Science.gov

Sample records for device manufacturing ii

  1. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    PubMed

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  2. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification; Class II devices; optical impression systems for computer assisted design and manufacturing. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-04-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing an order granting a petition requesting exemption from the premarket notification requirements for data acquisition units for ceramic dental restoration systems. This rule exempts from premarket notification data acquisition units for ceramic dental restoration systems and establishes a guidance document as a special control for this device. FDA is publishing this order in accordance with the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA).

  3. Layer manufacturing for in vivo devices.

    PubMed

    Savalani, M M; Harris, R A

    2006-05-01

    Traditional in vivo devices fabricated to be used as implantation devices included sutures, plates, pins, screws, and joint replacement implants. Also, akin to developments in regenerative medicine and drug delivery, there has been the pursuit of less conventional in vivo devices that demand complex architecture and composition, such as tissue scaffolds. Commercial means of fabricating traditional devices include machining and moulding processes. Such manufacturing techniques impose considerable lead times and geometrical limitations, and restrict the economic production of customized products. Attempts at the production of non-conventional devices have included particulate leaching, solvent casting, and phase transition. These techniques cannot provide the desired total control over internal architecture and compositional variation, which subsequently restricts the application of these products. Consequently, several parties are investigating the use of freeform layer manufacturing techniques to overcome these difficulties and provide viable in vivo devices of greater functionality. This paper identifies the concepts of rapid manufacturing (RM) and the development of biomanufacturing based on layer manufacturing techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on the development and experimentation of new materials for bio-RM, production techniques based on the layer manufacturing concept, and computer modelling of in vivo devices for RM techniques.

  4. Evaluation of Manufacturing Processes for Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura Jáuregui, Ana; Siller, Héctor R.; Rodriguez, Ciro A.; Elías-Zúñiga, Alex

    2009-11-01

    In this paper several micro-mechanical manufacturing technologies were studied in order to characterize their performance for making miniaturized geometries known as micro-channels, which are the main geometric features of micro-fluidic devices. The technologies used were Micro-End Milling, Wire Electro Discharge Machiningesol Sandblasting and Abrasive Water Jet. Their capabilities were compared with Lithography capabilities, which is the conventional process for micro-channel manufacturing. The evaluation consists in a comprehensive study of surface quality and topography, made with the help of advanced contact and non-contact devices over each prototype made by each technology. Also economical considerations have been taken into account in order to choose the most appropriate manufacturing process for the prototyping of micro-fluidic devices. The results show that Micro-End Milling process can compete with Lithography, in terms of achieving acceptable levels of product quality and economics.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Biomedical Device Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; Drijfhout, Jan W; Nibbering, Peter H; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades the use of medical devices, such as catheters, artificial heart valves, prosthetic joints, and other implants, has grown significantly. Despite continuous improvements in device design, surgical procedures, and wound care, biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are still a major problem in modern medicine. Conventional antibiotic treatment often fails due to the low levels of antibiotic at the site of infection. The presence of biofilms on the biomaterial and/or the multidrug-resistant phenotype of the bacteria further impair the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. Removal of the biomaterial is then the last option to control the infection. Clearly, there is a pressing need for alternative strategies to prevent and treat BAI. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered promising candidates as they are active against a broad spectrum of (antibiotic-resistant) planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Moreover, bacteria are less likely to develop resistance to these rapidly-acting peptides. In this review we highlight the four main strategies, three of which applying AMPs, in biomedical device manufacturing to prevent BAI. The first involves modification of the physicochemical characteristics of the surface of implants. Immobilization of AMPs on surfaces of medical devices with a variety of chemical techniques is essential in the second strategy. The main disadvantage of these two strategies relates to the limited antibacterial effect in the tissue surrounding the implant. This limitation is addressed by the third strategy that releases AMPs from a coating in a controlled fashion. Lastly, AMPs can be integrated in the design and manufacturing of additively manufactured/3D-printed implants, owing to the physicochemical characteristics of the implant material and the versatile manufacturing technologies compatible with antimicrobials incorporation. These novel technologies utilizing AMPs will contribute to development of novel and safe

  6. Three-Dimensional Printing Based Hybrid Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Yunus; Hasan, Muhammad Noman; Shen, Richang; Gurkan, Umut A

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms offer revolutionary and practical solutions to challenging problems in biology and medicine. Even though traditional micro/nanofabrication technologies expedited the emergence of the microfluidics field, recent advances in advanced additive manufacturing hold significant potential for single-step, stand-alone microfluidic device fabrication. One such technology, which holds a significant promise for next generation microsystem fabrication is three-dimensional (3D) printing. Presently, building 3D printed stand-alone microfluidic devices with fully embedded microchannels for applications in biology and medicine has the following challenges: (i) limitations in achievable design complexity, (ii) need for a wider variety of transparent materials, (iii) limited z-resolution, (iv) absence of extremely smooth surface finish, and (v) limitations in precision fabrication of hollow and void sections with extremely high surface area to volume ratio. We developed a new way to fabricate stand-alone microfluidic devices with integrated manifolds and embedded microchannels by utilizing a 3D printing and laser micromachined lamination based hybrid manufacturing approach. In this new fabrication method, we exploit the minimized fabrication steps enabled by 3D printing, and reduced assembly complexities facilitated by laser micromachined lamination method. The new hybrid fabrication method enables key features for advanced microfluidic system architecture: (i) increased design complexity in 3D, (ii) improved control over microflow behavior in all three directions and in multiple layers, (iii) transverse multilayer flow and precisely integrated flow distribution, and (iv) enhanced transparency for high resolution imaging and analysis. Hybrid manufacturing approaches hold great potential in advancing microfluidic device fabrication in terms of standardization, fast production, and user-independent manufacturing.

  7. Three-Dimensional Printing Based Hybrid Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Richang; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms offer revolutionary and practical solutions to challenging problems in biology and medicine. Even though traditional micro/nanofabrication technologies expedited the emergence of the microfluidics field, recent advances in advanced additive manufacturing hold significant potential for single-step, stand-alone microfluidic device fabrication. One such technology, which holds a significant promise for next generation microsystem fabrication is three-dimensional (3D) printing. Presently, building 3D printed stand-alone microfluidic devices with fully embedded microchannels for applications in biology and medicine has the following challenges: (i) limitations in achievable design complexity, (ii) need for a wider variety of transparent materials, (iii) limited z-resolution, (iv) absence of extremely smooth surface finish, and (v) limitations in precision fabrication of hollow and void sections with extremely high surface area to volume ratio. We developed a new way to fabricate stand-alone microfluidic devices with integrated manifolds and embedded microchannels by utilizing a 3D printing and laser micromachined lamination based hybrid manufacturing approach. In this new fabrication method, we exploit the minimized fabrication steps enabled by 3D printing, and reduced assembly complexities facilitated by laser micromachined lamination method. The new hybrid fabrication method enables key features for advanced microfluidic system architecture: (i) increased design complexity in 3D, (ii) improved control over microflow behavior in all three directions and in multiple layers, (iii) transverse multilayer flow and precisely integrated flow distribution, and (iv) enhanced transparency for high resolution imaging and analysis. Hybrid manufacturing approaches hold great potential in advancing microfluidic device fabrication in terms of standardization, fast production, and user-independent manufacturing. PMID:27512530

  8. Manufacturing of polymer light-emitting device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomikoski, M.; Suhonen, R.; Välimäki, M.; Maaninen, T.; Maaninen, A.; Sauer, M.; Rogin, P.; Mennig, M.; Heusing, S.; Puetz, J.; Aegerter, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    The gravure printing technique is currently under investigation as a possible method for the roll-to-roll production of OLEDs in the 6th framework EU funded project entitled ROLLED - "Roll-to-roll manufacturing technology for flexible OLED devices and arbitrary size and shape displays". The objective in the project is to fabricate an entire OLED structure by using roll-to-roll manufacturing methods and to examine, how the commercial production could be set up and integrated into an existing printing process. In order to attain a roll-to-roll compatibility, all the materials, inks and device structures need to be suitable for printing. Since, such OLED device structures are very sensitive to moisture and oxygen, high barrier materials to be applied as wet chemical coatings on transparent polymer films such as PET by common roll-to-roll coating techniques have been investigated. The barrier films on their respective substrates act as front and back side encapsulation materials, where the front side encapsulation material is to be used as a transparent and flexible substrate for OLED fabrication. The transmission rates to be achieved for both front and back side encapsulation for oxygen and water vapour are 5 mg m -2day -1 (corresponding to 7 cm 3m -2day -1 for O II). In this paper, we show how light-emitting devices manufactured by gravure printing operate compared to the ones manufactured by traditional methods. Furthermore, we present recent results on the development of ITO nanoparticle coatings, cathode inks and flexible barrier materials.

  9. Sterile devices: A GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) workshop manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derision, R.; Lower, A.; Bimonte, R.

    1983-05-01

    The manual, which covers GMPs for sterilization processes, presents model procedures and forms as well as a variety of articles and reprints. It is a compilation of GMP materials that small device firms may find useful in understanding how some manufacturers have successfully compiled with the GMP requirements as they apply to the manufacture of sterile devices.

  10. 78 FR 12068 - Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory Committee... meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory... effects of extreme weather and natural disasters on medical device manufacturing chain processes...

  11. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H [Rigby, ID; Derr, Kurt W [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohde, Kenneth W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-08

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  12. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-02-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  13. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  14. Silicon nanowire device and method for its manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Draper, Bruce L.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2017-01-03

    There is provided an electronic device and a method for its manufacture. The device comprises an elongate silicon nanowire less than 0.5 .mu.m in cross-sectional dimensions and having a hexagonal cross-sectional shape due to annealing-induced energy relaxation.

  15. Multijunction photovoltaic device and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rejeewa R.; Catalano, Anthony W.; Bennett, Murray

    1995-04-04

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first, second, and third amorphous silicon p-i-n photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. The intrinsic layers of the second and third cells are formed of a-SiGe alloys with differing ratios of Ge such that the bandgap of the intrinsic layers respectively decrease from the first uppermost cell to the third lowermost cell. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one of the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers.

  16. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances. 801.63... class I ozone-depleting substances. (a) All over-the-counter devices containing or manufactured with...: Warning: Contains , a substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the...

  17. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances. 801.63... class I ozone-depleting substances. (a) All over-the-counter devices containing or manufactured with...: Warning: Contains , a substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the...

  18. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances. 801.63... class I ozone-depleting substances. (a) All over-the-counter devices containing or manufactured with...: Warning: Contains , a substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the...

  19. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances. 801.63... class I ozone-depleting substances. (a) All over-the-counter devices containing or manufactured with...: Warning: Contains , a substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the...

  20. Medical devices manufactured from latex: European regulatory initiatives.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W H; Geertsma, R E; Tinkler, J J B

    2002-05-01

    In Europe the marketing of medical devices manufactured from latex is regulated by directives describing the essential (safety) requirements that products have to fulfill to obtain marketing approval. This paper describes the general requirements for marketing medical devices in Europe and, more specifically, the requirements for products manufactured from natural rubber latex. The requirements for marketing medical devices can be fulfilled by using the relevant harmonized European standards. These standards are regularly under revision to incorporate the latest scientific developments. For certain devices, for example, latex medical (examination and surgical) gloves, specific standards have been published. Medical devices manufactured from latex pose a serious problem because of the risk of induction of allergy both against the latex proteins inherently present (type I or immediate type allergy) and against chemicals added during processing (type IV or delayed type hypersensitivity) present as residues in the latex products. So, besides requirements for product quality in terms of barrier properties, strength, and sterility, the main focus consists of the allergy-inducing properties of the latex products. Recent developments have reopened the discussion on the value of total protein versus allergen determination in latex medical gloves. However, as long as minimal levels needed for both sensitization and elicitation have not been established, a safe maximum level for leachable proteins/allergens in latex products cannot be determined. A European Commission guidance document on the latex allergy problem is currently being drafted by experts from Competent Authorities.

  1. Fringe stabilizers and their application to telecommunication device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odhner, Jefferson E.

    2000-10-01

    The ability to create stable holographic grating is an important part of the production of many telecommunication products. The stability problem is increased by the need to use ultra-violet light for close fringe spacing and long exposure times on phot-resist - a relatively low sensitivity material. Active fringe locking increases the modulation depth and efficiency of these holographic gratings. A discussion of how fringe lockers work and how they can be incorporated into a manufacturing set-up is followed by results of using fringe lockers in the manufacturing of some telecommunication devices.

  2. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  3. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  4. Soft ionization device with characterization systems and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Various configurations of characterization systems such as ion mobility spectrometers and mass spectrometers are disclosed that are coupled to an ionization device. The ionization device is formed of a membrane that houses electrodes therein that are located closer to one another than the mean free path of the gas being ionized. Small voltages across the electrodes generate large electric fields which act to ionize substantially all molecules passing therethrough without fracture. Methods to manufacture the mass spectrometer and ion mobility spectrometer systems are also described.

  5. Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P [Richland, WA; Cowell, Andrew J [Kennewick, WA; Gregory, Michelle L [Richland, WA; Baddeley, Robert L [Richland, WA; Paulson, Patrick R [Pasco, WA; Tratz, Stephen C [Richland, WA; Hohimer, Ryan E [West Richland, WA

    2012-03-20

    Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a hypothesis analysis method includes providing a hypothesis, providing an indicator which at least one of supports and refutes the hypothesis, using the indicator, associating evidence with the hypothesis, weighting the association of the evidence with the hypothesis, and using the weighting, providing information regarding the accuracy of the hypothesis.

  6. 75 FR 51829 - Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology: Manufacturing, Characterization, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... No. FDA-2010-N-0427] Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology: Manufacturing... public workshop entitled ``Medical Devices & Nanotechnology: Manufacturing, Characterization, and... statement that describes your experience or expertise with nanotechnology. There will be a limited number of...

  7. Direct digital manufacturing of autonomous centrifugal microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents strategies that attempt to solve two key problems facing the commercialization of microfluidics: cost reduction in microfluidic chip manufacturing and microfluidic device driver development. To reduce the cost of microfluidic chip manufacturing, we propose to use of three-dimensional (3D) printers for direct digital manufacturing (DDM). An evaluation of 3D micro-scale structure printing using several 3D printers is reported, and some of the technical issues to be addressed in the future are suggested. To evaluate micro-scale printing, three types of 3D printers, with the ability to print structures on the scale of several hundred meters, were selected by first screening six 3D printers. Line and space patterns with line widths of 100-500 µm and an aspect ratio of one were printed and evaluated. The estimated critical dimension was around 200 µm. The manufacturing of a monolithic microfluidic chip with embedded channels was also demonstrated. Monolithic microfluidic chips with embedded microchannels having 500 × 500 and 250 × 250 µm2 cross sections and 2-20 mm lengths were printed, and the fidelity of the channel shape, residual supporting material, and flow of liquid water were evaluated. The liquid flow evaluation showed that liquid water could flow through all of the microchannels with the 500 × 500 µm2 cross section, whereas this was not possible through some of the channels with the 250 × 250 µm2 cross section because of the residual resin or supporting material. To reduce the device-driver cost, we propose to use of the centrifugal microfluidic concept. An autonomous microfluidic device that could implement sequential flow control under a steadily rotating condition was printed. Four-step flow injection under a steadily rotating condition at 1500 rpm was successfully demonstrated without any external triggering such as changing the rotational speed.

  8. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  9. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  10. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  11. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  12. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  13. Manufacturing and wetting low-cost microfluidic cell separation devices

    PubMed Central

    Pawell, Ryan S.; Inglis, David W.; Barber, Tracie J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) is a microfluidic size-based particle separation or filter technology with applications in cell separation and enrichment. Currently, there are no cost-effective manufacturing methods for this promising microfluidic technology. In this fabrication paper, however, we develop a simple, yet robust protocol for thermoplastic DLD devices using regulatory-approved materials and biocompatible methods. The final standalone device allowed for volumetric flow rates of 660 μl min−1 while reducing the manufacturing time to <1 h. Optical profilometry and image analysis were employed to assess manufacturing accuracy and precision; the average replicated post height was 0.48% less than the average post height on the master mold and the average replicated array pitch was 1.1% less than the original design with replicated posts heights of 62.1 ± 5.1 μm (mean ± 6 standard deviations) and replicated array pitches of 35.6 ± 0.31 μm. PMID:24404077

  14. Manufacturability of 2x-nm devices with EUV tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawarayama, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yumi; Kyoh, Suigen; Aoyama, Hajime; Matsunaga, Kentaro; Magoshi, Shunko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yumi; Mori, Ichiro

    2011-04-01

    Due to the promising development status of EUVL as a practical lithography technology for the 2x-nm node, we are continuing to evaluate its process liability using the EUV1 at Selete, which has an Off-Axis illumination capability. The resolution limit of the EUV1 for L&S patterns is currently 18 nm for dipole illumination, and 16 nm for aggressive dipole illumination. This study examined the critical points of EUVL for device manufacturing through wafer processes. The yield obtained from electrical measurements indicates the maturity of the technology, including the resist process, the tool, and the mask. Optimization of the resist and RIE processes significantly improved the yield. The final yields obtained from electrical measurements were 100% for hp 30 nm, 70% for hp 28 nm, and 40% for hp 26 nm. These results demonstrate EUV lithography to be a practical technology that is now suitable for 2x nm semiconductor manufacture.

  15. Optical Microanalysis In Microelectronic Device And Packaging Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popek, K. M.; Ramsey, J. N...

    1983-11-01

    Electron probe microanalysis (and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis) has been used for small area analysis for many years, but it gives only elemental information, in general. Cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence have been available as small area analytical techniques for several years, giving molecular information. Two "new" small area molecular analysis techniques have become available in the last few years, viz Raman (to be discussed in this symposium by C.L. Needham) and infra-red, which we will discuss. Examples will be given of the application of these various optical microanalytical techniques to device and packaging manufacture. The electron probe microanalyzer has been used for many years for analysis of small areas of microelectronic devices and packaging (e.g. Prof. Dave Wittry's initial analysis of Purple Plague was 1959). This type of analysis has been extended widely with the developments of scanning electron microscopes and energy dispersive x-ray analysis detectors and circuitry. Such analysis is elemental, in general, and has been very useful in the study of microstructure, thin films, contamination, corrosion products, etc. in all stages of device development, manufacture, test and application. However, often even quantitative elemental information lacks definition, and molecular information (how the elements are bonded together) is required. (In the analysis method described, some limited molecular information is available in low atomic number elements by measuring x-ray line shifts.)

  16. Towards roll-to-roll manufacturing of polymer photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Lin, Xiaohui; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally, polymer photonic devices are fabricated using clean-room processes such as photolithography, e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and lift-off methods etc, which leads to long fabrication time, low throughput and high cost. We have utilized a novel process for fabricating polymer photonic devices using a combination of imprinting and ink jet printing methods, which provides high throughput on a variety of rigid and flexible substrates with low cost. We discuss the manufacturing challenges that need to be overcome in order to realize true implementation of roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible polymer photonic systems. Several metrology and instrumentation challenges involved such as availability of particulate-free high quality substrate, development and implementation of high-speed in-line and off-line inspection and diagnostic tools with adaptive control for patterned and unpatterned material films, development of reliable hardware, etc need to be addressed and overcome in order to realize a successful manufacturing process. Due to extreme resolution requirements compared to print media, the burden of software and hardware tools on the throughput also needs to be carefully determined. Moreover, the effect of web wander and variations in web speed need to accurately be determined in the design of the system hardware and software. In this paper, we show the realization of solutions for few challenges, and utilizing these solutions for developing a high-rate R2R dual stage ink-jet printer that can provide alignment accuracy of <10μm at a web speed of 5m/min. The development of a roll-to-roll manufacturing system for polymer photonic systems opens limitless possibilities for the deployment of high performance components in a variety of applications including communication, sensing, medicine, agriculture, energy, lighting etc.

  17. Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E; Hetzler, Elizabeth G; Nakamura, Grant C

    2013-05-28

    Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis device includes processing circuitry configured to analyze initial text to generate a measurement basis usable in analysis of subsequent text, wherein the measurement basis comprises a plurality of measurement features from the initial text, a plurality of dimension anchors from the initial text and a plurality of associations of the measurement features with the dimension anchors, and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to access a viewpoint indicative of a perspective of interest of a user with respect to the analysis of the subsequent text, and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to use the viewpoint to generate the measurement basis.

  18. Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E; Hetzler, Elizabeth G; Nakamura, Grant C

    2015-03-31

    Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis device includes a display configured to depict visible images, and processing circuitry coupled with the display and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to access a first vector of a text item and which comprises a plurality of components, to access a second vector of the text item and which comprises a plurality of components, to weight the components of the first vector providing a plurality of weighted values, to weight the components of the second vector providing a plurality of weighted values, and to combine the weighted values of the first vector with the weighted values of the second vector to provide a third vector.

  19. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  20. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  1. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  2. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  3. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  4. Design optimization of heat transfer and fluidic devices by using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nikhil

    After the development of additive manufacturing technology in the 1980s, it has found use in many applications like aerospace, automotive, marine, machinery, consumer and electronic applications. In recent time, few researchers have worked on the applications of additive manufacturing for heat transfer and fluidic devices. As the world has seen a drastic increase in population in last decades which have put stress on already scarce energy resources, optimization of energy devices which include energy storing devices, heat transfer devices, energy capturing devices etc. is need for the hour. Design of energy devices is often constrained by manufacturing constraints thus current design of energy devices is not an optimized one. In this research we want to conceptualize, design and manufacture optimized heat transfer and fluidic devices by exploiting the advantages provided by additive manufacturing. We want to benefit from the fact that very intricate geometry and desired surface finish can be obtained by using additive manufacturing. Additionally, we want to compare the efficacy of our designed device with conventional devices. Work on usage of Additive manufacturing for increasing efficiency of heat transfer devices can be found in the literature. We want to extend this approach to other heat transfer devices especially tubes with internal flow. By optimizing the design of energy systems we hope to solve current energy shortage and help conserve energy for future generation. We will also extend the application of additive manufacturing technology to fabricate "device for uniform flow distribution".

  5. Readability of "Dear Patient" device advisory notification letters created by a device manufacturer.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Luke A; Sharma, Arjun; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Mueller, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    In 2006, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) recommended that cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) manufacturers use advisory notification letters to communicate with affected patients. To evaluate the readability of the HRS sample "patient device advisory notification" letter and those created by 1 CIED manufacturer. The HRS sample letter and 25 Boston Scientific Corporation letters dated from 2005 through 2011 were evaluated by using 6 readability tests. Readability (Flesch-Kincaid score) of the HRS sample letter was grade level 12.5, and median readability of the device manufacturer letters was grade level 12.8 (range 10.8-18.9). Similar results were obtained by using other readability scales. No letters had readability scores at the National Work Group on Literacy and Health's recommended reading level-fifth grade; the letters' readability exceeded this recommended level by an average of 7.7 grades (95% confidence interval 6.9-8.5; P<.001). Likewise, no letters had readability scores at the average reading level of US adults-eighth grade; the letters' readability exceeded this level by an average of 4.7 grades (95% confidence interval 3.9-5.5; P< .001). The readability of the HRS sample letter and those created by a CIED manufacturer significantly exceeded the recommended and average US adults' reading skill levels. Such letters are unlikely to be informative to many patients. CIED manufacturers should ensure that advisory letters are comprehensible to most affected patients. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved Method of Manufacturing SiC Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The phrase, "common-layered architecture for semiconductor silicon carbide" ("CLASSiC") denotes a method of batch fabrication of microelectromechanical and semiconductor devices from bulk silicon carbide. CLASSiC is the latest in a series of related methods developed in recent years in continuing efforts to standardize SiC-fabrication processes. CLASSiC encompasses both institutional and technological innovations that can be exploited separately or in combination to make the manufacture of SiC devices more economical. Examples of such devices are piezoresistive pressure sensors, strain gauges, vibration sensors, and turbulence-intensity sensors for use in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive atmospheres). The institutional innovation is to manufacture devices for different customers (individuals, companies, and/or other entities) simultaneously in the same batch. This innovation is based on utilization of the capability for fabrication, on the same substrate, of multiple SiC devices having different functionalities (see figure). Multiple customers can purchase shares of the area on the same substrate, each customer s share being apportioned according to the customer s production-volume requirement. This makes it possible for multiple customers to share costs in a common foundry, so that the capital equipment cost per customer in the inherently low-volume SiC-product market can be reduced significantly. One of the technological innovations is a five-mask process that is based on an established set of process design rules. The rules provide for standardization of the fabrication process, yet are flexible enough to enable multiple customers to lay out masks for their portions of the SiC substrate to provide for simultaneous batch fabrication of their various devices. In a related prior method, denoted multi-user fabrication in silicon carbide (MUSiC), the fabrication process is based largely on surface micromachining of poly Si

  7. Data graphing methods, articles of manufacture, and computing devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak Chung; Mackey, Patrick S.; Cook, Kristin A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Whiting, Mark A.

    2016-12-13

    Data graphing methods, articles of manufacture, and computing devices are described. In one aspect, a method includes accessing a data set, displaying a graphical representation including data of the data set which is arranged according to a first of different hierarchical levels, wherein the first hierarchical level represents the data at a first of a plurality of different resolutions which respectively correspond to respective ones of the hierarchical levels, selecting a portion of the graphical representation wherein the data of the portion is arranged according to the first hierarchical level at the first resolution, modifying the graphical representation by arranging the data of the portion according to a second of the hierarchal levels at a second of the resolutions, and after the modifying, displaying the graphical representation wherein the data of the portion is arranged according to the second hierarchal level at the second resolution.

  8. Simulations of Plasma Sources for Semiconductor Device Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventzek, Peter

    2012-10-01

    First being applied to etching [1] and deposition [2] more than four decades ago, plasma unit processes are now ubiquitous in the semiconductor industry. However, in many cases the use of plasma discharges for semiconductor process development has far outpaced our fundamental understanding of plasma unit processes. Fortunately, state-of-the-art modeling and simulation is now applied both in the capitol equipment and device manufacturing sectors fortified by close relationships with academic institutions and national laboratories globally. The simulation tableau, modeling and simulation for semiconductor device manufacturing community may be broken into the following categories: new concept development, new process development, equipment physics and equipment engineering. This presentation will focus on simulation modalities that highlight how the physics of production equipment result in beneficial processes. Two classes of examples with be provided. [3] The first will illustrate the behavior of microwave plasma source; the second will explore the electron kinetics associated of capacitively coupled plasma sources. The common thread linking these topics is the importance of the frequency dependence of the electron energy distribution function (eedf) to the fidelity of the simulation results. With respect to the microwave driven plasma sources, in addition to comparing predictions of different modeling approaches to experimental data, the relationship between the microwave network and the plasma dynamics in addition will be highlighted. While the criticality of the eedf to all of capacitively coupled systems will be discussed, particular focus is paid to dc augmented capacitively coupled sources where management of how the ballistic electron population reaches the substrate is critical to process results. Fluid, test particle and full particle-in-cell Monte Carlo simulations will be used to illustrate different discharge behavior.[4pt] [1] H. Abe et al. Jpn. J. Appl

  9. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing or experimentation. The... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to the...

  10. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... patient, shall promptly provide the manufacturer tracking the device with the following information: (1... provide the manufacturer tracking the device with the following information: (1) The name and address of... when applicable, the date the device was explanted, the date of the patient's death, or the date...

  11. 78 FR 41069 - Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... describes and explains the current FDA regulation that addresses reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to manufacturers of medical devices for certain device-related adverse events. This draft guidance... adverse event reporting obligations for manufacturers and importers. FDA published ``Medical Device...

  12. Towards manufacturing of advanced logic devices by double-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Chiew-seng; Halle, Scott; Holmes, Steven; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew; van Dommelen, Youri; Jiang, Aiqin; Crouse, Michael; Dunn, Shannon; Hetzer, David; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Cantone, Jason; Huli, Lior; Rodgers, Martin; Martinick, Brian

    2011-04-01

    As reported previously, the IBM Alliance has established a DETO (Double-Expose-Track-Optimized) baseline, in collaboration with ASML, TEL, and CNSE, to evaluate commercially available DETO photoresist system for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. Although EUV lithography is the baseline strategy for <2x nm logic nodes, alternative techniques are still being pursued. The DETO technique produces pitch-split patterns capable of supporting 16 nm and 11 nm node semiconductor devices. We present the long-term monitoring performances of CD uniformity (CDU), overlay, and defectivity of our DETO process. CDU and overlay performances for controlled experiments are also presented. Two alignment schemes in DETO are compared experimentally for their effects on inter-level & intralevel overlays, and space CDU. We also experimented with methods for improving CDU, in which the CD-OptimizerTMand DoseMapperTM were evaluated separately and in tandem. Overlay improvements using the Correction Per Exposure (CPE) and the intra-field High-Order Process Correction (i-HOPC) were compared against the usual linear correction method. The effects of the exposure field size are also compared between a small field and the full field. Included in all the above, we also compare the performances derived from stack-integrated wafers and bare-Si wafers.

  13. Space manufacturing of surface acoustic wave devices, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sardella, G.

    1973-01-01

    Space manufacturing of transducers in a vibration free environment is discussed. Fabrication of the masks, and possible manufacturing of the surface acoustic wave components aboard a space laboratory would avoid the inherent ground vibrations and the frequency limitation imposed by a seismic isolator pad. The manufacturing vibration requirements are identified. The concepts of space manufacturing are analyzed. A development program for manufacturing transducers is recommended.

  14. Device-Related Adverse Events During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: Review of the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) Database.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel H; Schulman, Ariel; Bloom, Jonathan; Uppaluri, Nikil; Phillips, John L; Konno, Sensuke; Choudhury, Muhammed; Eshghi, Majid

    2017-08-22

    Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an established technique for removal of large stones from the upper urinary tract. It is a complex, multistep procedure requiring several classes of instruments that are subject to operator misuse and device malfunction. We report device-related adverse events during PCNL from the MAUDE database using a recently developed standardized classification system. The MAUDE database was queried for "percutaneous nephrolithotomy" from 2006 to 2016. The circumstances and patient complications associated with classes of devices used during PCNL were identified. We then utilized a novel MAUDE classification system to categorize clinical events. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations between device classes and severe adverse events. A total of 218 device-related events were reported. The most common classes included: lithotripter 53 (24.3%), wires 43 (19.7%), balloon dilators 30 (13.8%) and occlusion balloons 28 (12.8%). Reported patient complications included need for a second procedure 12 (28.6%), bleeding 8 (19.0%), retained fragments 7 (16.7%), prolonged procedure 4 (9.5%), ureteral injury 2 (4.8%) and conversion to an open procedure 3 (7.1%). Using a MAUDE classification system, 176 complications (81%) were Level I (mild/none), 26 (12%) were Level II (moderate), 15 (7%) were Level III (severe) and 1 (0.5%) was Level IV (life threatening). On univariate analysis, balloon dilators had the highest risk of Level II-IV complications compared to the other device classes [OR: 4.33, CI: 1.978-9.493, p<0.001]. The device was evaluated by the manufacturer in 93 (42.7%) cases, with 54.8% of reviewed cases listing the source of malfunction as misuse by the operator. PCNL is subject to a wide range of device-related adverse events. A MAUDE classification system is useful for standardized, clinically-relevant reporting of events. Our findings highlight the importance of proper surgeon training with devices to maximize

  15. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturer of a tracked device shall keep current records in accordance with its standard operating procedure... this section. A manufacturer shall make this standard operating procedure available to FDA upon request. A manufacturer shall incorporate the following into the standard operating procedure: (1)...

  16. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturer of a tracked device shall keep current records in accordance with its standard operating procedure... this section. A manufacturer shall make this standard operating procedure available to FDA upon request. A manufacturer shall incorporate the following into the standard operating procedure: (1)...

  17. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device tracking system and content...

  18. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for tracked devices that are intended for use by a single patient over the life of the device, after...: manufacturer requirements. 821.25 Section 821.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS...

  19. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform test: Type II devices. (a) The arithmetic mean of the fecal coliform bacteria in 38 of 40 samples of effluent... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices...

  20. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... distributes that enables a manufacturer to provide FDA with the following information in writing for...

  1. A UNIX device driver for a Translink II Transputer board

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A UNIX device driver for a TransLink II Transputer board is described. A complete listing of the code is presented. The device driver allows a transputer array to be used with the A/UX operating system.

  2. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  3. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Jerry P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-29

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  4. A nanolaminate manufacturing technique for multifunctional materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Marriner H.

    A new method of quickly, simply, and efficiently assembling nanolayered materials and devices is developed. The method is called Spin-Spray Layer by Layer Self Assembly (SSLbL) and is a modification of the well-established Layer by Layer Self Assembly (LbL) method. SSLBL is a conceptually simple process. Very dilute, aqueous solutions of polymers, nanoparticles, or other colloids are sprayed onto a rapidly spinning substrate, quickly spreading over the surface. As the solvent evaporates, the chosen polymer or colloid adheres to the surface via electrostatic, physical, and other interactions. Typically this process is carried out in bilayers of colloids or polymers that are attracted to each other. Called nanolaminae, these bilayers are the fundamental building blocks of SSLbL. With thicknesses on the order of a single nanometer, nanolaminae consisting of different materials can be stacked in almost any sequence, allowing the creation of nanostructured materials. A model of the SSLbL process is developed based primarily on spin-coating physics. This model gives a qualitative understanding of the dynamic fluid processes as well as quantitative results. These quantitative results include the amount of solution that should be sprayed on a spinning disk, the solution concentration, and dry time. The parameters gained from the model are used as inputs for SSLbL experimentation. SSLbL experimentation is then shown to both validate the model as well as offer fine-tuning of the parameters for specific materials or applications. SSLbL represents a significant advancement of the state of the art by increasing the speed and efficiency of existing LbL techniques. It is demonstrated here to be capable of effectively building high quality nanolaminae similar to those produced via LbL. However, SSLbL is significantly faster, constructing each nanolamina in about 20 s, compared to 20min using LbL, an improvement of two orders of magnitude. Additionally, traditional LbL is quite

  5. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Koontz, Steven L.; Cross, Jon B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2-20 eV, preferably 1-10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal (kinetic energy>1 eV) oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask-protected areas.

  6. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Cross, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2 to 20 eV, preferably 1 to 10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask protected areas.

  7. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to the...

  8. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to the...

  9. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to the...

  10. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to the...

  11. 21 CFR 801.433 - Warning statements for prescription and restricted device products containing or manufactured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... device products containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances... chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances. (a)(1) All prescription and restricted device products... substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere. (2)...

  12. 21 CFR 801.433 - Warning statements for prescription and restricted device products containing or manufactured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... device products containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances... chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances. (a)(1) All prescription and restricted device products... substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere. (2)...

  13. 21 CFR 801.433 - Warning statements for prescription and restricted device products containing or manufactured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... device products containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances... chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances. (a)(1) All prescription and restricted device products... substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere. (2)...

  14. 21 CFR 801.433 - Warning statements for prescription and restricted device products containing or manufactured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... device products containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances... chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances. (a)(1) All prescription and restricted device products... substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere. (2)...

  15. 21 CFR 801.433 - Warning statements for prescription and restricted device products containing or manufactured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... device products containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances... chlorofluorocarbons or other ozone-depleting substances. (a)(1) All prescription and restricted device products... substance which harms public health and environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere. (2)...

  16. 47 CFR 15.124 - DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices. 15.124 Section 15.124 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.124 DTV transition notices by...

  17. 47 CFR 15.124 - DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices. 15.124 Section 15.124 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.124 DTV transition notices by...

  18. Digital capture, design, and manufacturing of an extraoral device for a clarinet player with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Aita-Holmes, Cynthia; Liacouras, Peter; Wilson, William O; Grant, Gerald T

    2015-08-01

    An extraoral device was fabricated to assist a clarinet player with Bell's palsy. The device was fabricated by using stereophotogrammetry, digital design, and additive manufacturing technologies. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard for egress windows and... SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.404 Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes..., construction, and installation of windows and approved devices intended to be used as an emergency exit during...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Standard for egress windows and... SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.404 Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes..., construction, and installation of windows and approved devices intended to be used as an emergency exit during...

  1. 10 CFR 32.30 - Certain industrial devices containing byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS..., storage, use, and disposal of the device; (6) Maximum external radiation levels at 5 and 30 centimeters... the method of measurement; (7) Degree of access of human beings to the device during normal...

  2. 10 CFR 32.30 - Certain industrial devices containing byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS..., storage, use, and disposal of the device; (6) Maximum external radiation levels at 5 and 30 centimeters... the method of measurement; (7) Degree of access of human beings to the device during normal...

  3. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Standard for egress windows and... SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.404 Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes..., construction, and installation of windows and approved devices intended to be used as an emergency exit...

  4. Additive manufacturing of polymer melts for implantable medical devices and scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Almoatazbellah; Hollister, Scott J; Dalton, Paul D

    2017-02-28

    Melt processing is routinely used to fabricate medical polymeric devices/implants for clinical reconstruction and can be incorporated into quality systems procedures for medical device manufacture. As additive manufacturing (AM) becomes increasingly used for biomaterials and biofabrication, the translation of new, customizable, medical devices to the clinic becomes paramount. Melt processing is therefore a distinguishable group within AM that provides an avenue to manufacture scaffolds/implants with a clinical end-point. Three key melt processing AM technologies are highlighted in this review: melt micro-extrusion, selective laser sintering and melt electrospinning writing. The in vivo (including clinical) outcomes of medical devices and scaffolds made with these processes are reviewed. Together, they encompass the melt AM of scaffold architectures with feature sizes and resolutions ranging from 800 nm up to 700 μm.

  5. Co-Extrusion: Advanced Manufacturing for Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Corie Lynn

    2016-11-18

    The development of mass markets for large-format batteries, including electric vehicles (EVs) and grid support, depends on both cost reductions and performance enhancements to improve their economic viability. Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) has developed a multi-material, advanced manufacturing process called co-extrusion (CoEx) to remove multiple steps in a conventional battery coating process with the potential to simultaneously increase battery energy and power density. CoEx can revolutionize battery manufacturing across most chemistries, significantly lowering end-product cost and shifting the underlying economics to make EVs and other battery applications a reality. PARC’s scale-up of CoEx for electric vehicle (EV) batteries builds on a solid base of experience in applying CoEx to solar cell manufacturing, deposition of viscous ceramic pastes, and Li-ion battery chemistries. In the solar application, CoEx has been deployed commercially at production scale where multi-channel CoEx printheads are used to print viscous silver gridline pastes at full production speeds (>40 ft/min). This operational scale-up provided invaluable experience with the nuances of speed, yield, and maintenance inherent in taking a new technology to the factory floor. PARC has leveraged this experience, adapting the CoEx process for Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery manufacturing. To date, PARC has worked with Li-ion battery materials and structured cathodes with high-density Li-ion regions and low-density conduction regions, documenting both energy and power performance. Modeling results for a CoEx cathode show a path towards a 10-20% improvement in capacity for an EV pouch cell. Experimentally, we have realized a co-extruded battery structure with a Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) cathode at print speeds equivalent to conventional roll coating processes. The heterogeneous CoEx cathode enables improved capacity in thick electrodes at higher C-rates. The proof-of-principle coin cells

  6. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  7. An analytic framework for developing inherently-manufacturable pop-up laminate devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aukes, Daniel M.; Goldberg, Benjamin; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Wood, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    Spurred by advances in manufacturing technologies developed around layered manufacturing technologies such as PC-MEMS, SCM, and printable robotics, we propose a new analytic framework for capturing the geometry of folded composite laminate devices and the mechanical processes used to manufacture them. These processes can be represented by combining a small set of geometric operations which are general enough to encompass many different manufacturing paradigms. Furthermore, such a formulation permits one to construct a variety of geometric tools which can be used to analyze common manufacturability concepts, such as tool access, part removability, and device support. In order to increase the speed of development, reduce the occurrence of manufacturing problems inherent with current design methods, and reduce the level of expertise required to develop new devices, the framework has been implemented in a new design tool called popupCAD, which is suited for the design and development of complex folded laminate devices. We conclude with a demonstration of utility of the tools by creating a folded leg mechanism.

