57.4% and 95.3% might be estimated in fruit yield per square metre in two transgenic lines due to their compact architecture. Significantly, BR level was positively related with the carotenoid accumulation in the fruits. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BRs are actively involved in the regulation of multiple developmental processes relating to agronomical important traits.

  20. Alterations in the Anandamide Metabolism in the Development of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Natalia; Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (EC), particularly anandamide (AEA), released constitutively in pain pathways might be accountable for the inhibitory effect on nociceptors. Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain may reflect complex remodeling of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord EC system. Multiple pathways involved both in the biosynthesis and degradation of AEA have been suggested. We investigated the local synthesis and degradation features of AEA in DRGs and spinal cord during the development and maintenance of pain in a model of chronic constriction injury (CCI). All AEA synthesis and degradation enzymes are present on the mRNA level in DRGs and lumbar spinal cord of intact as well as CCI-treated animals. Deregulation of EC system components was consistent with development of pain phenotype at days 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. The expression levels of enzymes involved in AEA degradation was significantly upregulated ipsilateral in DRGs and spinal cord at different time points. Expression of enzymes of the alternative, sPLA2-dependent and PLC-dependent, AEA synthesis pathways was elevated in both of the analyzed structures at all time points. Our data have shown an alteration of alternative AEA synthesis and degradation pathways, which might contribute to the variation of AEA levels and neuropathic pain development. PMID:25276812

  1. Absence of chemopreventive influence of propolis on the rat liver altered foci development.

    PubMed

    Said, Roueda Abou; Grassi, Tony Fernando; Scolastici, Clarissa; Alves de Lima, Rodrigo Otávio; Darros, Bruno R; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; de Camargo, João Lauro V

    2010-07-01

    Propolis (bee glue) is a complex mixture of natural substances that exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities. As the possibility exists that it may exert a chemopreventive role against cancer development, the present study aimed to evaluate the chemopreventive influence of a Brazilian aqueous propolis extract (APE) in a rat two-stage (initiation-promotion) medium-term bioassay for chemical liver carcinogenesis. Male Wistar rats were sequentially initiated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 200mg/kgb.w.) and, 2 weeks later, exposed to a diet containing hexachlorobenzene (HCB, 100ppm) and to APE 0.1% through drinking water for 6 weeks. Appropriate control groups were also established. The animals were sacrificed at the weeks 8th and 30th when liver samples were processed to evaluate the development of altered hepatocyte foci (AHF) identified under hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and by the immunohistochemical expression of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P). The results indicate that APE 0.1% did not protect against the development of any of the differentially identified putative preneoplastic foci in DEN-initiated animals, exposed or not to the promoting agent HCB. Also, APE 0.1% by itself did not significantly induce any AHF, what is in line with its already known absence of genotoxic potential. Our results indicate that an aqueous extract of Brazilian propolis did not exert chemoprevention on the hepatocarcinogenesis process chemically induced in the rat.

  2. Reduction of the Cytosolic Phosphoglucomutase in Arabidopsis Reveals Impact on Plant Growth, Seed and Root Development, and Carbohydrate Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Malinova, Irina; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Alseekh, Saleh; Herbst, Karoline; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Gierth, Markus; Fettke, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoglucomutase (PGM) catalyses the interconversion of glucose 1-phosphate (G1P) and glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and exists as plastidial (pPGM) and cytosolic (cPGM) isoforms. The plastidial isoform is essential for transitory starch synthesis in chloroplasts of leaves, whereas the cytosolic counterpart is essential for glucose phosphate partitioning and, therefore, for syntheses of sucrose and cell wall components. In Arabidopsis two cytosolic isoforms (PGM2 and PGM3) exist. Both PGM2 and PGM3 are redundant in function as single mutants reveal only small or no alterations compared to wild type with respect to plant primary metabolism. So far, there are no reports of Arabidopsis plants lacking the entire cPGM or total PGM activity, respectively. Therefore, amiRNA transgenic plants were generated and used for analyses of various parameters such as growth, development, and starch metabolism. The lack of the entire cPGM activity resulted in a strongly reduced growth revealed by decreased rosette fresh weight, shorter roots, and reduced seed production compared to wild type. By contrast content of starch, sucrose, maltose and cell wall components were significantly increased. The lack of both cPGM and pPGM activities in Arabidopsis resulted in dwarf growth, prematurely die off, and inability to develop a functional inflorescence. The combined results are discussed in comparison to potato, the only described mutant with lack of total PGM activity. PMID:25401493

  3. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  4. Neonatal exposure to a glyphosate based herbicide alters the development of the rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Schimpf, Marlise; Milesi, María M; Ingaramo, Paola I; Luque, Enrique H; Varayoud, Jorgelina

    2017-02-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are extensively used to control weeds on both cropland and non-cropland areas. No reports are available regarding the effects of GBHs exposure on uterine development. We evaluated if neonatal exposure to a GBH affects uterine morphology, proliferation and expression of proteins that regulate uterine organogenetic differentiation in rats. Female Wistar pups received saline solution (control, C) or a commercial formulation of glyphosate (GBH, 2mg/kg) by sc injection every 48h from postnatal day (PND) 1 to PND7. Rats were sacrificed on PND8 (neonatal period) and PND21 (prepubertal period) to evaluate acute and short-term effects, respectively. The uterine morphology was evaluated in hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. The epithelial and stromal immunophenotypes were established by assessing the expression of luminal epithelial protein (cytokeratin 8; CK8), basal epithelial proteins (p63 and pan cytokeratin CK1, 5, 10 and 14); and vimentin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To investigate changes on proteins that regulate uterine organogenetic differentiation we evaluated the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), Hoxa10 and Wnt7a by IHC. The GBH-exposed uteri showed morphological changes, characterized by an increase in the incidence of luminal epithelial hyperplasia (LEH) and an increase in the stromal and myometrial thickness. The epithelial cells showed a positive immunostaining for CK8, while the stromal cells for vimentin. GBH treatment increased cell proliferation in the luminal and stromal compartment on PND8, without changes on PND21. GBH treatment also altered the expression of proteins involved in uterine organogenetic differentiation. PR and Hoxa10 were deregulated both immediately and two weeks after the exposure. ERα was induced in the stromal compartment on PND8, and was downregulated in the luminal epithelial cells of gyphosate-exposed animals on PND21. GBH treatment also increased

  5. Effect of Altered Gravity Environment on Tobacco Hornworm (Manduca Sexta) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1996-01-01

    Metamorphosis provides a unique condition for studying the role of gravity in development. Formation of new organs in a previously existing organism requires a highly active period of turnover of amino acids and proteins, and of changes in the endocrine profile. Furthermore, metamorphosis offers the advantage of studying a self-contained biological system. The tobacco hornworm provides a suitable species to study the effect of altered gravitational environment on invertebrate development. This species has been one of the most thoroughly investigated organisms in a variety of aspects of insect biology. M. sexta pharate adults can provide significant amounts of material with which to work, thus facilitating the study of metabolic aspects of adult development. During wandering, the period immediately following cessation of larval feeding, the larva burrows into the soil to form a pupation chamber. Despite burrowing down 25 to 30 cm, the insects reorient themselves to a slightly head-up (10 +/- 1 degree) position. Since light and temperature are not factors in this process, the larvae must sense the gravity vector. In our ground-based studies we had assessed whether developing adults might be sensitive to their gravitational environment by orienting pupae in a vertical head-up position within 24 to 48 h after pupal ecdysis. Our ground-based findings formed the foundation for determining which parameters would be evaluated in developing Manduca following spaceflight. Measurements were to include: (1) extent of development by all of the insects, (2) analysis of hemolymph obtained from half of the insects postflight for ecdysteroid, amino acid, urea, ammonia and trehalose concentrations, (3) further development of the other half of the insects to adult (moths), (4) analysis of the flight muscle protein content of the adults. Based on the first flight attempt in July, 1995, we modified the BRIC hardware to accommodate the insects. Our studies after BRIC-04 showed that

  6. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Shannon K; McManamay, Ryan A; Miller, Andrew D; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  7. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Shannon K.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  8. Advancing environmental flow science: Developing frameworks for altered landscapes and integrating efforts across disciplines.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, Shannon K.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  9. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    DOE PAGES

    Brewer, Shannon; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; ...

    2016-05-13

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a bettermore » understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.« less

  10. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Shannon; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-05-13

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  11. Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Parasites Exhibit Altered Patterns of Development in Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hott, Amanda; Casandra, Debora; Sparks, Kansas N.; Morton, Lindsay C.; Castanares, Geocel-Grace; Rutter, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin derivatives are used in combination with other antimalarial drugs for treatment of multidrug-resistant malaria worldwide. Clinical resistance to artemisinin recently emerged in southeast Asia, yet in vitro phenotypes for discerning mechanism(s) of resistance remain elusive. Here, we describe novel phenotypic resistance traits expressed by artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The resistant parasites exhibit altered patterns of development that result in reduced exposure to drug at the most susceptible stage of development in erythrocytes (trophozoites) and increased exposure in the most resistant stage (rings). In addition, a novel in vitro delayed clearance assay (DCA) that assesses drug effects on asexual stages was found to correlate with parasite clearance half-life in vivo as well as with mutations in the Kelch domain gene associated with resistance (Pf3D7_1343700). Importantly, all of the resistance phenotypes were stable in cloned parasites for more than 2 years without drug pressure. The results demonstrate artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum has evolved a novel mechanism of phenotypic resistance to artemisinin drugs linked to abnormal cell cycle regulation. These results offer insights into a novel mechanism of drug resistance in P. falciparum and new tools for monitoring the spread of artemisinin resistance. PMID:25779582

  12. Effects of high dietary sucrose on the development of enzyme-altered foci during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hei, T.K.; Sudilovsky, O.

    1985-01-01

    Dietary factors may influence initiation, promotion or progression of tumors. To examine whether a high sucrose diet has any effect on the development of enzyme-altered foci (EAF) during promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis, one day old Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single i.p. dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Controls received an equivalent i.p. volume of saline. After weaning at 21 days, rats were fed modified AIN-76 diets containing either 65% glucose (HGD) or sucrose (HSD), with or without 0.05% phenobarbital (PB). Four weeks later females on HSD, but not males, had significantly heavier livers than those of HGD. Female rats fed HSD developed twice as many ..gamma..-glutamyl transpeptidase positive foci/cm/sup 2/ of liver sections than animals on HGD. Addition of PB increased the number of foci in the HGD group five-fold and, in the HSD group, three-fold. No significant difference was found between the number of foci in animals on either of the two PB-supplemented diets. Results in males were similar, although differences between treatments were smaller. By autoradiography it was shown that hepatocytes within EAF, both in females and in males, had significantly higher DNA synthesizing activity than surrounding normal hepatocytes. These results suggest that HSD has a weak promoting effect during DEN-hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

  13. Brain development, environment and sex: what can we learn from studying graviperception, gravitransduction and the gravireaction of the developing CNS to altered gravity?

    PubMed

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, Elizabeth M

    2008-01-01

    As man embarks on space exploration and contemplates space habitation, there is a critical need for basic understanding of the impact of the environmental factors of space, and in particular gravity, on human survival, health, reproduction and development. This review summarizes our present knowledge on the effect of altered gravity on the developing CNS with respect to the response of the developing CNS to altered gravity (gravireaction), the physiological changes associated with altered gravity that could contribute to this effect (gravitransduction), and the possible mechanisms involved in the detection of altered gravity (graviperception). Some of these findings transcend gravitational research and are relevant to our understanding of the impact of environmental factors on CNS development on Earth.

  14. Context-Specific Reweighting of Auditory Spatial Cues following Altered Experience during Development

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Peter; Dahmen, Johannes C.; King, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Neural systems must weight and integrate different sensory cues in order to make decisions. However, environmental conditions often change over time, altering the reliability of different cues and therefore the optimal way for combining them. To explore how cue integration develops in dynamic environments, we examined the effects on auditory spatial processing of rearing ferrets with localization cues that were modified via a unilateral earplug, interspersed with brief periods of normal hearing. Results In contrast with control animals, which rely primarily on timing and intensity differences between their two ears to localize sound sources, the juvenile-plugged ferrets developed the ability to localize sounds accurately by relying more on the unchanged spectral localization cues provided by the single normal ear. This adaptive process was paralleled by changes in neuronal responses in the primary auditory cortex, which became relatively more sensitive to these monaural spatial cues. Our behavioral and physiological data demonstrated, however, that the reweighting of different spatial cues disappeared as soon as normal hearing was experienced, showing for the first time that this type of plasticity can be context specific. Conclusions These results show that developmental changes can be selectively expressed in response to specific acoustic conditions. In this way, the auditory system can develop and simultaneously maintain two distinct models of auditory space and switch between these models depending on the prevailing sensory context. This ability is likely to be critical for maintaining accurate perception in dynamic environments and may point toward novel therapeutic strategies for individuals who experience sensory deficits during development. PMID:23810532

  15. Salmonid sexual development is not consistently altered by embryonic exposure to endocrine-active chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, D B; Curtis, L R; Williams, D E

    2000-01-01

    Fish sexual development is sensitive to exogenous hormone manipulation, and salmonids have been used extensively as environmental sentinels and models for biomedical research. We simulated maternal transfer of contaminants by microinjecting rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) embryos. Fish were reared for 6 months and sexed, and gonads were removed for histology and measurement of in vitro steroid production. Analysis of fat samples showed that dichlorodiphenylethylene (DDE) levels, o, p'M-DDE and p,o, p'-DDE isomers, were elevated 6 months after treatment. A preliminary study showed an increased ratio of males to females after treatment with 80 mg/kg and 160 mg/kg of the xenoestrogen o,o, p'-DDE. One fish treated with 160 mg/kg o,o, p'-DDE had gonads with cells typical of both males and females. A follow-up study, using more fish and excluding the highly toxic 160 mg/kg o,o, p'-DDE dose, showed no effect on sex ratio or gonadal histology. Embryonic exposure of monosex male trout, monosex female trout, and mixed sex salmon to o, o, p'-DDE, p,o, p'-DDE, mixtures of DDE isomers, and octylphenol failed to alter sexual development. We observed no treatment-dependent changes in in vitro gonadal steroid production in any experiments. Trout exposed in ovo and reared to maturity spawned successfully. These results suggest that mortality attributable to the xenoestrogens o,o, p'-DDE, chlordecone, and octylphenol, and the antiandrogen p,o, p'-DDE, is likely to occur before the appearance of subtle changes in sexual development. Because trout appeared to be sensitive to endocrine disruption, we cannot dismiss the threat of heavily contaminated sites or complex mixtures to normal sexual development of salmonids or other aquatic organisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10706532

  16. Transmission Electron Microscope Observations of Phyllosilicate Development During Experimental Aqueous Alteration of Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. L.; Brearley, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of Allende have been altered hydrothermally under oxidizing conditions at 200 C. TEM studies show that within 30 days evidence of replacement of matrix olivines by fine-grained serpentine is present and by 90 days complete alteration of many grains has occurred.

  17. 3. Impact of altered gravity on CNS development and behavior in male and female rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sulkowski, V. A.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Baxter, M. G.

    The present study examined the effect of altered gravity on CNS development. Specifically, we compared neurodevelopment, behavior, cerebellar structure and protein expression in rat neonates exposed perinatally to hypergravity. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1.5G-1.75G hypergravity on a 24-ft centrifuge starting on gestational day (G) 10, through giving birth on G22/G23, and nursing their offspring through postnatal day (P) 21. Cerebellar mass on P6 was decreased in 1.75G-exposed male pups by 27.5 percent; in 1.75G-exposed female pups it was decreased by 22.5 percent. The observed cerebellar changes were associated with alterations in neurodevelopment and motor behavior. Exposure to hypergravity impaired performance on the following neurocognitive tests: (1) righting time on P3 was more than doubled in 1.75G-exposed rats and the effect appeared more pronounced in female pups, (2) startle response on P10 was delayed in both male and female HG pups; HG pups were one-fifth as likely to respond to a clapping noise as SC pups, and (3) performance on a rotorod on P21 was decreased in HG pups; the duration of the stay on rotorod recorded for HG pups of both sexes was one tenth of the SC pups. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of selected cerebellar proteins suggested gender-specific changes in glial and neuronal proteins. On P6, GFAP expression was decreased by 59.2 percent in HG males, while no significant decrease was observed in female cerebella. Synaptophysin expression was decreased in HG male neonates by 29.9 percent and in HG female neonates by 20.7 percent as compared to its expression in SC cerebella. The results of this experiment suggest that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar development and behavior differently in male and female neonates. If one accepts that hypergravity is a good paradigm to study the effect of microgravity on the CNS, and since males and females were shown to respond differently to hypergravity, it can be

  18. Crystal structures of bovine CD1d reveal altered αGalCer presentation and a restricted A' pocket unable to bind long-chain glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C₁₈, while GSLs with fatty acids of C₂₄ do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C₁₂-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C₁₆-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL's to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells.

  19. Crystal Structures of Bovine CD1d Reveal Altered αGalCer Presentation and a Restricted A’ Pocket Unable to Bind Long-Chain Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C18, while GSLs with fatty acids of C24 do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C12-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C16-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL’s to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells. PMID:23110152

  20. Single-quantum-dot tracking reveals altered membrane dynamics of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder-derived dopamine transporter coding variant.

    PubMed

    Kovtun, Oleg; Sakrikar, Dhananjay; Tomlinson, Ian D; Chang, Jerry C; Arzeta-Ferrer, Xochitl; Blakely, Randy D; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2015-04-15

    The presynaptic, cocaine- and amphetamine-sensitive dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) controls the intensity and duration of synaptic dopamine signals by rapid clearance of DA back into presynaptic nerve terminals. Abnormalities in DAT-mediated DA clearance have been linked to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, autism, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Membrane trafficking of DAT appears to be an important, albeit incompletely understood, post-translational regulatory mechanism; its dysregulation has been recently proposed as a potential risk determinant of these disorders. In this study, we demonstrate a link between an ADHD-associated DAT mutation (Arg615Cys, R615C) and variation on DAT transporter cell surface dynamics, a combination only previously studied with ensemble biochemical and optical approaches that featured limited spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we utilize high-affinity, DAT-specific antagonist-conjugated quantum dot (QD) probes to establish the dynamic mobility of wild-type and mutant DATs at the plasma membrane of living cells. Single DAT-QD complex trajectory analysis revealed that the DAT 615C variant exhibited increased membrane mobility relative to DAT 615R, with diffusion rates comparable to those observed after lipid raft disruption. This phenomenon was accompanied by a loss of transporter mobilization triggered by amphetamine, a common component of ADHD medications. Together, our data provides the first dynamic imaging of single DAT proteins, providing new insights into the relationship between surface dynamics and trafficking of both wild-type and disease-associated transporters. Our approach should be generalizable to future studies that explore the possibilities of perturbed surface DAT dynamics that may arise as a consequence of genetic alterations, regulatory changes, and drug use that contribute to the etiology or treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Existence of a photoinducible phase for ovarian development and photoperiod-related alteration of clock gene expression in a damselfish.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Hada, Noriko; Imamura, Satoshi; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Bouchekioua, Selma; Takemura, Akihiro

    2015-10-01

    The sapphire devil, Chrysiptera cyanea, is a reef-associated damselfish and their ovarian development can be induced by a long photoperiod. In this study, we demonstrated the existence of a photoinducible phase for the photoperiodic ovarian development in the sapphire devil. Induction of ovarian development under night-interruption light schedules and Nanda-Hamner cycles revealed that the photoinducible phase appeared in a circadian manner between ZT12 and ZT13. To characterize the effect of photoperiod on clock gene expression in the brain of this species, we determined the expression levels of the sdPer1, sdPer2, sdCry1, and sdCry2 clock genes under constant light and dark conditions (LL and DD) and photoperiodic (short and long photoperiods). The expression of sdPer1 exhibited clear circadian oscillation under both LL and DD conditions, while sdPer2 and sdCry1 expression levels were lower under DD than under LL conditions and sdCry2 expression was lower under LL than under DD conditions. These results suggest a key role for sdPer1 in circadian clock cycling and that sdPer2, sdCry1, and sdCry2 are light-responsive clock genes in the sapphire devil. After 1 week under a long photoperiod, we observed photoperiod-related changes in sdPer1, sdPer2, and sdCry2 expression, but not in sdCry1 expression. These results suggest that the expression patterns of some clock genes exhibit seasonal variation according to seasonal changes in day length and that such seasonal alteration of clock gene expression may contribute to seasonal recognition by the sapphire devil.

  2. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG.

    PubMed

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-06-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts.

  3. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG

    PubMed Central

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. PMID:25609749

  4. Compost and biochar alter mycorrhization, tomato root exudation, and development of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Adnan; Hage-Ahmed, Karin; Soja, Gerhard; Steinkellner, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    Soil amendments like compost and biochar are known to affect soil properties, plant growth as well as soil borne plant pathogens. Complex interactions based on microbial activity and abiotic characteristics are supposed to be responsible for suppressive properties of certain substrates, however, the specific mechanisms of action are still widely unknown. In the present study, the main focus was on the development of the soil borne pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and changes in root exudates of tomato plants grown in different soil substrate compositions, such as compost (Comp) alone at application rate of 20% (v/v), and in combination with wood biochar (WB; made from beech wood chips) or green waste biochar (GWB; made from garden waste residues) at application rate of 3% (v/v), and/or with additional arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The association of GWB and AMF had a positive effect on tomato plants growth unlike to the plants grown in WB containing a soil substrate. The AMF root colonization was not enhanced by the addition of WB or GWB in the soil substrate, though a bio-protective effect of mycorrhization was evident in both biochar amended treatments against Fol. Compost and biochars altered root exudates differently, which is evident from variable response of in vitro growth and development of Fol. The microconidia germination was highest in root exudates from plants grown in the soil containing compost and GWB, whereas root exudates of plants from a substrate containing WB suppressed the mycelial growth and development of Fol. In conclusion, the plant growth response and disease suppression in biochar containing substrates with additional AMF was affected by the feedstock type. Moreover, application of compost and biochars in the soil influence the quality and composition of root exudates with respect to their effects on soil-dwelling fungi. PMID:26217373

  5. Compost and biochar alter mycorrhization, tomato root exudation, and development of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Adnan; Hage-Ahmed, Karin; Soja, Gerhard; Steinkellner, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    Soil amendments like compost and biochar are known to affect soil properties, plant growth as well as soil borne plant pathogens. Complex interactions based on microbial activity and abiotic characteristics are supposed to be responsible for suppressive properties of certain substrates, however, the specific mechanisms of action are still widely unknown. In the present study, the main focus was on the development of the soil borne pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and changes in root exudates of tomato plants grown in different soil substrate compositions, such as compost (Comp) alone at application rate of 20% (v/v), and in combination with wood biochar (WB; made from beech wood chips) or green waste biochar (GWB; made from garden waste residues) at application rate of 3% (v/v), and/or with additional arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The association of GWB and AMF had a positive effect on tomato plants growth unlike to the plants grown in WB containing a soil substrate. The AMF root colonization was not enhanced by the addition of WB or GWB in the soil substrate, though a bio-protective effect of mycorrhization was evident in both biochar amended treatments against Fol. Compost and biochars altered root exudates differently, which is evident from variable response of in vitro growth and development of Fol. The microconidia germination was highest in root exudates from plants grown in the soil containing compost and GWB, whereas root exudates of plants from a substrate containing WB suppressed the mycelial growth and development of Fol. In conclusion, the plant growth response and disease suppression in biochar containing substrates with additional AMF was affected by the feedstock type. Moreover, application of compost and biochars in the soil influence the quality and composition of root exudates with respect to their effects on soil-dwelling fungi.

  6. Collagen and elastin cross-linking is altered during aberrant late lung development associated with hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Mižíková, Ivana; Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Steenbock, Heiko; Madurga, Alicia; Vadász, István; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Seeger, Werner; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Morty, Rory E

    2015-06-01

    Maturation of the lung extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the formation of alveolar gas exchange units. A key step in ECM maturation is cross-linking of collagen and elastin, which imparts stability and functionality to the ECM. During aberrant late lung development in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) patients and animal models of BPD, alveolarization is blocked, and the function of ECM cross-linking enzymes is deregulated, suggesting that perturbed ECM cross-linking may impact alveolarization. In a hyperoxia (85% O2)-based mouse model of BPD, blunted alveolarization was accompanied by alterations to lung collagen and elastin levels and cross-linking. Total collagen levels were increased (by 63%). The abundance of dihydroxylysinonorleucine collagen cross-links and the dihydroxylysinonorleucine-to-hydroxylysinonorleucine ratio were increased by 11 and 18%, respectively, suggestive of a profibrotic state. In contrast, insoluble elastin levels and the abundance of the elastin cross-links desmosine and isodesmosine in insoluble elastin were decreased by 35, 30, and 21%, respectively. The lung collagen-to-elastin ratio was threefold increased. Treatment of hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice with the lysyl oxidase inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile partially restored normal collagen levels, normalized the dihydroxylysinonorleucine-to-hydroxylysinonorleucine ratio, partially normalized desmosine and isodesmosine cross-links in insoluble elastin, and partially restored elastin foci structure in the developing septa. However, β-aminopropionitrile administration concomitant with hyperoxia exposure did not improve alveolarization, evident from unchanged alveolar surface area and alveoli number, and worsened septal thickening (increased by 12%). These data demonstrate that collagen and elastin cross-linking are perturbed during the arrested alveolarization of developing mouse lungs exposed to hyperoxia.

  7. Conserved mechanisms across development and tumorigenesis revealed by a mouse development perspective of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Alvin T.; Zhao, Qing; Cai, Zhaohui; Butte, Atul J.; Kim, John Y.H.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Rowitch, David H.; Kohane, Isaac S.

