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Sample records for device-assisted implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

  1. How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work? An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has wires with ... tune the programming of your ICD so it works better to correct irregular heartbeats. The type of ...

  2. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Baddour LM, Epstein AE, Erickson CC, et al. Update on cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections and their management: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation . ...

  3. Athletes with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Ponamgi, Shiva P.; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Athletes with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) represent a diverse group of individuals who may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) when engaging in vigorous physical activity. Therefore, they are excluded by the current guidelines from participating in most competitive sports except those classified as low intensity, such as bowling and golf. The lack of substantial data on the natural history of the cardiac diseases affecting these athletes, as well as the unknown efficacy of implanted ICDs in terminating life-threatening arrhythmias occurring during intense exercise, have resulted in the restrictive nature of these now decade old guidelines. Recently, there is emerging data, derived from a few retrospective studies and a large prospective registry that demonstrates the relative safety of high-risk athletes participating in competitive sports and challenges the prohibitive nature of these guidelines. Nevertheless, the safe participation of all athletes with an ICD in competitive sports continues to be contemplated. The increased number of inappropriate shocks, damage to the ICD/pacemaker system, and the questionable efficacy of the delivered shock in the setting of vigorous physical activity are some of the main challenges faced by these athletes who choose to continue participation in competitive sports. The fear of SCD and ICD shocks faced by these athletes is also associated with a negative psychological burden and affects their quality of life, as does restricting them from all competitive sports. Therefore, shared decision making is necessary between the clinician and athlete after carefully analyzing the risks and benefits associated with competitive sports participation. PMID:26100423

  4. [Implantable cardioverter defibrillator: an update].

    PubMed

    le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Aliot, Etienne

    2007-01-01

    Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator is now a well established therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death. In secondary prevention (patients with a previous cardiac arrest) defibrillator can be considered as a class I indication, if there is no transient or reversible cause. The level of proof is A. in primary prevention the defibrillator is indicated in coronary artery disease patients with or without symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure (NYHA II or III), an ejection fraction lower than 30 %, measured at least one month after a myocardial infarction and 3 months after a revascularisation, surgery or angioplasty (level of proof B). It is also indicated in symptomatic spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardias with underlying heart disease (level of proof B), in patients with spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia, poorly tolerated, without underlying heart disease for which pharmacological treatment or ablation can not be performed or failed (level of proof B). Finally it is also indicated in patients with syncope of unknown cause with sustained ventricular tachycardia or inducible ventricular fibrillation, with an underlying heart disease (level of proof B). The guidelines proposed by the different societies have also proposed class IIa recommendations which are the following: coronary artery disease patients with left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction between 31 or 35 %) measured at least one month after a myocardial infarction and 3 months after a revascularisation with an inducible ventricular arrhythmia. It can be also indicated in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies with an ejection fraction lower than 30% and NYHA class II or III. It can be also indicated in familial or inherited conditions with a high risk of sudden cardiac death by ventricular fibrillation without any other efficient known treatment and finally in heart failure patients remaining symptomatic, in class III or IV NYHA, with an optimal medical therapy, an

  5. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators. Prophylactic Use

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    of evidence for each outcome. The balance between benefits and harms, quality of evidence, applicability, and the certainty of the baseline risks are considered in judgments about the strength of recommendations. Summary of Findings Overall, ICDs are effective for the primary prevention of SCD. Three studies – the Multicentre Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial I (MADIT I), the Multicentre Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial II (MADIT II), and SCD-HeFT – showed there was a statistically significant decrease in total mortality for patients who prophylactically received an ICD compared with those who received conventional therapy (Table 1). Table 1: Results of Key Studies on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators for the Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death – All-Cause Mortality Study, * Year Population N Follow-up, Months Mortality, ICD† Group, % Mortality, Control Group, % Hazard Ratio (95% CI) P NNT† MADIT, 1996 (2) Ischemic 196 27 15.8 38.6 0.46 (0.26–0.82) .009 4 Priormyocardialinfarction Conventional therapy 54% relative reduction Ejection fraction ≤ 0.35NSVT†EP† + MADIT II, 2002 (3) Ischemic 1232 20 14.2 19.8 0.69(0.51–0.93) .016 18 Priormyocardialinfarction Conventional therapy 31% relative reduction Ejection fraction ≤ 0.30 SCD-HeFT, 2005 (4) Ischemic & Nonischemic 2521 60 22 29 0.77 (0.62–0.96) .007 13 Optimal therapy Ejection fraction < 0.35 23% relative reduction * MADIT I: Multicentre Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial I; MADIT II: Multicentre Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial II; SCD-HeFT: Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial. † EP indicates electrophysiology; ICD, implantable cardioverter defibrillator; NNT, number needed to treat; NSVT, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. The NNT will appear higher if follow-up is short. For ICDs, the absolute benefit increases over time for at least a 5-year period; the NNT declines, often substantially, in studies with a longer follow

  6. Indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Chinushi, Masaomi; Washizuka, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Since the first clinical use of implantable defibrillator in human, the technology and the function of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) have been much improved and now, ICD can be implanted within the chest wall. ICD is the most reliable therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with documented VT/VF and the efficacy is most clear in patients with depressed heart function. It is now extended as a tool of the primary prevention of SCD in high risk patients after myocardial infarction. However, such beneficial effect is not applicable to DCM though patients might have depressed heart function. ICD is not free from procedure- or device-related problems which need to be resolved. From unknown causes, VT/VF might recur in an incessant form and an emergency admission is needed. Therefore, even during ICD therapy, patients often require antiarrhythmic drugs or catheter ablation. PMID:15206546

  7. Biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator and inappropriate shocks.

    PubMed

    Srivathsan, Komandoor; Bazzell, Jane L; Lee, Richard W

    2003-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy underwent implantation of a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for symptomatic ventricular tachycardia. He received five shocks while attempting to exercise, 48 hours after implantation. Interrogation of the device revealed double counting of ventricular sensed events by the left and right ventricular leads. Shortening the AV delay and AV nodal blockade (beta-blocker) to promote ventricular pacing failed to prevent additional inappropriate ICD discharges. After detailed consideration of all options including AV nodal ablation, we chose to disconnect the left ventricular lead pending availability of newer devices with sensing functions limited to the right ventricular lead. Since then, the patient has not experienced any additional inappropriate discharges. PMID:12625617

  8. The automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Mirowski, M; Reid, P R; Mower, M M; Watkins, L; Platia, E V; Griffith, L S; Juanteguy, J M

    1984-05-01

    The automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is an electronic device designed to monitor the heart continuously, to identify malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and then to deliver effective countershock to restore normal rhythm. There are two defibrillating electrodes which are also used for waveform analysis; one is located in the superior vena cava, the other is placed over the cardiac apex. A third bipolar right ventricular electrode serves for rate counting and R-wave synchronization. When ventricular fibrillation occurs, a 25 joule pulse is delivered; when ventricular tachycardia faster than a preset rate is detected, the discharge is R-wave synchronized. The device can recycle three times if required. Special batteries can deliver over 100 shocks or provide a 3-year monitoring life. Implantation of the device is made either through a thoracotomy or by a subxiphoid approach. Thus far, the device has been implanted in 160 patients with a follow-up of 42 months. Acceleration of ventricular tachycardia to a faster rhythm or to ventricular fibrillation occurred only rarely and is dealt with most successfully through recycling. Actuarial analysis of the initial 52 patients has indicated 22.9% one-year total mortality, a 52% decrease from the 48% mortality that would be expected in the same group of patients without the device; the mortality attributed to arrhythmias was only 8.5%. In conclusion, the automatic cardioverter-defibrillator can reliably identify and correct potentially lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias, leading to a substantial increase in survival in properly selected high-risk patients. PMID:6204311

  9. Chagas' disease and the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ronaldo F; Neto, Argemiro S; Franken, Roberto A

    2006-01-01

    The authors discuss the epidemiology and pathogenesis of Chagas' disease in Brazil, including the use of treatment with a cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with low ejection fraction. Select patients may benefit from resynchronization therapy associated with cardioverter-defibrillator treatment. Electrophysiologic study is indicated in the assessment of the potential utility of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. PMID:17086031

  10. When to consider an implantable cardioverter defibrillator following myocardial infarction?

    PubMed

    Szwejkowski, Benjamin R; Wright, Gary A; Connelly, Derek T; Gardner, Roy S

    2015-12-01

    After reading this article the reader should be familiar with: Current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use post myocardial infarction (MI) and ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Primary prevention ICD guidelines. Secondary prevention ICD guidelines. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients post MI and the use of ICDs. Programming ICDs. PMID:26526420

  11. Electroconvulsive therapy in the setting of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Davis, Asha; Zisselman, Marc; Simmons, Tony; McCall, W Vaughn; McCafferty, John; Rosenquist, Peter B

    2009-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy has potent cardiovascular effects, which may pose a challenge in treating patients with preexisting cardiac disease. Although it is well studied in the treatment of refractory depression, there are still pitfalls to overcome when treating those with comorbid cardiovascular disease. The synergistic effects of depression and cardiovascular disease in affecting the morbidity and mortality of patients make treatment a significant issue. The authors discuss 3 elderly patients treated for major depression, all of whom previously had implantable cardioverter-defibrillators placed. All 3 patients were effectively treated, with no major adverse effects. The cases illustrate how taking the appropriate preventative measures allow even the most medically challenging patient to undergo effective treatment and highlight the debate surrounding the intraoperative management of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator devices. PMID:19300291

  12. Patient perceptions of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    MacIver, Jane; Tibbles, Alana; Billia, Filio; Ross, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a class I recommendation for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions to occur between physicians and heart failure patients. Few studies have reported the patient’s perspective on the timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Aim: To determine patient awareness, preferences and timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Design: Grounded theory was used to collect and analyze interview data from 25 heart failure patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Setting and participants: Patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, from the Heart Function Clinic at University Health Network (Toronto, Canada). Results: The sample (n = 25) was predominately male (76%) with an average age of 62 years. Patients identified three stages where they felt implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation should be discussed: (1) prior to implantation, (2) with any significant deterioration but while they were of sound mind to engage in and communicate their preferences and (3) at end of life, where patients wished further review of their previously established preferences and decisions about implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation. Most patients (n = 17, 68%) said they would consider deactivation, six (24%) were undecided and two (8%) were adamant they would never turn it off. Conclusion: The patient preferences identified in this study support the need to include information on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation at implant, with change in clinical status and within broader discussions about end-of-life treatment preferences. Using this process to help patients determine and communicate their implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation preferences may reduce the number of patients experiencing distressing implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks at end of life. PMID:27110361

  13. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator infection due to Mycobacterium mageritense.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masato; Goya, Masahiko; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are usually detected in blood cultures after 4-5 days of incubation, so it is important to differentiate RGM from contamination of commensal organisms on human skin. We report an unusual case of Mycobacterium mageritense bacteremia and infection of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator originally misidentified as Corynebacterium spp. or Nocardia spp. in gram-stained smears. 16S rRNA gene sequencing had utility in the definitive identification of isolates. We should be aware that RGM infection may exist in repeated implantable device infections. PMID:26719132

  14. Magnets and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Yiliam F; Souki, Fouad; Tamayo, Evelyn; Candiotti, Keith

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of surgical patients present to the operating room with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). Peri-operative care of these patients dictates that ICD function be suspended for many surgical procedures to avoid inappropriate, and possibly harmful, ICD therapy triggered by electromagnetic interference (EMI). An alternative to reprogramming the ICD is the use of a magnet to temporarily suspend its function. However, this approach is not without complications. We report a case where magnet use failed to inhibit ICD sensing of EMI, and a shock was delivered to the patient. Measures to decrease EMI, controversies regarding magnet use, and expert recommendations are discussed.

  15. Deactivation of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Brock, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs), including pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), are the most effective treatment for life-threatening arrhythmias. Patients or their surrogates may request device deactivation to avoid prolongation of the dying process or in other settings, such as after device-related complications or with changes in their health care goals. Despite published guidelines outlining theoretical and practical aspects of this common clinical scenario, significant uncertainty remains for both patients and health care providers regarding the ethical and legal status of CIED deactivation. This review outlines the ethical and legal principles supporting CIED deactivation at patients’ request, centered upon patient autonomy and authority over their own medical treatment. The empirical literature describing stakeholder views and experiences surrounding CIED deactivation is described, along with lessons for future research and practice guidance surrounding the care of patients with CIEDs. PMID:23217433

  16. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs.

  17. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Jaber; R Ehrlich, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  18. The Significance of Shocks in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Anthony; Kaura, Amit; Sunderland, Nicholas; Dhillon, Paramdeep S

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) trials have unequivocally shown a reduction in mortality in appropriately selected patients with heart failure and depressed left ventricular function. However, there is a strong association between shocks and increased mortality in ICD recipients. It is unclear if shocks are merely a marker of a more severe cardiovascular disease or directly contribute to the increase in mortality. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between ICD shocks and mortality, and explore possible mechanisms. Data examining the effect of shocks in the absence of spontaneous arrhythmias as well as studies of non-shock therapy and strategies to reduce shocks are analysed to try and disentangle the shocks versus substrate debate.

  19. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  20. The Significance of Shocks in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Anthony; Kaura, Amit; Sunderland, Nicholas; Dhillon, Paramdeep S; Scott, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) trials have unequivocally shown a reduction in mortality in appropriately selected patients with heart failure and depressed left ventricular function. However, there is a strong association between shocks and increased mortality in ICD recipients. It is unclear if shocks are merely a marker of a more severe cardiovascular disease or directly contribute to the increase in mortality. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between ICD shocks and mortality, and explore possible mechanisms. Data examining the effect of shocks in the absence of spontaneous arrhythmias as well as studies of non-shock therapy and strategies to reduce shocks are analysed to try and disentangle the shocks versus substrate debate. PMID:27617089

  1. The Significance of Shocks in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Anthony; Kaura, Amit; Sunderland, Nicholas; Dhillon, Paramdeep S

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) trials have unequivocally shown a reduction in mortality in appropriately selected patients with heart failure and depressed left ventricular function. However, there is a strong association between shocks and increased mortality in ICD recipients. It is unclear if shocks are merely a marker of a more severe cardiovascular disease or directly contribute to the increase in mortality. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between ICD shocks and mortality, and explore possible mechanisms. Data examining the effect of shocks in the absence of spontaneous arrhythmias as well as studies of non-shock therapy and strategies to reduce shocks are analysed to try and disentangle the shocks versus substrate debate. PMID:27617089

  2. Economic evaluations of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Lidia; Pinilla-Domínguez, Pilar; García-Quintana, Antonio; Caballero-Dorta, Eduardo; García-García, F Javier; Linertová, Renata; Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the cost-effectiveness studies of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) for primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). A systematic review of the literature published in English or Spanish was performed by electronically searching MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, NHS-EED, and EconLit. Some keywords were implantable cardioverter defibrillator, heart failure, heart arrest, myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, syncope, sudden death. Selection criteria were the following: (1) full economic evaluations published after 1995, model-based studies or alongside clinical trials (2) that explored the cost-effectiveness of ICD with or without associated treatment compared with placebo or best medical treatment, (3) in adult patients for primary or secondary prevention of SCD because of ventricular arrhythmias. Studies that fulfilled these criteria were reviewed and data were extracted by two reviewers. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed and a narrative synthesis was prepared. In total, 24 studies were included: seven studies on secondary prevention and 18 studies on primary prevention. Seven studies were performed in Europe. For secondary prevention, the results showed that the ICD is considered cost-effective in patients with more risk. For primary prevention, the cost-effectiveness of ICD has been widely studied, but uncertainty about its cost-effectiveness remains. The cost-effectiveness ratios vary between studies depending on the patient characteristics, methodology, perspective, and national settings. Among the European studies, the conclusions are varied, where the ICD is considered cost-effective or not dependent on the study.

  3. Economic evaluations of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Lidia; Pinilla-Domínguez, Pilar; García-Quintana, Antonio; Caballero-Dorta, Eduardo; García-García, F Javier; Linertová, Renata; Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the cost-effectiveness studies of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) for primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). A systematic review of the literature published in English or Spanish was performed by electronically searching MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, NHS-EED, and EconLit. Some keywords were implantable cardioverter defibrillator, heart failure, heart arrest, myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, syncope, sudden death. Selection criteria were the following: (1) full economic evaluations published after 1995, model-based studies or alongside clinical trials (2) that explored the cost-effectiveness of ICD with or without associated treatment compared with placebo or best medical treatment, (3) in adult patients for primary or secondary prevention of SCD because of ventricular arrhythmias. Studies that fulfilled these criteria were reviewed and data were extracted by two reviewers. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed and a narrative synthesis was prepared. In total, 24 studies were included: seven studies on secondary prevention and 18 studies on primary prevention. Seven studies were performed in Europe. For secondary prevention, the results showed that the ICD is considered cost-effective in patients with more risk. For primary prevention, the cost-effectiveness of ICD has been widely studied, but uncertainty about its cost-effectiveness remains. The cost-effectiveness ratios vary between studies depending on the patient characteristics, methodology, perspective, and national settings. Among the European studies, the conclusions are varied, where the ICD is considered cost-effective or not dependent on the study. PMID:25323413

  4. [Fitness to drive in patients with implanted cardioverter-defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Klein, H H

    2012-09-01

    A physician who takes care for patients with implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) must inform them about their fitness to drive since these patients carry a higher risk for the occurrence of syncope or sudden cardiac death at the wheel. The driver's license law in Germany does not mention patients with ICD. The fitness to drive of patients with ICD is covered by the Advisory Board for Traffic Medicine in Germany (Bundesanstalt für Straßenwesen). These guidelines, however, are outdated and cannot be used to inform patients. Actually, these guidelines are under revision. Currently, the position paper of the German Society of Cardiology on "Fitness to drive and cardiovascular diseases" together with a recently published Dutch paper on this topic forms the basis of these recommendations. One week after ICD implantation for primary or one month after implantation for secondary prevention the patient may resume to drive. After adequate shocks the fitness to drive can be expected 2-4 months (3 months) later. The assessment of the fitness to drive has to be performed individually, taking into account also possible other influencing factors. In individual cases it appears to be justified that patients with ICD work as professional drivers.