  8. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  9. CdTe devices and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Noufi, Rommel; Dhere, Ramesh G.; Albin, David S.; Barnes, Teresa; Burst, James; Duenow, Joel N.; Reese, Matthew

    2015-09-29

    A method of producing polycrystalline CdTe materials and devices that incorporate the polycrystalline CdTe materials are provided. In particular, a method of producing polycrystalline p-doped CdTe thin films for use in CdTe solar cells in which the CdTe thin films possess enhanced acceptor densities and minority carrier lifetimes, resulting in enhanced efficiency of the solar cells containing the CdTe material are provided.

  10. Superconductive tunnel junction device and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.

    1983-12-20

    A Josephson tunnel junction device having niobium nitride superconductive electrodes includes a polycrystalline semiconductor tunneling barrier therebetween comprised of silicon, germanium, or an alloy thereof preferably deposited on the lower superconductive electrodes by vapor deposition. The barrier thickness of the junction is controlled by precision doping of the semiconductor material. The active junction is defined after the interfaces between the barrier material and the two superconductor lines are formed, retaining those active interfaces in fully unpolluted character.

  11. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  12. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  13. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  14. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  15. Manufacturability of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors for infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglund, L.; Asplund, C.; Marcks von Würtemberg, R.; Kataria, H.; Gamfeldt, A.; Smuk, S.; Martijn, H.; Costard, E.

    2017-08-01

    Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cut-off wavelength at 5.1 μm have been studied. For single pixel devices, dark current densities of 1 × 10-6 A/cm2 and quantum efficiencies of 53% were measured at 120 K. From statistics of manufactured FPAs, an average FPA operability of 99.87% was observed. Furthermore, average temporal and spatial noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) values of 12 mK and 4 mK, respectively, were deduced. Excellent stability of FPAs after non-uniformity correction was observed with no deterioration of the ratio between spatial and temporal noise during a two hour long measurement. Also after several cooldowns the ratio between spatial and temporal NETD stayed below 0.6.

  16. Photonomics: automation approaches yield economic aikido for photonics device manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Scott

    2002-09-01

    In the glory days of photonics, with exponentiating demand for photonics devices came exponentiating competition, with new ventures commencing deliveries seemingly weekly. Suddenly the industry was faced with a commodity marketplace well before a commodity cost structure was in place. Economic issues like cost, scalability, yield-call it all "Photonomics" -now drive the industry. Automation and throughput-optimization are obvious answers, but until now, suitable modular tools had not been introduced. Available solutions were barely compatible with typical transverse alignment tolerances and could not automate angular alignments of collimated devices and arrays. And settling physics served as the insoluble bottleneck to throughput and resolution advancement in packaging, characterization and fabrication processes. The industry has addressed these needs in several ways, ranging from special configurations of catalog motion devices to integrated microrobots based on a novel mini-hexapod configuration. This intriguing approach allows tip/tilt alignments to be automated about any point in space, such as a beam waist, a focal point, the cleaved face of a fiber, or the optical axis of a waveguide- ideal for MEMS packaging automation and array alignment. Meanwhile, patented new low-cost settling-enhancement technology has been applied in applications ranging from air-bearing long-travel stages to subnanometer-resolution piezo positioners to advance resolution and process cycle-times in sensitive applications such as optical coupling characterization and fiber Bragg grating generation. Background, examples and metrics are discussed, providing an up-to-date industry overview of available solutions.

  17. Observations on medical device design, Part II: Good practice.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K; Clarkson, J; Bishop, D

    1999-10-01

    Current guidance on design is inadequate. This second article in a two-part series presents a framework for good design practice that attempts to improve designers' awareness of manufacturing and validation issues. Seven design tactics, derived from observations of current industry practice and design literature, seek to encourage good practice and achieve safer, more profitable devices.

  18. Microcomponents manufacturing for precise devices by copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, Sergey; Nikonchuk, Michail O.; Polyakov, Igor V.

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents investigation results of drilling of metal microcomponents by copper vapor laser. The laser consists of master oscillator - spatial filter - amplifier system, electronics switching with digital control of laser pulse repetition rate and quantity of pulses, x-y stage with computer control system. Mass of metal, removed by one laser pulse, is measured and defined by means of diameter and depth of holes. Interaction of next pulses on drilled material is discussed. The difference between light absorption and metal evaporation processes is considered for drilling and cutting. Efficiency of drilling is estimated by ratio of evaporation heat and used laser energy. Maximum efficiency of steel cutting is calculated with experimental data of drilling. Applications of copper vapor laser for manufacturing is illustrated by such microcomponents as pin guide plate for printers, stents for cardio surgery, encoded disks for security systems and multiple slit masks for spectrophotometers.

  19. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S; Blount, Katrina L; Ritchie, Jessica D; Hodshon, Beth; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    Background In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA’s pre-market approval (PMA) pathway. Methods and results We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%), nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Conclusion Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives. PMID:26060416

  20. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph S; Blount, Katrina L; Ritchie, Jessica D; Hodshon, Beth; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA's pre-market approval (PMA) pathway. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%), nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives.

  1. Fast detection of manufacturing systematic design pattern failures causing device yield loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Feldman, Nelly; Riewer, Olivia; Yesilada, Emek; Vallet, Michel; Suzor, Christophe; Talluto, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    Starting from the 45nm technology node, systematic defectivity has a significant impact on device yield loss with each new technology node. The effort required to achieve patterning maturity with zero yield detractor is also significantly increasing with technology nodes. Within the manufacturing environment, new in-line wafer inspection methods have been developed to identify device systematic defects, including the process window qualification (PWQ) methodology used to characterize process robustness. Although patterning is characterized with PWQ methodology, some questions remain: How can we demonstrate that the measured process window is large enough to avoid design-based defects which will impact the device yield? Can we monitor the systematic yield loss on nominal wafers? From device test engineering point of view, systematic yield detractors are expected to be identified by Automated Test Pattern Generator (ATPG) test results diagnostics performed after electrical wafer sort (EWS). Test diagnostics can identify failed nets or cells causing systematic yield loss [1],[2]. Convergence from device failed nets and cells to failed manufacturing design pattern are usually based on assumptions that should be confirmed by an electrical failure analysis (EFA). However, many EFA investigations are required before the design pattern failures are found, and thus design pattern failure identification was costly in time and resources. With this situation, an opportunity to share knowledge exists between device test engineering and manufacturing environments to help with device yield improvement. This paper presents a new yield diagnostics flow dedicated to correlation of critical design patterns detected within manufacturing environment, with the observed device yield loss. The results obtained with this new flow on a 28nm technology device are described, with the defects of interest and the device yield impact for each design pattern. The EFA done to validate the design

  2. Additively Manufactured Combustion Devices Components for LOX/Methane Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Protz, Christopher; Garcia, Chance; Goodman, Dwight; Baker, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has designed, fabricated, and hot-fire tested a variety of successful injectors, chambers, and igniters for potential liquid oxygen (LOX) and methane (CH4) systems since 2005. The most recent efforts have focused on components with additive manufacturing (AM) to include unique design features, minimize joints, and reduce final machining efforts. Inconel and copper alloys have been used with AM processes to produce a swirl coaxial injector and multiple methane cooled thrust chambers. The initial chambers included unique thermocouple ports for measuring local coolant channel temperatures along the length of the chamber. Results from hot-fire testing were used to anchor thermal models and generate a regeneratively cooled thruster for a 4,000 lbf LOX/CH4 engine. The completed thruster will be hot-fire tested in the summer of 2016 at MSFC. The thruster design can also be easily scaled and used on a 25,000 lbf engine. To further support the larger engine design, an AM gas generator injector has been designed. Hot-fire testing on this injector is planned for the summer of 2016 at MSFC.

  3. The role of the user within the medical device design and development process: medical device manufacturers' perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Academic literature and international standards bodies suggest that user involvement, via the incorporation of human factors engineering methods within the medical device design and development (MDDD) process, offer many benefits that enable the development of safer and more usable medical devices that are better suited to users' needs. However, little research has been carried out to explore medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within this process, or indeed what value they believe can be added by doing so. Methods In-depth interviews with representatives from 11 medical device manufacturers are carried out. We ask them to specify who they believe the intended users of the device to be, who they consult to inform the MDDD process, what role they believe the user plays within this process, and what value (if any) they believe users add. Thematic analysis is used to analyse the fully transcribed interview data, to gain insight into medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within the MDDD process. Results A number of high-level themes emerged, relating who the user is perceived to be, the methods used, the perceived value and barriers to user involvement, and the nature of user contributions. The findings reveal that despite standards agencies and academic literature offering strong support for the employment formal methods, manufacturers are still hesitant due to a range of factors including: perceived barriers to obtaining ethical approval; the speed at which such activity may be carried out; the belief that there is no need given the 'all-knowing' nature of senior health care staff and clinical champions; a belief that effective results are achievable by consulting a minimal number of champions. Furthermore, less senior health care practitioners and patients were rarely seen as being able to provide valuable input into the process. Conclusions Medical device manufacturers often

  4. Current situation of the development and manufacture of vary large scale integrated devices in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubiao, He

    1988-06-01

    The manufacture of Large Scale Integration (LSI) and Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) devices in foreign countries is a highly competitive high-tech industry. It requires high-precision manufacturing technology, and very expensive manufacturing equipment. Therefore, it is impossible to conduct research and form industrial production capability by merely relying on obsolete manufacturing equipment and semi-manual production techniques. According to the experience of our foreign counterparts and based on our current situation, it is highly desirable for domestic LSI and VLSI research institutes and manufacturers to establish unified development-manufacturing units, concentrate resources, amass available funds to upgrade equipment and technology, improve management, conduct theoretical research, and develop new technology and new devices under a unified planning and assigned responsibility. It is only in this way that we can reduce the gap between domestic and foreign VLSI device industries, and promote our micro-electronic industry. This should be the trend for the development of the microelectronic industry in China.

  5. Bioharness™ Multivariable Monitoring Device: Part. II: Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, James A.; Ford, Paul A.; Hughes, Gerwyn; Watson, Tim; Garrett, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The Bioharness™ monitoring system may provide physiological information on human performance but the reliability of this data is fundamental for confidence in the equipment being used. The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of each of the 5 Bioharness™ variables using a treadmill based protocol. 10 healthy males participated. A between and within subject design to assess the reliability of Heart rate (HR), Breathing Frequency (BF), Accelerometry (ACC) and Infra-red skin temperature (ST) was completed via a repeated, discontinuous, incremental treadmill protocol. Posture (P) was assessed by a tilt table, moved through 160°. Between subject data reported low Coefficient of Variation (CV) and strong correlations(r) for ACC and P (CV< 7.6; r = 0.99, p < 0.01). In contrast, HR and BF (CV~19.4; r~0.70, p < 0.01) and ST (CV 3.7; r = 0.61, p < 0.01), present more variable data. Intra and inter device data presented strong relationships (r > 0.89, p < 0.01) and low CV (<10.1) for HR, ACC, P and ST. BF produced weaker relationships (r < 0.72) and higher CV (<17.4). In comparison to the other variables BF variable consistently presents less reliability. Global results suggest that the Bioharness™ is a reliable multivariable monitoring device during laboratory testing within the limits presented. Key pointsHeart rate and breathing frequency data increased in variance at higher velocities (i.e. ≥ 10 km.h-1)In comparison to the between subject testing, the intra and inter reliability presented good reliability in data suggesting placement or position of device relative to performer could be important for data collectionUnderstanding a devices variability in measurement is important before it can be used within an exercise testing or monitoring setting PMID:24149347

  6. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  7. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  8. A new USP Class VI-compliant substrate for manufacturing disposable microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jason S.; Ng, Laiying; Yen, Gloria S.; Lorenz, Robert M.; Schiro, Perry G.; Edgar, J. Scott; Zhao, Yongxi; Lim, David S. W.; Allen, Peter B.; Jeffries, Gavin D. M.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    As microfluidic systems transition from research tools to disposable clinical-diagnostic devices, new substrate materials are needed to meet both the regulatory requirement as well as the economics of disposable devices. This paper introduces a UV-curable polyurethane-methacrylate (PUMA) substrate that has been qualified for medical use and meets all of the challenges of manufacturing microfluidic devices. PUMA is optically transparent, biocompatible, and exhibits high electroosmotic mobility without surface modification. We report two production processes that are compatible with the existing methods of rapid prototyping and present characterizations of the resultant PUMA microfluidic devices. PMID:19294296

  9. A review of the scalable nano-manufacturing technology for flexible devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Yu, Xingtao; Liu, Yanhua; Qiao, Wen; Chen, Linsen

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in electronic and photonic devices, such as artificial skin, wearable systems, organic and inorganic light-emitting diodes, have gained considerable commercial and scientific interest in the academe and in industries. However, low-cost and high-throughput nano-manufacturing is difficult to realize with the use of traditional photolithographic processes. In this review, we summarize the status and the limitations of current nanopatterning techniques for scalable and flexible functional devices in terms of working principle, resolution, and processing speed. Finally, several remaining unsolved problems in nano-manufacturing are discussed, and future research directions are highlighted.

  10. A review of the scalable nano-manufacturing technology for flexible devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Yu, Xingtao; Liu, Yanhua; Qiao, Wen; Chen, Linsen

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in electronic and photonic devices, such as artificial skin, wearable systems, organic and inorganic light-emitting diodes, have gained considerable commercial and scientific interest in the academe and in industries. However, low-cost and high-throughput nano-manufacturing is difficult to realize with the use of traditional photolithographic processes. In this review, we summarize the status and the limitations of current nanopatterning techniques for scalable and flexible functional devices in terms of working principle, resolution, and processing speed. Finally, several remaining unsolved problems in nano-manufacturing are discussed, and future research directions are highlighted.

  11. Simulating The Technological Movements Of The Equipment Used For Manufacturing Prosthetic Devices Using 3D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Anca-Lucia

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the process of building geometric and kinematic models of a technological equipment used in the process of manufacturing devices. First, the process of building the model for a six axes industrial robot is presented. In the second part of the paper, the process of building the model for a five-axis CNC milling machining center is also shown. Both models can be used for accurate cutting processes simulation of complex parts, such as prosthetic devices.

  12. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Standard for egress windows and... SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.404 Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes... section is to establish the requirements for the design, construction, and installation of windows...

  13. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements...

  14. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements...

  15. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements...

  16. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... interior pressure tests for components and cladding must be conducted at the design wind loads required by... conducted at the design wind loads specified in § 3280.305(c)(1). (f) Protection of egress window openings in high wind areas. For homes designed to be located in Wind Zones II and III, manufacturers shall...

  18. An academic, clinical and industrial update on electrospun, additive manufactured and imprinted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina N M; Fuller, Kieran P; Larrañaga, Aitor; Biggs, Manus; Bayon, Yves; Sarasua, Jose R; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning, additive manufacturing and imprint lithography scaffold fabrication technologies have attracted great attention in biomedicine, as they allow production of two- and three- dimensional constructs with tuneable topographical and geometrical features. In vitro data demonstrate that electrospun and imprinted substrates offer control over permanently differentiated and stem cell function. Advancements in functionalisation strategies have further enhanced the bioactivity and reparative capacity of electrospun and additive manufactured devices, as has been evidenced in several preclinical models. Despite this overwhelming success in academic setting, only a few technologies have reached the clinic and only a fraction of them have become commercially available products.

  19. Regulatory Considerations in the Design and Manufacturing of Implantable 3D-Printed Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Robert J; Kashlan, Khaled N; Flanangan, Colleen L; Wright, Jeanne K; Green, Glenn E; Hollister, Scott J; Weatherwax, Kevin J

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, technology has rapidly penetrated the medical device industry over the past several years, and innovative groups have harnessed it to create devices with unique composition, structure, and customizability. These distinctive capabilities afforded by 3D printing have introduced new regulatory challenges. The customizability of 3D-printed devices introduces new complexities when drafting a design control model for FDA consideration of market approval. The customizability and unique build processes of 3D-printed medical devices pose unique challenges in meeting regulatory standards related to the manufacturing quality assurance. Consistent material powder properties and optimal printing parameters such as build orientation and laser power must be addressed and communicated to the FDA to ensure a quality build. Postprinting considerations unique to 3D-printed devices, such as cleaning, finishing and sterilization are also discussed. In this manuscript we illustrate how such regulatory hurdles can be navigated by discussing our experience with our group's 3D-printed bioresorbable implantable device.

  20. Regulatory Considerations in the Design and Manufacturing of Implantable 3D‐Printed Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Robert J.; Kashlan, Khaled N.; Flanangan, Colleen L.; Wright, Jeanne K.; Green, Glenn E.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three‐dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, technology has rapidly penetrated the medical device industry over the past several years, and innovative groups have harnessed it to create devices with unique composition, structure, and customizability. These distinctive capabilities afforded by 3D printing have introduced new regulatory challenges. The customizability of 3D‐printed devices introduces new complexities when drafting a design control model for FDA consideration of market approval. The customizability and unique build processes of 3D‐printed medical devices pose unique challenges in meeting regulatory standards related to the manufacturing quality assurance. Consistent material powder properties and optimal printing parameters such as build orientation and laser power must be addressed and communicated to the FDA to ensure a quality build. Postprinting considerations unique to 3D‐printed devices, such as cleaning, finishing and sterilization are also discussed. In this manuscript we illustrate how such regulatory hurdles can be navigated by discussing our experience with our group's 3D‐printed bioresorbable implantable device. PMID:26243449

  1. Design, manufacture and in-vitro evaluation of a new microvascular anastomotic device.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Fu; Wang, Tien-Hsiang; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Huang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chun-Li; Kuo, Hsien-Nan; Yu, Tsung-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Many microvascular anastomoses have been proposed for use with physical assisted methods, such as cuff, ring-pin, stapler, clip to the anastomose blood vessel. The ring-pin type anastomotic device (e.g., 3M Microvascular Anastomotic System) is the most commonly used worldwide because the anastomotic procedure can be conducted more rapidly and with fewer traumas than using sutures. However, problems including vessel leakage, ring slippage, high cost and high surgical skill demand need to be resolved. The aim of this study is to design and manufacture a new anastomotic device for microvascular anastomosis surgery and validate the device functions with in-vitro testing. The new device includes one pair of pinned rings and a set of semi-automatic flap apparatus designed and made using computer-aided design / computer-aided manufacture program. A pair of pinned rings was used to impale vessel walls and establish fluid communication with rings joined. The semi-automatic flap apparatus was used to assist the surgeon to invert the vessel walls and impale onto each ring pin, then turning the apparatus knob to bring the rings together. The device was revised until it became acceptable for clinical requires. An in-vitro test was performed using a custom-made seepage micro-fluid system to detect the leakage of the anastomotic rings. The variation between input and output flow for microvascular anastomoses was evaluated. The new microvascular anastomotic device was convenient and easy to use. It requires less time than sutures to invert and impale vessel walls onto the pinned rings using the semi-automatic flap apparatus. The in-vitro test data showed that there were no tears from the joined rings seam during the procedures. The new anastomotic devices are effective even with some limitations still remaining. This device can be helpful to simplify the anastomosis procedure and reduce the surgery time.

  2. Manufacture of micro fluidic devices by laser welding using thermal transfer printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.; Klein, K. F.; Tobisch, T.; Thoelken, D.; Belz, M.

    2016-03-01

    Micro-fluidic devices are widely used today in the areas of medical diagnostics and drug research, as well as for applications within the process, electronics and chemical industry. Microliters of fluids or single cell to cell interactions can be conveniently analyzed with such devices using fluorescence imaging, phase contrast microscopy or spectroscopic techniques. Typical micro-fluidic devices consist of a thermoplastic base component with chambers and channels covered by a hermetic fluid and gas tight sealed lid component. Both components are usually from the same or similar thermoplastic material. Different mechanical, adhesive or thermal joining processes can be used to assemble base component and lid. Today, laser beam welding shows the potential to become a novel manufacturing opportunity for midsize and large scale production of micro-fluidic devices resulting in excellent processing quality by localized heat input and low thermal stress to the device during processing. For laser welding, optical absorption of the resin and laser wavelength has to be matched for proper joining. This paper will focus on a new approach to prepare micro-fluidic channels in such devices using a thermal transfer printing process, where an optical absorbing layer absorbs the laser energy. Advantages of this process will be discussed in combination with laser welding of optical transparent micro-fluidic devices.

  3. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  8. Manufacturing process and material selection in concurrent collaborative design of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuan F.; Du, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present knowledge of an intensive approach and system for selecting suitable manufacturing processes and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices in concurrent collaborative design environment. In the paper, fundamental issues on MEMS manufacturing process and material selection such as concurrent design framework, manufacturing process and material hierarchies, and selection strategy are first addressed. Then, a fuzzy decision support scheme for a multi-criteria decision-making problem is proposed for estimating, ranking and selecting possible manufacturing processes, materials and their combinations. A Web-based prototype advisory system for the MEMS manufacturing process and material selection, WebMEMS-MASS, is developed based on the client-knowledge server architecture and framework to help the designer find good processes and materials for MEMS devices. The system, as one of the important parts of an advanced simulation and modeling tool for MEMS design, is a concept level process and material selection tool, which can be used as a standalone application or a Java applet via the Web. The running sessions of the system are inter-linked with webpages of tutorials and reference pages to explain the facets, fabrication processes and material choices, and calculations and reasoning in selection are performed using process capability and material property data from a remote Web-based database and interactive knowledge base that can be maintained and updated via the Internet. The use of the developed system including operation scenario, use support, and integration with an MEMS collaborative design system is presented. Finally, an illustration example is provided.

  9. INSERTION DEVICES R AND Ds FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SHAFTAN, T.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    NSLS-II is a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also for broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are for polarization control. Rigorous R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the above devices as well as building new types of insertion devices such as high temperature superconducting wiggler/undulators. This paper describes the details of these activities and discuss technical issues.

  10. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  11. George E. Pake Prize: A Few Challenges in the Evolution of Semiconductor Device/Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Robert

    In the early 1980s, the semiconductor industry faced the related challenges of ``scaling through the one-micron barrier'' and converting single-level-metal NMOS integrated circuits to multi-level-metal CMOS. Multiple advances in lithography technology and device materials/process integration led the way toward the deep-sub-micron transistors and interconnects that characterize today's electronic chips. In the 1990s, CMOS scaling advanced at an accelerated pace enabled by rapid advances in many aspects of optical lithography. However, the industry also needed to continue the progress in manufacturing on ever-larger silicon wafers to maintain economy-of-scale trends. Simultaneously, the increasing complexity and absolute-precision requirements of manufacturing compounded the necessity for new processes, tools, and control methodologies. This talk presents a personal perspective on some of the approaches that addressed the aforementioned challenges. In particular, early work on integrating silicides, lightly-doped-drain FETs, shallow recessed isolation, and double-level metal will be discussed. In addition, some pioneering efforts in deep-UV lithography and single-wafer processing will be covered. The latter will be mainly based on results from the MMST Program - a 100 M +, 5-year R&D effort, funded by DARPA, the U.S. Air Force, and Texas Instruments, that developed a wide range of new technologies for advanced semiconductor manufacturing. The major highlight of the program was the demonstration of sub-3-day cycle time for manufacturing 350-nm CMOS integrated circuits in 1993. This was principally enabled by the development of: (1) 100% single-wafer processing, including rapid-thermal processing (RTP), and (2) computer-integrated-manufacturing (CIM), including real-time, in-situ process control.

  12. Lexicon generation methods, lexicon generation devices, and lexicon generation articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Carter, Richard J [Richland, WA; McCall, Jonathon D [West Richland, WA; Whitney, Paul D [Richland, WA; Gregory, Michelle L [Richland, WA; Turner, Alan E [Kennewick, WA; Hetzler, Elizabeth G [Kennewick, WA; White, Amanda M [Kennewick, WA; Posse, Christian [Seattle, WA; Nakamura, Grant C [Kennewick, WA

    2010-10-26

    Lexicon generation methods, computer implemented lexicon editing methods, lexicon generation devices, lexicon editors, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a lexicon generation method includes providing a seed vector indicative of occurrences of a plurality of seed terms within a plurality of text items, providing a plurality of content vectors indicative of occurrences of respective ones of a plurality of content terms within the text items, comparing individual ones of the content vectors with respect to the seed vector, and responsive to the comparing, selecting at least one of the content terms as a term of a lexicon usable in sentiment analysis of text.

  13. TOPAZ II Anti-Criticality Device Rapid Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Donald R.; Otting, William D.

    1994-07-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) has been working on a Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Project (NEPSTP) using an existing Russian Topaz II reactor system to power the NEPSTP satellite. Safety investigations have shown that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the United States with some modification to preclude water flooded criticality. A ``fuel-out'' water subcriticality concept was selected by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as the baseline concept. A fuel-out anti-criticality device (ACD) conceptual design was developed by Rockwell. The concept functions to hold the fuel from the four centermost thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) outside the reactor during launch and reliably inserts the fuel into the reactor once the operational orbit is achieved. A four-tenths scale ACD rapid prototype model, fabricated from the CATIA solids design model, clearly shows in three dimensions the relative size and spatial relationship of the ACD components.

  14. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer luminous safety devices containing tritium... maximum quantity of tritium or promethium-147 in each device; (2) Details of construction and design; (3) Details of the method of binding or containing the tritium or promethium-147; (4) Procedures for and...

  15. Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of locking devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrucko, R.J.; Hurst, B.T.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide (EPA/600/R-92/088). The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that fabricates and finishes metal components that are assembled into several types of locking devices. Raw materials are machined and then shipped offsite for heat-treating, stored until needed, or buffed and cleaned. Then, all parts other than those made of stainless steel are electroplated, electrostatically powder coated, or lacquer coated. The various component parts are then assembled into the locking devices. The assessment team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that the vapor degreasers generate a significant amount of waste and that vapor degreasing could be replaced with an aqueous cleaning system for intermediate cleaning. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  16. Material structure and processes required for the manufacture of micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrobis, Kenneth J.; Christenson, J.; Staller, Steve E.; Freeman, J.; Gadgil, Prashant

    1997-09-01

    The field of micromechanics is rapidly expanding in both the number of research groups and the number of materials being employed. Although this diversity is a strong indication of a healthy field, care must be taken to keep the focus on producing products and processes which can be transferred to the manufacturing facility. During the 1980s polysilicon was shown to contain a significant amount of process flexibility and economic potential. Although the demonstration of polysilicon sensors was noticed and in some cases pursued by industry, single-crystal silicon sensors continue to dominate the products used by the primary sensor customer, the automotive industry. A similar trend which also began in the 1980s was the use of the LIGA process for sensor fabrication. Once again, this field showed a significant amount of economic promise. However, for the resources being invested and the number of research groups pursuing this process, significant problems exist with respect to product manufacturability. Although LIGA remains an exciting field of research, new micromechanical processes or materials may greatly reduce the window of device profitability before the difficulties associated with LIGA can be brought under control. Oddly enough, it is the same material which polysilicon has failed to displace which may limit the LIGA process to only one application area, that area being magnetics. New deep anisotropic etching systems and new substrate suppliers for micromachining applications, along with the knowledge and experience industry already possesses, will maintain single crystal silicon as the sensor material of choice for the 1990s and beyond. This article reviews the material stability and processes associated with polysilicon, single crystal silicon, and electrodeposits. Emphasis will be placed on the inherent material structure and processes required to manufacture a profitable device.

  17. The Latest Status of NSLS-II Insertion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Toshi; Kitegi, Charles; He, Ping; Musardo, Marco; Rank, Oleg Chubar James; Cappadoro, Peter; Fernandes, Huston; Harder, David; Corwin, Todd

    2014-03-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is now in the final stage of construction. The Linac, the Booster synchrotron, and the Storage Ring magnets girder assemblies have been installed. The first damping wiggler has been delivered and its field characteristics are carefully measured. A Three Pole Wiggler (3PW) and Apple-II type elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs) have been fabricated by the vendors. Two 3.0m long in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) and one 1.5m long IVU are almost complete and waiting for factory acceptance tests. One 3.0m long IVU for Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline is in fabrication by a different vendor. Recently two 2.8m long IVUs for long straight sections (LSSs) have been added to the project for "future beamlines". In addition, two 1.5m long IVUs and one 2.8m long IVU for LSSs have been procured for Advanced Beamlines for Biological Investigations with X-rays (ABBIX) project funded by National Institure of Health (NIH). Further, two 3.5m long EPUs for LSSs are being designed for NSLS-II Experimental Tools (NEXT) -Major Item of Equipment (MIE) project. To succeed these conventional IVUs, PrFeB based cryo-permanent magnet undulator (CPMU) is considered as next generation device of hard X-ray sources. An In-Vacuum Magnetic Measurement System (IVMMS) for cold in-situ Hall probe mapping of CPMUs up to 1.5m in length has been developed. Summary of the current status of each project and future plans for the NSLS-II ring will be discussed.

  18. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89 Power interruption: Type I and II devices. A discharge device must be designed so that a momentary loss of power...

  19. Conceptual design of the Topaz II anticriticality device

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, D.; Bultman, D.; Potter, R.C.; Sanchez, L.; Skobelev, V.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Topaz II Flight Safety team requires that the hardware for the Rusian-built reactor be modified to ensure that the reactor remains subcritical in the event of an inadvertent accident in which the reactor is submersed in wet sand or water. In April 1993, the American Flight safety team chose the fuel-out anticriticality device as the baseline for the hardware design. We describe the initial stages of the hardware design; show how the mechanism works; and describe its function, the functional and operational requirements, and the difficult design problems encountered. Also described, are the initial interactions between the Russian and American design teams. Because the effort is to add an American modification to a Russian flight reactor, this project has required unusual technical cooperation and consultation with the Russian design team.

  20. Data visualization methods, data visualization devices, data visualization apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E.; Crow, Vernon L.; Payne, Deborah A.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Cook, Kristin A.; Cowley, Wendy E.

    2015-06-30

    Data visualization methods, data visualization devices, data visualization apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a data visualization method includes accessing a plurality of initial documents at a first moment in time, first processing the initial documents providing processed initial documents, first identifying a plurality of first associations of the initial documents using the processed initial documents, generating a first visualization depicting the first associations, accessing a plurality of additional documents at a second moment in time after the first moment in time, second processing the additional documents providing processed additional documents, second identifying a plurality of second associations of the additional documents and at least some of the initial documents, wherein the second identifying comprises identifying using the processed initial documents and the processed additional documents, and generating a second visualization depicting the second associations.

  1. Manufacturing microstructured tool inserts for the production of polymeric microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Srivastava, Amit; Kirwan, Brendan; Byrne, Richard; Fang, Fengzhou; Browne, David J.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2015-09-01

    Tooling is critical in defining multi-scale patterns for mass production of polymeric microfluidic devices using the microinjection molding process. In the present work, fabrication of various microstructured tool inserts using stainless steel, nickel and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is discussed based on die-sinking EDM (electrical discharge machining), electroforming, focused ion beam milling and thermoplastic forming processes. Tool performance is evaluated in terms of surface roughness, hardness and tool life. Compared to stainless steel, nickel and BMGs are capable of integrating length scales from 100 to 10-8 m and are good candidates for producing polymeric microfluidics. Selection of tool materials and manufacturing technologies should consider the end-user requirements of actual applications.

  2. Electrospray as a suitable technique for manufacturing carbon-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varea, Aïda; Monereo, Oriol; Xuriguera, Elena; Prades, J. Daniel; Cirera, Albert

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate here that electrospray is a technique suitable for deposition carbon-based materials. It is versatile enough to be used with graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and carbon nanofibers (CNF), obtained by chemical methods. A detailed analysis of the effects of the dispersion properties and the main process parameters (voltage and flow rate) on the deposits quality is presented. Rigid and flexible substrates have been coated with good geometry control under ambient conditions. Thickness of GO films onto silicon substrates, optical transmittance of rGO onto fluoride doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate and electrical resistance of both, rGO and CNF films onto flexible polyamide have been correlated with deposition time. As an example of application, the manufacture of carbon nanofibers gas sensing devices deposited onto a ceramic platform and flexible polyimide by means of electrospray technique are shown.

  3. Environment for thin-film manufacturing process development for product engineering of micro and nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortloff, Dirk; Hahn, Kai; Popp, Jens; Schmidt, Thilo; Brück, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Product engineering of micro and nano technology (MNT) devices differs substantially from product engineering in more traditional industries. The general development approach is mostly bottom up, as it centers around the available fabrication techniques and is characterised by application specific fabrication flows, i.e. fabrication processes depending on the later product. In the first part of this paper we introduce a comprehensive customer-oriented product engineering methodology for MNT products that regards the customer as the driving force behind new product developments. The MNT product engineering process is analyzed with regard to application-specific procedures and interfaces. An environment for the development of MNT manufacturing processes has been identified as a technical foundation for the methodology and will be described in the second part of this paper.

  4. Rapid thermal processing in the manufacturing technology of contacts to InP-based photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Avishay

    1991-04-01

    Rapid thermal alloying and sintering of metal ohmic contacts such as AuBe PtTFi and W to InP-based materials is shown to perform with better electrical properties than the same contacts heated by means of conventional furnace. The metalsemiconductor interfacial reactions induced by the rapid thermal processing were much shallower than those formed during the conventional heating cycle at the same temperature however with a negligible influence on the overall stresses developed in the film. These results demonstrate the superiority of the rapid thermal processing over the conventional furnace heating in sintering the metal electrical contacts and its potential while integrated into the overall manufacturing process sequence of the InP based photonic devices.

  5. Toward high-performance quality meeting IC device manufacturing requirements with AZ SMART DSA process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JiHoon; Yin, Jian; Cao, Yi; Her, YoungJun; Petermann, Claire; Wu, Hengpeng; Shan, Jianhui; Tsutsumi, Tomohiko; Lin, Guanyang

    2015-03-01

    Significant progresses on 300 mm wafer level DSA (Directed Self-Assembly) performance stability and pattern quality were demonstrated in recent years. DSA technology is now widely regarded as a leading complementary patterning technique for future node integrated circuit (IC) device manufacturing. We first published SMARTTM DSA flow in 2012. In 2013, we demonstrated that SMARTTM DSA pattern quality is comparable to that generated using traditional multiple patterning technique for pattern uniformity on a 300 mm wafer. In addition, we also demonstrated that less than 1.5 nm/3σ LER (line edge roughness) for 16 nm half pitch DSA line/space pattern is achievable through SMARTTM DSA process. In this publication, we will report impacts on SMARTTM DSA performances of key pre-pattern features and processing conditions. 300mm wafer performance process window, CD uniformity and pattern LER/LWR after etching transfer into carbon-hard mask will be discussed as well.

  6. Hysteroscopic morcellation: review of the manufacturer and user facility device experience (MAUDE) database.

    PubMed

    Haber, Karina; Hawkins, Eleanor; Levie, Mark; Chudnoff, Scott

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the number and type of adverse events associated with hysteroscopic morcellation of intrauterine disease. Systematic review of Manufacturer and User Device Experience (MAUDE) database from 2005 to June 2014 (Canadian Task Force classification III). Women undergoing hysteroscopic surgery for removal of intrauterine polyps or myomas with use of a reciprocating morcellator. The MAUDE database was searched for the key words "Hysteroscope," "Hysteroscopic reciprocating morcellator," "Interlace," "MyoSure," "Smith & Nephew," and "TRUCLEAR," to identify reported incidences of device malfunction, injury, or death. A total of 119 adverse events were analyzed. Reports were reviewed individually and categorized by date of occurrence, type of morcellation device, type of complication, and a brief description. Each company was contacted to provide an estimate of the number of procedures performed or units sold to date. From 2005 to June 2014, 119 adverse events were reported to the MAUDE database. On the basis of severity, adverse events were categorized as major or minor complications. Major events included intubation/admission to an intensive care unit (n = 14), bowel damage (n = 12), hysterectomy (n = 6), and death (n = 2). Minor events included uterine perforation requiring no other treatment (n = 29), device failure (n = 25), uncomplicated fluid overload (n = 19), postoperative bleeding controlled using noninvasive measures (n = 6), and pelvic infection (n = 4). These events were then categorized according to manufacturer. The number of adverse events reported to the MAUDE database was divided by the total units sold as a surrogate for the estimated number of procedures performed. Understanding the limitation of the numbers used as a numerator and denominator, we concluded that adverse events complicated hysteroscopic morcellation in <0.1% cases. The suction-based, mechanical energy, rotating tubular cutting system was developed to overcome adverse events

  7. Inadvertent Detachment of a Retrievable Intracranial Stent: Review of Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience.

    PubMed

    Yub Lee, Sang; Won Youn, Sung; Kyun Kim, Ho; Rok Do, Young

    2015-04-01

    Few systematic surveys have dealt with the potential procedural risks associated with the use of retrievable intracranial stents [Solitaire Flow Restoration (Solitaire FR)], which have become effective tools for recanalizing acutely occluded cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to present the real-world experiences of Solitaire-FR-related adverse events by reviewing the MAUDE (Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience) as published on the United States Food and Drug Administration website. In total, 85 adverse events related to the use of the Solitaire FR stent were reported between March 2012 and October 2014. In 80 patients these adverse events were attributable to inadvertent detachment of the device. Thirteen of these 80 patients (16%) died after the procedure. Morbidity data were available in 62 patients, among whom 11 (18%) had suffered a procedure-related injury. Detachment occurred at the first, second, and third pass in nine (21%), 21 (49%), and 13 (30%) of the 43 patients for whom this information was available, respectively. Resistance was perceived by the physician during retrieval of the device in 12 patients, and lesion characteristics were noted in 13. A rescue maneuver was reported in 20 (25%) of the 80 patients in whom the adverse event was attributable to detachment of the device, resulting in flow reestablishment in 13 (65%). The risk of inadvertent detachment during stent retrieval cannot be overemphasized in real-world scenarios, and careful consideration of the "dos and don'ts" is essential for the achievement of a safe procedure. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. A review of nanoimprint lithography for high-volume semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Douglas J.; Choi, Jin

    2017-06-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be a promising technique for the replication of nanoscale features. Jet and flash imprint lithography (J-FIL) [jet and flash imprint lithography and J-FIL are trademarks of Molecular Imprints, Inc.] involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low-viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid, which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. After this filling step, the resist is cross-linked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are many criteria that determine whether a particular technology is ready for wafer manufacturing. Included on the list are overlay, throughput, and defectivity. The most demanding devices now require an overlay of better than 4 nm, 3σ. Throughput for an imprint tool is generally targeted at 80 wafers/h. Defectivity and mask life play a significant role relative to meeting the cost of ownership (CoO) requirements in the production of semiconductor devices. The purpose of this paper is to report the status of throughput and defectivity work and to describe the progress made in addressing overlay for advanced devices. To address high-order corrections, a high-order distortion correction (HODC) system is introduced. The combination of applying magnification actuation to the mask and temperature correction to the wafer is described in detail. Examples are presented for the correction of K7, K11, and K17 distortions as well as distortions on actual device wafers.