    2004-01-01

    Identification of common mechanisms underlying organ development and primary tumor formation should yield new insights into tumor biology and facilitate the generation of relevant cancer models. We have developed a novel method to project the gene expression profiles of medulloblastomas (MBs)—human cerebellar tumors—onto a mouse cerebellar development sequence: postnatal days 1-60 (P1-P60). Genomically, human medulloblastomas were closest to mouse P1-P10 cerebella, and normal human cerebella were closest to mouse P30-P60 cerebella. Furthermore, metastatic MBs were highly associated with mouse P5 cerebella, suggesting that a clinically distinct subset of tumors is identifiable by molecular similarity to a precise developmental stage. Genewise, down- and up-regulated MB genes segregate to late and early stages of development, respectively. Comparable results for human lung cancer vis-a-vis the developing mouse lung suggest the generalizability of this multiscalar developmental perspective on tumor biology. Our findings indicate both a recapitulation of tissue-specific developmental programs in diverse solid tumors and the utility of tumor characterization on the developmental time axis for identifying novel aspects of clinical and biological behavior. PMID:15075291

  8. Supplement of autologous ooplasm into porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos does not alter embryo development.

    PubMed

    Lee, W-J; Lee, J-H; Jeon, R-H; Jang, S-J; Lee, S-C; Park, J-S; Lee, S-L; King, W-A; Rho, G-J

    2017-02-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered as the technique in which a somatic cell is introduced into an enucleated oocyte to make a cloned animal. However, it is unavoidable to lose a small amount of the ooplasm during enucleation step during SCNT procedure. The present study was aimed to uncover whether the supplement of autologous ooplasm could ameliorate the oocyte competence so as to improve low efficiency of embryo development in porcine SCNT. Autologous ooplasm-transferred (AOT) embryos were generated by the supplementation with autologous ooplasm into SCNT embryos. They were comparatively evaluated with respect to embryo developmental potential, the number of apoptotic body formation and gene expression including embryonic lineage differentiation, apoptosis, epigenetics and mitochondrial activity in comparison with parthenogenetic, in vitro-fertilized (IVF) and SCNT embryos. Although AOT embryos showed perfect fusion of autologous donor ooplasm with recipient SCNT embryos, the supplement of autologous ooplasm could not ameliorate embryo developmental potential in regard to the rate of blastocyst formation, total cell number and the number of apoptotic body. Furthermore, overall gene expression of AOT embryos was presented with no significant alterations in comparison with that of SCNT embryos. Taken together, the results of AOT demonstrated inability to make relevant values improved from the level of SCNT embryos to their IVF counterparts.

  9. Hemorrhage and resuscitation induce alterations in cytokine expression and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Coulson, W F; Abraham, E

    1994-03-01

    Acute pulmonary injury occurs frequently following hemorrhage and injury. In order to better examine the sequence of events leading to lung injury in this setting, we investigated lung histology as well as in vivo mRNA levels for cytokines with proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties (IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, IFN-gamma) over the 3 days following hemorrhage and resuscitation. Significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, were present among intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells obtained 1 and 3 days after hemorrhage. Among alveolar macrophages, TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA levels were increased 3 days after hemorrhage. Few changes in cytokine mRNA levels, with the exception of TNF-alpha at 3 days after hemorrhage, were present among peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Histologic examination of lungs from hemorrhaged animals showed no alterations 1 day after hemorrhage, but neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltrates, edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and fibrin generation were present 3 days after hemorrhage. These results suggest that hemorrhage-induced enhancement of proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription may be an important mechanism contributing to the frequent development of acute lung injury following blood loss and injury.

  10. Revealing the bovine embryo transcript profiles during early in vivo embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Maud; Dufort, Isabelle; Desrosiers, Stéphanie; Labbe, Aurélie; Gravel, Catherine; Gilbert, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2009-07-01

    Gene expression profiling is proving to be a powerful approach for the identification of molecular mechanisms underlying complex cellular functions such as the dynamic early embryonic development. The objective of this study was to perform a transcript abundance profiling analysis of bovine early embryonic development in vivo using a bovine developmental array. The molecular description of the first week of life at the mRNA level is particularly challenging when considering the important fluctuations in RNA content that occur between developmental stages. Accounting for the different intrinsic RNA content between developmental stages was achieved by restricting the reaction time during the global amplification steps and by using spiked controls and reference samples. Analysis based on intensity values revealed that most of the transcripts on the array were present at some point during in vivo bovine early embryonic development, while the varying number of genes detected in each developmental stage confirmed the dynamic profile of gene expression occurring during embryonic development. Pair-wise comparison of gene expression showed a marked difference between oocytes and blastocysts profiles, and principal component analysis revealed that the majority of the transcripts could be regrouped into three main clusters representing distinct RNA abundance profiles. Overall, these data provide a detailed temporal profile of the abundance of mRNAs revealing the richness of signaling processes in early mammalian development. Results presented here provide better knowledge of bovine in vivo embryonic development and contribute to the progression of our current knowledge regarding the first week of life in mammals.

  11. Sharing Life-Altering Information: Development of Pediatric Hospital Guidelines and Team Training

    PubMed Central

    Frierdich, Sharon A.; Wish, Joel; Kilgore-Carlin, Joyce; Plotkin, Julie A.; Hoover-Regan, Margo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite parent and physician reports of inadequate skill development, there are few guidelines for training the pediatric care team in sharing life-altering information (SLAI), i.e., “breaking bad news.” The necessary skills for SLAI differ between pediatric and adult medical environments. Objectives: We set out to establish evidence-based guidelines and multidisciplinary team training for SLAI in pediatrics, and to demonstrate an improvement in immediate self-efficacy of training participants. Methods: A multidisciplinary task force, which included parent participation and feedback, and which received input from parents of patients in multiple pediatric subspecialties, crafted children's hospitalwide guidelines for SLAI. A one-hour training module on the guidelines was presented to several multidisciplinary pediatric team audiences; 159 voluntary pre- and post-presentation self-efficacy surveys were collected. Responses were analyzed by paired t-test (within groups) and ANOVA (between groups). Results: All evaluated groups of care team members reported significant improvements in self-efficacy among four learning objectives after the training. Medical trainees, newer physicians, and nonphysician (e.g., midlevel providers including nurses) team members reported the greatest improvements, regardless of whether they had received previous training in SLAI. Conclusions: We propose pediatric-focused SLAI guidelines based on a modified SPIKES protocol. Focus on patient- and family-centered, culturally sensitive pediatric practices should be the basis for development of training that can be periodically reinforced. Future comprehensive training will incorporate experiential learning. SLAI requires a skill set that benefits from lifelong learning. PMID:24971650

  12. Tributyltin alters the bone marrow microenvironment and suppresses B cell development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amelia H; Wu, Ting Hua; Bolt, Alicia M; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Mann, Koren K; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2017-04-07

    Organotins are industrial chemicals and agricultural pesticides, and they contaminate both outdoor and indoor environments. Organotins are detectable in human sera at biologically active concentrations and are immuno-and neuro-toxicants. Triphenyltin, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) and promote adipogenesis. TBT also has been shown to suppress osteogenesis; osteoblasts not only support bone homeostasis but also support B lymphopoiesis. In addition, developing B cells are highly sensitive to exogenous insults. Thus, we hypothesized that bone marrow B cells may be negatively affected by TBT exposure both directly, through activation of apoptosis, and indirectly, through alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment. TBT activated apoptosis in developing B cells at environmentally relevant concentrations (as low as 80 nM) in vitro, via a mechanism that is distinct from that induced by high dose (μM) TBT and that requires p53. TBT suppressed the proliferation of hematopoietic cells in an ex vivo bone marrow model. Concurrent treatment of stromal cells and B cells or pretreatment of stromal cells with TBT induced adipogenesis in the stromal cells and reduced the progression of B cells from the early pro B (Hardy fraction B) to the pre B stage (Hardy fraction D). In vivo, TBT induced adipogenesis in bone marrow, reduced "aging-sensitive" AA4+CD19+ B cells in bone marrow, and reduced splenic B cell numbers. Immunosenescence and osteoporosis are adverse health effects of aging, we postulate that TBT exposure may mimic, and possibly intensify, these pathologies.

  13. Effect of Carbonate Chemistry Alteration on the Early Embryonic Development of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    PubMed Central

    Gazeau, Frédéric; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry; Peene, Jan; Heip, Carlo H. R.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO2 absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportions of abnormal development under low pH conditions, they did not allow attribution to pH induced changes in physiology or changes due to a decrease in aragonite saturation state. This study aims to assess the impact of several carbonate-system perturbations on the growth of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae during the first 3 days of development (until shelled D-veliger larvae). Seawater with five different chemistries was obtained by separately manipulating pH, total alkalinity and aragonite saturation state (calcium addition). Results showed that the developmental success and growth rates were not directly affected by changes in pH or aragonite saturation state but were highly correlated with the availability of carbonate ions. In contrast to previous studies, both developmental success into viable D-shaped larvae and growth rates were not significantly altered as long as carbonate ion concentrations were above aragonite saturation levels, but they strongly decreased below saturation levels. These results suggest that the mechanisms used by these organisms to regulate calcification rates are not efficient enough to compensate for the low availability of carbonate ions under corrosive conditions. PMID:21860666

  14. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy; Primig, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6Δ mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MAT a/α wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes.

  15. An activated form of UFO alters leaf development and produces ectopic floral and inflorescence meristems.

    PubMed

    Risseeuw, Eddy; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Komendant, Kristina; Daskalchuk, Tim; Babic, Vivijan; Crosby, William; Datla, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants.

  16. An Activated Form of UFO Alters Leaf Development and Produces Ectopic Floral and Inflorescence Meristems

    PubMed Central

    Risseeuw, Eddy; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Komendant, Kristina; Daskalchuk, Tim; Babic, Vivijan; Crosby, William; Datla, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants. PMID:24376756

  17. DVL, a novel class of small polypeptides: overexpression alters Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiangqi; Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2004-03-01

    Small polypeptides can act as important regulatory molecules that coordinate cellular responses required for differentiation, growth, and development. In a gain-of-function genetic screen for genes that influence fruit development in Arabidopsis, we identified a novel gene -DEVIL1 (DVL1) - encoding a small protein. Overexpression of DVL1 results in pleiotropic phenotypes featured by shortened stature, rounder rosette leaves, clustered inflorescences, shortened pedicles, and siliques with pronged tips. cDNA analysis indicates that DVL1 has a 153-nucleotide (nt) open-reading frame (ORF) encoding a 51-amino acid polypeptide that shares no significant similarity to previously identified proteins. Sequence alignment shows that DVL1 belongs to a family of related genes that are limited to angiosperm plants. Ectopic overexpression of each of the five closely related Arabidopsis DVL genes causes similar phenotypic changes, suggesting overlapping function in the DVL gene family. Point mutations of conserved amino acids in the C-terminal region of the DVL1 polypeptide reveal that these conserved residues are required for DVL1-overexpression phenotypes. Our results show that the DVL family is a novel class of small polypeptides and the overexpression phenotypes suggest that these polypeptides may have a role in plant development.

  18. The characterization of transgenic tomato overexpressing gibberellin 20-oxidase reveals induction of parthenocarpic fruit growth, higher yield, and alteration of the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    García-Hurtado, Noemí; Carrera, Esther; Ruiz-Rivero, Omar; López-Gresa, Maria Pilar; Hedden, Peter; Gong, Fan; García-Martínez, José Luis

    2012-10-01

    Fruit-set and growth in tomato depend on the action of gibberellins (GAs). To evaluate the role of the GA biosynthetic enzyme GA 20-oxidase (GA20ox) in that process, the citrus gene CcGA20ox1 was overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cv Micro-Tom. The transformed plants were taller, had non-serrated leaves, and some flowers displayed a protruding stigma due to a longer style, thus preventing self-pollination, similar to GA(3)-treated plants. Flowering was delayed compared with wild-type (WT) plants. Both yield and number of fruits per plant, some of them seedless, were higher in the transgenic plants. The Brix index value of fruit juice was also higher due to elevated citric acid content, but not glucose or fructose content. When emasculated, 14-30% of ovaries from transgenic flowers developed parthenocarpically, whereas no parthenocarpy was found in emasculated WT flowers. The presence of early-13-hydroxylation and non-13-hydroxylation GA pathways was demonstrated in the shoot and fruit of Micro-Tom, as well as in two tall tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and UC-82). The transgenic plants had altered GA profiles containing higher concentrations of GA(4), from the non-13-hydroxylation pathway, which is generally a minor active GA in tomato. The effect of GA(4) application in enhancing stem growth and parthenocarpic fruit development was proportional to dose, with the same activity as GA(1). The results support the contention that GA20ox overexpression diverts GA metabolism from the early-13-hydroxylation pathway to the non-13-hydroxylation pathway. This led to enhanced GA(4) synthesis and higher yield, although the increase in GA(4) content in the ovary was not sufficient to induce full parthenocarpy.

  19. Metabolic Profiling Reveals Effects of Age, Sexual Development and Neutering in Plasma of Young Male Cats

    PubMed Central

    Allaway, David; Gilham, Matthew S.; Colyer, Alison; Jönsson, Thomas J.; Swanson, Kelly S.; Morris, Penelope J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutering is a significant risk factor for obesity in cats. The mechanisms that promote neuter-associated weight gain are not well understood but following neutering, acute changes in energy expenditure and energy consumption have been observed. Metabolic profiling (GC-MS and UHPLC-MS-MS) was used in a longitudinal study to identify changes associated with age, sexual development and neutering in male cats fed a nutritionally-complete dry diet to maintain an ideal body condition score. At eight time points, between 19 and 52 weeks of age, fasted blood samples were taken from kittens neutered at either 19 weeks of age (Early Neuter (EN), n = 8) or at 31 weeks of age (Conventional Neuter (CN), n = 7). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare plasma metabolites (n = 370) from EN and CN cats. Age was the primary driver of variance in the plasma metabolome, including a developmental change independent of neuter group between 19 and 21 weeks in lysolipids and fatty acid amides. Changes associated with sexual development and its subsequent loss were also observed, with differences at some time points observed between EN and CN cats for 45 metabolites (FDR p<0.05). Pathway Enrichment Analysis also identified significant effects in 20 pathways, dominated by amino acid, sterol and fatty acid metabolism. Most changes were interpretable within the context of male sexual development, and changed following neutering in the CN group. Felinine metabolism in CN cats was the most significantly altered pathway, increasing during sexual development and decreasing acutely following neutering. Felinine is a testosterone-regulated, felid-specific glutathione derivative secreted in urine. Alterations in tryptophan, histidine and tocopherol metabolism observed in peripubertal cats may be to support physiological functions of glutathione following diversion of S-amino acids for urinary felinine secretion. PMID:27942045

  20. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  1. Targeted detection of genetic alterations reveal the prognostic impact of H3K27M and MAPK pathway aberrations in paediatric thalamic glioma.

    PubMed

    Ryall, Scott; Krishnatry, Rahul; Arnoldo, Anthony; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Mistry, Matthew; Siddaway, Robert; Ling, Cino; Pajovic, Sanja; Yu, Man; Rubin, Joshua B; Hukin, Juliette; Steinbok, Paul; Bartels, Ute; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2016-08-31

    Paediatric brain tumours arising in the thalamus present significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to physicians due to their sensitive midline location. As such, genetic analysis for biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these tumours is needed. Here, we identified 64 thalamic gliomas with clinical follow-up and characterized targeted genomic alterations using newly optimized droplet digital and NanoString-based assays. The median age at diagnosis was 9.25 years (range, 0.63-17.55) and median survival was 6.43 (range, 0.01-27.63) years. Our cohort contained 42 and 22 tumours reviewed as low and high grade gliomas, respectively. Five (12 %) low grade and 11 (50 %) high grade gliomas were positive for the H3F3A/HIST1H3B K27M (H3K27M) mutation. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly worse overall survival for patients harbouring the H3K27M mutation versus H3F3A/HIST1H3B wild type (H3WT) samples (log-rank p < 0.0001) with a median survival of 1.02 vs. 9.12 years. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation via BRAF or FGFR1 hotspot mutations or fusion events were detected in 44 % of patients, and was associated with long-term survival in the absence of H3K27M (log-rank p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated H3K27M status and high grade histology to be the most significant independent predictors of poor overall survival with hazard ratios of 6.945 and 7.721 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In contrast, MAPK pathway activation is a predictor of favourable patient outcome, although not independent of other clinical factors. Importantly, we show that low grade malignancies may harbour H3K27M mutations and that these tumours show a dismal survival compared to low grade H3WT cases. Our data strongly supports the inclusion of targeted genetic testing in childhood thalamic tumours to most accurately stratify patients into appropriate risk groups.

  2. Alterations of interneurons in the striatum and frontal cortex of mice during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Eto, Risa; Abe, Manami; Kimoto, Hiroki; Imaoka, Eri; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the postnatal alterations of neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive neurons, parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive interneurons, and neurotrophic factors in the mouse striatum and frontal cortex using immunohistochemistry. NeuN, PV, nNOS, nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity were measured in 1-, 2-, 4- and 8-week-old mice. Total number of NeuN-positive neurons was unchanged in the mouse striatum and frontal cortex from 1 up to 8 weeks of age. In contrast, a significant decrease in the number of PV-positive interneurons was observed in the striatum and frontal cortex of 1-, 2- and 4-week-old mice. Furthermore, a significant increase of nNOS-positive interneurons was found in the striatum and frontal cortex of 1- and/or 2-week-old mice. NGF-positive neurons were unchanged in the mouse striatum from 1 up to 8 weeks of age. In the frontal cortex, a significant increase in the number of NGF-positive neurons was observed only in 1-week-old mice. In contrast, a significant increase in the number of NGF-positive glia 1 cells was found in the striatum and frontal cortex of 4-week-old mice. Our double-labeled immunostaining showed that nNOS immunoreactivity was not found in PV-immunopositive interneurons. Furthermore, BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in both nNOS-positive and PV-positive interneurons in the striatum of 1- or 2-week-old mice. These results show that the maturation of nNOS-immunopositive interneurons precedes the maturation of PV-immunopositive interneurons in the striatum and frontal cortex during postnatal development. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the expression of BDNF may play some role in the maturation of interneurons in the striatum and frontal cortex during postnatal development. Moreover, our findings suggest that the expression of NGF in glia cells may play some role in the maturation of glial cells and PV-positive interneurons

  3. Prenatal stress alters microglial development and distribution in postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Beatriz; Escobar, Alfonso

    2010-03-01

    Stress affects microglial function and viability during adulthood and early postnatal life; however, it is unknown whether stress to the pregnant dam might alter offspring microglia. The effects of prenatal stress on microglial development and distribution in the postnatal brain were studied using Wistar rats. Prenatal stress consisting of 20 min of forced swimming occurred on embryonic days 10-20. On postnatal days 1 and 10, stressed and control pups were killed. Microglia were identified using Griffonia simplicifolia lectin and quantified in the whole encephalon. In addition, plasma corticosterone was measured in dams at embryonic day 20, and in pups on postnatal days 1 and 10. At postnatal day 1, there was an increase in number of ramified microglia in the parietal, entorhinal and frontal cortices, septum, basal ganglia, thalamus, medulla oblongata and internal capsule in the stressed pups as compared to controls, but also there was a reduction of amoeboid microglia and the total number of microglia in the corpus callosum. By postnatal day 10, there were no differences in the morphologic type or the distribution of microglia between the prenatal stress and control groups, except in the corpus callosum; where prenatal stress decreased the number of ramified microglia. The stress procedure was effective in producing plasma rise in corticosterone levels of pregnant rats at embryonic day 20 when compared to same age controls. Prenatal stress reduced the number of immature microglia and promoted an accelerated microglial differentiation into a ramified form. These findings may be related to an increase in plasma corticosterone in the pregnant dam.

  4. Altered Refractive Development in Mice With Reduced Levels of Retinal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Michael A.; Park, Han na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Landis, Erica G.; Sidhu, Curran; He, Li; Iuvone, P. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neuromodulator dopamine (DA) has been implicated in the prevention of excessive ocular elongation and myopia in various animal models. This study used retina-specific DA knockout mice to investigate the role of retinal DA in refractive development and susceptibility to experimental myopia. Methods Measurements of refractive error, corneal curvature, and ocular biometrics were obtained as a function of age for both untreated and form-deprived (FD) groups of retina-specific tyrosine hydroxylase knockout (rTHKO) and control (Ctrl) mice. Retinas from each group were analyzed by HPLC for levels of DA and its primary metabolite (DOPAC). Results Under normal visual conditions, rTHKO mice showed significantly myopic refractions (F(1,188) = 7.602, P < 0.001) and steeper corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,180) = 5.1, P < 0.01) at 4 and 6 weeks of age compared with Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO mice also had thinner corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,181) = 37.17, P < 0.001), thinner retinas (F(6,181) = 6.07, P < 0.001), and shorter axial lengths (F(6,181) = 3.78, P < 0.01) than Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO retinas contained less than 15% of DA and DOPAC compared with Ctrl retinas, and the remaining DA had a significantly higher turnover, as indicated by DOPAC/DA ratios (Student's t-test, P < 0.05). Retina-specific THKO mice showed similar, yet more variable, responses to 6 weeks of FD compared with Ctrl mice. Conclusions Diminished retinal DA induced spontaneous myopia in mice raised under laboratory conditions without form deprivation. The relative myopic shift in rTHKO mice may be explained by steeper corneas, an unexpected finding. The chronic loss of DA did not significantly alter the FD myopia response in rTHKO mice. PMID:27750284

  5. Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol-A Alters Peripubertal Mammary Gland Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-de-Toro, Monica; Markey, Caroline M.; Wadia, Perinaaz R.; Luque, Enrique H.; Rubin, Beverly S.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Developmental exposure to estrogenic chemicals induces morphological, functional, and behavioral anomalies associated with reproduction. Humans are exposed to bisphenol-A (BPA), an estrogenic compound that leaches from dental materials and plastic food and beverage containers. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of perinatal exposure to low, environmentally relevant doses of BPA [25 and 250 ng BPA/kg body weight (bw)·d] on the peripubertal development of the mammary gland. BPA exposure enhanced the mammary glands' sensitivity to estradiol in ovariectomized CD-1 mice. In their intact 30-d-old littermates, the area and numbers of terminal end buds relative to the gland ductal area increased whereas their apoptotic activity decreased. There was a positive correlation between ductal length and the age at first proestrus; that was reduced as the BPA dose increased, suggesting that BPA exposure slows down ductal invasion of the stroma. There was also a significant increase of progesterone receptor-positive ductal epithelial cells that were localized in clusters, suggesting future branching points. Indeed, lateral branching was significantly enhanced at 4 months of age in mice exposed to 25 ng BPA /kg bw·d. In conclusion, perinatal exposure to environmentally relevant BPA doses results in persistent alterations in mammary gland morphogenesis. Of special concern is the increased terminal end bud density at puberty as well as the increased number of terminal ends reported previously in adult animals, as these two structures are the sites at which cancer arises in humans and rodents. PMID:15919749

  6. Impact of the altered light vector relative to gravity vector on plant growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Yu. A.; Smolyanina, S. O.; Krivobok, N. M.; Erokhin, A. N.; Ivanov, V. B.

    We studied effects of gravity force and photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) direction on growth and development of Triticum aestivum L. cv. Apogee. In our ground experiments, light flux was set relatively to gravity vector unidirectional or in opposite direction. In the first set of tests initial seedlings orientation was natural (vertical), inverse or perpendicular to the gravity vector. In the second set of tests plant orientation relative to gravity vector was vertical or inverse. Wheat seeds were grown in a 2-mm layer of fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate overlaying horizontal hydrophilic plates (membranes) of porous titanium. In the other case, seeds were anchored to porous ceramic tubes by plastic rings. High pressure sodium lamp with PPF of 55 ± 5 or 550 ± 20 μmol m -2 s -1 24 h per day were used for lighting. Water potential (WP) at the membrane surface varied from 0 to (-10) kPa. It was demonstrated that irrespective of light direction plants grown at PPF of 550 μmol m -2 s -1 and WP of (-1.0) kPa remained nearly unchanged and produced viable seeds. In the inverse light orientation, 25% increase in shoot dry mass at complete ripeness and doubled number of productive tillers as compared to control were observed. Root dry mass and shoot length were lowered by 50% and 35%, respectively. Given reduced PPF (55 μmol m -2 s -1), shoot dry mass of inverted plants was 22% lower compared to control whereas this parameter decreased by 63% when WP was -10 kPa. Root dry mass of the inverted plants was lower than of naturally grown plants regardless of growth conditions. These results allow suggest similar changes in morphology and harvest index of plants grown in altered gravity conditions.

  7. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) alters histiotrophic nutrition pathways and epigenetic processes in the developing conceptus

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Karilyn E.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Jilek, Joseph L.; Shay, Brian J.; Harris, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Histiotrophic nutrition pathways (HNPs) are processes by which the organogenesis-stage conceptus obtains nutrients, amino acids, vitamins, and cofactors required for protein biosynthesis and metabolic activities. Nutrients are captured from the maternal milieu as whole proteins and cargoes via receptor-mediated endocytosis in the visceral yolk sac (VYS), degraded by lysosomal proteolysis, and delivered to the developing embryo (EMB). Several nutrients obtained by HNPs are required substrates for one-carbon (C1) metabolism and supply methyl groups required for epigenetic processes, including DNA and histone methylation. Increased availability of methyl donors has been associated with reduced risk for neural tube defects (NTDs). Here we show that mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) treatment (100 or 250 µM) alters HNPs, C1 metabolism, and epigenetic programming in the organogenesis-stage conceptus. Specifically, 3 h MEHP treatment of mouse embryos in whole culture resulted in dose dependent reduction of HNP activity in the conceptus. To observe nutrient consequences of decreased HNP function, C1 components and substrates and epigenetic outcomes were quantified at 24 h. Treatment with 100 µM MEHP resulted in decreased dietary methyl donor concentrations, while treatment with 100 or 250 µM MEHP resulted in dose-dependent elevated C1 products and substrates. In MEHP-treated EMBs with NTDs, H3K4 methylation was significantly increased, while no effects were seen in treated VYS. DNA methylation was reduced in MEHP-treated EMB with and without NTDs. This research suggests that environmental toxicants such as MEHP decrease embryonic nutrition in a time-dependent manner, and that epigenetic consequences of HNP disruption may be exacerbated in EMB with NTDs. PMID:26507544

  8. ALTERATIONS IN DEVELOPMENT OF REPRODUCTIVE AND ENDOCRINE SYSTEMS OF WILDLIFE POPULATIONS EXPOSED TO ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CONTAMINANTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wildlife and human populations are affected by contaminants in natural settings. This problem has been a growing concern over the last decade with the realization that various environmental chemicals can alter the development and functioning of endocrine organs, cells and target ...