  5. [Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator at the end of life].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Hagendorff, A; Kühne, C; Reinhardt, S; Klein, N

    2015-06-01

    Brady- and tachyarrhythmias at the end of life are common observations. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators answer with antibrady and antitachycardia pacing, which will not be associated with any complaints of the dying patient. In contrast, defibrillation and cardioversion shocks are extremely painful. Therefore shocks should be inactivated at the end of life. Family doctors, internists, emergency physicians and paramedics are unable to inactivate shocks. Deactivation of shocks at the end of life is not comparable to euthanasia or assisted suicide, but allow the patient to die at the end of an uncurable endstage disease. Deactivation of shocks should be discussed with the patient before initial implantation of the devices. The precise moment of the inactivation at the end of life should be discussed with patients and relatives. There is no common recommendation for the time schedule of this decision; therefore it should be based on the individual situation of the patient. Emergency health care physicians need magnets and sufficient information to inactivate defibrillators. The wishes of the patient have priority in the decision process and should be written in the patient's advance directive, which must be available in the final situation. However the physician must not necessarily follow every wish of the patient. As long as the laws in the European Union are not uniform, German recommendations are needed. PMID:26001358

  6. Sensing and detection in Medtronic implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark L; Swerdlow, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    Ensuring sensing and detection of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) was a prerequisite for the clinical trials that established the survival benefit of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). However, for decades, a high incidence of unnecessary shocks limited patients' and physicians' acceptance of ICD therapy. Oversensing, misclassification of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) as VT, and self-terminating VT accounted for the vast majority of unnecessary shocks. Medtronic ICDs utilize sensitive baseline settings with minimal blanking periods to ensure accurate sensing of VF, VT, and SVT electrograms. Programmable algorithms reject oversensing caused by far-field R waves, T waves, and non-physiologic signals caused by lead failure. A robust hierarchy of SVT-VT discriminators minimize misclassification of SVT as VT. These features, combined with evidence-based programming, have reduced the 1‑year inappropriate shock rate to 1.5 % for dual-/triple-chamber ICDs and to 2.5 % for single-chamber ICDs. PMID:27624809

  7. Generator and Lead-Related Complications of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Yaminisharif, Ahmad; Soofizadeh, Nader; Shafiee, Akbar; Kazemisaeid, Ali; Jalali, Arash; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increase in the number of patients treated with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) requests more attention regarding its complications. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the generator- and lead-related complications at implantation and during follow-up in the patients who were treated with ICD for primary and secondary prevention reasons. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 255 consecutive patients who underwent transvenous ICD implantation for the first time in a 7-year period and were followed-up for 3 years at Tehran Heart Center. The personal and clinical data of the patients as well as specific data on the ICD implantation were retrieved. The frequency of each of the complications was reported and the study variables were compared between the patients with and without complications using Student’s t-test and chi-square test where appropriate. P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Out of a total of 525 implanted leads and 255 implanted devices in 255 patients (mean age = 62.57 ± 13.50 years; male = 196 [76.9%]), complications leading to generator or lead replacement occurred in 32 patients (12.5%). The results revealed no significant difference between the patients with and without complications regarding gender and age (P = 0.206 and P = 0.824, respectively). Also, no significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the ejection fraction (P = 0.271). Lead fracture was the most frequent lead-related complication and was observed in 17 patients (6.6%). Besides, it was mainly observed in the RV leads. Generator-related complications leading to generator replacement were observed in 2 patients (0.7%). Conclusions: Despite considerable improvements in the ICD technology, the rate of the ICD complications leading to device replacement and surgical revision, especially those related to the leads, is still clinically important. PMID:24936484

  8. Predictors of early mortality in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Kenneth M.; Mittal, Suneet; Gilliam, F. Roosevelt; Gilligan, David M.; Zhong, Qian; Kraus, Stacia Merkel; Meyer, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Multiple trials have shown that implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) prolong survival in secondary and primary prevention populations. However, in spite of the efficacy of these devices in terminating life-threatening arrhythmias, total mortality remains high. Methods and results We evaluated 1703 patients (mean age: 67 ± 12 years, 82% male) with conventional ICD indications, who were enrolled and followed between 2001 and 2004 at 128 US centres. Patients were followed for up to a year, and vital status was obtained for 1655 patients (97%, median follow-up: 377 days). There were 183 deaths within 1 year of ICD implantation (1-year mortality rate: 16%). Predictors of mortality included a history of atrial fibrillation (AF, P < 0.0001), diabetes (P = 0.0001), failure to use cholesterol-lowering medications (P < 0.001), use of digitalis and derivatives (P < 0.0001), use of diuretics (P < 0.0001), low body mass index (BMI, P < 0.0001), increasing age (P < 0.0001), low left ventricular ejection fraction (P < 0.0001), low activity hours (P < 0.0001), elevated resting heart rate (P = 0.014), low mean arterial pressure (MAP, P = 0.007), and poor functional status (New York Heart Association class, P < 0.0001). In multivariate modelling, AF (P ≤ 0.001), diabetes (P = 0.004), BMI (P = 0.001), MAP (P = 0.040), and functional class (P = 0.006) predicted mortality. Conclusion In this population undergoing ICD implantation, poor functional status, low MAP, diabetes, low BMI, and AF were strongly associated with death within a year. PMID:19279025

  9. Dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Is it useful in patient with permanent atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Porres-Aracama, José M; Cerezuela, José Luis; García-Urra, Francisco; Luque-Lezcano, Oscar; Herrero, Vicente

    2016-08-01

    In patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implant indication, a single-chamber device is the choice because AF does not provide interesting information for the treatment. It is very unusual to find patients with permanent AF that coexist with atrial tachycardia with various degree of Atrioventricular block. PMID:27525075

  10. Safety of Electromagnetic Articulography in Patients with Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joglar, Jose A.; Nguyen, Carol; Garst, Diane M.; Katz, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: "Electromagnetic articulography (EMA)" uses a helmet to create alternating magnetic fields for tracking speech articulator movement. An important safety consideration is whether EMA magnetic fields interfere with the operation of speakers' pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). In this investigation, individuals…

  11. Initial experience of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillators in Singapore: a case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tien Siang Eric; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Lim, Chuh Yih Paul; Teo, Wee Siong; Ching, Chi-Keong

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillators are a type of implantable cardiac device. They are effective at reducing total and arrhythmic mortality in patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. Subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillators (S-ICDs) are a new alternative that avoids the disadvantages of transvenous lead placement. In this case series, we report on the initial feasibility and safety of S-ICD implantation in Singapore. PMID:26512151

  12. Combined Subpectoral Implantation of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator and Augmentation Mammoplasty in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Je Wook; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Dong Won; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device is the standard method. Occasionally, subpectoral cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation via axillary incisions is performed in young female patients for cosmetic purposes. Because subpectoral CIED implantation and augmentation mammoplasty involve the same layer, it is feasible to perform both procedures simultaneously. We report a case of combined subpectoral implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and augmentation mammoplasty via the axillary approach in a young female patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and small breasts. PMID:27721868

  13. Silicone Breast Implant and Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: Can They Coexist? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Or, Friedman; Arik, Zaretski

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of a silicone breast implant rupture after insertion of an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD). A 51-year-old woman presented to our plastic surgery clinic to exchange her silicone breast implants. The patient underwent cosmetic mastopexy and breast augmentation in 2008. Because of recurrent myocardial infarctions and chronic heart failure, she underwent an insertion of an AICD in 2014 in which the left breast implant was hit. In this report, we discuss the first case of an AICD insertion, disrupting a breast implant. This case report illustrates the rare but real possibility of breast implant rupture after even minor surgical manipulation of the breast area. PMID:27622117

  14. [Tachycardia detection in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators by Sorin/LivaNova : Algorithms, pearls and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Ocklenburg, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    For physicians involved in the treatment of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) the knowledge of tachycardia detection algorithms is of paramount importance. This knowledge is essential for adequate device selection during de-novo implantation, ICD replacement, and for troubleshooting during follow-up. This review describes tachycardia detection algorithms incorporated in ICDs by Sorin/LivaNova and analyses their strengths and weaknesses.

  15. [Tachycardia detection in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators by Sorin/LivaNova : Algorithms, pearls and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Ocklenburg, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    For physicians involved in the treatment of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) the knowledge of tachycardia detection algorithms is of paramount importance. This knowledge is essential for adequate device selection during de-novo implantation, ICD replacement, and for troubleshooting during follow-up. This review describes tachycardia detection algorithms incorporated in ICDs by Sorin/LivaNova and analyses their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27605232

  16. Beam Profile Disturbances from Implantable Pacemakers or Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gossman, Michael S.; Nagra, Bipinpreet; Graves-Calhoun, Alison; Wilkinson, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The medical community is advocating for progressive improvement in the design of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and implantable pacemakers to accommodate elevations in dose limitation criteria. With advancement already made for magnetic resonance imaging compatibility in some, a greater need is present to inform the radiation oncologist and medical physicist regarding treatment planning beam profile changes when such devices are in the field of a therapeutic radiation beam. Treatment plan modeling was conducted to simulate effects induced by Medtronic, Inc.-manufactured devices on therapeutic radiation beams. As a continuation of grant-supported research, we show that radial and transverse open beam profiles of a medical accelerator were altered when compared with profiles resulting when implantable pacemakers and cardioverter-defibrillators are placed directly in the beam. Results are markedly different between the 2 devices in the axial plane and the sagittal planes. Vast differences are also presented for the therapeutic beams at 6-MV and 18-MV x-ray energies. Maximum changes in percentage depth dose are observed for the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as 9.3% at 6 MV and 10.1% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.3 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. For the implantable pacemaker, the maximum changes in percentage depth dose were observed as 10.7% at 6 MV and 6.9% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.5 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. No differences were discernible for the defibrillation leads and the pacing lead.

  17. Isorhythmic dissociation with smart sensing in a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Strohmer, Bernhard

    2006-07-01

    Isorhythmic dissociation is an uncommon but clinically important finding in a patient implanted with a dual chamber cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) capable of SmartSensing. The surface ECG mimicked a malfunction of the pacemaker that was related to the concomitant hemodynamic deterioration. Device interrogation revealed dissociation of the intrinsic junctional and the pacemaker rhythm, which appeared at similar rates. Careful analysis of intracardiac electrograms and marker channel annotations helped to unravel the limitations for physiologic pacing.

  18. Sensing failure in a tiered therapy implantable cardioverter defibrillator: role of auto adjustable gain.

    PubMed

    Wase, A; Natale, A; Dhala, A A; Deshpande, S; Sra, J S; Blanck, Z; Maglio, C; Jazayeri, M R; Akhtar, M

    1995-06-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators have an established role in the management of life-threatening tachyarrhythmias. These devices use sophisticated sensing circuitry to detect and promptly treat a vast majority of these arrhythmias. However, they are not foolproof. We report one case where the device failed to sense every other QRS complex during induced ventricular fibrillation due to marked electrical alterans. Thus, undersensing can be a potentially fatal problem despite the use of auto adjustable gain. PMID:7659589

  19. Overview of implantable cardioverter defibrillator and cardiac resynchronisation therapy in heart failure management

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pow-Li; Foo, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials have established the benefits of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) in the treatment of heart failure patients. As adjuncts to guideline-directed medical therapy, ICDs confer mortality benefits from sudden cardiac arrest, while CRT reduces mortality, hospitalisation rates and improves functional capacity. This review discusses the use of ICDs and CRT devices in heart failure management, outlining the evidence supporting their use, indications and contraindications. PMID:27440409

  20. Silicone Breast Implant and Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: Can They Coexist? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Zaretski

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a silicone breast implant rupture after insertion of an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD). A 51-year-old woman presented to our plastic surgery clinic to exchange her silicone breast implants. The patient underwent cosmetic mastopexy and breast augmentation in 2008. Because of recurrent myocardial infarctions and chronic heart failure, she underwent an insertion of an AICD in 2014 in which the left breast implant was hit. In this report, we discuss the first case of an AICD insertion, disrupting a breast implant. This case report illustrates the rare but real possibility of breast implant rupture after even minor surgical manipulation of the breast area. PMID:27622117

  1. Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a comparison among manufacturers and over time

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Simon; Schaer, Beat A.; Yap, Sing-Chien; Szili-Torok, Tamas; Kühne, Michael; Sticherling, Christian; Osswald, Stefan; Theuns, Dominic A.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is crucial for patients and healthcare systems as replacements impact on infection rates and cost-effectiveness. Aim was to determine longevity using very large databases of two teaching hospitals with a high number of replacements and a rather homogeneous distribution among manufacturers. Methods and results The study population consists of all patients in whom an ICD was inserted in. All ICD manufacturers operating in Switzerland and the Netherlands and all implanted ICDs were included. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator replacements due to normal battery depletion were considered events, and other replacements were censored. Longevity was assessed depending on manufacturers, pacing mode, implant before/after 2006, and all parameters combined. We analysed data from 3436 patients in whom 4881 ICDs [44.2% VVI-ICDs, 27.4% DDD-ICDs, 26.3% cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)-ICDs, 2.0% subcutaneous ICDs] were implanted. The four major manufacturers had implant shares between 18.4 and 31.5%. Replacement due to battery depletion (27.4%) was performed for 1339 ICDs. Patient survival at 5 years was 80.1%. Longevity at 5 years improved in contemporary compared with elderly ICDs [63.9–80.6% across all ICDs, of 73.7–92.1% in VVIs, 58.2–76.1% in DDDs, and of 47.1–66.3% in CRT defibrillators, all P value < 0.05]. Remarkable differences were seen among manufacturers, and those with better performance in elderly ICDs were not those with better performance in contemporary ones. Conclusion Implantable cardioverter defibrillator longevity increased in contemporary models independent of manufacturer and pacing mode. Still, significant differences exist among manufacturers. These results might impact on device selection. PMID:26609076

  2. An updated review of implantable cardioverter/defibrillators, induced anxiety, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael; Sola, Christopher L

    2011-01-01

    Despite overall favorable acceptance of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), patients may experience discharges as frightening and painful. The authors reviewed ICD-induced psychopathology in 2005. During the past 2 years the number of studies examining psychopathology and quality of life after ICD implantation has increased dramatically, warranting this update of that review. Variables assessed have included recipient age, gender, social support network, perception of control and predictability of shocks, and personality style. Now the picture of what is known is, if anything, cloudier than it was 2 years ago, with little definitive and much contradictory data emerging in most of these categories. PMID:21109213

  3. Double valve replacement in a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator with severe left ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, Girish; Rao, Prakash; Prakash, Nagendra; Shivaram, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data from landmark trials suggest that the indications for cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are set to expand to include heart failure, sleep-disordered breathing, and possibly routine implantation in patients with myocardial infarction and poor ventricular function.[1] This will inevitably result in more patients with cardiac devices undergoing surgeries. Perioperative electromagnetic interference and their potential effects on ICDs pose considerable challenges to the anesthesiologists.[2] We present a case of a patient with automatic ICD with severe left ventricular dysfunction posted for double valve replacement. PMID:27716706

  4. A Canadian hospital's experience with the automatic implantable cardioverter/defibrillator.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A D; Guiraudon, G; Klein, G J; Yee, R

    1987-01-01

    The automatic implantable cardioverter/defibrillator is a device that can be implanted in patients for treatment of recurrent ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. It was recently approved for clinical use in Canada. The authors describe their experience with 12 patients (mean age 51.3 years) who underwent implantation of a defibrillator. All 12 patients had a history of documented ventricular fibrillation, which was idiopathic in 3 and due to ischemic heart disease in 9. Electrophysiologic testing revealed inducible ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in 8 of the 10 patients tested. An important criterion for selection for implantation was failure of pharmacologic therapy to suppress ventricular arrhythmias induced during electrophysiologic testing. Of the 12 patients, 1 died within 24 hours after implantation. During a mean follow-up period of 15.5 months there were no further deaths. All the surviving patients expressed satisfaction with the device; five of the seven under the age of 60 years have returned to work, and one has returned to school. This initial favourable experience with the automatic implantable cardioverter/defibrillator suggests that future increases in the availability of the device and improvements in its function will lead to much more widespread use, as the population of patients at risk of sudden cardiac death is large. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3442769

  5. Subglandular placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for an improved cosmetic outcome.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cassidy D; Roehl, Kendall R; Stephen Huang, Shoei K; Mahabir, Raman C

    2013-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) technology has progressed through the years decreasing the size of the device, and its effectiveness in preventing sudden cardiac death has made it a mainstay of treatment for many patients. As the use of ICDs in younger patients has increased, issues with placement of an ICD in the usual prepectoral, infraclavicular region have arisen. Subglandular placement through an inframammary incision provides a unique approach and an aesthetically pleasing outcome for ICD placement. We present a review of the current literature and 3 cases of young female patients who had placement of an ICD using this approach.

  6. Tools and strategies for the reduction of inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Kolb, Christof; Vardas, Panos E

    2008-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have been shown to provide a survival benefit in patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death. A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients' quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. Despite recent technological advances, the incidence of inappropriate shocks remains high, thus posing a challenge that we have to meet. In the present review we summarise the available tools and the strategies that can be followed in order to reduce inappropriate ICD shocks.

  7. The oral cavity is not a primary source for implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillator infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that the oral cavity is a potential source for implantable pacemaker and cardioverter defibrillators infections, the bacterial diversity on explanted rhythm heart management devices was investigated and compared to the oral microbiome. Methods A metagenomic approach was used to analyze the bacterial diversity on the surfaces of non-infected and infected pacemakers. The DNA from surfaces swaps of 24 non-infected and 23 infected pacemaker were isolated and subjected to bacterial-specific DNA amplification, single strand conformation polymorphism- (SSCP) and sequencing analysis. Species-specific primer sets were used to analyze for any correlation between bacterial diversity on pacemakers and in the oral cavity. Results DNA of bacterial origin was detected in 21 cases on infected pacemakers and assigned to the bacterial phylotypes Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi and Stapyhlococcus. In 17 cases bacterial DNA was found on pacemakers with no clinical signs of infections. On the basis of the obtained sequence data, the phylotypes Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus and an uncultured bacterium were identified. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the only bacteria detected in pacemeaker (n = 25) and oral samples (n = 11). Conclusions The frequency of the coincidental detection of bacteria on infected devices and in the oral cavity is low and the detected bacteria are highly abundant colonizers of non-oral human niches. The transmission of oral bacteria to the lead or device of implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators is unlikely relevant for the pathogenesis of pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators infections. PMID:23575037

  8. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices.

    PubMed

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation.

  9. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation. PMID:24714370

  10. Interference between pacemakers/implantable cardioverter defibrillators and video capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Gehron, Johannes; Höltgen, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Our Letter to the Editor, related to the article “Small bowel capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: Outcome analysis using telemetry” by Cuschieri et al, comments on some small errors, that slipped into the authors discussions. The given informations concerning the pacemaker- and implantable cardioverter defibrillators modes were inaccurate and differ between the text and the table. Moreover, as 8 of 20 patient’s pacemakers were programmed to VOO or DOO (“interference mode”) and one patient was not monitored by telemetry during capsule endoscopy, 9 of 20 patients (45%) lack the informations of possible interference between capsule endoscopy their implanted device. Another objection refers to the interpretation of an electrocardiogram (figure 1, trace B) presented: in contrast to the author’s opinion the marked spike should be interpreted as an artefact and not as ”undersensing of a fibrillatory wave”. Finally, three comments to cited reviews were not complete respectively not quoted correctly. PMID:23596547

  11. Removal of the broken part of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator's electrode causing pulmonary embolism via femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Zencir, Cemil; Selvi, Mithat; Elbi, Huseyin; Cetin, Mustafa; Gungor, Hasan; Akgullu, Cagdas; Badak, Muharrem Ismail

    2015-12-01

    A 66-year-old patient with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent transvenous extraction of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The distal part of the electrode was broken during manual traction through the left subclavian vein. In the present case, we showed a rare complication of transvenous lead extraction and its management. PMID:26995444

  12. Questions to Ask Your Doctor--Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... implanted to restore normal heart rhythm and prevent sudden cardiac death. To help you understand what it does and how it may affect you or your family member before and after implantation, ask your doctor or healthcare team any ...

  13. Updated care guidelines for patients with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Moser, S A; Crawford, D; Thomas, A

    1993-04-01

    Since its clinical introduction, AICD therapy has gained significant acceptance. Some physicians consider it the "gold standard" in treating malignant tachyarrhythmias associated with sudden cardiac death. As the technology and therapy application have grown, nursing responsibilities have evolved as well. And, with the forthcoming combinations of technology such as AICDs with antitachycardia pacing and bradycardia pacing, the sophistication of the therapy is expected to increase. However, the most critical role for nurses in AICD patient care remains education. Increased utilization has made AICD implants more common, but many patients still lack the initial information and acceptance needed for therapeutic success. Health-care professionals who continue to update and share their understanding of this life-saving technology make invaluable contributions to the care of these patients who have received a second chance at life.

  14. Appropriateness of sling immobilization to prevent lead displacement after pacemaker/implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation.

    PubMed

    Naffe, Aster; Iype, Mini; Easo, Mini; McLeroy, Sandra Dejong; Pinaga, Kelli; Vish, Nancy; Wheelan, Kevin; Franklin, Jay; Adams, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    After pacemaker/implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (pacemaker/ICD) implantation, patients are often required to immobilize the affected arm with a sling to minimize the risk of lead displacement. We examined whether performing a resistive range-of-motion exercise protocol after pacemaker/ICD surgery would result in lead displacement and, therefore, whether sling immobilization and activity restrictions are justified. Ten subjects who had undergone pacemaker/ICD surgery performed four individual resistive range-of-motion exercises (three sets of 10 repetitions for each: one warm-up set without weight and two sets with a 1- or 2-pound hand weight) with the affected arm prior to hospital discharge. For each subject, an electrophysiology nurse specialist used a noninvasive device programmer to evaluate surgical lead placement before and after the exercises. As an adjunct to the study, we queried clinicians at 48 US hospitals about sling immobilization and activity restrictions after pacemaker/ICD implantation at their institutions. No lead displacement occurred after the weightlifting exercises were performed. Based on these results in a small group of patients, it appears that requiring the use of a joint immobilization sling is overly restrictive, promotes fear, and hinders recovery. We encourage the development of consistent discharge instructions that will promote early mobility and a safe and rapid return to normal activities.

  15. Surgical techniques for implanting implantable cardioverter defibrillators in children and infants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shoji; Motohashi, Shinya; Matsumoto, Masahiko

    2014-10-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are now being used in children. ICDs can be used to prevent sudden cardiac death caused by not only congenital heart defects, but also various non-structural diseases, such as long QT syndrome. However, a standard implantation technique for children, especially infants, has not yet been established. As the surgical implantation in infants is not amenable to transvenous lead placement, it was necessary to choose from epicardial, subcutaneous and pericardial ICD systems. However, many of these systems are associated with high rates of late complications. Lead fracture, insulation breakage, migration, buckling or crinkling of the patch lead and constrictive pericarditis have been reported as the most common lead-related complications. An increase in the defibrillation threshold is another issue that must be considered when using an ICD in a child or infant. Further studies on the outcomes, psychosomatic impact and other specific complications in the pediatric population need to be considered. The clinical use of ICDs in infants is still limited. Therefore, it is important to have many surgical options available so that the treatment can be custom-tailored to suit individual patients. PMID:24154922

  16. Electrical storm in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: can it be forecast?

    PubMed

    Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alihasani, Narges; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Tayyebi, Mohammad; Bonakdar, Hamid; Barakpour, Hamid; Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of electrical storm in 227 patients who had received implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and had been monitored for 31.7 +/- 15.6 months. Of these, 174 (77%) were men. The mean age was 55.8 +/- 15.5 years (range, 20-85 yr), and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 0.30 +/- 0.14. One hundred forty-six of the patients (64%) had underlying coronary artery disease. Cardioverter-defibrillators were implanted for secondary (80%) and primary (20%) prevention. Of the 227 patients, 117 (52%) experienced events that required ICD therapy. Thirty patients (mean age, 57.26 +/- 14.3 yr) had > or = 3 episodes requiring ICD therapy in a 24-hour period and were considered to have electrical storm. The mean number of events was 12.75 +/- 15 per patient. Arrhythmia-clustering occurred an average of 6.1 +/- 6.7 months after ICD implantation. Clinical variables with the most significant association with electrical storm were low LVEF (P = 0.04; hazard ratio of 0.261, and 95% confidence interval of 0.08-0.86) and higher use of class IA antiarrhythmic drugs (P = 0.018, hazard ratio of 3.84, and 95% confidence interval of 1.47-10.05). Amiodarone treatment and use of beta-blockers were not significant predictors when subjected to multivariate analysis. We conclude that electrical storm is most likely to occur in patients with lower LVEF and that the use of Class IA antiarrhythmic drugs is a risk factor.