  9. Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe,T.

    2008-06-23

    NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.

  10. 75 FR 44172 - Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II Devices and Exemption From... Register of April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17093). The document proposed to amend certain neurological and physical... proposed rule to amend certain neurological device and physical medicine device regulations to establish...

  11. Hearing Device Manufacturers Call for Interoperability and Standardization of Internet and Audiology.

    PubMed

    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Abrams, Harvey; Bülow, Maja; Lunner, Thomas; Nelson, John; Riis, Søren Kamaric; Vanpoucke, Filiep

    2016-10-01

    This article describes the perspectives of hearing device manufacturers regarding the exciting developments that the Internet makes possible. Specifically, it proposes to join forces toward interoperability and standardization of Internet and audiology. A summary of why such a collaborative effort is required is provided from historical and scientific perspectives. A roadmap toward interoperability and standardization is proposed. Information and communication technologies improve the flow of health care data and pave the way to better health care. However, hearing-related products, features, and services are notoriously heterogeneous and incompatible with other health care systems (no interoperability). Standardization is the process of developing and implementing technical standards (e.g., Noah hearing database). All parties involved in interoperability and standardization realize mutual gains by making mutually consistent decisions. De jure (officially endorsed) standards can be developed in collaboration with large national health care systems as well as spokespeople for hearing care professionals and hearing device users. The roadmap covers mutual collaboration; data privacy, security, and ownership; compliance with current regulations; scalability and modularity; and the scope of interoperability and standards. We propose to join forces to pave the way to the interoperable Internet and audiology products, features, and services that the world needs.

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of PNEUMOVAX II manufactured by a new process in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mair, Stuart; Fiquet, Anne; Meghlaoui, Gilles; Thomas, Stephane; Ledesma, Emilio

    2009-09-01

    In response to increased demand for the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine PNEUMOVAX II, a new manufacturing process has been implemented that improves the consistency and increases the scale of production. This double-blind, randomized, clinical study compared the immunogenicity and safety profiles of the new-process PNEUMOVAX II (n = 111) formulated with all 23 new process polysaccharides to the former-process PNEUMOVAX II (n = 109) formulation in adults aged > or =50 years. The primary aim of the study was to compare the post-vaccination geometric mean of antibody titres (GMT) to pneumococcal serotypes 3 and 8 in recipients of new- and former-process PNEUMOVAX II. The post-vaccination GMTs for serotypes 3 and 8 elicited by the new-process PNEUMOVAX II [1.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.63) and 10.78 (95% CI, 9.10-12.77), respectively] were non-inferior to those elicited by the former-process PNEUMOVAX II [1.24 (95% CI, 1.07-1.43) and 9.72 (95% CI, 8.22-11.50), respectively]. Both PNEUMOVAX II formulations were well tolerated; there were no vaccine-related serious adverse events. A total of 74 (66.7%) subjects in the new-process group and 66 (60.6%) in the former-process group had at least one injection-site reaction or vaccine-related systemic event within 14 days following vaccination. There was a trend for higher incidence of two solicited injection-site reactions (erythmea and induration) and three solicited systemic events (asthenia, chills and body aches) with the new- versus former-process PNEUMOVAX II, but these were mainly of mild intensity and short duration. The new-process PNEUMOVAX(R II thus showed similar immunogenicity to the former-process vaccine for pneumococcal serotypes 3 and 8 and both vaccines were well tolerated in older subjects.

  13. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  14. Environmentally benign manufacturing of compact disc stampers [Final Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    Optical data storage is currently a $10B/yr. business. With the introduction of the high capacity Digital Versatile Disc (D/D) as well as the continued growth of CD-Audio and CD-ROM worldwide sales of optical data products as a whole are growing at rate of more than 10% per year. In North America, more than 2.5 billion optical discs will be sold in 1998. By 1999, the numbers of optical discs produced for the North American market will grow to almost three billion. The optical disc manufacturing industry is dominated by Asian and European companies (e.g. Sony of Japan and Philips of Netherlands). Prism Corporation has created a process that could significantly improve US competitiveness in the business of optical disc production. The objectives of the Phase II STTR project were to build and test an ion machining system (IMS) for stamper fabrication, prove overall manufacturing system feasibility by fabrication stampers and replicas, and evaluate alternative materials and alternative process parameters to optimize the process. During tie period of the Phase II project Prism Corporation was able to meet these objectives. In the course of doing so, adjustments had been made to better the project and in turn the final product. An ion machining system was designed and built that produced stampers ready for the molding process. Also, many control steps in the manufacturing process were studied to improve the current process and make it even more compatible with the industry standards, fitting seamlessly into current manufacturing lines.

  15. II-VI Materials-Based High Performance Intersubband Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Arvind Pawan

    achieve normal-incident absorption, taking advantage of light-scattering in sloped surfaces; this method is wavelength independent and does not involve complicated fabrication techniques. With the performance of II-VI devices matching or surpassing existing commercial solutions, integrated mid-IR photonics based sensing is poised to play a big role in the future of sensing technologies.

  16. Adverse events associated with ultrasonic scalers: A manufacturer and user facility device experience database analysis.

    PubMed

    Thennukonda, Rajagopal Athmarao; Natarajan, Bhavani Rekha

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the frequency and type of adverse events (AEs) associated with ultrasonic scaler reported to the Food and Drug Administration manufacturer and user facility device experience (MAUDE) database. The authors reviewed the ultrasonic scaler units (USU) related AEs reported to MAUDE from October 1, 1995, to September 31, 2015. Analyses of details collected are presented. MAUDE received a total of 667 unique USU-related AE reports. Of 667 cases, MAUDE classified 628 instances (94.2%) as malfunction 27 (4%) as injurious, 10 (1.5%) as others, and 2 (0.3%) claiming the use of USU as cause of death. Of the 667 cases, 511 (76.6%) were used for endodontic application, and 147 (22%) as scaler applications. In 512 (76.8%) instances, there was separation of the tips, posing danger to patients or users, and 112 (16.8%) instances of overheating, 12 (1.8%) instances of breakage, and electrical issues in 8 (1.2%) instances. These AE resulted in 19 instances of thermal injury, 2 suspicious deaths, and hearing loss in 3 cases. In 4 cases, patient swallowed broken parts requiring additional medical care. Use of USU, a Class 2 device without exemption, carries a degree of risk to patient's safety, if not properly used. As of today, MAUDE data is the only reliable source of AE until another database or such study is carried out. Certain AE that has been largely anecdotal, such as hearing loss has been reported in this study. The findings from study reiterate that more in-depth analysis of AE of USU is needed. Until then operator needs to take all precautions to avoid AE when using USU.

  17. Adverse events of gastric electrical stimulators recorded in the Manufacturer and User Device Experience (MAUDE) Registry.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The role of gastric electrical stimulation for patients with refractory symptoms of gastroparesis remains controversial. Open label studies suggest benefit while randomized controlled trials did not demonstrate differences between active and sham intervention. Using a voluntary reporting system of the Federal Drug Administration, we examined the type and frequency of adverse events. We conducted an electronic search of the Manufacturer and User Device Experience (MAUDE) databank using the keyword 'Enterra' for the time between January of 2001 and October of 2015. We abstracted information about the year of stimulator implantation, the year and type of adverse effect, the resulting intervention and outcome if available. A total of 1587 entries described adverse effects related the GES. Only 36 of the reports listed perioperative complications. The vast majority described problems that could be classified as patient concerns, local complications, or system failure. The most common problem related lack or loss of efficacy, followed by pain or complications affecting the pocket site. A subset of 801 reports provided information about the time between system implant and registration of concerns, which gradually declined over time. More than one third (35.7%) of the reported adverse events prompted surgical correction. The number of voluntarily reported adverse events and the high likelihood of repeated surgical interventions clearly demonstrate the potential downside of gastric electrical stimulation. Physicians considering this intervention will need to carefully weigh these risks and include this information when counseling or consenting patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Design for Additive Bio-Manufacturing: From Patient-Specific Medical Devices to Rationally Designed Meta-Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zadpoor, Amir A

    2017-07-25

    Recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) techniques in terms of accuracy, reliability, the range of processable materials, and commercial availability have made them promising candidates for production of functional parts including those used in the biomedical industry. The complexity-for-free feature offered by AM means that very complex designs become feasible to manufacture, while batch-size-indifference enables fabrication of fully patient-specific medical devices. Design for AM (DfAM) approaches aim to fully utilize those features for development of medical devices with substantially enhanced performance and biomaterials with unprecedented combinations of favorable properties that originate from complex geometrical designs at the micro-scale. This paper reviews the most important approaches in DfAM particularly those applicable to additive bio-manufacturing including image-based design pipelines, parametric and non-parametric designs, metamaterials, rational and computationally enabled design, topology optimization, and bio-inspired design. Areas with limited research have been identified and suggestions have been made for future research. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the practical aspects of DfAM and the potential of combining AM with subtractive and formative manufacturing processes in so-called hybrid manufacturing processes.

  19. Design for Additive Bio-Manufacturing: From Patient-Specific Medical Devices to Rationally Designed Meta-Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zadpoor, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) techniques in terms of accuracy, reliability, the range of processable materials, and commercial availability have made them promising candidates for production of functional parts including those used in the biomedical industry. The complexity-for-free feature offered by AM means that very complex designs become feasible to manufacture, while batch-size-indifference enables fabrication of fully patient-specific medical devices. Design for AM (DfAM) approaches aim to fully utilize those features for development of medical devices with substantially enhanced performance and biomaterials with unprecedented combinations of favorable properties that originate from complex geometrical designs at the micro-scale. This paper reviews the most important approaches in DfAM particularly those applicable to additive bio-manufacturing including image-based design pipelines, parametric and non-parametric designs, metamaterials, rational and computationally enabled design, topology optimization, and bio-inspired design. Areas with limited research have been identified and suggestions have been made for future research. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the practical aspects of DfAM and the potential of combining AM with subtractive and formative manufacturing processes in so-called hybrid manufacturing processes. PMID:28757572

  20. Two-fold efficiency increase in nanocrystalline-TiO II/polymer photovoltaic devices by interfacial modification with a lithium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.; Carey, Michelle J.; Xie, Zhibin; Kirov, Kiril R.; Henry, Bernard M.; Assender, Hazel E.; Webster, Graham R.; Burn, Paul L.

    2006-08-01

    Modification of the interface of titanium dioxide/poly[2-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-5-methoxy-1,4,-phenylenevinylene] (TiO II/MEH-PPV) nanocomposite photovoltaic devices with a lithium salt, Li[CF 3SO II] IIN, is shown to result in a twofold increase in device efficiency. The devices are of the type ITO/TiO II/MEH-PPV/Au. The TiO II layer is deposited by doctor blading a colloidal anatase paste, and the polymer is then spin-coated on top followed by thermal evaporation of gold contacts. Careful control of manufacturing conditions and use of a 35 nm polymer layer leads to a device efficiency of 0.48% for un-modified devices. The increased efficiency following Li treatment is the result of a 40% increase in both the short-circuit current and fill factor, while the open-circuit voltage remains unchanged. A maximum efficiency of 1.05% has been achieved under 80% sun illumination. This represents a record efficiency for this type of cell. Photoconductivity experiments show a substantial increase in conductivity of the TiO II layer following Li modification. Interfacial modification is done via a simple soaking procedure, and the effect of varying the concentration of Li[CF 3SO II] IIN is discussed. We report investigations into optimization and the mechanism of such improvement, for example by varying processing parameters of the modification procedure or the ionic species themselves.

  1. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part II - Adaptive Motion Control.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J Q; Rudolph, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a study of adaptive motion control of smart versatile rehabilitation devices using MR fluids. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Adaptive controls are developed to regulate resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. Special consideration has been given to the human-machine interaction in the adaptive control that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue of the human subject.

  2. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... devices. (a) In addition to labeling requirements in subchapter H of this chapter, when a medical device... reactivity of the human blood or blood component in the medical device presents no significant health...

  3. Assurance of Medical Device Quality with Quality Management System: An Analysis of Good Manufacturing Practice Implementation in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Pei-Weng; Wu, Shiow-Ing

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of an effective quality management system has always been considered a principal method for a manufacturer to maintain and improve its product and service quality. Globally many regulatory authorities incorporate quality management system as one of the mandatory requirements for the regulatory control of high-risk medical devices. The present study aims to analyze the GMP enforcement experience in Taiwan between 1998 and 2013. It describes the regulatory implementation of medical device GMP requirement and initiatives taken to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in compliance with the regulatory requirement. Based on statistical data collected by the competent authority and industry research institutes, the present paper reports the growth of Taiwan local medical device industry after the enforcement of GMP regulation. Transition in the production, technologies, and number of employees of Taiwan medical device industry between 1998 and 2013 provides the competent authorities around the world with an empirical foundation for further policy development. PMID:26075255

  4. Assurance of medical device quality with quality management system: an analysis of good manufacturing practice implementation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzu-Wei; Tu, Pei-Weng; Liu, Li-Ling; Wu, Shiow-Ing

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of an effective quality management system has always been considered a principal method for a manufacturer to maintain and improve its product and service quality. Globally many regulatory authorities incorporate quality management system as one of the mandatory requirements for the regulatory control of high-risk medical devices. The present study aims to analyze the GMP enforcement experience in Taiwan between 1998 and 2013. It describes the regulatory implementation of medical device GMP requirement and initiatives taken to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in compliance with the regulatory requirement. Based on statistical data collected by the competent authority and industry research institutes, the present paper reports the growth of Taiwan local medical device industry after the enforcement of GMP regulation. Transition in the production, technologies, and number of employees of Taiwan medical device industry between 1998 and 2013 provides the competent authorities around the world with an empirical foundation for further policy development.

  5. Forecasting Device Effectiveness: Volume II. Procedures. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Andrew M.; And Others

    This report describes an analytic training Device Effectiveness Forecasting Technique known as DEFT. DEFT accounts for device effectivness in terms of several different criteria and classes of independent predictor variables. In its present form, DEFT is a series of interactive, menu-driven computer programs that provide for three levels of device…

  6. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  7. The Woven EndoBridge cerebral aneurysm embolization device (WEB II): initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Klisch, Joachim; Sychra, Vojtech; Strasilla, Christoph; Liebig, Thomas; Fiorella, David

    2011-08-01

    The Woven Endobridge (WEB II) device (Sequent Medical, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA, USA) is an intra-saccular, oblate, braided-wire embolization device designed to provide flow disruption at the aneurysm neck-parent artery interface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute and short-term performance of the WEB II device regarding the immediacy, degree, and durability of aneurysm occlusion in two patients. The WEB II device was implanted in one patient with an unruptured MCA trifurcation aneurysm and one patient with an unruptured basilar tip aneurysm. The degree of intra-aneurysmal flow disruption was graded based on serial digital subtraction aneurysm angiography performed over 30 min immediately following device implantation and at 8 weeks. Immediate and 8-week post-treatment CT and 3-T MRI studies were also performed. Delivery and deployment of the WEB II device was technically straightforward and achieved without complications. Neither device required retrieval or repositioning after full deployment. There were no peri-procedural thrombembolic or hemorrhagic complications. In both cases, complete aneurysm occlusion was observed within minutes of device deployment. Short-term angiographic follow-up confirmed stable complete occlusion at 8 weeks. Early technical and clinical results from the first WEB II cases have been encouraging and suggest that the intra-saccular deployment of self-expanding, compliant, cylindrical, high-density, braided metallic mesh constructs may represent a feasible approach for the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

  8. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements and Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other than device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...

  9. Complications in cosmetic laser surgery: a review of 494 Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Reports.

    PubMed

    Zelickson, Zachary; Schram, Sarah; Zelickson, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Complications in cosmetic laser and energy based surgery affect a number of patients every year and may cause scars, burns, blisters, and pigmentation damage. To evaluate documented complications in cosmetic laser- and energy-based surgeries, determine the most common errors, and recommend a simple procedural sequence to reduce patient complications. U.S. Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Adverse Event Reports after cosmetic laser- and energy-based procedures with varied devices were reviewed (N = 494). The laser manufacturer, device used, event type, injury type, cause, operator, and indication for treatment for each case were identified. In the 494 cases reviewed between 2006 and 2011, the most common complications were burns, scarring, blistering, pigmentation damage, and infection. The most common cause of these complications was user error by a healthcare provider (30%), followed by laser device malfunction (20%) and patient error (4%). Indications for treatment were unknown for 69% of cases, and 38% of the cases were an unknown cause of complication. User error was a major factor in laser surgery complications. To improve safety and reduce errors, we propose the implementation of a procedural sequence for cosmetic laser surgery. © 2014 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II devices. 159.89 Section 159.89 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89...

  11. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II devices. 159.126a Section 159.126a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  12. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II devices. 159.126a Section 159.126a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  13. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II devices. 159.126a Section 159.126a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  14. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II devices. 159.89 Section 159.89 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89...

  15. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II devices. 159.89 Section 159.89 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89...

  16. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II devices. 159.89 Section 159.89 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89...

  17. Annex II technical documentation assessed.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, A W; Roszek, B; van Tienhoven, E A E; Geertsma, R E; Boumans, R T; Kraus, J J A M

    2005-12-01

    Annex II of the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is used frequently by manufacturers to obtain CE-marking. This procedure relies on a full quality assurance system and does not require an assessment of the individual medical device by a Notified Body. An investigation into the availability and the quality of technical documentation for Annex II devices revealed severe shortcomings, which are reported here.

  18. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent samples...

  19. Interband cascade light emitting devices based on type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lin, C.H.; Murry, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    The authors discuss physical processes in the newly developed type-II interband cascade light emitting devices, and review their recent progress in the demonstration of the first type-II interband cascade lasers and the observation of interband cascade electroluminescence up to room temperature in a broad mid-infrared wavelength region (extended to 9 {mu}m).

  20. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent samples... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in...

  1. Method And Apparatus For Coupling Optical Elements To Optoelectronic Devices For Manufacturing Optical Transceiver Modules

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Mitchell, Robert T.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Rising, Merideth A.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2005-06-14

    A process is provided for aligning and connecting at least one optical fiber to at least one optoelectronic device so as to couple light between at least one optical fiber and at least one optoelectronic device. One embodiment of this process comprises the following steps: (1) holding at least one optical element close to at least one optoelectronic device, at least one optical element having at least a first end; (2) aligning at least one optical element with at least one optoelectronic device; (3) depositing a first non-opaque material on a first end of at least one optoelectronic device; and (4) bringing the first end of at least one optical element proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that the first non-opaque material contacts the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element. The optical element may be an optical fiber, and the optoelectronic device may be a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. The first non-opaque material may be a UV optical adhesive that provides an optical path and mechanical stability. In another embodiment of the alignment process, the first end of at least one optical element is brought proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that an interstitial space exists between the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element.

  2. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  3. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  4. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing, Part II: Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Draper, Robert D.; Shin, Eugene; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Lao, Chao; Rhein, Morgan; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the second part of the three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce aircraft engine components by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using commercially available polyetherimides-Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 mixed with 10% chopped carbon fiber. A property comparison between FDM-printed and injection molded coupons for Ultem 9085, Ultem 1000 resin and the fiber-filled composite Ultem 1000 was carried out. Furthermore, an acoustic liner was printed from Ultem 9085 simulating conventional honeycomb structured liners and tested in a wind tunnel. Composite compressor inlet guide vanes were also printed using fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and tested in a cascade rig. The fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and composite vanes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and acid digestion to determine the porosity of FDM-printed articles which ranged from 25 to 31%. Coupons of Ultem 9085, experimental Ultem 1000 composites and XH6050 resin were tested at room temperature and 400F to evaluate their corresponding mechanical properties. A preliminary modeling was also initiated to predict the mechanical properties of FDM-printed Ultem 9085 coupons in relation to varied raster angles and void contents, using the GRC-developed MAC/GMC program.

  5. Treatment of class ii in adulthood by forsus frd device

    PubMed Central

    DE NUCCIO, F.; D’EMIDIO, M.M.; DE NUCCIO, F.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Scientific research data show that the Forsus FRD seems to have a great potential in the correction of Class II in childhood. The conclusions reached by the various Authors seem to support the hypothesis of an exclusively or mainly dentoalveolar correction, as the skeletal correction seems to have no – or little – appreciable results. In the light of such provided by different Authors, the potential of dentoalveolar compensation in adult patients with mild skeletal class II was investigated. Materials and methods At the UOC (Complex Operative Unit) of Orthodontics at “G. Eastman” Hospital Rome, 3 cases of skeletal class II mild (ANB <5 °) in adult patients were selected. They were treated with fixed multibracket appliance and Forsus EZ2 module. Cephalometric tracings were compared at the beginning and at the end of the treatment in order to assess the skeletal and dentoalveolar changes. Results The occlusal correction was achieved through a dentoalveolar compensation characterized by the flaring of the lower teeth. Conclusions Forsus FRD equipment is an excellent compromise for the correction of mild Class II, even during the post development age. The resulting correction is appreciated at dental alveolar level with a mesial movement of the incisors and molars. PMID:28280539

  6. Application of Lean Manufacturing Principles to DARHT-II Induction Cell Refurbishment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    has been transformed to support Lean Manufacturing . This paper presents and discusses the processes and facility configuration developed to apply Lean Manufacturing for cell refurbishment....commissioning milestones of the DARHT second-axis accelerator. To this end, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has adopted the principles of Lean ... Manufacturing and applied them to the cell refurbishment effort. These principles emphasize streamline thinking and methodologies for manufacturing

  7. Development of Inorganic Precursors for Manufacturing of Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-308

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M.; Ginley, D.

    2013-06-01

    Both NREL and Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials are interested in the development of solution phase metal and semiconductive precursors for the manufacturing of photovoltaic devices. In particular, we intend to develop material sets for atmospheric deposition processes. The cooperation between these two parties will enable high value materials and processing solutions for the manufacturing of low cost, roll-to-roll photovoltaics.

  8. Complications of Electromechanical Morcellation Reported in the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) Database.

    PubMed

    Naumann, R Wendel; Brown, Jubilee

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate adverse events associated with electromechanical morcellation as reported to the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. Retrospective analysis of an established database (Canadian Task Force classification III). A search of the MAUDE database for terms associated with commercially available electromechanical morcellation devices was undertaken for events leading to injury or death between 2004 and 2014. Data, including the types of injury, need for conversion to open surgery, type of open surgery, and clinical outcomes, were extracted from the records. Over a 10-year period, 9 events associated with death and 215 events associated with patient injury or significant delay of the surgical procedure were recorded. These involved 137 device failures, 51 organ injuries, and the morcellation of 27 previously undiagnosed malignancies. Of the 9 deaths, 1 was associated with organ injury, and the other 8 were associated with morcellation of cancer. Of the 27 undiagnosed cancers, 5 were reported by the manufacturer, 8 were reported by the patient or family, 9 were reported by medical or news reports, 2 were reported by medical professionals, and 3 were due to litigation. Morcellation of an undiagnosed malignancy was first reported to the database in December 2013. The MAUDE database appears to detect perioperative events, such as device failures and organ injury at the time of surgery, but appears to be poor at detecting late events after surgery, such as the potential spread of cancer. Outcome registries are likely a more efficient means of tracking potential long-term adverse events associated with surgical devices. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Superconductive tunnel junction device with enhanced characteristics and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.; Jillie, D. W.

    1985-08-20

    A superconductive tunnel junction device comprises first and second superconductive electrodes with a barrier disposed therebetween where the first superconductive electrode and the barrier are formed without interruption in the same vacuum system pump down and with the first superconductive electrode subjected to sputter etching in an argon plasma before the deposition of the barrier for improving the characteristics of the device.

  10. POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF LOCKING DEVICES (EPA/600/S-95/013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected u...

  11. Development and fabrication of improved power transistor switches. [fabrication and manufacturing of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Chu, C. K.

    1976-01-01

    A new class of high-voltage power transistors has been achieved by adapting present interdigitated thyristor processing techniques to the fabrication of NPN Si transistors. Present devices are 2.3 cm in diameter. The electrical performance obtained is consistent with the predictions of an optimum design theory specifically developed for power switching transistors. The forward safe operating area of the experimental transistors shows a significant improvement over commercially available devices. The report describes device design, wafer processing, and various measurements which include dc characteristics, forward and reverse second breakdown limits, and switching times.

  12. A fracture-mechanics-based approach to fracture control in biomedical devices manufactured from superelastic Nitinol tube.

    PubMed

    Robertson, S W; Ritchie, R O

    2008-01-01

    Several key fracture-mechanics parameters associated with the onset of subcritical and critical cracking, specifically the fracture toughness, crack-resistance curve, and fatigue threshold, have recently been reported for the superelastic alloy Nitinol, in the product form of the thin-walled tube that is used to manufacture several biomedical devices, most notably endovascular stents. In this study, we use these critical parameters to construct simple decision criteria for assessing the quantitative effect of crack-like defects in such Nitinol devices with respect to their resistance to failure by deformation or fracture. The criteria are based on the (equivalent) crack-initiation fracture toughness and fatigue threshold stress-intensity range, together with the general yield strength and fatigue endurance strength, and are used to construct a basis for design against single-event (overload) failures as well as for time-/cycle-delayed failures associated with fatigue.

  13. Photovoltaic device with increased light absorption and method for its manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Glatfelter, Troy; Vogeli, Craig; Call, Jon; Hammond, Ginger

    1993-07-20

    A photovoltaic cell having a light-directing optical element integrally formed in an encapsulant layer thereof. The optical element redirects light to increase the internal absorption of light incident on the photovoltaic device.

  14. Analysis of adverse events with Essure hysteroscopic sterilization reported to the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database.

    PubMed

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Shavell, Valerie I; Hobson, Deslyn T G; Berman, Jay M; Diamond, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database may be useful for clinicians using a Food and Drug Administration-approved medical device to identify the occurrence of adverse events and complications. We sought to analyze and investigate reports associated with the Essure hysteroscopic sterilization system (Conceptus Inc., Mountain View, CA) using this database. Retrospective review of the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database for events related to Essure hysteroscopic sterilization from November 2002 to February 2012 (Canadian Task Force Classification III). Online retrospective review. Online reports of patients who underwent Essure tubal sterilization. Essure tubal sterilization. Four hundred fifty-seven adverse events were reported in the study period. Pain was the most frequently reported event (217 events [47.5%]) followed by delivery catheter malfunction (121 events [26.4%]). Poststerilization pregnancy was reported in 61 events (13.3%), of which 29 were ectopic pregnancies. Other reported events included perforation (90 events [19.7%]), abnormal bleeding (44 events [9.6%]), and microinsert malposition (33 events [7.2%]). The evaluation and management of these events resulted in an additional surgical procedure in 270 cases (59.1%), of which 44 were hysterectomies. Sixty-one unintended poststerilization pregnancies were reported in the study period, of which 29 (47.5%) were ectopic gestations. Thus, ectopic pregnancy must be considered if a woman becomes pregnant after Essure hysteroscopic sterilization. Additionally, 44 women underwent hysterectomy after an adverse event reported to be associated with the use of the device. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Additive manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices: promises and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Macdonald, Niall P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    This work describes a preliminary investigation of commercially available 3D printing technologies for rapid prototyping and low volume fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip devices. The main motivation of the work was to use off-the-shelf 3D printing methods in order to rapidly and inexpensively build microfluidic devices with complex geometric features and reduce the need to use clear room environment and conventional microfabrication techniques. Both multi-jet modelling (MJM) and stereolithography (SLA) processes were explored. MJM printed devices were fabricated using a HD3500+ (3D Systems) high-definition printer using a thermo-polymer VisiJet Crystal (3D Systems) substratum that allows for a z-axis resolution of 16 μm and 25 μm x-y accuracy. SLA printed devices were produced using a Viper Pro (3D Systems) stereolithography system using Watershed 11122XC (DSM Somos) and Dreve Fototec 7150 Clear (Dreve Otoplastik GmbH) resins which allow for a z-axis resolution of 50 μm and 25 μm x-y accuracy. Fabrication results compared favourably with other forms of rapid prototyping such as laser cut PMMA devices and PDMS moulded microfluidic devices of the same design. Both processes allowed for fabrication of monolithic, optically transparent devices with features in the 100 μm range requiring minimal post-processing. Optical polymer qualities following different post-processing methods were also tested in both brightfield and fluorescence imaging of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Finally, we show that only ethanol-treated Dreve Fototec 7150 Clear resign proved to be non-toxic to human cell lines and fish embryos in fish toxicity assays (FET) requiring further investigation of 3D printing materials.

  16. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  17. How do medical device manufacturers' websites frame the value of health innovation? An empirical ethics analysis of five Canadian innovations.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, P; Hivon, M; Williams-Jones, B; Miller, F A; Urbach, D R

    2012-02-01

    While every health care system stakeholder would seem to be concerned with obtaining the greatest value from a given technology, there is often a disconnect in the perception of value between a technology's promoters and those responsible for the ultimate decision as to whether or not to pay for it. Adopting an empirical ethics approach, this paper examines how five Canadian medical device manufacturers, via their websites, frame the corporate "value proposition" of their innovation and seek to respond to what they consider the key expectations of their customers. Our analysis shows that the manufacturers' framing strategies combine claims that relate to valuable socio-technical goals and features such as prevention, efficiency, sense of security, real-time feedback, ease of use and flexibility, all elements that likely resonate with a large spectrum of health care system stakeholders. The websites do not describe, however, how the innovations may impact health care delivery and tend to obfuscate the decisional trade-offs these innovations represent from a health care system perspective. Such framing strategies, we argue, tend to bolster physicians' and patients' expectations and provide a large set of stakeholders with powerful rhetorical tools that may influence the health policy arena. Because these strategies are difficult to counter given the paucity of evidence and its limited use in policymaking, establishing sound collective health care priorities will require solid critiques of how certain kinds of medical devices may provide a better (i.e., more valuable) response to health care needs when compared to others.

  18. Polyimide microfluidic devices with integrated nanoporous filtration areas manufactured by micromachining and ion track technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, S.; Trautmann, C.; Bertsch, A.; Renaud, Ph

    2004-03-01

    This paper reports on polyimide microfluidic devices fabricated by photolithography and a layer transfer lamination technology. The microchannels are sealed by laminating an uncured polyimide film on a partially cured layer and subsequent imidization. Selected areas of the microchannels were irradiated with heavy ions of several hundred MeV and the generated ion tracks are chemically etched to submicron pores of high aspect ratio. The ion beam parameters and the track etching conditions define density, length, diameter and shape of the pores. Membrane permeability and separation performance is demonstrated in cross-flow filtration experiments. The devices can be used for selective delivery or probing of fluids to biological tissue, e.g. drug delivery or microdialysis. For chip-based devices the filters can be used as a sample pre-treatment unit for filtration or concentration of particles or molecules.

  19. —Part II. Development of the Electrolysis Devices and Process Technology Approval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikov, Yurii P.; Shurov, Nikolay I.; Batukhtin, Victor P.; Molostov, Oleg G.

    2014-06-01

    The electrolyzers used to extract calcium from copper-calcium alloys at 0.5 to 3.0 kA were designed, manufactured, and utilized to study the process parameters more precisely. The pilot electrolysis device used to produce calcium from copper-calcium alloys at 12 to 15 kA was developed. The calcium production using the bipolar electrolyzer was proved to be possible and was experimentally tested.

  20. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Optical Communications, Optronic Devices Manufacturing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to the well layer. At W = 4 /im or less, a single peak near field pattern is obtained with a drop in Ith. Over an extremely narrow width , the clad ...for the composition of the growth film and In to melt them. Usually, in the fabrication of a wafer for a Fabry-Perot laser , an InP single crystal is...Production Technology for AlGaAs/GaAs Quantum-Well Laser 31 InGaAsP/InP DFB Laser Manufacturing Process Technology 40 Planar Type InGaAs-APD

  1. Subxiphoid exchange of HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Luc, Jessica G Y; Haswell, Joshua; Hallian, William; Massey, H Todd

    2016-12-20

    With increasing use of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) for long-term circulatory support comes a growing need for device exchange. The conventional surgical approach for device exchanges has been a reoperative median resternotomy. Less invasive HeartMate II LVAD exchange via a non-muscle-dividing subxiphoid incision as an alternative to a left subcostal incision may reduce pain burden and facilitate recovery. From November 2006 through June 2015, 292 patients underwent HeartMate II LVAD placement, of which 30 (10.3%) required an exchange. Twenty-four (80%) LVAD exchanges were performed through a subxiphoid sternal-sparing approach, and 6 (20%) through reoperative sternotomy. Predominant indication for device exchange was suspected or confirmed pump thrombus (73.3%), followed by electromechanical pump dysfunction (16.7%). The subxiphoid approach resulted in significantly shorter median intensive care unit (7 vs 37 days, p = 0.01) and hospital stay (29 vs 107 days, p = 0.01) compared to reoperative sternotomy. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed comparable survival between the subgroups (p=0.15) as well as between the patients with device exchange and the rest of the HeartMate II LVAD patients at our institution (p = 0.12). Subxiphoid device exchange is a viable option, resulting in low operative morbidity and mortality with no adverse effect on late survival.

  2. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  3. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  4. Design and manufacturing of a piezoelectric traveling-wave pumping device.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Camilo; Bernard, Yves; Razek, Adel

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we present the design and construction of a micropump exhibiting a nontraditional pumping principle whose design is achievable at very low scales. The operation is based on the action of a mechanical traveling wave deforming the bottom wall of a flexible channel containing a fluid. The paper treats for the first time the influence of the traveling wave parameters on the performance of the pump with the help of finite element simulations. The results obtained from the simulation are subsequently used for the dimensioning of the linear ultrasonic traveling wave actuator that drives the device. Finally, a very simple channel-reservoirs structure was conceived to test the device. At this point, several measurements of flow rate and back pressure were carried out to estimate the performance of the prototype for different values of wave amplitude. The article finishes with a comparison between the numerical and experimental results and a brief section of discussion and conclusions.

  5. Nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires having piezoelectric and/or pyroelectric properties and devices manufactured therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Thomas P [Amherst, MA; Lutkenhaus, Jodie [Wethersfield, CT

    2012-05-15

    Disclosed herein is a device comprising a pair of electrodes; and a nanotube, a nanorod and/or a nanowire; the nanotube, nanorod and/or nanowire comprising a piezoelectric and/or pyroelectric polymeric composition; the pair of electrodes being in electrical communication with opposing surfaces of the nanotube, nanorod and/or a nanowire; the pair of electrodes being perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the nanotube, nanorod and/or a nanowire.

  6. A technology for the calculation and manufacture of devices for shaping a proton beam in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, A. V.; Endzheichak, D.; Luchin, E. I.; Mitsyn, G. V.; Molokanov, A. G.; Shipulin, K. N.

    2012-11-01

    A therapeutic proton beam for an actual irradiation procedure is shaped using customized collimator leaves made out of Cerrobend, while to make the proton-beam depth-dose distribution conformal to the target volume, so-called boluses (compensators) with sophisticated shapes are calculated and then fabricated to compensate for the heterogeneities of a patient's tissues and organs in the beam path. This article describes the main stages of testing a technology for manufacturing bolus from industrial wax which was developed at the Medico-Technical Complex (MTC) at the Dzelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (DLNP JINR), by comparing the spatial dose distributions obtained under a computer simulation of proton irradiation and the actually measured ones under the experiment.

  7. 21 CFR 821.20 - Devices subject to tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.20 Devices subject to tracking. (a) A manufacturer of any class II or class III device that fits within one of the three criteria... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Devices subject to tracking. 821.20 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 821.20 - Devices subject to tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.20 Devices subject to tracking. (a) A manufacturer of any class II or class III device that fits within one of the three criteria... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Devices subject to tracking. 821.20 Section...

  9. 21 CFR 821.20 - Devices subject to tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.20 Devices subject to tracking. (a) A manufacturer of any class II or class III device that fits within one of the three criteria... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Devices subject to tracking. 821.20 Section...

  10. The Aqualert II: An End-of-Lane Signaling Device for Swimmers Who Are Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheib, Katherine M.; Ponchillia, Paul E.

    1999-01-01

    Four athletes who are blind tested the effectiveness of an end-of-the-lane signaling device for swimmers with visual impairments. Swimmers preferred the Aqualert II over the tap stick because it gave them a better idea of the location of the wall, more advanced warning, and allowed them to be more independent. (CR)

  11. Control of immediate precursor used in the illicit manufacture of fentanyl as a schedule II controlled substance. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-06-29

    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is designating the precursor chemical, 4-anilino-N-phenethyl-4-piperidine (ANPP) as an immediate precursor for the schedule II controlled substance fentanyl under the definition set forth in 21 U.S.C. 802(23). Furthermore, DEA is finalizing the control of ANPP as a schedule II substance under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA), pursuant to the authority in 21 U.S.C. 811(e), which states that an immediate precursor may be placed in the same schedule as the controlled substance it produces, without regard to the procedures required by 21 U.S.C. 811(a) and (b) and without regard to the findings required by 21 U.S.C. 811(a) and 812(b). ANPP is the immediate chemical intermediary in the synthesis process currently used by clandestine laboratory operators for the illicit manufacture of the schedule II controlled substance fentanyl. In 2005 and 2006, the distribution of illicitly manufactured fentanyl caused an unprecedented outbreak of hundreds of fentanyl-related overdoses in the United States. DEA believes that the control of ANPP as a schedule II controlled substance is necessary to prevent its diversion as an immediate chemical intermediary for the illicit production of fentanyl.

  12. Report on the CMU-Westinghouse Printed Wiring Board Inspection Device: PWBIS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibadeau, Robert

    1987-05-01

    There are over a dozen commercially available automatic visual inspection devices for quality control on multilayer printed wiring boards (PWBs) and printed wiring phototools. Among the many early prototypes built for commercial evaluation was the PWBIS II unit built in our laboratory with sponsorship of the Robotics Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The design was done in collaboration with Dr. Mark Friedman, with engineering support from Drew Anderson, Robert Berger, and Dan Nydick of the Robotics Institute. This report summarizes the operation and methods employed in that device. The focus is on measurement embodied in the device itself and on the problem of the evaluating a PWB inspection station's performance. In previous papers we alluded to this device and how it operated [10], but did not discuss its design and performance. This device, which we called "PWBIS II" for 'Printed Wiring Board Inspection Station II', was decommissioned by Westinghouse approximately six months ago. It has been moved back to the laboratory and is available now for research uses.

  13. IMPROVED EQUIPMENT CLEANING IN COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES (PHASE II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses EPA efforts to identify, demonstrate, and publish pollution prevention information and opportunities for equipment cleaning for the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry. It summarizes initial data collected and summarized during industry obse...

  14. IMPROVED EQUIPMENT CLEANING IN COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES (PHASE II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses EPA efforts to identify, demonstrate, and publish pollution prevention information and opportunities for equipment cleaning for the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry. It summarizes initial data collected and summarized during industry obse...