  9. Altered Development of White Matter in Youth at High Familial Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versace, Amelia; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Romero, Soledad; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study white matter (WM) development in youth at high familial risk for bipolar disorder (BD). WM alterations are reported in youth and adults with BD. WM undergoes important maturational changes in adolescence. Age-related changes in WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics in healthy…

  10. INVESTIGATION OF THE ABILITY OF DIISONONYL PHTHALATE (DINP) TO ALTER ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT TISSUE DEVELOPMENT IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: INVESTIGATION OF THE ABILITY OF DIISONONYL PHTHALATE (DINP) TO ALTER ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT TISSUE DEVELOPMENT IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS.
    Authors: J S Ostby 1 , A K Hotchkiss 2 , J R Furr 1 and L E Gray Jr. 1
    Sponsor: L Gray Jr.
    Institutions: 1. USEPA, NH...

  11. Simultaneous Silencing of Two Arginine Decarboxylase Genes Alters Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rangel, Diana; Chávez-Martínez, Ana I.; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Maruri-López, Israel; Urano, Kaoru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are small aliphatic polycations that are found ubiquitously in all organisms. In plants, PAs are involved in diverse biological processes such as growth, development, and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the arginine decarboxylase enzymes (ADC1 and 2) catalyze the first step of PA biosynthesis. For a better understanding of PA biological functions, mutants in PA biosynthesis have been generated; however, the double adc1/adc2 mutant is not viable in A. thaliana. In this study, we generated non-lethal A. thaliana lines through an artificial microRNA that simultaneously silenced the two ADC genes (amiR:ADC). The generated transgenic lines (amiR:ADC-L1 and -L2) showed reduced AtADC1 and AtADC2 transcript levels. For further analyses the amiR:ADC-L2 line was selected. We found that the amiR:ADC-L2 line showed a significant decrease of their PA levels. The co-silencing revealed a stunted growth in A. thaliana seedlings, plantlets and delay in its flowering rate; these phenotypes were reverted with PA treatment. In addition, amiR:ADC-L2 plants displayed two seed phenotypes, such as yellow and brownish seeds. The yellow mutant seeds were smaller than adc1, adc2 mutants and wild type seeds; however, the brownish were the smallest seeds with arrested embryos at the torpedo stage. These data reinforce the importance of PA homeostasis in the plant development processes. PMID:27014322

  12. Genome wide analysis of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis development reveals dynamic expression using network enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Valérie S; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Development involves precise timing of gene expression and coordinated pathways for organogenesis and morphogenesis. Functional and sub-network enrichment analysis provides an integrated approach for identifying networks underlying development. The objectives of this study were to characterize early gene regulatory networks over Silurana tropicalis development from NF stage 2 to 46 using a custom Agilent 4×44K microarray. There were >8000 unique gene probes that were differentially expressed between Nieuwkoop-Faber (NF) stage 2 and stage 16, and >2000 gene probes differentially expressed between NF 34 and 46. Gene ontology revealed that genes involved in nucleosome assembly, cell division, pattern specification, neurotransmission, and general metabolism were increasingly regulated throughout development, consistent with active development. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that processes such as membrane hyperpolarisation, retinoic acid, cholesterol, and dopamine metabolic gene networks were activated/inhibited over time. This study identifies RNA transcripts that are potentially maternally inherited in an anuran species, provides evidence that the expression of genes involved in retinoic acid receptor signaling may increase prior to those involved in thyroid receptor signaling, and characterizes novel gene expression networks preceding organogenesis which increases understanding of the spatiotemporal embryonic development in frogs.

  13. Functional delineation of rice MADS29 reveals its role in embryo and endosperm development by affecting hormone homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Rice MADS29 has recently been reported to cause programmed cell death of maternal tissues, the nucellus, and the nucellar projection during early stages of seed development. However, analyses involving OsMADS29 protein expression domains and characterization of OsMADS29 gain-of-function and knockdown phenotypes revealed novel aspects of its function in maintaining hormone homeostasis, which may have a role in the development of embryo and plastid differentiation and starch filling in endosperm cells. The MADS29 transcripts accumulated to high levels soon after fertilization; however, protein accumulation was found to be delayed by at least 4 days. Immunolocalization studies revealed that the protein accumulated initially in the dorsal-vascular trace and the outer layers of endosperm, and subsequently in the embryo and aleurone and subaleurone layers of the endosperm. Ectopic expression of MADS29 resulted in a severely dwarfed phenotype, exhibiting elevated levels of cytokinin, thereby suggesting that cytokinin biosynthesis pathway could be one of the major targets of OsMADS29. Overexpression of OsMADS29 in heterologous BY2 cells was found to mimic the effects of exogenous application of cytokinins that causes differentiation of proplastids to starch-containing amyloplasts and activation of genes involved in the starch biosynthesis pathway. Suppression of MADS29 expression by RNAi severely affected seed set. The surviving seeds were smaller in size, with developmental abnormalities in the embryo and reduced size of endosperm cells, which also contained loosely packed starch granules. Microarray analysis of overexpression and knockdown lines exhibited altered expression of genes involved in plastid biogenesis, starch biosynthesis, cytokinin signalling and biosynthesis. PMID:23929654

  14. Evaluation of novel acyclic nucleoside phosphonates against human and animal gammaherpesviruses revealed an altered metabolism of cyclic prodrugs upon Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in P3HR-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Coen, Natacha; Duraffour, Sophie; Naesens, Lieve; Krecmerová, Marcela; Van den Oord, Joost; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela

    2013-11-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), such as (S)-1-[(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonomethoxy)propyl)]cytosine (HPMPC), are an important group of broad-spectrum antiviral agents with activity against DNA viruses. In this report, we present the in vitro potencies of novel ANPs against gammaherpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and three animal gammaherpesviruses. 1-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-5-azacytosine (HPMP-5-azaC), (S)-9-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-3-deazaadenine (3-deaza-HPMPA), and their cyclic derivatives have emerged as highly potent antigammaherpesvirus agents. Interestingly, cyclic prodrugs of ANPs exhibited reduced activities against EBV strain P3HR-1, but not against EBV strain Akata. Cell culture metabolism studies with HPMPC and cyclic HPMPC revealed that these differences were attributable to an altered drug metabolism in P3HR-1 cells after EBV reactivation and, more specifically, to a reduced hydrolysis of cyclic HPMPC by cyclic CMP phosphodiesterase. We did not correlate this effect with phosphodiesterase downregulation, or to functional mutations. Instead, altered cyclic AMP levels in P3HR-1 cells indicated a competitive inhibition of the phosphodiesterase by this cyclic nucleotide. Finally, both HPMPC and HPMP-5-azaC emerged as highly effective inhibitors in vivo through significant inhibition of murine gammaherpesvirus replication and dissemination. With the current need for potent antigammaherpesvirus agents, our findings underline the requirement of appropriate surrogate viruses for antiviral susceptibility testing and highlight HPMP-5-azaC as a promising compound for future clinical development.

  15. Signaling from an Altered Cell Wall to the Nucleus Mediates Sugar-Responsive Growth and Development in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunhai; Smith, Caroline; Corke, Fiona; Zheng, Leiying; Merali, Zara; Ryden, Peter; Derbyshire, Paul; Waldron, Keith; Bevan, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Sugars such as glucose function as signal molecules that regulate gene expression, growth, and development in plants, animals, and yeast. To understand the molecular mechanisms of sugar responses, we isolated and characterized an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, high sugar response8 (hsr8), which enhances sugar-responsive growth and gene expression. Light-grown hsr8 plants exhibited increased starch and anthocyanin and reduced chlorophyll content in response to glucose treatment. Dark-grown hsr8 seedlings showed glucose-hypersensitive hypocotyl elongation and development. The HSR8 gene, isolated using map-based cloning, was allelic to the MURUS4 (MUR4) gene involved in arabinose synthesis. Dark-grown mur1 and mur3 seedlings also exhibited similar sugar responses to hsr8/mur4. The sugar-hypersensitive phenotypes of hsr8/mur4, mur1, and mur3 were rescued by boric acid, suggesting that alterations in the cell wall cause hypersensitive sugar-responsive phenotypes. Genetic analysis showed that sugar-hypersensitive responses in hsr8 mutants were suppressed by pleiotropic regulatory locus1 (prl1), indicating that nucleus-localized PRL1 is required for enhanced sugar responses in hsr8 mutant plants. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of many cell wall–related and sugar-responsive genes was altered in mur4-1, and the expression of a significant proportion of these genes was restored to wild-type levels in the mur4-1 prl1 double mutant. These findings reveal a pathway that signals changes in the cell wall through PRL1 to altered gene expression and sugar-responsive metabolic, growth, and developmental changes. PMID:17693536

  16. The Maize Viviparous8 Locus, Encoding a Putative ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1-Like Peptidase, Regulates Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Coordinates Embryo and Endosperm Development1[W

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Latshaw, Susan; Sato, Yutaka; Settles, A. Mark; Koch, Karen E.; Hannah, L. Curtis; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; McCarty, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a mutant of Zea mays isolated from a W22 inbred transposon population, widow's peak mutant1 (wpk1), with an altered pattern of anthocyanin synthesis and aleurone cell differentiation in endosperm. In addition, a failure of the developing mutant embryo to form leaf initials is associated with decreased expression of a subset of meristem regulatory genes that includes Abphyl1 and Td1. We show that the viviparous8 (vp8) mutant has a similar pleiotropic phenotype in the W22 inbred background in contrast to the viviparous embryo phenotype exhibited in the standard genetic background, and we confirmed that wpk1 is allelic to vp8. Further genetic analysis revealed that the standard vp8 stock contains an unlinked, partially dominant suppressor of the vp8 mutation that is not present in W22. Consistent with the early-onset viviparous phenotype of vp8, expression of several embryonic regulators, including LEC1/B3 domain transcription factors, was reduced in the mutant embryo. Moreover, reduced abscisic acid (ABA) content of vp8/wpk1 embryos was correlated with altered regulation of ABA biosynthesis, as well as ABA catabolic pathways. The ABA biosynthetic gene Vp14 was down-regulated in the nonsuppressed background, whereas the ZmABA8′oxA1a ABA 8′-hydroxylase gene was strongly up-regulated in both genetic backgrounds. Molecular analysis revealed that Vp8 encodes a putative peptidase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1. Because the Vp8 regulates meristem development as well as seed maturation processes, including ABA accumulation, we propose that VP8 is required for synthesis of an unidentified signal that integrates meristem and embryo formation in seeds. PMID:18203869

  17. The Maize Viviparous8 locus, encoding a putative ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1-like peptidase, regulates abscisic acid accumulation and coordinates embryo and endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Latshaw, Susan; Sato, Yutaka; Settles, A Mark; Koch, Karen E; Hannah, L Curtis; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; McCarty, Donald R

    2008-03-01

    We describe a mutant of Zea mays isolated from a W22 inbred transposon population, widow's peak mutant1 (wpk1), with an altered pattern of anthocyanin synthesis and aleurone cell differentiation in endosperm. In addition, a failure of the developing mutant embryo to form leaf initials is associated with decreased expression of a subset of meristem regulatory genes that includes Abphyl1 and Td1. We show that the viviparous8 (vp8) mutant has a similar pleiotropic phenotype in the W22 inbred background in contrast to the viviparous embryo phenotype exhibited in the standard genetic background, and we confirmed that wpk1 is allelic to vp8. Further genetic analysis revealed that the standard vp8 stock contains an unlinked, partially dominant suppressor of the vp8 mutation that is not present in W22. Consistent with the early-onset viviparous phenotype of vp8, expression of several embryonic regulators, including LEC1/B3 domain transcription factors, was reduced in the mutant embryo. Moreover, reduced abscisic acid (ABA) content of vp8/wpk1 embryos was correlated with altered regulation of ABA biosynthesis, as well as ABA catabolic pathways. The ABA biosynthetic gene Vp14 was down-regulated in the nonsuppressed background, whereas the ZmABA8'oxA1a ABA 8'-hydroxylase gene was strongly up-regulated in both genetic backgrounds. Molecular analysis revealed that Vp8 encodes a putative peptidase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1. Because the Vp8 regulates meristem development as well as seed maturation processes, including ABA accumulation, we propose that VP8 is required for synthesis of an unidentified signal that integrates meristem and embryo formation in seeds.

  18. Molecular Profiling of the Developing Lacrimal Gland Reveals Putative Role of Notch Signaling in Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Tao, Wensi; Pappas, Steve; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Tse, David T.; Ivanov, Dmitry; Pelaez, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Although normal function of the lacrimal gland is essential for vision (and thus for human well-being), the lacrimal gland remains rather poorly understood at a molecular level. The purpose of this study was to identify new genes and signaling cascades involved in lacrimal gland development. Methods To identify these genes, we used microarray analysis to compare the gene expression profiles of developing (embryonic) and adult lacrimal glands. Differential data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR, and several corresponding proteins were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. To evaluate the role of NOTCH signaling in lacrimal gland (LG) development, we used the NOTCH inhibitor DAPT and conditional Notch1 knockouts. Results Our microarray data and an in silico reconstruction of cellular networks revealed significant changes in the expression patterns of genes from the NOTCH, WNT, TGFβ, and Hedgehog pathways, all of which are involved in the regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our study also revealed new putative lacrimal gland stem cell/progenitor markers. We found that inhibiting Notch signaling both increases the average number of lacrimal gland lobules and reduces the size of each lobule. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NOTCH-, WNT-, TGFβ-, and Hedgehog-regulated EMT transition are critical mechanisms in lacrimal gland development and morphogenesis. Our data also supports the hypothesis that NOTCH signaling regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing lacrimal gland by suppressing cleft formation. PMID:28192800

  19. An integrated cell purification and genomics strategy reveals multiple regulators of pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Cecil M; Qu, Kun; Sugiyama, Takuya; Pauerstein, Philip T; Liu, Yinghua; Tsai, Jennifer; Gu, Xueying; Ghodasara, Amar; Arda, H Efsun; Zhang, Jiajing; Dekker, Joseph D; Tucker, Haley O; Chang, Howard Y; Kim, Seung K

    2014-10-01

    The regulatory logic underlying global transcriptional programs controlling development of visceral organs like the pancreas remains undiscovered. Here, we profiled gene expression in 12 purified populations of fetal and adult pancreatic epithelial cells representing crucial progenitor cell subsets, and their endocrine or exocrine progeny. Using probabilistic models to decode the general programs organizing gene expression, we identified co-expressed gene sets in cell subsets that revealed patterns and processes governing progenitor cell development, lineage specification, and endocrine cell maturation. Purification of Neurog3 mutant cells and module network analysis linked established regulators such as Neurog3 to unrecognized gene targets and roles in pancreas development. Iterative module network analysis nominated and prioritized transcriptional regulators, including diabetes risk genes. Functional validation of a subset of candidate regulators with corresponding mutant mice revealed that the transcription factors Etv1, Prdm16, Runx1t1 and Bcl11a are essential for pancreas development. Our integrated approach provides a unique framework for identifying regulatory genes and functional gene sets underlying pancreas development and associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lin; Twell, David; Kuang, Yanfeng; Liao, Jingping; Zhou, Xianqiang

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the anther transcriptome on non-model plants without a known genome are surprisingly scarce. RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling provides a comprehensive approach to identify candidate genes contributing to developmental processes in non-model species. Here we built a transcriptome library of developing anthers of Hamelia patens and analyzed DGE profiles from each stage to identify genes that regulate tapetum and pollen development. In total 7,720 putative differentially expressed genes across four anther stages were identified. The number of putative stage-specific genes was: 776 at microspore mother cell stage, 807 at tetrad stage, 322 at uninucleate microspore stage, and the highest number (1,864) at bicellular pollen stage. GO enrichment analysis revealed 243 differentially expressed and 108 stage-specific genes that are potentially related to tapetum development, sporopollenin synthesis, and pollen wall. The number of expressed genes, their function and expression profiles were all significantly correlated with anther developmental processes. Overall comparisons of anther and pollen transcriptomes with those of rice and Arabidopsis together with the expression profiles of homologs of known anther-expressed genes, revealed conserved patterns and also divergence. The divergence may reflect taxon-specific differences in gene expression, the use RNA-seq as a more sensitive methodology, variation in tissue composition and sampling strategies. Given the lack of genomic sequence, this study succeeded in assigning putative identity to a significant proportion of anther-expressed genes and genes relevant to tapetum and pollen development in H. patens. The anther transcriptome revealed a molecular distinction between developmental stages, serving as a resource to unravel the functions of genes involved in anther development in H. patens and informing the analysis of other members of the Rubiaceae. PMID:28119704

  1. Increased maternal nutrition alters development of the appetite-regulating network in the brain.

    PubMed

    Muhlhausler, B S; Adam, C L; Findlay, P A; Duffield, J A; McMillen, I C

    2006-06-01

    Individuals exposed to an increased nutrient supply before birth have a high risk of becoming obese children and adults. It has been proposed that exposure of the fetus to high maternal nutrient intake results in permanent changes within the central appetite regulatory network. No studies, however, have investigated the impact of increased maternal nutrition on the appetite regulatory network in species in which this network develops before birth, as in the human. In the present study, pregnant ewes were fed a diet which provided 100% (control, n = 8) or approximately 160% (well-fed, n = 8) of metabolizable energy requirements. Ewes were allowed to lamb spontaneously, and lambs were sacrificed at 30 days of postnatal age. All fat depots were dissected and weighed, and expression of the appetite-regulating neuropeptides and the leptin receptor (OBRb) were determined by in situ hybridization. Lambs of well-fed ewes had higher glucose (Glc) concentrations during early postnatal life (F = 5.93, P<0.01) and a higher relative subcutaneous (s.c.) fat mass at 30 days of age (34.9+/-4.7 g/kg vs. 22.8+/-3.3 g/kg; P<0.05). The hypothalamic expression of pro-opiomelanocortin was higher in lambs of well-fed ewes (0.48+/-0.09 vs. 0.28+/-0.04, P<0.05). In lambs of overnourished mothers, but not in controls, the expression of OBRb was inversely related to total relative fat mass (r2 = 0.50, P = 0.05, n = 8), and the direct relationship between the expression of the central appetite inhibitor CART and fat mass was lost. The expression of neuropeptide Y and AGRP was inversely related to total relative fat mass (NPY, r2 = 0.28, P<0.05; agouti-related peptide, r2 = 0.39, P<0.01). These findings suggest that exposure to increased nutrition before birth alters the responses of the central appetite regulatory system to signals of increased adiposity after birth.

  2. Intracerebroventricular kainic acid administration to neonatal rats alters interneuron development in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongxin; Csernansky, Cynthia A; Chu, Yunxiang; Csernansky, John G

    2003-10-10

    The effects of neonatal exposure to excitotoxins on the development of interneurons have not been well characterized, but may be relevant to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, the excitotoxin, kainic acid (KA) was administered to rats at postnatal day 7 (P7) by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion. At P14, P25, P40 and P60, Nissl staining and immunohistochemical studies with the interneuron markers, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67), calbindin-D28k (CB) and parvalbumin (PV) were performed in the hippocampus. In control animals, the total number of interneurons, as well as the number of interneurons stained with GAD-67, CB and PV, was nearly constant from P14 through P60. In KA-treated rats, Nissl staining, GAD-67 staining, and CB staining revealed a progressive decline in the overall number of interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields from P14 to P60. In contrast, PV staining in KA-treated rats showed initial decreases in the number of interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields at P14 followed by increases that approached control levels by P60. These results suggest that, in general, early exposure to the excitotoxin KA decreases the number of hippocampal interneurons, but has a more variable effect on the specific population of interneurons labeled by PV. The functional impact of these changes may be relevant to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.

  3. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  4. Transcriptome using Illumina sequencing reveals the traits of spermatogenesis and developing testes in Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) has the spermatozoa with typical aflagellate, decondensed chromatin, cup-shaped nuclei, and radial arms. However, the mechanism of spermatogenesis during which the specific spermatozoa are generated in this species is yet unclear. Here, the transcriptome of developing testis in E. sinensis was analyzed using the ways of RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis to identify candidate genes potentially involved in development of testis and spermatogenesis. The Illumina HiSeq2500 sequencing of three replicons of samples produced a total of 145.19 M clean reads representing with a total of 21.34 Gb bases and 45.48% GC content. 56.30% clean reads were mapped to the draft genome of E. sinensis. The assembly of the transcriptome yielded contigs of 5691802 sequences and unigenes of 406527 sequences. Total 24246 and 40793 transcripts were annotated using Swissprot and Nr database, respectively. There were 48213 (70.31%) and 7858 (46.25%) transcripts with identity of more than 99 matching to mature testis unigenes in the databases of Nr and EST, respectively. The analytic results of KOG, GO and KEGG showed wide potential molecular functions of transcripts in the developing testes. KEGG analysis of unigenes yielded total 9422 predicted genes. Those predicted genes were involved in total 216 KEGG pathways related to the physiological activities of developing testis. 1975 predicted genes were involved in cellular and subcellular structural alteration of male germ cells. There were important roles of some pathways in the processes of morphological and structural biogenesis pertaining to testis development and spermatogenesis. Other 583 unigenes encoding the genetic and epigenetic factors also be found, which might contribute to the decondensation and stability of decondensed nuclei in the spermatozoa. These predicted events provide a view of the potential molecular mechanisms of development of testis and spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. PMID

  5. Octylphenol and UV-B radiation alter larval development and hypothalamic gene expression in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Douglas; Lean, David; Trudeau, Vance L

    2002-01-01

    We assessed octylphenol (OP), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical, and UV-B radiation, a known stressor in amphibian development, for their effects on hypothalamic gene expression and premetamorphic development in the leopard frog Rana pipiens. Newly hatched tadpoles were exposed for 10 days to OP alone at two different dose levels; to subambient UV-B radiation alone; and to two combinations of OP and UV-B. Control animals were exposed to ethanol vehicle (0.01%) exposure, a subset of tadpoles from each treatment group was raised to metamorphosis to assess differences in body weight and time required for hindlimb emergence. Tadpoles from one of the OP/UV-B combination groups had greater body weight and earlier hindlimb emergence (p < 0.05), but neither OP nor UV-B alone produced significant changes in body weight or hindlimb emergence, indicating a potential mechanism of interaction between OP and UV-B. We hypothesized that the developing hypothalamus might be a potential environmental sensor for neurotoxicologic studies because of its role in the endocrine control of metamorphosis. We used a differential display strategy to identify candidate genes differentially expressed in the hypothalamic region of the exposed tadpoles. Homology cloning was performed to obtain R. pipiens glutamate decarboxylases--GAD65 and GAD67, enzymes involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). cDNA expression profiles revealed that OP and UV-B affected the levels of several candidate transcripts in tadpole (i.e., Nck, Ash, and phospholipase C gamma-binding protein 4 and brain angiogenesis inhibitor-3) and metamorph (i.e., GAD67, cytochrome C oxidase, and brain angiogenesis inhibitor-2 and -3) brains. This study represents a novel approach in toxicology that combines physiologic and molecular end points and indicates that levels of OP commonly found in the environment and subambient levels of UV-B alter the expression of important hypothalamic

  6. Metabolite profiling reveals clear metabolic changes during somatic embryo development of Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Businge, Edward; Brackmann, Klaus; Moritz, Thomas; Egertsdotter, Ulrika

    2012-02-01

    Progress on industrial-scale propagation of conifers by somatic embryogenesis has been hampered by the differences in developmental capabilities between cell lines, which are limiting the capture of genetic gains from breeding programs. In this study, we investigated the metabolic events occurring during somatic embryo development in Norway spruce to establish a better understanding of the fundamental metabolic events required for somatic embryo development. Three embryogenic cell lines of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) with different developmental capabilities were studied during somatic embryo development from proliferation of proembryogenic masses to mature somatic embryos. The three different cell lines displayed normal, aberrant and blocked somatic embryo development. Metabolite profiles from four development stages in each of the cell lines were obtained using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate discriminant analyses of the metabolic data revealed significant metabolites (P  ≤  0.05) for each development stage and transition. The results suggest that endogenous auxin and sugar signaling affects initial stages of somatic embryo development. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of a timed stress response and the presence of stimulatory metabolites during late stages of embryo development.

  7. Task and Resting-State fMRI Reveal Altered Salience Responses to Positive Stimuli in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhong, Ning; Imamura, Kazuyuki; Lu, Shengfu; Li, Mi; Zhou, Haiyan; Li, Huaizhou; Yang, Xiaojing; Wan, Zhijiang; Wang, Gang; Hu, Bin; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain function in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been repeatedly demonstrated by task-based and resting-state studies, respectively. However, less is known concerning whether overlapped abnormalities in functional activities across modalities exist in MDD patients. To find out the answer, we implemented an fMRI experiment and collected both task and resting-state data from 19 MDD patients and 19 matched, healthy, controls. A distraction paradigm involving emotionally valenced pictures was applied to induce affective responses in subjects. As a result, concurrent deficits were found in arousing activation during a positive task in both the reward circuit and salience network (SN) that is composed of the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and bilateral anterior insulae (AI) in only the MDD group. Subsequent amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and functional connectivity analyses based on resting-state data exhibited consistent alterations in the bilateral AI of MDD patients, and indicated patients’ difficulties in regulating the balance between central executive network (CEN) and default mode network (DMN) due to altered connectivity among the CEN, DMN, and SN. Our findings provide new evidence demonstrating impaired salience processing and resulting alterations in responses to positive stimuli in MDD patients. Furthermore, brain abnormalities synchronized across functional states in MDD patients can be evidenced by a combination of task and resting-state fMRI analyses. PMID:27192082

  8. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J C; Van Leeuwen, Fred W; Dantuma, Nico P; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin.