  17. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  18. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    McGuinn, L; Hajat, S; Wilkinson, P; Armstrong, B; Anderson, H R; Monk, V; Harrison, R

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  19. Exercise and competitive sports in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Carré, Francois

    2014-11-21

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) prevent sudden arrhythmic death in patients with different arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases. Because intense physical activity may trigger ventricular arrhythmias and may favour inappropriate shock delivery that impacts quality of life, current international recommendations only give clearance for moderate leisure-time physical activity to patients with an ICD. Hence, athletes are deemed non-eligible to compete with their ICD. The rationale for the current restriction from competitive sports is discussed in this review, as well as new insights that may alter these recommendations for certain sports participants in the foreseeable future. This review provides guidance for the choice of a durable lead and device system, careful programming tailored to the characteristics of the patient's physiological and pathological heart rhythms, instalment of preventive bradycardic medication, and guided rehabilitation with psychological counselling, allowing a maximum of benefit and a minimum of harm for physically active ICD patients.

  20. Guidelines on the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Datino, T; Rexach, L; Vidán, M T; Alonso, A; Gándara, Á; Ruiz-García, J; Fontecha, B; Martínez-Sellés, M

    2014-01-01

    This article is a joint document of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology, the Spanish Society of Palliative Care and the Section of Geriatric Cardiology of the Spanish Society of Cardiology. Its aim is to address the huge gap that exists in Spain with regard to the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in the final stages of life. It is increasingly common to find patients carrying these devices that are in the terminal stage of an advanced disease. This occurs in patients with advanced heart disease and subsequent heart failure refractory to treatment but also in a patient with an ICD who develops cancer disease, organ failure or other neurodegenerative diseases with poor short-term prognosis. The vast majority of these patients are over 65, so the paper focuses particularly on the elderly who are in this situation, but the decision-making process is similar in younger patients with ICDs who are in the final phase of their life.

  1. [Guidelines on the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators at the end of life].

    PubMed

    Datino, T; Rexach, L; Vidán, M T; Alonso, A; Gándara, Á; Ruiz-García, J; Fontecha, B; Martínez-Sellés, M

    2014-01-01

    This article is a joint document of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology, the Spanish Society of Palliative Care and the Section of Geriatric Cardiology of the Spanish Society of Cardiology. Its aim is to address the huge gap that exists in Spain with regard to the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in the final stages of life. It is increasingly common to find patients carrying these devices that are in the terminal stage of an advanced disease. This occurs in patients with advanced heart disease and subsequent heart failure refractory to treatment but also in a patient with an ICD who develops cancer disease, organ failure or other neurodegenerative diseases with poor short-term prognosis. The vast majority of these patients are over 65, so the paper focuses particularly on the elderly who are in this situation, but the decision-making process is similar in younger patients with ICDs who are in the final phase of their life.

  2. New Zealand primary implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation and biventricular pacing guidelines.

    PubMed

    Smith, Warren

    2010-02-19

    Primary implantation of an implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is recommended for patients with ischaemic or non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy present for at least 3 months, with ejection fraction (EF) = or <30% measured = or >3 months after optimal heart failure treatment. Patients should be on maximal heart failure treatment as tolerated for = or >3 and preferably 6 months, and in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II or III. They should be = or >3 months remote from any revascularisation procedure or have no clinical symptoms or findings that would make them a candidate for revascularisation. There should be no associated disease reducing survival <18 months. Biventricular pacing is recommended for patients with an EF = or <35% after = or >6 weeks of optimal heart failure treatment, whose QRS duration is >149 ms or is 120-149 ms with two additional criteria for dyssynchrony (aortic pre-ejection delay >140 ms, interventricular mechanical delay >40 ms or delayed activation of the posterolateral left ventricular wall). They should be NYHA Class III, have had no major cardiovascular event in the prior 6 weeks and be in sinus rhythm. There should be no major comorbidity reducing survival <18 months or seriously impairing quality of life.

  3. Hospice Use Following Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Parzynski, Craig S.; Spertus, John A.; Mor, Vincent; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Older recipients of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are at increased risk for short-term mortality in comparison with younger patients. Although hospice use is common among decedents aged >65, its use among older ICD recipients is unknown. Methods and Results— Medicare patients aged >65 matched to data in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry – ICD Registry from January 1, 2006 to March 31, 2010 were eligible for analysis (N=194 969). The proportion of ICD recipients enrolled in hospice, cumulative incidence of hospice admission, and factors associated with time to hospice enrollment were evaluated. Five years after device implantation, 50.9% of patients were either deceased or in hospice. Among decedents, 36.8% received hospice services. The cumulative incidence of hospice enrollment, accounting for the competing risk of death, was 4.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6%–4.8%) within 1 year and 21.3% (95% CI, 20.7%–21.8%) at 5 years. Factors most strongly associated with shorter time to hospice enrollment were older age (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.73–1.81), class IV heart failure (versus class I; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.66–1.94); ejection fraction <20 (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.48–1.67), and greater hospice use among decedents in the patients’ health referral region. Conclusions— More than one-third of older patients dying with ICDs receive hospice care. Five years after implantation, half of older ICD recipients are either dead or in hospice. Hospice providers should be prepared for ICD patients, whose clinical trajectories and broader palliative care needs require greater focus. PMID:27016104

  4. Predictors and Clinical Impact of Inappropriate Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shocks in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Hoon; Byeon, Kyeongmin; Yim, Hye Ran; Park, Jung Wae; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo

    2012-01-01

    Limited data are available on inappropriate shocks in Korean patients implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We investigated the impact of inappropriate shocks on clinical outcomes. This retrospective, single-center study included 148 patients treated between October 1999 and June 2011. The primary outcome was a composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalization for any cardiac reason. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (interquartile range: 8 to 53). One or more inappropriate shocks occurred in 34 (23.0%) patients. A history of atrial fibrillation was the only independent predictor of inappropriate shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.89-9.15, P < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of inappropriate shock (67.7%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia (23.5%), and abnormal sensing (8.8%). A composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalizations for any cardiac reason during follow-up was not significantly different between patients with or without inappropriate shock (inappropriate shock vs no inappropriate shock: 35.3% vs 35.4%, adjusted HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49-2.29, P = 0.877). Inappropriate shocks do not affect clinical outcomes in patients implanted with an ICD, although the incidence of inappropriate shocks is high. PMID:22690092

  5. Clinical Course After Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation: Chagasic Versus Ischemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisca Tatiana Moreira; Rocha, Eduardo Arrais; Monteiro, Marcelo de Paula Martins; Lima, Neiberg de Alcantara; Rodrigues Sobrinho, Carlos Roberto Martins; Pires Neto, Roberto da Justa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The outcome of Chagas disease patients after receiving implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is still controversial. Objective: To compare clinical outcomes after ICD implantation in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Methods: Prospective study of a population of 153 patients receiving ICD (65 with CCC and 88 with IHD). The devices were implanted between 2003 and 2011. Survival rates and event-free survival were compared. Results: The groups were similar regarding sex, functional class and ejection fraction. Ischemic patients were, on average, 10 years older than CCC patients (p < 0.05). Patients with CCC had lower schooling and monthly income than IHD patients (p < 0.05). The number of appropriate therapies was 2.07 higher in CCC patients, who had a greater incidence of appropriate shock (p < 0.05). Annual mortality rate and electrical storm incidence were similar in both groups. There was no sudden death in CCC patients, and only one in IHD patients. Neither survival time (p = 0.720) nor event-free survival (p = 0.143) significantly differed between the groups. Conclusion: CCC doubles the risk of receiving appropriate therapies as compared to IHD, showing the greater complexity of arrhythmias in Chagas patients. PMID:27411097

  6. Changing Views: Safety and Efficacy of Implantable Cardioverter- Defibrillator Therapy in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Pavlů, Luděk; Hutyra, Martin; Táborský, Miloš

    2015-11-01

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is highly effective in reducing sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmia among high-risk cardiac patients. Conventional advice given to patients with ICD is to avoid physical activity more strenuous than playing golf or bowling. This recommendation is given due to a theoretical risk of arrhythmia precipitation, and thus increased risk of death due to failure to defibrillate, injury resulting from loss of control caused by arrhythmia-related syncope or shock, and also due to sport related direct damage to the ICD system. Recent prospective data from an international registry involving 372 athletes with ICDs in situ and actively participating in sports has been published. This indicates that, although physical activity resulted in an increased number of shocks compared to rest, there was no significant difference between intensive physical activity and any other activity (10% vs. 8%, p=0.34) in frequency of shocks. Furthermore, over a median follow-up period of 31 months (21-46 months), in the period of sports activity and 2 hour rest directly after there were no occurrences of death, resuscitated arrest or arrhythmia, or shock-related injury. This data is likely to start a shift in every-day clinical decision-making leading to revision of the high level of precautions imposed on the rapidly enlarging ICD recipient population. PMID:26849548

  7. Quality of Life in Patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tomzik, Juliane; Koltermann, Katharina C; Zabel, Markus; Willich, Stefan N; Reinhold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the indisputable mortality advantages of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), no consensus exists regarding their impact on quality of life (QoL). This systematic review investigates differences in QoL between patients with ICDs and controls. We systematically searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, and PsychINFO databases. Articles were included if they were published after the year 2000 and reported on original studies with a control group. Five randomized controlled trials with a total of 5,138 patients and 10 observational studies with a total of 1,513 patients met the inclusion criteria. Nine studies found comparable QoL for ICD recipients and patients in the control groups, three studies found an increased QoL for ICD patients, and three studies found a decreased QoL for ICD patients. The question of whether QoL relates to ICD therapy cannot be answered conclusively due to the heterogeneity of the existing studies. Lower QoL was apparent among patients with an ICD who experienced several device discharges. Medical staff should be particularly aware of the signs of both psychological and physical disorders in these patients. Further investigations on QoL in ICD patients are desirable, but ethical reasons restrict the conduct of randomized trials. PMID:26664905

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With 'MR-conditional' devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  9. Arrhythmia Management in the Elderly-Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillators and Prevention of Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Manian, Usha; Gula, Lorne J

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of arrhythmia management in elderly patients as it pertains to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy and prevention of sudden death. Treatment of arrhythmia in elderly patients is fraught with challenges pertaining to goals of care and patient frailty. With an ever increasing amount of technology available, realistic expectations of therapy need to balance quality and quantity of life. The ICD is an important treatment option for selected patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. However, the incidence of sudden death as a percentage of all-cause mortality decreases with age. Studies have reported that 20% of elderly patients might die within 1 year of an episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but most because of nonarrhythmic causes. This illustrates the 'sudden cardiac death paradox,' with a great proportion of death in elderly patients, even those at risk for ventricular arrhythmias, attributable to medical conditions that cannot be addressed by an ICD. We discuss current practices in ICD therapy in elderly patients, existing evidence from registries and clinical trials, approaches to risk stratification, and important ethical considerations. Although the decision on whether ICD insertion is appropriate in the elderly population remains an area of uncertainty from an evidence-based and ethical perspective, we offer insight on potential clinical and research strategies for this growing population. PMID:27568872

  10. Quality of Life in Patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tomzik, Juliane; Koltermann, Katharina C.; Zabel, Markus; Willich, Stefan N.; Reinhold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the indisputable mortality advantages of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), no consensus exists regarding their impact on quality of life (QoL). This systematic review investigates differences in QoL between patients with ICDs and controls. We systematically searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, and PsychINFO databases. Articles were included if they were published after the year 2000 and reported on original studies with a control group. Five randomized controlled trials with a total of 5,138 patients and 10 observational studies with a total of 1,513 patients met the inclusion criteria. Nine studies found comparable QoL for ICD recipients and patients in the control groups, three studies found an increased QoL for ICD patients, and three studies found a decreased QoL for ICD patients. The question of whether QoL relates to ICD therapy cannot be answered conclusively due to the heterogeneity of the existing studies. Lower QoL was apparent among patients with an ICD who experienced several device discharges. Medical staff should be particularly aware of the signs of both psychological and physical disorders in these patients. Further investigations on QoL in ICD patients are desirable, but ethical reasons restrict the conduct of randomized trials. PMID:26664905

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  12. Tachycardia detection in modern implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Thomas; Dahlke, Daniel; Chebbo, Amin; Neumann, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) have to reliably sense, detect, and treat malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Inappropriate treatment of non life-threatening tachyarrhythmias should be avoided. This article outlines the functionality of ICDs developed and manufactured by BIOTRONIK. Proper sensing is achieved by an automatic sensitivity control which can be individually tailored to solve special under- and oversensing situations. The programming of detection zones for ventricular fibrillation (VF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), and zones to monitor other tachyarrhythmias is outlined. Dedicated single-chamber detection algorithms based on average heart rate, cycle length variability, sudden rate onset, and changes in QRS morphology as used in ICDs by BIOTRONIK are described in detail. Preconditions and confirmation algorithms for therapy deliveries as antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and high energy shocks are explained. Finally, a detailed description of the dual-chamber detection algorithm SMART is given. It comprises additional detection criteria as stability of atrial intervals, 1:1 conduction, atrial-ventricular (AV) multiplicity, AV trend, and AV regularity to differentiate between ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27576695

  13. [Twiddler-Syndrome in a subpectoral implanted unipolar cardioverter-defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Mewis, C; Kühlkamp, V; Dörnberger, V; Kalighi, K; Seipel, L

    1998-01-01

    Twiddler's syndrome is a rare complication in patients with pacemakers. We report this very rare syndrome in a patient with pectoral implanted unipolar cardioverter defibrillator. This syndrome was detected because the patient presented in the 3 month routine visit an exitblock with an increased pacing impedance. The defibrillation threshold remained unchanged. The chest x-ray revealed an inferolaterally migrated generator with a multiply rotated lead. The intraoperative exploration showed a generator which was rotated nine-fold around its longitudinal axis with a multiple twisted unipolar lead. The lead was substituted and the aggregate fixed with a suture to the underlying muscle fascia. An atrophy of the pectoralis muscle was found in this patient which previously resulted from a long hospital stay. This atrophy was identified as a possible risk factor for the development of Twiddler's syndrome. This report illustrates that Twiddler's syndrome, a rare complication in patients with pectoral ICD, may become a significant problem in these patients as it is for pacemaker patients but with more serious possible consequences.

  14. Manual vs. automatic capture management in implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Murgatroyd, Francis D.; Helmling, Erhard; Lemke, Bernd; Eber, Bernd; Mewis, Christian; van der Meer-Hensgens, Judith; Chang, Yanping; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Katz, Amos

    2010-01-01

    Aims The Secura™ ICD and Consulta™ CRT-D are the first defibrillators to have automatic right atrial (RA), right ventricular (RV), and left ventricular (LV) capture management (CM). Complete CM was evaluated in an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) population. Methods and results Two prospective clinical studies were conducted in 28 centres in Europe and Israel. Automatic CM data were compared with manual threshold measurements, the CM applicability was determined, and adjustments to pacing outputs were analysed. In total, 160 patients [age 64.6 ± 10.4 years, 77% male, 80 ICD and 80 cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D)] were included. The differences between automatic and manual measurements were ≤0.25 V in 97% (RA CM) and 96% (RV CM) and were all within the safety margin. Fully automatic CM measurements were available within 1 week prior to the 3-month visit in 90% (RA), 99% (RV), and 97% (LV) of the patients. Results indicated increased output (threshold >2.5 V) due to raised RA threshold in seven (4.4%), high RV threshold in nine (5.6%), and high LV threshold in three patients (3.8%). All high threshold detections and all automatic modulations of pacing output were adjudicated appropriate. Conclusion Complete CM adjusts pacing output appropriately, permitting a reduction in office visits while it may maximize device longevity. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00526227 and NCT00526162. PMID:20231152

  15. Ironic Technology: Old Age and the implantable cardioverter defibrillator in US health care

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Sharon R.; Mueller, Paul S.; Ottenberg, Abigale L.; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    We take the example of cardiac devices, specifically the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or ICD, to explore the complex cultural role of technology in medicine today. We focus on persons age 80 and above, for whom ICD use is growing in the U.S. We highlight an ironic feature of this device. While it postpones death and ‘saves’ life by thwarting a lethal heart rhythm, it also prolongs living in a state of dying from heart failure. In that regard the ICD is simultaneously a technology of life extension and dying. We explore that irony among the oldest age group -- those whose considerations of medical interventions are framed by changing societal assumptions of what constitutes premature death, the appropriate time for death and medicine’s goals in an aging society. Background to the rapidly growing use of this device among the elderly is the ‘technological imperative’ in medicine, bolstered today by the value given to evidence-based studies. We show how evidence contributes to standards of care and to the expansion of Medicare reimbursement criteria. Together, those factors shape the ethical necessity of physicians offering and patients accepting the ICD in late life. Two ethnographic examples document the ways in which those factors are lived in treatment discussions and in expectations about death and longevity. PMID:21126815

  16. [Guidelines on the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators at the end of life].

    PubMed

    Datino, T; Rexach, L; Vidán, M T; Alonso, A; Gándara, Á; Ruiz-García, J; Fontecha, B; Martínez-Sellés, M

    2014-01-01

    This article is a joint document of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology, the Spanish Society of Palliative Care and the Section of Geriatric Cardiology of the Spanish Society of Cardiology. Its aim is to address the huge gap that exists in Spain with regard to the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in the final stages of life. It is increasingly common to find patients carrying these devices that are in the terminal stage of an advanced disease. This occurs in patients with advanced heart disease and subsequent heart failure refractory to treatment but also in a patient with an ICD who develops cancer disease, organ failure or other neurodegenerative diseases with poor short-term prognosis. The vast majority of these patients are over 65, so the paper focuses particularly on the elderly who are in this situation, but the decision-making process is similar in younger patients with ICDs who are in the final phase of their life. PMID:24331838

  17. Guidelines on the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Datino, T; Rexach, L; Vidán, M T; Alonso, A; Gándara, Á; Ruiz-García, J; Fontecha, B; Martínez-Sellés, M

    2014-01-01

    This article is a joint document of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology, the Spanish Society of Palliative Care and the Section of Geriatric Cardiology of the Spanish Society of Cardiology. Its aim is to address the huge gap that exists in Spain with regard to the management of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in the final stages of life. It is increasingly common to find patients carrying these devices that are in the terminal stage of an advanced disease. This occurs in patients with advanced heart disease and subsequent heart failure refractory to treatment but also in a patient with an ICD who develops cancer disease, organ failure or other neurodegenerative diseases with poor short-term prognosis. The vast majority of these patients are over 65, so the paper focuses particularly on the elderly who are in this situation, but the decision-making process is similar in younger patients with ICDs who are in the final phase of their life. PMID:24119393

  18. Driving restrictions advised by midwestern cardiologists implanting cardioverter defibrillators: present practices, criteria utilized, and compatibility with existing state laws.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, L A; Winston, S A; Honoway, S; Reed, P

    1992-08-01

    Although some patients remain at risk of losing physical control or collapsing after implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator for sustained ventricular arrhythmias, little is known about restrictions advised by arrhythmia specialists to patients with implanted devices concerning physical activities such as driving. In this study, all of the 58 cardiologists implanting cardioverter defibrillators in three contiguous midwestern states were surveyed to determine present practices and the compatibility of these practices with existing state law. Of the 51 respondents (88%), 27 cardiologists (53%) advised only those implanted patients who had had arrhythmia-induced presyncope or physical collapse to cease driving. Twenty two of the remaining cardiologists (43%) advised all implanted patients to cease driving, whereas two cardiologists (4%) never advised any implanted patient to restrict driving. Permanent driving abstinence was advised by seven of the responding cardiologists (14%), while temporary driving abstinence for periods of 2-12 months (mean 6 +/- 3 months) was recommended by the remaining 42 respondents (82%) who advised against driving. The criteria utilized, driving restrictions advised, and durations advised for driving restrictions were not uniform in any of the 13 surveyed university and nonaffiliated cardiology practices with greater than or equal to 2 implanting cardiologists. Overall, 38 cardiologists (74%) advised against driving and recommended durations that equaled or exceed their state's minimum legal requirements, although only 27 of the 51 cardiologists (53%) based their practice upon knowledge of their state's driving laws. The results of this survey suggest that the majority of cardiologists who implant cardioverter defibrillators advise their patients against driving postoperatively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Home monitoring report from a single lead Lumax DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator: New observations in a new system.