  15. Heliostat Manufacturing for Near-Term Markets: Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    This report describes a project by Science Applications International Corporation and its subcontractors Boeing/Rocketdyne and Bechtel Corp. to develop manufacturing technology for production of SAIC stretched membrane heliostats. The project consists of three phases, of which two are complete. This first phase had as its goals to identify and complete a detailed evaluation of manufacturing technology, process changes, and design enhancements to be pursued for near-term heliostat markets. In the second phase, the design of the SAIC stretched membrane heliostat was refined, manufacturing tooling for mirror facet and structural component fabrication was implemented, and four proof-of-concept/test heliostats were produced and installed in three locations. The proposed plan for Phase III calls for improvements in production tooling to enhance product quality and prepare increased production capacity. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Manufacturing Technology Program (SolMaT).

  16. Modelling of double air-bridged structured inductor implemented by a GaAs integrated passive device manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yao, Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Wei; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Li, Zhi-Ming; Li, Nian-Qiang; Wang, Cong

    2017-05-01

    In order to provide excellent performance and show the development of a complicated structure in a module and system, this paper presents a double air-bridge-structured symmetrical differential inductor based on integrated passive device technology. Corresponding to the proposed complicated structure, a new manufacturing process fabricated on a high-resistivity GaAs substrate is described in detail. Frequency-independent physical models are presented with lump elements and the results of skin effect-based measurements. Finally, some key features of the inductor are compared; good agreement between the measurements and modeled circuit fully verifies the validity of the proposed modeling approach. Meanwhile, we also present a comparison of different coil turns for inductor performance. The proposed work can provide a good solution for the design, fabrication, modeling, and practical application of radio-frequency modules and systems.

  17. Three metal-on-metal hip replacement devices from the same manufacturer--a short- to mid-term survival.

    PubMed

    Kostensalo, Inari; Junnila, Mika; Mokka, Jari; Virolainen, Petri; Vahlberg, Tero; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate short- to mid-term results of three different metal-on-metal hip devices from the same manufacturer. A total of 329 hip operations were performed in a single academic unit between 2004 and 2010 using either Birmingham hip resurfacing or Synergy--Birmingham and Synergy--R3 total hip arthroplasty. The overall survival rate at the end of the follow-up time for Birmingham hip resurfacing was 88%, for Synergy--Birmingham total hip arthroplasty 95%, and for Synergy--R3 total hip arthroplasty 81% (p = 0.036). Five revision operations were performed due to adverse reaction to metal debris. Head sizes > 50 mm had lower revision rates compared to smaller ones. Synergy--R3 had a poor survival already at short-term. The mid-term survival of Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty was inferior compared to previous studies.

  18. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  19. Mass-manufacturable polymer microfluidic device for dual fiber optical trapping.

    PubMed

    De Coster, Diane; Ottevaere, Heidi; Vervaeke, Michael; Van Erps, Jürgen; Callewaert, Manly; Wuytens, Pieter; Simpson, Stephen H; Hanna, Simon; De Malsche, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-11-30

    We present a microfluidic chip in Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) for optical trapping of particles in an 80µm wide microchannel using two counterpropagating single-mode beams. The trapping fibers are separated from the sample fluid by 70µm thick polymer walls. We calculate the optical forces that act on particles flowing in the microchannel using wave optics in combination with non-sequential ray-tracing and further mathematical processing. Our results are compared with a theoretical model and the Mie theory. We use a novel fabrication process that consists of a premilling step and ultraprecision diamond tooling for the manufacturing of the molds and double-sided hot embossing for replication, resulting in a robust microfluidic chip for optical trapping. In a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the trapping capabilities of the hot embossed chip by trapping spherical beads with a diameter of 6µm, 8µm and 10µm and use the power spectrum analysis of the trapped particle displacements to characterize the trap strength.

  20. A low-cost, manufacturable method for fabricating capillary and optical fiber interconnects for microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Daniel M; Nevill, J Tanner; Pettigrew, Kenneth I; Votaw, Gregory; Kung, Pang-Jen; Crenshaw, Hugh C

    2008-04-01

    Microfluidic chips require connections to larger macroscopic components, such as light sources, light detectors, and reagent reservoirs. In this article, we present novel methods for integrating capillaries, optical fibers, and wires with the channels of microfluidic chips. The method consists of forming planar interconnect channels in microfluidic chips and inserting capillaries, optical fibers, or wires into these channels. UV light is manually directed onto the ends of the interconnects using a microscope. UV-curable glue is then allowed to wick to the end of the capillaries, fibers, or wires, where it is cured to form rigid, liquid-tight connections. In a variant of this technique, used with light-guiding capillaries and optical fibers, the UV light is directed into the capillaries or fibers, and the UV-glue is cured by the cone of light emerging from the end of each capillary or fiber. This technique is fully self-aligned, greatly improves both the quality and the manufacturability of the interconnects, and has the potential to enable the fabrication of interconnects in a fully automated fashion. Using these methods, including a semi-automated implementation of the second technique, over 10,000 interconnects have been formed in almost 2000 microfluidic chips made of a variety of rigid materials. The resulting interconnects withstand pressures up to at least 800psi, have unswept volumes estimated to be less than 10 femtoliters, and have dead volumes defined only by the length of the capillary.

  1. Multi-functional micro electromechanical devices and method of bulk manufacturing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method of bulk manufacturing SiC sensors is disclosed and claimed. Materials other than SiC may be used as the substrate material. Sensors requiring that the SiC substrate be pierced are also disclosed and claimed. A process flow reversal is employed whereby the metallization is applied first before the recesses are etched into or through the wafer. Aluminum is deposited on the entire planar surface of the metallization. Photoresist is spun onto the substantially planar surface of the Aluminum which is subsequently masked (and developed and removed). Unwanted Aluminum is etched with aqueous TMAH and subsequently the metallization is dry etched. Photoresist is spun onto the still substantially planar surface of Aluminum and oxide and then masked (and developed and removed) leaving the unimidized photoresist behind. Next, ITO is applied over the still substantially planar surface of Aluminum, oxide and unimidized photoresist. Unimidized and exposed photoresist and ITO directly above it are removed with Acetone. Next, deep reactive ion etching attacks exposed oxide not protected by ITO. Finally, hot phosphoric acid removes the Al and ITO enabling wires to connect with the metallization. The back side of the SiC wafer may be also be etched.

  2. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  3. Electrowetting-based microfluidic operations on rapid-manufactured devices for heat pipe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Renee S.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2017-07-01

    The heat transport capacity of traditional heat pipes is limited by the capillary pressure generated in the internal wick that pumps condensate to the evaporator. Recently, the authors conceptualized a novel heat pipe architecture, wherein wick-based pumping is replaced by electrowetting (EW)-based pumping of microliter droplets in the adiabatic section. An electrowetting heat pipe (EHP) can overcome the capillary limit to heat transport capacity and enable compact, planar, gravity-insensitive, and ultralow power consumption heat pipes that transport kiloWatt heat loads over extended distances. This work develops a novel technique for rapid, scalable fabrication of EW-based devices and studies critical microfluidic operations underlying the EHP, with the objective of predicting the key performance parameters of the EHP. Devices are fabricated on a printed circuit board (PCB) substrate with mechanically-milled electrodes, and a removable polyimide dielectric film. The first set of experiments uncovers the maximum channel gap (1 mm) for reliable EW-based pumping; this parameter determines the heat transport capacity of the EHP, which scales linearly with the channel gap. The second set of experiments uncovers the maximum channel gap (375 microns) at which EW voltages can successfully split droplets. This is an important consideration which ensures EHP operability in the event of unintentional droplet merging. The third set of experiments demonstrate and study EW-induced droplet generation from an open-to-air reservoir, which mimics the interface between the condenser and adiabatic sections of the EHP. The experimental findings predict that planar, water-based EHPs with a (10 cm by 4 mm) cross section can transport 1.6 kW over extended distances (>1 m), with a thermal resistance of 0.01 K W-1.

  4. CURRENT STATUS OF INSERTION DEVICE DEVELOPMENT AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D.A.; He, P.; Kitegi, C.; Rank, J.; Rhein, C.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2011-03-28

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is currently under construction. Procurement of various insertion devices (IDs) has begun. This ring assumes a very high beam stability requirement which imposes tighter field specifications on insertion devices (IDs) compared to the rings of previous generation. The state of the art ID Magnetic Measurement Facility is being set up in order to be able to certify the stringent requirements on the magnetic field of NSLS-II IDs. The IDs in the project baseline scope include six 3.5m long damping wigglers (DWs) with 100mm period length and 15mm pole gap, two 2.0m Elliptically Polarizing Undulator (EPU) with 49mm period and 11.5mm minimum magnetic gap, two 3.0m long 20mm period and one 1.5m long 21mm period IVU, which the minimum gap of these is 5mm and 5.5mm, respectively. Recently a special device for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) beamline has been added to the collection of baseline devices. Three pole wigglers with a 28mm magnetic gap and a peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of the type of radiation which is currently produced with bending magnets at the NSLS.

  5. Method of manufacturing semiconductor having group II-group VI compounds doped with nitrogen

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Price, Kent J.; Ma, Xianda; Makhratchev, Konstantin

    2005-02-08

    A method of making a semiconductor comprises depositing a group II-group VI compound onto a substrate in the presence of nitrogen using sputtering to produce a nitrogen-doped semiconductor. This method can be used for making a photovoltaic cell using sputtering to apply a back contact layer of group II-group VI compound to a substrate in the presence of nitrogen, the back coating layer being doped with nitrogen. A semiconductor comprising a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, and a photovoltaic cell comprising a substrate on which is deposited a layer of a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, are also included.

  6. Removal of Fe(II) from the wastewater of a galvanized pipe manufacturing industry by adsorption onto bentonite clay.

    PubMed

    Tahir, S S; Rauf, Naseem

    2004-12-01

    Bentonite clay has been used for the adsorption of Fe(II) from aqueous solutions over a concentration range of 80-200 mg/l, shaking time of 1-60 min, adsorbent dosage from 0.02 to 2 g and pH of 3. The process of uptake follows both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and also the first-order kinetics. The maximum removal (>98%) was observed at pH of 3 with initial concentration of 100 mg/l and 0.5 g of bentonite. The efficiency of Fe(II) removal was also tested using wastewater from a galvanized pipe manufacturing industry. More than 90% of Fe(II) can be effectively removed from the wastewater by using 2.0 g of the bentonite. The effect of cations (i.e. zinc, manganese, lead, cadmium, nickel, cobalt, chromium and copper) on the removal of Fe(II) was studied in the concentration range of 10-500 mg/l. All the added cations reduced the adsorption of Fe(II) at high concentrations except Zn. Column studies have also been carried out using a certain concentration of wastewater. More than 99% recovery has been achieved by using 5 g of the bentonite with 3M nitric acid solution.

  7. Credibility and Confidence in Your Dental Laboratory Work-How Quality Assurance Systems Can Be Used in the Manufacturing of Individual Custom-Made Dental Devices.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Manufacturing of custom-made dental devices such as removable dentures, fixed prosthodontics and orthodontics are subject to the requirements of the Medical Devices Directive (MDD). Many dental laboratories often enhance these requirements by implementing quality assurance procedures that then provide enhanced consistency. This paper provided a personal view of some of the systems currently being used in dental laboratories to provide a quality assured product and associated issues.

  8. Advanced manufacturing rules check (MRC) for fully automated assessment of complex reticle designs: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, J. A.; Aguilar, D.; Buck, P. D.; Dawkins, D.; Gladhill, R.; Nolke, S.; Riddick, J.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced electronic design automation (EDA) tools, with their simulation, modeling, design rule checking, and optical proximity correction capabilities, have facilitated the improvement of first pass wafer yields. While the data produced by these tools may have been processed for optimal wafer manufacturing, it is possible for the same data to be far from ideal for photomask manufacturing, particularly at lithography and inspection stages, resulting in production delays and increased costs. The same EDA tools used to produce the data can be used to detect potential problems for photomask manufacturing in the data. In the previous paper, it was shown how photomask MRC is used to uncover data related problems prior to automated defect inspection. It was demonstrated how jobs which are likely to have problems at inspection could be identified and separated from those which are not. The use of photomask MRC in production was shown to reduce time lost to aborted runs and troubleshooting due to data issues. In this paper, the effectiveness of this photomask MRC program in a high volume photomask factory over the course of a year as applied to more than ten thousand jobs will be shown. Statistics on the results of the MRC runs will be presented along with the associated impact to the automated defect inspection process. Common design problems will be shown as well as their impact to mask manufacturing throughput and productivity. Finally, solutions to the most common and most severe problems will be offered and discussed.

  9. Evaluation of chondrocyte growth in the highly porous scaffolds made by fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) filled with type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hung-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Tsai, Ching-Lin

    2009-06-01

    Highly porous poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering were fabricated in this study using the fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) process and were further modified by type II collagen. The average molecular weight of PLGA decreased to about 60% of the original value after the melt-extrusion process. Type II collagen exhibited sponge-like structure and filled the macroporous FDM scaffolds. An increase of the fiber spacing resulted in an increase of the porosity. The storage modulus of FDM scaffolds with a large fiber spacing was comparable to that of the native porcine articular cartilage. Although the FDM hybrid scaffolds were swollen in various extents after 28 days of in vitro culture, the seeded chondrocytes were well distributed in the interior of the scaffolds with a large fiber spacing and neocartilage was formed around the scaffolds. The study also suggested that a low processing temperature may be required to produce PLGA precision scaffolds using FDM.

  10. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes.

  11. Treatment of Wide-Neck Basilar Tip Aneurysms Using the Web II Device

    PubMed Central

    Colla, Ruben; Cirillo, Luigi; Princiotta, Ciro; Dall’Olio, Massimo; Menetti, Federico; Vallone, Stefano; Leonardi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Endovascular treatment has assumed a major role in the management of intracranial aneurysms. Although current techniques have proven extremely effective in the embolization of a large number of intracranial aneurysms, wide-necked basilar tip aneurysms represent a subset that continues to pose technical challenges in treatment. This study reports our experience with WEB II, a new embolization device employed in four patients with this type of aneurysm. PMID:24355186

  12. Measured Infiltration and Ventilation in Manufactured Homes : Residential Construction Demonstration Project, Cycle II.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiter, Larry S.; Ecotope, Inc.

    1992-04-28

    Air infiltration is an important factor in heat loss and indoor air quality; in modern well-insulated homes, it may account for as much as half of the total heat loss. Due to the recent emphasis by home buyers and manufacturers on energy efficiency, tighter homes are being constructed. In the past, it was assumed that natural infiltration would provide adequate ventilation to maintain acceptable indoor air quality, but this is no longer the case in modern energy-efficient homes. This report summarizes the results of infiltration measurements made on two groups of manufactured homes in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area: 131 energy-efficient homes constructed under RCDP, and a control group of 29 homes not participating in energy-efficiency programs.

  13. A comparison of the heat transfer capabilities of two manufacturing methods for high heat flux water-cooled devices

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to compare the heat transfer characteristics of water-cooled copper devices manufactured via conventional drilled passage construction and via a technique whereby molten copper is cast over a network of preformed cooling tubes. Two similar test blocks were constructed; one using the drilled passage technique, the other via casting copper over Monel pipe. Each test block was mounted in a vacuum system and heated uniformly on the top surface using a swept electron beam. From the measured absorbed powers and resultant temperatures, an overall heat transfer coefficient was calculated. The maximum heat transfer coefficient calculated for the case of the drilled passage test block was 2534 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F. This corresponded to an absorbed power density of 320 w/cm/sup 2/ and resulted in a maximum recorded copper temperature of 346/sup 0/C. Corresponding figures for the cast test block were 363 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F, 91 w/cm/sup 2/, and 453/sup 0/C.

  14. Major complications associated with transcatheter atrial septal occluder implantation: a review of the medical literature and the manufacturer and user facility device experience (MAUDE) database.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Jeffrey W; Li, Jennifer S; Rhodes, John F

    2007-01-01

    To summarize major complications and outcome for patients receiving percutaneous closure of atrial septal communications. The Medline database and the United States Food and Drug Administration manufacturer and user facility device experience databases (MAUDE) were searched for reports related to complications with atrial septal occluding devices. The medical literature documenting complication rates for these devices were reviewed and summarized. The MAUDE database complication reports were compared with those reported in the medical literature using national implant estimates. The MAUDE database correlated in the type of complications most frequently encountered with each device. However, based on estimated total implant numbers, there is a higher incidence of major complications, including death. AGA devices had a 0.3% erosion/perforation rate with a higher morbidity and mortality (29%) than previously reported. NMT devices had a lower incidence of erosion/perforation rate of 0.05%. Embolization rates for the NMT devices were also lower than published European studies, possibly reflecting the US restriction of the device for closure of patent foramen ovale. Thrombus was more frequently encountered on the NMT device. Both AGA and NMT devices have been shown to be safe and effective alternatives to cardiac surgery. The MAUDE database correlated, with a very low overall complication rate, but showed a higher estimated major complication rate than the medical literature. These data demonstrate the difficulty in quantifying rare complications in the premarketing analysis and the obligation providers have to report and evaluate complications through vigilant postmarketing surveillance.

  15. Screening of Potential Landing Gear Noise Control Devices at Virginia Tech For QTD II Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Stoker, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the QTD II (Quiet Technology Demonstrator) program, aeroacoustic measurements of a 26%-scale, Boeing 777 main landing gear model were conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. The objective of these measurements was to perform risk mitigation studies on noise control devices for a flight test performed at Glasgow, Montana in 2005. The noise control devices were designed to target the primary main gear noise sources as observed in several previous tests. To accomplish this task, devices to reduce noise were built using stereo lithography for landing gear components such as the brakes, the forward cable harness, the shock strut, the door/strut gap and the lower truck. The most promising device was down selected from test results. In subsequent stages, the initial design of the selected lower truck fairing was improved to account for all the implementation constraints encountered in the full-scale airplane. The redesigned truck fairing was then retested to assess the impact of the modifications on the noise reduction potential. From extensive acoustic measurements obtained using a 63-element microphone phased array, acoustic source maps and integrated spectra were generated in order to estimate the noise reduction achievable with each device.

  16. PROGRESS ON INSERTION DEVICE RELATED ACTIVITIES AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D. A.; He, P.; Rank, J.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2010-05-23

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is now in the construction stage. A new insertion device (ID) magnetic measurement facility (MMF) is being set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory in order to satisfy the stringent requirement on the magnetic field measurement of IDs. ISO-Class7 temperature stabilized clean room is being constructed for this purpose. A state-of-the-art Hall probe bench and integrated field measurement system will be installed therein. IDs in the project baseline scope include six damping wigglers, two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), three 3.0m long in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) and one 1.5m long IVU. Three-pole wigglers with peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of bending magnet radiation at the NSLS. Future plans includes: (1) an in-vacuum magnetic measurement system, (2) use of PrFeB magnet for improved cryo undulator, (3) development of advanced optimization program for sorting and shimming of IDs, (4) development of a closed loop He gas refrigerator, (5) switchable quasi-periodic EPU. Design features of the baseline devices, IDMMF and the future plans for NSLS-II ID activities are described.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts.

  18. Electron heat transport comparison in the Large Helical Device and TJ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Dies, J.; Castejón, F.; Yamazaki, K.

    2007-10-01

    The electron heat transport in the Large Helical Device (LHD) [K. Ida, T. Shimozuma, H. Funaba et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 085003 (2003)] and TJ-II [F. Castejón, V. Tribaldos, I. García-Cortés, E. de la Luna, J. Herranz, I. Pastor, T. Estrada, and TJ-II Team, Nucl. Fusion 42, 271 (2002)] is analyzed by means of the TOTAL [K. Yamazaki and T. Amano, Nucl. Fusion 32, 4 (1992)] and PRETOR-Stellarator [J. Dies, F. Castejon, J. M. Fontdecaba, J. Fontanet, J. Izquierdo, G. Cortes, and C. Alejaldre, Proceedings of the 29th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, Montreux, 2002, Europhysics Conference Abstracts, 2004, Vol. 26B, P-5.027] plasma simulation codes and assuming a global transport model mixing GyroBohm-like drift wave model and other drift wave model with shorter wavelength. The stabilization of the GyroBohm-like model by the E ×B shear has been also taken into account. Results show how such kind of electron heat transport can simulate experimental evidence in both devices, leading to the electron internal transport barrier (eITB) formation in the LHD and to the so-called "enhanced heat confinement regimes" in TJ-II when electron density is low enough. Therefore, two sources for the anomalous electron heat transport can coexist in plasmas with eITB; however, for each device the relative importance of anomalous and neoclassical transport can be different.

  19. Design and high-volume manufacture of low-cost molded IR aspheres for personal thermal imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazny, A. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Deegan, J. P.; Bundschuh, B.; Patton, E. K.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for infrared optical elements, particularly those made of chalcogenide materials, is rapidly increasing as thermal imaging becomes affordable to the consumer. The use of these materials in conjunction with established lens manufacturing techniques presents unique challenges relative to the cost sensitive nature of this new market. We explore the process from design to manufacture, and discuss the technical challenges involved. Additionally, facets of the development process including manufacturing logistics, packaging, supply chain management, and qualification are discussed.

  20. A Disposable Microfluidic Device with a Screen Printed Electrode for Mimicking Phase II Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliadou, Rafaela; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Mehdi; Brown, Nathan J.; Welham, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS) has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human metabolism. This paper describes the development of a disposable microfluidic device with a screen-printed electrode (SPE) for monitoring phase II GSH reactions. The proposed chip has the potential to be used as a primary screening tool, thus complementing the current in vitro methods. PMID:27598162

  1. Development of superconducting contacts for the CRESST II 66-channel superconducting quantum interference device readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Majorovits, B.; Henry, S.; Kraus, H.

    2007-07-15

    The CRESST experiment is designed to search for weakly interacting massive particle dark matter with cryogenic detectors. CRESST II will use up to 33 CaWO{sub 4} crystals with a total mass of {approx}10 kg. These many detectors require a readout system based on 66-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this article we report on the development of a modular superconducting connector for the 66-channel SQUID readout circuit. We show that the technique developed reliably produces superconducting contacts.

  2. 76 FR 58840 - In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice of... display devices, including digital televisions and monitors by reason of infringement of various claims of...

  3. 76 FR 13432 - In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice of... United States after importation of certain display devices, including digital televisions and monitors by... digital televisions and monitors that infringe one or more of claims 41-44 of the `468 patent; claims 1-4...

  4. Peak radiated power measurement of the DOE Mark II container tag with integrated ST-676 sensor radio frequency identification device.

    SciTech Connect

    Jursich, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The total peak radiated power of the Department of Energy Mark II container tag was measured in the electromagnetic reverberation chamber facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The tag's radio frequency content was also evaluated for possible emissions outside the intentional transmit frequency band. No spurious emissions of any significance were found, and the radiated power conformed to the manufacturer's specifications.

  5. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  6. A Simple Paper-Based Colorimetric Device for Rapid Mercury(II) Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Fang, Xueen; Li, Hua; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of the environment by mercury(II) ions (Hg2+) poses a serious threat to human health and ecosystems. Up to now, many reported Hg2+ sensors require complex procedures, long measurement times and sophisticated instrumentation. We have developed a simple, rapid, low cost and naked-eye quantitative method for Hg2+ environmental analysis using a paper-based colorimetric device (PCD). The sample solution to which platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) have been added is dispensed to the detection zone on the PCD, where the 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) substrate has been pre-loaded. The PtNPs effect a rapid oxidization of TMB, inducing blue colorization on the PCD. However, Hg2+ in the solution rapidly interact with the PtNPs, suppressing the oxidation capacity and hence causing a decrease in blue intensity, which can be observed directly by the naked eye. Moreover, Hg2+ at concentrations as low as 0.01 uM, can be successfully monitored using a fiber optic device, which gives a digital readout proportional to the intensity of the blue color change. This paper-based colorimetric device (PCD) shows great potential for field measurement of Hg2+. PMID:27554633

  7. Latest experiences and future plans on NSLS-II insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Hidaka, Y.; Kitegi, C.; Hidas, D.; Musardo, M.; Harder, D. A.; Rank, J.; Cappadoro, P.; Fernandes, H.; Corwin, T.

    2016-07-27

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is the latest storage ring of 3 GeV energy at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The horizontal emittance of the electron beam with the currently installed six damping wigglers is 0.9 nm.rad, which could be further reduced to 0.5 nm.rad with more insertion devices (IDs). With only one RF cavity the beam current is restricted to 200 mA. Five hundred mA operation is envisaged for next year with an addition of the second cavity. Six (plus two branches) beamlines have been commissioned in the initial phase of the project. In July 2015, three NIH funded beamlines called “Advanced Beamlines for Biological Investigations with X-rays” (ABBIX) will be added for operation. This paper describes the experiences of ID development, installation, and commissioning for the NSLS-II project as well as our future plans to improve the performance of the facility in terms of source development.

  8. Development of the Second Generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Changying

    2015-01-01

    To quantitatively measure the impacts during blueberry harvesting and post-harvest handling, this study designed the second generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II) sensor with a size of 21 mm in diameter and a weight of 3.9 g, which reduced the size by 17% and the weight by 50% compared to the previous prototype. The sensor was able to measure accelerations up to 346 g at a maximum frequency of 2 KHz. Universal Serial Bus (USB) was used to directly connect the sensor with the computer, removing the interface box used previously. LabVIEW-based PC software was designed to configure the sensor, download and process the data. The sensor was calibrated using a centrifuge. The accuracy of the sensor was between −1.76 g to 2.17 g, and the precision was between 0.21 g to 0.81 g. Dynamic drop tests showed that BIRD II had smaller variance in measurements than BIRD I. In terms of size and weight, BIRD II is more similar to an average blueberry fruit than BIRD I, which leads to more accurate measurements of the impacts for blueberries. PMID:25664430

  9. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ice detection devices containing strontium-90... Generally Licensed Items § 32.61 Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to... ice detection devices containing strontium-90 for distribution to persons generally licensed under...

  10. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ice detection devices containing strontium-90... Generally Licensed Items § 32.61 Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to... ice detection devices containing strontium-90 for distribution to persons generally licensed under...

  11. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ice detection devices containing strontium-90... Generally Licensed Items § 32.61 Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to... ice detection devices containing strontium-90 for distribution to persons generally licensed under...

  12. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ice detection devices containing strontium-90... Generally Licensed Items § 32.61 Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to... ice detection devices containing strontium-90 for distribution to persons generally licensed under...

  13. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ice detection devices containing strontium-90... Generally Licensed Items § 32.61 Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to... ice detection devices containing strontium-90 for distribution to persons generally licensed under...

  14. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Methane monitoring devices and portable, battery-powered, self-contained devices used for...

  15. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Methane monitoring devices and portable, battery-powered, self-contained devices used for...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Methane monitoring devices and portable, battery-powered, self-contained devices used for...

  17. Longevity of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for cardiac resynchronization therapy in current clinical practice: an analysis according to influencing factors, device generation, and manufacturer.

    PubMed

    Landolina, Maurizio; Curnis, Antonio; Morani, Giovanni; Vado, Antonello; Ammendola, Ernesto; D'onofrio, Antonio; Stabile, Giuseppe; Crosato, Martino; Petracci, Barbara; Ceriotti, Carlo; Bontempi, Luca; Morosato, Martina; Ballari, Gian Paolo; Gasparini, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Device replacement at the time of battery depletion of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may carry a considerable risk of complications and engenders costs for healthcare systems. Therefore, ICD device longevity is extremely important both from a clinical and economic standpoint. Cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) battery longevity is shorter than ICDs. We determined the rate of replacements for battery depletion and we identified possible determinants of early depletion in a series of patients who had undergone implantation of CRT-D devices. We retrieved data on 1726 consecutive CRT-D systems implanted from January 2008 to March 2010 in nine centres. Five years after a successful CRT-D implantation procedure, 46% of devices were replaced due to battery depletion. The time to device replacement for battery depletion differed considerably among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers, with rates of batteries still in service at 5 years ranging from 52 to 88% (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were independent determinants of early depletion [hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57-2.46; P < 0.001 and HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25-2.01; P < 0.001, respectively]. The implantation of a recent-generation device (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45-0.72; P < 0.001), the battery chemistry and the CRT-D manufacturer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47-0.89; P = 0.008) were additional factors associated with replacement for battery depletion. The device longevity at 5 years was 54%. High left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were associated with early battery depletion, while recent-generation CRT-Ds displayed better longevity. Significant differences emerged among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  18. Longevity of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for cardiac resynchronization therapy in current clinical practice: an analysis according to influencing factors, device generation, and manufacturer

    PubMed Central

    Landolina, Maurizio; Curnis, Antonio; Morani, Giovanni; Vado, Antonello; Ammendola, Ernesto; D'onofrio, Antonio; Stabile, Giuseppe; Crosato, Martino; Petracci, Barbara; Ceriotti, Carlo; Bontempi, Luca; Morosato, Martina; Ballari, Gian Paolo; Gasparini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims Device replacement at the time of battery depletion of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may carry a considerable risk of complications and engenders costs for healthcare systems. Therefore, ICD device longevity is extremely important both from a clinical and economic standpoint. Cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) battery longevity is shorter than ICDs. We determined the rate of replacements for battery depletion and we identified possible determinants of early depletion in a series of patients who had undergone implantation of CRT-D devices. Methods and results We retrieved data on 1726 consecutive CRT-D systems implanted from January 2008 to March 2010 in nine centres. Five years after a successful CRT-D implantation procedure, 46% of devices were replaced due to battery depletion. The time to device replacement for battery depletion differed considerably among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers, with rates of batteries still in service at 5 years ranging from 52 to 88% (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were independent determinants of early depletion [hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57–2.46; P < 0.001 and HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25–2.01; P < 0.001, respectively]. The implantation of a recent-generation device (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45–0.72; P < 0.001), the battery chemistry and the CRT-D manufacturer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47–0.89; P = 0.008) were additional factors associated with replacement for battery depletion. Conclusion The device longevity at 5 years was 54%. High left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were associated with early battery depletion, while recent-generation CRT-Ds displayed better longevity. Significant differences emerged among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers. PMID:25976906

  19. Acute and chronic liver toxicity resulting from exposure to chlorinated naphthalenes at a cable manufacturing plant during World War II.

    PubMed

    Ward, E M; Ruder, A M; Suruda, A; Smith, A B; Fessler-Flesch, C A; Zahm, S H

    1996-08-01

    Historical records were used to reconstruct an outbreak of chlorance and acute liver toxicity due to chlorinated naphthalene exposure at a New York State plant which manufactured "Navy cables" during World War II. A cohort mortality study was conducted of the population (n = 9,028) employed at the plant from 1940 to 1944. Vital status was followed through December 31, 1985. The study found an excess of deaths from cirrhosis of the liver [observed (OBS) = 150; standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 1.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.56-2.16]; cirrhosis deaths were elevated to a similar degree in the 460 individuals who had chlorance (OBS = 8; SMR = 1.51; CI = 0.65-2.98). The SMR for "non-alcoholic cirrhosis" (OBS = 83; SMR = 1.67; CI = 1.33-2.07) was similar to the SMR for "alcoholic cirrhosis" (OBS = 59; SMR = 1.96; CI = 1.49-2.53). There was no evidence for increased alcoholism in the overall cohort based on mortality from alcohol-related causes of death other than cirrhosis (SMR for esophageal cancer = 1.01 and for deaths from alcoholism = 0.99). We conclude that the excess mortality from cirrhosis of the liver observed in this cohort is due to the chronic effect of chlorinated naphthalene exposure.

  20. HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device Pump Exchange: A Single-Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Asad F; Joseph, Susan M; Lima, Brian; Hall, Shelley A; Malyala, Rajasekhar; Rafael, Aldo E; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V; Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles

    2016-11-30

    Background Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have revolutionized the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. These devices are replaced when pump complications arise if heart transplant is not possible. We present our experience with HeartMate II (HMII (Thoratec, Plesanton, California, United States)) LVAD pump exchange. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all cases that required pump exchange due to LVAD complication from November 2011 until June 2016 at a single high-volume institution. The indications, demographics, and outcome were extracted and analyzed. Results Of 250 total patients with implanted HMII LVADs, 16 (6%) required pump exchange during the study period. The initial indications for LVAD placement in these patients were bridge to transplantation (n = 6 [37.5%]) or destination therapy (n = 10 [62.5%]). Fifteen patients (93.8%) required pump exchange due to pump thrombosis and 1 (6.2%) due to refractory driveline infection. Nine patients (56.2%) underwent repeat median sternotomy while a left subcostal approach was used in the remaining seven patients. Fifteen patients (93.7%) survived until hospital discharge. During the follow-up period (median, 155 days), 11 patients remained alive and 4 of these underwent successful cardiac transplantation. Conclusion HMII LVAD pump exchange can be safely performed for driveline infection or pump thrombosis when heart transplantation is not an option.

  1. Radiation Characteristics of the FN-II Dense Plasma Focus Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Mejía, Fermín; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Rangel-Gutiérrez, José; Villalobos-Pérez, Salvador

    2008-04-01

    The Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II) dense plasma focus device is a small machine (4.6 kJ), operating at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, in which neutrons, as well as soft and hard X rays have been studied with a number of diagnostics. Neutrons are studied with silver activation counters, and scintillator-photomultiplier detectors, while their angular distribution inside and outside the discharge chamber have been studied with CR-39 plastic track detectors. The soft X rays are studied with a multiple-pin-hole camera and PIN diodes, while the hard X-rays are observed with the scintillator-photomultiplier detectors mentioned above. When a needle is inserted on the inner electrode, a bright spot of hard x-rays can be concentrated, and used for the production of high-contrast radiography. Dosimetric measurements have been made for X-rays crossing a 300 micron aluminum window, through the axis of the machine, showing an average dose of 0.11±0.01 mGy per shot. In contrast, the average dose with a hollow cathode is 0.077±0.006 mGy per shot.

  2. Treatment of division II malocclusion in young adult with Forsus fatigue-resistant device.

    PubMed

    Krishna Nayak, U S; Goyal, Varun

    2012-01-01

    The traditional technique for correcting class II malocclusion - involving the use of class II elastics and headgear - has been problematic due to its dependence on patient compliance. Functional orthopedic treatment seeks to correct malocclusions and harmonize the shape of the dental arch and orofacial functions. Removable functional appliances are normally very large in size, have unstable fixation, cause discomfort, exert pressure on the mucosa, reduce space for the tongue, cause difficulties in deglutition and speech, and very often affect esthetic appearance. With a fixed appliance like the Forsus fatigue-resistant device (FRD), as the appliance is fixed, there is less dependence on patient compliance and the remaining growth after the pubertal growth spurt can be harbored effectively. The Forsus FRD is not as rigid as the previous fixed functional appliances and hence is comfortable for the patients. In this case report we describe a patient at the end of the growth stage who had mandibular retrognathia and was successfully treated with the Forsus FRD.

  3. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices containing byproduct material, the radiation profile of a prototype device; (v) Details of quality...) Method of sealing containment; (iv) Containment construction materials; (v) Form of contained radioactive... containing byproduct material for medical use. 32.74 Section 32.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY...

  4. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... containing byproduct material for medical use. 32.74 Section 32.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... primary containment; (iii) Method of sealing containment; (iv) Containment construction materials; (v...

  5. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... containing byproduct material for medical use. 32.74 Section 32.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Generally...) Method of sealing containment; (iv) Containment construction materials; (v) Form of contained radioactive...

  6. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... containing byproduct material for medical use. 32.74 Section 32.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... primary containment; (iii) Method of sealing containment; (iv) Containment construction materials; (v...

  7. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... containing byproduct material for medical use. 32.74 Section 32.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Generally...) Method of sealing containment; (iv) Containment construction materials; (v) Form of contained radioactive...

  8. Analysis of the US Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database for adverse events involving Amplatzer septal occluder devices and comparison with the Society of Thoracic Surgery congenital cardiac surgery database.

    PubMed

    DiBardino, Daniel J; McElhinney, Doff B; Kaza, Aditya K; Mayer, John E

    2009-06-01

    Amplatzer (AGA Medical Corporation, Plymouth, Minn) septal and vascular occluder devices have significantly altered the care of patients with congenital heart disease. The relative frequency and consequence of complications resulting from the attempted placement of such devices, however, have not been well assessed. The purpose of this study is to use large databases to assess the frequency and severity of such complications and compare them with those of surgical atrial septal defect closure. The US Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database was quarried for all adverse events for Amplatzer septal occluder devices, which were categorized and analyzed with particular emphasis on management and outcome. The Society of Thoracic Surgery database was likewise quarried for the same data regarding atrial septal defect closures over a contemporaneous time period. By using a literature-derived denominator for total Amplatzer implant numbers, the results of the 2 therapies were compared. Since July 1, 2002, 223 adverse events in patients undergoing Amplatzer atrial septal defect closure were submitted to the Food and Drug Administration, resulting in 17 deaths (7.6%) and 152 surgical rescue operations (68.2%). Society of Thoracic Surgery data demonstrated 1537 primary operations with 2 deaths (0.13%) and 6 reoperations (0.39%). By extrapolating on published estimates of Amplatzer implantation to provide an implant denominator (n = 18,333), there was no difference between overall mortality for surgical (0.13%) and device closure (0.093%, P = .649). Rescue operation for device adverse events (0.83%) was 2.1 times more likely than reoperation for surgical closure (0.39%, P = .063). Mortality per adverse event was higher for device closure (7.6%) than for surgical closure (1.2%, P = .004), and the need for surgery per adverse event was higher for device closure (68.2%) than for surgical closure (3.6%, P < .001). The mortality for

  9. Transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defects using the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II device: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Türkmen, Esma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Off-label use of different devices has been described for percutaneous closure of ventricular septal defects (VSD) because of the unacceptable rate of post-procedure heart block associated with special VSD devices. Aim To describe the early single-center clinical experience with closure of a VSD using the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II (ADO II) device in children. Material and methods Between May 2013 and June 2015, 26 patients between 13 days and 16 years of age underwent percutaneous closure of a VSD with an ADO II device at our institute. The decision to use the ADO II device was based primarily on lower risk of total atrioventricular block (TAVB) after VSD closure reported in the literature, reduction of the cost of the procedure and the need to close symptomatic VSDs in young patients. Results The location of the VSD was perimembranous in 21 patients, postsurgical residual in 2, midmuscular in 2 and apical muscular in 1. Complex procedures including newborn, combined procedures and postsurgical residual VSD were performed in 5 (19%) patients. The median duration of follow-up was 12 months. The complete VSD closure rate was 81% immediately after the procedure, 85% at 24 h, and 93% at the last follow-up. There was no device embolization. During the entire follow-up period, TAVB did not develop. Conclusions The ADO II constitutes a safe and effective therapeutic alternative for morphologically varied VSDs in all pediatric age groups. A larger range of sizes and configurations of this occluder may be required to successfully occlude a wider range of VSDs. PMID:27980548

  10. Treatment effects of a fixed intermaxillary device to correct class II malocclusions in growing patients.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Dean A; Shammaa, Imad; Martin, Chris; Razmus, Thomas; Gunel, Erdogan; Ngan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the treatment effects of Forsus™ Fatigue Resistant Device (FRD; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) in growing patients with Class II non-extraction malocclusions. A retrospective sample of 24 class II patients treated consecutively with the FRD followed by comprehensive orthodontic treatment was compared to a sample of untreated control subjects from the Bolton Brush Study who was matched in age, sex, and craniofacial morphology. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken before treatment (T1) and after removal of fixed appliances (T2). Growth changes were subtracted from the treatment changes to obtain the treatment effects of the appliance. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and a match paired t test. Significant differences were found between the treated and control groups for 12 of the 29 measured variables (Co-Gn minus Co-Apt, Wits, Is-OLp, Ii-OLp, overjet, Mi-OLp, molar relationship, overbite, Mic-ML, SNA, ANB, and Ii-ML). With 27.8 months of treatment, all patients were corrected to a class I dental arch relationship. Overjet and molar relationships were improved by an average of 4.7 and 3.1 mm, respectively. This was contributed by a 1.2 mm of restraint in forward maxillary growth, 0.7 mm of forward movement of the mandible, 1.5 mm of backward movement of the maxillary incisors, 1.3 mm forward movement of the mandibular incisors, 0.5 mm backward movement of the maxillary molars, and 1.3 mm of forward movement of the mandibular molars. The overbite was decreased by 2 mm with no significant change in the occlusal, palatal, or mandibular plane. Individual variations in response to the FRD treatment were large for most of the parameters tested. Significant differences in treatment changes between male and female subjects were found only in a few parameters measured. These results demonstrate that significant overjet and overbite corrections can be obtained with the Forsus FRD in conjunction with comprehensive orthodontic

  11. Implications of the new Food and Drug Administration draft guidance on human factors engineering for diabetes device manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Stephen B; Drucker, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the implications of the new Food and Drug Administration's draft guidance on human factors and usability engineering for the development of diabetes-related devices. Important considerations include the challenge of identifying users, when the user population is so dramatically broad, and the challenge of identifying use environments when the same can be said for use environments. Another important consideration is that diabetes-related devices, unlike many other medical devices, are used constantly as part of the user's lifestyle--adding complexity to the focus on human factors and ease of use emphasized by the draft guidance. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  12. Nonvolatile Memory Effect in Indium Gallium Arsenide-Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices Using II-VI Tunnel Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P.-Y.; Gogna, M.; Suarez, E.; Karmakar, S.; Al-Amoody, F.; Miller, B. I.; Jain, F. C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper reports the successful use of ZnSe/ZnS/ZnMgS/ZnS/ZnSe as a gate insulator stack for an InGaAs-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device, and demonstrates the threshold voltage shift required in nonvolatile memory devices using a floating gate quantum dot layer. An InGaAs-based nonvolatile memory MOS device was fabricated using a high- κ II-VI tunnel insulator stack and self-assembled GeO x -cladded Ge quantum dots as the charge storage units. A Si3N4 layer was used as the control gate insulator. Capacitance-voltage data showed that, after applying a positive voltage to the gate of a MOS device, charges were being stored in the quantum dots. This was shown by the shift in the flat-band/threshold voltage, simulating the write process of a nonvolatile memory device.