  9. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J. C.; Van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin. PMID:25343989

  10. A BAFF-R mutation associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma alters TRAF recruitment and reveals new insights into BAFF-R signaling.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Joanne M; Luo, Zhenghua; Manske, Michelle K; Price-Troska, Tammy; Ziesmer, Steven C; Lin, Wai; Hostager, Bruce S; Slager, Susan L; Witzig, Thomas E; Ansell, Stephen M; Cerhan, James R; Bishop, Gail A; Novak, Anne J

    2010-11-22

    The cytokine B cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptor, BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), modulate signaling cascades critical for B cell development and survival. We identified a novel mutation in TNFRSF13C, the gene encoding human BAFF-R, that is present in both tumor and germline tissue from a subset of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This mutation encodes a His159Tyr substitution in the cytoplasmic tail of BAFF-R adjacent to the TRAF3 binding motif. Signaling through this mutant BAFF-R results in increased NF-κB1 and NF-κB2 activity and increased immunoglobulin production compared with the wild-type (WT) BAFF-R. This correlates with increased TRAF2, TRAF3, and TRAF6 recruitment to His159Tyr BAFF-R. In addition, we document a requirement for TRAF6 in WT BAFF-R signaling. Together, these data identify a novel lymphoma-associated mutation in human BAFF-R that results in NF-κB activation and reveals TRAF6 as a necessary component of normal BAFF-R signaling.

  11. Hurricane Sandy Exposure Alters the Development of Neural Reactivity to Negative Stimuli in Children.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Ellen M; Nelson, Brady D; Kujawa, Autumn; Hajcak, Greg; Kotov, Roman; Bromet, Evelyn J; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Klein, Daniel N

    2016-12-15

    This study examined whether exposure to Hurricane Sandy-related stressors altered children's brain response to emotional information. An average of 8 months (Mage  = 9.19) before and 9 months after (Mage  = 10.95) Hurricane Sandy, 77 children experiencing high (n = 37) and low (n = 40) levels of hurricane-related stress exposure completed a task in which the late positive potential, a neural index of emotional reactivity, was measured in response to pleasant and unpleasant, compared to neutral, images. From pre- to post-Hurricane Sandy, children with high stress exposure failed to show the same decrease in emotional reactivity to unpleasant versus neutral stimuli as those with low stress exposure. Results provide compelling evidence that exposure to natural disaster-related stressors alters neural emotional reactivity to negatively valenced information.

  12. Development and validation of a postmortem radiological alteration index: the RA-Index.

    PubMed

    Egger, C; Vaucher, P; Doenz, F; Palmiere, C; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to derive an index quantifying the state of alteration of cadavers by quantifying the presence of gas in the body using postmortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging, and to validate the index by defining its sensitivity and specificity. The RA (radiological alteration)-index was derived from postmortem MDCT data from 118 nontraumatically deceased people. To validate the index, 100 additional scanned bodies (50 % traumatically deceased) were retrospectively examined by two independent observers. Presence of gas at 82 sites was assessed by a radiologist, whereas a forensic pathologist only investigated the seven sites used for the RA-index. The RA-index was highly correlated to the overall presence of gas in all 82 sites (R(2) = 0.98 in the derivation set and 0.85 in the validation set). Semiquantitative evaluation of gas presence in each site showed moderate reliability (Cohen's kappa range, 0.41-0.78); nevertheless, the overall RA-index was very reliable (ICC(2,1) = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.92-0.96). Examiner using the RA-index detected heart cavities full of gas with a sensitivity of 100 % (95 % CI 51.7-100) and a specificity of 98.8 % (92.6-99.9). We conclude that determining the presence of gas at seven sites is a valid means to measure the distribution of gas due to cadaveric alteration in the entire body. The RA-index is rapid, easy-to-use, and reliable for nonexperienced users, and it is a valid method to suspect the normal presence of gas from cadaveric alteration. MDCT can be used to screen for gas embolism and to give indications for gas composition analysis (gas chromatography).

  13. Development of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) lines with altered starch granule size distribution.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sarita; Båga, Monica; Ahuja, Geetika; Rossnagel, Brian G; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2014-03-12

    Microscope analysis of starches prepared from 139 barley genotypes identified a Japanese genotype, Kinai Kyoshinkai-2 (KK-2), with altered starch granule size distribution. Compared to normal barley starch, KK-2 produced consistently higher volumes of starch granules with 5-15 μm diameter and reduced volumes of starch granules with >15 μm diameter when grown in different environments. A cross between KK-2 and normal starch cultivar CDC Kendall was made and led to the production of 154 F5 lines with alterations to the normal 7:3:1 distribution for A-:B-:C-type starch granule volumes. Three F5 lines showed unimodal starch granule size distribution due to apparent lack of very small (<5.0 μm diameter) C-type starch granules, but the phenotype was accompanied by reduced grain weight and total starch concentration. Five F5 lines produced a significantly larger population of large (>15 μm diameter) A-type starch granules as compared to normal starch and showed on average a 10:4:1 distribution for A-:B-:C-type starch granule volumes. The unusual starch phenotypes displayed by the F5 lines confirm starch granule size distribution in barley can be genetically altered.

  14. Alteration of gene expression in human cells treated with the agricultural chemical diazinon: possible interaction in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Mankame, T; Hokanson, R; Fudge, R; Chowdhary, R; Busbee, D

    2006-05-01

    Agricultural chemicals frequently alter human health or development, typically because they have endocrine agonist or antagonist activities and alter hormone-regulation of gene expression. The insecticide, diazinon, was evaluated for gene expression disrupting activity using MCF-7 cells, an estrogen-dependent human cell line, to examine the capacity of the insecticide to disrupt gene expression essential for morphological development, immune system development or function, and/or central nervous system development and function. MCF-7 cells were treated with 30, 50 or 67 ppm diazinon, and gene expression was measured in treated cells compared to expression in untreated or estrogen-treated cells. DNA microarray analysis of diazinon-treated cells showed significant up- or down-regulation of a large number of genes compared to untreated cells. Of the 600 human genes on the Phase 1 chip utilized for these studies, two specific genes--calreticulin and TGF-beta3--were selected for corroboration using quantitative real time PCR (qrtPCR). qrtPCR, completed to assess gene expression levels for calreticulin and TGFbeta3, confirmed results showing significant up-regulation of these two genes obtained from the microarray data. These studies were designed to provide baseline data on the gene expression-altering capacity of a specific chemical, diazinon, and allow a partial assessment of the potentially deleterious effects associated with exposure of human cells to this chemical. Currently, it is not known whether results from cells in vitro can be extrapolated to human health consequences of chemical exposure.

  15. Transcriptional role of cyclin D1 in development revealed by a “genetic-proteomic” screen

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenu, Frédéric; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Elias, Joshua E.; Meyer, Clifford A.; Mizeracka, Karolina; Marson, Alexander; Frampton, Garrett M.; Cole, Megan F.; Odom, Duncan T.; Odajima, Junko; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jecrois, Marie; Young, Richard A.; Liu, X. Shirley; Cepko, Constance L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Sicinski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin D1 belongs to the core cell cycle machinery, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers1,2. The full repertoire of cyclin D1 functions in normal development and in oncogenesis is currently unclear. Here we developed FLAG- and HA-tagged cyclin D1 knock-in mouse strains that allowed high-throughput mass spectrometry approach to search for cyclin D1-binding proteins in different mouse organs. In addition to cell cycle partners, we observed several proteins involved in transcription. Genome-wide location (ChIP-chip) analyses revealed that during mouse development cyclin D1 occupies promoters of abundantly expressed genes. In particular, we found that in developing mouse retinas – an organ that critically requires cyclin D1 function3,4 – cyclin D1 binds the upstream regulatory region of the Notch1 gene where it serves to recruit CBP histone acetyltransferase. Genetic ablation of cyclin D1 resulted in decreased CBP recruitment, decreased histone acetylation of the Notch1 promoter region, and led to decreased levels of the Notch transcript and protein in cyclin D1-null retinas. Transduction of an activated allele of Notch1 into cyclin D1−/− retinas increased proliferation of retinal progenitor cells, indicating that upregulating Notch1 signaling alleviates the phenotype of cyclin D1-deficiency. These studies reveal that in addition to its well-established cell cycle roles, cyclin D1 plays an in vivo transcriptional function in mouse development. Our approach, which we term “genetic-proteomic” can be used to study the in vivo function of essentially any protein. PMID:20090754

  16. Rap1 overexpression reveals that activated RasD induces separable defects during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Louis, S A; Weeks, G; Spiegelman, G B

    1997-10-15

    One of the Dictyostelium ras genes, rasD, is expressed preferentially in prestalk cells at the slug stage of development and overexpression of this gene containing a G12T activating mutation causes the formation of aberrant multitipped aggregates that are blocked from further development (Reymond et al., 1986, Nature, 323, 340-343). The ability of the Dictyostelium rap1 gene to suppress this abnormal developmental phenotype was investigated. The rap1 gene and G12V activated and G10V negative mutant forms of the rap1 gene were independently linked to the rasD promoter and each construct used to transform M1, a Dictyostelium cell line expressing RasD[G12T]. Transformants of M1 that expressed Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] protein still formed multitipped aggregates, but most tips were able to complete development and form fruiting bodies. Cell lines showing this modified phenotype were designated ME (multitipped escape). The rap1[G10V] construct did not modify the M1 phenotype. These data suggest that overexpression of RasD[G12T] has two effects, the formation of a multitipped aggregate and a block in subsequent differentiation and that the expression of Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] reverses only the latter. Differentiation of ME cells in low density monolayers showed the identical low level of stalk and spore cell formation seen for M1 cells under the same conditions. Thus the cell autonomous defect in monolayer differentiation induced in the M1 strain was not corrected in the ME strain. Cell type-specific gene expression during the development of M1 cells is dramatically altered: prestalk cell-specific gene expression is greatly enhanced, whereas prespore-specific gene expression is almost suppressed (Louis et al., 1997, Mol. Biol. Cell, 8, 303-312). During the development of ME cells, ecmA mRNA levels were restored to those seen for Ax3, and tagB mRNA levels were also markedly reduced, although not to Ax3 levels. cotC expression in ME cells was enhanced severalfold relative to M1

  17. Melanogenesis stimulation in B16-F10 melanoma cells induces cell cycle alterations, increased ROS levels and a differential expression of proteins as revealed by proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, Elizabeth S.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Kadowaki, Marina K.; Amstalden, Hudson G.; Noleto, Guilhermina R.; Cadena, Silvia Maria S.C.; Winnischofer, Sheila M.B.; Martinez, Glaucia R.

    2012-09-10

    Considering that stimulation of melanogenesis may lead to alterations of cellular responses, besides melanin production, our main goal was to study the cellular effects of melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results show increased levels of the reactive oxygen species after 15 h of melanogenesis stimulation. Following 48 h of melanogenesis stimulation, proliferation was inhibited (by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase) and the expression levels of p21 mRNA were increased. In addition, melanogenesis stimulation did not induce cellular senescence. Proteomic analysis demonstrated the involvement of proteins from other pathways besides those related to the cell cycle, including protein disulfide isomerase A3, heat-shock protein 70, and fructose biphosphate aldolase A (all up-regulated), and lactate dehydrogenase (down-regulated). In RT-qPCR experiments, the levels of pyruvate kinase M2 mRNA dropped, whereas the levels of ATP synthase (beta-F1) mRNA increased. These data indicate that melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 cells leads to alterations in metabolism and cell cycle progression that may contribute to an induction of cell quiescence, which may provide a mechanism of resistance against cellular injury promoted by melanin synthesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis stimulation by L-tyrosine+NH{sub 4}Cl in B16-F10 melanoma cells increases ROS levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis inhibits cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteomic analysis showed alterations in proteins of the cell cycle and glucose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RT-qPCR analysis confirmed alterations of metabolic targets after melanogenesis stimulation.

  18. Transcriptomics Profiling of Alzheimer’s Disease Reveal Neurovascular Defects, Altered Amyloid-β Homeostasis, and Deregulated Expression of Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Magistri, Marco; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Makhmutova, Madina; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The underlying genetic variations of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) cases remain largely unknown. A combination of genetic variations with variable penetrance and lifetime epigenetic factors may converge on transcriptomic alterations that drive LOAD pathological process. Transcriptome profiling using deep sequencing technology offers insight into common altered pathways regardless of underpinning genetic or epigenetic factors and thus represents an ideal tool to investigate molecular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of LOAD. We performed directional RNA sequencing on high quality RNA samples extracted from hippocampi of LOAD and age-matched controls. We further validated our data using qRT-PCR on a larger set of postmortem brain tissues, confirming downregulation of the gene encoding substance P (TAC1) and upregulation of the gene encoding the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (SERPINE1). Pathway analysis indicates dysregulation in neural communication, cerebral vasculature, and amyloid-β clearance. Beside protein coding genes, we identified several annotated and non-annotated long noncoding RNAs that are differentially expressed in LOAD brain tissues, three of them are activity-dependent regulated and one is induced by Aβ1 - 42 exposure of human neural cells. Our data provide a comprehensive list of transcriptomics alterations in LOAD hippocampi and warrant holistic approach including both coding and non-coding RNAs in functional studies aimed to understand the pathophysiology of LOAD. PMID:26402107

  19. Prenatal exposure to cannabinoids evokes long-lasting functional alterations by targeting CB1 receptors on developing cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Salas-Quiroga, Adán; Díaz-Alonso, Javier; García-Rincón, Daniel; Remmers, Floortje; Vega, David; Gómez-Cañas, María; Lutz, Beat; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the main target of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most prominent psychoactive compound of marijuana, plays a crucial regulatory role in brain development as evidenced by the neurodevelopmental consequences of its manipulation in animal models. Likewise, recreational cannabis use during pregnancy affects brain structure and function of the progeny. However, the precise neurobiological substrates underlying the consequences of prenatal THC exposure remain unknown. As CB1 signaling is known to modulate long-range corticofugal connectivity, we analyzed the impact of THC exposure on cortical projection neuron development. THC administration to pregnant mice in a restricted time window interfered with subcerebral projection neuron generation, thereby altering corticospinal connectivity, and produced long-lasting alterations in the fine motor performance of the adult offspring. Consequences of THC exposure were reminiscent of those elicited by CB1 receptor genetic ablation, and CB1-null mice were resistant to THC-induced alterations. The identity of embryonic THC neuronal targets was determined by a Cre-mediated, lineage-specific, CB1 expression-rescue strategy in a CB1-null background. Early and selective CB1 reexpression in dorsal telencephalic glutamatergic neurons but not forebrain GABAergic neurons rescued the deficits in corticospinal motor neuron development of CB1-null mice and restored susceptibility to THC-induced motor alterations. In addition, THC administration induced an increase in seizure susceptibility that was mediated by its interference with CB1-dependent regulation of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neuron development. These findings demonstrate that prenatal exposure to THC has long-lasting deleterious consequences in the adult offspring solely mediated by its ability to disrupt the neurodevelopmental role of CB1 signaling. PMID:26460022

  20. Prenatal exposure to cannabinoids evokes long-lasting functional alterations by targeting CB1 receptors on developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    de Salas-Quiroga, Adán; Díaz-Alonso, Javier; García-Rincón, Daniel; Remmers, Floortje; Vega, David; Gómez-Cañas, María; Lutz, Beat; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2015-11-03

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the main target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most prominent psychoactive compound of marijuana, plays a crucial regulatory role in brain development as evidenced by the neurodevelopmental consequences of its manipulation in animal models. Likewise, recreational cannabis use during pregnancy affects brain structure and function of the progeny. However, the precise neurobiological substrates underlying the consequences of prenatal THC exposure remain unknown. As CB1 signaling is known to modulate long-range corticofugal connectivity, we analyzed the impact of THC exposure on cortical projection neuron development. THC administration to pregnant mice in a restricted time window interfered with subcerebral projection neuron generation, thereby altering corticospinal connectivity, and produced long-lasting alterations in the fine motor performance of the adult offspring. Consequences of THC exposure were reminiscent of those elicited by CB1 receptor genetic ablation, and CB1-null mice were resistant to THC-induced alterations. The identity of embryonic THC neuronal targets was determined by a Cre-mediated, lineage-specific, CB1 expression-rescue strategy in a CB1-null background. Early and selective CB1 reexpression in dorsal telencephalic glutamatergic neurons but not forebrain GABAergic neurons rescued the deficits in corticospinal motor neuron development of CB1-null mice and restored susceptibility to THC-induced motor alterations. In addition, THC administration induced an increase in seizure susceptibility that was mediated by its interference with CB1-dependent regulation of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neuron development. These findings demonstrate that prenatal exposure to THC has long-lasting deleterious consequences in the adult offspring solely mediated by its ability to disrupt the neurodevelopmental role of CB1 signaling.

  1. Beyond eye gaze: What else can eyetracking reveal about cognition and cognitive development?

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Maria K; Guerra-Carrillo, Belén; Miller Singley, Alison T; Bunge, Silvia A

    2016-11-11

    This review provides an introduction to two eyetracking measures that can be used to study cognitive development and plasticity: pupil dilation and spontaneous blink rate. We begin by outlining the rich history of gaze analysis, which can reveal the current focus of attention as well as cognitive strategies. We then turn to the two lesser-utilized ocular measures. Pupil dilation is modulated by the brain's locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system, which controls physiological arousal and attention, and has been used as a measure of subjective task difficulty, mental effort, and neural gain. Spontaneous eyeblink rate correlates with levels of dopamine in the central nervous system, and can reveal processes underlying learning and goal-directed behavior. Taken together, gaze, pupil dilation, and blink rate are three non-invasive and complementary measures of cognition with high temporal resolution and well-understood neural foundations. Here we review the neural foundations of pupil dilation and blink rate, provide examples of their usage, describe analytic methods and methodological considerations, and discuss their potential for research on learning, cognitive development, and plasticity.

  2. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans protein farnesyltransferase reveal strategies for developing inhibitors that target fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hast, Michael A; Nichols, Connie B; Armstrong, Stephanie M; Kelly, Shannon M; Hellinga, Homme W; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Beese, Lorena S

    2011-10-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  3. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  4. Outcome revealed by preference in schizophrenia (OPS): development of a new class of outcome measurements.

    PubMed

    Falissard, Bruno; Bazin, Nadine; Hardy-Bayle, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a new type of outcome measurement, based on revealed preference, which can be used in serious chronic illnesses. Fifteen texts of about 200 words each were written by one of the authors on the day-to-day life of 15 schizophrenic patients. These 15 'slices of life' thus described were then ranked in terms of acceptability by a second group of 10 schizophrenic patients and by a group of 12 relatives of schizophrenic patients. From these rankings, six situations were selected so as to obtain evenly distributed positioning on an axis of acceptability. These six situations comprised the final instrument. In administration, the patients were first asked if the 'slices of life' that were described were acceptable or not, then if the 'slices of life' described were more or less acceptable than their own lives. Two scores were derived, one for an absolute level and the other for a relative level of the patient's satisfaction with his or her existence. Validation results were presented to a new sample of 229 schizophrenic patients. Internal consistency appeared good and the initial ranking of the six situations in terms of acceptability was confirmed. This study encourages the development of global outcome measures based on revealed preference in chronic serious illnesses.

  5. Overcrowding-mediated stress alters cell proliferation in key neuroendocrine areas during larval development in Rhinella arenarum.

    PubMed

    Distler, Mijal J; Jungblut, Lucas D; Ceballos, Nora R; Paz, Dante A; Pozzi, Andrea G

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to adverse environmental conditions can elicit a stress response, which results in an increase in endogenous corticosterone levels. In early life stages, it has been thoroughly demonstrated that amphibian larval growth and development is altered as a consequence of chronic stress by interfering with the metamorphic process, however, the underlying mechanisms involved have only been partially disentangled. We examined the effect of intraspecific competition on corticosterone levels during larval development of the toad Rhinella arenarum and its ultimate effects on cell proliferation in particular brain areas as well as the pituitary gland. While overcrowding altered the number of proliferating cells in the pituitary gland, hypothalamus, and third ventricle of the brain, no differences were observed in areas which are less associated with neuroendocrine processes, such as the first ventricle of the brain. Apoptosis was increased in hypothalamic regions but not in the pituitary. With regards to pituitary cell populations, thyrotrophs but not somatoatrophs and corticotrophs showed a decrease in the cell number in overcrowded larvae. Our study shows that alterations in growth and development, produced by stress, results from an imbalance in the neuroendocrine systems implicated in orchestrating the timing of metamorphosis.

  6. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  7. Soluble Endoglin Level Increase Occurs Prior to Development of Subclinical Structural Vascular Alterations in Diabetic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Bideci, Aysun; Damar, Çağrı; Derinkuyu, Betül; Çelik, Nurullah; Döğer, Esra; Yüce, Özge; Özmen, Mehmet Cüneyt; Çamurdan, Mahmut Orhun; Cinaz, Peyami

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Soluble endoglin (S-endoglin) has been implicated as a potential marker of endothelial dysfunction (ED) and was reported to be elevated in diabetic adults, correlating with the severity of diabetic vasculopathy. However, circulating S-endoglin and its association with other markers of ED have not been formerly analyzed in the first decade of diabetes onset in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: Fifty-eight adolescents with moderately/poorly controlled T1DM were included in this study and twenty-nine healthy adolescents served as controls. The diabetic group was divided into two groups based on the presence of microalbuminuria, as the microalbuminuria group (n=15) and the normoalbuminuria group (n=43). Functional vascular alterations were evaluated by measuring serum S-endoglin and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) was measured for evaluation of structural vascular alterations. Results: The S-endoglin and NO levels of both microalbuminuria and normoalbuminuria groups were higher than those of the control group (for S-endoglin, p=0.047 and p<0.001; for NO, p=0.004 and p=0.006, respectively). The FMD percent was lower in the microalbuminuria group compared to the normoalbuminuria and control groups (p=0.036 and p=0.020, respectively). There were negative correlations between S-endoglin concentration and FMD percent (r=-0.213, p=0.051) and between serum S-endoglin concentration and albumin excretion rate (r=-0.361, p=0.005). No significant differences were found in CIMT among any of the groups (p=0.443). Conclusion: In adolescents with T1DM, S-endoglin concentrations might increase in parallel to the deterioration in endothelial function before subclinical structural vascular alterations become evident. PMID:27097763

  8. Non-Linear Responses to Precipitation and Shrub Encroachment in Semi-Arid Grassland: Isotopes and CO2 Fluxes Reveal Soil Microsite Alteration as Explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, J. M.; Sun, W.; Ogle, K.; Williams, D. G.; Potts, D. L.; Scott, R. L.; Huxman, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Responses of net ecosystem production (NEP) to growing season rainfall amount is non-linear over a gradient of woody-plant encroachment in semi-arid riparian grassland. NEP is positively correlated with growing season precipitation amount in the grassland, but is negatively correlated with precipitation amount in a former C4 grassland now occupied by large mesquite (Prosopis) individuals. NEP at sites with intermediate stages of mesquite encroachment have a complex, threshold response to precipitation amount. Mesquite encroachment creates patchy soil microsites and spatial variation in rooting depth and activity. We hypothesized that variation in soil microsite properties (e.g., temperature, labile carbon) and root activity affect soil CO2 efflux in such a way that explains the non-linearity in response of NEP to precipitation. We measured soil CO2 efflux during the dry pre-monsoon (early summer) and wet monsoon (mid summer) periods on old floodplain terraces along the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona. We made intensive spatial and temporal measurements of soil CO2 flux in four microsites associated with woody-plant encroachment: inter-canopy space and beneath the canopies of grasses, medium mesquite, and large mesquite. We also measured the δ13C of soil-respired CO2, which provided insight into the contribution of different sources (e.g., roots vs. microbes) to soil CO2 efflux. Soil respiration was highest beneath large mesquite near the canopy center, and lowest beneath medium mesquite and in inter-canopy spaces. The δ13C data revealed that soil respiration was dominated by a C4 signal during the pre-monsoon, but it switched to being dominated by the C3 mesquite signal during the wet monsoon period. Respiration was most sensitive to precipitation inputs beneath the large mesquite, where labile carbon in the form of mesquite litter is readily available. Conversely, soil respiration was least sensitive to precipitation in the open, inter- canopy space

  9. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZM, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases.

  10. Characterization of connexin31.1-deficient mice reveals impaired placental development.

    PubMed

    Zheng-Fischhöfer, Qingyi; Kibschull, Mark; Schnichels, Marc; Kretz, Markus; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Strotmann, Jörg; Reucher, Harald; Lynn, Bruce D; Nagy, James I; Lye, Stephen J; Winterhager, Elke; Willecke, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    The gap junction gene Connexin31.1 has been reported to be expressed predominantly in the epidermis of murine skin. To study the function of this gene, we generated mice in which the coding DNA of the Connexin31.1 gene was replaced by lacZ reporter coding DNA. Using beta-galactosidase staining, we have shown that lacZ/Connexin31.1 was expressed in the spinous and granular layers of the epidermis, in cells of olfactory epithelium and in the vomeronasal organ. During embryogenesis, Connexin31.1 was co-expressed with another isoform, Connexin31, in the post-implantation trophoblast cell lineage and, later in gestation, in placental glycogen cells. Although homozygous Connexin31.1-deficient mice were fertile and showed no morphological or functional defects in adult organs expressing this gene, 30% of the offspring expected according to Mendelian inheritance were lost between embryonic days 11.5 and 14.5 and surviving embryos were significantly reduced in weight near the end of pregnancy. Placentas of Connexin31.1-deficient embryos were reduced in weight and showed altered morphology of the spongiotrophoblast and labyrinth layer. The spongiotrophoblast formed a compact barrier at the decidual border that might restrict the maternal blood supply. We conclude that Connexin31.1 is critical for normal placental development but appears to be functionally compensated by other connexin isoforms in the embryo proper and adult mouse.