    PubMed

    Konstantino, Yuval; Kleiman, Alex; Amit, Guy

    2016-06-01

    A 56-year-old man underwent a single lead Lumax 640 DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. A DX system consists of a single lead, which provides atrial as well as ventricular electrograms, and enhances atrial arrhythmia detection. Three months after the implantation, high-frequency episodes were detected on the far field and the atrial channels, but not on the bipolar right ventricular channel; these were classified as atrial tachycardia. In the present report, we discussed the unusual pattern of the artifacts that was related to an electromagnetic interference detected by the novel DX system. PMID:27354868

  20. The Gulf Implantable Cardioverter-defibrillator Registry: Rationale, Methodology, and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Hersi, Ahmad S.; Hamad, Adel K. S.; Al Fagih, Ahmed R.; Al-Samadi, Faisal M.; Almusaad, Abdulmohsen M.; Bokhari, Fayez A.; Al-Kandari, Fawzia; Al-Ghamdi, Bandar S.; Al Rawahi, Najib; Asaad, Nidal; Alkaabi, Salem; Daoulah, Amin; Zaky, Hosam A.; Elhag, Omer; Al Hebaishi, Yahya S.; Sweidan, Raed; Alanazi, Haitham; Chase, David; Sabbour, Hani; Al Meheiri, Mohammad; Al Abri, Ismail; Amin, Mohammad; Dagriri, Khaled; Ahmed, Adil O.; Shafquat, Azam; Khan, Shahul Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is effective in the prevention of sudden cardiac death in high-risk patients. Little is known about ICD use in the Arabian Gulf. We designed a study to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients receiving ICDs in the Arab Gulf region. Methods: Gulf ICD is a prospective, multi-center, multinational, and observational study. All adult patients 18 years or older, receiving a de novo ICD implant and willing to sign a consent form will be eligible. Data on baseline characteristics, ICD indication, procedure and programing, in-hospital, and 1-year outcomes will be collected. Target enrollment is 1500 patients, which will provide adequate precision across a wide range of expected event rates. Results: Fifteen centers in six countries are enrolling patients (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Bahrain, and Qatar). Two-thirds of the centers have dedicated electrophysiology laboratories, and in almost all centers ICDs are implanted exclusively by electrophysiologists. Nearly three-quarters of the centers reported annual ICD implant volumes of ≤150 devices, and pulse generator replacements constitute <30% of implants in the majority of centers. Enrollment started in December 2013, and accrual rate increased as more centers entered the study reaching an average of 98 patients per month. Conclusions: Gulf ICD is the first prospective, observational, multi-center, and multinational study of the characteristics and, the outcomes of patients receiving ICDs in the Arab Gulf region. The study will provide valuable insights into the utilization of and outcomes related to ICD therapy in the Gulf region. PMID:26900416

  1. A single implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock unmasking an electrical storm of 389 ventricular tachycardia episodes triggering device therapies.

    PubMed

    Arias, Miguel A; Valverde, Irene; Puchol, Alberto; Castellanos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Sánchez, Ana M; Alvarez-Temiño, María; Palomino, Miguel

    2008-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy who presented the first implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shock approximately 5 months after implantation. Device interrogation surprisingly revealed the occurrence of 389 ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes terminated by asymptomatic antitachycardia pacing (ATP) except for the episode requiring shock. The present case of electrical storm highlights how contemporary tiered ATP schemes constitute a valuable but underused form of termination for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in ICD patients, reducing the number of painful shocks and their adverse consequences.

  2. Pacemakers, implantable cardioverter/defibrillators, and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: evidence-based guidelines for the modern era.

    PubMed

    Platonov, Michael A; Gillis, Anne M; Kavanagh, Katherine M

    2008-02-01

    Early work examining interactions between extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) and implantable pacemakers or implantable cardioverter/defibrillators suggested that shockwave oversensing may result in inappropriate suppression of pacing, delivery of antitachycardia pacing therapy, delivery of inappropriate shock therapy, or outright damage to such devices. In the absence of national guidelines, those provided by manufacturers are nonuniform and practice patterns vary between centers. Improvements in SWL energy delivery as well as in device shielding and discrimination technologies have demonstrated improved safety data in recent years. We review these advances in both technologies as well as the most recent data to construct practice guidelines for the modern era.

  3. Intrapericardial and retrocardial implantation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in a child with type 3 long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Mari; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Masuda, Munetaka

    2011-10-01

    A 6-year-old girl with type 3 long QT syndrome was safely and successfully implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) system. Prior to implantation, she had experienced uncontrollable life-threatening arrhythmia in spite of high-dose administration of mexiletine. An ICD coil lead for transvenous use was placed in the intrapericardial and retrocardial space and was connected to a generator placed in front of the posterior sheath of the right abdominal rectal muscle. Administration of a beta-blocker in addition to atrial pacing almost completely eliminated the patient's life-threatening arrhythmia attacks. Intrapericardial and retrocardial implantation of ICD coil leads might be useful for children. PMID:21818650

  4. Association of Physician Certification and Outcomes Among Patients Receiving an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeptha P.; Luebbert, Jeffrey J.; Wang, Yongfei; Rathore, Saif S.; Chen, Jersey; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Hammill, Stephen C.; Lampert, Rachel I.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2009-01-01

    Context Allowing nonelectrophysiologists to perform implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) procedures is controversial. However, it is not known whether outcomes of ICD implantation vary by physician specialty. Objective To determine the association of implanting physician certification with outcomes following ICD implantation. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective cohort study using cases submitted to the ICD Registry performed between January 2006 and June 2007. Patients were grouped by the certification status of the implanting physician into mutually exclusive categories: electrophysiologists, nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, thoracic surgeons, and other specialists. Hierarchical logistic regression models were developed to determine the independent association of physician certification with outcomes. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital procedural complication rates and the proportion of patients meeting criteria for a defibrillator with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D) who received that device. Results Of 111 293 ICD implantations included in the analysis, 78 857 (70.9%) were performed by electrophysiologists, 24 399 (21.9%) by nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 1862 (1.7%) by thoracic surgeons, and 6175 (5.5%) by other specialists. Compared with patients whose ICD was implanted by electrophysiologists, patients whose ICD was implanted by either nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists or thoracic surgeons were at increased risk of complications in both unadjusted (electrophysiologists, 3.5% [2743/78 857]; nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 4.0% [970/24 399]; thoracic surgeons, 5.8% [108/1862]; P < .001) and adjusted analyses (relative risk [RR] for nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 1.11 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01–1.21]; RR for thoracic surgeons, 1.44 [95% CI, 1.15–1.79]). Among 35 841 patients who met criteria for CRT-D, those whose ICD was implanted by physicians other than electrophysiologists were significantly

  5. Induction ovens and electromagnetic interference: what is the risk for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators?

    PubMed

    Binggeli, Christian; Rickli, Hans; Ammann, Peter; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Hufschmid, Urs; Luechinger, Roger; Duru, Firat

    2005-04-01

    Electromagnetic fields may interfere with normal implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) function. Although the devices are effectively shielded and use exclusively bipolar leads, electromagnetic interference (EMI) remains a concern when patients are exposed to several household appliances. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential EMI risk of induction ovens, which are increasingly common in private households. In vitro measurements of an induction oven for private households GK 43 TI (V-Zug, Inc., Zug, Switzerland) showed that heating is regulated by increasing operating time from level 1 (100 ms/sec) to 5 (continuous operation). From levels 5 to 9 the magnetic field increases. Nineteen patients with left-sided implants of single- and dual-chamber ICD systems (8 Medtronic, 7 Guidant, and 4 St. Jude Medical) (18 males, 1 female), age (mean +/- SEM) 58 +/- 3 years, were included in this study. All patients were examined in standing position, bent over the cooking pot (minimal distance to the induction coil 25 cm), and with the cooking pot put eccentrically over the induction field at three different cooking levels (level 2, 5, and 9). The tests were repeated touching the cooking pot with one hand. Ventricular sensitivity was left unchanged. Ventricular tachycardia therapies were turned off in Medtronic and Guidant devices and ventricular sensing was continuously monitored in St. Jude Medical devices during testing. Interrogation of the devices after exposure did not show any inappropriate tachycardia detection, oversensing, or reprogramming. In conclusion, ICD patients can be reassured that EMI is unlikely to affect their devices if induction ovens are used in their kitchens.

  6. Influence of primary and secondary prevention indications on anxiety about the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Rahmawati, Anita; Chishaki, Akiko; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Sawatari, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki; Ohtsuka, Yuko; Nakai, Mori; Miyazono, Mami; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Sakurada, Harumizu; Takemoto, Masao; Mukai, Yasushi; Inoue, Shujirou; Sunagawa, Kenji; Chishaki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) have been established for primary and secondary prevention of fatal arrhythmias. However, little is known about the influence of ICD indications on quality of life (QOL) and psychological disturbances. This study aimed to examine whether there were differences in QOL and psychological distress in patients that have an ICD for primary or secondary prevention of fatal arrhythmias. Methods A multicenter survey of 179 consecutive outpatients (29.1% primary prevention) with ICD implantations completed the Short Form-8 (SF-8), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Worries about ICD (WAICD). Results Patients with an ICD for primary prevention had a higher trait anxiety score and worries about ICD score than patients with an ICD for secondary prevention (41.7±12.4 vs. 34.7±12.3, p=0.001 and 39.6±18.0 vs. 30.0±18.9, p=0.002, respectively), even after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. In multivariable analysis of variance, primary prevention ICD recipients reported a poorer QOL on the vitality subscale of the SF-8. Conclusions In our study population, which mostly consisted of New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I and II subjects, primary prevention ICD recipients were more prone to experience worries about their ICD, anxiety, and a poorer QOL compared to secondary prevention ICD recipients. In clinical practice, primary prevention ICD patients should be closely monitored. If warranted, they should be offered psychological intervention, as anxiety and low QOL were predictors of mortality. PMID:27092190

  7. Prediction of ventricular arrhythmia events in ischemic heart disease patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianjie; Zhang, Shu; Chen, Keping; Hua, Wei; Ren, Xiaoqing

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to exam the prediction of ventricular arrhythmia events in ischemic heart disease patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD). A total of 123 consecutive patients confirmed ischemia heart disease with ICD were examined. After device implantation, the occurrence of appropriate ICD therapy was noted. Patients were divided into two groups according to the ventricular arrhythmia occurrence. Patients with ventricular arrhythmia occurrence had a significantly great incidence of atrial fibrillation history compare to the no-ventricular arrhythmia occurrence group (8 vs. 39%, P = 0.02). The level of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) baseline was also significantly higher in the ventricular arrhythmia group than in the no ventricular arrhythmia (3.78 ± 1.1 vs. 0.94 ± 0.7, P < 0.01). The taking of β blocker is not common in ventricular arrhythmia group patients than no ventricular arrhythmia group (5 vs. 29%, P = 0.03). By univariate comparison, male sex, the history of atrial fibrillation, and a high level of hsCRP were significant predictors for ventricular arrhythmia occurrence. By multivariate analysis, the atrial fibrillation burden, and had a high level of hsCRP were significant for incidence of ventricular arrhythmia occurrence in ischemic heart disease patients. β-block were more likely to be free from ventricular arrhythmia occurrence. The high level of hsCRP, and the atrial fibrillation burden were strong predictor of ventricular arrhythmia occurrence in secondary prevention ICD recipients with ischemic heart disease. Taking β-blockers was free from ventricular arrhythmia occurrence.

  8. Rare infection of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead with Candida albicans: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Nina Thakkar; Bray, Natasha; Wang, Hong; Zelnick, Kenneth; Osman, Ahmed; Vicuña, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    Infection of implanted cardiac devices has a low rate of occurrence. Fungal infections of such devices represent an atypical phenomenon, associated with high mortality. Both medical and surgical therapies are recommended for a successful outcome. A 60-year-old woman with past medical history of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement, sarcoidosis and diabetes presented with fevers and atypical pleuritic chest pain. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a highly mobile 2.09 cm by 4.49 cm mass associated with the ICD wire. Blood cultures were positive for Candida albicans. The patient underwent sternotomy for removal. The vegetation was 4 cm by 2 cm by 2 cm in size, attached to the right ventricle without interference with the tricuspid valve. The patient was treated with micafungin for 2 weeks and then fluconazole for 6 weeks. In this case report, we describe the rare infection of an ICD lead with C. albicans, in the form of a fungal ball. This is the 18th reported case of Candida device-related endocarditis and the first reported in a woman. Prior case reports have occurred primarily in pacemaker rather than ICD leads. The vegetation size is also one of the largest that has been reported, measuring 4 cm at its greatest length. As Candida device-related endocarditis is so rare, and as fatality occurs in half of cases, clinical management can only be derived from sporadic case reports. Therefore, the course of this patient's disease care will be a useful adjunct to the current literature for determining treatment and prognosis in similar cases.

  9. Referring Physicians’ Discordance with the Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Guidelines: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Jorge M; Smith, Lisa M; Varosy, Paul D.; Dehlendorf, Christine; Marcus, Gregory M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The ACC/AHA/HRS Guidelines provide patient selection criteria for primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). For unknown reasons, guideline discordant practice is common. OBJECTIVE To determine referring physicians’ concordance with the primary prevention ICD guidelines. METHODS We mailed a survey regarding ICD guidelines and individual practice characteristics to a random national sample of 3,000 physicians, 1/3rd each specializing in family medicine, internal medicine, and general cardiology, selected from the American Medical Association Masterfile. RESULTS Sixty-four percent with correct contact information responded. Three hundred and ninety-five (28%, 95% CI 25–30%) respondents never refer patients with the intent of consideration for a primary prevention ICD, including 7% (95% CI 5–10%) of cardiologists. Two hundred and twelve (15%, 95% CI 13–17%) believe ventricular arrhythmias are required before a primary prevention ICD is indicated; 525 (36%, 95% CI 34–39%) believe an ejection fraction > 40% warrants a primary prevention ICD; and 361 (25%, 95% CI 23–27%) would refer a patient for a primary prevention ICD within 40 days of a myocardial infarction. In multivariate analyses, family practice physicians and physicians residing in the Western US most often provided guideline-discordant answers, while cardiologists and those that refer to an electrophysiologist most often provided guideline-concordant answers. Primary care physicians that manage heart failure patients without referral to a subspecialist were not more likely to provide guideline concordant answers. CONCLUSIONS Answers discordant with the primary prevention ICD guidelines were common, suggesting that referring physician beliefs are an important barrier to appropriate patient referrals for primary prevention ICD implantation. PMID:22306794

  10. No Electromagnetic Interference Occurred in a Patient with a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System and a Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Kar, Biswajit; Loyalka, Pranav; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The use of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators is a novel option for preventing arrhythmia-mediated cardiac death in patients who are at risk of endovascular-device infection or in whom venous access is difficult. However, the potential for electromagnetic interference between subcutaneous defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices is largely unknown. We report the case of a 24-year-old man in whom we observed no electromagnetic interference between a subcutaneous implanted cardioverter-defibrillator and a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System, at 3 different pump speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in this circumstance. PMID:27127441

  11. No Electromagnetic Interference Occurred in a Patient with a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System and a Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Shabari, Farshad Raissi; Kar, Biswajit; Loyalka, Pranav; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    The use of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators is a novel option for preventing arrhythmia-mediated cardiac death in patients who are at risk of endovascular-device infection or in whom venous access is difficult. However, the potential for electromagnetic interference between subcutaneous defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices is largely unknown. We report the case of a 24-year-old man in whom we observed no electromagnetic interference between a subcutaneous implanted cardioverter-defibrillator and a HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System, at 3 different pump speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in this circumstance.

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in a Patient with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) and Posttraumatic stress disorder(PTSD).

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sahar; Arbabi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has currently become the standard treatment for preventing sudden cardiac death. There are some psychological consequences in patients with ICD such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the shocks induced by ICD. This report aimed to present the case of a 54-year-old man with ICD who had developed PTSD; his PTSD was treated, using cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy consisting of relaxation, mindfulness and problem solving techniques. In patients with ICD who are experiencing PTSD using cognitive behavioral interventions may be helpful to reduce their psychological sufferings.

  13. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Moderately Strenuous Aerobic Exercise After an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Glenny, Robb W.; Burr, Robert L.; Flo ARNP, Gayle L.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its salutary effects on health, aerobic exercise is often avoided after receipt of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) because of fears that exercise may provoke acute arrhythmias. We prospectively evaluated the effects of a home aerobic exercise training and maintenance program (EX) on aerobic performance, ICD shocks and hospitalizations exclusively in ICD recipients. Methods and Results One hundred sixty (124 men, 36 women) were randomized who had an ICD for primary (43%) or secondary (57%) prevention to EX or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2), measured with cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline, 8 and 24 weeks. EX consisted of 8 weeks of home walking 1 hour/day, 5 days/week at 60-80% of heart rate reserve, followed by 16 weeks of maintenance home walking for 150 minutes/week. Adherence to EX was determined from exercise logs, ambulatory HR recordings of exercise, and weekly telephone contacts. UC received no exercise directives and were monitored by monthly telephone contact. Adverse events were identified by ICD interrogations, patient reports and medical records. ICD recipients averaged 55±12 years and mean ejection fraction of 40.6±15.7, all were taking beta blocker medications. EX significantly increased peakVO2 ml/kg/min (EX 26.7±7.0; UC 23.9±6.6, p=0.002) at 8 weeks, which persisted during maintenance exercise at 24 weeks (EX 26.9±7,7; UC 23.4±6.0, p<0.001). ICD shocks were infrequent (EX=4 vs UC=8), with no differences in hospitalizations or deaths between groups. Conclusions Prescribed home exercise is safe and significantly improves cardiovascular performance in ICD recipients without causing shocks or hospitalizations. PMID:25792557

  14. Readability and Content of Patient Education Material Related to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Patricia H.; de Laat, Sonya; Carroll, Sandra L.; Schwartz, Lisa; Vaandering, Katie; Toor, Gurjit K.; Arthur, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly offered to patients for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Candidates for ICD receive ICD-related patient education material when they make decisions to consent or decline a primary prevention ICD. Printed patient education material directed at ICD candidates has not been the focus of direct appraisal. Objective We evaluated the readability and content of ICD-related print education materials made available to patients who were enrolled in a study involving patient decision making for ICD from 3 ICD sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Methods All ICD print materials referred to during interviews and/or that were available in ICD site waiting rooms were collected for analysis. Readability testing was conducted using the SMOG (“simple measurement of gobbledygook”) and Fry methods. The material was evaluated according to selected plain-language criteria, thematic content analysis, and rhetoric analysis. Results Twenty-one print materials were identified and analyzed. Documents were authored by device manufacturers, tertiary care hospitals, and cardiac support organizations. Although many documents adhered to plain-language recommendations, text-reading levels were higher than recommended. Twelve major content themes were identified. Content focused heavily on the positive aspects of living with the device to the exclusion of other possible information that could be relevant to the decisions that patients made. Conclusions Print-based patient education materials for ICD candidates are geared to a highly literate population. The focus on positive information to the exclusion of potentially negative aspects of the ICD, or alternatives to accepting 1, could influence and/or confuse patients about the purpose and implications of this medical device. Development of print materials is indicated that includes information about possible problems and that would be relevant for the

  15. Sustaining cyborgs: sensing and tuning agencies of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Oudshoorn, Nelly

    2015-02-01

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in cyborgs, and particularly in new and emerging fusions of humans and technologies related to the development of human enhancement technologies. These studies reflect a trend to follow new and emerging technologies. In this article, I argue that it is important to study 'older' and more familiar cyborgs as well. Studying 'the old' is important because it enables us to recognize hybrids' embodied experiences. This article addresses two of these older hybrids: pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators inserted in the bodies of people suffering from heart-rhythm disturbances. My concern with hybrid bodies is that internal devices seem to present a complex and neglected case if we wish to understand human agency. Their 'users' seem to be passive because they cannot exert any direct control over the working of their devices. Technologies inside bodies challenge a longstanding tradition of theorizing human-technology relations only in terms of technologies external to the body. Cyborg theory is problematic as well because most studies tend to conceptualize the cyborg merely as a discursive entity and silence the voices of people living as cyborgs. Inspired by feminist research that foregrounds the materiality of the lived and intimate relations between bodies and technologies, I argue that creating these intimate relations requires patients' active involvement in sustaining their hybrid bodies. Based on observations of these monitoring practices in a Dutch hospital and interviews with patients and technicians, the article shows that heart cyborgs are far from passive. On the contrary, their unique experience in sensing the entangled agencies of technologies and their own heart plays a crucial role in sustaining their hybrid bodies.