  13. Cancer mortality patterns among female and male workers employed in a cable manufacturing plant during World War II.

    PubMed

    Ward, E M; Ruder, A M; Suruda, A; Smith, A B; Halperin, W; Fessler, C A; Zahm, S H

    1994-08-01

    A cohort mortality study was conducted among 9028 (3042 women, 5986 men) workers potentially exposed to chlorinated naphthalenes (chloracnegens structurally similar to dioxins) and asbestos in the manufacture of Navy cable during World War II. Based on mortality through December 31, 1985, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for all cancers was 1.03 in women (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.9 to 1.17) and 1.18 in men (95% CI = 1.10 to 1.26). There were no significant elevations in causes of death hypothesized a prior to be associated with chlorinated naphthalene exposure (malignant neoplasms [MN] of connective tissue, liver, and lymphatic and hematopoietic organs). An excess of MN of the connective tissue was suggested for workers with over 1 year of exposure and 25 years of latency (SMR = 3.54; 95% CI = 0.97 to 9.07). Among cancer sites not hypothesized to be related a priori, three showed concordant excesses among both genders (MN of stomach; rectum; and trachea, bronchus, and lung). No significant elevations occurred in hormonally related cancers among women. Cancer mortality among 460 individuals with chloracne (431 men, 29 women) was similar to that of the entire cohort, although the chloracne subcohort showed significant excesses in two rare causes of death (MN of esophagus, SMR = 3.26; "benign and unspecified neoplasms," SMR = 4.93). Use of county referent rates decreased SMRs for stomach, rectal, and buccal cavity cancer, suggesting a role for nonoccupational risk factors. It is difficult to draw conclusions about carcinogenicity of chlorinated naphthalenes because of study limitations, most importantly, concomitant asbestos exposure and the relatively short duration of exposure to chlorinated naphthalenes among most of the cohort.

  14. Pump Thrombosis following HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation in a Patient with Aspirin and Plavix Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ghodsizad, Ali; Badiye, A; Zeriouh, M; Pae, W; Koerner, M M; Loebe, M

    2016-12-14

    Despite advances in pump technology, thromboembolic events and pump thrombosis are potentially life-threatening complications in patients with continuous flow ventricular assist devices. Here we describe a patient with pump thrombosis following LVAD HeartMate II implantation presenting with Aspirin and Plavix resistance and signs of acute hemolysis as manifested by high LDH, changing pump power, pulse index and reduced pump flows.

  15. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  16. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-09-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained.

  17. Dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes as multifunctional magnetic devices: a joint experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Castellano, María; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Pardo, Emilio; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc

    2015-03-17

    nature of these metallosupramolecular complexes. This new class of oxamato-based dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes affords an excellent synthetic and theoretical set of models for both chemical and physical fundamental studies on redox- and photo-triggered, long-distance electron exchange phenomena, which are two major topics in molecular magnetism and molecular electronics. Apart from their use as ground tests for the fundamental research on the relative importance of the spin delocalization and spin polarization mechanisms of the electron exchange interaction through extended π-conjugated aromatic ligands in polymetallic complexes, oxamato-based dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes possessing spin-containing electro- and chromophores at the metal and/or the ligand counterparts emerge as potentially active (magnetic and electronic) molecular components to build a metal-based spintronic circuit. They are thus unique examples of multifunctional magnetic complexes to get single-molecule spintronic devices by controlling and allowing the spin communication, when serving as molecular magnetic couplers and wires, or by exhibiting bistable spin behavior, when acting as molecular magnetic rectifiers and switches. Oxamato-based dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes also emerge as potential candidates for the study of coherent electron transport through single molecules, both experimentally and theoretically. The results presented herein, which are a first step in the metallosupramolecular approach to molecular spintronics, intend to attract the attention of physicists and materials scientists with a large expertice in the manipulation and measurement of single-molecule electron transport properties, as well as in the processing and addressing of molecules on different supports.

  18. A fast and flexible method for manufacturing 3D molded interconnect devices by the use of a rapid prototyping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, P.; Pscherer, C.; Rechtenwald, T.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    This paper presents experimental results of manufacturing MID-prototypes by means of SLS, laser structuring and metallization. Therefore common SLS powder (PA12) doped with laser structuring additives is used. First of all the influence of the additives on the characteristic temperatures of melting and crystallization is analyzed by means of DSC. Afterwards the sintering process is carried out and optimized by experiments. Finally the generated components are qualified regarding their density, mechanical properties and surface roughness. Especially the surface quality is important for the metallization process. Therefore surface finishing techniques are investigated.

  19. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or promethium-147 for use in aircraft, for distribution to persons generally licensed under § 31.7 of... maximum quantity of tritium or promethium-147 in each device; (2) Details of construction and design; (3) Details of the method of binding or containing the tritium or promethium-147; (4) Procedures for...

  20. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or promethium-147 for use in aircraft, for distribution to persons generally licensed under § 31.7 of... maximum quantity of tritium or promethium-147 in each device; (2) Details of construction and design; (3) Details of the method of binding or containing the tritium or promethium-147; (4) Procedures for...

  1. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... or promethium-147 for use in aircraft, for distribution to persons generally licensed under § 31.7 of... maximum quantity of tritium or promethium-147 in each device; (2) Details of construction and design; (3) Details of the method of binding or containing the tritium or promethium-147; (4) Procedures for...

  2. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or promethium-147 for use in aircraft, for distribution to persons generally licensed under § 31.7 of... maximum quantity of tritium or promethium-147 in each device; (2) Details of construction and design; (3) Details of the method of binding or containing the tritium or promethium-147; (4) Procedures for...

  3. The microwell-mesh: A novel device and protocol for the high throughput manufacturing of cartilage microtissues.

    PubMed

    Futrega, Kathryn; Palmer, James S; Kinney, Mackenzie; Lott, William B; Ungrin, Mark D; Zandstra, Peter W; Doran, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Microwell platforms are frequently described for the efficient and uniform manufacture of 3-dimensional (3D) multicellular microtissues. Multiple partial or complete medium exchanges can displace microtissues from discrete microwells, and this can result in either the loss of microtissues from culture, or microtissue amalgamation when displaced microtissues fall into common microwells. Herein we describe the first microwell platform that incorporates a mesh to retain microtissues within discrete microwells; the microwell-mesh. We show that bonding a nylon mesh with an appropriate pore size over the microwell openings allows single cells to pass through the mesh into the microwells during the seeding process, but subsequently retains assembled microtissues within discrete microwells. To demonstrate the utility of this platform, we used the microwell-mesh to manufacture hundreds of cartilage microtissues, each formed from 5 × 10(3) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). The microwell-mesh enabled reliable microtissue retention over 21-day cultures that included multiple full medium exchanges. Cartilage-like matrix formation was more rapid and homogeneous in microtissues than in conventional large diameter control cartilage pellets formed from 2 × 10(5) MSC each. The microwell-mesh platform offers an elegant mechanism to retain microtissues in microwells, and we believe that this improvement will make this platform useful in 3D culture protocols that require multiple medium exchanges, such as those that mimic specific developmental processes or complex sequential drug exposures. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective atomic-level etching using two heating procedures, infrared irradiation and ion bombardment, for next-generation semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, K.; Miyoshi, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Miura, M.; Kurihara, M.; Maeda, K.; Negishi, N.; Sonoda, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yasui, N.; Izawa, M.; Ishii, Y.; Okuma, K.; Saldana, T.; Manos, J.; Ishikawa, K.; Hori, M.

    2017-05-01

    The demand for precisely controlled etching is increasing as semiconductor device geometries continue to shrink. To fulfill this demand, cyclic atomic level/layer etching will become one of the key technologies in semiconductor device manufacturing at nanometer dimensions. This review describes recent trends in semiconductor devices and some of the latest results on cyclic atomic-level etching. In particular, it focuses on two types of cyclic etching that use different heating procedures: infrared irradiation for isotropic etching and Ar+ ion bombardment for anisotropic etching. It describes how an inductively-coupled-plasma down-flow etching apparatus with infrared lamps can be used for isotropic cyclic etching. The isotropic cyclic etching of SiN involves the formation and thermal desorption of ammonium hexafluorosilicate-based surface modified layers. This method features high selectivity with respect to SiO2, atomic-level control of the amount of SiN etching, and isotropic etched features. On the other hand, the anisotropic cyclic etching with Ar+ ion bombardment uses a microwave electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma etching apparatus. The anisotropic process for poly Si is composed of cyclic repetitions of chlorine adsorption and Ar+ ion bombardment. The anisotropic process for SiN is composed of cyclic repetitions involving an adsorption step using hydrofluorocarbon chemistry and a desorption step using Ar+ ion bombardment. Potential applications of these isotropic/anisotropic cyclic etching processes are described.

  5. Method and device for dynamic modelling of rubbery materials applied to human soft tissues. Part II: device and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, M. C.; Ciornei, F. C.; Filote, C.; Romanu, I. C.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained on an experimental device where a horizontal rubber wire is stretched by a transversal oscillating force - that is a body with an acceleration sensor attached, placed at the middle of it that oscillates freely. A nonlinear model was proposed for the experimental test rig, the differential equation of motion was offered and a series of curves were traced and compared to the experimental ones. One can conclude that the theoretical model certifies very well the behaviour of the real model. An open problem remains the manner of adopting the parameters characteristic to the dissipative element of the system.

  6. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted...

  8. Device Processing of II-VI Semiconductor Films and Quantum Well Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-07

    The objectives of this program is to develop a device processing technology necessary for proper utilization of Hg-based heterostructures and...superlattices in device applications. The specific focus or long term goal guiding the direction of the program is to develop the devices and processing ... technology required for an IR focal plane integrated with on-board signal processing electronics.

  9. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a... be used in Subcategory I-C mines. (c)(1) If electrically......

  10. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a... be used in Subcategory I-C mines. (c)(1) If electrically......

  11. Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

  12. Clinical manifestations of heart failure abate with transcatheter aortic paravalvular leak closure using Amplatzer vascular plug II and III devices.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Grzegorz; Pysz, Piotr; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Ochała, Andrzej; Peszek-Przybyła, Ewa; Roleder, Tomasz; Jasinski, Marek; Gasior, Zbigniew

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the transcatheter paravalvular leak closure (TPVLC) aptitude to reduce manifestations of heart failure caused by aortic paravalvular leak (PVL). TPVLC is a valuable alternative to reoperation. While technical feasibility of the method is well established, data on long-term clinical outcome are less abundant. We launched a prospective registry of patients with clinically significant aortic PVL. They were scheduled for TPVLC with Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) II and III devices serving as occluders. The efficacy and safety were monitored at 6-month follow-up exam. The occluder deployment reached a success rate of nearly 90%. Following the procedure, we recorded significant improvement both in terms of patient functional capacity and echocardiographic determinants of left ventricular performance. Simultaneously, NT-proBNP plasma concentration and hemolysis markers decreased. Only local complications related to puncture site occurred. Heart failure caused by aortic PVL can be safely and efficiently treated with TPVLC using AVP II and III devices as occluders.

  13. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part II: active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    The number and the types of electromagnetic emitters to which patients with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) are exposed to in their daily activities have proliferated over the last decade. Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is an example of wireless technology applied in many fields. The interaction between RFID emitters and AIMD is an important issue for patients, industry and regulators, because of the risks associated with such interactions. The different AIMDs refer to different standards that address the electromagnetic immunity issue in different ways. Indeed, different test setups, immunity levels and rationales are used to guarantee that AIMDs are immune to electromagnetic nonionizing radiation. In this article, the regulatory framework concerning electromagnetic compatibility between RFID systems and AIMDs is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current AIMD standards allows for the effective control of the possible risks associated with RFID technology.

  14. Isotropic and anisotropic components of neutron emissions at the FN-II and PACO dense plasma focus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Rangel, J.; Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Pouzo, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G.

    2003-03-01

    The average angular distribution of neutron emissions has been measured in the Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II) dense plasma focus device (5 kJ) by means of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. When pure deuterium is used as the filling gas, the data can be adjusted to a Gaussian function, related to anisotropic emission, superposed on a constant pedestal, related to isotropic emission. When deuterium-argon admixtures are used, the anisotropic contribution is best represented by a parabola. The same analysis is applied to previously reported results, for fewer shots, in pure deuterium from the PACO device, which is similar in size to the FN-II. In both devices the anisotropic component is smaller than the isotropic one, but with different features. In PACO the anisotropic component is concentrated on a large narrow beam around the axis, but its contribution to the total neutron yield is significantly smaller than in the FN-II, where the anisotropic component spreads over a wider range. The neutron flux per shot is monitored in both devices with calibrated silver activation detectors, at 20° and at 90° from the axis. The average values of the neutron flux at these two angles are used, along with the angular distributions obtained form the track detectors, in order to estimate the absolute neutron yield of both the isotropic and the anisotropic contributions. From examining different groups of shots, it is found that the shape of the angular distribution is important in the estimation of anisotropy, and that the value usually reported, as the ratio of neutron counts head-on and side-on, as measured by activation counters, may be misleading.

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 221 - Procedures for Approval of Rear End Marking Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590; (ii) The results of the tests performed under paragraph (i) of... description of the device including the type of material, the reflectance factor, the size of the device, and... description of the device including the type, luminance description, size of lens, manufacturer and...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 221 - Procedures for Approval of Rear End Marking Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590; (ii) The results of the tests performed under paragraph (i) of... description of the device including the type of material, the reflectance factor, the size of the device, and... description of the device including the type, luminance description, size of lens, manufacturer and...

  17. Characterization of in vivo ablation zones following percutaneous microwave ablation of the liver with two commercially available devices: are manufacturer published reference values useful?

    PubMed

    Winokur, Ronald S; Du, Jerry Y; Pua, Bradley B; Talenfeld, Adam D; Sista, Akhilesh K; Schiffman, Marc A; Trost, David W; Madoff, David C

    2014-12-01

    To analyze in vivo ablation properties of microwave ablation antennae in tumor-bearing human livers by performing retrospective analysis of ablation zones following treatment with two microwave ablation systems. Percutaneous microwave ablations performed in the liver between February 2011 and February 2013 with use of the AMICA and Certus PR ablation antennae were included. Immediate postablation computed tomography images were evaluated retrospectively for ablation length, diameter, and volume. Ablation length, diameter, and volume indices were calculated and compared between in vivo results and references provided from each device manufacturer. The two microwave antenna models were then also compared versus each other. Twenty-five ablations were performed in 20 patients with the AMICA antenna, and 11 ablations were performed in eight patients with the Certus PR antenna. The AMICA and Certus PR antennae showed significant differences in ablation length (P = .013 and P = .009), diameter (P = .001 and P = .009), and volume (P = .003 and P = .009). The AMICA ablation indices were significantly higher than the Certus PR ablation indices in length (P = .026) and volume (P = .002), but there was no significant difference in ablation diameter indices (P = .110). In vivo ablation indices of human tumors are significantly smaller than reference ex vivo ablation indices, and there are significant differences in ablation indices and sphericity between devices. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Certification of an in-house manufactured translational couch unit for total body irradiation in accordance with the medical devices act].

    PubMed

    Scherf, Christian; Härtl, Petra; Treutwein, Marius; Bogner, Ludwig

    2007-01-01

    A new translational couch unit with extended potentials of dose optimization by variable velocity and a comfortable user interface with integrated patient administration was developed at the university clinic of Regensburg. The concept and construction were elaborated in legal accordance with the in-house manufacture conditions mentioned in the German Medical Devices Act. In particular we have implemented a concept of functional safety based on a controller unit, an independent monitoring unit and self-testing procedures. Redundant safety relevant hard- and software components are continuously checked against each other. In case of any malfunction the translation movement and the linear accelerator are stopped. Gap-free continuation of the treatment will be possible after elimination of the cause of the interrupt. After the testing of the implemented functional safety features including the risk assessment and management, electrical safety, electromagnetic compatibility by accredited technical experts the translational couch system complies with the requirements of the Medical Devices Act and can be operated in terms of in-house application. The presented certification procedure can motivate other radiation departments to develop own systems for in-house usage.

  19. 75 FR 37295 - Control of Immediate Precursor Used in the Illicit Manufacture of Fentanyl as a Schedule II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... been determined by DEA's Office of Forensic Sciences that ANPP can also be produced through synthetic... fentanyl, rather than from fentanyl diverted from legal pharmaceutical manufacturers. Forensic testing of.... The forensic data suggests that most of these fentanyl-related deaths are from fentanyl illicitly...

  20. 75 FR 17093 - Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... powered device used to apply an electrical current to electrodes on a patient's skin to relieve pain. This...- counter use and used to apply an electrical current to electrodes on a patient's skin to relieve pain... relief is an electrically powered device that is used to apply an electrical current to electrodes on...

  1. Comparative studies of hemoperfusion devices. II. Pressure drop and flow uniformity tests.

    PubMed

    Cooney, D O; Infantolino, W; Kane, R

    1979-01-01

    One resin-based hemoperfusion device and three charcoal-based hemoperfusion devices were tested to determine their pressure drop and flow uniformity characteristics. Measurements were made on pressure drop versus flow rate using distilled water and on pressure drop versus time using bovine blood. Effluent concentration curves obtained after the step-change introduction of a high molecular weight dye solution to each unit were used to determine the priming volumes of the devices and were interpreted to yield information regarding the uniformities of flow in each device. The pressure drop and priming volume values for the resin-based device were significantly higher than the corresponding values for the charcoal-based units.

  2. Detecting Changes Following the Provision of Assistive Devices: Utility of the WHO-DAS II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a non-disease-specific International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health-based disability assessment instrument developed to measure activity limitations and restrictions to participation. The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate WHO-DAS II…

  3. Detecting Changes Following the Provision of Assistive Devices: Utility of the WHO-DAS II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a non-disease-specific International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health-based disability assessment instrument developed to measure activity limitations and restrictions to participation. The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate WHO-DAS II…

  4. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VIII. Device utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.T.

    1982-02-26

    This report describes the activities conducted during the Preliminary Design Period for the Device Utilities Systems. All GAI preliminary specifications, drawings, and reports (listed in Section 4.0) have been transmitted to ORNL for review and approval. Device Utility Systems Descriptions are also presented in Section 4.0. The GAI Device Enclosure Gamma Radiation Analysis is presented in Appendix B. Pending design criteria revisions are described in Section 6.0. A type B Change Notice Request (CNR) has been transmitted to GAI. The Type B CNR authorizes cost and schedule assessment for each revision identified. Formal Proposed Design Changes (PDC's) will be provided to ORNL when this data is available.

  5. Challenges and Recent Developments in Hearing Aids: Part II. Feedback and Occlusion Effect Reduction Strategies, Laser Shell Manufacturing Processes, and Other Signal Processing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on the challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Feedback and the occlusion effect pose great challenges in hearing aid design and usage. Yet, conventional solutions to feedback and the occlusion effect often create a dilemma: the solution to one often leads to the other. This review discusses the advanced signal processing strategies to reduce feedback and some new approaches to reduce the occlusion effect. Specifically, the causes of three types of feedback (acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic) are discussed. The strategies currently used to reduce acoustic feedback (i.e., adaptive feedback reduction algorithms using adaptive gain reduction, notch filtering, and phase cancellation strategies) and the design of new receivers that are built to reduce mechanical and electromagnetic feedback are explained. In addition, various new strategies (i.e., redesigned sound delivery devices and receiver-in-the-ear-canal hearing aid configuration) to reduce the occlusion effect are reviewed. Many manufacturers have recently adopted laser shell-manufacturing technologies to overcome problems associated with manufacturing custom hearing aid shells. The mechanisms of selected laser sintering and stereo lithographic apparatus and the properties of custom shells produced by these two processes are reviewed. Further, various new developments in hearing aid transducers, telecoils, channel-free amplification, open-platform programming options, rechargeable hearing aids, ear-level frequency modulated (FM) receivers, wireless Bluetooth FM systems, and wireless programming options are briefly explained and discussed. Finally, the applications of advanced hearing aid technologies to enhance other devices such as cochlear implants, hearing protectors, and cellular phones are discussed. PMID:15735871

  6. Challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Part II. Feedback and occlusion effect reduction strategies, laser shell manufacturing processes, and other signal processing technologies.

    PubMed

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on the challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Feedback and the occlusion effect pose great challenges in hearing aid design and usage. Yet, conventional solutions to feedback and the occlusion effect often create a dilemma: the solution to one often leads to the other. This review discusses the advanced signal processing strategies to reduce feedback and some new approaches to reduce the occlusion effect. Specifically, the causes of three types of feedback (acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic) are discussed. The strategies currently used to reduce acoustic feedback (i.e., adaptive feedback reduction algorithms using adaptive gain reduction, notch filtering, and phase cancellation strategies) and the design of new receivers that are built to reduce mechanical and electromagnetic feedback are explained. In addition, various new strategies (i.e., redesigned sound delivery devices and receiver-in-the-ear-canal hearing aid configuration) to reduce the occlusion effect are reviewed. Many manufacturers have recently adopted laser shell-manufacturing technologies to overcome problems associated with manufacturing custom hearing aid shells. The mechanisms of selected laser sintering and stereo lithographic apparatus and the properties of custom shells produced by these two processes are reviewed. Further, various new developments in hearing aid transducers, telecoils, channel-free amplification, open-platform programming options, rechargeable hearing aids, ear-level frequency modulated (FM) receivers, wireless Bluetooth FM systems, and wireless programming options are briefly explained and discussed. Finally, the applications of advanced hearing aid technologies to enhance other devices such as cochlear implants, hearing protectors, and cellular phones are discussed.

  7. Analysis of adverse events with use of orthodontic sequential aligners as reported in the manufacturer and user facility device experience database.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Rooban; Thennukonda, Rajagopal Athmarao

    2015-01-01

    Sequential aligners (SAs) introduced about a decade ago, changed the practice of orthodontics as we knew it but the adverse events and reactions (AER) associated with SA is not known. The Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is a reliable database that has AERs reported. The manuscript attempts to review the AER associated with SA using the MAUDE database. The authors downloaded and reviewed the SA-related AER from MAUDE for a period of 5 years. In-depth analysis of the site and nature of intraoral and extraoral AERs were performed. We attempted to calculate the probability of pathologies being directly related to SA use, using Bayes' theorem. In the study period of 5 years, 175 cases of AER registered with MAUDE database owing to use of SA. Of the 175 cases, 129 (73.71%) instances were mandatory reports filed by the manufacturer. Of all AERs, 32 (18.29%) cases had been diagnosed/suspected to have an allergic reaction, 20 (11.43%) of them with anaphylactic reaction and 4 (2.29%) of them with angioedema. Lesions involving tongue, throat, and lip such as soreness, inflammation, and hives were more commonly reported. In addition, 12 cases (6.86%) reported of nausea, 11 (6.29%) of gastrointestinal issues (stomach upset, diarrhea, and vomiting), 13 (7.43%) of neuromuscular issues (muscle cramps, spasm, and pain), 13 (7.43%) of cough, 10 (5.71%) of persistent headache, 3 (1.71%) of fever, and 12 (6.86%) of cardiac-related issues were identified. The AERs associated with SA has been described. Though the MAUDE database is not an exact, wholesome and reliable source to identify the potential AER, currently, it is the only available source of AERs associated with SA use. The nature of AERs with the use of SA and its potential pathogenesis and implications has been discussed.

  8. Advances in antimonide-based Type-II superlattices for infrared detection and imaging at center for quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, M.; Haddadi, A.; Hoang, A. M.; Huang, E. K.; Chen, G.; Bogdanov, S.; Darvish, S. R.; Callewaert, F.; McClintock, R.

    2013-07-01

    Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices (T2SLs), a system of multi-interacting quantum wells, was introduced by Nobel Laureate L. Esaki in the 1970s. Since then, this material system has drawn a lot of attention especially for infrared detection. In recent years, T2SL material system has experienced incredible improvements in material quality, device structure designs and device fabrication process which elevated the performances of T2SL-based photo-detectors to a comparable level to the state-of-the-art material systems for infrared detection such as Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT). In this paper, we will present the current status of T2SL-based photo-detectors and focal plane arrays for imaging in different infrared regions, from SWIR to VLWIR, and the future outlook of this material system.

  9. Bariatric surgery for a patient with a HeartMate II ventricular assist device for destination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Kathleen L; Allen, Carrie; Lohmann, Douglas; Severyn, Donald A; Schaub, Richard D; Kauffman, Kelly E; Hodges, Jeffrey R; Woodhall, Lorna; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Eckert, Chad E; Kormos, Robert L

    2013-03-01

    A patient with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device who had a body mass index of 52 needed gastric bypass surgery in order to qualify for a heart transplant. Unlike previous experience in which the surgery was performed at the implant hospital, the gastric bypass surgery in this case was performed at a bariatric center of excellence that was a separate facility from the implant hospital. The artificial heart program of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center worked with the bariatric center of excellence in scheduling the gastric bypass surgery using a multidisciplinary team approach at 2 hospitals to coordinate safe, high-quality patient care in a unique situation.

  10. Treatment of Class II Division 2 Malocclusion Using the Forsus Fatigue Resistance Device and 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Ezgi; Kocadereli, Ilken

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents the treatment of a 14-year-and-8-month-old boy with Class II division 2 mandibular retrusion, severe deep bite, and concave profile. The Forsus fatigue resistance device (FRD) was effective in correcting both skeletal and dental parameters. At 5-year posttreatment follow-up, the teeth were well aligned and the occlusion was stable. FRD application with appropriate treatment time can result with prominent changes in the facial profile and dentition, and the outcomes can be maintained at the long-term follow-up periods. PMID:27034855

  11. Correction of Class II, Division 2 malocclusions using a completely customized lingual appliance and the Herbst device.

    PubMed

    Vu, Julius; Pancherz, Hans; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficiency of correcting a Class II, Division 2 malocclusion using a completely customized lingual appliance. In 18 consecutively completed, Class II, Division 2 malocclusion patients, the correction of the upper incisor inclination, deep and distal bite were assessed by means of plaster casts, digital lateral cephalograms, and intraoral photographs taken at the time of debond. Furthermore, two independent calibrated examiners determined the weighted Peer Assessment Rating index (PAR Index) of the initial and end models. All Class II, Division 2 patients were treated successfully: upper incisor inclination using the palatal plane as a reference improved on average from 95.4° to 111.2°. The deep bite was reduced on average from 3.6 mm to 1.7 mm. Neutral occlusion was achieved in all patients who had undergone correction of an initially pronounced distal occlusion (4.5 mm on average). An 86.2% marked improvement was observed in the weighted PAR index score from an average of 24.7 at the beginning of treatment to 2.9 at the end of treatment, with no patient classified as "worse or no different." Class II, Division 2 malocclusions can be efficiently and reliably treated by a combination of a completely customized lingual appliance and the Herbst device.

  12. 21 CFR 803.58 - Foreign manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING Manufacturer Reporting Requirements § 803.58 Foreign manufacturers. (a) Every foreign manufacturer whose devices are distributed in the United States shall designate a...

  13. 21 CFR 803.58 - Foreign manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING Manufacturer Reporting Requirements § 803.58 Foreign manufacturers. (a) Every foreign manufacturer whose devices are distributed in the United States shall designate a...

  14. Detecting changes following the provision of assistive devices: utility of the WHO-DAS II.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Albanesi, Francesca; Gatti, Valeria; Andrich, Renzo; Leonardi, Matilde

    2010-12-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a non-disease-specific International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health-based disability assessment instrument developed to measure activity limitations and restrictions to participation. The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate WHO-DAS II responsiveness in detecting short-time changes following the provision of an Assistive Technology,which is important to define its utility in performing daily activities. Adult inpatients with a diagnosis of Disease of the Nervous System (included in Chapter VI of the ICD-10),who were prescribed an Assistive Technology to be used in the household settings, were enrolled. The WHO-DAS II was administered in individual interview at baseline and at a 2 months follow-up: in this period patients were transitioning from the hospital to home. Changes in disability profiles were detected by calculating the effect size (ES) for each WHO-DAS II domain. Ten patients with different neurological diseases were enrolled. Few longitudinal changes in disability level are reported: mild improvement is observed in the household activities (ES0.28), whereas mild worsening is reported in self-care and participation in society domains (ES – 0.27 and – 0.26,respectively). Our study shows that the WHO-DAS II is responsive in detecting domain-specific changes over a short-term period and provides preliminary encouraging evidence for the utility of its utilization in clinical settings.However, changes in setting between baseline and follow up could have an impact on the findings and interpretation of this study.

  15. Integration of autonomous systems for remote control of data acquisition and diagnostics in the TJ-II device

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, J.; Mollinedo, A.; Lopez, A.; Pacios, L.

    1997-01-01

    The data acquisition system for TJ-II will consist of a central computer, containing the data base of the device, and a set of independent systems (personal computers, embedded ones, workstations, minicomputers, PLCs, and microprocessor systems among others), controlling data collection, and automated diagnostics. Each autonomous system can be used to isolate and manage specific problems in the most efficient manner. These problems are related to data acquisition, hard ({mu}s{endash}ms) real time requirements, soft (ms{endash}s) real time requirements, remote control of diagnostics, etc. In the operation of TJ-II, the programming of systems will be carried out from the central computer. Coordination and synchronization will be performed by linking systems to local area networks. Several Ethernet segments and FDDI rings will be used for these purposes. Programmable logic controller devices (PLCs) used for diagnostic low level control will be linked among them through a fast serial link, the RS485 Profibus standard. One VME crate, running on the OS-9 real time operating system, will be assigned as a gateway, so as to connect the PLCs based systems with an Ethernet segment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Electrodeposited doped II-VI semiconductor films and devices incorporating such films

    SciTech Connect

    Ondris, M.; Picher, M.A.; Brownfield, R.E.

    1990-03-20

    This patent describes a photovoltaic device. It comprises: a first thin film of a compound semiconductor of a first conductivity type including tellurium and a metal selected from Group IIB of the Periodic Table of Elements and containing as a dopant impurity in a concentration not exceeding 10{sup 20} atoms per cubic centimeter a metal selected from Group IB, a second semiconductor thin film in contact with the first semiconductor thin film and having a second conductivity type opposite that of the first conductivity type and electrical contacts to each of the first and second semiconductor thin films. Also described is the device wherein the first thin film is p-type cadmium telluride.

  17. In vivo accuracy of three electronic root canal length measurement devices: Dentaport ZX, Raypex 5 and ProPex II.

    PubMed

    Somma, F; Castagnola, R; Lajolo, C; Paternò Holtzman, L; Marigo, L

    2012-06-01

    To compare in vivo three different electronic root canal length measurement devices: Dentaport ZX, Raypex 5 and ProPex II. Thirty single-rooted permanent teeth scheduled for extraction because of periodontal disease were selected from 10 adult patients (ranging from 45 to 67 years) and divided into three groups of 10 teeth. Before the extraction, an access cavity was prepared and the crown was adjusted to establish a stable reference point for all measurements. The working length in Group 1 was determined using the Dentaport ZX apex locator. A K-file with the largest diameter that could reach the last green bar on the screen was stabilized in the canal using a dual-curable flow resin composite. The same procedure was used for the Raypex 5 (the file reached the last yellow bar) and Propex II (0.0 orange bar) apex locators. The teeth were then extracted and cleared. The distance between the tip of the file and the major foramen was then calculated for each tooth using digital photography according to Axiovision AC software (Carl Zeiss). Positive values were assigned when the file tip passed beyond the major foramen, negative values when the tip was short of the foramen and zero value when the file tip and the foramen coincided. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test (P ≤ 0.05).   Dentaport ZX, Raypex 5 and ProPex ΙΙ produced, respectively, 6, 2 and 4 out of 10 correct measurements, 0, 6 and 5 long measurements and 4, 2, and 1 short measurements. The differences between the three electronic root canal length measurement devices were not significant (P = 0.507). Under the in vivo conditions of this study, the three electronic root canal length measurement devices were not significantly different in terms of locating the major foramen. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  18. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle. Phase II - title 1 report. Volume I. Device summary

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, D.W.

    1982-02-01

    This document presents a summary of the EBT-P Preliminary Design (Title I) effort. The work was performed, under the direction of ORNL, for the Department of Energy by MDAC-St. Louis. Major subcontractors assisting MDAC included General Dynamics for the magnet system, Gilbert Associates for the device utilities and facility architecture and engineering, and Lockheed - Oak Ridge for engineering support services. The Title I period of performance was from 1 October 1980 to 1 March 1982.

  19. Static and Dynamics of a Pump Impeller with a Balancing Device Part II: Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martsinkovsky, V. A.; Zhulyov, A.; Kundera, C.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical study of the system comprising an impeller and a balancing device. It deals with the dynamic analysis of the system, i.e., the axial vibrations of the impeller, and the system stability. The dynamic analysis took into account linearized hydrodynamic forces and moments generated in the longitudinal clearances of the seals of the impeller. The theoretical analysis was supplemented with a numerical example with characteristics determined for a real single-stage centrifugal pump

  20. Advanced Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    manufacturing will enable the mass customization of products and create new market opportunities in the commercial sector. Flexible manufacturing ...the mass customization of products and create new market opportunities in the commercial sector. One of the most promising flexible manufacturing ... manufacturing , increase efficiency and productivity. Research in leading edge technologies continues to promise exciting new manufacturing methods

  1. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  2. High fidelity computational simulation of thrombus formation in Thoratec HeartMate II continuous flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Yang, Fang; Wu, Jingchun; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F

    2016-12-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) provide a life-saving therapy for severe heart failure. However, in recent years, the incidence of device-related thrombosis (resulting in stroke, device-exchange surgery or premature death) has been increasing dramatically, which has alarmed both the medical community and the FDA. The objective of this study was to gain improved understanding of the initiation and progression of thrombosis in one of the most commonly used cfVADs, the Thoratec HeartMate II. A computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) was performed using our recently updated mathematical model of thrombosis. The patterns of deposition predicted by simulation agreed well with clinical observations. Furthermore, thrombus accumulation was found to increase with decreased flow rate, and can be completely suppressed by the application of anticoagulants and/or improvement of surface chemistry. To our knowledge, this is the first simulation to explicitly model the processes of platelet deposition and thrombus growth in a continuous flow blood pump and thereby replicate patterns of deposition observed clinically. The use of this simulation tool over a range of hemodynamic, hematological, and anticoagulation conditions could assist physicians to personalize clinical management to mitigate the risk of thrombosis. It may also contribute to the design of future VADs that are less thrombogenic.

  3. High fidelity computational simulation of thrombus formation in Thoratec HeartMate II continuous flow ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Yang, Fang; Wu, Jingchun; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) provide a life-saving therapy for severe heart failure. However, in recent years, the incidence of device-related thrombosis (resulting in stroke, device-exchange surgery or premature death) has been increasing dramatically, which has alarmed both the medical community and the FDA. The objective of this study was to gain improved understanding of the initiation and progression of thrombosis in one of the most commonly used cfVADs, the Thoratec HeartMate II. A computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) was performed using our recently updated mathematical model of thrombosis. The patterns of deposition predicted by simulation agreed well with clinical observations. Furthermore, thrombus accumulation was found to increase with decreased flow rate, and can be completely suppressed by the application of anticoagulants and/or improvement of surface chemistry. To our knowledge, this is the first simulation to explicitly model the processes of platelet deposition and thrombus growth in a continuous flow blood pump and thereby replicate patterns of deposition observed clinically. The use of this simulation tool over a range of hemodynamic, hematological, and anticoagulation conditions could assist physicians to personalize clinical management to mitigate the risk of thrombosis. It may also contribute to the design of future VADs that are less thrombogenic. PMID:27905492

  4. The PediPump: development status of a new pediatric ventricular assist device: update II.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Brian W; Dudzinski, David T; Gu, Lei; Mielke, Nicole; Noecker, Angela M; Kopcak, Michael W; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Cingoz, Faruk; Ootaki, Yoshio; Smith, William A

    2006-01-01

    The PediPump is a new ventricular assist device with a hydraulic output range designed for children from newborn infants to adolescents. The design is based on a mixed-flow rotary pump; the rotating assembly consists of a front impeller, front and rear radial magnetic bearings, and a central motor magnet. Two different implantable pumps were designed initially: an intravascular pump measuring 7 x 75 mm and an extravascular pump measuring 14 x 85 mm. Current prototypes are substantially smaller: The current intravascular version measures 4.5 x 55 mm, whereas the current extravascular version measures 11 x 70 mm. Both devices provide pressure and flows capable of supporting adults, far exceeding the initially defined physiologic requirements for children weighing 2 to 25 kg. This basic pump design may be used in acute or chronic clinical settings to provide right ventricular, left ventricular, or biventricular support. There are three objectives for the PediPump development program: 1) determination of basic engineering requirements for hardware and control logic including design analysis for system sizing, evaluation of control concepts, and bench testing of prototypes; 2) performance of preclinical anatomic fitting studies using CT-based 3D modeling; and 3) animal studies to provide characterization and reliability testing of the device.