  11. Alterations induced by chronic lead exposure on the cells of circadian pacemaker of developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Rojas, Patricia; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Pérez, Oscar Gutiérrez; Montes, Sergio; Ríos, Camilo

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure alters the temporal organization of several physiological and behavioural processes in which the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus plays a fundamental role. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic early Pb exposure (CePbe) on the morphology, cellular density and relative optical density (OD) in the cells of the SCN of male rats. Female Wistar rats were exposed during gestation and lactation to a Pb solution containing 320 ppm of Pb acetate through drinking water. After weaning, the pups were maintained with the same drinking water until sacrificed at 90 days of age. Pb levels in the blood, hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were significantly increased in the experimental group. Chronic early Pb exposure induced a significant increase in the minor and major axes and somatic area of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and vasopressin (VP)-immunoreactive neurons. The density of VIP-, VP- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells showed a significant decrease in the experimental group. OD analysis showed a significant increase in VIP neurons of the experimental group. The results showed that CePbe induced alterations in the cells of the SCN, as evidenced by modifications in soma morphology, cellular density and OD in circadian pacemaker cells. These findings provide a morphological and cellular basis for deficits in circadian rhythms documented in Pb-exposed animals. PMID:21324006

  12. Altering conditions for student participation and motive development in school science: learning from Helena's mistake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrée, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Previous research on science education has described various factors influencing students' participation and produced categorizations of students based on e.g. cultural background. In this article it is argued, theoretically and empirically, that an understanding of students' participation in science education needs to begin with an analysis of what activity students are engaged in. The aim is to explore how altering conditions of classroom work may open up opportunities for students mainly participating in an activity of education or schooling to engage in an activity of science learning. Activity is conceptualized in a Cultural-Historical Activity Theory perspective as object-oriented and transformative. Drawing on an ethnographic study in a Swedish compulsory school, a critical incident of the participation in science education of a 7th grade girl called Helena is analyzed. The results show that altered conditions of classroom practice may produce new possibilities for student participation, and point to the impossibility of determining students as `different kinds of students' based on a priori categories e.g. sex, ethnicity, socio-economic background.

  13. Altered branching patterns of Purkinje cells in mouse model for cortical development disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyung; Kwon, Namseop; Chang, Soeun; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Yun, So Jeong; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Jee Woong; Hwu, Yeukuang; Margaritondo, Giorgio; Je, Jung Ho; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2011-01-01

    Disrupted cortical cytoarchitecture in cerebellum is a typical pathology in reeler. Particularly interesting are structural problems at the cellular level: dendritic morphology has important functional implication in signal processing. Here we describe a combinatorial imaging method of synchrotron X-ray microtomography with Golgi staining, which can deliver 3-dimensional(3-D) micro-architectures of Purkinje cell(PC) dendrites, and give access to quantitative information in 3-D geometry. In reeler, we visualized in 3-D geometry the shape alterations of planar PC dendrites (i.e., abnormal 3-D arborization). Despite these alterations, the 3-D quantitative analysis of the branching patterns showed no significant changes of the 77 ± 8° branch angle, whereas the branch segment length strongly increased with large fluctuations, comparing to control. The 3-D fractal dimension of the PCs decreased from 1.723 to 1.254, indicating a significant reduction of dendritic complexity. This study provides insights into etiologies and further potential treatment options for lissencephaly and various neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. Characterization of a Viral Synergism in the Monocot Brachypodium distachyon Reveals Distinctly Altered Host Molecular Processes Associated with Disease1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Kranthi K.; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G.

    2012-01-01

    Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) and its satellite virus (SPMV) together infect several small grain crops, biofuel, and forage and turf grasses. Here, we establish the emerging monocot model Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as an alternate host to study PMV- and SPMV-host interactions and viral synergism. Infection of Brachypodium with PMV+SPMV induced chlorosis and necrosis of leaves, reduced seed set, caused stunting, and lowered biomass, more than PMV alone. Toward gaining a molecular understanding of PMV- and SPMV-affected host processes, we used a custom-designed microarray and analyzed global changes in gene expression of PMV- and PMV+SPMV-infected plants. PMV infection by itself modulated expression of putative genes functioning in carbon metabolism, photosynthesis, metabolite transport, protein modification, cell wall remodeling, and cell death. Many of these genes were additively altered in a coinfection with PMV+SPMV and correlated to the exacerbated symptoms of PMV+SPMV coinfected plants. PMV+SPMV coinfection also uniquely altered expression of certain genes, including transcription and splicing factors. Among the host defenses commonly affected in PMV and PMV+SPMV coinfections, expression of an antiviral RNA silencing component, SILENCING DEFECTIVE3, was suppressed. Several salicylic acid signaling components, such as pathogenesis-related genes and WRKY transcription factors, were up-regulated. By contrast, several genes in jasmonic acid and ethylene responses were down-regulated. Strikingly, numerous protein kinases, including several classes of receptor-like kinases, were misexpressed. Taken together, our results identified distinctly altered immune responses in monocot antiviral defenses and provide insights into monocot viral synergism. PMID:22961132

  15. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2016-10-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k-means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  16. Genome-Wide Analyses Reveal a Role for Peptide Hormones in Planarian Germline Development

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Hou, Xiaowen; Romanova, Elena V.; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Miller, Claire M.; Saberi, Amir; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive peptides (i.e., neuropeptides or peptide hormones) represent the largest class of cell-cell signaling molecules in metazoans and are potent regulators of neural and physiological function. In vertebrates, peptide hormones play an integral role in endocrine signaling between the brain and the gonads that controls reproductive development, yet few of these molecules have been shown to influence reproductive development in invertebrates. Here, we define a role for peptide hormones in controlling reproductive physiology of the model flatworm, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Based on our observation that defective neuropeptide processing results in defects in reproductive system development, we employed peptidomic and functional genomic approaches to characterize the planarian peptide hormone complement, identifying 51 prohormone genes and validating 142 peptides biochemically. Comprehensive in situ hybridization analyses of prohormone gene expression revealed the unanticipated complexity of the flatworm nervous system and identified a prohormone specifically expressed in the nervous system of sexually reproducing planarians. We show that this member of the neuropeptide Y superfamily is required for the maintenance of mature reproductive organs and differentiated germ cells in the testes. Additionally, comparative analyses of our biochemically validated prohormones with the genomes of the parasitic flatworms Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum identified new schistosome prohormones and validated half of all predicted peptide-encoding genes in these parasites. These studies describe the peptide hormone complement of a flatworm on a genome-wide scale and reveal a previously uncharacterized role for peptide hormones in flatworm reproduction. Furthermore, they suggest new opportunities for using planarians as free-living models for understanding the reproductive biology of flatworm parasites. PMID:20967238

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals long noncoding RNAs involved in fiber development in cotton (Gossypium arboreum).

    PubMed

    Zou, Changsong; Wang, Qiaolian; Lu, Cairui; Yang, Wencui; Zhang, Youping; Cheng, Hailiang; Feng, Xiaoxu; Prosper, Mtawa Andrew; Song, Guoli

    2016-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in various biological regulatory processes in yeast, mammals, and plants. However, no systematic identification of lncRNAs has been reported in Gossypium arboreum. In this study, the strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq) of samples from cotton fibers and leaves was performed, and lncRNAs involved in fiber initiation and elongation processes were systematically identified and analyzed. We identified 5,996 lncRNAs, of which 3,510 and 2,486 can be classified as long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) and natural antisense transcripts (lncNAT), respectively. LincRNAs and lncNATs are similar in many aspects, but have some differences in exon number, exon length, and transcript length. Expression analysis revealed that 51.9% of lincRNAs and 54.5% of lncNATs transcripts were preferentially expressed at one stage of fiber development, and were significantly highly expressed than protein-coding transcripts (21.7%). During the fiber and rapid elongation stages, rapid and dynamic changes in lncRNAs may contribute to fiber development in cotton. This work describes a set of lncRNAs that are involved in fiber development. The characterization and expression analysis of lncRNAs will facilitate future studies on their roles in fiber development in cotton.

  18. Separable roles of UFO during floral development revealed by conditional restoration of gene function.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Patrick; Coen, Enrico; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Traas, Jan; Doonan, John

    2003-02-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis including specification of organ identity in the second and third whorls and the proper pattern of primordium initiation in the inner three whorls. UFO is expressed in a dynamic pattern during the early phases of flower development. Here we dissect the role of UFO by ubiquitously expressing it in ufo loss-of-function flowers at different developmental stages and for various durations using an ethanol-inducible expression system. The previously known functions of UFO could be separated and related to its expression at specific stages of development. We show that a 24- to 48-hour period of UFO expression from floral stage 2, before any floral organs are visible, is sufficient to restore normal petal and stamen development. The earliest requirement for UFO is during stage 2, when the endogenous UFO gene is transiently expressed in the centre of the wild-type flower and is required to specify the initiation patterns of petal, stamen and carpel primordia. Petal and stamen identity is determined during stages 2 or 3, when UFO is normally expressed in the presumptive second and third whorl. Although endogenous UFO expression is absent from the stamen whorl from stage 4 onwards, stamen identity can be restored by UFO activation up to stage 6. We also observed floral phenotypes not observed in loss-of-function or constitutive gain-of-function backgrounds, revealing additional roles of UFO in outgrowth of petal primordia.

  19. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation.

  20. Temporal plasticity in annelid development--ontogeny of Phyllodoce groenlandica (Phyllodocidae, Annelida) reveals heterochronous patterns.

    PubMed

    Helm, Conrad; Schemel, Sina; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    The variety of annelid larval types and developmental modes reflects the high diversity and variability within these lophotrochozoans. However, our knowledge of pattern formation and tissue development in annelids and allies is scarce. In order to gain more data concerning neurogenesis and myogenesis in annelid trochophores, we analyzed different larval stages of Phyllodoce groenlandica using immunohistochemical staining techniques and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy (clsm). Focusing on pre-metamorphic stages, we reconstruct the process of tissue and body formation within planktonic polychaetous trochophore larvae. Our investigations revealed detailed knowledge of general developmental modes in Annelida and exhibit ontogenetic heterochrony of tissue development between two closely related annelid species. As such, P. groenlandica shows a delayed onset of nervous system development when compared with P. maculata. In contrast to the latter species, we were not able to detect the posterior sensory organ in larval P. groenlandica. We draw conclusions concerning general development of annelid trochophores and provide data showing new insights into the plasticity of body plans in Annelida.

  1. Increased leaf mesophyll porosity following transient retinoblastoma-related protein silencing is revealed by microcomputed tomography imaging and leads to a system-level physiological response to the altered cell division pattern.

    PubMed

    Dorca-Fornell, Carmen; Pajor, Radoslaw; Lehmeier, Christoph; Pérez-Bueno, Marísa; Bauch, Marion; Sloan, Jen; Osborne, Colin; Rolfe, Stephen; Sturrock, Craig; Mooney, Sacha; Fleming, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    The causal relationship between cell division and growth in plants is complex. Although altered expression of cell-cycle genes frequently leads to altered organ growth, there are many examples where manipulation of the division machinery leads to a limited outcome at the level of organ form, despite changes in constituent cell size. One possibility, which has been under-explored, is that altered division patterns resulting from manipulation of cell-cycle gene expression alter the physiology of the organ, and that this has an effect on growth. We performed a series of experiments on retinoblastoma-related protein (RBR), a well characterized regulator of the cell cycle, to investigate the outcome of altered cell division on leaf physiology. Our approach involved combination of high-resolution microCT imaging and physiological analysis with a transient gene induction system, providing a powerful approach for the study of developmental physiology. Our investigation identifies a new role for RBR in mesophyll differentiation that affects tissue porosity and the distribution of air space within the leaf. The data demonstrate the importance of RBR in early leaf development and the extent to which physiology adapts to modified cellular architecture resulting from altered cell-cycle gene expression.

  2. Ceratopteris richardii: a productive model for revealing secrets of signaling and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Ceratopteris richardii is an aquatic fern grown in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. It is proven to be a productive model system for studies in the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of basic biologic processes that occur in early gametophytic development. It provides several advantages to biologists, especially those interested in gravitational biology, polarity development, and in the genetics of sexual development. It is easy to culture, has a relatively short life cycle, and offers an array of attractive features that facilitate genetic studies. The germination and early development of large populations of genetically identical spores are easy to synchronize, and both the direction of polarity development and cell-level gravity responses can be measured and readily manipulated within the first 24 h of spore development. Although there is no reliable transformation system available yet in Ceratopteris, recent studies suggest that the technique of RNA interference can be used to block translation of specific genes in a related fern, Marsilea, and current studies will soon reveal the applicability of this approach, as well as of other transformation approaches, in Ceratopteris. A recently completed expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project makes available the partial sequence of more than 2000 cDNAs, representing a significant percentage of the genes being expressed during the first 24 h of spore germination, when many developmentally interesting processes are occurring. A microarray of these ESTs is being constructed, so especially for those scientists interested in basic cellular phenomena that occur early in spore germination, the availability of the ESTs and of the microarray will make Ceratopteris an even more attractive model system.

  3. Ceratopteris richardii: a productive model for revealing secrets of signaling and development.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Roux, S J

    2000-09-01

    Ceratopteris richardii is an aquatic fern grown in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. It is proven to be a productive model system for studies in the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of basic biologic processes that occur in early gametophytic development. It provides several advantages to biologists, especially those interested in gravitational biology, polarity development, and in the genetics of sexual development. It is easy to culture, has a relatively short life cycle, and offers an array of attractive features that facilitate genetic studies. The germination and early development of large populations of genetically identical spores are easy to synchronize, and both the direction of polarity development and cell-level gravity responses can be measured and readily manipulated within the first 24 h of spore development. Although there is no reliable transformation system available yet in Ceratopteris, recent studies suggest that the technique of RNA interference can be used to block translation of specific genes in a related fern, Marsilea, and current studies will soon reveal the applicability of this approach, as well as of other transformation approaches, in Ceratopteris. A recently completed expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project makes available the partial sequence of more than 2000 cDNAs, representing a significant percentage of the genes being expressed during the first 24 h of spore germination, when many developmentally interesting processes are occurring. A microarray of these ESTs is being constructed, so especially for those scientists interested in basic cellular phenomena that occur early in spore germination, the availability of the ESTs and of the microarray will make Ceratopteris an even more attractive model system.

  4. Primer Sets Developed for Functional Genes Reveal Shifts in Functionality of Fungal Community in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, S. Emilia; van Veen, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of soil microbes is a hot topic at the moment. However, the molecular tools for the assessment of functional diversity in the fungal community are less developed than tools based on genes encoding the ribosomal operon. Here 20 sets of primers targeting genes involved mainly in carbon cycling were designed and/or validated and the functioning of soil fungal communities along a chronosequence of land abandonment from agriculture was evaluated using them. We hypothesized that changes in fungal community structure during secondary succession would lead to difference in the types of genes present in soils and that these changes would be directional. We expected an increase in genes involved in degradation of recalcitrant organic matter in time since agriculture. Out of the investigated genes, the richness of the genes related to carbon cycling was significantly higher in fields abandoned for longer time. The composition of six of the genes analyzed revealed significant differences between fields abandoned for shorter and longer time. However, all genes revealed significant variance over the fields studied, and this could be related to other parameters than the time since agriculture such as pH, organic matter, and the amount of available nitrogen. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the genes significantly different between fields were not related to the decomposition of more recalcitrant matter but rather involved in degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose. PMID:27965632

  5. Physiological Perturbation Reveals Modularity of Eyespot Development in the Painted Lady Butterfly, Vanessa cardui

    PubMed Central

    Rhen, Turk; Simmons, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly eyespots are complex morphological traits that can vary in size, shape and color composition even on the same wing surface. Homology among eyespots suggests they share a common developmental basis and function as an integrated unit in response to selection. Despite strong evidence of genetic integration, eyespots can also exhibit modularity or plasticity, indicating an underlying flexibility in pattern development. The extent to which particular eyespots or eyespot color elements exhibit modularity or integration is poorly understood, particularly following exposure to novel conditions. We used perturbation experiments to explore phenotypic correlations among different eyespots and their color elements on the ventral hindwing of V. cardui. Specifically, we identified which eyespots and eyespot features are most sensitive to perturbation by heat shock and injection of heparin—a cold shock mimic. For both treatments, the two central eyespots (3 + 4) were most affected by the experimental perturbations, whereas the outer eyespot border was more resistant to modification than the interior color elements. Overall, the individual color elements displayed a similar response to heat shock across all eyespots, but varied in their response to each other. Graphical modeling also revealed that although eyespots differ morphologically, regulation of eyespot size and colored elements appear to be largely integrated across the wing. Patterns of integration, however, were disrupted following heat shock, revealing that the strength of integration varies across the wing and is strongest between the two central eyespots. These findings support previous observations that document coupling between eyespots 3 + 4 in other nymphalid butterflies. PMID:27560365

  6. Primer Sets Developed for Functional Genes Reveal Shifts in Functionality of Fungal Community in Soils.

    PubMed

    Hannula, S Emilia; van Veen, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of soil microbes is a hot topic at the moment. However, the molecular tools for the assessment of functional diversity in the fungal community are less developed than tools based on genes encoding the ribosomal operon. Here 20 sets of primers targeting genes involved mainly in carbon cycling were designed and/or validated and the functioning of soil fungal communities along a chronosequence of land abandonment from agriculture was evaluated using them. We hypothesized that changes in fungal community structure during secondary succession would lead to difference in the types of genes present in soils and that these changes would be directional. We expected an increase in genes involved in degradation of recalcitrant organic matter in time since agriculture. Out of the investigated genes, the richness of the genes related to carbon cycling was significantly higher in fields abandoned for longer time. The composition of six of the genes analyzed revealed significant differences between fields abandoned for shorter and longer time. However, all genes revealed significant variance over the fields studied, and this could be related to other parameters than the time since agriculture such as pH, organic matter, and the amount of available nitrogen. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the genes significantly different between fields were not related to the decomposition of more recalcitrant matter but rather involved in degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose.

  7. Microbiota alteration is associated with the development of stress-induced despair behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ioana A.; Goertz, Jennifer E.; Ren, Tiantian; Rich, Stephen S.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Farber, Emily; Wu, Martin; Overall, Christopher C.; Kipnis, Jonathan; Gaultier, Alban

    2017-01-01

    Depressive disorders often run in families, which, in addition to the genetic component, may point to the microbiome as a causative agent. Here, we employed a combination of behavioral, molecular and computational techniques to test the role of the microbiota in mediating despair behavior. In chronically stressed mice displaying despair behavior, we found that the microbiota composition and the metabolic signature dramatically change. Specifically, we observed reduced Lactobacillus and increased circulating kynurenine levels as the most prominent changes in stressed mice. Restoring intestinal Lactobacillus levels was sufficient to improve the metabolic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Mechanistically, we identified that Lactobacillus-derived reactive oxygen species may suppress host kynurenine metabolism, by inhibiting the expression of the metabolizing enzyme, IDO1, in the intestine. Moreover, maintaining elevated kynurenine levels during Lactobacillus supplementation diminished the treatment benefits. Collectively, our data provide a mechanistic scenario for how a microbiota player (Lactobacillus) may contribute to regulating metabolism and resilience during stress. PMID:28266612

  8. Microbiota alteration is associated with the development of stress-induced despair behavior.

    PubMed

    Marin, Ioana A; Goertz, Jennifer E; Ren, Tiantian; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Farber, Emily; Wu, Martin; Overall, Christopher C; Kipnis, Jonathan; Gaultier, Alban

    2017-03-07

    Depressive disorders often run in families, which, in addition to the genetic component, may point to the microbiome as a causative agent. Here, we employed a combination of behavioral, molecular and computational techniques to test the role of the microbiota in mediating despair behavior. In chronically stressed mice displaying despair behavior, we found that the microbiota composition and the metabolic signature dramatically change. Specifically, we observed reduced Lactobacillus and increased circulating kynurenine levels as the most prominent changes in stressed mice. Restoring intestinal Lactobacillus levels was sufficient to improve the metabolic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Mechanistically, we identified that Lactobacillus-derived reactive oxygen species may suppress host kynurenine metabolism, by inhibiting the expression of the metabolizing enzyme, IDO1, in the intestine. Moreover, maintaining elevated kynurenine levels during Lactobacillus supplementation diminished the treatment benefits. Collectively, our data provide a mechanistic scenario for how a microbiota player (Lactobacillus) may contribute to regulating metabolism and resilience during stress.

  9. Afferent control mechanisms involved in the development of soleus fiber alterations in simulated hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, B. S.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Shapovalova, K. B.; Podlubnaya, Z. A.; Vikhliantsev, I. M.; Moukhina, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-02-01

    It was recently established that support withdrawal (withdrawal of support reaction force) in microgravity provokes a sequence of functional shifts in the activity of motor units (inactivation of slow ones) and peripheral muscle apparatus which lead to the decline of postural muscle contractility and alterations in fiber characteristics. However, mechanisms involved in inactivation of the slow motor units and appropriate slow-twitch muscle fiber disuse under the supportless conditions remained unknown. We show here that artificial inactivation of muscles-antagonists (which are known to be hyperactive during unloading) counteracts some of the unloading-induced events in the rat soleus (fiber size reduction, slow-to-fast fiber-type transition and decline of titin and nebulin content). It was also demonstrated that direct activation of the muscarinic receptors of the neostriatum neurons prevented slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation in soleus of hindlimb suspended rats.