  16. Electromagnetic interference of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator and HeartWare left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Labedi, Mohamed R; Alharethi, Rami; Kfoury, A G; Budge, Deborah; Bruce, Reid; Rasmusson, Brad; Bunch, T Jared

    2013-01-01

    The use of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have markedly improved outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). The HeartWare LVAD is a miniaturized centrifugal pump implanted within the pericardial space. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are susceptible to oversensing of extracardiac signals (electromagnetic interference [EMI]). We report two cases of EMI in patients that received a HeartWare LVAD as destination therapy for advanced HF. The patients were 75 and 78 years old, both with severe ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction < 0.20) and New York Heart Association class 4 heart failure. Both patients had a St. Jude Medical Unify ICD with a 7 Fr dual coil St. Jude Medical Durata ICD lead. In both patients, the lead location was in the right ventricular apex with an inferior orientation. Both patients experienced immediate ICD therapies after LVAD placement, requiring the tachytherapies to be disabled. ICD programming changes to increase sensitivity and the detection windows were ineffective. Both patients underwent ICD system revision. In one patient, the existing lead was moved to an anteroseptal location that stopped the EMI. In the other patient, the ICD system was changed to allow a separate right ventricular sensing lead in an anteroseptal location and a dual coil ICD lead placed in an apical location, a strategy used to obtain an acceptable defibrillation threshold. The patients have had no subsequent EMI detected on clinical and remote monitoring. Patients with a right ventricular apical ICD lead placement that undergo placement of a HeartWare LVAD are susceptible to EMI and inappropriate ICD therapies. These cases suggest the primary mechanism is proximity of the ICD lead to the device and as such relocation to an anteroseptal location can overcome the problem. These data suggest that all patients that receive a HeartWare LVAD with an ICD should have the device carefully checked at maximum LVAD

  17. Serum-Based Oxylipins Are Associated with Outcomes in Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Harms, Amy C.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Cheng, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with systolic heart failure are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying these events. We sought to better understand if oxylipins, a diverse class of lipid metabolites derived from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, were associated with these outcomes in recipients of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Methods Among 479 individuals from the PROSE-ICD study, baseline serum were analyzed and quantitatively profiled for 35 known biologically relevant oxylipin metabolites. Associations with ICD shocks for ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Six oxylipins, 17,18-DiHETE (HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99 per SD change in oxylipin level), 19,20-DiHDPA (HR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.98), 5,6-DiHETrE (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.91), 8,9-DiHETrE (HR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.95), 9,10-DiHOME (HR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.00), and PGF1α (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.71) were associated with the risk of appropriate ICD shock after multivariate adjustment for clinical factors. Additionally, 4 oxylipin-to-precursor ratios, 15S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3), 17,18-DiHETE / FA (20:5-ω3), 19,20-DiHDPA / FA (20:5-ω3), and 5S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3) were positively associated with the risk of all-cause mortality. Conclusion In a prospective cohort of patients with primary prevention ICDs, we identified several novel oxylipin markers that were associated with appropriate shock and mortality using metabolic profiling techniques. These findings may provide new insight into the potential biologic pathways leading to adverse events in this patient population. PMID:27281224

  18. Correlation of Geomagnetic Activity with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks and Antitachycardia Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Ebrille, Elisa; Konecny, Tomas; Konecny, Dana; Spacek, Radim; Jones, Paul; Ambroz, Pavel; DeSimone, Christopher V; Powell, Brian D; Hayes, David L; Friedman, Paul A; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Small-scale observational studies have suggested that geomagnetic activity (GMA) may negatively correlate with the frequency of life-threatening arrhythmias. We investigated a potential relationship between implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies and daily GMA recorded in a large database. Patients and Methods The ALTITUDE database, derived from the Boston Scientific LATITUDE remote monitoring system, was retrospectively analyzed for the frequency of ICD therapies. Daily GMA was expressed as the planetary K-index and the integrated A-index and graded as Levels I – quiet, II – unsettled, III – active, and IV – storm. Results A daily mean of 59,468 ± 11,397 patients were monitored between 2009 and 2012. The distribution of days according to GMA was: Level I 75%, Level II 18%, Level III 5%, Level IV 2%. The daily number of ICD shocks received per 1000 active patients in the database was 1.29 ± 0.47, 1.17 ± 0.46, 1.03 ± 0.37, and 0.94 ± 0.29 on Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV days respectively; the daily sum of shocks and antitachycardia pacing (ATP) therapies was 9.29 ± 2.86, 8.46 ± 2.45, 7.92 ± 1.80, and 7.83 ± 2.28 on quiet, unsettled, active and storm days respectively. A statistically significant inverse relationship between GMA and the frequency of ICD therapies was identified, with the most pronounced difference between Level I and Level IV days (p < .001 for shocks, p = .008 for shocks + ATP). Conclusion In a large scale cohort analysis, ICD therapies were delivered less frequently on days of higher GMA, confirming the previous pilot data and suggesting that higher GMA does not pose an increased risk of arrhythmias using ICD therapies as a surrogate marker. Further studies are needed to gain an in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25659238

  19. Current implantable cardioverter-defibrillator programming in Europe: the results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Grazia Bongiorni, Maria; Etsner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to examine the current practice on the choice of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) type, use of defibrillation testing, and ICD programming for detection and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias. In accordance with recent guidelines and the results of observational studies, the majority of EHRA research network centres reported a high utilization rate of dual-chamber ICDs in the presence of symptomatic and asymptomatic sinus node dysfunction, biventricular ICD in high-degree atrioventricular block and QRS duration <120 ms, and a limited use of defibrillation testing either in primary and secondary prevention settings. Activation of the long ventricular tachycardia (VT) detection window, slow VT zone, antitachycardia pacing before shock for slow and fast VT, and atrial tachyarrhythmia discrimination were considered useful in ICD programming for the majority of patients.

  20. Safety and Cost-Effectiveness of Same-Day Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Implantation.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Gavin; McAloon, Christopher James; Chohan, Bhaveek; Heining, Dominic; Anderson, Benjamin; Barker, Jethro; Randeva, Harpal; Osman, Faizel

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation improve morbidity and mortality in selected patients. Many centers still admit patients overnight. We evaluated the safety, feasibility, and cost savings of same-day CRT/ICD device implantation by performing a retrospective study of all consecutive elective CRT/ICD implants at a tertiary center from January 2009 to April 2013. All emergency and/or inpatient cases were excluded. Data were collected on baseline demographics, implantation indication, procedure details, complications (categorized as immediate [≤24 hours], short term [24 hours to 6 weeks], medium term [6 weeks to 4 months], and long term [>4 months]), and mortality (30 day and 1 year). Comparisons were made between those having planned same-day versus overnight stay procedures. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate cost savings of the same-day policy. A total of 491 devices were implanted during this period: 267 were elective (54 planned overnight, 213 planned same-day) of which 229 were CRT pacemakers or CRT defibrillators and 38 ICDs. There were 26 total overall complications (9.7%) with no significant differences between planned same-day versus planned overnight stay cohorts (9.4% vs 11.1%, p = 0.8) and specifically no differences in immediate, short-, medium-, and long-term complications at follow-up. The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates did not differ between the two groups. An overnight stay at our hospital costs $450 (£300); our cost saving during this period was $91,800 (£61,200). Same-day CRT/ICD implantation is safe, feasible, and associated with significant cost savings. It provides significant advantages for patients and health care providers, especially given the current financial climate. PMID:26993428

  1. Prevalence and outcomes of patients receiving implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for primary prevention not based on guidelines.

    PubMed

    Levine, Yehoshua C; Tuttle, Mark K; Rosenberg, Michael A; Goldberg, Randal; Matos, Jason; Samuel, Michelle; Kramer, Daniel B; Buxton, Alfred E

    2015-06-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation outside practice guidelines remains contentious, particularly during the mandated waiting periods in patients with recent cardiac events. We assessed the prevalence and outcomes of non-guideline-based (NGB) ICD implantations in a tertiary academic medical center, with a specific focus on adjudication of arrhythmia events. All patients who underwent initial primary prevention ICD implantation at our institution from 2004 to 2012 were categorized as having received guideline-based (GB) or NGB implants and were retrospectively assessed for first episode of appropriate ICD therapy and total mortality. Of 807 patients, 137 (17.0%) received NGB implants. During a median follow-up of 2.9 years, patients with NGB implants had similar times to first appropriate ICD therapy (median time to event 1.94 vs 2.17 years in patients with GB implants, p = 0.20). After multivariable analysis, patients with NGB implants remained at higher risk for death (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.2, p = 0.03) but not appropriate ICD therapy (hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.5 to 1.3, p = 0.51). Furthermore, only 1 of 125 patients who underwent implant within the 40-day waiting period after myocardial infarction or 3-month waiting period after revascularization or cardiomyopathy diagnosis received an appropriate therapy within this period. In conclusion, few patients received NGB ICD implants in our academic medical center. Although these patients have similar long-term risk of receiving appropriate ICD therapy compared with patients with GB implants, this risk is very low during the waiting periods mandated by clinical practice guidelines. These results suggest that there is little need to rush into implanting ICDs during these waiting periods. PMID:25840578

  2. Impact of dual chamber pacing on the incidence of atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias in recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Strohmer, Bernhard; Mermi, Johann; Castellanos, Eduardo; Mayr, Harald; Gill, Jaswinder; Abadia, Antonio Asso; Kuehl, Martin; Wolpert, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that frequent dual-chamber pacing in recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) may adversely influence clinical outcomes. This prospective, multicenter study examined the relationship between the frequency of atrial (%AP) and ventricular pacing (%VP) and the incidence of atrial (AT) and/or ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in a standard ICD population. A total of 141 consecutive patients with primary and secondary ICD indications were studied. Continuous arrhythmia detection with a dual-chamber ICD revealed paroxysmal AT in 60 (43%) and VT in 72 (51%) patients within 6 months of device implantation. Far-field oversensing of ventricular signals occurred in 13% of all "atrial tachy response" mode switches. Without adjustment for covariates, a higher %AP was associated with an increased incidence of AT (P < 0.05). However, this association remained only weakly significant after adjustment for covariates using a multivariate model. High New York heart failure functional classes correlated significantly with AT (P = 0.02) and VT (P = 0.007). Rate-modulated pacing, programmed in 1/3 of patients, correlated with occurrence of AT (P = 0.006), but not with occurrence of VT. With respect to dual-chamber pacing, a %AP >/= 48% combined with a %VP > 40% was associated with an increased probability for VT. In conclusion, AT and VT occurred frequently within 6 months after dual-chamber ICD implantation. High rates of DDD/R stimulation were associated with a trend toward higher incidence of AT, VT, or both.

  3. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a firefighter after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Sandra; Arnett, Justin K.; Kennedy, Kathleen; Franklin, Jay O.; Berbarie, Rafic F.

    2014-01-01

    Firefighters who have received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) are asked to retire or are permanently placed on restricted duty because of concerns about their being incapacitated by an ICD shock during a fire emergency. We present the case of a 40-year-old firefighter who, after surviving sudden cardiac arrest and undergoing ICD implantation, sought to demonstrate his fitness for active duty by completing a high-intensity, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training program. The report details the exercise training, ICD monitoring, and stress testing that he underwent. During the post-training treadmill stress test in firefighter turnout gear, the patient reached a functional capacity of 17 metabolic equivalents (METs), exceeding the 12-MET level required for his occupation. He had no ICD shock therapy or recurrent sustained arrhythmias during stress testing or at any time during his cardiac rehabilitation stay. By presenting this case, we hope to stimulate further discussion about firefighters who have an ICD, can meet the functional capacity requirements of their occupation, and want to return to work. PMID:24982569

  4. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients: a single tertiary center experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo Kyung; Bang, Ji Seok; Choi, Eun Young; Kim, Gi Beom; Kwon, Bo Sang; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Kim, Woong Han

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) to prevent sudden cardiac death is increasing in children and adolescents. This study investigated the use of ICDs in children with congenital heart disease. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on the clinical characteristics and effectiveness of ICD implantation at the department of pediatrics of a single tertiary center between 2007 and 2011. Results Fifteen patients underwent ICD implantation. Their mean age at the time of implantation was 14.5±5.4 years (range, 2 to 22 years). The follow-up duration was 28.9±20.4 months. The cause of ICD implantation was cardiac arrest in 7, sustained ventricular tachycardia in 6, and syncope in 2 patients. The underlying disorders were as follows: ionic channelopathy in 6 patients (long QT type 3 in 4, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT] in 1, and J wave syndrome in 1), cardiomyopathy in 5 patients, and postoperative congenital heart disease in 4 patients. ICD coils were implanted in the pericardial space in 2 children (ages 2 and 6 years). Five patients received appropriate ICD shock therapy, and 2 patients received inappropriate shocks due to supraventricular tachycardia. During follow-up, 2 patients required lead dysfunction-related revision. One patient with CPVT suffered from an ICD storm that was resolved using sympathetic denervation surgery. Conclusion The overall ICD outcome was acceptable in most pediatric patients. Early diagnosis and timely ICD implantation are recommended for preventing sudden death in high-risk children and patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:23559974

  5. Failure of a novel silicone–polyurethane copolymer (Optim™) to prevent implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead insulation abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert G.; Abdelhadi, Raed H.; McGriff, Deepa M.; Kallinen Retel, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to determine if Optim™, a unique copolymer of silicone and polyurethane, protects Riata ST Optim and Durata implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads (SJM, St Jude Medical Inc., Sylmar, CA, USA) from abrasions that cause lead failure. Methods and results We searched the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Manufacturers and User Device Experience (MAUDE) database on 13 April 2012 using the simple search terms ‘Riata ST Optim™ abrasion analysis’ and ‘Durata abrasion analysis’. Lead implant time was estimated by subtracting 3 months from the reported lead age. The MAUDE search returned 15 reports for Riata ST Optim™ and 37 reports for Durata leads, which were submitted by SJM based on its analyses of returned leads for clinical events that occurred between December 2007 and January 2012. Riata ST Optim™ leads had been implanted 29.1 ± 11.7 months. Eight of 15 leads had can abrasions and three abrasions were caused by friction with another device, most likely another lead. Four of these abrasions resulted in high-voltage failures and one death. One failure was caused by an internal insulation defect. Durata leads had been implanted 22.2 ± 10.6 months. Twelve Durata leads had can abrasions, and six leads had abrasions caused by friction with another device. Of these 18 can and other device abrasions, 13 (72%) had electrical abnormalities. Low impedances identified three internal insulation abrasions. Conclusions Riata ST Optim™ and Durata ICD leads have failed due to insulation abrasions. Optim™ did not prevent these abrasions, which developed ≤4 years after implant. Studies are needed to determine the incidence of these failures and their clinical implications. PMID:22915789

  6. Replacement of implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Tilz, Roland; Boveda, Serge; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Dobreanu, Dan; Haugaa, Kristina H; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this EP Wire was to assess the management, indications, and techniques for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device replacement in Europe. A total of 24 centres in 14 European countries completed the questionnaire. All centres were members of the European Heart Rhythm Association Electrophysiology Research Network. Replacement procedures were performed by electrophysiologists in 52% of the centres, by cardiologists in 33%, and both in the remaining centres. In the majority of centres, the procedures were performed during a short hospitalization (<2 days; 61.2%), or on an outpatient basis (28%). The overwhelming majority of centres reported that they replaced ICDs at the end of battery life. Only in a small subset (<10%) of patients with ICD for primary prevention and without ventricular tachycardia (VT) since implantation, ICD was not replaced. In inherited primary arrhythmia syndromes, 80% of the centres always replaced the ICD at the end of battery life. After VT ablation, only few centres (9%) explanted or downgraded the device that was previously implanted for secondary prevention, but only in those patients without new VT episodes. Patient's life expectancy <1 year was the most commonly reported reason (61%) to downgrade from a CRT-D to a CRT-P device. While warfarin therapy was continued in 47% of the centres, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants were discontinued without bridging 24 h prior to replacement procedures in 60%. Finally, in 65% of the centres, VT induction and shock testing during ICD and CRT-D replacement were performed only in the case of leads with a warning or with borderline measurements. This survey provides a snapshot of the perioperative management, indications, and techniques of ICD and CRT device replacement in Europe. It demonstrates some variations between participating centres, probably related to local policies and to the heterogeneity of the ICD population. PMID

  7. Potential clinical impact of cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of ejection fraction on eligibility for cardioverter defibrillator implantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death, guidelines provide left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) criteria for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) placement without specifying the technique by which it should be measured. We sought to investigate the potential impact of performing cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for EF on ICD eligibility. Methods The study population consisted of patients being considered for ICD implantation who were referred for EF assessment by CMR. Patients who underwent CMR within 30 days of echocardiography were included. Echocardiographic EF was determined by Simpson’s biplane method and CMR EF was measured by Simpson’s summation of discs method. Results Fifty-two patients (age 62±15 years, 81% male) had a mean EF of 38 ± 14% by echocardiography and 35 ± 14% by CMR. CMR had greater reproducibility than echocardiography for both intra-observer (ICC, 0.98 vs 0.94) and inter-observer comparisons (ICC 0.99 vs 0.93). The limits of agreement comparing CMR and echocardiographic EF were – 16 to +10 percentage points. CMR resulted in 11 of 52 (21%) and 5 of 52 (10%) of patients being reclassified regarding ICD eligibility at the EF thresholds of 35 and 30% respectively. Among patients with an echocardiographic EF of between 25 and 40%, 9 of 22 (41%) were reclassified by CMR at either the 35 or 30% threshold. Echocardiography identified only 1 of the 6 patients with left ventricular thrombus noted incidentally on CMR. Conclusions CMR resulted in 21% of patients being reclassified regarding ICD eligibility when strict EF criteria were used. In addition, CMR detected unexpected left ventricular thrombus in almost 10% of patients. Our findings suggest that the use of CMR for EF assessment may have a substantial impact on management in patients being considered for ICD implantation. PMID:23043729

  8. Wrong detection of ventricular fibrillation in an implantable cardioverter defibrillator caused by the movement near the MRI scanner bore.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Mancini, Matteo; Napolitano, Antonio; Genovese, Elisabetta; Cannata, Vittorio; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The static magnetic field generated by MRI systems is highly non-homogenous and rapidly decreases when moving away from the bore of the scanner. Consequently, the movement around the MRI scanner is equivalent to an exposure to a time-varying magnetic field at very low frequency (few Hz). For patients with an implanted cardiac stimulators, such as an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the movements inside the MRI environment may thus induce voltages on the loop formed by the leads of the device, with the potential to affect the behavior of the stimulator. In particular, the ICD's detection algorithms may be affected by the induced voltage and may cause inappropriate sensing, arrhythmia detections, and eventually inappropriate ICD therapy.We performed in-vitro measurements on a saline-filled humanshaped phantom (male, 170 cm height), equipped with an MRconditional ICD able to transmit in real-time the detected cardiac activity (electrograms). A biventricular implant was reproduced and the ICD was programmed in standard operating conditions, but with the shock delivery disabled. The electrograms recorded in the atrial, left and right ventricle channels were monitored during rotational movements along the vertical axis, in close proximity of the bore. The phantom was also equipped with an accelerometer and a magnetic field probe to measure the angular velocity and the magnetic field variation during the experiment. Pacing inhibition, inappropriate detection of tachyarrhythmias and of ventricular fibrillation were observed. Pacing inhibition began at an angular velocity of about 7 rad/s, (dB/dt of about 2 T/s). Inappropriate detection of ventricular fibrillation occurred at about 8 rad/s (dB/dt of about 3 T/s). These findings highlight the need for a specific risk assessment of workers with MR-conditional ICDs, which takes into account also effects that are generally not considered relevant for patients, such as the movement around the scanner bore. PMID

  9. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  10. Anger-induced T-wave alternans predicts future ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel; Shusterman, Vladimir; Burg, Matthew; McPherson, Craig; Batsford, William; Goldberg, Anna; Soufer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether T-wave alternans (TWA) induced by anger in a laboratory setting predicts future ventricular arrhythmias (VT/VF) in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Background Anger can precipitate spontaneous VT/VF, and induce TWA. Whether anger-induced TWA predicts future arrhythmias is unknown. Methods Sixty-two patients with ICDs underwent ambulatory ECG during a mental stress protocol, three months post-implant. TWA was analyzed using time-domain methods. After ≥ 1 year follow-up, ICD stored data was reviewed to determine incidence of ICD-terminated VT/VF. Results Patients with ICD-terminated arrhythmias during follow-up (N=10) had higher TWA induced by anger, 13.2uV (iqr 9.3-16), compared to 9.3uV (7.5-11.5) (p<0.01). Patients in the highest quartile of anger-induced TWA (>11.9uV, N=15) were more likely to experience arrhythmias by one year than those in the lower quartiles, (33% versus 4%), and during extended follow-up (40% versus 9%, p<0.01 for both.) In multivariable regression controlling for ejection fraction, prior clinical arrhythmia, and wide QRS, anger-induced TWA remained a significant predictor of arrhythmia, with likelihood in the top quartile 10.8 times that of other patients (CI 1.6-113, p<0.05.) Conclusion Anger-induced TWA predicts future ventricular arrhythmias in patients with ICDs, suggesting that emotion-induced repolarization instability may be one mechanism linking stress and sudden death. Whether there is a clinical role for anger-induced TWA testing requires further study. PMID:19245968

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress in Patients With Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jessica; Rosman, Lindsey; Wuensch, Karl; Irvine, Jane; Sears, Samuel F

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to a history of cardiac arrest, device implantation, and ICD shock. There has been very little examination of treatment of PTSD symptoms in these patients. This study evaluated the effect of a specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for ICD patients with high levels of PTSD symptoms: a manualized program consisting of 8 telephone sessions with a trained counselor, a patient education book, and a stress management procedure on compact disc. Participants were 193 ICD patients, who were randomized to CBT or usual cardiac care (UCC) who completed self-report surveys at the time of recruitment and 6 and 12 months after initial measurement. Previous publication on the primary research evaluation questions reported that the CBT condition resulted in greater improvement on PTSD and depression symptoms than the UCC for the general population of ICD patients, but did not evaluate the effect on those with elevated symptoms of PTSD. The authors conducted secondary analyses of the effect of treatment on high and low PTSD symptom groups based on a cutoff for the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (Weiss & Marmar, 1997). Participants in the CBT group who had high symptoms experienced significantly greater symptom reduction from baseline to 12 months (d = 2.44, p = .021) than the UCC group (d = 1.12). Participants with low symptoms had small reductions regardless of group assignment (d = 0.16, p = .031). ICD-focused CBT was sufficient to produce a large, statistically significant reduction in PTSD symptoms in ICD patients with indications for treatment.