  5. Electro-nanomechanically wavelength-tunable integrated-optical Bragg reflectors Part II: Stable device operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabathuler, W.; Lukosz, W.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate stable operation of electro-nanomechanically wavelength-tunable integrated-optical (IO) Bragg reflectors. We eliminated the wavelength drift of these IO devices reported in a previous paper I [Optics Comm. 135 (1997) 385] by surface treatment (hydrophobization) of the waveguides and of the micromachined membranes. The membranes are spanned as `effective-refractive-index-shifting elements' E over surface relief gratings on the planar or rib waveguides. Electrostatic forces cause elastic deflections of an element E and, consequently, changes in the width of a sub-wavelength-wide air gap between the element E and the waveguide. Thus, the effective-refractive-index changes required for device operation are induced. As the cause of the drift effect, we identified the small but finite ionic electric conductivity of the nanometer thick adsorbed water film on the surfaces of the element E and of the waveguide enclosing the air gap. The IO nanomechanical devices with response times of μs to ms are fabricated using silicon technology. Their achieved stability is a precondition for potential applications, for example, as wavelength-tunable filters in optical networks.

  6. Diagnostic neutral beam injector and associated diagnostic systems for the TJ-II stellarator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Balbín, R.; López-Fraguas, A.; García, A.; Carmona, J. M.; Sánchez, J.; Ivanov, A. A.

    2004-10-01

    A diagnostic neutral beam injector, based on the DINA-5F injector, is under development for the highly flexible TJ-II stellarator. The principal goals are to obtain spatially resolved charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy and neutral particle analysis measurements along the plasma minor radius and to stimulate opportunities for new physics studies. We first summarize relevant TJ-II characteristics and the considerations addressed when defining this compact system, for instance, the steps taken to minimize the impact of ferromagnetic shielding on magnetic configurations. We then outline the main aspects of the system and associated diagnostics. In particular, we highlight a bidirectional fiber-optic based multichannel spectrometer for obtaining Doppler measurements with high spatial resolution.

  7. M-M-R(®)II manufactured using recombinant human albumin (rHA) and M-M-R(®)II manufactured using human serum albumin (HSA) exhibit similar safety and immunogenicity profiles when administered as a 2-dose regimen to healthy children.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Richard T; Reisinger, Keith S; Hartzel, Jonathan; Malacaman, Edgardo; Senders, Shelly D; Giacoletti, Katherine E D; Shaw, Eric; Kuter, Barbara J; Schödel, Florian; Musey, Luwy K

    2015-04-27

    Prior to 2006, M-M-R(®)II (measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine live) was manufactured using human serum albumin (HSA) and each dose of the vaccine contained a relatively small amount (≤0.3mg) of HSA. Because of specific regulatory requirements and limited suppliers of HSA acceptable for human use, there was a need to replace HSA with recombinant human albumin (rHA) to mitigate any potential risk to the availability of M-M-R(®)II. Two different formulations of M-M-R(®)II manufactured using either rHA or HSA were clinically evaluated for safety and immunogenicity when administered as a 2-dose regimen to healthy children 12-18 months and 3-4 years of age. Adverse events, including those indicative of a possible hypersensitivity reaction, were collected for 42 days after each dose. Antibodies to measles, mumps, and rubella were measured before and approximately 6 weeks after dose 1. Antibodies to rHA were measured before and approximately 6 weeks after dose 1 and dose 2. Antibody seroconversion rates to measles, mumps, and rubella were 97.0%, 99.5%, and 99.7%, respectively, for recipients of M-M-R(®)II with rHA and 97.2%, 97.9%, and 99.6%, respectively, for recipients of M-M-R(®)II with HSA, and geometric mean titers to all 3 vaccine viral antigens were comparable between the 2 vaccination groups. The proportions of subjects who reported adverse events, including those suggestive of hypersensitivity reactions, after each dose of study vaccine were comparable between the 2 vaccination groups. No subject had detectable antibodies to rHA immediately prior to or following receipt of either the first or second dose of study vaccine. Given the comparable immunogenicity and safety profiles of both formulations, rHA is an acceptable replacement for HSA in the manufacture of M-M-R(®)II.

  8. Repair of pectus excavatum during HeartMate II left ventricular assist device placement.

    PubMed

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Massey, Howard Todd

    2016-01-01

    Pectus excavatum deformity often remains clinically asymptomatic even in cases of a severely diminished thoracic volume and frequently remains uncorrected. In the patient population that requires left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement, a diminished thoracic volume can be problematic and lead to significant challenges in pump and outflow cannula positioning. Here we present a case of pectus excavatum correction during LVAD placement to show that this deformity can be successfully addressed with minimal, if any, additional operative risk at the time of LVAD implant.

  9. The Intrauterine Device in Women with Diabetes Mellitus Type I and II: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goldstuck, Norman D.; Steyn, Petrus S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Women with diabetes mellitus type I and type II need effective contraception for personal and medical reasons. Long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods are among the most efficient and cost-effective methods. Study Design. We searched the Popline, PubMed, and clinicaltrials.gov databases from 1961 to March 2013 for studies on the efficacy of the IUD in diabetic women and the possible changes it may produce in laboratory parameters. Studies of at least 30 subjects with DM1 or DM2 who were studied for 6 to 12 months depending on the method of analysis were eligible. Results. The search produced seven articles which gave event rate efficacy evaluable results and three which evaluated the effect of the IUD on laboratory parameters. One of the earlier efficacy studies showed an abnormally high pregnancy rate which sparked a controversy which is discussed in the Introduction section. The remaining 6 studies produced acceptable pregnancy rates. The three laboratory studies showed that the copper and levonorgestrel releasing IUD/IUS do not affect the diabetic state in any way. Conclusions. The copper bearing and levonorgestrel releasing IUDs are safe and effective in women with diabetes type I and diabetes type II although the evidence in the latter is limited. PMID:24396605

  10. [Historical study of moth repellent, "Fujisawa Camphor" (6) - manufacturing and selling of "Fujisawa Camphor" during World War II.].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akira

    2005-01-01

    During World War II, the amount of camphor production did not decrease, since it was used for munitions. At that time, camphor was not use for moth repellents, are not a life supporting necessity. The factory that took charge of camphor production was busy producing medicine for military use. Due to the war, an abnormal situation in the factory arose when the procurement department requested supplementation because of reinforcement of a lack of materials. Additionally, in the home, the use of moth repellent for clothing was not a concern. Of importance where was ensuring sufficient food to survive. The supply of "Fujisawa Camphor" for home use started in the post-war days, 1947.

  11. Human-centered design (HCD) of a fault-finding application for mobile devices and its impact on the reduction of time in fault diagnosis in the manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Annette; Termer, Anatoli

    2017-03-01

    The present article describes the design process of a fault-finding application for mobile devices, which was built to support workers' performance by guiding them through a systematic strategy to stay focused during a fault-finding process. In collaboration with a project partner in the manufacturing industry, a fault diagnosis application was conceptualized based on a human-centered design approach (ISO 9241-210:2010). A field study with 42 maintenance workers was conducted for the purpose of evaluating the performance enhancement of fault finding in three different scenarios as well as for assessing the workers' acceptance of the technology. Workers using the mobile device application were twice as fast at fault finding as the control group without the application and perceived the application as very useful. The results indicate a vast potential of the mobile application for fault diagnosis in contemporary manufacturing systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease in a patient with left ventricular assist device (Heart Mate II).

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Maddalena; Del Bravo, Paola; Rigo, Fabio; Azzini, Anna Maria; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Concia, Ercole

    2015-09-01

    Although disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, especially HIV-infected patients in the last stage of the disease (AIDS), this condition is still rare in immunocompetent subjects. We report the case of a Caucasian man who received a left ventricular assist device two years before as a bridge to heart transplantation, that began to present signs and symptoms of mycobacterial infection. The diagnostic work-up we performed showed the presence of Mycobacterium intracellulare in lungs and both peripherical and bone marrow blood. Although evaluated, we found no abnormalities in the patient's immune system that can be related to mycobacterial infection. The beginning of a specific therapy made the patient slowly improve and further nuclear medicine assay (PET-TC) showed a good reduction in radio-labelled drug captation.

  14. Manufacturing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that…

  15. Manufacturing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that…

  16. Manufacturers' support policies.

    PubMed

    1992-09-01

    Choosing an effective plan for supporting a medical device is critical to its safe use, cost-effectiveness, and longevity. Hospitals can choose from a variety of support providers, including manufacturers, third-party service vendors, or hospital clinical engineering (CE) departments. However, if the hospital plans to use a third-party service vendor or its own CE department to provide support, the manufacturer's cooperation or assistance will still be needed to implement the support plan effectively. Over the years, ECRI has received many comments from hospitals about the way in which manufacturers respond to their equipment support needs. We have learned that some manufacturers are not willing to assist third-party service vendors or in-house service programs or do not always deliver the support they promise. Also, hospitals do not always consider their support needs before purchase, when they have the most leverage to negotiate flexible support arrangements. To help foster better equipment support and customer satisfaction, we polled manufacturers that have participated in recent Health Devices Evaluations to obtain detailed information about their policies toward manufacturers' contract, third-party, and in-house support. Ready access to this information will help hospitals evaluate whether manufacturers' support policies will meet their needs, and it will allow them to minimize problems by working with the manufacturer to negotiate optimal support arrangements during the purchase process. In this article, we briefly discuss the factors to consider when evaluating support alternatives and manufacturers' support policies. We also present the questions posed to each manufacturer on our Manufacturers' Support Policies Questionnaire, along with a summary of the responses that we received for each question.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device during comprehensive Class II correction in growing patients

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Giorgio; Alvetro, Lisa; Defraia, Efisio; Ghislanzoni, Luis Tomas Huanc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device (Forsus) during comprehensive correction of Class II malocclusion in growing patients. Methods Fifty-four patients (mean age, 12.5 ± 1.2 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion were consecutively treated with fixed app-liances in combination with Forsus. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed at the beginning of the fixed treatment (T1), Forsus insertion (T2), its removal (T3), and end of the comprehensive therapy (T4). Statistical comparisons were carried out by repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). Results The overall therapeutic effects were mainly dentoalveolar and occurred mostly during the active treatment with Forsus (T2-T3, mean duration = 0.5 ± 0.1 years). The overjet and overbite decreased significantly (-3.5 and -1.5 mm, respectively) and the molar relationship improved by 4.3 mm. These changes were associated with significant retroclination of the maxillary incisors (-3.1°), proclination and intrusion of the mandibular incisors (+5.0° and -1.5 mm, respectively), and mesialization of the mandibular molars (+2.0 mm). Conclusions Forsus had mainly dentoalveolar effects and contributed largely to the overall therapeutic outcome. PMID:24892027

  18. Active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device during comprehensive Class II correction in growing patients.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Giorgio; Alvetro, Lisa; Defraia, Efisio; Ghislanzoni, Luis Tomas Huanc; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device (Forsus) during comprehensive correction of Class II malocclusion in growing patients. Fifty-four patients (mean age, 12.5 ± 1.2 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion were consecutively treated with fixed app-liances in combination with Forsus. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed at the beginning of the fixed treatment (T1), Forsus insertion (T2), its removal (T3), and end of the comprehensive therapy (T4). Statistical comparisons were carried out by repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). The overall therapeutic effects were mainly dentoalveolar and occurred mostly during the active treatment with Forsus (T2-T3, mean duration = 0.5 ± 0.1 years). The overjet and overbite decreased significantly (-3.5 and -1.5 mm, respectively) and the molar relationship improved by 4.3 mm. These changes were associated with significant retroclination of the maxillary incisors (-3.1°), proclination and intrusion of the mandibular incisors (+5.0° and -1.5 mm, respectively), and mesialization of the mandibular molars (+2.0 mm). Forsus had mainly dentoalveolar effects and contributed largely to the overall therapeutic outcome.

  19. First experience of percutaneous radio-frequency ablation for atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation in a patient with HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Maury, Philippe; Delmas, Clement; Trouillet, Charlotte; Slaughter, Mark S; Lairez, Olivier; Galinier, Michel; Roncalli, Jerome; Bertrand, David; Mathevet, Lydie; Duparc, Alexandre; Salvador, Michelle; Delay, Marc; Dambrin, Camille

    2010-10-01

    We report the first case of percutaneous radio-frequency (RF) ablation procedure in a patient implanted with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device for refractory heart failure. This procedure was performed for poorly tolerated recurrent atrial arrhythmias. No harmful consequence happened during or after the procedure despite the potential electromagnetic interferences existing between the RF delivery and the functioning of the device.

  20. CONTROL OF NONLINEAR DYNAMICS BY ACTIVE AND PASSIVE METHODS FOR THE NSLS-II INSERTION DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson J.; Chubar, O.; Kitegi, C.; Tanabe, T.

    2012-05-20

    Nonlinear effects from insertion devices are potentially a limiting factor for the electron beam quality of modern ring-based light sources, i.e., the on and off-dynamical aperture, leading to reduced injection efficiency and beam lifetime. These effects can be modelled by e.g. kick maps ({approx}1/{gamma}{sup 2}) and controlled by e.g. first-order thin or thick magnetic kicks introduced by 'magic fingers,' 'L-shims,' or 'current strips'. However, due to physical or technological constraints, these corrections are typically only partial. Therefore, a precise model is needed to correctly minimize the residual nonlinear effects for the entire system. We outline a systematic method for integrated design and rapid prototyping based on evaluation of the 3D magnetic field and control of the local trajectory with RADIA, and particle tracking with Tracy-3 for validation. The optimal geometry for the compensating magnetic fields is determined from the results of these simulations using a combination of linear algebra and genetic optimization.

  1. Combined orthodontic-orthopedic treatment of an adolescent Class II Division 2 patient with extreme deepbite using the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Mehmet

    2017-09-01

    Class II Division 2 malocclusion is often characterized by severe, traumatic deepbite with lingually inclined and overerupted incisors. Combined orthodontic-orthopedic treatment of this malocclusion is a challenging issue for orthodontists. This case report describes the combined orthodontic-orthopedic treatment of an adolescent Class II Division 2 patient with an extreme deepbite and a retrognathic mandible using the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cooling for SC devices of test cryomodule for ADS Injector II at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Wang, S. Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, S. H.; Liu, Y. Y.; Guo, X. L.

    2014-01-29

    The superconducting half-wave resonance cavities connected in series with superconducting solenoids will be applied to the Injector II of the Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (ADS) to be built at the Modern Physics Institute, China. A test system has been developed for the purpose of performance test of the HWR cavities as well as validating the relevant technique for cooling the cavity and the solenoids together. It mainly comprises a cryogenic valve box (TVB), a test cryomodule (TCM1) and transfer lines. The TCM1 includes one HWR cavity, two superconducting solenoids, one cold BPM and their cooling system. The design of the TCM1 cryostat was carried out by the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), CAS. Both the cavity and the solenoids will work at 4.4 K by bath cooling. The fast cooling down for the cavity from around 100 K to 120 K is required to avoid degrading of the cavity performance. After cool down and before energization, the solenoids should be warmed up to above 10 K and re-cooled down for the purpose of degaussing. The TCM1 can not only be cooled by using the dewar-filling system, but also operated by the refrigerator system. For the purpose of reducing the heat loads to the cold mass at 4 K from room temperature, thermal radiation shields cooled by liquid nitrogen flowing in tubing were employed. This paper presents the design details of cooling circuits and thermal shields of the TCM1 as well as related calculations and analyses.

  3. Design, development, manufacture, testing, and delivery of devices for connection of solar cell panel circuitry to flat conductor cable solar cell array harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, P. A.; Waddington, D.

    1971-01-01

    The technology status and problem areas which exist for the application of flat conductor cabling to solar cell arrays are summarized. Details covering the design, connector manufacture, and prototype test results are also summarized.

  4. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT XXVIII, I--CATERPILLAR STARTING (PONEY) ENGINE (PART II), II--UNDERSTANDING MORE ABOUT STARTING DEVICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF DIESEL ENGINE STARTING ENGINES. TOPICS ARE (1) STARTING ENGINE MAGNETO (WICO), (2) MAGNETO MAINTENANCE, (3) SPARK PLUGS, (4) GENERAL DESCRIPTION (STARTING DEVICES), (5) OPERATING (STARTING DEVICES), (6) LUBRICATION (STARTING DEVICES), (7)…

  5. Specific PVMaT R and D in CdTe Product Manufacturing; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report; May 1999--September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, A.

    2001-01-22

    Just prior to the beginning of Phase II of the PVMaT project Solar Cells, Inc, (SCI) and True North Partners of Scottsdale, AZ, formed a joint venture partnership name First Solar, LLC. By the end of 1999, this event resulted in the construction of a new major manufacturing plant for photovoltaic modules, based on cadmium telluride, located in Perrysburg, a suburb of Toledo, Ohio. This plant was designed to be capable of producing PV modules at a rate of 100 MW per year within about three years. Significantly, a new semiconductor coating system, the heat of the production line, has already shown the capability of the 100 MW per year rate. These events have led to the expansion of the effort on the PVMaT project that included the former SCI team in Toledo, Ohio, a new team of engineering subcontractor, Product Search, Inc., and, later, a new laser team from First Solar, both from Scottsdale, Arizona. These three teams joined in a collaborative effort on Tasks 4: Manufacturing Line Improvements, on Task 5: Product Readiness, and on Task Environmental, Health, and Safety Issues. One Task 4 goal was to address the technical issues of the failed UL 1703 qualification testing in Phase I. Completing this goal, along with module lamination improvement done in Task 5, was instrumental in the design, fabrication, and installation of a high-throughput solar finishing line. The main components of this line, also a Task 4 project, were successfully tested in module finalization on the production line. Developing a novel, single-laser scribing system was another major accomplishment. In Task 5, the major activity was improved module lamination. Progress in Tasks 4 and 5 resulted in improved modules that were submitted for UL 1703 qualification testing. In March 2000, a new encapsulation process came under development, in which the back glass cover plate is substituted by a combination of a polymer layer as a dielectric and aluminum foil as a moisture barrier. The go al of the

  6. An Electromagnetic Sensor for the Autonomous Running of Visually Impaired and Blind Athletes (Part II: The Wearable Device)

    PubMed Central

    Pieralisi, Marco; Di Mattia, Valentina; Petrini, Valerio; De Leo, Alfredo; Manfredi, Giovanni; Russo, Paola; Scalise, Lorenzo; Cerri, Graziano

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the availability of technology developed to increase the autonomy of visually impaired athletes during sports is limited. The research proposed in this paper (Part I and Part II) focuses on the realization of an electromagnetic system that can guide a blind runner along a race track without the need for a sighted guide. In general, the system is composed of a transmitting unit (widely described in Part I) and a receiving unit, whose components and main features are described in this paper. Special attention is paid to the definition of an electromagnetic model able to faithfully represent the physical mechanisms of interaction between the two units, as well as between the receiving magnetic sensor and the body of the user wearing the device. This theoretical approach allows for an estimation of the signals to be detected, and guides the design of a suitable signal processing board. This technology has been realized, patented, and tested with a blind volunteer with successful results and this paper presents interesting suggestions for further improvements. PMID:28212348

  7. An Electromagnetic Sensor for the Autonomous Running of Visually Impaired and Blind Athletes (Part II: The Wearable Device).

    PubMed

    Pieralisi, Marco; Di Mattia, Valentina; Petrini, Valerio; De Leo, Alfredo; Manfredi, Giovanni; Russo, Paola; Scalise, Lorenzo; Cerri, Graziano

    2017-02-16

    Currently, the availability of technology developed to increase the autonomy of visually impaired athletes during sports is limited. The research proposed in this paper (Part I and Part II) focuses on the realization of an electromagnetic system that can guide a blind runner along a race track without the need for a sighted guide. In general, the system is composed of a transmitting unit (widely described in Part I) and a receiving unit, whose components and main features are described in this paper. Special attention is paid to the definition of an electromagnetic model able to faithfully represent the physical mechanisms of interaction between the two units, as well as between the receiving magnetic sensor and the body of the user wearing the device. This theoretical approach allows for an estimation of the signals to be detected, and guides the design of a suitable signal processing board. This technology has been realized, patented, and tested with a blind volunteer with successful results and this paper presents interesting suggestions for further improvements.

  8. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  9. REmote SUpervision to Decrease HospitaLization RaTe. Unified and integrated platform for data collected from devices manufactured by different companies: Design and rationale of the RESULT study.

    PubMed

    Tajstra, Mateusz; Sokal, Adam; Gwóźdź, Arkadiusz; Wilczek, Marcin; Gacek, Adam; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Gadula-Gacek, Elżbieta; Adamowicz-Czoch, Elżbieta; Chłosta-Niepiekło, Katarzyna; Milewski, Krzysztof; Rozentryt, Piotr; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Gąsior, Mariusz; Poloński, Lech

    2017-07-01

    The number of patients with heart failure implantable cardiac electronic devices (CIEDs) is growing. Hospitalization rate in this group is very high and generates enormous costs. To avoid the need for hospital treatment, optimized monitoring and follow-up is crucial. Remote monitoring (RM) has been widely put into practice in the management of CIEDs but it may be difficult due to the presence of differences in systems provided by device manufacturers and loss of gathered data in case of device reimplantation. Additionally, conclusions derived from studies about usefulness of RM in clinical practice apply to devices coming only from a single company. An integrated monitoring platform allows for more comprehensive data analysis and interpretation. Therefore, the primary objective of Remote Supervision to Decrease Hospitalization Rate (RESULT) study is to evaluate the impact of RM on the clinical status of patients with ICDs or CRT-Ds using an integrated platform. Six hundred consecutive patients with ICDs or CRT-Ds implanted will be prospectively randomized to either a traditional or RM-based follow-up model. The primary clinical endpoint will be a composite of all-cause mortality or hospitalization for cardiovascular reasons within 12 months after randomization. The primary technical endpoint will be to construct and evaluate a unified and integrated platform for the data collected from RM devices manufactured by different companies. This manuscript describes the design and methodology of the prospective, randomized trial designed to determine whether remote monitoring using an integrated platform for different companies is safe, feasible, and efficacious (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02409225). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is at the core of Sandia National Laboratories' advanced manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process. The center's capabilities in product and process development are summarized in the following disciplines: (1) mechanical - rapid prototyping, manufacturing engineering, machining and computer-aided manufacturing, measurement and calibration, and mechanical and electronic manufacturing liaison; (2) electronics - advanced packaging for microelectronics, printed circuits, and electronic fabrication; and (3) materials - ceramics, glass, thin films, vacuum technology, brazing, polymers, adhesives, composite materials, and process analysis.

  11. Surgical considerations for the explantation of the Parachute left ventricular partitioning device and the implantation of the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Yazhini; Bansal, Shelley; Rosas, Paola C; Mazzaferri, Ernest L; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2016-04-01

    Chronic heart failure is the leading cause of death in the world. With newer therapies, the burden of this disease has decreased; however, a significant number of patients remain refractive to existing therapies. Myocardial infarction often leads to ventricular remodeling and eventually contributes to heart failure. The Parachute™ (Cardiokinetix, Menlo Park, CA) is the first device designed for percutaneous ventricular restoration therapy, which reduces left ventricular volume and minimizes the risk of open surgical procedures. For the first time, we report a case of explantation of the Parachute ventricular partitioning device and transition to a HeartMate II™ left ventricular assist device and the surgical considerations for a successful outcome.

  12. Surgical considerations for the explantation of the Parachute left ventricular partitioning device and the implantation of the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shelley; Rosas, Paola C.; Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is the leading cause of death in the world. With newer therapies, the burden of this disease has decreased; however, a significant number of patients remain refractive to existing therapies. Myocardial infarction often leads to ventricular remodeling and eventually contributes to heart failure. The Parachute™ (Cardiokinetix, Menlo Park, CA) is the first device designed for percutaneous ventricular restoration therapy, which reduces left ventricular volume and minimizes the risk of open surgical procedures. For the first time, we report a case of explantation of the Parachute ventricular partitioning device and transition to a HeartMate II™ left ventricular assist device and the surgical considerations for a successful outcome. PMID:27034560

  13. Basic Mathematics II for Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Kathy

    This document offers instructional materials for a 60-hour course on math operations involving decimals, fractions, proportions, statistics, probability, measurement, geometry, and linear algebra as applied in the workplace. The course was part of a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its…

  14. Exploring Uncertainty in Economic Evaluations of Drugs and Medical Devices: Lessons from the First Review of Manufacturers' Submissions to the French National Authority for Health.

    PubMed

    Ghabri, Salah; Hamers, Françoise F; Josselin, Jean Michel

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate how uncertainty has been accounted for in the cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) submitted by manufacturers to the French National Authority for Health (HAS) and to identify recurring concerns in these submissions. We used a cross-sectional design to evaluate manufacturers' submissions from the beginning of the evaluation process in October 2013 to the end of May 2015 (n = 28). The sources of uncertainty attached to these CEAs were categorized and assessed. Relevant data were extracted independently by two assessors. Adherence to the HAS reference case was generally considered to be acceptable. Methodological uncertainty and parameter uncertainty were the sources of uncertainty that were most frequently explored by manufacturers. The quality of reporting of deterministic sensitivity analysis and probabilistic sensitivity analysis varied substantially across submissions, with a frequent lack of justification of the plausible range of parameter point estimates in 12 submissions (43 %). Structural uncertainty was explored much less frequently. Concerns related to omission of either important clinical events or relevant health states or extrapolation of the effects of the technology beyond the time horizon of the clinical trials were identified in 16 submissions (57 %). This study presented a characterization of the treatment of uncertainty for the first 28 manufacturers' submissions to the HAS. This work identified important concerns regarding the exploration of sources of uncertainty. The findings may help manufacturers to improve the quality of their submissions and may provide useful insights for extending guidelines on uncertainty analysis in CEAs submitted to the HAS.

  15. Effect of resin coating and occlusal loading on microleakage of Class II computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing fabricated ceramic restorations: a confocal microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Shuzo; Nasser, Nasser A; Pilecki, Peter; Wilson, Ron F; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Watson, Timothy F; Foxton, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of resin coating and occlusal loading on microleakage of class II computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic restorations. Molars were prepared for an mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlay and were divided into two groups: non-coated (controls); and resin-coated, in which the cavity was coated with a combination of a dentin bonding system (Clearfil Protect Bond) and a flowable resin composite (Clearfil Majesty Flow). Ceramic inlays were fabricated using the CAD/CAM technique (CEREC 3) and cemented with resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement). After 24 h of water storage, the restored teeth in each group were divided into two subgroups: unloaded or loaded with an axial force of 80 N at a rate of 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles while stored in water. After immersion in 0.25% Rhodamine B solution, the teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually at the mesial and distal boxes. Tandem scanning confocal microscopy (TSM) was used for evaluation of microleakage. The locations of the measurements were assigned to the cavity walls and floor. Loading did not have a significant effect on microleakage in either the resin-coated or non-coated group. Resin coating significantly reduced microleakage regardless of loading. The cavity floor exhibited greater microleakage compared to the cavity wall. TSM observation also revealed that microleakage at the enamel surface was minimal regardless of resin coating. In contrast, non-coated dentin showed extensive leakage, whereas resin-coated dentin showed decreased leakage. Resin coating with a combination of a dentin-bonding system and a flowable resin composite may be indicated prior to impression-taking when restoring teeth with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays in order to reduce microleakage at the tooth-resin interface.

  16. Investigation of p-side contact layers for II-VI compound semiconductor optical devices fabricated on InP substrates by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Shingo; Nomura, Ichirou; Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Kishino, Katsumi

    2015-09-01

    N-doped p-type ZnTe and ZnSeTe contact layers were investigated to evaluate which is more suitable for use in II-VI compound semiconductor optical devices on InP substrates. Contact resistances (Rc) between the contact layers and several electrode materials (Pd/Pt/Au, Pd/Au, and Au) were measured by the circular transmission line model (c-TLM) method using p-n diode samples grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The lowest Rc (6.5×10-5 Ω cm2) was obtained in the case of the ZnTe contact and Pd/Pt/Au electrode combination, which proves that the combination is suitable for obtaining low Rc. Yellow light-emitting diode devices with a ZnTe and ZnSeTe p-contact layer were fabricated by MBE to investigate the effect of different contact layers. The devices were characterized under direct current injections at room temperature. Yellow emission at around 600 nm was observed for each device. Higher emission intensity and lower slope resistance were obtained for the device with the ZnTe contact layer and Pd/Pt/Au electrode compared with other devices. These device performances are ascribed to the low Rc of the ZnTe contact and Pd/Pt/Au electrode combination.

  17. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  18. Sudden power loss in a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device due to intermittent pin contact with the battery: case report.

    PubMed

    Belway, Dean; Cleland, Mark; Zakutney, Timothy; Grenon, Jackie; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Hendry, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device technology has improved such that mechanical malfunction, particularly with newer generation continuous flow devices, is a relatively rare event. We present a case of sudden power loss in a HeartMate II caused by intermittent contact of the battery terminals after a clip was dropped with the battery inserted in it. The clip was replaced and the patient made a complete recovery. A new inspection and testing methodology, and amended approach to patient and caregiver training, designed to prevent future occurrences is described.

  19. Radiation dosimetry measurements with real time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II in Space Shuttle STS-79.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, T; Doke, T; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Hasebe, N; Kashiwagi, T; Takashima, T; Takahashi, K; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Takahashi, S; Yamanaka, H; Yamaguchi, K; Badhwar, G D

    1997-12-01

    The real-time measurement of radiation environment was made with an improved real-time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II onboard Space Shuttle STS-79 (S/MM#4: 4th Shuttle MIR Mission, at an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees and an altitude of 250-400km) for 199 h during 17-25 September, 1996. The observation of the detector covered the linear energy transfer (LET) range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The Shuttle orbital profile in this mission was equivalent to that of the currently planned Space Station, and provided an opportunity to investigate variations in count rate and dose equivalent rate depending on altitude, longitude, and latitude in detail. Particle count rate and dose equivalent rate were mapped geographically during the mission. Based on the map of count rate, an analysis was made by dividing whole region into three regions: South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region, high latitude region and other regions. The averaged absorbed dose rate during the mission was 39.3 microGy/day for a LET range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The corresponding average dose equivalent rates during the mission are estimated to be 293 microSv/day with quality factors from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-Pub. 60 and 270 microSv/day with quality factors from ICRP-Pub. 26. The effective quality factors for ICRP-Pub. 60 and 26 are 7.45 and 6.88, respectively. From the present data for particles of LET > 3.5keV/micrometer, we conclude that the average dose equivalent rate is dominated by the contribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. The dose-detector depth dependence was also investigated.

  20. Radiation dosimetry measurements with real time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II in Space Shuttle STS-79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Doke, T.; Hayashi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Hasebe, N.; Kashiwagi, T.; Takashima, T.; Takahashi, K.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The real-time measurement of radiation environment was made with an improved real-time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II onboard Space Shuttle STS-79 (S/MM#4: 4th Shuttle MIR Mission, at an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees and an altitude of 250-400km) for 199 h during 17-25 September, 1996. The observation of the detector covered the linear energy transfer (LET) range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The Shuttle orbital profile in this mission was equivalent to that of the currently planned Space Station, and provided an opportunity to investigate variations in count rate and dose equivalent rate depending on altitude, longitude, and latitude in detail. Particle count rate and dose equivalent rate were mapped geographically during the mission. Based on the map of count rate, an analysis was made by dividing whole region into three regions: South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region, high latitude region and other regions. The averaged absorbed dose rate during the mission was 39.3 microGy/day for a LET range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The corresponding average dose equivalent rates during the mission are estimated to be 293 microSv/day with quality factors from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-Pub. 60 and 270 microSv/day with quality factors from ICRP-Pub. 26. The effective quality factors for ICRP-Pub. 60 and 26 are 7.45 and 6.88, respectively. From the present data for particles of LET > 3.5keV/micrometer, we conclude that the average dose equivalent rate is dominated by the contribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. The dose-detector depth dependence was also investigated.

  1. Cable manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, P.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of flat electrical cable manufacturing, with particular reference to patented processes. The economics of manufacture based on an analysis of material and operating costs is considered for the various methods. Attention is given to the competitive advantages of the several processes and their resulting products. The historical area of flat cable manufacture is presented to give a frame of reference for the survey.

  2. Continued Development and Implementation of the Universal Network Interface Device (UNID) II, Digital Engineering Laboratory Network (DELNET) Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    OH, December 1979 (AD A080173). 8. Bytek Corporation . EPROM Programmer Manual. Manufacture’s data. Santa Clara CA, 1982. 9. Cole, Kenneth. Private...Interchange. Washington, D.C.: Electronic Industrial Association, November 1977. 20. Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation . Microprocessor Products Data...Book. Manufacturer’s data. Santa Clara, California: Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation , January 1983. 21. Specification for Message Format

  3. 76 FR 72976 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Opium tincture (9630) II Opium, powdered (9639) II Opium, granulated (9640) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to manufacture the...

  4. Manufacturer evaluations of endograft modifications.

    PubMed

    Waninger, Matthew S; Whirley, Robert G; Smith, Louis J; Wolf, Ben S

    2013-03-01

    The motivation to modify the design of a vascular device can arise from a number of sources. Clinical experience with the unmodified device could suggest new design modifications to improve device performance or clinical outcomes. Similarly, clinical success with a device often suggests modifications that could broaden the applicability of the device to enable treatment of different or more advanced disease states. As a specific example, both of these scenarios have arisen during the last decade in the evolution of endovascular grafts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, with modifications enabling the treatment of patients with shorter infrarenal necks, more angulated anatomy, and smaller access vessels. These modifications have been made by manufacturers and additionally by physicians who create branched and fenestrated devices. The experience to date with the use of fenestrated devices and the development of chimney, snorkel, and periscope techniques suggests that modifications to off-the-shelf devices may provide some clinical benefit. This experience provides additional motivation for manufacturers to develop devices to address the clinical needs not met with their current product lines. For manufacturers, the device development process includes an assessment of the new device design to determine the appropriate evaluation strategy to support the safety and effectiveness of the modified device. This report provides a high-level overview of the process generally followed by device manufacturers to evaluate a proposed device modification before market release, in accordance with local country regulations and recognized international standards such as the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) standards for endovascular grafts (ISO 25539 Part 1). Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  6. Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, James L.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high school industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in manufacturing technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to manufacturing, materials processing, personnel management, production management,…

  7. 78 FR 51210 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Chattem Chemicals, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Chattem Chemicals... manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid... Tapentadol (9780) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances...

  8. Chromatic analysis by monitoring unmodified silver nanoparticles reduction on double layer microfluidic paper-based analytical devices for selective and sensitive determination of mercury(II).

    PubMed

    Meelapsom, Rattapol; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe; Kulsing, Chadin; Shen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This study demonstrates chromatic analysis based on a simple red green blue (RGB) color model for sensitive and selective determination of mercury(II). The analysis was performed by monitoring the color change of a microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Device (µPAD). The device was fabricated by using alkyl ketene dimer (AKD)-inkjet printing and doped with unmodified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which were disintegrated when being exposed to mercury(II). The color intensity was detected by using an apparatus consisting of a digital camera and a homemade light box generating constant light intensity. A progressive increase in color intensity of the tested area on the µPAD (3.0mm) was observed with increasing mercury(II) concentration. The developed system enabled quantification of mercury(II) at low concentration with the detection limit of 0.001mgL(-1) (3 SD blank/slope of the calibration curve) and small sample volume uptake (2µL). The linearity range of the calibration curve in this technique was demonstrated from 0.05 to 7mgL(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with good precision (RSD less than 4.1%). Greater selectivity towards mercury(II) compared with potential interference ions was also observed. Furthermore, the percentage recoveries of spiked water samples were in an acceptable range which was in agreement with the values obtained from the conventional method utilizing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometer (CVAAS). The proposed technique allows a rapid, simple, sensitive and selective analysis of trace mercury(II) in water samples.

  9. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  10. Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

  11. Smart Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  12. Preliminary plans to move the special nuclear material supporting category I and II missions from TA-18 to the device assembly facility

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, William Earl; Nicholas, N. J.; Mann, P.

    2004-01-01

    In December 2002, the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) issued a Record of Decision announcing its intent to relocate safeguards Category I and II missions and associated special nuclear materials (SNM) from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 18 (TA-18) to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Cat I and II missions support nuclear criticality safety, nuclear emergency response, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. TA-18 is the sole remaining facility in the United States with the capability to perform general-purpose nuclear materials handling experiments and training. Hands-on and remote control experiments, measurements, and training with special materials and devices are conducted. The conceptual design for modifying the DAF to house these Cat I and II missions includes plans for packaging and transporting the SNM inventory associated with the missions. This paper discusses these preliminary packaging and transporting plans, including how they fit into the plans for transitioning the relevant TA- 18 missions to DAF while ensuring that mission, cost, and schedule requirements are met.

  13. Pulmonary drug delivery. Part II: The role of inhalant delivery devices and drug formulations in therapeutic effectiveness of aerosolized medications

    PubMed Central

    Labiris, N R; Dolovich, M B

    2003-01-01

    Research in the area of pulmonary drug delivery has gathered momentum in the last several years, with increased interest in using the lung as a means of delivering drugs systemically. Advances in device technology have led to the development of more efficient delivery systems capable of delivering larger doses and finer particles into the lung. As more efficient pulmonary delivery devices and sophisticated formulations become available, physicians and health professionals will have a choice of a wide variety of device and formulation combinations that will target specific cells or regions of the lung, avoid the lung's clearance mechanisms and be retained within the lung for longer periods. It is now recognized that it is not enough just to have inhalation therapy available for prescribing; physicians and other healthcare providers need a basic understanding of aerosol science, inhaled formulations, delivery devices, and bioequivalence of products to prescribe these therapies optimally. PMID:14616419

  14. Electron beam evaporation induced discoloration of reflective film on InGaN/sapphire in III-V LED TFFC device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakandan, Sivanantham; Chai, Chun Hoo; Chaw, Kam Hoe; Sae Tae, Veera

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the discoloration of indium-gallium-nitride (InGaN) on sapphire (Al2O3) substrate after processing in electron beam vacuum evaporation for mirror metal evaporation has been investigated. Discoloration can be detrimental to light output of a light emitting diode (LED) as the light extraction through discolored gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxy is impacted. The investigation shows that the discoloration caused by an interaction between few factors such as the level of organic contamination present at the edges of the substrate, contact area with holding dome of the evaporator, thickness of the film deposited and radiation intensity from the evaporation source. Reflection Spectroscopy was used to quantify reflectivity of discolored mirror metal while X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) was used to measure film thickness and time of flight - secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) was employed to measure organic contamination amounts. A residual gas analyzing (RGA) technique was established to detect potential discoloration to eliminate disruptions to manufacturing.

  15. Synthesis, molecular orbital, optical and device characterization of mononuclear mixed ligand nickel(II) complex of phthalate with N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine for photodiode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, A.; Farag, A. A. M.; Shebl, Magdy; Ammar, A. H.; Ahmed, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new synthesized mononuclear mixed ligand nickel(II) complex was characterized by various techniques. Crystalline characteristics of [Ni(Phth)(Me4en)(H2O)2]·4H2O were studied by using transmission electron microscope(TEM). Well crystalline structure corresponds to the hexagonal crystal system and identified by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were achieved. Coordination of the nickel(II) ion with the functional groups of the ligands was established from the IR spectrum. Molar conductance of the current complex in DMF (10-3 mol/L) indicated a non-electrolytic nature of the complex. Electronic spectra showed a strong band in the region 661-684 nm; MeCN (661 nm), CHCl3 (663 nm), MeOH (667 nm), Me2CO (675 nm), DMSO (682 nm) and DMF (684 nm) which can be assigned to 3A2g(F) → 3T1g(F) transition of an octahedral structure around nickel(II). Multiple peaks were easily resolved from the spectral dependence of the absorption coefficient (α) measurements and the analysis near the fundamental absorption edge showed two direct allowed transition with energy gaps of 1.18 and 2.53 eV. Dark current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics of [Ni(Phth)(Me4en)(H2O)2]·4H2O/n-Si heterojunctions were studied to extract the main important parameters of the heterojunction device. The electrical characteristics of the heterojunction device under illumination hold the suitability of the device for optoelectronic applications.