  10. Role of Neurotrophins in Mediating the Effect of Altered Gravity on the Developing Rat Cerebellum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, Elizabeth

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in oxidative stress that may contribute to the decrease in Purkinje cell number and the impairment of motor coordination in hypergravity-exposed rat neonates. However, the increase in oxidative stress markers was not uniformly observed in males and females. In the present study we explored the possibility that exposure to hypergravity may result in altered level of neurotrophins, which have been recognized as mediators of both neurodegenerative and neuroprotective mechanisms in the central nervous system. An elevation of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) has been observed in animal models of hypoxia. To test this hypothesis we compared cerebellar levels of NT-3 between stationary control (SC) and rat neonates exposed perinatally to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge. The levels of NT-3 were determined by specific ELISA. Preliminary data suggests a 123

  11. Suppressing Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Alters Chloroplast Development and Triggers Sterol-Dependent Induction of Jasmonate- and Fe-Related Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Arró, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) catalyzes the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes (FPS1 and FPS2) encoding FPS. Single fps1 and fps2 knockout mutants are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, while fps1/fps2 double mutants are embryo lethal. To assess the effect of FPS down-regulation at postembryonic developmental stages, we generated Arabidopsis conditional knockdown mutants expressing artificial microRNAs devised to simultaneously silence both FPS genes. Induction of silencing from germination rapidly caused chlorosis and a strong developmental phenotype that led to seedling lethality. However, silencing of FPS after seed germination resulted in a slight developmental delay only, although leaves and cotyledons continued to show chlorosis and altered chloroplasts. Metabolomic analyses also revealed drastic changes in the profile of sterols, ubiquinones, and plastidial isoprenoids. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction transcriptomic analysis showed that a reduction in FPS activity levels triggers the misregulation of genes involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses, the most prominent one being the rapid induction of a set of genes related to the jasmonic acid pathway. Down-regulation of FPS also triggered an iron-deficiency transcriptional response that is consistent with the iron-deficient phenotype observed in FPS-silenced plants. The specific inhibition of the sterol biosynthesis pathway by chemical and genetic blockage mimicked these transcriptional responses, indicating that sterol depletion is the primary cause of the observed alterations. Our results highlight the importance of sterol homeostasis for normal chloroplast development and function and reveal important clues about how isoprenoid and sterol metabolism is integrated within plant physiology and development. PMID

  12. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Black Rice Grain Development Reveals Metabolic Pathways Associated with Anthocyanin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Linghua; Huang, Yining; Xu, Ming; Cheng, Zuxin; Zhang, Dasheng; Zheng, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Background Black rice (Oryza sativa L.), whose pericarp is rich in anthocyanins (ACNs), is considered as a healthier alternative to white rice. Molecular species of ACNs in black rice have been well documented in previous studies; however, information about the metabolic mechanisms underlying ACN biosynthesis during black rice grain development is unclear. Results The aim of the present study was to determine changes in the metabolic pathways that are involved in the dynamic grain proteome during the development of black rice indica cultivar, (Oryza sativa L. indica var. SSP). Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) MS/MS were employed to identify statistically significant alterations in the grain proteome. Approximately 928 proteins were detected, of which 230 were differentially expressed throughout 5 successive developmental stages, starting from 3 to 20 days after flowering (DAF). The greatest number of differentially expressed proteins was observed on 7 and 10 DAF, including 76 proteins that were upregulated and 39 that were downregulated. The biological process analysis of gene ontology revealed that the 230 differentially expressed proteins could be sorted into 14 functional groups. Proteins in the largest group were related to metabolic process, which could be integrated into multiple biochemical pathways. Specifically, proteins with a role in ACN biosynthesis, sugar synthesis, and the regulation of gene expression were upregulated, particularly from the onset of black rice grain development and during development. In contrast, the expression of proteins related to signal transduction, redox homeostasis, photosynthesis and N-metabolism decreased during grain maturation. Finally, 8 representative genes encoding different metabolic proteins were verified via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, these genes had differed in transcriptional and translational expression during grain development. Conclusions

  13. Microsatellite development for the genus Guibourtia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) reveals diploid and polyploid species1

    PubMed Central

    Tosso, Felicien; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Kaymak, Esra; Daïnou, Kasso; Duminil, Jérôme; Hardy, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nuclear microsatellites (nSSRs) were designed for Guibourtia tessmannii (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae), a highly exploited African timber tree, to study population genetic structure and gene flow. Methods and Results: We developed 16 polymorphic nSSRs from a genomic library tested in three populations of G. tessmannii and two populations of G. coleosperma. These nSSRs display three to 14 alleles per locus (mean 8.94) in G. tessmannii. Cross-amplification tests in nine congeneric species demonstrated that the genus Guibourtia contains diploid and polyploid species. Flow cytometry results combined with nSSR profiles suggest that G. tessmannii is octoploid. Conclusions: nSSRs revealed that African Guibourtia species include both diploid and polyploid species. These markers will provide information on the mating system, patterns of gene flow, and genetic structure of African Guibourtia species. PMID:27437170

  14. Quantitative and Temporal Requirements Revealed for Zap-70 Catalytic Activity During T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Melichar, Heather J.; Ross, Jenny O.; Cheng, Debra A.; Zikherman, Julie; Shokat, Kevan M.; Robey, Ellen A.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Zap-70 is crucial for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, but the quantitative and temporal requirements for its function in thymocyte development are not known. Using a chemical-genetic system to selectively and reversibly inhibit Zap-70 catalytic activity in a model of synchronized thymic selection, we showed that CD4+CD8+ thymocytes integrate multiple, transient, Zap-70-dependent signals over more than 36 h to reach a cumulative threshold for positive selection, whereas one hour of signaling was sufficient for negative selection. Titration of Zap-70 activity resulted in graded reductions in positive and negative selection but did not decrease the cumulative TCR signals integrated by positively selected OT-I cells, revealing heterogeneity, even among CD4+CD8+ thymocytes expressing identical TCRs undergoing positive selection. PMID:24908390

  15. A Chemical Genetic Approach Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of EphB Signaling During Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Soskis, Michael J.; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Robichaux, Michael A.; Malik, Athar N.; Ataman, Bulent; Rubin, Alex A.; Zieg, Janine; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Sharma, Nikhil; Cowan, Christopher W.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    EphB receptor tyrosine kinases control multiple steps in nervous system development. However, it remains unclear whether EphBs regulate these different developmental processes directly or indirectly. In addition, as EphBs signal through multiple mechanisms, it has been challenging to define which signaling functions of EphBs regulate particular developmental events. To address these issues, we engineered triple knockin mice in which the kinase activity of three neuronally expressed EphBs can be rapidly, reversibly, and specifically blocked. Using these mice we demonstrate that the tyrosine kinase activity of EphBs is required for axon guidance in vivo. By contrast, EphB-mediated synaptogenesis occurs normally when the kinase activity of EphBs is inhibited suggesting that EphBs mediate synapse development by an EphB tyrosine kinase-independent mechanism. Taken together, these experiments reveal that EphBs control axon guidance and synaptogenesis by distinct mechanisms, and provide a new mouse model for dissecting EphB function in development and disease. PMID:23143520

  16. Genetic manipulation of cardiac Hsp72 levels does not alter substrate metabolism but reveals insights into high-fat feeding-induced cardiac insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Estevez, E; Allen, T L; Heywood, S E; Gardner, T; Yang, C; Mellett, N A; Kingwell, B A; Meikle, P J; Febbraio, M A

    2015-05-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects cells against a variety of stressors, and multiple studies have suggested that Hsp72 plays a cardioprotective role. As skeletal muscle Hsp72 overexpression can protect against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance, alterations in substrate metabolism may be a mechanism by which Hsp72 is cardioprotective. We investigated the impact of transgenically overexpressing (Hsp72 Tg) or deleting Hsp72 (Hsp72 KO) on various aspects of cardiac metabolism. Mice were fed a normal chow (NC) or HFD for 12 weeks from 8 weeks of age to examine the impact of diet-induced obesity on metabolic parameters in the heart. The HFD resulted in an increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation and a decrease in cardiac glucose oxidation and insulin-stimulated cardiac glucose clearance; however, there was no difference in Hsp72 Tg or Hsp72 KO mice in these rates compared with their respective wild-type control mice. Although HFD-induced cardiac insulin resistance was not rescued in the Hsp72 Tg mice, it was preserved in the skeletal muscle, suggesting tissue-specific effects of Hsp72 overexpression on substrate metabolism. Comparison of two different strains of mice (BALB/c vs. C57BL/6J) also identified strain-specific differences in regard to HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. These strain differences suggest that cardiac lipid accumulation can be dissociated from cardiac insulin resistance. Our study finds that genetic manipulation of Hsp72 does not lead to alterations in metabolic processes in cardiac tissue under resting conditions, but identifies mouse strain-specific differences in cardiac lipid accumulation and insulin-stimulated glucose clearance.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Dynein-Interacting Proteins in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Synaptosomes Reveals Alterations in the RNA-Binding Protein Staufen1*

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni-Emek, Noga; Mazza, Arnon; Chein, Michael; Gradus-Pery, Tal; Xiang, Xin; Li, Ka Wan; Sharan, Roded; Perlson, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Synapse disruption takes place in many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the mechanistic understanding of this process is still limited. We set out to study a possible role for dynein in synapse integrity. Cytoplasmic dynein is a multisubunit intracellular molecule responsible for diverse cellular functions, including long-distance transport of vesicles, organelles, and signaling factors toward the cell center. A less well-characterized role dynein may play is the spatial clustering and anchoring of various factors including mRNAs in distinct cellular domains such as the neuronal synapse. Here, in order to gain insight into dynein functions in synapse integrity and disruption, we performed a screen for novel dynein interactors at the synapse. Dynein immunoprecipitation from synaptic fractions of the ALS model mSOD1G93A and wild-type controls, followed by mass spectrometry analysis on synaptic fractions of the ALS model mSOD1G93A and wild-type controls, was performed. Using advanced network analysis, we identified Staufen1, an RNA-binding protein required for the transport and localization of neuronal RNAs, as a major mediator of dynein interactions via its interaction with protein phosphatase 1–beta (PP1B). Both in vitro and in vivo validation assays demonstrate the interactions of Staufen1 and PP1B with dynein, and their colocalization with synaptic markers was altered as a result of two separate ALS-linked mutations: mSOD1G93A and TDP43A315T. Taken together, we suggest a model in which dynein's interaction with Staufen1 regulates mRNA localization along the axon and the synapses, and alterations in this process may correlate with synapse disruption and ALS toxicity. PMID:26598648

  18. Altered proteostasis in aging and heat shock response in C. elegans revealed by analysis of the global and de novo synthesized proteome.

    PubMed

    Liang, Vanessa; Ullrich, Milena; Lam, Hong; Chew, Yee Lian; Banister, Samuel; Song, Xiaomin; Zaw, Thiri; Kassiou, Michael; Götz, Jürgen; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2014-09-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation as a consequence of impaired protein homeostasis (proteostasis) not only characterizes numerous age-related diseases but also the aging process itself. Functionally related to the aging process are, among others, ribosomal proteins, suggesting an intimate link between proteostasis and aging. We determined by iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis in C. elegans how the proteome changes with age and in response to heat shock. Levels of ribosomal proteins and mitochondrial chaperones were decreased in aged animals, supporting the notion that proteostasis is altered during aging. Mitochondrial enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the electron transport chain were also reduced, consistent with an age-associated energy impairment. Moreover, we observed an age-associated decline in the heat shock response. In order to determine how protein synthesis is altered in aging and in response to heat shock, we complemented our global analysis by determining the de novo proteome. For that, we established a novel method that enables both the visualization and identification of de novo synthesized proteins, by incorporating the non-canonical methionine analogue, azidohomoalanine (AHA), into the nascent polypeptides, followed by reacting the azide group of AHA by 'click chemistry' with an alkyne-labeled tag. Our analysis of AHA-tagged peptides demonstrated that the decreased abundance of, for example, ribosomal proteins in aged animals is not solely due to degradation but also reflects a relative decrease in their synthesis. Interestingly, although the net rate of protein synthesis is reduced in aged animals, our analyses indicate that the synthesis of certain proteins such as the vitellogenins increases with age.

  19. Structural Alterations of the Cysteine Desulfurase IscS of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Reveal Substrate Specificity of IscS in tRNA Thiolation

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Hans K.; Björk, Glenn R.

    2006-01-01

    The cysteine desulfurase IscS in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is required for the formation of all four thiolated nucleosides in tRNA, which is thought to occur via two principally different biosynthetic pathways. The synthesis of 4-thiouridine (s4U) and 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) occurs by a transfer of sulfur from IscS via various proteins to the target nucleoside in the tRNA, and no iron-sulfur cluster protein participates, whereas the synthesis of 2-thiocytidine (s2C) and N6-(4-hydroxyisopentenyl)-2-methylthioadenosine (ms2io6A) is dependent on iron-sulfur cluster proteins, whose formation and maintenance depend on IscS. Accordingly, inactivation of IscS should result in decreased synthesis of all thiolated nucleosides. We selected mutants defective either in the synthesis of a thiolated nucleoside (mnm5s2U) specific for the iron-sulfur protein-independent pathway or in the synthesis of a thiolated nucleoside (ms2io6A) specific for the iron-sulfur protein-dependent pathway. Although we found altered forms of IscS that influenced the synthesis of all thiolated nucleosides, consistent with the model, we also found mutants defective in subsets of thiolated nucleosides. Alterations in the C-terminal region of IscS reduced the level of only ms2io6A, suggesting that the synthesis of this nucleoside is especially sensitive to minor aberrations in iron-sulfur cluster transfer activity. Our results suggest that IscS has an intrinsic substrate specificity in how it mediates sulfur mobilization and/or iron-sulfur cluster formation and maintenance required for thiolation of tRNA. PMID:16585765

  20. Tick vitellogenin receptor reveals critical role in oocyte development and transovarial transmission of Babesia parasite.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Battsetseg, Badgar; Matsuo, Tomohide; Hatta, Takeshi; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Xuan, Xuenan; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2008-08-01

    A cDNA encoding the vitellogenin receptor of the ixodid tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann (HlVgR) was cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA is 5631 bp, including an intact ORF encoding an expected protein with 1782 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the HlVgR cDNA revealed two ligand-binding domains with four class A cysteine-rich repeats in the first domain and eight in the second domain similar to those of insect VgRs. The immunoblot analysis detected approximately 197 kDa protein in both tick ovary and egg. The developmental expression profile demonstrated that HlVgR mRNA exists throughout the ovarian development, and the transcriptional level is especially high in the previtellogenic period. Immuno electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the localization of HlVgR is detected on the external surface of oocyte plasma membrane. RNAi showed that eggs of HlVgR dsRNA-injected adult ticks had not developed into fully mature oocytes and laid abnormal eggs. The Babesia parasite DNA was not detected in the eggs of HlVgR dsRNA-injected tick that fed on Babesia gibsoni infected dog, whereas it was detected in the eggs of PBS-injected ticks and noninjected ticks. Expression of HlVgR was increased by the vitellogenic hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results indicate that HlVgR, which is produced by the developing oocytes, is essential for Vg uptake, egg development in the H. longicornis tick, and transovarial transmission of Babesia parasites.

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of toxoplasma development reveals many novel functions and structures specific to sporozoites and oocysts.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Heather M; Buchholz, Kerry R; Chen, Xiucui; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Rocke, David M; Conrad, Patricia A; Boothroyd, John C

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction of Toxoplasma gondii occurs exclusively within enterocytes of the definitive felid host. The resulting immature oocysts are excreted into the environment during defecation, where in the days following, they undergo a complex developmental process. Within each oocyst, this culminates in the generation of two sporocysts, each containing 4 sporozoites. A single felid host is capable of shedding millions of oocysts, which can survive for years in the environment, are resistant to most methods of microbial inactivation during water-treatment and are capable of producing infection in warm-blooded hosts at doses as low as 1-10 ingested oocysts. Despite its extremely interesting developmental biology and crucial role in initiating an infection, almost nothing is known about the oocyst stage beyond morphological descriptions. Here, we present a complete transcriptomic analysis of the oocyst from beginning to end of its development. In addition, and to identify genes whose expression is unique to this developmental form, we compared the transcriptomes of developing oocysts with those of in vitro-derived tachyzoites and in vivo-derived bradyzoites. Our results reveal many genes whose expression is specifically up- or down-regulated in different developmental stages, including many genes that are likely critical to oocyst development, wall formation, resistance to environmental destruction and sporozoite infectivity. Of special note is the up-regulation of genes that appear "off" in tachyzoites and bradyzoites but that encode homologues of proteins known to serve key functions in those asexual stages, including a novel pairing of sporozoite-specific paralogues of AMA1 and RON2, two proteins that have recently been shown to form a crucial bridge during tachyzoite invasion of host cells. This work provides the first in-depth insight into the development and functioning of one of the most important but least studied stages in the Toxoplasma life cycle.

  2. Dynamic Regulation of Auxin Response during Rice Development Revealed by Newly Established Hormone Biosensor Markers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Yuan, Zheng; Meng, Qingcai; Huang, Guoqiang; Périn, Christophe; Bureau, Charlotte; Meunier, Anne-Cécile; Ingouff, Mathieu; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing

    2017-01-01

    The hormone auxin is critical for many plant developmental processes. Unlike the model eudicot plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), auxin distribution and signaling in rice tissues has not been systematically investigated due to the absence of suitable auxin response reporters. In this study we observed the conservation of auxin signaling components between Arabidopsis and model monocot crop rice (Oryza sativa), and generated complementary types of auxin biosensor constructs, one derived from the Aux/IAA-based biosensor DII-VENUS but constitutively driven by maize ubiquitin-1 promoter, and the other termed DR5-VENUS in which a synthetic auxin-responsive promoter (DR5rev) was used to drive expression of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the obtained transgenic lines, we observed that during the vegetative development, accumulation of DR5-VENUS signal was at young and mature leaves, tiller buds and stem base. Notably, abundant DR5-VENUS signals were observed in the cytoplasm of cortex cells surrounding lateral root primordia (LRP) in rice. In addition, auxin maxima and dynamic re-localization were seen at the initiation sites of inflorescence and spikelet primordia including branch meristems (BMs), female and male organs. The comparison of these observations among Arabidopsis, rice and maize suggests the unique role of auxin in regulating rice lateral root emergence and reproduction. Moreover, protein localization of auxin transporters PIN1 homologs and GFP tagged OsAUX1 overlapped with DR5-VENUS during spikelet development, helping validate these auxin response reporters are reliable markers in rice. This work firstly reveals the direct correspondence between auxin distribution and rice reproductive and root development at tissue and cellular level, and provides high-resolution auxin tools to probe fundamental developmental processes in rice and to establish links between auxin, development and agronomical traits like yield or root architecture. PMID

  3. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5) mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development. PMID:21466694

  4. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) augmentation early in life alters hippocampal development and rescues the anxiety phenotype in vulnerable animals.

    PubMed

    Turner, Cortney A; Clinton, Sarah M; Thompson, Robert C; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2011-05-10

    Individuals with mood disorders exhibit alterations in the fibroblast growth factor system, including reduced hippocampal fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). It is difficult, however, to pinpoint whether these alterations are a cause or consequence of the disorder. The present study asks whether FGF2 administered the day after birth has long-lasting effects on hippocampal development and emotionality. We show that early-life FGF2 shifts the pace of neurogenesis, with an early acceleration around weaning followed by a deceleration in adulthood. This, in turn, results in a denser dentate gyrus with more neurons. To assess the impact of early-life FGF2 on emotionality, we use rats selectively bred for differences in locomotor response to novelty. Selectively bred low-responder (bLR) rats show low levels of novelty-induced locomotion and exhibit high levels of anxiety- and depression-like behavior compared with their selectively bred high-responder counterparts. Early-life FGF2 decreased anxiety-like behavior in highly anxious bLRs without altering other behaviors and without affecting high-responder rats. Laser capture microscopy of the dentate gyrus followed by microarray analysis revealed genes that were differentially expressed in bLRs exposed to early-life FGF2 vs. vehicle-treated bLRs. Some of the differentially expressed genes that have been positively associated with anxiety were down-regulated, whereas genes that promote cell survival were up-regulated. Overall, these results show a key role for FGF2 in the developmental trajectory of the hippocampus as well as the modulation of anxiety-like behavior in adulthood, and they point to potential downstream targets for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  5. New Developments in Salivary Gland Pathology: Clinically Useful Ancillary Testing and New Potentially Targetable Molecular Alterations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher C; Schmitt, Alessandra C; Little, James L; Magliocca, Kelly R

    2017-03-01

    Accurate diagnosis of salivary gland tumors can be challenging because of the many diagnostic entities, the sometimes extensive morphologic overlap, and the rarity of most tumor types. Ancillary testing is beginning to ameliorate some of these challenges through access to newer immunohistochemical stains and fluorescence in situ hybridization probes, which can limit differential diagnostic considerations in some cases. These ancillary testing strategies are especially useful in small biopsy samples, including aspiration cytology. Molecular techniques are also expanding our understanding of salivary gland tumor pathology and are helping to identify potential targets that may improve treatment for some of these tumors. Here, we summarize the clinical use of new immunohistochemical markers in our practice and review the current understanding of chromosomal rearrangements in salivary gland tumor pathology, emphasizing the prospects for exploiting molecular alterations in salivary gland tumors for diagnosis and targeted therapy. We find that immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization are powerful tools toward the diagnosis of salivary gland tumors, especially when used in a systematic manner based on morphologic differential-diagnostic considerations. As new targeted therapies emerge, it will become increasingly vital to incorporate appropriate molecular testing into the pathologic evaluation of salivary gland cancers.

  6. In defense of (some) altered standards of care for Ebola infections in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Rosoff, Philip M

    2015-03-01

    The current outbreak of Ebola virus infection in West Africa continues to spread. Several patients have now been treated in the United States and preparations are being made for more. Because of the strict isolation required for their care, questions have been raised about what diagnostic and therapeutic interventions should be available. I discuss the ethical challenges associated with caring for patients in strict isolation and personnel wearing bulky protective gear with reduced dexterity and flexibility, the limitations this may place on available treatments and the permissibility of consequent departures from the standards of care. Restricting access to some interventions such as surgery requiring an operating room, advanced imaging, etc. is reasonable due to concern for protecting other patients, visitors and staff. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a special case and the implications for withholding this intervention in situations where it may be desired is discussed, especially with respect to those patients who have suspected, but not proven, infection. These same restrictions are also considered under conditions where there are scarce resources and thus limited numbers of patients may receive care. While it is to be hoped that there is only limited and sporadic infection with Ebola virus in the US, careful thought must be given to the care of these patients under the unusual circumstances demanded by their isolation. I argue that an altered standard of care is reasonable and ethically acceptable under certain conditions.

  7. Development of bingeing in rats altered by a small operant requirement

    PubMed Central

    Wojnicki, F.H.E.; Johnson, D.S.; Charny, G.; Corwin, R.L.W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that providing an optional food for a brief period of time to non-food deprived rats on an intermittent basis in the home cage engenders significantly more intake (binge-type behavior) than when the optional food is provided for a brief period on a daily basis. Experiment 1 examined the effects of placing a small operant response requirement on access to an optional food (vegetable shortening) on the establishment of binge-type behavior. Experiment 2 examined the effects of different schedules of reinforcement, a period of abstinence from shortening, and 24 h of food deprivation on established binge-type behavior. In Experiment 1 the group of rats with 30-min access to shortening on an intermittent basis in their home cages (IC) consumed significantly more shortening than the group with 30-min daily access in the home cage (DC). The group with 30-min intermittent access in an operant chamber (IO group) earned significantly more reinforcers than the group with 30-min daily access in an operant chamber (DO). In Experiment 2, the IO group earned significantly more reinforcers than the DO group regardless of the response cost, the period of shortening abstinence, and overnight food deprivation. These results demonstrate that while intermittent access generates binge-type eating, the size of the binge (intake) can be altered by different contingency arrangements. PMID:26375821

  8. Development of bingeing in rats altered by a small operant requirement.

    PubMed

    Wojnicki, F H E; Johnson, D S; Charny, G; Corwin, R L W

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that providing an optional food for a brief period of time to non-food deprived rats on an intermittent basis in the home cage engenders significantly more intake (binge-type behavior) than when the optional food is provided for a brief period on a daily basis. Experiment 1 examined the effects of placing a small operant response requirement on access to an optional food (vegetable shortening) on the establishment of binge-type behavior. Experiment 2 examined the effects of different schedules of reinforcement, a period of abstinence from shortening, and 24h of food deprivation on established binge-type behavior. In Experiment 1 the group of rats with 30-min access to shortening on an intermittent basis in their home cages (IC) consumed significantly more shortening than the group with 30-min daily access in the home cage (DC). The group with 30-min intermittent access in an operant chamber (IO group) earned significantly more reinforcers than the group with 30-min daily access in an operant chamber (DO). In Experiment 2, the IO group earned significantly more reinforcers than the DO group regardless of the response cost, the period of shortening abstinence, and overnight food deprivation. These results demonstrate that while intermittent access generates binge-type eating, the size of the binge (intake) can be altered by different contingency arrangements.

  9. Bees for development: Brazilian survey reveals how to optimize stingless beekeeping.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Rodolfo; Pope, Nathaniel; Torres Carvalho, Airton; Madureira Maia, Ulysses; Blochtein, Betina; de Carvalho, Carlos Alfredo Lopes; Carvalho-Zilse, Gislene Almeida; Freitas, Breno Magalhães; Menezes, Cristiano; Ribeiro, Márcia de Fátima; Venturieri, Giorgio Cristino; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Stingless bees are an important asset to assure plant biodiversity in many natural ecosystems, and fulfill the growing agricultural demand for pollination. However, across developing countries stingless beekeeping remains an essentially informal activity, technical knowledge is scarce, and management practices lack standardization. Here we profited from the large diversity of stingless beekeepers found in Brazil to assess the impact of particular management practices on productivity and economic revenues from the commercialization of stingless bee products. Our study represents the first large-scale effort aiming at optimizing stingless beekeeping for honey/colony production based on quantitative data. Survey data from 251 beekeepers scattered across 20 Brazilian States revealed the influence of specific management practices and other confounding factors over productivity and income indicators. Specifically, our results highlight the importance of teaching beekeepers how to inspect and feed their colonies, how to multiply them and keep track of genetic lineages, how to harvest and preserve the honey, how to use vinegar traps to control infestation by parasitic flies, and how to add value by labeling honey containers. Furthermore, beekeeping experience and the network of known beekeepers were found to be key factors influencing productivity and income. Our work provides clear guidelines to optimize stingless beekeeping and help transform the activity into a powerful tool for sustainable development.

  10. Bees for Development: Brazilian Survey Reveals How to Optimize Stingless Beekeeping

    PubMed Central

    Jaffé, Rodolfo; Pope, Nathaniel; Carvalho, Airton Torres; Maia, Ulysses Madureira; Blochtein, Betina; de Carvalho, Carlos Alfredo Lopes; Carvalho-Zilse, Gislene Almeida; Freitas, Breno Magalhães; Menezes, Cristiano; de Fátima Ribeiro, Márcia; Venturieri, Giorgio Cristino; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Stingless bees are an important asset to assure plant biodiversity in many natural ecosystems, and fulfill the growing agricultural demand for pollination. However, across developing countries stingless beekeeping remains an essentially informal activity, technical knowledge is scarce, and management practices lack standardization. Here we profited from the large diversity of stingless beekeepers found in Brazil to assess the impact of particular management practices on productivity and economic revenues from the commercialization of stingless bee products. Our study represents the first large-scale effort aiming at optimizing stingless beekeeping for honey/colony production based on quantitative data. Survey data from 251 beekeepers scattered across 20 Brazilian States revealed the influence of specific management practices and other confounding factors over productivity and income indicators. Specifically, our results highlight the importance of teaching beekeepers how to inspect and feed their colonies, how to multiply them and keep track of genetic lineages, how to harvest and preserve the honey, how to use vinegar traps to control infestation by parasitic flies, and how to add value by labeling honey containers. Furthermore, beekeeping experience and the network of known beekeepers were found to be key factors influencing productivity and income. Our work provides clear guidelines to optimize stingless beekeeping and help transform the activity into a powerful tool for sustainable development. PMID:25826402

  11. Immunogold Labeling of Amelogenin in Developing Porcine Enamel Revealed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chang; Fan, Daming; Sun, Zhi; Fan, Yuwei; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The present study describes a method using immunohistochemical labeling in combination with high-resolution imaging (field emission scanning electron microscopy) to investigate the spatial localization of amelogenins on apatite crystallites in developing porcine enamel. Cross-sections of developing enamel tissue from freeze-fractured pig third molar were treated with antiserum against recombinant mouse amelogenin and immunoreactivity confirmed by Western blot analysis. The samples were then treated with the goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated with 10-nm gold particles. The control samples were treated with the secondary antibody only. The in-lens secondary electrons detector and quadrant back-scattering detector were employed to reveal the high-resolution morphology of enamel structures and gold particle distribution. The immunolabeling showed a preference of the gold particle localization along the side faces of the ribbon-like apatite crystals. The preferential localization of amelogenin in vivo on enamel crystals strongly supports its direct function in controlling crystal morphology. PMID:18701812

  12. Cell lineage tracing in the developing enteric nervous system: superstars revealed by experiment and simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Bevan L.; Zhang, Dongcheng; Binder, Benjamin J.; Newgreen, Donald F.; Landman, Kerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Cell lineage tracing is a powerful tool for understanding how proliferation and differentiation of individual cells contribute to population behaviour. In the developing enteric nervous system (ENS), enteric neural crest (ENC) cells move and undergo massive population expansion by cell division within self-growing mesenchymal tissue. We show that single ENC cells labelled to follow clonality in the intestine reveal extraordinary and unpredictable variation in number and position of descendant cells, even though ENS development is highly predictable at the population level. We use an agent-based model to simulate ENC colonization and obtain agent lineage tracing data, which we analyse using econometric data analysis tools. In all realizations, a small proportion of identical initial agents accounts for a substantial proportion of the total final agent population. We term these individuals superstars. Their existence is consistent across individual realizations and is robust to changes in model parameters. This inequality of outcome is amplified at elevated proliferation rate. The experiments and model suggest that stochastic competition for resources is an important concept when understanding biological processes which feature high levels of cell proliferation. The results have implications for cell-fate processes in the ENS. PMID:24501272

  13. A novel disorder reveals clathrin heavy chain-22 is essential for human pain and touch development.

    PubMed

    Nahorski, Michael S; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Hertecant, Jozef; Owen, David J; Borner, Georg H H; Chen, Ya-Chun; Benn, Caroline L; Carvalho, Ofélia P; Shaikh, Samiha S; Phelan, Anne; Robinson, Margaret S; Royle, Stephen J; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Congenital inability to feel pain is very rare but the identification of causative genes has yielded significant insights into pain pathways and also novel targets for pain treatment. We report a novel recessive disorder characterized by congenital insensitivity to pain, inability to feel touch, and cognitive delay. Affected individuals harboured a homozygous missense mutation in CLTCL1 encoding the CHC22 clathrin heavy chain, p.E330K, which we demonstrate to have a functional effect on the protein. We found that CLTCL1 is significantly upregulated in the developing human brain, displaying an expression pattern suggestive of an early neurodevelopmental role. Guided by the disease phenotype, we investigated the role of CHC22 in two human neural crest differentiation systems; human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived nociceptors and TRKB-dependant SH-SY5Y cells. In both there was a significant downregulation of CHC22 upon the onset of neural differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of CHC22 induced neurite outgrowth in neural precursor cells, which was rescued by stable overexpression of small interfering RNA-resistant CHC22, but not by mutant CHC22. Similarly, overexpression of wild-type, but not mutant, CHC22 blocked neurite outgrowth in cells treated with retinoic acid. These results reveal an essential and non-redundant role for CHC22 in neural crest development and in the genesis of pain and touch sensing neurons.