  12. Development and Testing of an Intervention to Improve Outcomes for Partners Following Receipt of an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator in the Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Thompson, Elaine A.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe 3 foundational studies and how their results were used to formulate, design, and test a novel partner intervention for implementation in the immediate post-ICD (implantable cardioverter defibrillator) period after returning home. Nursing’s expanding role into chronic illness management in the creation of evidence-based practice is highlighted. A randomized clinical trial comparing 2 intervention programs is being conducted with patients who receive an ICD for the first time and their intimate partners. Primary outcomes are physical functioning, psychological adjustment, relationship impact, and health care utilization. PMID:23107992

  13. Home monitoring of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: interpretation reliability of the second-generation “IEGM Online” system

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Herbert; Lipoldová, Jolana; Oswald, Hanno; Klein, Gunnar; Elvan, Arif; Vester, Ernst; Bauer, Wolfgang; Bondke, Hansjürgen; Reif, Sebastian; Daub, Claudia; Menzel, Frank; Schrader, Jürgen; Zach, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Aims Intracardiac electrograms (IEGMs) are essential for the assessment of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) function. The Biotronik Home Monitoring systems transmit an ‘IEGM Online’ that is shorter than the full-length programmer IEGM due to technical constrains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the physician's classification of the underlying rhythm based on the second-generation IEGM Online. Methods and results In total, 1533 patients treated with single- and dual-chamber ICDs and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators were enrolled at 67 investigational sites and followed for 15 months. The investigators classified the rhythm shown in IEGM Online as ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, atrial fibrillation, other supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, oversensing due to lead failure, T-wave oversensing, or other rhythm. At the next in-office follow-up, the investigators classified independently the rhythm seen in the corresponding programmer IEGM. The two rhythm classifications were compared thereafter. Both IEGM Online and programmer IEGM were available in 2099 arrhythmic or oversensing events, of which 146 (7.0%) were classified as other rhythm or artefacts and were excluded as inconclusive or atypical. The remaining 1953 events, affecting 352 patients (23.0%), were classified correctly in 1803 cases (92.3%). The accuracy of rough rhythm classification as ventricular, supraventricular, or oversensing was 97.2%. Conclusion The Lumax and IEGM Online HD Evaluation study demonstrates that remote IEGM analysis is reasonably accurate in a remote monitoring system that transmits shorter IEGM than the full-length programmer IEGM for the sake of frequent, fully automatic data transmission. PMID:25567067

  14. A pilot study of a mindfulness based stress reduction program in adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators or pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Thomas, Sue A; Friedmann, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or pacemakers (PMs) face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. Psychosocial interventions are effective for adults with cardiac devices and could potentially impact adolescents' adjustment to these devices. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured psycho-educational program that includes meditation, yoga, and group support and has been studied extensively among adults. This study examined the feasibility of the MBSR program for adolescents with ICDs/PMs, a population previously unexamined in the research literature. The participants completed measures of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and coping (Responses to Stress Questionnaire) at baseline and after the six-session MBSR intervention. Mean age of the cohort (n = 10) was 15 ± 3 years, 6 were male, 6 had a PM, and 4 had an ICD. Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment of 10 participants, 100 % participation and completion. Anxiety decreased significantly following the intervention, with a large effect size, t[9] = 3.67, p < .01, ŋ (2) = .59. Anxiety frequency decreased from baseline to post-intervention (Fisher's exact test p = .024), and 90 % of participants reported decreased anxiety scores post-intervention. Coping skills related negatively to anxiety (r = -.65, p = .04) and depression (r = -.88, p = .001). Post-intervention, the group independently formed their own Facebook group and requested to continue meeting monthly. Although generalizability is limited due to the small sample size, this successful pilot study paves the way for larger studies to examine the efficacy of MBSR interventions in adolescents with high-risk cardiac diagnoses.

  15. Sleep Quality and Sleepiness in Persons with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: Outcome from a Clinical Randomized Longitudinal Trial

    PubMed Central

    BERG, SELINA KIKKENBORG; HIGGINS, MELINDA; REILLY, CAROLYN M.; LANGBERG, JONATHAN J.; DUNBAR, SANDRA B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) report various types and degree of sleep disruptions, but little is known regarding their characteristics, duration, and associated factors. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe the effect of a psychoeducational intervention on sleep quality and daytime sleepiness, (2) to describe patterns of sleep over time, and (3) to identify predictors of poor sleep in an ICD population. Methods A randomized longitudinal intervention trial was designed to test the effects of a psychoeducational intervention, which included a sleep education and counseling session in patients receiving their initial ICD. Patients (n = 236; 75% men; mean age 58.4 [±11.2] from the PsychoEducationAl Intervention for ICD PatiEnts (PEACE) trial comprised the study population. Variables related to sleep were measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results No psychoeducational intervention effects on sleep outcomes were observed. However, 67.2% of the patients reported poor sleep quality at baseline, and 56.8% had low sleep quality at 6 months based on PSQI scores >5; one-third (32.6%) were excessively sleepy based on ESS scores =10 at 6 months. Anxiety, depression, physical function, pain intensity, and pain severity were all highly correlated to each other across time. Female gender was a significant covariate for the PSQI. New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was a significant covariate for sleepiness (Epworth). Conclusions Low sleep quality and daytime sleepiness are found at time of insertion and over time in patients with ICD. Female gender, higher NYHA class, as well as two latent factors encompassing increased anxiety, depressive symptoms, and decreased physical function and increased pain, were significant predictors of poor sleep quality and sleepiness over time. These data help identify those at higher risk for sleep problems after ICD. PMID

  16. Do implantable cardioverter defibrillators improve survival in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction after coronary artery bypass graft surgery?

    PubMed

    Fazal, Iftikhar A; Bates, Matthew G D; Matthews, Iain G; Turley, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) improve survival in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. ICDs are designed to terminate potentially fatal cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A right ventricular lead is mandatory for detection, pacing and defibrillation capabilities. Dual chamber ICDs have an additional right atrial lead and are used for patients with conventional atrioventricular pacing indications. More sophisticated, biventricular devices exist to provide cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) in addition to defibrillation (CRT-D). ICDs have been extensively investigated in patients with LVSD post myocardial infarction and in patients with non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy for both secondary prevention (history of ventricular arrhythmias) and primary prevention (deemed high risk for ventricular arrhythmias). This best evidence topic aims to review the evidence and its applicability to patients post CABG. Nine hundred and sixteen papers were identified using the search method outlined. Eight randomised controlled trials, two meta-analyses, and one non-randomised trial, in addition to international guidelines presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The current evidence base and guidelines suggest that ICDs should be considered for all patients with LVSD [ejection fraction (EF) ≤30-40%] receiving optimal pharmacological management, who are ≥40 days post MI [four weeks for National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)] and in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I-III. UK NICE guidelines require in addition; non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) on a Holter monitor and inducible ventricular tachycardia at electrophysiological study for EF between 30 and 35%; or a QRS >120 ms if EF <30%. The North American guidelines

  17. Association Between Comorbidities and Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients With and Without an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Khazanie, Prateeti; Hellkamp, Anne S; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Masoudi, Frederick A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Heidenreich, Paul A; Yancy, Clyde W; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2015-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is associated with improved outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF), but whether this association holds among older patients with multiple comorbid illnesses and worse HF burden remains unclear. Methods and Results Using the National Cardiovascular Data Registry’s ICD Registry and the Get With The Guidelines–Heart Failure (GWTG-HF) registry linked with Medicare claims, we examined outcomes associated with primary-prevention ICD versus no ICD among HF patients aged ≥65 years in clinical practice. We included patients with an ejection fraction ≤35% who received (ICD Registry) and who did not receive (GWTG-HF) an ICD. Compared with patients with an ICD, patients in the non-ICD group were older and more likely to be female and white. In matched cohorts, the 3-year adjusted mortality rate was lower in the ICD group versus the non-ICD group (46.7% versus 55.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.76; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.83). There was no associated difference in all-cause readmission (HR 0.99; 95% CI 0.92 to 1.08) but a lower risk of HF readmission (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.97). When compared with no ICD, ICDs were also associated with better survival in patients with ≤3 comorbidities (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87) and >3 comorbidities (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.93) and in patients with no hospitalization for HF (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.86) and at least 1 prior HF hospitalization (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.58 to 0.82). In subgroup analyses, there were no interactions between ICD and mortality risk for comorbidity burden (P=0.95) and for prior HF hospitalization (P=0.46). Conclusion Among older HF patients, ICDs for primary prevention were associated with lower risk of mortality even among those with high comorbid illness burden and prior HF hospitalization. PMID:26251283

  18. A case-crossover analysis of particulate air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kira E; Petkau, John; Vedal, Sverre; Brauer, Michael

    2004-06-01

    We investigated the relationship between air pollution and incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in a study of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Thirty-four patients (ages 15-85 yr, 80% male) with ICDs residing in the Vancouver, Canada, area were included in the analyses, representing all patients attending the 2 ICD clinics in the study region who had recorded at least 1 ICD discharge during the 14 February to 31 December 2000 study period. Air pollutant (PM(2.5), PM(10), SO(4)(2-), elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], O(3), SO(2), NO(2), and CO) concentrations on days for which ICD discharges were observed ("case days") were compared to concentrations on control days in case-crossover analyses. Control days were selected symmetrically, 7 days before and after each case day. ICD discharges occurring within 72 h of 1 another were grouped and considered as 1 discharge event. Temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were included simultaneously as covariates. Sensitivity analyses examined the effect of grouping ICD discharges, of including meteorological variables, and of excluding discharges that were considered inappropriate by a cardiologist. As in previous studies, mean concentrations and interquartile ranges of air pollutants in Vancouver were low (e.g., PM(2.5) mean = 8.2 microg/m(3)). Although in general there were no statistically significant results, there were trends that might indicate associations between pollutants and ICD discharges. Odds ratios (OR) were consistently higher in summer than in winter (e.g., lag 0 per interquartile range increase in EC: 1.09 [0.86-1.37] vs. 0.61 [0.31-1.18]) and, in general, the highest ORs were observed for same-day effects. The one major exception was the observation of high ORs for ozone in winter (e.g., lag 1: 2.27 [0.67-7.66]). While an OR of 1.55 (0.51-4.70) was observed in summer at lag 0 for PM(10), no indications of positive associations were

  19. [Who dictates the rhythm which must be followed? : Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, M; Walther, A; Serf, C

    2011-08-01

    The number of patients with implantable cardiac devices for the treatment of cardiac dysrhythmia is steadily climbing. Due to the increase in indications for implantation and the range of functions, an end to this development is not yet in sight. In order to provide safety in the everyday handling of these systems it is necessary to pay attention to various aspects prior to, during and after surgery or anesthesia.

  20. Cognitive and Behavioral Treatments for Anxiety and Depression in a Patient with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD): A Case Report and Clinical Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Samuel F.; Conti, Jamie B.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are the treatment of choice for patients at risk for potentially life threatening arrhythmias. The associated stress of living with an implanted device and receiving ICD shock therapy has been noted to exert a psychological toll on the individual patient and family. Anxious and depressive symptomatology is frequently reported by these patients, thus creating a demand for tailored psychological interventions for this population. The current case report describes the components, delivery, and effectiveness of a targeted treatment approach for anxiety and depression in an individual with an ICD. Test results and interview data revealed significant improvements in multiple domains of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral functioning. Improvements in marital relations were also achieved. These treatment effects were maintained at follow-up and in the context of acute, medical stressors. Future clinical and research directions are also discussed. PMID:19404725

  1. Results of ENHANCED Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Programming to Reduce Therapies and Improve Quality of Life (from the ENHANCED-ICD Study).

    PubMed

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Pedersen, Susanne S; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Doevendans, Pieter A; Meine, Mathias

    2016-02-15

    Novel implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) discrimination algorithms and programming strategies have significantly reduced the incidence of inappropriate shocks, but there are still gains to be made with respect to reducing appropriate but unnecessary antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and shocks. We examined whether programming a number of intervals to detect (NID) of 60/80 for ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) detection was safe and the impact of this strategy on (1) adverse events related to ICD shocks and syncopal events; (2) ATPs/shocks; and (3) patient-reported outcomes. The "ENHANCED Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator programming to reduce therapies and improve quality of life" study (ENHANCED-ICD study) was a prospective, safety-monitoring study enrolling 60 primary and secondary prevention patients at the University Medical Center Utrecht. Patients implanted with any type of ICD with SmartShock technology and aged 18 to 80 years were eligible to participate. In all patients, a prolonged NID 60/80 was programmed. The cycle length for VT/fast VT/VF was 360/330/240 ms, respectively. Programming a NID 60/80 proved safe for ICD patients. Because of the new programming strategy, unnecessary ICD therapy was prevented in 10% of ENHANCED-ICD patients during a median follow-up period of 1.3 years. With respect to patient-reported outcomes, levels of distress were highest and perceived health status lowest at the time of implantation, which both gradually improved during follow-up. In conclusion, the ENHANCED-ICD study demonstrates that programming a NID 60/80 for VT/VF detection is safe for ICD patients and does not negatively impact their quality of life.

  2. Programming implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in primary prevention: higher or later.

    PubMed

    Clementy, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Simeon, Edouard; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    Defibrillator shocks, appropriate or not, are associated with significant morbidity, as they decrease quality of life, can be involved in depression and anxiety, and are known to be proarrhythmic. Most recent data have even shown an association between shocks and overall mortality. As opposed to other defibrillator-related complications, the rate of inappropriate and unnecessary shocks can (and should) be decreased with adequate programming. This review focuses on the different programming strategies and tips available to reduce the rate of shocks in primary prevention patients with left ventricular dysfunction implanted with a defibrillator, as well as some of the manufacturers' device specificities.

  3. Long-term structural failure of coaxial polyurethane implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Robert G; Cannom, David; Hayes, David L; Parsonnet, Victor; Hayes, John; Ratliff, Norman; Tyers, G Frank O; Epstein, Andrew E; Vlay, Stephen C; Furman, Seymour; Gross, Jay

    2002-06-01

    Transvene models 6936/6966, a coaxial polyurethane ICD lead, may be prone to structural failure. These models comprise 54% of ICD lead failures in the authors' Multicenter Registry database. Because ICD leads perform a vital function, the clinical features, causes, and probability of Transvene 6936/6966 lead failure were determined. The Registry and United States Food and Drug Administration databases were queried for the clinical features and structural causes of the Transvene 6936/6966 lead failure, and a five-center substudy estimated the survival probability for 521 Transvene 6936/6966 implants. The mean time to failure was 4.8 +/- 2.1 years, and the estimated survival at 60 and 84 months after implant were 92% and 84%, respectively. Oversensing was the most common sign of failure (76%), and 24 patients experienced inappropriate shocks. The manufacturer's reports indicated that high voltage coil fracture and 80A polyurethane defects were the predominant causes of lead failure. Transvene models 6936 and 6966 coaxial polyurethane ICD leads are prone to failure over time. Patients who have these leads should be evaluated frequently. Additional studies are needed to identify safe management strategies. PMID:12137338

  4. Remote monitoring and follow-up of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Haran; Senouf, David

    2009-01-01

    In the era of communication technology, new options are now available for following-up patients implanted with pacemakers (PMs) and defibrillators (ICDs). Most major companies offer devices with wireless capabilities that communicate automatically with home transmitters, which then relay data to the physician, thereby allowing remote patient follow-up and monitoring. These systems are being widely used in the USA for remote follow-up, and have been more recently introduced in Europe, where their adoption is increasing. In this article, we describe the currently existing systems, review the available evidence in the literature regarding remote follow-up and monitoring of PMs and ICDs, and finally discuss some unresolved issues. PMID:19470595

  5. [Practical questions around individual with a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Fantoni, Sophie; Montpellier, Dominique; Tordjman, Eric; Jarde, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    An individual with a pacemaker can ask his GP for information about potential problems associated with the device. Should a pacemaker continue to be used by end-of-life patients? Should a pacemaker be stopped in a limited care situation? What precautions should be taken when treating a patient with a pacemaker? Pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Medically, MRIs are theoretically contraindicated, even though examinations could be performed without a major problem, and special precautions should be taken when using an electrosurgical cutter or radiotherapy. In case of death, a doctor or embalmer must remove the patient's pacemaker due to its risk of explosion during cremation. Doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. It may affect an employee's ability to work. Are there some professions that are not well suited for individuals with a pacemaker? PMID:22138293

  6. [High incidence of isolator fractures in transvenous implantation of cardioverter defibrillators].

    PubMed

    Mewis, C; Kühlkamp, V; Dörnberger, V; Mermi, J; Seipel, L

    1997-02-01

    With the growing complexity of transvenous ICD-lead systems the incidence of lead complications might increase in comparison to usual pacemaker leads. The incidence of insulation defects of transvenous leads was determined during a mean follow-up time of 23.8 +/- 10.9 months. Among 130 transvenous ICD-patients, eight insulation-breaks in seven patients (6%) could be identified after a mean follow-up of 28 +/- 13 months. After a follow-up period of 12 months no lead defect was identified, after 24 months 96.3 +/- 1.8% of all transvenous leads were free of complications, after 36 months 87.9 +/- 6% and after 48 months in 61.2 +/- 18.7% of all leads no isolator fracture was found. In seven cases an operative revision was required. All insulation-defects were exclusively found in abdominally implanted silicone lead-systems type Endotak/CPI (Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc., USA): isolator fractures occurred in 12% of all Endotak leads used, 19% of the Endotak C models 62, 64, 72 and 74 were affected. In none of 66 implanted Transvene lead systems (Medtronic, Inc., USA) were isolator defects found. In six patients the proximal part of the sensing lead near the device was affected. All of these patients experienced potentially harmful repetitive device discharges. In one patient during elective ICD-replacement an isolation break of the proximal shock electrode was found, in another patient between the proximal and distal shock-electrode. Despite regular follow-ups with impedance-measurements, only in one case was the insulation break foreseeable. Stored electrograms were helpful to disclose insulation defects. With increasing age of the transvenous lead systems a growing number of insulation defects has to be expected. Especially the isolators of the first Endotak C models 60-74 seem to create major problems with increasing age.