  16. Metal migration processes in homo- and heterobimetallic bismuth(III)-lead(II) porphyrin complexes: emergence of allosteric Newton's cradle-like devices.

    PubMed

    Najjari, Btissam; Le Gac, Stéphane; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Boitrel, Bernard

    2012-09-26

    Metal ion migration in a bis-strapped porphyrin ligand with overhanging carboxylate groups has been investigated in solution. Two types of homobimetallic complexes are generated with Pb(II) and Bi(III) cations, which stand on both sides of the macrocycle: (i) a dissymmetric complex with one cation bound to the porphyrin N core and the other cation hung over the N core through bonding with a carboxylate of a strap; (ii) a C(2)-symmetric complex with both cations coordinated to the N core and to the carboxylate groups of the straps. Variable-temperature NMR studies and 2D rotational Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR experiments have shown that in the former dissymmetric complexes, the two cations undergo a coupled intramolecular migration resulting in exchange of their coordination modes. Such complexes constitute active states of Newton's cradle-like devices (NCDs), with the ion migration rate depending on the lability of the metal-ligand interactions [Pb(II) faster than Bi(III) NCDs]. On the other hand, the C(2)-symmetric complexes constitute either an inactive state [with Pb(II)] or a resting state [with Bi(III)] of an NCD, since they correspond respectively to a precursor or an intermediate in the motion of the cations. The NCDs are under both allosteric and acid-base control: (i) with Pb(II), the addition of an allosteric effector such as an acetate anion to the medium allows the conversion of the symmetric form to the dissymmetric one, thus triggering the Newton's cradle-like motion of the cations; (ii) with Bi(III), a lifted state was converted to a resting one by the addition of protons and then restored by the addition of a base. As an extension to nondegenerate systems, a heterobimetallic Bi(III)-Pb(II) complex was selectively obtained, and it constitutes a frozen lifted state of a dissymmetric NCD. All of these homo- and hetero-NCDs could be successively formed by selective metal ion exchange. These unique findings open the way to novel tristable devices.

  17. Manufacturing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Obara, Clifford J.; Martin, Glen L.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, natural laminar flow (NLF) has been proven to be achievable on modern smooth airframe surfaces over a range of cruise flight conditions representative of most current business and commuter aircraft. Published waviness and boundary layer transition measurements on several modern metal and composite airframes have demonstrated the fact that achievable surface waviness is readily compatible with laminar flow requirements. Currently, the principal challenge to the manufacture of NLF-compatible surfaces is two-dimensional roughness in the form of steps and gaps at structural joints. Results of recent NASA investigations on manufacturing tolerances for NLF surfaces, including results of a flight experiment are given. Based on recent research, recommendations are given for conservative manufacturing tolerances for waviness and shaped steps.

  18. Disposable mercury-free cell-on-a-chip devices with integrated microfabricated electrodes for the determination of trace nickel(II) by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios; Raptis, Ioannis; Speliotis, Thanassis

    2008-08-01

    This work reports the fabrication of disposable three-electrode cells with integrated sputtered metal-film electrodes. The working electrode was a bismuth-film electrode (BiFE) while the reference and counter electrodes were made of Ag and Pt, respectively. The deposition of the metal layers was carried out by sputtering of the respective metals on a silicon substrate while the exact geometry of the electrodes was defined via a metal mask placed on the substrate during the deposition process. Initially, the electrodes were characterised by cyclic voltammetry. The utility of these devices was tested for the trace determination of Ni(II) by square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV) after complexation with dimethylglyoxime (DMG). The experimental variables (the presence of oxygen, the DMG concentration, the preconcentration potential, the accumulation time and the SW parameters), as well as potential interferences, were investigated. Using the selected conditions, the 3sigma limit of detection was 100 ng L(-1) for Ni(II) (for 90 s of preconcentration) and the relative standard deviation for Ni(II) was 2.3% at the 10 microg L(-1) level (n=8). Finally, the method was applied to the determination of Ni(II) in a certified river water sample.

  19. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  20. Relationship between industrial discharges and contamination of raw water resources by perfluorinated compounds: part II: Case study of a fluorotelomer polymer manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Xavier; Boiteux, Virginie; Rosin, Christophe; Munoz, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the concentrations of 10 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were measured in effluents of a fluorotelomer polymer manufacturing plant and its wastewater treatment plant. A 50-fold increase between the two effluents mass flows was observed. The water quality of two drinking water treatment plants located downstream at 15 and 25 km from the manufacturing plant was examined. An increase of the sum of PFCs was observed between the river (30 ng/L) and an alluvial well (70 ng/L), and between the raw water (9 ng/L) and the outlet of a biological treatment (97 ng/L). These results indicate a possible degradation of fluorotelomers, occurring during wastewater treatment, sediment infiltration in the alluvial aquifer, and drinking water treatment.

  1. Ex-situ manufacturing of SiC-doped MgB2 used for superconducting wire in medical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbirowo, Satrio; Imaduddin, Agung; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Yuwono, Akhmad Herman

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is a superconductor material with a relatively high critical temperature. Due to its relatively high critical temperature, this material is promising and has the potential to replace Nb3Sn for wire superconducting used in many medical devices. In this work, nanoparticle SiC-doped MgB2 superconducting material has been fabricated through an ex-situ method. The doping of nanoparticle SiC by 10 and 15 wt% was conducted to analyze its effect on specific resistivity of MgB2. The experiment was started by weighing a stoichiometric amount of MgB2 and nanoparticles SiC. Both materials were mixed and grounded for 30 minutes by using an agate mortar. The specimens were then pressed into a 6 mm diameter stainless steel tube, which was then reduced until 3 mm through a wire drawing method. X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted to confirm the phase, whereas the superconductivity of the specimens was analyzed by using resistivity measurement under cryogenic magnetic system. The results indicated that the commercial MgB2 showed a critical temperature of 37.5 K whereas the SiC doped MgB2 has critical temperature of 38.3 K.

  2. Study of Training Device Needs for Meeting Basic Officer Tactics Training Requirements. Volume I of II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammell, Thomas J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the appropriate training objectives for fire control personnel aboard nuclear submarines, to identify specific requirements for training materials to accomplish these objectives, and to provide functional descriptions of recommended training devices. A task analysis was conducted to determine the skill and…

  3. 78 FR 39340 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Amphetamine (1100) II Methylphenidate (1724) II Methadone (9250) II Methadone Intermediate (9254) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled... Methadone Intermediate (9254) the company plans to produce Methadone HCL active pharmaceutical...

  4. ISO 12189 standard for the preclinical evaluation of posterior spinal stabilization devices--II: A parametric comparative study.

    PubMed

    La Barbera, Luigi; Costa, Francesco; Villa, Tomaso

    2016-02-01

    The International Standardization Organization (ISO) 12189 standard was recently introduced to preclinically evaluate and compare the mechanical properties of posterior stabilization devices. This scenario presents some new significant steps ahead over the vertebrectomy model recommended by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F1717 standard: the modular anterior support allows for describing a closer scenario to the effective clinical use as well as to test very flexible and dynamic posterior stabilization devices. Despite these significant advantages, ISO 12189 received little attention in the literature. Anatomical parameters depending on the spinal level were compared to the published data or original measurements on biplanar stereoradiography on 13 patients. Other mechanical variables, describing the test set-up design, were considered and all parameters were investigated using a numerical parametric finite element model. Stress values were calculated by also considering their worst-case combination. The standard set-up represents quite well the anatomy of an instrumented average thoracolumbar segment. The parametric comparative analysis demonstrates a significant (even beyond +350%) maximum increase in the stress on the device, compared to the standard currently in use. The anterior support stiffness plays the most detrimental effect (maximum stress increases up to 396%). The initial precompression step has an important role in determining the final stress values achieved at peak load (up to +76%). Moreover, when combining these two contributions, an even higher stress increase may be achieved (up to 473%). Despite the other anatomical parameters playing a secondary role, their worst-case combination demonstrates that a device could potentially undergo higher stresses than those reached according to standard suggestions (maximum increase of 22.4% at L1). Any user/designer should be aware of these effects when using ISO 12189 standard for the

  5. 76 FR 77257 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Methylphenidate (1724) II Hydrocodone (9193) II The company plans to utilize this facility to manufacture small... company's primary manufacturing facility in West Deptford, New Jersey. The controlled substances manufactured in bulk at this facility will be distributed to the company's customers. Any other such applicant...

  6. 76 FR 72974 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Remifentanil (9739) II Sufentanil (9740) II The company plans to utilize this facility to manufacture small... company's primary manufacturing facility in West Deptford, New Jersey. The controlled substances manufactured in bulk at this facility will be distributed to the company's customers. Any other such applicant...

  7. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, Vernon O. (Editor); Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Topics discussed include thin-film technology, microwave transmission lines and resonators, microwave devices and circuits, infrared detectors and bolometers, and superconducting junctions. Papers are presented on possible enhancement in bolometric response using free-standing film of YBa2Cu3O(x), aging and surface instability in high-Tc superconductors, epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin films on LaAlO3 and their microwave device properties, the performance of stripline resonators using sputtered YBCO films, and a coplanar waveguide microwave filter of YBa2Cu3O7. Attention is also given to the performance characteristics of Y-Ba-Cu-O microwave superconducting detectors, high-Tc bolometer developments for planetary missions, infrared detectors from YBaCuO thin films, high-temperature superconductor junction technology, and submillimeter receiver components using superconducting tunnel junctions.

  8. 21 CFR 803.53 - If I am a manufacturer, in which circumstances must I submit a 5-day report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING Manufacturer... the same nature that involve substantially similar devices for the time period specified in...

  9. Evaluation of a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane device as a chemical surrogate for the measurements of zinc (II) bioavailability using two microalgae strains as biological references.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Erik A; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; de Gyves, Josefina

    2017-03-01

    The environmental bioavailability of zinc (II), i.e., the uptake of the element by an organism, was determined using two microalgae species, Scenedesmus acutus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and estimated using hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HF-SLM) device as the chemical surrogate. Several experimental conditions were studied including the presence of organic matter, inorganic anions and concomitant cations and pH. The results show strong positive correlation coefficients between the responses given by the HF-SLM and the microalgae species (r = 0.900 for S. acutus and r = 0.876 for P. subcapitata) in multivariate environments (changes in pH, calcium, humic and citrate concentrations). The maximum amount of zinc (II) retained by the HF-SLM (4.7 × 10(-8) mol/cm(2)) was higher than those for P. subcapitata and S. acutus (9.4 × 10(-11) mol/cm(2) and 6.2 × 10(-11) mol/cm(2), respectively). The variation in pH (pH 5.5-9) was the variable with the greatest effect on zinc internalization in all systems, increasing approximately 2.5 times for P. subcapitata and 5.5 times for S. acutus respect to pH = 5.5, while the presence of humic acids did not affect the response. The species' concentration analysis of the experimental design at pH = 5.5 indicated that the amount of internalized zinc (II) by the HF-SLM and both microalgae species is strongly dependent on the free zinc concentration (r = 0.910 for the HF-SLM, r = 0.922 for S. acutus and r = 0.954 for P. subcapitata); however, at pH = 9.0, the amount of internalized zinc (II) is strongly dependent on the sum of free zinc and labile species (r = 0.912 for the HF-SLM, r = 0.947 for S. acutus and r = 0.900 for P. subcapitata). The presence of inorganic ligands (chloride, sulfate, phosphate, carbonate, and nitrate) and metal ions (cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II), chromium (VI), lead (II) and cadmium (II)) produced different behaviors both in the chemical surrogate and the

  10. Apparel Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center teamed with the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) in 1989 on a program involving development of advanced simulation software. Concurrently, the State of Alabama chartered UAH to conduct a technology advancement program in support of the state's apparel manufacturers. In 1992, under contract to Marshall, UAH developed an apparel-specific software package that allows manufacturers to design and analyze modules without making an actual investment -- it functions on ordinary PC equipment. By 1995, Marshall had responded to requests for the package from more than 400 companies in 36 states; some of which reported savings up to $2 million. The National Garment Company of Missouri, for example, uses the system to design and balance a modular line before committing to expensive hardware; for setting up sewing lines; and for determining the composition of a new team.

  11. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. Material/Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. Results The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. Conclusions BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  12. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    BACKGROUND BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. MATERIAL AND METHODS Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. RESULTS The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. CONCLUSIONS BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments.

  13. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

  14. 21 CFR 1303.21 - Individual manufacturing quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individual manufacturing quotas. 1303.21 Section... Manufacturing Quotas § 1303.21 Individual manufacturing quotas. (a) The Administrator shall, on or before July 1... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, and who applies for a manufacturing quota, an...

  15. 21 CFR 1303.21 - Individual manufacturing quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individual manufacturing quotas. 1303.21 Section... Manufacturing Quotas § 1303.21 Individual manufacturing quotas. (a) The Administrator shall, on or before July 1... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, and who applies for a manufacturing quota, an...

  16. 21 CFR 1303.21 - Individual manufacturing quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Individual manufacturing quotas. 1303.21 Section... Manufacturing Quotas § 1303.21 Individual manufacturing quotas. (a) The Administrator shall, on or before July 1... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, and who applies for a manufacturing quota, an...

  17. 21 CFR 1303.21 - Individual manufacturing quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual manufacturing quotas. 1303.21 Section... Manufacturing Quotas § 1303.21 Individual manufacturing quotas. (a) The Administrator shall, on or before July 1... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, and who applies for a manufacturing quota, an...

  18. 21 CFR 1303.21 - Individual manufacturing quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Individual manufacturing quotas. 1303.21 Section... Manufacturing Quotas § 1303.21 Individual manufacturing quotas. (a) The Administrator shall, on or before July 1... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, and who applies for a manufacturing quota, an...

  19. Green Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  20. Strategic drivers of contract manufacturing: Part I, The theory.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Geoff; Geimer, Harald

    2002-12-01

    Medical device manufacturers and diagnostics companies have significantly increased their use of contract manufacturers to outsource production of components. This, the first of a two-part article, reviews strategic benefits and best practices in outsourcing.

  1. Review of laser micromachining in contract manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Glenn; Gu, Bo

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the wide range of laser micromachining applications used in contract manufacturing. Contract manufacturing is used in several key industries such as microelectronics packaging, semiconductor, data storage, medical devices, communications, peripherals, automobiles and aerospace. Material types includes plastics, metals, ceramics, inorganics and composites. However laser micromachining is just one available technology for micromachining and other methods will be reviewed. Contract manufacturing offers two important glimpses of the future. Firstly prototype work for new applications often beings in contract manufacturing. Secondly, contract manufacturing can be an economic springboard to allow laser systems to be installed in a production environment.

  2. A new approach to heat and moisture regeneration in the ventilation system of rooms. II. Prototype of the real device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Yu. A.; Mezentsev, I. V.; Mukhin, V. A.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations conducted on the real prototype of a regenerator whose operating conditions depended on the weather conditions during the testing (winter of 2004). It has been shown that the heat and moisture recovery coefficients can be purposefully and independently regulated over a wide range by selecting the quantity of the adsorbent and heat-accumulating medium. The use of the proposed device in the ventilation system of a standard two-room apartment under the conditions of Novosibirsk can lead to a 44% reduction of heating costs annually.

  3. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at LLNL, to conduct their future business. The specific goals were (1) to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) to construct general purpose process models that have wide applicability; (3) to document their findings and models in journals; (4) to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) to develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance their collective understanding of fabrication processes. In support of this mission, two projects were reported here, each of which explores a way to bring higher precision to the manufacturing challenges that we face over the next few years. The first, ''A Spatial-Frequency-Domain Approach to Designing a Precision Machine Tools,'' is an overall view of how they design machine tools and instruments to make or measure workpieces that are specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of the residual errors of the workpiece surface. This represents an improvement of an ''error budget,'' a design tool that saw significant development in the early 1980's, and has been in active use since then. The second project, ''Micro-Drilling of ICF Capsules,'' is an attempt to define the current state in commercial industry for drilling small holes, particularly laser-drilling. The report concludes that 1-{micro}m diameter holes cannot currently be drilled to high aspect ratios, and then defines the engineering challenges that will have to be overcome to machine holes small enough for NIF capsules.

  4. Fabric Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    When rapid oscillation of blanket wearing looms at Chatham Manufacturing Company caused significant metal fatigue, the company turned to NC/STRC for a NASA data bank computer search. The search pinpointed tensile stress, and suggested a built-in residual compressive stress as a solution. "Shot peening," bombarding a part with a high velocity stream of very small shot to pound and compress the part's surface, was found to be the only practical method for creating compressive stress. The method has been successful and the company estimates its annual savings as a quarter million dollars.

  5. Manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. A.; Floyd, H. L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high-voltage varistors. A selective laser sintering process automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves the performance of a photoresist stripper (a simulation on a Cray supercomputer reveals the path of a uniform plasma). Improved mathematical models will help make the dream of low-cost ceramic composites come true.

  6. Selective laser melting: a unit cell approach for the manufacture of porous, titanium, bone in-growth constructs, suitable for orthopedic applications. II. Randomized structures.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lewis; Stamp, Robin C; Fox, Peter; Jones, Eric; Ngo, Chau; Sutcliffe, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the unit cell approach, which has previously been demonstrated as a method of manufacturing porous components suitable for use as orthopedic implants, has been further developed to include randomized structures. These random structures may aid the bone in-growth process because of their similarity in appearance to trabecular bone and are shown to carry legacy properties that can be related back to the original unit cell on which they are ultimately based. In addition to this, it has been shown that randomization improves the mechanical properties of regular unit cell structures, resulting in anticipated improvements to both implant functionality and longevity. The study also evaluates the effect that a post process sinter cycle has on the components, outlines the improved mechanical properties that are attainable, and also the changes in both the macro and microstructure that occur.

  7. Long-term health experience of jet engine manufacturing workers: II. Total and cause-specific mortality excluding central nervous system neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Gary M; Buchanich, Jeanine M; Youk, Ada O; Cunningham, Michael A; Lieberman, Frank S; Kennedy, Kathleen J; Lacey, Steven E; Hancock, Roger P; Esmen, Nurtan A

    2008-10-01

    As part of an exploratory investigation of an unusual occurrence of glioblastoma at one jet engine manufacturing facility located in North Haven, Connecticut (CT), we examined total and cause-specific (excluding central nervous system neoplasms) mortality rates at eight of the company's CT facilities. Subjects were 223,894 workers ever employed in one or more of the manufacturing facilities from 1952 to 2001. Vital status was determined through 2004 for 99% of subjects and cause of death for 95% of 68,701 deaths. We computed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) based on US and CT state rates and modeled internal cohort rates. We observed overall deficits in deaths based on national and state comparisons from all causes, all cancers and most of the cause of death categories examined. State comparisons revealed statistically significant excesses in deaths greater than 25% for kidney cancer (68 deaths, SMR = 1.30, CI = 1.01-1.65) and "other non-malignant respiratory disease" (291 deaths, SMR = 1.27, CI = 1.13-1.42) among subjects employed only at North Haven, and for bronchitis (713 deaths, SMR = 1.28, CI = 1.18-1.37) among all hourly workers. These excesses occurred mainly among short-term workers and hourly workers. We found no evidence of elevated mortality risks for all causes combined, all cancers combined and most of the causes of death categories examined. The pattern of findings for kidney cancer, bronchitis and other non-malignant respiratory disease, based on currently available data, suggests these excesses may be due to non-occupational risk factors or to external occupational factors. We will investigate these excesses further when detailed work history and exposure data from the companion exposure assessment project become available.

  8. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  9. Development of a Prototype Experimental Plan to Evaluate Stabilized Optical Viewing Devices. II. Inflight Measures of Airsickness Potential.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-08

    Caged Stabilized 1 2 3 Flights FlightsA Group Mean 1.69 2.50 2.86 2.4 2.94 Standard Deviction 0.33 0.54 0.50 0.50 0.47 Standard Error of Mean 0.06 0.10...Range In Space Provided. RESPONSE IF YES IF YES IF YES WHERE UETECTED DATA FROM RITE WRITE WRITE TARGET TARGET TARGET I 1 TARGET 2 TARGET 3 SU J C IN IN...OBSERVER TO VIEW TARGETS ANDIENTER ORIENI ATION IN SPACES PROVIDED AT RIGHT. (DEVICE) FACIAL OVERALL EXPRESSION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 RATING 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

  10. [Ethylene oxide sterilization. II. Influence of test devices on the performance of biological monitors and its evaluation].

    PubMed

    Pinto, T de J; Saito, T

    1992-12-01

    In view of the importance of the assurance of the sterility of medical devices, with a large incidence of tubular forms, a study of biological monitors was undertaken, using paper as a carrier, the dimension of the test specimens being the variable considered. After the sterilization process in an industrial cycle, followed by the recovery of the surviving spores through inoculation of the carriers into thioglycolate broth, soybean-casein broth and this last with the addition of bromothymol blue. No differences were found between the growth promoting capacity of these 3 media. The effectiveness of sterilization was dependent on the dimension of the test specimens. The periodic determination of residual gas content on the test specimens, as well as the monitoring of the industrial environment demonstrate the need and importance of the legislation in force.

  11. Application of the transition semiconductor to semimetal in type II nanostructure superlattice for mid-infrared optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutramine, Abderrazak; Nafidi, Abdelhakim; Barkissy, Driss; Hannour, Abdelkrim; Elanique, Abdellatif; Gouti, Thami El

    2016-04-01

    The present work is devoted to the study of band structure and band gap in symmetric InAs (d 1 = 25 Å)/GaSb (d 2 = 25 Å) type II superlattice. Our calculations were performed in the envelope function formalism with the valence band offset Λ = 570 meV. We discussed the semiconductor to semimetal transition and the evolutions of the fundamental band gap, E g (Γ), as a function of d 1, Λ and the temperature. This study suggests that a wide range of wavelength can be reached by adjusting d 1. In addition, E g (Γ, T) decreases from 288.7 to 230 meV in the range of 4.2-300 K, corresponding to the cutoff wavelength ranging from 4.3 to 5.4 µm. These latter results explain the recent experimental ones realized by C. Cervera et al. for our Λ = 588 meV.

  12. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  13. Emergency-escape device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Relatively simple inexpensive device uses reeled steel cable, is controlled by automotive-type shock absorber, and allows safe descent from burning building. Device is cheap to manufacture and assemble and requires neither skill, special knowledge, or athletic ability to operate. It is reliable and fireproof and can be deployed instantly.

  14. 76 FR 4283 - Foreign-Trade Zone 153-San Diego, CA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Abbott...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...; Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (Cardiovascular Device Manufacturing); Riverside County, CA An... of FTZ 153, requesting manufacturing authority on behalf of Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc... production of cardiovascular devices including stents, catheters and guidewires. Components and materials...

  15. Chemical and physical passivation of type II strained-layer superlattice devices by means of thiolated self-assembled monolayers and polymer encapsulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Nathan C.; Knorr, Daniel B.; Williams, Kristen S.; Baril, Neil; Nallon, Eric; Lenhart, Joseph L.; Andzelm, Jan W.; Pellegrino, Joseph; Tidrow, Meimei; Cleveland, Erin; Bandara, Sumith

    2015-05-01

    The efficacy of solution deposition of thiolated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been explored for the purpose of passivating III-V type II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors, more specifically a p-type heterojunction device. Sulfur passivation has previously been achieved on T2SL devices. However, degradation over time, temperature sensitivity and inconsistent reproducibility necessitate a physical encapsulate that can chemically bond to the chemical passivant. Thus, this research investigates two passivation methods, surface passivation with a thiol monolayer and passivation with a polymer encapsulant with a view toward future combination of these techniques. Analysis of the physical and chemical condition of the surface prior to deposition assisted in the development of ideal processes for optimized film quality. Successful deposition was facilitated by in situ oxide removal. Various commercially available functional (cysteamine) and non-functional (alkane) thiolated monolayers were investigated. Dark current was reduced by 3 orders of magnitude and achieved negligible surface leakage at low bias levels. The lowest dark current result, 7.69 × 10-6 A/cm2 at 50 mV, was achieved through passivation with cysteamine.

  16. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-04-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (adjustable supermirror curvature) and the compact size (only 0.5 m long). We have simulated the neutron transport across the entire guide system. We present a detailed computer characterization of the existing device, along with the study of the factors mostly influencing the future improvement. We have optimized the simulated prototype as a function of the neutron wavelength, accounting also for all relevant features of a real instrument like the non-reflecting side edges. The results confirm the ;chromatic; displacement of the focal point (flux density maximum) at fixed supermirror curvature, and the ability of a variable curvature to keep the focal point at the sample position. Our simulations are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the experimentally measured beam profile. With respect to the possibility of a further upgrade, we find that supermirror coatings with m-values higher than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  17. Vacuum erection device in treatment of organic erectile dysfunction and penile vascular differences between patients with DM type I and DM type II.

    PubMed

    Pajovic, Bogdan; Dimitrovski, Antonio; Fatic, Nikola; Malidzan, Milos; Vukovic, Marko

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the vascular system and hemodynamics between patients with organic erectile dysfunction (ED) (DM type I and II), as well as to compare the quality of sexual life between those two groups after the treatment with vacuum erection device (VED). Study enrolled 50 males with DM, aged from 35 to 67 years, who have attended the urologic clinic due to inability to attain and maintain an erection of the penis sufficient to permit satisfactory sexual intercourse. Patients were using VED and six months later were assessed for therapy results. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) was used to quantify erectile dysfunction. Alprostadil injection test was also used, with Doppler color flow imaging system, to evaluate the peak systolic velocity (PSV) and diameter of cavernosal artery (DCA). Significantly higher values of PSV were obtained in patients with DM type II. Also, DCA showed significant difference between two groups of patients. There was significant improvement in three items of IIEF after six months of treatment among both groups of examinees. Patients with DM type I had more serious risk for development of arteriogenic ED. VED could be a good alternative therapy for patients who denied peroral therapy.

  18. A meta-analysis of prehospital airway control techniques part II: alternative airway devices and cricothyrotomy success rates.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Michael W; Wilfong, Denise A; Brown, Lawrence H; Hertelendy, Attila; Benner, Randall W

    2010-01-01

    Airway management is a key component of prehospital care for seriously ill and injured patients. Oral endotracheal intubation (OETI) is the definitive airway of choice in most emergency medical services (EMS) systems. However, OETI may not be an approved skill for some clinicians or may prove problematic in certain patients because of anatomic abnormalities, trauma, or inadequate relaxation. In these situations alternative airways are frequently employed. However, the reported success rates for these devices vary widely, and established benchmarks are lacking. We sought to determine pooled estimates of the success rates of alternative airway devices (AADs) and needle cricothyrotomy (NCRIC) and surgical cricothyrotomy (SCRIC) placement through a meta-analysis of the literature. We performed a systematic literature search for all English-language articles reporting success rates for AADs, SCRIC, and NCRIC. Studies of field procedures performed by prehospital personnel from any nation were included. All titles were reviewed independently by two authors using prespecified inclusion criteria. Pooled estimates of success rates for each airway technique were calculated using a random-effects meta-analysis model. Of 2,005 prehospital airway titles identified, 35 unique studies were retained for analysis of AAD success rates, encompassing a total of 10,172 prehospital patients. The success rates for SCRIC and NCRIC were analyzed across an additional 21 studies totaling 512 patients. The pooled estimates (and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for intervention success across all clinicians and patients were as follows: esophageal obturator airway-esophageal gastric tube airway (EOA-EGTA) 92.6% (90.1%-94.5%); pharyngeotracheal lumen airway (PTLA) 82.1% (74.0%-88.0%); esophageal-tracheal Combitube (ETC) 85.4% (77.3%-91.0%); laryngeal mask airway (LMA) 87.4% (79.0%-92.8%); King Laryngeal Tube airway (King LT) 96.5% (71.2%-99.7%); NCRIC 65.8% (42.3%-83.59%); and SCRIC 90.5% (84

  19. Complete and partial uterine perforation and embedding following insertion of intrauterine devices. II. Diagnostic methods, prevention, and management.

    PubMed

    Zakin, D; Stern, W Z; Rosenblatt, R

    1981-08-01

    This paper discusses the various methods used to diagnose uterine perforation caused by an IUD. Radiography, or plain film, has a limited use in the diagnosis of uterine perforation since its usefulness depends on the radiopacity of the particular IUD; if the IUD appears on film, plain film does not allow one to conclude whether the device is in its proper position. Several modifications of plain film have been tried but all methods fall short of their goals. Hysterography permits the best diagnostic assessment since it allows the visualization of the entire uterine cavity so that the position of the IUD is immediately evident in cases of embedding and of perforation. Pelvic pneumography can differentiate between intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal locations of perforated IUDs; it can be enhanced by hysterosalpingography and can be done on an ambulatory basis. Ultrasonography simply determines the presence or absence of an IUD, but has the advantage of accurately demonstrating a concomitant pregnancy; the sonogram is not reliable if the IUD is surrounded by omentum or by loops of bowel; ultrasonography can be advantageously coupled with hysterography. Laparoscopy is still the method most used to diagnose uterine IUD perforation; when removal of the device is advisable laparotomy is usually carried out concomitantly; successful laparoscopy requires a skilled and experienced operator. Hysteroscopy is a new and extremely valuable technique which should not be chosen as a primary procedure because it carries a risk of complications. The best prevention of uterine perforation is a meticulous and well executed insertion technique, done only by an experienced operator and after a careful pelvic examination. Uterine size, consistency and position must be exactly known; IUD insertion is easier during or immediately after menstruation. Perforated IUDs should be removed even if considered innocuous, although this is a matter still debated by the specialists. Spontaneous IUD

  20. Silicon photonics manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Watts, Michael R

    2010-11-08

    Most demonstrations in silicon photonics are done with single devices that are targeted for use in future systems. One of the costs of operating multiple devices concurrently on a chip in a system application is the power needed to properly space resonant device frequencies on a system's frequency grid. We asses this power requirement by quantifying the source and impact of process induced resonant frequency variation for microdisk resonators across individual die, entire wafers and wafer lots for separate process runs. Additionally we introduce a new technique, utilizing the Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes in microdisks, to extract thickness and width variations across wafers and dice. Through our analysis we find that a standard six inch Silicon on Insulator (SOI) 0.35 μm process controls microdisk resonant frequencies for the TE fundamental resonances to within 1 THz across a wafer and 105 GHz within a single die. Based on demonstrated thermal tuner technology, a stable manufacturing process exhibiting this level of variation can limit the resonance trimming power per resonant device to 231 μW. Taken in conjunction with the power to compensate for thermal environmental variations, the expected power requirement to compensate for fabrication-induced non-uniformities is 17% of that total. This leads to the prediction that thermal tuning efficiency is likely to have the most dominant impact on the overall power budget of silicon photonics resonator technology.

  1. Results of HeartMate II left ventricular assist device implantation on renal function in patients requiring post-implant renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Demirozu, Zumrut T; Etheridge, Whitson B; Radovancevic, Rajko; Frazier, O H

    2011-02-01

    Renal function is often compromised in patients with advanced heart failure. We evaluated renal function in heart failure patients supported by the HeartMate II (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) who required renal replacement therapy (RRT) by continuous venovenous hemofiltration dialysis (CVVHD) or hemodialysis, or both. Indications for RRT included oliguria (urine < 400 ml/day) unresponsive to diuretic therapy for > 24 hours with a creatinine level > 2.0 mg/dl or 1.5 times that of the pre-implant creatinine level, severe acidemia, and volume overload. Of 107 consecutive patients who underwent HeartMate II implantation at our center and had been supported for > 30 days, 15 (13 men and 2 women) required post-implant RRT. Of the 15 patients, 3 received CVVHD and 12 received CVVHD and hemodialysis. Renal function improved within 2 months of support compared with average values before support (creatinine clearance, 64 ± 39 vs 92 ± 55 ml/min, p = 0.041; glomerular filtration rate, 46.9 ± 20.7 vs 73.2 ± 38.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2); p = 0.032). Renal function improved after HeartMate II implantation in 10 patients, and RRT was removed. Of these 10 patients, 2 underwent heart transplantation 4 months after RRT was removed, 1 underwent heart and kidney transplantation 4 years later, 2 died at home of conditions unrelated to renal function 6 months after RRT was removed, and 5 are awaiting heart transplantation, with good quality of life. In this study, patients who experienced clinical recovery after the LVAD implant had subsequent recovery of renal function after continuous-flow LVAD support. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient algorithm for locating and sizing series compensation devices in large power transmission grids: II. Solutions and applications

    DOE PAGES

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2014-10-01

    In a companion manuscript, we developed a novel optimization method for placement, sizing, and operation of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices to relieve transmission network congestion. Specifically, we addressed FACTS that provide Series Compensation (SC) via modification of line inductance. In this manuscript, this heuristic algorithm and its solutions are explored on a number of test cases: a 30-bus test network and a realistically-sized model of the Polish grid (~ 2700 nodes and ~ 3300 lines). The results on the 30-bus network are used to study the general properties of the solutions including non-locality and sparsity. The Polishmore » grid is used as a demonstration of the computational efficiency of the heuristics that leverages sequential linearization of power flow constraints and cutting plane methods that take advantage of the sparse nature of the SC placement solutions. Using these approaches, the algorithm is able to solve an instance of Polish grid in tens of seconds. We explore the utility of the algorithm by analyzing transmission networks congested by (a) uniform load growth, (b) multiple overloaded configurations, and (c) sequential generator retirements.« less

  3. CIS-Type PV Device Fabrication by Novel Techniques; Phase II Subcontract Report 1 July 1999--31 June 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, M.L.; Kapur, V.K.

    2001-01-22

    The R and D program at ISET is centered on development of a novel, dispersion-based route to the deposition of precursor thin films that are converted to CIS-type absorbers through high temperature reactions at or close to atmospheric pressure. The goal of the current research program at ISET is to bring a non-vacuum processing route for CIS closer to commercialization by improving the device efficiency through an increase in absorber bandgap. The basic processing approach involves first synthesizing a powder containing the oxides of copper, indium and gallium. A dispersion (ink) is prepared from the starting powder by mechanical milling or sonication. This ink is then deposited onto the glass/moly substrate as a thin precursor (3-4 {micro}m) and converted to a metallic alloy film by reaction in a hydrogen atmosphere. Controlled synthesis of starting powders and proper reduction results in reasonably smooth, metallic precursor films similar to those produced by sputtering or evaporation. From this point the processing is similar to that in the other two-stage techniques, with the metallic film being reacted in H2Se to form the final photovoltaic absorber, followed by CdS and TCO deposition.

  4. Efficient Algorithm for Locating and Sizing Series Compensation Devices in Large Transmission Grids: Solutions and Applications (PART II)

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2014-01-14

    In a companion manuscript, we developed a novel optimization method for placement, sizing, and operation of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices to relieve transmission network congestion. Specifically, we addressed FACTS that provide Series Compensation (SC) via modification of line inductance. In this manuscript, this heuristic algorithm and its solutions are explored on a number of test cases: a 30-bus test network and a realistically-sized model of the Polish grid (~2700 nodes and ~3300 lines). The results on the 30-bus network are used to study the general properties of the solutions including non-locality and sparsity. The Polish grid is used as a demonstration of the computational efficiency of the heuristics that leverages sequential linearization of power flow constraints and cutting plane methods that take advantage of the sparse nature of the SC placement solutions. Using these approaches, the algorithm is able to solve an instance of Polish grid in tens of seconds. We explore the utility of the algorithm by analyzing transmission networks congested by (a) uniform load growth, (b) multiple overloaded configurations, and (c) sequential generator retirements

  5. Efficient algorithm for locating and sizing series compensation devices in large power transmission grids: II. Solutions and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2014-10-01

    In a companion manuscript, we developed a novel optimization method for placement, sizing, and operation of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices to relieve transmission network congestion. Specifically, we addressed FACTS that provide Series Compensation (SC) via modification of line inductance. In this manuscript, this heuristic algorithm and its solutions are explored on a number of test cases: a 30-bus test network and a realistically-sized model of the Polish grid (~ 2700 nodes and ~ 3300 lines). The results on the 30-bus network are used to study the general properties of the solutions including non-locality and sparsity. The Polish grid is used as a demonstration of the computational efficiency of the heuristics that leverages sequential linearization of power flow constraints and cutting plane methods that take advantage of the sparse nature of the SC placement solutions. Using these approaches, the algorithm is able to solve an instance of Polish grid in tens of seconds. We explore the utility of the algorithm by analyzing transmission networks congested by (a) uniform load growth, (b) multiple overloaded configurations, and (c) sequential generator retirements.

  6. SmartStretch™ technology. II. Improving the tenderness of leg meat from sheep using a meat stretching device.

    PubMed

    Toohey, E S; van de Ven, R; Thompson, J M; Geesink, G H; Hopkins, D L

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of stretching hot-boned sheep hindlegs from 40 sheep carcases, classified as mutton, using a prototype device (SmartStretch™). Left and right legs were collected pre-rigor and randomly allocated to one of four treatments; 0days ageing+SmartStretch™, 0days ageing+no stretch, 5days ageing+SmartStretch™ and 5days ageing+no stretch. There was a significant interaction between stretch treatment and ageing (P<0.05) for shear force of the m. biceps femoris such that stretched and aged samples were the most tender. By contrast stretched m. semimembranosus (SM) had a significantly (P<0.05) lower shear force only at 0days of ageing. Stretching produced longer sarcomeres (P<0.001) for both the SM and m. semitendinosus muscles. Myofibrillar degradation indicated by particle size analysis or histology was not affected by stretching, but there was an ageing effect (P<0.001). SmartStretch™ provided significant improvements in tenderness of the individual muscles. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  8. Turbine Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The machinery pictured is a set of Turbodyne steam turbines which power a sugar mill at Bell Glade, Florida. A NASA-developed computer program called NASTRAN aided development of these and other turbines manufactured by Turbodyne Corporation's Steam Turbine Division, Wellsville, New York. An acronym for NASA Structural Analysis Program, NASTRAN is a predictive tool which advises development teams how a structural design will perform under service use conditions. Turbodyne uses NASTRAN to analyze the dynamic behavior of steam turbine components, achieving substantial savings in development costs. One of the most widely used spinoffs, NASTRAN is made available to private industry through NASA's Computer Software Management Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia.