  14. Development and application of a novel genome-wide SNP array reveals domestication history in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huairen; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-02-09

    Domestication of soybeans occurred under the intense human-directed selections aimed at developing high-yielding lines. Tracing the domestication history and identifying the genes underlying soybean domestication require further exploration. Here, we developed a high-throughput NJAU 355 K SoySNP array and used this array to study the genetic variation patterns in 367 soybean accessions, including 105 wild soybeans and 262 cultivated soybeans. The population genetic analysis suggests that cultivated soybeans have tended to originate from northern and central China, from where they spread to other regions, accompanied with a gradual increase in seed weight. Genome-wide scanning for evidence of artificial selection revealed signs of selective sweeps involving genes controlling domestication-related agronomic traits including seed weight. To further identify genomic regions related to seed weight, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted across multiple environments in wild and cultivated soybeans. As a result, a strong linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 20 was found to be significantly correlated with seed weight in cultivated soybeans. Collectively, these findings should provide an important basis for genomic-enabled breeding and advance the study of functional genomics in soybean.

  15. A variant of LEAFY reveals its capacity to stimulate meristem development by inducing RAX1.

    PubMed

    Chahtane, Hicham; Vachon, Gilles; Le Masson, Marie; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Périgon, Sophie; Mihajlovic, Nela; Kalinina, Anna; Michard, Robin; Moyroud, Edwige; Monniaux, Marie; Sayou, Camille; Grbic, Vojislava; Parcy, Francois; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle

    2013-05-01

    In indeterminate inflorescences, floral meristems develop on the flanks of the shoot apical meristem, at positions determined by auxin maxima. The floral identity of these meristems is conferred by a handful of genes called floral meristem identity genes, among which the LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor plays a prominent role. However, the molecular mechanism controlling the early emergence of floral meristems remains unknown. A body of evidence indicates that LFY may contribute to this developmental shift, but a direct effect of LFY on meristem emergence has not been demonstrated. We have generated a LFY allele with reduced floral function and revealed its ability to stimulate axillary meristem growth. This role is barely detectable in the lfy single mutant but becomes obvious in several double mutant backgrounds and plants ectopically expressing LFY. We show that this role requires the ability of LFY to bind DNA, and is mediated by direct induction of REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEMS1 (RAX1) by LFY. We propose that this function unifies the diverse roles described for LFY in multiple angiosperm species, ranging from monocot inflorescence identity to legume leaf development, and that it probably pre-dates the origin of angiosperms.

  16. Smoking and the developing brain: altered white matter microstructure in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    van Ewijk, Hanneke; Groenman, Annabeth P; Zwiers, Marcel P; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Faraone, Stephen V; Hartman, Catharina A; Luman, Marjolein; Greven, Corina U; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    Brain white matter (WM) tracts, playing a vital role in the communication between brain regions, undergo important maturational changes during adolescence and young adulthood, a critical period for the development of nicotine dependence. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with increased smoking and widespread WM abnormalities, suggesting that the developing ADHD brain might be especially vulnerable to effects of smoking. This study aims to investigate the effect of smoking on (WM) microstructure in adolescents and young adults with and without ADHD. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in an extensively phenotyped sample of nonsmokers (n = 95, 50.5% ADHD), irregular smokers (n = 41, 58.5% ADHD), and regular smokers (n = 50, 82.5% ADHD), aged 14-24 years. A whole-brain voxelwise approach investigated associations of smoking, ADHD and their interaction, with WM microstructure as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Widespread alterations in FA and MD were found for regular smokers compared to irregular and nonsmokers, mainly located in the corpus callosum and WM tracts surrounding the basal ganglia. Several regions overlapped with regions of altered FA for ADHD versus controls, albeit in different directions. Irregular and nonsmokers did not differ, and ADHD and smoking did not interact. Results implicate that smoking and ADHD have independent effects on WM microstructure, and possibly do not share underlying mechanisms. Two mechanisms may play a role in the current results. First, smoking may cause alterations in WM microstructure in the maturing brain. Second, pre-existing WM microstructure differences possibly reflect a risk factor for development of a smoking addiction.

  17. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Alterations in Mouse Plasma and Liver in Response to Fava Beans.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Man; Du, Guankui; Zhong, Guobing; Yan, Dongjing; Zeng, Huazong; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-01-01

    Favism is a life-threatening hemolytic anemia resulting from the intake of fava beans by susceptible individuals with low erythrocytic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. However, little is known about the metabolomic changes in plasma and liver after the intake of fava beans in G6PD normal and deficient states. In this study, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze the plasma and liver metabolic alterations underlying the effects of fava beans in C3H- and G6PD-deficient (G6PDx) mice, and to find potential biomarkers and metabolic changes associated with favism. Our results showed that fava beans induced oxidative stress in both C3H and G6PDx mice. Significantly, metabolomic differences were observed in plasma and liver between the control and fava bean treated groups of both C3H and G6PDx mice. The levels of 7 and 21 metabolites in plasma showed significant differences between C3H-control (C3H-C)- and C3H fava beans-treated (C3H-FB) mice, and G6PDx-control (G6PDx-C)- and G6PDx fava beans-treated (G6PDx-FB) mice, respectively. Similarly, the levels of 7 and 25 metabolites in the liver showed significant differences between C3H and C3H-FB, and G6PDx and G6PDx-FB, respectively. The levels of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine were significantly increased in the plasma of both C3H-FB and G6PDx-FB mice. In the liver, more metabolic alterations were observed in G6PDx-FB mice than in C3H-FB mice, and were involved in a sugar, fatty acids, amino acids, cholesterol biosynthesis, the urea cycle, and the nucleotide metabolic pathway. These findings suggest that oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine may be potential biomarkers of the response to fava beans in C3H and G6PDx mice and therefore that oleic acid and linoleic acid may be involved in oxidative stress induced by fava beans. This study demonstrates that G6PD activity in mice can affect their metabolic pathways in response to fava beans.

  18. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Alterations in Mouse Plasma and Liver in Response to Fava Beans

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guobing; Yan, Dongjing; Zeng, Huazong; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-01-01

    Favism is a life-threatening hemolytic anemia resulting from the intake of fava beans by susceptible individuals with low erythrocytic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. However, little is known about the metabolomic changes in plasma and liver after the intake of fava beans in G6PD normal and deficient states. In this study, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze the plasma and liver metabolic alterations underlying the effects of fava beans in C3H- and G6PD-deficient (G6PDx) mice, and to find potential biomarkers and metabolic changes associated with favism. Our results showed that fava beans induced oxidative stress in both C3H and G6PDx mice. Significantly, metabolomic differences were observed in plasma and liver between the control and fava bean treated groups of both C3H and G6PDx mice. The levels of 7 and 21 metabolites in plasma showed significant differences between C3H-control (C3H-C)- and C3H fava beans-treated (C3H-FB) mice, and G6PDx-control (G6PDx-C)- and G6PDx fava beans-treated (G6PDx-FB) mice, respectively. Similarly, the levels of 7 and 25 metabolites in the liver showed significant differences between C3H and C3H-FB, and G6PDx and G6PDx-FB, respectively. The levels of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine were significantly increased in the plasma of both C3H-FB and G6PDx-FB mice. In the liver, more metabolic alterations were observed in G6PDx-FB mice than in C3H-FB mice, and were involved in a sugar, fatty acids, amino acids, cholesterol biosynthesis, the urea cycle, and the nucleotide metabolic pathway. These findings suggest that oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine may be potential biomarkers of the response to fava beans in C3H and G6PDx mice and therefore that oleic acid and linoleic acid may be involved in oxidative stress induced by fava beans. This study demonstrates that G6PD activity in mice can affect their metabolic pathways in response to fava beans. PMID:26981882

  19. The development of control processes supporting source memory discrimination as revealed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    de Chastelaine, Marianne; Friedman, David; Cycowicz, Yael M

    2007-08-01

    Improvement in source memory performance throughout childhood is thought to be mediated by the development of executive control. As postretrieval control processes may be better time-locked to the recognition response rather than the retrieval cue, the development of processes underlying source memory was investigated with both stimulus- and response-locked event-related potentials (ERPs). These were recorded in children, adolescents, and adults during a recognition memory exclusion task. Green- and red-outlined pictures were studied, but were tested in black outline. The test requirement was to endorse old items shown in one study color ("targets") and to reject new items along with old items shown in the alternative study color ("nontargets"). Source memory improved with age. All age groups retrieved target and nontarget memories as reflected by reliable parietal episodic memory (EM) effects, a stimulus-locked ERP correlate of recollection. Response-locked ERPs to targets and nontargets diverged in all groups prior to the response, although this occurred at an increasingly earlier time point with age. We suggest these findings reflect the implementation of attentional control mechanisms to enhance target memories and facilitate response selection with the greatest and least success, respectively, in adults and children. In adults only, response-locked ERPs revealed an early-onsetting parietal negativity for nontargets, but not for targets. This was suggested to reflect adults' ability to consistently inhibit prepotent target responses for nontargets. The findings support the notion that the development of source memory relies on the maturation of control processes that serve to enhance accurate selection of task-relevant memories.

  20. Altering the Application of the Traditional Systems Development Life Cycle for Air Force Software Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    York: North Holland, Inc., 1981. 2. Fox, Joseph M. Software and Its Development. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1982. A 3. Gujarati ... Damodar . Basic Econometrics. New York: McGraw- Hill Book Company, 1978. J.,. 4. Larr, L., et al. Planning Guide for Computer Programming Development

  1. Olanzapine Treatment of Adolescent Rats Causes Enduring Specific Memory Impairments and Alters Cortical Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Thomas; Enos, Jennifer K.; Bailey, Aileen M.; Kolb, Bryan; Frost, Douglas O.

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly used in children and adolescents to treat a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, little is known about the long-term effects of early life antipsychotic drug treatment. Most antipsychotic drugs are potent antagonists or partial agonists of dopamine D2 receptors; atypical antipsychotic drugs also antagonize type 2A serotonin receptors. Dopamine and serotonin regulate many neurodevelopmental processes. Thus, early life antipsychotic drug treatment can, potentially, perturb these processes, causing long-term behavioral- and neurobiological impairments. Here, we treated adolescent, male rats with olanzapine on post-natal days 28–49. As adults, they exhibited impaired working memory, but normal spatial memory, as compared to vehicle-treated control rats. They also showed a deficit in extinction of fear conditioning. Measures of motor activity and skill, habituation to an open field, and affect were normal. In the orbital- and medial prefrontal cortices, parietal cortex, nucleus accumbens core and dentate gyrus, adolescent olanzapine treatment altered the developmental dynamics and mature values of dendritic spine density in a region-specific manner. Measures of motor activity and skill, habituation to an open field, and affect were normal. In the orbital- and medial prefrontal cortices, D1 binding was reduced and binding of GABAA receptors with open Cl− channels was increased. In medial prefrontal cortex, D2 binding was also increased. The persistence of these changes underscores the importance of improved understanding of the enduring sequelae of pediatric APD treatment as a basis for weighing the benefits and risks of adolescent antipsychotic drug therapy, especially prophylactic treatment in high risk, asymptomatic patients. The long-term changes in neurotransmitter receptor binding and neural circuitry induced by adolescent APD treatment may also cause enduring changes in behavioral- and neurobiological responses to

  2. Invasive mussels alter the littoral food web of a large lake: stable isotopes reveal drastic shifts in sources and flow of energy.

    PubMed

    Ozersky, Ted; Evans, David O; Barton, David R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels impacted the structure and energy sources of the littoral benthic food web of a large temperate lake. We combined information about pre- and postdreissenid abundance, biomass, and secondary production of the littoral benthos with results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of archival (predreissenid) and recent (postdreissenid) samples of all common benthic taxa. This approach enabled us to determine the importance of benthic and sestonic carbon to the littoral food web before, and more than a decade after dreissenid establishment. Long term dreissenid presence was associated with a 32-fold increase in abundance, 6-fold increase in biomass, and 14-fold increase in secondary production of the littoral benthos. Dreissenids comprised a large portion of the post-invasion benthos, making up 13, 38, and 56% of total abundance, biomass, and secondary production, respectively. The predreissenid food web was supported primarily by benthic primary production, while sestonic material was relatively more important to the postdreissenid food web. The absolute importance of both sestonic material and benthic primary production to the littoral benthos increased considerably following dreissenid establishment. Our results show drastic alterations to food web structure and suggest that dreissenid mussels redirect energy and material from the water column to the littoral benthos both through biodeposition of sestonic material as well as stimulation of benthic primary production.

  3. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  4. Characterization of a FGF19 variant with altered receptor specificity revealed a central role for FGFR1c in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongfei; Baribault, Helene; Vonderfecht, Steven; Lemon, Bryan; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Gardner, Jonitha; Lee, Ki Jeong; Gupte, Jamila; Mookherjee, Paramita; Wang, Minghan; Sheng, Jackie; Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes and associated metabolic conditions have reached pandemic proportions worldwide, and there is a clear unmet medical need for new therapies that are both effective and safe. FGF19 and FGF21 are distinctive members of the FGF family that function as endocrine hormones. Both have potent effects on normalizing glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and therefore, represent attractive potential next generation therapies for combating the growing epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. The mechanism responsible for these impressive metabolic effects remains unknown. While both FGF19 and FGF21 can activate FGFRs 1c, 2c, and 3c in the presence of co-receptor βKlotho in vitro, which receptor is responsible for the metabolic activities observed in vivo remains unknown. Here we have generated a variant of FGF19, FGF19-7, that has altered receptor specificity with a strong bias toward FGFR1c. We show that FGF19-7 is equally efficacious as wild type FGF19 in regulating glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in both diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient mouse models. These results are the first direct demonstration of the central role of the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex in glucose and lipid regulation, and also strongly suggest that activation of this receptor complex alone might be sufficient to achieve all the metabolic functions of endocrine FGF molecules.

  5. 3D Texture Analysis Reveals Imperceptible MRI Textural Alterations in the Thalamus and Putamen in Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy Type 1, EPM1

    PubMed Central

    Suoranta, Sanna; Holli-Helenius, Kirsi; Koskenkorva, Päivi; Niskanen, Eini; Könönen, Mervi; Äikiä, Marja; Eskola, Hannu; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Vanninen, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (EPM1) is an autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young onset age, myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. At the time of diagnosis, the visual assessment of the brain MRI is usually normal, with no major changes found later. Therefore, we utilized texture analysis (TA) to characterize and classify the underlying properties of the affected brain tissue by means of 3D texture features. Sixteen genetically verified patients with EPM1 and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. TA was performed upon 3D volumes of interest that were placed bilaterally in the thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and putamen. Compared to the healthy controls, EPM1 patients had significant textural differences especially in the thalamus and right putamen. The most significantly differing texture features included parameters that measure the complexity and heterogeneity of the tissue, such as the co-occurrence matrix-based entropy and angular second moment, and also the run-length matrix-based parameters of gray-level non-uniformity, short run emphasis and long run emphasis. This study demonstrates the usability of 3D TA for extracting additional information from MR images. Textural alterations which suggest complex, coarse and heterogeneous appearance were found bilaterally in the thalamus, supporting the previous literature on thalamic pathology in EPM1. The observed putamenal involvement is a novel finding. Our results encourage further studies on the clinical applications, feasibility, reproducibility and reliability of 3D TA. PMID:23922849

  6. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  7. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  8. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of mouse cerebellum reveals alterations in RasGRF1 expression following in vivo chronic treatment with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Rusconi, Francesco; Rubino, Tiziana; Cattaneo, Angela; Martegani, Enzo; Parolaro, Daniela; Bachi, Angela; Zippel, Renata

    2009-02-01

    We have applied transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to identify changes in the RNA and the protein levels in the mouse cerebellum after chronic treatment with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Among approximately 14,000 transcripts in a mouse cDNA microarray library, we found 11 genes with altered expression. RasGRF1, a neuron-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor, showed a reduction both at the RNA and protein levels with a specific decrease of the protein pool associated to cell membranes. In addition, proteomic analysis on cerebellum obtained from chronically THC-treated mice detected quantitative changes of additional 27 spots, mostly in the membranous fraction. We found enrichment of alpha (Galphao, Galphaq) and beta subunits (beta4/beta2 and beta5) of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and of two calcium-binding proteins, calretinin and hippocalcin-like protein-1. In addition, we also detected a significant increase in the membrane fraction of proteins involved in exo-endocytosis such as septins, dynamin-1, and vesicle protein sorting 29. By western blotting, we confirmed increased membrane localization of calretinin and of dynamin-1 isoforms with higher isoelectric point, indicative for an underphosphorylated state of the molecule. In conclusion, our results indicate that chronic THC modulates the expression and subcellular localization of proteins implicated in Ras signaling, calcium-buffering potential, and trafficking.

  9. Comparative Transcriptome Atlases Reveal Altered Gene Expression Modules between Two Cleomaceae C3 and C4 Plant Species[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Külahoglu, Canan; Denton, Alisandra K.; Sommer, Manuel; Maß, Janina; Schliesky, Simon; Wrobel, Thomas J.; Berckmans, Barbara; Gongora-Castillo, Elsa; Buell, C. Robin; Simon, Rüdiger; De Veylder, Lieven; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P.M.

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis outperforms the ancestral C3 state in a wide range of natural and agro-ecosystems by affording higher water-use and nitrogen-use efficiencies. It therefore represents a prime target for engineering novel, high-yielding crops by introducing the trait into C3 backgrounds. However, the genetic architecture of C4 photosynthesis remains largely unknown. To define the divergence in gene expression modules between C3 and C4 photosynthesis during leaf ontogeny, we generated comprehensive transcriptome atlases of two Cleomaceae species, Gynandropsis gynandra (C4) and Tarenaya hassleriana (C3), by RNA sequencing. Overall, the gene expression profiles appear remarkably similar between the C3 and C4 species. We found that known C4 genes were recruited to photosynthesis from different expression domains in C3, including typical housekeeping gene expression patterns in various tissues as well as individual heterotrophic tissues. Furthermore, we identified a structure-related module recruited from the C3 root. Comparison of gene expression patterns with anatomy during leaf ontogeny provided insight into genetic features of Kranz anatomy. Altered expression of developmental factors and cell cycle genes is associated with a higher degree of endoreduplication in enlarged C4 bundle sheath cells. A delay in mesophyll differentiation apparent both in the leaf anatomy and the transcriptome allows for extended vein formation in the C4 leaf. PMID:25122153

  10. Invasive Mussels Alter the Littoral Food Web of a Large Lake: Stable Isotopes Reveal Drastic Shifts in Sources and Flow of Energy

    PubMed Central

    Ozersky, Ted; Evans, David O.; Barton, David R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels impacted the structure and energy sources of the littoral benthic food web of a large temperate lake. We combined information about pre- and postdreissenid abundance, biomass, and secondary production of the littoral benthos with results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of archival (predreissenid) and recent (postdreissenid) samples of all common benthic taxa. This approach enabled us to determine the importance of benthic and sestonic carbon to the littoral food web before, and more than a decade after dreissenid establishment. Long term dreissenid presence was associated with a 32-fold increase in abundance, 6-fold increase in biomass, and 14-fold increase in secondary production of the littoral benthos. Dreissenids comprised a large portion of the post-invasion benthos, making up 13, 38, and 56% of total abundance, biomass, and secondary production, respectively. The predreissenid food web was supported primarily by benthic primary production, while sestonic material was relatively more important to the postdreissenid food web. The absolute importance of both sestonic material and benthic primary production to the littoral benthos increased considerably following dreissenid establishment. Our results show drastic alterations to food web structure and suggest that dreissenid mussels redirect energy and material from the water column to the littoral benthos both through biodeposition of sestonic material as well as stimulation of benthic primary production. PMID:23284673

  11. Maternal and cord blood LC-HRMS metabolomics reveal alterations in energy and polyamine metabolism, and oxidative stress in very-low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Alexandre-Gouabau, Marie-Cécile; Courant, Frédérique; Moyon, Thomas; Küster, Alice; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Tea, Illa; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Darmaun, Dominique

    2013-06-07

    To assess the global effect of preterm birth on fetal metabolism and maternal-fetal nutrient transfer, we used a mass spectrometric-based chemical phenotyping approach on cord blood obtained at the time of birth. We sampled umbilical venous, umbilical arterial, and maternal blood from mothers delivering very-low birth weight (VLBW, with a median gestational age and weight of 29 weeks, and 1210 g, respectively) premature or full-term (FT) neonates. In VLBW group, we observed a significant elevation in the levels and maternal-fetal gradients of butyryl-, isovaleryl-, hexanoyl- and octanoyl-carnitines, suggesting enhanced short- and medium chain fatty acid β-oxidation in human preterm feto-placental unit. The significant decrease in glutamine-glutamate in preterm arterial cord blood beside lower levels of amino acid precursors of Krebs cycle suggest increased glutamine utilization in the fast growing tissues of preterm fetus with a deregulation in placental glutamate-glutamine shuttling. Enhanced glutathione utilization is likely to account for the decrease in precursor amino acids (serine, betaine, glutamate and methionine) in arterial cord blood. An increase in both the circulating levels and maternal-fetal gradients of several polyamines in their acetylated form (diacetylspermine and acetylputrescine) suggests an enhanced polyamine metabolic cycling in extreme prematurity. Our metabolomics study allowed the identification of alterations in fetal energy, antioxidant defense, and polyamines and purines flux as a signature of premature birth.

  12. Maternal iron deficiency alters circulating thyroid hormone levels in developing neonatal rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency and iron deficiency (FeD) during fetal and neonatal life are both similarly deleterious to mammalian development suggesting a possible linkage between iron and thyroid hormone insufficiencies. Recent published data from our laboratory demonstrate a r...

  13. Novel quantitative methods for characterization of chemical induced functional alteration in developing neuronal cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Thousands of chemicals lack adequate testing for adverse effects on nervous system development, stimulating research into alternative methods to screen chemicals for potential developmental neurotoxicity. Microelectrode arrays (MEA) collect action potential spiking...

  14. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    involved in autism pathogenesis also occur in many children that do not develop ASD. This suggests there is an underlying vulnerability phenotype that...involved in autism pathogenesis occur in many more children than those that develop ASD. This suggests that there is an underlying vulnerability phenotype...hypothesis to explain the observations that the multiple environmental insults that have been suggested to be involved in autism pathogenesis occur in

  15. Development of Intra-Articular Drug Delivery to Alter Progression of Arthritis Following Joint Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    increased intra-articular fracture severity in the mouse knee . Osteoarthritis Cartilage, 2011. 19(7): p. 864-73. 5. Ward, B.D., et al., Absence of...The work in this study addresses the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) and seeks to develop a basis for future therapeutic...symptomatic osteoarthritis patients are post-traumatic [1]. At the present time, the state of the art treatment for displaced articular fractures in

  16. Animal models of maternal nutrition and altered offspring bone structure--bone development across the lifecourse.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Stuart A; Bertram, Caroline; Cooper, Cyrus; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2011-11-24

    It is widely accepted that the likelihood of offspring developing heart disease, stroke, or diabetes in later life, is influenced by the their in utero environment and maternal nutrition. There is increasing epidemiological evidence that osteoporosis in the offspring may also be influenced by the mother's nutrition during pregnancy. This review provides evidence from a range of animal models that supports the epidemiological data; suggesting that lifelong bone development and growth in offspring is determined during gestation.