  7. An updated review of implantable cardioverter/defibrillators, induced anxiety, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael; Sola, Christopher L

    2007-12-01

    During the past 2 years the number of studies examining psychopathology and quality of life after ICD implantation has increased dramatically. Variables assessed have included recipient age, gender, and social support network. How recipients respond to having the device, particularly after experiencing firing, has been evaluated in light of new depression and anxiety disorder diagnoses as well as premorbid personality structure. Now the picture of what is known is, if anything, cloudier than it was 2 years ago, with little definitive and much contradictory data emerging in most of these categories. It still seems clear that in a significant minority of ICD recipients the device negatively affects quality of life, probably more so if it fires. Education about life with the device before receiving it remains paramount. Reports continue to appear of patients developing new-onset diagnosable anxiety disorders such as panic and posttraumatic stress disorder. Until recently the strongest predictors of induced psychopathology were considered to be the frequency and recency of device firing. It now seems that preimplantation psychologic variables such as degree of optimism or pessimism and an anxious personality style may confer an even greater risk than previously thought. Certainly many variables factor into the induction of psychopathology in these patients. Among these factors are age, gender, and perception of control of shocks, as well as the predictability of shocks and psychologic attributions made by the patient regarding the device. Another source of variability is this population's medical heterogeneity. Some patients receive ICDs after near-death experiences; others get them as anticipatory prophylaxis. Some have longstanding and entrenched heart disease; others were apparently healthy before sudden dangerous arrhythmias. Diagnoses as diverse as myocardial infarction in the context of advanced coronary artery disease and dilated cardiomyopathy after acute viral

  8. Circadian variations in the occurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Kozák, Milan; Krivan, Lubomír; Semrád, Borivoj

    2003-03-01

    A circadian distribution has been demonstrated in episodes of sudden cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, ventricular premature complexes, heart rate variability, and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The aim of this study was to evaluate the circadian distribution of ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes in a population of ICD patients. Data were gathered from 72 patients (55 men, 17 women; mean age 62.7 +/- 12.2 years, mean LVEF 0.0037 +/- 0.0011) with ICDs implanted for standard indications. Patients were followed every 3 months over a mean period of 21 +/- 12.8 months. At each examination, symptoms at arrhythmia onset and perception of ICD therapy were recorded, and the ICD memory was interrogated. During follow-up, 1,023 episodes' of malignant ventricular arrhythmias were detected and effectively terminated, 506 of which were fully analyzed. A morning peak in ventricular tachyarrhythmias was demonstrated between 7:00 and 11:00 AM, and an afternoon peak between 6:00 and 7:00 PM. A significantly lower occurrence of VT was observed at 1:00 AM and between 4:00 and 6:00 AM. A circadian distribution in the occurrence of ventricular tachycardias was found. The three striking features of the data are: the early morning peak (about three hours after waking up), relatively stable incidence throughout waking hours, and decline in incidence in the previous period. PMID:12698674

  9. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Cedars, Ari M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  10. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in a 34-year-old patient with eating disorders and after the third sudden cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Orzechowski, Piotr; Bilinska, Maria; Przybylski, Andrzej; Szumowski, Lukasz; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are psychiatric diseases associated with the highest mortality rate of any other psychiatric disorders. More recently, long-term outcome studies with follow-up of over 20 years report a mortality of between 15% and 18% (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). The sudden death secondary to arrhythmias is often the cause of death in these patients (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). A case of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia (VA) in a patient with ED is presented. Clinical records (cardiologic, psychiatric), electrocardiograms, echocardiogram, coronary angiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance, and endocrine diagnostics were performed. Finally a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was implanted in the patient after her third cardiac arrest. An optimal approach to antiarrhythmic therapy in such patients is a real challenge for a cardiologist.

  11. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Sandeep S; Cedars, Ari M

    2015-08-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  12. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Does an ICD Work During ICD Surgery After ICD Surgery What Are the Risks Lifestyle Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Heart Attack How the Heart Works Pacemakers Sudden Cardiac Arrest Send a link to NHLBI to ...

  13. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin. Like pacemakers , ICDs contain a generator containing a computer, battery, and wires called “leads” ... while the other end is connected to the generator. The battery in the generator lasts 5-8 ...

  14. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart failure ... Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  15. Design and Methods for a Pilot Study of a Phone-Delivered, Mindfulness-Based Intervention in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Carmody, James; Yeh, Gloria; Crawford, Sybil; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Background. Meditation practices are associated with a reduction in adrenergic activity that may benefit patients with severe cardiac arrhythmias. This paper describes the design and methods of a pilot study testing the feasibility of a phone-delivered mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) for treatment of anxiety in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Design and Methods. Consecutive, clinically stable outpatients (n = 52) will be screened for study eligibility within a month of an ICD-related procedure or ICD shock and will be randomly assigned to MBI or to usual care. MBI patients will receive eight weekly individual phone sessions based on two mindfulness practices (awareness of breath and body scan) plus home practice with a CD for 20 minutes daily. Patients assigned to usual care will be offered the standard care planned by the hospital. Assessments will occur at baseline and at the completion of the intervention (between 9 and 12 weeks after randomization). The primary study outcome is feasibility; secondary outcomes include anxiety, mindfulness, and number of administered shocks during the intervention period. Conclusions. If proven feasible and effective, phone-delivered mindfulness-based interventions could improve psychological distress in ICD outpatients with serious cardiovascular conditions. PMID:22536294

  16. Integrated approach for smart implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) device with real time ECG monitoring: use of flexible sensors for localized arrhythmia sensing and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Munish; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Miranda, Aimon C.; Gelot, Shyam; Moreno, Wilfrido; Adithya, Prashanth C.; Law, Catherine; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2013-01-01

    Arrhythmias are the most common cause of death associated with sudden death and are common in US and worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), evolving from pacemakers and development of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), has been adopted for therapeutic use and demonstrated benefits in patients over the years due to its design and intricate functionality. Recent research has been focused on significant design improvement and efforts are dedicated toward device size reduction, weight and functionality in commercially available ICD's since its invention in the 1960's. Commercially available CRT-D has shown advancement on both clinical and technical side. However, improved focus is required on the device miniaturization, technologically supported and integrated wireless based system for real time heart monitoring electrocardiogram (ECG). In the present report a concise overview for the state-of-the art technology in ICDs and avenues for future development are presented. A unique perspective is also included for ICD device miniaturization and integration of flexible sensing array. Sensor array integration along with its capabilities for identifying localized arrhythmia detection and targeted stimulation for enhancing ICD device capabilities is reviewed. PMID:24167492

  17. Improving the appropriateness of sudden arrhythmic death primary prevention by implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction. Point of view

    PubMed Central

    Disertori, Marcello; Gulizia, Michele M.; Casolo, Giancarlo; Delise, Pietro; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Lunati, Maurizio; Mestroni, Luisa; Salerno-Uriarte, Jorge; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the current guidelines for the primary prevention of sudden arrhythmic death, which are based on ejection fraction, do not allow the optimal selection of patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction of ischemic and nonischemic etiology for implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator. Ejection fraction alone is limited in both sensitivity and specificity. An analysis of the risk of sudden arrhythmic death with a combination of multiple tests (ejection fraction associated with one or more arrhythmic risk markers) could partially compensate for these limitations. We propose a polyparametric approach for defining the risk of sudden arrhythmic death using ejection fraction in combination with other clinical and arrhythmic risk markers (i.e. late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance, T-wave alternans, programmed ventricular stimulation, autonomic tone, and genetic testing) that have been validated in nonrandomized trials. In this article, we examine these approaches to identify three subsets of patients who cannot be comprehensively assessed by the current guidelines: patients with ejection fraction of 35% or less and a relatively low risk of sudden arrhythmic death despite the ejection fraction value; patients with ejection fraction of 35% or less and high competitive risk of death due to evolution of heart failure or noncardiac causes; and patients with ejection fraction between 35 and 45% with relatively high risk of sudden arrhythmic death despite the ejection fraction value. PMID:26895401

  18. Prediction of Appropriate Shocks Using 24-Hour Holter Variables and T-Wave Alternans After First Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Patients With Ischemic or Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seegers, Joachim; Bergau, Leonard; Expósito, Pascal Muñoz; Bauer, Axel; Fischer, Thomas H; Lüthje, Lars; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Friede, Tim; Zabel, Markus

    2016-07-01

    In patients treated with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), prediction of both overall survival and occurrence of shocks is important if improved patient selection is desired. We prospectively studied the predictive value of biomarkers and indexes of cardiac and renal function and spectral microvolt T-wave alternans testing and 24-hour Holter variables in a population who underwent first ICD implantation. Consecutive patients in sinus rhythm with ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy scheduled for primary or secondary prophylactic ICD implantation were enrolled. Exercise microvolt T-wave alternans and 24-hour Holter for number of ventricular premature contractions (VPCs), deceleration capacity, heart rate variability, and heart rate turbulence were done. Death of any cause and first appropriate ICD shock were defined as end points. Over 33 ± 15 months of follow-up, 36 of 253 patients (14%) received appropriate shocks and 39 of 253 patients (15%) died. Only 3 of 253 patients (1%) died after receiving at least 1 appropriate shock. In univariate analyses, New York Heart Association class, ejection fraction, N-terminal pro brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), renal function, ICD indication, deceleration capacity, heart rate variability, and heart rate turbulence were predictive of all-cause mortality and VPC number and deceleration capacity predicted first appropriate shock. NT-proBNP (≥1,600 pg/ml) was identified as the only independent predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.0, confidence interval 1.3 to 7.3, p = 0.014). In contrast, VPC number predicted appropriate shocks (hazard ratio 2.3, confidence interval 1.0 to 5.5, p = 0.047) as the only independent risk marker. In conclusion, NT-proBNP is a strong independent predictor of mortality in a typical prospective cohort of newly implanted patients with ICD, among many electrocardiographic and clinical variables studied. Number of VPCs was identified as a predictor of appropriate shocks

  19. Gender Differences in Appropriate Shocks and Mortality among Patients with Primary Prophylactic Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conen, David; Arendacká, Barbora; Röver, Christian; Bergau, Leonard; Munoz, Pascal; Wijers, Sofieke; Sticherling, Christian; Zabel, Markus; Friede, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Some but not all prior studies have shown that women receiving a primary prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) have a lower risk of death and appropriate shocks than men. Purpose To evaluate the effect of gender on the risk of appropriate shock, all-cause mortality and inappropriate shock in contemporary studies of patients receiving a primary prophylactic ICD. Data Source PubMed, LIVIVO, Cochrane CENTRAL between 2010 and 2016. Study Selection Studies providing at least 1 gender-specific risk estimate for the outcomes of interest. Data Extraction Abstracts were screened independently for potentially eligible studies for inclusion. Thereby each abstract was reviewed by at least two authors. Data Synthesis Out of 680 abstracts retained by our search strategy, 20 studies including 46’657 patients had gender-specific information on at least one of the relevant endpoints. Mean age across the individual studies varied between 58 and 69 years. The proportion of women enrolled ranged from 10% to 30%. Across 6 available studies, women had a significantly lower risk of first appropriate shock compared with men (pooled multivariable adjusted hazard ratio 0.62 (95% CI [0.44; 0.88]). Across 14 studies reporting multivariable adjusted gender-specific hazard ratio estimates for all-cause mortality, women had a lower risk of death than men (pooled hazard ratio 0.75 (95% CI [0.66; 0.86]). There was no statistically significant difference for the incidence of first inappropriate shocks (3 studies, pooled hazard ratio 0.99 (95% CI [0.56; 1.73]). Limitations Individual patient data were not available for most studies. Conclusion In this large contemporary meta-analysis, women had a significantly lower risk of appropriate shocks and death than men, but a similar risk of inappropriate shocks. These data may help to select patients who benefit from primary prophylactic ICD implantation. PMID:27618617

  20. Comparison of the Effects of High-Energy Photon Beam Irradiation (10 and 18 MV) on 2 Types of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hashii, Haruko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ayako; Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Hanmura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for cancer may be required for patients with implantable cardiac devices. However, the influence of secondary neutrons or scattered irradiation from high-energy photons (≥10 MV) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) is unclear. This study was performed to examine this issue in 2 ICD models. Methods and Materials: ICDs were positioned around a water phantom under conditions simulating clinical radiation therapy. The ICDs were not irradiated directly. A control ICD was positioned 140 cm from the irradiation isocenter. Fractional irradiation was performed with 18-MV and 10-MV photon beams to give cumulative in-field doses of 600 Gy and 1600 Gy, respectively. Errors were checked after each fraction. Soft errors were defined as severe (change to safety back-up mode), moderate (memory interference, no changes in device parameters), and minor (slight memory change, undetectable by computer). Results: Hard errors were not observed. For the older ICD model, the incidences of severe, moderate, and minor soft errors at 18 MV were 0.75, 0.5, and 0.83/50 Gy at the isocenter. The corresponding data for 10 MV were 0.094, 0.063, and 0 /50 Gy. For the newer ICD model at 18 MV, these data were 0.083, 2.3, and 5.8 /50 Gy. Moderate and minor errors occurred at 18 MV in control ICDs placed 140 cm from the isocenter. The error incidences were 0, 1, and 0 /600 Gy at the isocenter for the newer model, and 0, 1, and 6 /600Gy for the older model. At 10 MV, no errors occurred in control ICDs. Conclusions: ICD errors occurred more frequently at 18 MV irradiation, which suggests that the errors were mainly caused by secondary neutrons. Soft errors of ICDs were observed with high energy photon beams, but most were not critical in the newer model. These errors may occur even when the device is far from the irradiation field.

  1. Perceptions of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator: A qualitative study of families with a history of sudden life-threatening cardiac events and recommendations to improve care

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Jarrett; Hidayatallah, Nadia; Stolerman, Marina; McDonald, Thomas V.; Marion, Robert; Walsh, Christine; Dolan, Siobhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify major concerns associated with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and to provide recommendations to adult and pediatric physicians involved in the care of patients with ICDs. Background Cardiac ion channelopathies are a well-recognized cause of sudden cardiac death in infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. ICDs are effective in preventing sudden death from fatal arrhythmias in patients with known cardiac channelopathies. There is a paucity of research on the effect of ICDs on quality of life in patients with cardiac channelopathy diagnoses, especially young patients. Methods A qualitative study interviewing patients and families affected by inherited arrhythmias was conducted. Fifty participants with personal or family histories of cardiac events or sudden death were interviewed individually or in focus groups by clinical psychologists. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and then analyzed and coded based on current qualitative research theory to identify themes related to the research question. Twenty-four participants discussed ICDs in their interviews. Results Participants reported concerns about ICDs, and these concerns were categorized into six themes: (1) comprehension and physician-patient communication; (2) anxiety; (3) restrictions and fallacies; (4) complications; (5) utility; and (6) alternative therapy. Participants noted communication breakdowns between providers and their colleagues, and between providers and their patients. Participants and their families experienced many different forms of anxiety, including worry about the aesthetics of the ICDs and fears of being shocked. Multiple restrictions, fallacies, and complications were also cited. Conclusion Interview themes were used to formulate recommendations for counseling and educating patients with ICDs. PMID:25383067

  2. [The Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (WCD)].

    PubMed

    Helms, Thomas M; Müller, A; Schwab, J O; Bänsch, D; Karle, C; Klingenheben, T; Zugck, C; Perings, C

    2015-06-01

    While the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has been proven to be the best choice for patients with long-term risk for sudden cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death (SCA/SCD), the question is how to manage patients with only temporary risk, e.g., during the guidelines-recommended waiting period until the decision for an ICD can be made. These patient groups should be monitored around the clock to guarantee a lifesaving shock within a few minutes, if necessary.These conditions can be accomplished by the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) in the outpatient sector. The WCD is worn on the skin and consists of four nonadhesive ECG electrodes as well as three defibrillation electrodes-two at the back and one at the front-embedded in a garment. The defibrillation unit is connected via a cord and can be worn over the shoulder or on a belt. Cardiac events can be recorded and retrospectively analyzed by the treating physician.The WCD is a safe and effective measure to terminate potentially lethal ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. It may be used early after myocardial infarction with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as for patients with acute heart failure in nonischemic cardiomyopathy with uncertain cause and prognosis. In addition, it may be used for patients waiting for heart transplantation, for patients who cannot be implanted an ICD due to comorbidities, and for patients after explantation of their ICD, e.g., because of infection until reimplantation.One may expect that risk stratification of patients with the WCD will lead to even better selection for ICD use. PMID:25939989

  3. Long-term follow up of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and mild, moderate, or severe impairment of left ventricular function.

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, H. J.; Wenzlaff, P.; Pfitzner, P.; Fieguth, H. G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with life threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias, impaired left ventricular function, and severe heart failure will benefit from implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) treatment. DESIGN: 410 patients were followed up after ICD implant. Left ventricular function was assessed by the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class of heart failure: 50 patients (12%) were in NYHA I-II, 151 (37%) in NYHA II, 117 (29%) in NYHA II-III, and 92 (22%) in NYHA III. Epicardial ICD implantation was performed in 209 patients (51%) and 201 patients (49%) received non-thoracotomy ICDs. RESULTS: Perioperatively, 12 patients (3%) died, more often after epicardial ICD implant (11/209 patients, 5%) than after transvenous implant (1/201 patients, < 1%) (P < 0.05). During a mean (SD) follow up of 28 (24) months (range < 1 to 114 months), 90 patients (23%) died: nine (2%) died from sudden arrhythmia; five (1%) also died suddenly but probably not from arrhythmic causes; 55 (14%) died from cardiac causes (congestive heart failure, myocardial reinfarction); 21 (5%) died from non-cardiac causes. The three year, five year, and seven year survival was 92-96% for arrhythmic mortality in NYHA class I, II and III, compared to a three year survival of 94% and a five year and seven year survival of 84% for patients in NYHA class II-III. 338 patients (82%) received ICD shocks (21 (SD 43) shocks per patient); patients in NYHA class II (83%), class II-III (84%), and class III (90%) received ICD discharges more often than those in class I-II (64%) (P < 0.05). The mean (SD) time interval between ICD implant and the first ICD shock was shorter in NYHA class II (16 (17) months), class II-III (19 (27) months), and class III (16 (19) months) than in class 0-I (22 (24) months) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mild, moderate, and severe left ventricular dysfunction benefit from ICD treatment and these patients survive for a considerable time after the

  4. Longevity of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for cardiac resynchronization therapy in current clinical practice: an analysis according to influencing factors, device generation, and manufacturer

    PubMed Central

    Landolina, Maurizio; Curnis, Antonio; Morani, Giovanni; Vado, Antonello; Ammendola, Ernesto; D'onofrio, Antonio; Stabile, Giuseppe; Crosato, Martino; Petracci, Barbara; Ceriotti, Carlo; Bontempi, Luca; Morosato, Martina; Ballari, Gian Paolo; Gasparini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims Device replacement at the time of battery depletion of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may carry a considerable risk of complications and engenders costs for healthcare systems. Therefore, ICD device longevity is extremely important both from a clinical and economic standpoint. Cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) battery longevity is shorter than ICDs. We determined the rate of replacements for battery depletion and we identified possible determinants of early depletion in a series of patients who had undergone implantation of CRT-D devices. Methods and results We retrieved data on 1726 consecutive CRT-D systems implanted from January 2008 to March 2010 in nine centres. Five years after a successful CRT-D implantation procedure, 46% of devices were replaced due to battery depletion. The time to device replacement for battery depletion differed considerably among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers, with rates of batteries still in service at 5 years ranging from 52 to 88% (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were independent determinants of early depletion [hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57–2.46; P < 0.001 and HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25–2.01; P < 0.001, respectively]. The implantation of a recent-generation device (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45–0.72; P < 0.001), the battery chemistry and the CRT-D manufacturer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47–0.89; P = 0.008) were additional factors associated with replacement for battery depletion. Conclusion The device longevity at 5 years was 54%. High left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were associated with early battery depletion, while recent-generation CRT-Ds displayed better longevity. Significant differences emerged among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers. PMID:25976906

  5. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Chan, Maria F; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T; Li, Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar™ DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium (∼2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by ± 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., ∼d(max) of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  6. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Li Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  7. A plea for delivery of high-voltage shocks during implantable cardioverter-defibrillator replacement or system upgrade.

    PubMed

    Sticherling, Christian; Schaer, Beat; Kühne, Michael; Osswald, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a faulty lead that led to failure to defibrillate during defibrillation threshold testing at the time of elective generator replacement. Standard lead measurements failed to detect the malfunction. Many centres perform neither defibrillation threshold testing nor commanded high-energy shock delivery. Even changes in the position of the lead in relation to the generator may cause problems that will go undetected without high-voltage shock delivery. We therefore caution against the wholesale abandonment of high-voltage shock testing in patients with pre-existing implanted leads.

  8. A plea for delivery of high-voltage shocks during implantable cardioverter-defibrillator replacement or system upgrade.

    PubMed

    Sticherling, Christian; Schaer, Beat; Kühne, Michael; Osswald, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a faulty lead that led to failure to defibrillate during defibrillation threshold testing at the time of elective generator replacement. Standard lead measurements failed to detect the malfunction. Many centres perform neither defibrillation threshold testing nor commanded high-energy shock delivery. Even changes in the position of the lead in relation to the generator may cause problems that will go undetected without high-voltage shock delivery. We therefore caution against the wholesale abandonment of high-voltage shock testing in patients with pre-existing implanted leads. PMID:22498180

  9. The mismatch between patient life expectancy and the service life of implantable devices in current cardioverter-defibrillator therapy: a call for larger device batteries.