  9. Definition and application of good manufacturing process-compliant production of CEA-specific chimeric antigen receptor expressing T-cells for phase I/II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guest, Ryan D; Kirillova, Natalia; Mowbray, Sam; Gornall, Hannah; Rothwell, Dominic G; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Austin, Eric; Smith, Keith; Watt, Suzanne M; Kühlcke, Klaus; Westwood, Nigel; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Hawkins, Robert E; Gilham, David E

    2014-02-01

    Adoptive cell therapy employing gene-modified T-cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising preclinical activity in a range of model systems and is now being tested in the clinical setting. The manufacture of CAR T-cells requires compliance with national and European regulations for the production of medicinal products. We established such a compliant process to produce T-cells armed with a first-generation CAR specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). CAR T-cells were successfully generated for 14 patients with advanced CEA(+) malignancy. Of note, in the majority of patients, the defined procedure generated predominantly CD4(+) CAR T-cells with the general T-cell population bearing an effector-memory phenotype and high in vitro effector function. Thus, improving the process to generate less-differentiated T-cells would be more desirable in the future for effective adoptive gene-modified T-cell therapy. However, these results confirm that CAR T-cells can be generated in a manner compliant with regulations governing medicinal products in the European Union.

  10. New Italian device registration requirements.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2008-01-01

    A medical device manufacturer located outside Europe was informed by an Italian distributor that the European Authorised Representative must designate the distributor as the authorised entity when registering the manufacturer's devices in Italy in a new online data bank. This is incorrect. This article discusses the new requirements for registering medical devices in Italy, together with the steps in the registration process and common problems encountered.

  11. 77 FR 30026 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Application, Ampac Fine Chemicals LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will manufacture Thebaine intermediates for sale to...

  12. 77 FR 2324 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I Amphetamine (1100) II... 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk manufacture cannabidiol as a synthetic intermediate....

  13. 76 FR 51401 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I Amphetamine (1100) II... 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk manufacture cannabidiol as a synthetic intermediate....

  14. 78 FR 46372 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Ampac Fine Chemicals, LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Methylphenidate (1724) II Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will...

  15. 78 FR 23596 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Rhodes Technologies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... Noroxymorphone (9668) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in... Control, Federal Register Representative (ODL), 8701 Morrissette Drive, Springfield, Virginia 22152; and...

  16. 21 CFR 864.9195 - Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9195 Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices. (a) Identification. A blood mixing device is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to mix blood...

  17. 21 CFR 864.9195 - Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9195 Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices. (a) Identification. A blood mixing device is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to mix blood...

  18. 21 CFR 864.9195 - Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9195 Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices. (a) Identification. A blood mixing device is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to mix blood...

  19. 21 CFR 864.9195 - Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9195 Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices. (a) Identification. A blood mixing device is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to mix blood...

  20. 21 CFR 864.9195 - Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9195 Blood mixing devices and blood weighing devices. (a) Identification. A blood mixing device is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to mix blood...

  1. Cloud manufacturing: a new manufacturing paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yongliang; Tao, Fei; Li, Bo Hu; Ren, Lei; Zhang, Xuesong; Guo, Hua; Cheng, Ying; Hu, Anrui; Liu, Yongkui

    2014-03-01

    Combining with the emerged technologies such as cloud computing, the Internet of things, service-oriented technologies and high performance computing, a new manufacturing paradigm - cloud manufacturing (CMfg) - for solving the bottlenecks in the informatisation development and manufacturing applications is introduced. The concept of CMfg, including its architecture, typical characteristics and the key technologies for implementing a CMfg service platform, is discussed. Three core components for constructing a CMfg system, i.e. CMfg resources, manufacturing cloud service and manufacturing cloud are studied, and the constructing method for manufacturing cloud is investigated. Finally, a prototype of CMfg and the existing related works conducted by the authors' group on CMfg are briefly presented.

  2. Ambient hemolysis and activation of coagulation is different between HeartMate II and HeartWare left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Birschmann, Ingvild; Dittrich, Marcus; Eller, Thomas; Wiegmann, Bettina; Reininger, Armin J; Budde, Ulrich; Strüber, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic and bleeding events in patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are still a major cause of complications. Therefore, the balance between anti-coagulant and pro-coagulant factors needs to be tightly controlled. The principle hypothesis of this study is that different pump designs may have an effect on hemolysis and activation of the coagulation system. Referring to this, the HeartMate II (HMII; Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, CA) and the HeartWare HVAD (HeartWare International Inc, Framingham, MA) were investigated. For 20 patients with LVAD support (n = 10 each), plasma coagulation, full blood count, and clinical chemistry parameters were measured. Platelet function was monitored using platelet aggregometry, platelet function analyzer-100 system ( Siemens, Marburg, Germany), vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay, immature platelet fraction, platelet-derived microparticles, and von Willebrand diagnostic. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome could be detected in all patients. Signs of hemolysis, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase levels (mean, 470 U/liter HMII, 250 U/liter HVAD; p < 0.001), were more pronounced in the HMII patients. In contrast, D-dimer analysis indicated a significantly higher activation of the coagulation system in HVAD patients (mean, 0.94 mg/liter HMII, 2.01 mg/liter HVAD; p < 0.01). The efficacy of anti-platelet therapy using clopidogrel was not sufficient in more than 50% of the patients. Our results support the finding that all patients with rotary blood pumps suffered from von Willebrand syndrome. In addition, a distinct footprint of effects on hemolysis and the coagulation system can be attributed to different devices. As a consequence, the individual status of the coagulation system needs to be controlled in long-term patients. © 2013 Published by International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation on behalf of International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

  3. Investigation of Tin(II)2,3-naphtalocyanine molecule used as near-infrared sensitive layer in organic up-conversion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melquíades, Mônica C.; Aderne, Rian; Cuin, Alexandre; Quirino, Welber G.; Cremona, Marco; Legnani, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    In this work, a near infrared (NIR) sensitive molecule, Tin(II)2,3-naphthalocyanine (SnNc) was characterized by different techniques. UV-Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed in order to determine the absorption spectrum, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies of this molecule deposited in form of thin films. We found energies of 5.0 ± 0.1 eV and 3.7 ± 0.1 eV for HOMO and LUMO, respectively. The charge carrier mobility was also investigated by space charge limit current technique showing values of μh (8.8 ± 0.1) x 10-5 cm2V-1s-1. SnNc alone or blended with fullerene was used as efficient NIR sensitive layer due to its absorption around 875 nm. The crystalline structure of SnNc was studied by X-ray powder diffraction, showing a monoclinic system and P21/c space group, with cell parameters a = (15.948 ± 6) Å, b = (15.818 ± 2) Å, c = (14.649 ± 1) Å and β = (67.096 ± 6) Å. Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LDI-TOFMS) technique was employed to obtain information of molecular structure of the SnNc in thin film, showing that the thin film of the SnNc has no dimer formation. Due to its absorption around 875 nm, SnNc blended with fullerene was used as efficient NIR sensitive layer in the fabrication of an organic up-conversion device. When the device is submitted to IR radiation, a gain of about 133% was observed in the luminous efficiency when compared to values without IR irradiation.

  4. Use of penile extender device in the treatment of penile curvature as a result of Peyronie's disease. Results of a phase II prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gontero, Paolo; Di Marco, Massimiliano; Giubilei, Gianluca; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Pappagallo, Giovanni; Tizzani, Alessandro; Mondaini, Nicola

    2009-02-01

    Pilot experiences have suggested that tension forces exerted by a penile extender may reduce penile curvature as a result of Peyronie's disease. To test this hypothesis in a Phase II study using a commonly marketed brand of penile extender. Peyronie's disease patients with a curvature not exceeding 50 degrees with mild or no erectile dysfunction (ED) were eligible. Fifteen patients were required to test the efficacy of the device assuming an effect size of >0.8, consistent with an "important" reduction in penile curvature. Changes in penile length over baseline and erectile function (EF) domain scores of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) constituted secondary end points. Patients were counselled on the use of the penile extender for at least 5 hours per day for 6 months. Photographic pictures of the erect penis and measurements were carried out at baseline, at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months (end of study). The IIEF-EF domain scores were administered at baseline and at the end of study. Treatment satisfaction was assessed at end of study using a nonvalidated institutional 5-item questionnaire. Penile curvature decreased from an average of 31 degrees to 27 degrees at 6 months without reaching the effect size (P = 0.056). Mean stretched and flaccid penile length increased by 1.3 and 0.83 cm, respectively at 6 months. Results were maintained at 12 months. Overall treatment results were subjectively scored as acceptable in spite of curvature improvements, which varied from "no change" to "mild improvement." In our study, the use of a penile extender device provided only minimal improvements in penile curvature but a reasonable level of patient satisfaction, probably attributable to increased penile length. The selection of patients with a stabilized disease, a penile curvature not exceeding 50 degrees, and no severe ED may have led to outcomes underestimating the potential efficacy of the treatment.

  5. 76 FR 32225 - Manufacturer Of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company...

  6. 75 FR 10313 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... hydroxybutyric acid (2010) I Amphetamine (1100) II Methylphenidate (1724) II The company plans to manufacture bulk products for finished dosage units and distribution to its customers. No comments or objections...

  7. Medical Devices; Cardiovascular Devices; Classification of the Coronary Vascular Physiologic Simulation Software Device. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-10-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the coronary vascular physiologic simulation software device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the coronary vascular physiologic simulation software device's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  8. A simulation model for the density of states and for incomplete ionization in crystalline silicon. II. Investigation of Si:As and Si:B and usage in device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altermatt, P. P.; Schenk, A.; Schmithüsen, B.; Heiser, G.

    2006-12-01

    Building on Part I of this paper [Altermatt et al., J. Appl. Phys. 100, 113714 (2006)], the parametrization of the density of states and of incomplete ionization (ii) is extended to arsenic- and boron-doped crystalline silicon. The amount of ii is significantly larger in Si:As than in Si:P. Boron and phosphorus cause a similar amount of ii although the boron energy level has a distinctly different behavior as a function of dopant density than the phosphorus level. This is so because the boron ground state is fourfold degenerate, while the phosphorus ground state is twofold degenerate. Finally, equations of ii are derived that are suitable for implementation in device simulators. Simulations demonstrate that ii increases the current gain of bipolar transistors by up to 25% and that it decreases the open-circuit voltage of thin-film solar cells by up to 10mV. The simulation model therefore improves the predictive capabilities of device modeling of p-n-junction devices.

  9. 24 CFR 982.623 - Manufactured home space rental: Housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manufactured home space rental... Special Housing Types Manufactured Home Space Rental § 982.623 Manufactured home space rental: Housing...) Manufactured home space cost minus the total tenant payment. (ii) The rent to owner for the manufactured home...

  10. 24 CFR 982.623 - Manufactured home space rental: Housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manufactured home space rental... Special Housing Types Manufactured Home Space Rental § 982.623 Manufactured home space rental: Housing...) Manufactured home space cost minus the total tenant payment. (ii) The rent to owner for the manufactured home...

  11. 24 CFR 982.623 - Manufactured home space rental: Housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufactured home space rental... Special Housing Types Manufactured Home Space Rental § 982.623 Manufactured home space rental: Housing...) Manufactured home space cost minus the total tenant payment. (ii) The rent to owner for the manufactured home...

  12. 24 CFR 982.623 - Manufactured home space rental: Housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manufactured home space rental... Special Housing Types Manufactured Home Space Rental § 982.623 Manufactured home space rental: Housing...) Manufactured home space cost minus the total tenant payment. (ii) The rent to owner for the manufactured home...

  13. Nanochanneled Device and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Mauro (Inventor); Liu, Xuewu (Inventor); Grattoni, Alessandro (Inventor); Fine, Daniel (Inventor); Goodall, Randy (Inventor); Hosali, Sharath (Inventor); Medema, Ryan (Inventor); Hudson, Lee (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A nanochannel delivery device and method of manufacturing and use. The nanochannel delivery device comprises an inlet, an outlet, and a nanochannel. The nanochannel may be oriented parallel to the primary plane of the nanochannel delivery device. The inlet and outlet may be in direct fluid communication with the nanochannel.

  14. Medical devices and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Errors related to health care devices are not well understood. Nurses in intensive care and progressive care environments can benefit from understanding manufacturer-related error and device-use error, the principles of human factors engineering, and the steps that can be taken to reduce risk of errors related to health care devices.

  15. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  16. 46 CFR 160.077-25 - Manufacturer records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hybrid Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices § 160.077-25 Manufacturer records. (a) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must keep the records required by § 159.007-13 of... requirements of this subpart. (d) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must also keep the following records:...

  17. 46 CFR 160.077-25 - Manufacturer records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hybrid Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices § 160.077-25 Manufacturer records. (a) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must keep the records required by § 159.007-13 of... requirements of this subpart. (d) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must also keep the following records:...

  18. 46 CFR 160.077-25 - Manufacturer records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hybrid Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices § 160.077-25 Manufacturer records. (a) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must keep the records required by § 159.007-13 of... requirements of this subpart. (d) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must also keep the following records:...

  19. 46 CFR 164.019-15 - Component manufacturer records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-15 Component manufacturer records. (a) Each component manufacturer shall retain records as required by § 159.007-13 of this... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Component manufacturer records. 164.019-15 Section 164...

  20. Nickel (II) Preconcentration and Speciation Analysis During Transport from Aqueous Solutions Using a Hollow-fiber Permeation Liquid Membrane (HFPLM) Device.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Flores, Ana Nelly; De San Miguel, Eduardo Rodríguez; Gyves, Josefina de; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-08-18

    Nickel (II) preconcentration and speciation analysis using a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device was studied. A counterflow of protons coupled to complexation with formate provided the driving force of the process, while Kelex 100 was employed as carrier. The influence of variables related to module configuration (acceptor pH and carrier concentration) and to the sample properties (donor pH) on the preconcentration factor, E, was simultaneously studied and optimized using a 3 factor Doehlert matrix response surface methodology. The effect of metal concentration was studied as well. Preconcentration factors as high as 4240 were observed  depending on the values of the different variables. The effects of the presence of inorganic anions (NO2-, SO42-, Cl-, NO3-, CO32-, CN-) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the form of humic acids were additionally considered in order to carry out a speciation analysis study. Nickel preconcentration was observed to be independent of both effects, except when cyanide was present in the donor phase. A characterization of the transport regime was performed through the analysis of the dependence of E on the temperature. E increases with the increase in temperature according to the equation E(K) = -8617.3 + 30.5T with an activation energy of 56.7 kJ mol-1 suggesting a kinetic-controlled regime. Sample depletion ranged from 12 to 1.2% depending on the volume of the donor phase (100 to 1000 mL, respectively).

  1. Desktop Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Desktop manufacturing is the use of data from a computer-assisted design system to construct actual models of an object. Emerging processes are stereolithography, laser sintering, ballistic particle manufacturing, laminated object manufacturing, and photochemical machining. (SK)

  2. Desktop Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Desktop manufacturing is the use of data from a computer-assisted design system to construct actual models of an object. Emerging processes are stereolithography, laser sintering, ballistic particle manufacturing, laminated object manufacturing, and photochemical machining. (SK)

  3. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M. )

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing multiple-band-gap, multiple- junction solar cells and photovoltaic modules. Amorphous silicon alloy material is deposited (using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition) on a stainless-steel substrate using a roll-to-roll process that is continuous and automated. Rapid thermal equilibration of the metal substrate allows rapid throughput of large-area devices in smaller production machines. Potential improvements in the design, deposition, and module fabrication process are described. Problems are also discussed that could impede using these potential improvements. Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) proposes cost and time estimates for investigating and solving these problems. Manufacturing modules for less than $1.00 per peak watt and stable module efficiencies of greater than 10% are near-term goals proposed by ECD. 18 refs.

  4. OPINION: Safe exponential manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, Chris; Drexler, Eric

    2004-08-01

    In 1959, Richard Feynman pointed out that nanometre-scale machines could be built and operated, and that the precision inherent in molecular construction would make it easy to build multiple identical copies. This raised the possibility of exponential manufacturing, in which production systems could rapidly and cheaply increase their productive capacity, which in turn suggested the possibility of destructive runaway self-replication. Early proposals for artificial nanomachinery focused on small self-replicating machines, discussing their potential productivity and their potential destructiveness if abused. In the light of controversy regarding scenarios based on runaway replication (so-called 'grey goo'), a review of current thinking regarding nanotechnology-based manufacturing is in order. Nanotechnology-based fabrication can be thoroughly non-biological and inherently safe: such systems need have no ability to move about, use natural resources, or undergo incremental mutation. Moreover, self-replication is unnecessary: the development and use of highly productive systems of nanomachinery (nanofactories) need not involve the construction of autonomous self-replicating nanomachines. Accordingly, the construction of anything resembling a dangerous self-replicating nanomachine can and should be prohibited. Although advanced nanotechnologies could (with great difficulty and little incentive) be used to build such devices, other concerns present greater problems. Since weapon systems will be both easier to build and more likely to draw investment, the potential for dangerous systems is best considered in the context of military competition and arms control.

  5. Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-08-01

    This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local Motors Inc. Phase 1 was previously reported as Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Cyber Mechanical Devices through Community Engagement and Micro-manufacturing and demonstrated the integration of components onto a prototype body part for a vehicle. Phase 2 was reported as Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for the Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles and demonstrated the high profile live printing of an all-electric vehicle using ONRL s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology. This demonstration generated considerable national attention and successfully demonstrated the capabilities of the BAAM system as developed by ORNL and Cincinnati, Inc. and the feasibility of additive manufacturing of a full scale electric vehicle as envisioned by the CRADA partner Local Motors, Inc.

  6. 76 FR 81979 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... physical security systems, verification of the company's compliance with state and local laws, and a review... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will manufacture Thebaine...

  7. Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) analysis of pump thrombosis in the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David C; Kormos, Robert L; Pagani, Francis D; Myers, Susan L; Stevenson, Lynne W; Acker, Michael A; Goldstein, Daniel L; Silvestry, Scott C; Milano, Carmelo A; Baldwin, J T; Timothy Baldwin, J; Pinney, Sean; Eduardo Rame, J; Miller, Marissa A

    2014-01-01

    Pump thrombosis remains an uncommon but potentially catastrophic complication of durable continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). A perceived increase in the incidence of pump thrombosis in the HeartMate II (HMII) LVAD (Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA) by clinicians prompted this analysis of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) database. Between 2006 and June 2013, 8,988 United States patients aged older than 18 years received a durable LVAD. Of these, 6,910 adult patients from 132 institutions who received a HMII LVAD were entered in the INTERMACS database and constitute the study group for this analysis. Overall survival (with censoring at transplant or explant for recovery) with the HMII LVAD was 80% at 1 year and 69% at 2 years and was not significantly different when stratified by era of implant. Freedom from device exchange or death due to thrombosis decreased from 99% at 6 months in 2009 to 94% in 2012 (p < 0.0001). Multivariable hazard function analysis showed risk factors for pump thrombosis included later implant year (p < 0.0001), younger age (p < 0.0001), higher creatinine (p = 0.002), larger body mass index (p = 0.004), white race (p = 0.0004), left ventricular ejection fraction above 20% (p = 0.02), and higher lactate dehydrogenase level at 1 month (p < 0.0001). Survival (p < 0.0001) and freedom from infection (p = 0.008) and cerebrovascular accident (p < 0.0001) were lower after pump exchange than after primary implant. Pump exchange or death due to pump thrombosis increased during 2011 and 2012, but the magnitude of the increase remained relatively small. Survival remains high (80% at 1 year) with the HMII LVAD. Risk factor analysis suggests that a number of patient-related factors contribute to the risk of thrombosis. Markedly elevated lactate dehydrogenase in the first month is a predictor of pump thrombosis. This analysis could not examine the potential role of technical factors during implant

  8. 21 CFR 820.184 - Device history record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device history record. 820.184 Section 820.184...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Records § 820.184 Device history record. Each manufacturer shall maintain device history records (DHR's). Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures...

  9. 21 CFR 820.184 - Device history record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Device history record. 820.184 Section 820.184...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Records § 820.184 Device history record. Each manufacturer shall maintain device history records (DHR's). Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures...

  10. 21 CFR 820.184 - Device history record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device history record. 820.184 Section 820.184...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Records § 820.184 Device history record. Each manufacturer shall maintain device history records (DHR's). Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures...

  11. 21 CFR 820.184 - Device history record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Device history record. 820.184 Section 820.184...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Records § 820.184 Device history record. Each manufacturer shall maintain device history records (DHR's). Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures...

  12. 21 CFR 820.184 - Device history record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device history record. 820.184 Section 820.184...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Records § 820.184 Device history record. Each manufacturer shall maintain device history records (DHR's). Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures to...

  13. Haemolysis as a first sign of thromboembolic event and acute pump thrombosis in patients with the continuous-flow left ventricular assist device HeartMate II.

    PubMed

    Akin, S; Soliman, O I; Constantinescu, A A; Akca, F; Birim, O; van Domburg, R T; Manintveld, O; Caliskan, K

    2016-02-01

    Despite advances in pump technology, thromboembolic events/acute pump thrombosis remain potentially life-threatening complications in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVAD). We sought to determine early signs of thromboembolic event/pump thrombosis in patients with CF-LVAD, which could lead to earlier intervention. We analysed all HeartMate II recipients (n = 40) in our centre between December 2006 and July 2013. Thromboembolic event/pump thrombosis was defined as a transient ischaemic attack (TIA), ischaemic cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or pump thrombosis. During median LVAD support of 336 days [IQR: 182-808], 8 (20 %) patients developed a thromboembolic event/pump thrombosis (six TIA/CVA, two pump thromboses). At the time of the thromboembolic event/pump thrombosis, significantly higher pump power was seen compared with the no-thrombosis group (8.2 ± 3.0 vs. 6.4 ± 1.4 W, p = 0.02), as well as a trend towards a lower pulse index (4.1 ± 1.5 vs. 5.0 ± 1.0, p = 0.05) and a trend towards higher pump flow (5.7 ± 1.0 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9 L m, p = 0.06). The thrombosis group had a more than fourfold higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) median 1548 [IQR: 754-2379] vs. 363 [IQR: 325-443] U/L, p = 0.0001). Bacterial (n = 4) or viral (n = 1) infection was present in 5 out of 8 patients. LDH > 735 U/L predicted thromboembolic events/pump thrombosis with a positive predictive value of 88 %. In patients with a CF-LVAD (HeartMate II), thromboembolic events and/or pump thrombosis are associated with symptoms and signs of acute haemolysis as manifested by a high LDH, elevated pump power and decreased pulse index, especially in the context of an infection.

  14. Nickel (II) Preconcentration and Speciation Analysis During Transport from Aqueous Solutions Using a Hollow-fiber Permeation Liquid Membrane (HFPLM) Device

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Flores, Ana Nelly; de San Miguel, Eduardo Rodríguez; de Gyves, Josefina; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-01-01

    Nickel (II) preconcentration and speciation analysis using a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device was studied. A counterflow of protons coupled to complexation with formate provided the driving force of the process, while Kelex 100 was employed as carrier. The influence of variables related to module configuration (acceptor pH and carrier concentration) and to the sample properties (donor pH) on the preconcentration factor, E, was simultaneously studied and optimized using a 3 factor Doehlert matrix response surface methodology. The effect of metal concentration was studied as well. Preconcentration factors as high as 4240 were observed depending on the values of the different variables. The effects of the presence of inorganic anions (NO2−, SO42−, Cl−, NO3−, CO32−, CN−) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the form of humic acids were additionally considered in order to carry out a speciation analysis study. Nickel preconcentration was observed to be independent of both effects, except when cyanide was present in the donor phase. A characterization of the transport regime was performed through the analysis of the dependence of E on the temperature. E increases with the increase in temperature according to the equation E(K) = −8617.3 + 30.5T with an activation energy of 56.7 kJ mol−1 suggesting a kinetic-controlled regime. Sample depletion ranged from 12 to 1.2% depending on the volume of the donor phase (100 to 1000 mL, respectively). PMID:24957733

  15. Improvement of cardiac function with device-based diaphragmatic stimulation in chronic heart failure patients: the randomized, open-label, crossover Epiphrenic II Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Beeler, Remo; Schoenenberger, Andreas W; Bauer, Peter; Kobza, Richard; Bergner, Michael; Mueller, Xavier; Schlaepfer, Reinhard; Zuber, Michel; Erne, Susanne; Erne, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Device-based pacing-induced diaphragmatic stimulation (PIDS) may have therapeutic potential for chronic heart failure (HF) patients. We studied the effects of PIDS on cardiac function and functional outcomes. In 24 chronic HF patients with CRT, an additional electrode was attached to the left diaphragm. Randomized into two groups, patients received the following PIDS modes for 3 weeks in a different sequence: (i) PIDS off (control group); (ii) PIDS 0 ms mode (PIDS simultaneously with ventricular CRT pulse); or (iii) PIDS optimized mode (PIDS with optimized delay to ventricular CRT pulse). For PIDS optimization, acoustic cardiography was used. Effects of each PIDS mode on dyspnoea, power during exercise testing, and LVEF were assessed. Dyspnoea improved with the PIDS 0 ms mode (P = 0.057) and the PIDS optimized mode (P = 0.034) as compared with the control group. Maximal power increased from median 100.5 W in the control group to 104.0 W in the PIDS 0 ms mode (P = 0.092) and 109.5 W in the PIDS optimized mode (P = 0.022). Median LVEF was 33.5% in the control group, 33.0% in the PIDS 0 ms mode, and 37.0% in the PIDS optimized mode (P = 0.763 and P = 0.009 as compared with the control group, respectively). PIDS was asymptomatic in all patients. PIDS improves dyspnoea, working capacity, and LVEF in chronic HF patients over a 3 week period in addition to CRT. This pilot study demonstrates proof of principle of an innovative technology which should be confirmed in a larger sample. NCT00769678. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2013 European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Exploring Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iley, John; And Others

    These teacher's materials for an eight-unit course were developed to help students develop technological literacy, career exploration, and problem-solving skills relative to the manufacturing industries. The eight units include an overview of manufacturing, manufacturing enterprises and systems, manufacturing materials and selection, manufacturing…

  17. Manufacturing quality from electronic failure analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, B.

    The Electronic Failure Analysis Group of the AFWAL/Materials Laboratory Systems Support Division has investigated numerous electronic device failures that resulted from manufacturing process defects. The electronic failure analysis program that verifies the device failure, locates the failure site, establishes the cause of failure and recommends corrective actions is discussed in relation to improving the quality of electronic devices; performing electronic failure analysis is a high-payoff activity. Corrective actions usually involve very small costs to the manufacturer and provide the user with a large return on investment. Brief case histories are presented in regard to packaging, die attachment, solder flux removal, package moisture content, IC metallization processes, potted modules, and handling procedures affecting device cleanliness. Situations are identified where better quality control could eliminate many device defects that lead to premature part failure.

  18. Electrooptical Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-30

    Table 1-1 10 II-5 Calculated Ij as a Function of the Cap p-Doping 12 III-1 L-I Characteristics of the Five Mass-Transported BH Lasers with Different...343, a = 5.0 /im, W = 1.5 nmy and b = 2.0 pm 9 vni ELECTROOPTICAL DEVICES I. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MASS-TRANSPORTED GalnAsP/InP BURIED...HETEROSTRUCTURE LASERS As a potentially very important class of sources in fiber optical communication and inte- grated optics, GalnAsP/InP buried

  19. DARPA DICE Manufacturing Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    product and process domains. The system will support Design for Manufacturing and Assembly ( DFMA ) with a set of tools to model manufacturing processes, and...concurrently in the product and process domains. The system will support DFMA with a set of tools to model manufacturing processes, and manage tradeoffs across... DFMA Design for Manufacturing and Assembly DICE DARPA Initiative In Concurrent Engineering MO Manufacturing Optimization 5 MSD Missile Systems Division

  20. 78 FR 69133 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... as a bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Amphetamine (1100) II Methylphenidate (1724) II Codeine (9050) II Oxycodone (9143...

  1. 78 FR 23958 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; S & B Pharma Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Methamphetamine (1105) II Pentobarbital (2270) II Nabilone (7379) II The company plans to manufacture bulk... with state and local laws; and a review of the company's background and history. Therefore, pursuant to...

  2. Environmentally benign silicon solar cell manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Gee, J.M.; Menna, P.; Strebkov, D.S.; Pinov, A.; Zadde, V.

    1998-09-01

    The manufacturing of silicon devices--from polysilicon production, crystal growth, ingot slicing, wafer cleaning, device processing, to encapsulation--requires many steps that are energy intensive and use large amounts of water and toxic chemicals. In the past two years, the silicon integrated-circuit (IC) industry has initiated several programs to promote environmentally benign manufacturing, i.e., manufacturing practices that recover, recycle, and reuse materials resources with a minimal consumption of energy. Crystalline-silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which accounted for 87% of the worldwide module shipments in 1997, are large-area devices with many manufacturing steps similar to those used in the IC industry. Obviously, there are significant opportunities for the PV industry to implement more environmentally benign manufacturing approaches. Such approaches often have the potential for significant cost reduction by reducing energy use and/or the purchase volume of new chemicals and by cutting the amount of used chemicals that must be discarded. This paper will review recent accomplishments of the IC industry initiatives and discuss new processes for environmentally benign silicon solar-cell manufacturing.

  3. Non- contacting capacitive diagnostic device

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Timothy

    2005-07-12

    A non-contacting capacitive diagnostic device includes a pulsed light source for producing an electric field in a semiconductor or photovoltaic device or material to be evaluated and a circuit responsive to the electric field. The circuit is not in physical contact with the device or material being evaluated and produces an electrical signal characteristic of the electric field produced in the device or material. The diagnostic device permits quality control and evaluation of semiconductor or photovoltaic device properties in continuous manufacturing processes.

  4. Operation of Prisma flexible manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, W.; Rudolph, K.; Mueller, E.

    1985-03-01

    The development of technology and organization in the parts manufacturing taking place in machine construction factories occurs both in job site automation and in process-referred automation. It is characterized by the comprehensive employment of microelectronics which in turn leads to new more highly automated engineering solutions in the areas of manufacturing devices, transport technology and storage technology and manufacturing control. Systems used to process about 850 prismatic individual parts differing in design, differing technologically, and having the maximum dimensions 500 mm x 800 mm x 500 mm are described.

  5. Comparison of family functioning in families of depressed patients and nonclinical control families in China using the Family Assessment Device and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales II.

    PubMed

    Du, Na; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Liang, Su-gai; SiTu, Ming-jing; Huang, Yi; Mansfield, Abigail K; Keitner, Gabor

    2014-02-01

    Family functioning influences the course and long-term outcome for patients with depression. It is important to understand the family functioning of depressed patients from the viewpoint both of patients and their family members. The objective of this study was to explore the association between family functioning and depression in a sample of Chinese families, using the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales II (FACES II). This study was conducted in a sample of 61 depressed patients and their family members and 61 nonclinical controls in mainland China. It compared the perception of depressed patients and their family members and evaluated agreement between family members. Results indicate that in mainland China, functioning among families with a depressed family member is poorer than that of control families. Depressed patients reported less satisfaction than did their family members. There were significant differences on 4 of the 7 FAD scales among depressed patients and their family members, whereas no discrepancies were found on the FACES II. For the FAD, low agreement between patients and family members was found on all scales except behavioral control. Moderate agreement appeared on all dimensions of FACES II except for ideal cohesion and dissatisfaction with cohesion for the families of depressed patients. Depression is associated with impaired family functioning in families in mainland China. When applying the FAD and FACES II to samples of Chinese families, clinicians should be aware that the FAD may be more sensitive to detecting problems in some areas than the FACES II.

  6. Price transparency for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Mark V; Burns, Lawton R

    2008-01-01

    Hospital buyers of medical devices contract with manufacturers with market power that sell differentiated products. The medical staff strongly influences hospitals' choice of devices. Sellers have sought to limit disclosure of transaction prices. Policy-makers have proposed legislation mandating disclosure, in the interest of greater transparency. We discuss why a manufacturer might charge different prices to different hospitals, the role that secrecy plays, and the consequences of secrecy versus disclosure. We argue that hospital-physician relationships are key to understanding what manufacturers gain from price discrimination. Price disclosure can catalyze a restructuring of those relationships, which, in turn, can improve hospital bargaining.

  7. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification and validation of nebulized aerosol devices for sputum induction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Warren J; Dennis, John; The, Stephanie; Litoski, Belinda; Pieron, Cora; Leigh, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Induced sputum cell count measurement has proven reliability for evaluating airway inflammation in patients with asthma and other airway diseases. Although the use of nebulizer devices for sputum induction is commonplace, they are generally labelled as single-patient devices by the manufacturer and, therefore, cannot be used for multiple patients in large clinical sputum induction programs due to infect ion-control requirements. Accordingly, this study investigated the aerosol characteristics of alternative devices that could be used in such programs. BACKGROUND: Induced sputum cell counts are a noninvasive and reliable method for evaluating the presence, type and degree of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Currently, standard nebulizer devices used for sputum induction in multiple patients are labelled as single-patient devices by the manufacturer, which conflicts with infection prevention and control requirements. As such, these devices cannot feasibly be used in a clinical sputum induction program. Therefore, there is a need to identify alternative nebulizer devices that are either disposable or labelled for multi-patient use. OBJECTIVE: To apply validated rigorous, scientific testing methods to identify and validate commercially available nebulizer devices appropriate for use in a clinical sputum induction program. METHODS: Measurement of nebulized aerosol output and size for the selected nebulizer designs followed robust International Organization for Standardization methods. Sputum induction using two of these nebulizers was successfully performed on 10 healthy adult subjects. The cytotechnologist performing sputum cell counts was blinded to the type of nebulizer used. RESULTS: The studied nebulizers had variable aerosol outputs. The AeroNeb Solo (Aerogen, Ireland), Omron NE-U17 (Omron, Japan) and EASYneb II (Flaem Nuova, Italy) systems were found to have similar measurements of aerosol size. There was no significant difference in induced sputum

  9. Jaw bite force measurement device.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis; Ilies, Horea; O'Brien, Brendan; McManus, Anne; Larrow, Beau

    2012-08-01

    We describe a cost-effective device that uses an off-the-shelf force transducer to measure patient bite force as a diagnostic aid in determining dental implant size, number of implants, and prosthetic design for restoring partial edentulism. The main advantages of the device are its accuracy, simplicity, modularity, ease of manufacturing, and low cost.

  10. Quality assurance from a manufacturer's standpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William J.

    1991-05-01

    The efforts of a manufacturer in the area of component procurement acceptance testing are very visible, while the quality assurance work that goes on during the design and manufacture of medical imaging equipment is frequently not so apparent. Many steps in the design and production of imaging devices are carefully designed to promote not only quality of the devices when initially installed, but also the ability to maintain the device''s quality over a period of time. Customer requirements for aesthetics, performance, safety and regulatory compliance must be considered. Software, which represents over 70 of the design engineering of modern products, presents a special challenge since the quality of software cannot be tested and must be designed in. Specific hardware elements such as monitor phosphor color and uniformity deserve extra consideration. A design that allows quick diagnosis and replacement of failed components is also important.

  11. A CORBA-based manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pancerella, C.M.; Whiteside, R.A.; Klevgard, P.A.

    1996-08-01

    A CORBA-based distributed object software system was developed for Sandia`s Agile Manufacturing Testbed (SAMT). This information architecture supports the goals of agile manufacturing: rapid response to changing requirements; small lot machining; reduction in both time and cost of the product realization process; and integration within a heterogeneous, wide-area networked enterprise. Features of the resulting software-controlled manufacturing environment are: (1) Easy plug-and-play of manufacturing devices. (2) Support for both automated and manual operations. (3) Information flow both into and out of manufacturing devices. (4) Dynamic task sequencer. Each of the heterogeneous physical objects (lathe, milling machine, robot arm, etc.) has a corresponding software object that supports a common IDL interface called IDevice. This interface provides operations for material processing, material movement, status monitoring, and other administrative tasks. CORBA objects allow for the encapsulation of a machine tool, its controller, and the network interface to the controller. Both manual and automated operations are supported by the software system. If an IDevice object receives a request for a non-automated operation, it uses an associated Console object to affect the operation by communications with a human machinist. A design goal of the Console object for a machine is to provide an information-intensive environment for the machinist, rather than just the transmittal of instructions to be carried out. In addition to the flow of information into manufacturing devices (e.g., control and NC code), the software architecture supports the easy extraction of data (e.g., sensor data or inspection reports) back out of the machine and into the broader information processing environment The task sequencer object dynamically locates devices, accepts jobs, and dispatches tasks in the manufacturing cell. A job script captures setup operations, material movement, and processing.

  12. The Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, Christopher John

    2016-03-03

    Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, has become a ubiquitous tool in science for its precise control over mechanical design. For additive manufacturing to work, a 3-D structure is split into thin 2D slices, and then different physical properties, such as photo-polymerization or melting, are used to grow the sequential layers. The level of control allows not only for devices to be made with a variety of materials: e.g. plastics, metals, and quantum dots, but to also have finely controlled structures leading to other novel properties. While 3-D printing is widely used by hobbyists for making models, it also has industrial applications in structural engineering, biological tissue scaffolding, customized electric circuitry, fuel cells, security, and more.

  13. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; ...

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  14. Energy Use in Manufacturing

    EIA Publications

    2006-01-01

    This report addresses both manufacturing energy consumption and characteristics of the manufacturing economy related to energy consumption. In addition, special sections on fuel switching capacity and energy-management activities between 1998 and 2002 are also featured in this report.

  15. DARPA DICE Manufacturing Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing and Assembly ( DFMA ) with a set of tools to model the manufacturing processes, and manage tradeoffs across multiple processes. The subject of...in the product and process domains. The system will support DFMA with a set of tools to model the manufacturing processes, and manage tradeoffs across...concurrently in the product and process domains. The system will support Design for Manufacturing and Assembly ( DFMA ) with a set af tools to model the

  16. DARPA DICE Manufacturing Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Design for Manufacturing and Assembly ( DFMA ) with a set of tools to model the manufacturing processes, and manage tradeoffs across multiple processes. The...multiple manufacturing engineers, and the product/process changes are traded concurrently in the product and process domains. The system will support DFMA ...Contract Data Requirements List CM Communications Manager DARPA Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DFMA Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

  17. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection Task started the development of a real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record for the additive manufacturing process using infrared camera imaging and processing techniques. This project will benefit additive manufacturing by providing real-time inspection of internal geometry that is not currently possible and reduce the time and cost of additive manufactured parts with automated real-time dimensional inspections which deletes post-production inspections.

  18. Space Manufacturing: The Next Great Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Curreri, Peter; Sharpe, Jonathan B.; Colberg, Wendell R.; Vickers, John H.

    1998-01-01

    Space manufacturing encompasses the research, development and manufacture necessary for the production of any product to be used in near zero gravity, and the production of spacecraft required for transporting research or production devices to space. Manufacturing for space, and manufacturing in space will require significant breakthroughs in materials and manufacturing technology, as well as in equipment designs. This report reviews some of the current initiatives in achieving space manufacturing. The first initiative deals with materials processing in space, e.g., processing non-terrestrial and terrestrial materials, especially metals. Some of the ramifications of the United States Microgravity Payloads fourth (USMP-4) mission are discussed. Some problems in non-terrestrial materials processing are mentioned. The second initiative is structures processing in space. In order to accomplish this, the International Space Welding Experiment was designed to demonstrate welding technology in near-zero gravity. The third initiative is advancements in earth-based manufacturing technologies necessary to achieve low cost access to space. The advancements discussed include development of lightweight material having high specific strength, and automated fabrication and manufacturing methods for these materials.

  19. Workforce Development for Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Rosalie

    2007-01-01

    In a recent skills gap report, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) noted some disturbing trends in the gap between the demand for highly skilled manufacturing workers and the potential supply. The NAM report notes that smaller manufacturers rank finding qualified workers ahead of energy costs, taxes and government regulations on the…

  20. Designing using manufacturing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.