  17. Dysregulation of Semaphorin7A/β1-integrin signaling leads to defective GnRH-1 cell migration, abnormal gonadal development and altered fertility

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Andrea; Ferraris, Nicoletta; Wray, Susan; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Donohue, Duncan E.; Casoni, Filippo; Kramer, Phillip R.; Derijck, Alwin A.; Adolfs, Youri; Fasolo, Aldo; Pasterkamp, Ronald J.; Giacobini, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction in mammals is dependent on the function of specific neurons that secrete gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH-1). These neurons originate prenatally in the nasal placode and migrate into the forebrain along the olfactory–vomeronasal nerves. Alterations in this migratory process lead to defective GnRH-1 secretion, resulting in heterogeneous genetic disorders such as idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), and other reproductive diseases characterized by the reduction or failure of sexual competence. Combining mouse genetics with in vitro models, we demonstrate that Semaphorin 7A (Sema7A) is essential for the development of the GnRH-1 neuronal system. Loss of Sema7A signaling alters the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, resulting in significantly reduced numbers of these neurons in the adult brain as well as in reduced gonadal size and subfertility. We also show that GnRH-1 cells differentially express the Sema7 receptors β1-integrin and Plexin C1 as a function of their migratory stage, whereas the ligand is robustly expressed along developing olfactory/vomeronasal fibers. Disruption of Sema7A function in vitro inhibits β1-integrin-mediated migration. Analysis of Plexin C1−/− mice did not reveal any difference in the migratory process of GnRH-1 neurons, indicating that Sema7A mainly signals through β1-integrin to regulate GnRH-1 cell motility. In conclusion, we have identified Sema7A as a gene implicated in the normal development of the GnRH-1 system in mice and as a genetic marker for the elucidation of some forms of GnRH-1 deficiency in humans. PMID:21903667

  18. Microbiome-metabolome analysis reveals unhealthy alterations in the composition and metabolism of ruminal microbiota with increasing dietary grain in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sheng-Yong; Huo, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Wei-Yun

    2016-02-01

    Currently, knowledge about the impact of high-grain (HG) feeding on rumen microbiota and metabolome is limited. In this study, a combination of the 454 pyrosequencing strategy and the mass spectrometry-based metabolomics technique was applied to investigate the effects of increased dietary grain (0%, 25% and 50% maize grain) on changes in whole ruminal microbiota and their metabolites using goat as a ruminant model. We observed a significant influence of HG feeding in shaping the ruminal bacterial community structure, diversity and composition, with an overall dominance of bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes along with a low abundance of Bacteriodetes in the HG group. High-grain feeding increased the number of ciliate and methanogens, and decreased the density of anaerobic fungi and the richness of the archaeal community. The metabolomics analysis revealed that HG feeding increased the levels of several toxic, inflammatory and unnatural compounds, including endotoxin, tryptamine, tyramine, histamine and phenylacetate. Correlation analysis on the combined datasets revealed some potential relationships between ruminal metabolites and certain microbial species. Information about these relationships may prove useful in either direct (therapeutic) or indirect (dietary) interventions for ruminal disorders due to microbial compositional shifts, such as ruminal acidosis.

  19. Analysis of NUAK1 and NUAK2 expression during early chick development reveals specific patterns in the developing head.

    PubMed

    Bekri, Abdelhamid; Billaud, Marc; Thélu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Several human diseases are associated with the NUAK1 and NUAK2 genes. These genes encode kinases, members of the AMPK-related kinases (ARK) gene family. Both NUAK1 and NUAK2 are known targets of the serine threonine kinase LKB1, a tumor suppressor involved in regulating cell polarity. While much is known about their functions in disease, their expression pattern in normal development has not been extensively studied. Here, we present the expression patterns for NUAK1 and NUAK2 in the chick during early-stage embryogenesis, until day 3 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage HH20). Several embryonic structures, in particular the nascent head, showed distinct expression levels. NUAK1 expression was first detected at stage HH6 in the rostral neural folds. It was then expressed (HH7-11) throughout the encephalalon, predominantly in the telencephalon and mesencephalon. NUAK1 expression was also detected in the splanchnic endoderm area at HH8-10, and in the vitellin vein derived from this area, but not in the heart. NUAK2 expression was first detected at stage HH6 in the neural folds. It was then found throughout the encephalon at stage HH20. Particular attention was paid in this study to the dorsal ectoderm at stages HH7 and HH8, where a local deficit or accumulation of NUAK2 mRNA were found to correlate with the direction of curvature of the neural plate. This is the first description of NUAK1 and NUAK2 expression patterns in the chick during early development; it reveals non-identical expression profiles for both genes in neural development.

  20. Zero-expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR: recent developments reveal high potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Jedamzik, Ralf; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    ZERODUR® is a well-established material in astronomy and all fields of applications where temperature gradients might limit extreme precision and stability. Together with its rich heritage come a series of recent developments, which reveal the potential of the material for broader and more demanding applications. The outstanding degree of light-weighting achieved with progress in CNC grinding in the last two years shows its high suitability for space telescope mirrors. This is supported by new data on strength enabling higher mechanical loads. Also ground based telescopes benefit from the improved light-weight processing such as solar telescopes and downstream mirrors of extremely large telescopes. More and better data have been collected demonstrating the unique CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® and its very high reproducibility a necessary precondition for large series mirror production. Deliveries of more than 250 ZERODUR mirrors of 1.5 m in diameter prove the availability of robust industrial serial production capability inevitable for ELT mirror segment production.

  1. Comparative expression profiling reveals gene functions in female meiosis and gametophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihua; He, Jiangman; Cai, Hanyang; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Yanqiang; Liu, Renyi; Yang, Zhenbiao; Qin, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Megasporogenesis is essential for female fertility, and requires the accomplishment of meiosis and the formation of functional megaspores. The inaccessibility and low abundance of female meiocytes make it particularly difficult to elucidate the molecular basis underlying megasporogenesis. We used high-throughput tag-sequencing analysis to identify genes expressed in female meiocytes (FMs) by comparing gene expression profiles from wild-type ovules undergoing megasporogenesis with those from the spl mutant ovules, which lack megasporogenesis. A total of 862 genes were identified as FMs, with levels that are consistently reduced in spl ovules in two biological replicates. Fluorescence-assisted cell sorting followed by RNA-seq analysis of DMC1:GFP-labeled female meiocytes confirmed that 90% of the FMs are indeed detected in the female meiocyte protoplast profiling. We performed reverse genetic analysis of 120 candidate genes and identified four FM genes with a function in female meiosis progression in Arabidopsis. We further revealed that KLU, a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, is involved in chromosome pairing during female meiosis, most likely by affecting the normal expression pattern of DMC1 in ovules during female meiosis. Our studies provide valuable information for functional genomic analyses of plant germline development as well as insights into meiosis.

  2. Analysis of cancer genomes reveals basic features of human aging and its role in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Podolskiy, Dmitriy I.; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations have long been implicated in aging and disease, but their impact on fitness and function is difficult to assess. Here by analysing human cancer genomes we identify mutational patterns associated with aging. Our analyses suggest that age-associated mutation load and burden double approximately every 8 years, similar to the all-cause mortality doubling time. This analysis further reveals variance in the rate of aging among different human tissues, for example, slightly accelerated aging of the reproductive system. Age-adjusted mutation load and burden correlate with the corresponding cancer incidence and precede it on average by 15 years, pointing to pre-clinical cancer development times. Behaviour of mutation load also exhibits gender differences and late-life reversals, explaining some gender-specific and late-life patterns in cancer incidence rates. Overall, this study characterizes some features of human aging and offers a mechanism for age being a risk factor for the onset of cancer. PMID:27515585

  3. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  4. Analysis of Microtubule-Associated-Proteins during IBA-Mediated Adventitious Root Induction Reveals KATANIN Dependent and Independent Alterations of Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Mordehaev, Inna; Sunil Kumar, Gujulla B; Ophir, Ron; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O; Sadot, Einat

    2015-01-01

    Adventitious roots (AR) are post embryonic lateral organs that differentiate from non-root tissues. The understanding of the molecular mechanism which underlies their differentiation is important because of their central role in vegetative plant propagation. Here it was studied how the expression of different microtubule (MT)-associated proteins (MAPs) is affected during AR induction, and whether expression differences are dependent on MT organization itself. To examine AR formation when MTs are disturbed we used two mutants in the MT severing protein KATANIN. It was found that rate and number of AR primordium formed following IBA induction for three days was reduced in bot1-1 and bot1-7 plants. The reduced capacity to form ARs in bot1-1 was associated with altered expression of MAP-encoding genes along AR induction. While the expression of MAP65-4, MAP65-3, AURORA1, AURORA2 and TANGLED, increased in wild-type but not in bot1-1 plants, the expression of MAP65-8 and MDP25 decreased in wild type plants but not in the bot1-1 plant after two days of IBA-treatment. The expression of MOR1 was increased two days after AR induction in wild type and bot1-1 plants. To examine its expression specifically in AR primordium, MOR1 upstream regulatory sequence was isolated and cloned to regulate GFP. Expression of GFP was induced in the primary root tips and lateral roots, in the pericycle of the hypocotyls and in all stages of AR primordium formation. It is concluded that the expression of MAPs is regulated along AR induction and that reduction in KATANIN expression inhibits AR formation and indirectly influences the specific expression of some MAPs.

  5. Analysis of Microtubule-Associated-Proteins during IBA-Mediated Adventitious Root Induction Reveals KATANIN Dependent and Independent Alterations of Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Mordehaev, Inna; Sunil Kumar, Gujulla B; Ophir, Ron; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.; Sadot, Einat

    2015-01-01

    Adventitious roots (AR) are post embryonic lateral organs that differentiate from non-root tissues. The understanding of the molecular mechanism which underlies their differentiation is important because of their central role in vegetative plant propagation. Here it was studied how the expression of different microtubule (MT)-associated proteins (MAPs) is affected during AR induction, and whether expression differences are dependent on MT organization itself. To examine AR formation when MTs are disturbed we used two mutants in the MT severing protein KATANIN. It was found that rate and number of AR primordium formed following IBA induction for three days was reduced in bot1-1 and bot1-7 plants. The reduced capacity to form ARs in bot1-1 was associated with altered expression of MAP-encoding genes along AR induction. While the expression of MAP65-4, MAP65-3, AURORA1, AURORA2 and TANGLED, increased in wild-type but not in bot1-1 plants, the expression of MAP65-8 and MDP25 decreased in wild type plants but not in the bot1-1 plant after two days of IBA-treatment. The expression of MOR1 was increased two days after AR induction in wild type and bot1-1 plants. To examine its expression specifically in AR primordium, MOR1 upstream regulatory sequence was isolated and cloned to regulate GFP. Expression of GFP was induced in the primary root tips and lateral roots, in the pericycle of the hypocotyls and in all stages of AR primordium formation. It is concluded that the expression of MAPs is regulated along AR induction and that reduction in KATANIN expression inhibits AR formation and indirectly influences the specific expression of some MAPs. PMID:26630265

  6. Genome-wide analysis of abdominal and pleural malignant mesothelioma with DNA arrays reveals both common and distinct regions of copy number alteration

    PubMed Central

    Borczuk, Alain C.; Pei, Jianming; Taub, Robert N.; Levy, Brynn; Nahum, Odelia; Chen, Jinli; Chen, Katherine; Testa, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial linings of the serosal cavities. Pleural space is the most common site, accounting for about 80% of cases, while peritoneum makes up the majority of the remaining 20%. While histologically similar, tumors from these sites are epidemiologically and clinically distinct and their attribution to asbestos exposure differs. We compared DNA array-based findings from 48 epithelioid peritoneal MMs and 41 epithelioid pleural MMs to identify similarities and differences in copy number alterations (CNAs). Losses in 3p (BAP1 gene), 9p (CDKN2A) and 22q (NF2) were seen in tumors from both tumor sites, although CDKN2A and NF2 losses were seen at a higher rate in pleural disease (p<0.01). Overall, regions of copy number gain were more common in peritoneal MM, whereas losses were more common in pleural MM, with regions of loss containing known tumor suppressor genes and regions of gain encompassing genes encoding receptor tyrosine kinase pathway members. Cases with known asbestos causation (n = 32 ) were compared with those linked to radiation exposure (n = 9 ). Deletions in 6q, 14q, 17p and 22q, and gain of 17q were seen in asbestos-associated but not radiation-related cases. As reported in post-radiation sarcoma, gains outnumbered losses in radiation-associated MM. The patterns of genomic imbalances suggest overlapping and distinct molecular pathways in MM of the pleura and peritoneum, and that differences in causation (i.e., asbestos vs. radiation) may account for some of these site-dependent differences PMID:26853494

  7. Identification of hepatic phospholipidosis inducers in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes, a physiologically relevant model, reveals altered basolateral uptake and biliary excretion of anionic probe substrates.

    PubMed

    Ferslew, Brian C; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2014-05-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (PLD) is characterized by phospholipid accumulation within the lysosomes of affected tissues, resulting in lysosomal enlargement and laminar body inclusions. Numerous adverse effects and toxicities have been linked to PLD-inducing drugs, but it remains unknown whether drug-induced PLD represents a distinct toxicity or cellular adaptation. In silico and immortalized cellular models have been used to evaluate the PLD potential of new drugs, but these systems have some limitations. The aims of this study were to determine whether primary sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) can serve as a sensitive and selective model to evaluate hepatic drug-induced PLD, and to evaluate the impact of PLD on the uptake and biliary excretion of probe substrates, taurocholate (TC) and rosuvastatin (RSV). Rat SCH were cultured for 48 h with prototypic hepatic PLD-inducing drugs, amiodarone (AMD), chloroquine (CHQ), desipramine (DES), and azithromycin (AZI), as well as the renal PLD inducer gentamicin (GTM). LysoTracker Red localization and transmission electron microscopy indicated enlarged lysosomal compartments and laminar body inclusions in SCH treated with AMD, CHQ, DES, and AZI, but not GTM, relative to control. PLD resulted in a 51-92% decrease in the in vitro biliary clearance of both TC and RSV; the biliary excretion index significantly decreased for TC from 88 to 35-73%. These data suggested that PLD significantly reduced both organic anion transporting polypeptide-mediated uptake, and bile salt export pump-mediated biliary transport processes. The current study demonstrates that the rat SCH system is a promising model to study hepatic PLD in vitro. Altered hepatic transport of anionic substrates secondary to drug-induced PLD is a novel finding.

  8. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Hao, Zhao; Fernández-Nino, Susana G.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Willats, William G. T.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Vega-Sanchez, Miguel E.

    2015-08-18

    The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6) gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of 3 day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared (FTM-IR) Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell walls of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Finally, taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  9. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    DOE PAGES

    Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Hao, Zhao; Fernández-Nino, Susana G.; ...

    2015-08-18

    The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6) gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to testmore » the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of 3 day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared (FTM-IR) Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell walls of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Finally, taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.« less

  10. A comparative study of ripening among berries of the grape cluster reveals an altered transcriptional programme and enhanced ripening rate in delayed berries

    PubMed Central

    Gouthu, Satyanarayana; O’Neil, Shawn T.; Di, Yanming; Ansarolia, Mitra; Megraw, Molly; Deluc, Laurent G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional studies in relation to fruit ripening generally aim to identify the transcriptional states associated with physiological ripening stages and the transcriptional changes between stages within the ripening programme. In non-climacteric fruits such as grape, all ripening-related genes involved in this programme have not been identified, mainly due to the lack of mutants for comparative transcriptomic studies. A feature in grape cluster ripening (Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir), where all berries do not initiate the ripening at the same time, was exploited to study their shifted ripening programmes in parallel. Berries that showed marked ripening state differences in a véraison-stage cluster (ripening onset) ultimately reached similar ripeness states toward maturity, indicating the flexibility of the ripening programme. The expression variance between these véraison-stage berry classes, where 11% of the genes were found to be differentially expressed, was reduced significantly toward maturity, resulting in the synchronization of their transcriptional states. Defined quantitative expression changes (transcriptional distances) not only existed between the véraison transitional stages, but also between the véraison to maturity stages, regardless of the berry class. It was observed that lagging berries complete their transcriptional programme in a shorter time through altered gene expressions and ripening-related hormone dynamics, and enhance the rate of physiological ripening progression. Finally, the reduction in expression variance of genes can identify new genes directly associated with ripening and also assess the relevance of gene activity to the phase of the ripening programme. PMID:25135520

  11. Protein Composition of Infectious Spores Reveals Novel Sexual Development and Germination Factors in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingwei; Hebert, Alexander S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Spores are an essential cell type required for long-term survival across diverse organisms in the tree of life and are a hallmark of fungal reproduction, persistence, and dispersal. Among human fungal pathogens, spores are presumed infectious particles, but relatively little is known about this robust cell type. Here we used the meningitis-causing fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to determine the roles of spore-resident proteins in spore biology. Using highly sensitive nanoscale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we compared the proteomes of spores and vegetative cells (yeast) and identified eighteen proteins specifically enriched in spores. The genes encoding these proteins were deleted, and the resulting strains were evaluated for discernable phenotypes. We hypothesized that spore-enriched proteins would be preferentially involved in spore-specific processes such as dormancy, stress resistance, and germination. Surprisingly, however, the majority of the mutants harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. One mutant in the cohort was defective in the spore-specific process of germination, showing a delay specifically in the initiation of vegetative growth. Thus, by using this in-depth proteomics approach as a screening tool for cell type-specific proteins and combining it with molecular genetics, we successfully identified the first germination factor in C. neoformans. We also identified numerous proteins with previously unknown functions in both sexual development and spore composition. Our findings provide the first insights into the basic protein components of infectious spores and reveal unexpected molecular connections between infectious particle production and spore composition in a pathogenic eukaryote. PMID:26313153

  12. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  13. Landscape alterations influence differential habitat use of nesting buteos and ravens within sagebrush ecosystem: implications for transmission line development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Howe, Kristy B.; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A goal in avian ecology is to understand factors that influence differences in nesting habitat and distribution among species, especially within changing landscapes. Over the past 2 decades, humans have altered sagebrush ecosystems as a result of expansion in energy production and transmission. Our primary study objective was to identify differences in the use of landscape characteristics and natural and anthropogenic features by nesting Common Ravens (Corvus corax) and 3 species of buteo (Swainson's Hawk [Buteo swainsoni], Red-tailed Hawk [B. jamaicensis], and Ferruginous Hawk [B. regalis]) within a sagebrush ecosystem in southeastern Idaho. During 2007–2009, we measured multiple environmental factors associated with 212 nest sites using data collected remotely and in the field. We then developed multinomial models to predict nesting probabilities by each species and predictive response curves based on model-averaged estimates. We found differences among species related to nesting substrate (natural vs. anthropogenic), agriculture, native grassland, and edge (interface of 2 cover types). Most important, ravens had a higher probability of nesting on anthropogenic features (0.80) than the other 3 species (Artemisia spp.), favoring increased numbers of nesting ravens and fewer nesting Ferruginous Hawks. Our results indicate that habitat alterations, fragmentation, and forthcoming disturbances anticipated with continued energy development in sagebrush steppe ecosystems can lead to predictable changes in raptor and raven communities.

  14. Motor Experience Reprograms Development of a Genetically-Altered Bilateral Corticospinal Motor Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Serradj, Najet

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that motor experience plays a role in shaping development of the corticospinal system and voluntary motor control, which is a key motor function of the system. Here we used a mouse model with conditional forebrain deletion of the gene for EphA4 (Emx1-Cre:EphA4tm2Kldr), which regulates development of the laterality of corticospinal tract (CST). We combined study of Emx1-Cre:EphA4tm2Kldr with unilateral forelimb constraint during development to expand our understanding of experience-dependent CST development from both basic and translational perspectives. This mouse develops dense ipsilateral CST projections, a bilateral motor cortex motor representation, and bilateral motor phenotypes. Together these phenotypes can be used as readouts of corticospinal system organization and function and the changes brought about by experience. The Emx1-Cre:EphA4tm2Kldr mouse shares features with the common developmental disorder cerebral palsy: bilateral voluntary motor impairments and bilateral CST miswiring. Emx1-Cre:EphA4tm2Kldr mice with typical motor experiences during development display the bilateral phenotype of “mirror” reaching, because of a strongly bilateral motor cortex motor representation and a bilateral CST. By contrast, Emx1-Cre:EphA4tm2Kldr mice that experienced unilateral forelimb constraint from P1 to P30 and tested at maturity had a more contralateral motor cortex motor representation in each hemisphere; more lateralized CST projections; and substantially more lateralized/independent reaching movements. Changes in CST organization and function in this model can be explained by reduced synaptic competition of the CST from the side without developmental forelimb motor experiences. Using this model we show that unilateral constraint largely abrogated the effects of the genetic mutation on CST projections and thus demonstrates how robust and persistent experience-dependent development can be for the establishment of corticospinal system

  15. Structure-guided alterations of the gp41-directed HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5 reveal new properties regarding its neutralizing function.

    PubMed

    Guenaga, Javier; Wyatt, Richard T

    2012-01-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody 2F5 recognizes an epitope in the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER). The MPER adopts a helical conformation as free peptide, as post-fusogenic forms of gp41, and when bound to the 4E10 monoclonal antibody (Mab). However, when bound to 2F5, the epitope is an extended-loop. The antibody-peptide structure reveals binding between the heavy and light chains with most the long, hydrophobic CDRH3 not contacting peptide. However, mutagenesis identifies this loop as critical for binding, neutralization and for putative hydrophobic membrane interactions. Here, we examined length requirements of the 2F5 CDRH3 and plasticity regarding binding and neutralization. We generated 2F5 variants possessing either longer or shorter CDRH3s and assessed function. The CDRH3 tolerated elongations and reductions up to four residues, displaying a range of binding affinities and retaining some neutralizing capacity. 2F5 antibody variants selective recognition of conformationally distinctive MPER probes suggests a new role for the CDRH3 loop in destabilizing the helical MPER. Binding and neutralization were enhanced by targeted tryptophan substitutions recapitulating fully the activities of the wild-type 2F5 antibody in a shorter CDRH3 variant. MPER alanine scanning revealed binding contacts of this variant downstream of the 2F5 core epitope, into the 4E10 epitope region. This variant displayed increased reactivity to cardiolipin-beta-2-glycoprotein. Tyrosine replacements maintained neutralization while eliminating cardiolipin-beta-2-glycoprotein interaction. The data suggest a new mechanism of action, important for vaccine design, in which the 2F5 CDRH3 contacts and destabilizes the MPER helix downstream of its core epitope to allow induction of the extended-loop conformation.

  16. A MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE EMBRYONIC FORELIMB OF THE C57BL/6J MOUSE REVEALS SIGNIFICANT ALTERATIONS METABOLIC AND DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION FOLLOWING ETHANOL EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The observation of transcriptional changes following embryonic ethanol exposure may provide significant insights into the biological response to ethanol exposure. In this study, we used microarray analysis to examine the transcriptional response of the developing limb to a dose ...

  17. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  18. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  19. Altered thalamocortical development in the SAP102 knockout model of intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Crocker-Buque, Alex; Currie, Stephen P.; Luz, Liliana L.; Grant, Seth G.; Duffy, Kevin R.; Kind, Peter C.; Daw, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations known to cause intellectual disabilities (IDs) are concentrated in specific sets of genes including both those encoding synaptic proteins and those expressed during early development. We have characterized the effect of genetic deletion of Dlg3, an ID-related gene encoding the synaptic NMDA-receptor interacting protein synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102), on development of the mouse somatosensory cortex. SAP102 is the main representative of the PSD-95 family of postsynaptic MAGUK proteins during early development and is proposed to play a role in stabilizing receptors at immature synapses. Genetic deletion of SAP102 caused a reduction in the total number of thalamocortical (TC) axons innervating the somatosensory cortex, but did not affect the segregation of barrels. On a synaptic level SAP102 knockout mice display a transient speeding of NMDA receptor kinetics during the critical period for TC plasticity, despite no reduction in GluN2B-mediated component of synaptic transmission. These data indicated an interesting dissociation between receptor kinetics and NMDA subunit expression. Following the critical period NMDA receptor function was unaffected by loss of SAP102 but there was a reduction in the divergence of TC connectivity. These data suggest that changes in synaptic function early in development caused by mutations in SAP102 result in changes in network connectivity later in life. PMID:27466188

  20. Carbon and nitrogen provisions alter the metabolic flux in developing soybean embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans store approximately 40% of their biomass in the form of protein. Protein concentrations reflect the carbon and nitrogen levels received by the developing embryo. The relationship between carbon and nitrogen supply and seed composition during filling was examined through a series of embryo c...

  1. Antipsychotic drugs alter neuronal development including ALM neuroblast migration and PLM axonal outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Dallas R; Weeks, Kathrine; Aamodt, Eric J; Dwyer, Donard S

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly being prescribed for children and adolescents, and are used in pregnant women without a clear demonstration of safety in these populations. Global effects of these drugs on neurodevelopment (e.g., decreased brain size) have been reported in rats, but detailed knowledge about neuronal effects and mechanisms of action are lacking. Here we report on the evaluation of a comprehensive panel of antipsychotic drugs in a model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans) that is widely used to study neuronal development. Specifically, we examined the effects of the drugs on neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in mechanosensory neurons visualized with green fluorescent protein expressed from the mec-3 promoter. Clozapine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol produced deficits in the development and migration of ALM neurons and axonal outgrowth in PLM neurons. The defects included failure of neuroblasts to migrate to the proper location, and excessive growth of axons past their normal termination point, together with abnormal morphological features of the processes. Although the antipsychotic drugs are potent antagonists of dopamine and serotonin receptors, the neurodevelopmental deficits were not rescued by co-incubation with serotonin or the dopaminergic agonist, quinpirole. Other antipsychotic drugs, risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, trifluoperazine and olanzapine, also produced modest, but detectable, effects on neuronal development. This is the first report that antipsychotic drugs interfere with neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in a developing ne