    PubMed

    Neuzner, Jörg

    2015-06-01

    In 2005, Bob Hauser published a paper in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology entitled "The growing mismatch between patient longevity and the service life of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators". Now, nearly a decade later, I would like to perform a second look on the problem of a mismatching between ICD device service life and the survival of ICD recipients. Since 2005, the demographics of the ICD population has changed significantly. Primary prevention has become the dominant indication in defibrillator therapy and device implantation is indicated more and more in earlier stages of cardiac diseases. In former larger scale ICD trials, the patient average 5-year survival probability was in a range of 68-71%; in newer CRT-D trials in a range of 72-88%. Due to a progressively widened ICD indication and implantation preferentially performed in patients with better life expectancy, the problem of inadequate device service life is of growing importance. The early days of defibrillator therapy started with a generator volume of 145 ccm and a device service life <18 months. In this early period, the device miniaturization and extension of service life were similar challenges for the technicians. Today, we have reached a formerly unexpected extent of device miniaturization. However, technologic improvements were often preferentially translated in further device miniaturization and not in prolonging device service life. In his analysis, Bob Hauser reported a prolonged device service life of 2.3 years in ICD models with a larger battery capacity of 0.54 up to 0.69 Ah. Between 2008 and 2014, several studies had been published on the problem of ICD longevity in clinical scenarios. These analyses included "older" and currently used single chamber, dual chamber and CRT devices. The reported average 5-year device service life ranged from 0 to 75%. Assuming today technology, larger battery capacities will only result in minimal increase in device volume. Selected

  10. Manual for the psychotherapeutic treatment of acute and post-traumatic stress disorders following multiple shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jochen; Titscher, Georg; Peregrinova, Ludmila; Kirsch, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing number of implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), the number of people suffering from so-called “multiple ICD shocks” is also increasing. The delivery of more than five shocks (appropriate or inappropriate) in 12 months or three or more shocks (so called multiple shocks) in a short time period (24 hours) leads to an increasing number of patients suffering from severe psychological distress (anxiety disorder, panic disorder, adjustment disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder). Untreated persons show chronic disease processes and a low rate of spontaneous remission and have an increased morbidity and mortality. Few papers have been published concerning the psychotherapeutic treatment for these patients. Objective: The aim of this study is to develop a psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder or adjustment disorder after multiple ICD shocks. Design: Explorative feasibility study: Treatment of 22 patients as a natural design without randomisation and without control group. The period of recruitment was three years, from March 2007 to March 2010. The study consisted of two phases: in the first phase (pilot study) we tested different components and dosages of psychotherapeutic treatments. The final intervention programme is presented in this paper. In the second phase (follow-up study) we assessed the residual post-traumatic stress symptoms in these ICD patients. The time between treatment and follow-up measurement was 12 to 30 months. Population: Thirty-one patients were assigned to the Department of Psychocardiology after multiple shocks. The sample consisted of 22 patients who had a post-traumatic stress disorder or an adjustment disorder and were willing and able to participate. They were invited for psychological treatment. 18 of them could be included into the follow-up study. Methods: After the clinical assessment at the beginning and at the end of the inpatient treatment a post

  11. Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... discriminator functions and lacks antitachycardia pacing. Expanded Programmability Programming that allows lower shock energies and the ability ... the original device and placed in a new one. Postprocedural hospitalization is occasionally needed. Replacement procedures can ...

  12. Usefulness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the treatment of heart failure due to severe systolic dysfunction: systematic review of clinical trials and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    García García, M A; Rosero Arenas, M A; Ruiz Granell, R; Chorro Gascó, F J; Martínez Cornejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, and the combination of these devices (CRT+ICD) in adult patients with left ventricular dysfunction and symptomatic heart failure. Methods A comprehensive systematic review of randomised clinical trials was conducted. Several electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Cochrane, ClinicalTrials.gov) were reviewed. The mortality rates between treatments were compared. A network was established comparing the various options, and direct, indirect and mixed comparisons were made using multivariate meta-regression. The degree of clinical and statistical homogeneity was assessed. Results 43 trials involving 13 017 patients were reviewed. Resynchronisation therapy, defibrillators, and combined devices (CRT+ICD) are clearly beneficial compared to optimal medical treatment, showing clear benefit in all of these cases. In a theoretical order of efficiency, the first option is combined therapy (CRT+ICD), the second is CRT, and the third is defibrillator implantation (ICD). Given the observational nature of these comparisons, and the importance of the overlapping CIs, we cannot state that the combined option (CRT+ICD) offers superior survival benefit compared to the other two options. Conclusions The combined option of CRT+ICD seems to be better than the option of CRT alone, although no clear improvement in survival was found for the combined option. It would be advisable to perform a direct comparative study of these two options. PMID:27326223

  13. Rationale and design of a prospective study of the efficacy of a remote monitoring system used in implantable cardioverter defibrillator follow-up: the Lumos-T Reduces Routine Office Device Follow-Up Study (TRUST) study.

    PubMed

    Varma, Niraj

    2007-12-01

    Increased implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant volumes (and product advisories/recalls) pose management challenges. Most device interrogations at 3- to 6-month routine follow-up visits are "nonactionable," that is, require no clinically significant reprogramming, lead revision, or initiation or up-titration of antiarrhythmic medications. Conversely, implanted devices collect important diagnostic data (eg, atrial fibrillation onset, system integrity) that remain concealed between device interrogations. Remote monitoring may resolve some of these challenges, but has not been studied in a large-scale clinical trial. Home Monitoring (HM) uses automatic (without patient intervention) data and electrogram transmissions with rapid (<24 hours) event notification of significant (including silent) events. The Lumos-T Reduces Routine Office Device Follow-Up Study (TRUST) is a multicenter, prospective, randomized study enrolling 1000 ICD patients designed to test whether HM can safely reduce the number of scheduled nonactionable office device interrogations by 50% and provide early detection and notification of cardiac and/or device problems. After enrollment, TRUST patients are randomized 2:1 to either HM or to control (ie, HM off) arms and are seen for an in-office follow-up 3 months postimplant. At subsequent 3-month intervals, control patients have conventional office visits, whereas in HM, patient data are remotely retrieved and evaluated. In HM patients, early notification may automatically occur between periodic checks for compromised system integrity (battery, lead parameters, high-voltage circuitry) or arrhythmia occurrence (eg, atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmia). All study patients will have a final office visit 15 months after implant. The results of TRUST may confirm the role of remote monitoring as an intensive surveillance mechanism for device management. PMID:18035071

  14. The CopenHeartSF trial—comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme for male patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease and impaired sexual function: protocol of a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Pernille Palm; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Hastrup-Svendsen, Jesper; Frederiksen, Marianne; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Giraldi, Annamaria; Steinke, Elaine; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexuality is an important part of people’s physical and mental health. Patients with heart disease often suffer from sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction has a negative impact on quality of life and well-being in persons with heart disease, and sexual dysfunction is associated with anxiety and depression. Treatment and care possibilities seem to be lacking. Studies indicate that non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise training and psychoeducation possess the potential of reducing sexual dysfunction in patients with heart disease. The CopenHeartSF trial will investigate the effect of a comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme versus usual care. Methods and analysis CopenHeartSF is an investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 central randomisation to sexual rehabilitation plus usual care versus usual care alone. Based on sample size calculations, 154 male patients with impaired sexual function due to implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease will be included from two university hospitals in Denmark. All patients receive usual care and patients allocated to the experimental intervention group follow a 12-week sexual rehabilitation programme consisting of an individualised exercise programme and psychoeducative consultation with a specially trained nurse. The primary outcome is sexual function measured by the International Index of Erectile Function. The secondary outcome measure is psychosocial adjustment to illness by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, sexual domain. A number of explorative analyses will also be conducted. Ethics and dissemination CopenHeartSF is approved by the regional ethics committee (no H-4-2012-168) and the Danish Data Protection Agency (no 2007-58-0015) and is performed in accordance with good clinical practice and the Declaration of Helsinki in its latest form. Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01796353

  15. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus cardiac resynchronization therapy with pacemaker on mortality in heart failure patients: results of a high-volume, single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kutyifa, Valentina; Geller, Laszlo; Bogyi, Peter; Zima, Endre; Aktas, Mehmet K; Ozcan, Emin Evren; Becker, David; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Kosztin, Annamaria; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Merkely, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Aims There are limited and contradictory data on the effects of CRT with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D) on mortality as compared with CRT with pacemaker (CRT-P). Methods and results We evaluated the long-term outcome of patients implanted with a CRT-D or CRT-P device in our high-volume single-centre experience. Data on all-cause mortality were derived from clinic visits and the Hungarian National Healthcare Fund Death Registry. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and multivariate Cox regression models were used to evaluate all-cause mortality in patients with CRT-D vs. CRT-P, stratified by the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. From 2000 to 2011, 1122 CRT devices, 693 CRT-P (LVEF 28.2 ± 7.4%) and 429 CRT-D (LVEF 27.6 ± 6.4%), were implanted at our centre. During the median follow-up of 28 months, 379 patients died from any cause, 250 patients (36%) with an implanted CRT-P and 129 patients (30%) with an implanted CRT-D. There was no evidence of mortality benefit in patients implanted with a CRT-D compared with a CRT-P in the total cohort [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.32, P = 0.884]. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D treatment was associated with a significant 30% risk reduction in all-cause mortality compared with an implanted CRT-P (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.97, P = 0.03). In non-ischaemic patients, there was no mortality benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.73–1.32, P = 0.894, interaction P-value = 0.15). Conclusions In heart failure patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D was associated with a mortality benefit compared with CRT-P, but no benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P in mortality was observed in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25379962

  16. Incidence of ineffective safety margin testing (<10 J) and efficacy of routine subcutaneous array insertion during implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation.

    PubMed

    Ohlow, Marc-Alexander; Roos, Marcus; Lauer, Bernward; Geller, J Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess (1) the incidence of safety margin testing <10 J (SMT) and (2) the efficacy/safety of routinely adding a subcutaneous array (SQA) (Medtronic 6996SQ) for these patients. Patients with SMT smaller than a 10-J safety margin from maximum output were considered to have very high readings and underwent SQA insertion. These patients were compared with the rest of the patients who had acceptable SMT (≥10 J). A total of 616 patients underwent ICD implantation during the analysis period. Of those, 16 (2.6%) had SMT <10 J. By univariate analysis, younger age, and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, were all significant predictors of SMT <10 J (p < 0.05). In all 16 cases, other methods to improve SMT prior to array insertion were attempted but failed for all patients: reversing shock polarity (n = 15), removing the superior vena cava coil (n = 14), reprogramming shock waveform (n = 9), and repositioning right ventricular lead (n = 9). Addition of the SQA successfully increased SMT to within safety margin for all patients (32 ± 2 versus 21 ± 3 J; p < 0.001). Follow-up (mean 48.1 ± 21 months) was available for all patients with SQA, only 2 cases with inappropriate shocks due to atrial fibrillation had to be noted. None of the patients experienced complications due to SQA implantation. SMT <10 J occur in about 2.6% of patients undergoing ICD implantation. SQA insertion corrects this problem without procedural/mid-term complications.

  17. Incidence of ineffective safety margin testing (<10 J) and efficacy of routine subcutaneous array insertion during implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation.

    PubMed

    Ohlow, Marc-Alexander; Roos, Marcus; Lauer, Bernward; Geller, J Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess (1) the incidence of safety margin testing <10 J (SMT) and (2) the efficacy/safety of routinely adding a subcutaneous array (SQA) (Medtronic 6996SQ) for these patients. Patients with SMT smaller than a 10-J safety margin from maximum output were considered to have very high readings and underwent SQA insertion. These patients were compared with the rest of the patients who had acceptable SMT (≥10 J). A total of 616 patients underwent ICD implantation during the analysis period. Of those, 16 (2.6%) had SMT <10 J. By univariate analysis, younger age, and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, were all significant predictors of SMT <10 J (p < 0.05). In all 16 cases, other methods to improve SMT prior to array insertion were attempted but failed for all patients: reversing shock polarity (n = 15), removing the superior vena cava coil (n = 14), reprogramming shock waveform (n = 9), and repositioning right ventricular lead (n = 9). Addition of the SQA successfully increased SMT to within safety margin for all patients (32 ± 2 versus 21 ± 3 J; p < 0.001). Follow-up (mean 48.1 ± 21 months) was available for all patients with SQA, only 2 cases with inappropriate shocks due to atrial fibrillation had to be noted. None of the patients experienced complications due to SQA implantation. SMT <10 J occur in about 2.6% of patients undergoing ICD implantation. SQA insertion corrects this problem without procedural/mid-term complications. PMID:27676160

  18. Clinical management of electromagnetic interferences in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: review of the literature and focus on magnetic resonance conditional devices.

    PubMed

    Corzani, Alessandro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Allaria, Luca; Diemberger, Igor; Martignani, Cristian; Bratten, Tara; Gardini, Beatrice; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The number of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) has greatly increased in the last 10 years. Many electronic devices used in daily activities generate electromagnetic interferences (EMIs) that can interact with CIEDs. In clinical practice, it is very important to know the potential sources of EMIs and their effect on CIEDs in order to understand how to manage or mitigate them. A very important source of EMI is magnetic resonance (MR), which is considered nowadays the diagnostic gold standard for different anatomical districts. In this review, we focused on the effects of EMI on CIEDs and on the clinical management. Moreover, we made a clarification about MR and CIEDs.In patients with CIEDs, EMIs may cause potentially serious and even life-threatening complications (inappropriate shocks, device malfunctions, inhibition of pacing in pacemaker-dependent patients) and may rarely dictate device replacement. The association of inappropriate shocks with increased mortality highlights the importance of minimizing the occurrence of EMI. Adequate advice and recommendations about the correct management of EMIs in patients with CIEDs are required to avoid all complications during hospitalization and in daily life. Furthermore, the article focused on actual management about MR and CIEDs.

  19. Efficacy of metoprolol and sotalol in the prevention of recurrences of sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Kettering, Klaus; Mewis, Christian; Dörnberger, Volker; Vonthein, Reinhard; Bosch, Ralph F; Kühlkamp, Volker

    2002-11-01

    ICDs provide protection against sudden cardiac death in patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Nevertheless, most ICD recipients receive adjunctive antiarrhythmic drug therapy to reduce the number of recurrent episodes and ICD discharges. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of metoprolol and d,l-sotalol in preventing VT/VF recurrences in patients with an ICD in a prospective, randomized trial. One hundred patients (83 men, 17 women; mean age 59 years, SD +/- 11 years) were randomized to receive metoprolol or sotalol after implantation of an ICD. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to age, sex, underlying cardiac disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, NYHA class assessment and clinical arrhythmia. The median follow-up was 728 days (25th percentile: 530 days, 75th percentile: 943 days) in the metoprolol group and 727 days (25th percentile: 472 days, 75th percentile: 1,223 days) in the sotalol group (P = 0.52). Thirty-three patients treated with metoprolol and 30 patients receiving sotalol had at least one episode during the follow-up. Event-free survival curves were generated for the two treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method and showed no significant difference (P = 0.68). Eight patients treated with metoprolol and six patients treated with sotalol died during follow-up. Total mortality was not significantly different between the two study groups (P = 0.43). Metoprolol is as efficacious as sotalol in preventing VT/VF recurrences in patients with an ICD.

  20. Who Needs an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator?

    MedlinePlus

    ... would make one likely) on the following tests. EKG (Electrocardiogram) An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects and ... beating and its rhythm (steady or irregular). An EKG also records the strength and timing of electrical ...

  1. [A 65-year-old man with wearable cardioverter/defibrillator early after acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Horlbeck, F W; Nickenig, G; Schwab, J O

    2015-09-01

    A 65-year-old man with severe coronary artery disease and coronary artery bypass graft presented with an acute posterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Immediate percutaneous coronary intervention resulted in successful revascularisation of the culprit lesion (RCx) with several remaining coronary stenoses. Despite the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, no primary prevention indication for an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator early after myocardial infarction existed. Due to the complex coronary anatomy with several remaining stenotic vessels we regarded the patient to be at a particularly high risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias and provided him with a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD). Twenty-six days later, he experienced spontaneous ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation which was successfully treated with high voltage therapy by the WCD. Subsequently, we decided to implant him an ICD following secondary prevention indication. Besides established indications for primary prevention ICD therapy, some patients early after myocardial infarction may be at a particularly high risk for sudden cardiac death. Temporary protection with a WCD in carefully selected patients can offer a safe opportunity for later reevaluation of permanent ICD implantation depending on the course of left ventricular ejection fraction and the occurrence of arrhythmia. PMID:26338064

  2. Experience With the Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator in Patients at High Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Michael; Quick, Silvio; Pfluecke, Christian; Rottstädt, Fabian; Szymkiewicz, Steven J.; Ringquist, Steven; Strasser, Ruth H.; Speiser, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) for use and effectiveness in preventing sudden death caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia or fibrillation. Methods: From April 2010 through October 2013, 6043 German WCD patients (median age, 57 years; male, 78.5%) were recruited from 404 German centers. Deidentified German patient data were used for a retrospective, nonrandomized analysis. Results: Ninety-four patients (1.6%) were treated by the WCD in response to ventricular tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation. The incidence rate was 8.4 (95% confidence interval, 6.8–10.2) per 100 patient-years. Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation had an incidence rate of 19.3 (95% confidence interval, 12.2–29.0) per 100 patient-years. In contrast, an incidence rate of 8.2 (95% confidence interval, 6.4–10.3) was observed in the remaining cardiac diagnosis groups, including dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, and ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Among 120 shocked patients, 112 (93%) survived 24 hours after treatment, whereas asystole was observed in 2 patients (0.03%) with 1 resulting death. ConclusionS: This large cohort represents the first nationwide evaluation of WCD use in patients outside the US healthcare system and confirms the overall value of the WCD in German treatment pathways. PMID:27458236

  3. Iranian Patients’ Experiences of the Internal Cardioverter Defibrillator Device Shocks: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Pasyar, Nilofar; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Nikoo, Mohammad; Navab, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a valuable treatment for the patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. In this method, after diagnosis of pathological cardiac rhythms, shock is automatically applied to normalize the rhythms. Shock is discharged when the patients are conscious, but the patients’ experiences of shock have remained unknown. Thus, this study aimed to identify and describe the patients’ experiences of shocks received from ICD. Methods: The present qualitative study was conducted through thematic analysis and semi-structured interviews on 9 patients mean age 41.55 (1.57) with ICD from November 2013 to July 2014. Data analysis was also performed simultaneously using constant comparative analysis. Results: In this study, two main themes, namely "with a parachute for life" and "Faced with nuisance", were obtained representing the patients’ experiences regarding ICD shock. With a parachute for life included subthemes, such as "Rebirth", "Comforter and healing", and "Life assurance". In addition, "Faced with nuisance" consisted of 2 subthemes of "Discomfort in moments of shock" and "Displeasure after shock". Conclusion: This study provided a basis for evaluation of patients nursing after discharge. By identification of the patients’ experiences regarding shock, the present study can help the professional health staff to efficiently play their roles and provide patients with holistic care. It can also be effective in designing behavioral and cognitive interventional programs to change the patients’ attitude and promote their adaptation with their conditions. PMID:26744727

  4. Sexual Health for Patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Facebook Twitter Home About this Journal Editorial Board General Statistics Circulation Cover Doodle → Blip the Doodle Go Red For Women's Issue Information for Advertisers Author Reprints Commercial Reprints Customer Service and Ordering ...

  5. How to Respond to an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Recall

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart Association Facebook Twitter Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY ... Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Facebook Twitter Home About this ...

  6. How Will Having an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Affect My Lifestyle?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High-tension wires Metal detectors Industrial welders Electrical generators These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of ... 2 feet away from industrial welders or electrical generators. Rarely, ICDs have caused unnecessary shocks during long, ...

  7. Elderly Benefit from Using Implantable Defibrillators

    MedlinePlus

    ... org Learn More Elderly benefit from using implantable defibrillators June 17, 2013 Categories: Heart News Study Highlights: Older people may benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) as much as younger people. Overall health, ...

  8. Internet-Based Device-Assisted Remote Monitoring of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pron, G; Ieraci, L; Kaulback, K

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) report was to conduct a systematic review of the available published evidence on the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of Internet-based device-assisted remote monitoring systems (RMSs) for therapeutic cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. The MAS evidence-based review was performed to support public financing decisions. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of fatalities in developed countries. In the United States almost half a million people die of SCD annually, resulting in more deaths than stroke, lung cancer, breast cancer, and AIDS combined. In Canada each year more than 40,000 people die from a cardiovascular related cause; approximately half of these deaths are attributable to SCD. Most cases of SCD occur in the general population typically in those without a known history of heart disease. Most SCDs are caused by cardiac arrhythmia, an abnormal heart rhythm caused by malfunctions of the heart’s electrical system. Up to half of patients with significant heart failure (HF) also have advanced conduction abnormalities. Cardiac arrhythmias are managed by a variety of drugs, ablative procedures, and therapeutic CIEDs. The range of CIEDs includes pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. Bradycardia is the main indication for PMs and individuals at high risk for SCD are often treated by ICDs. Heart failure (HF) is also a significant health problem and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in those over 65 years of age. Patients with moderate to severe HF may also have cardiac arrhythmias, although the cause may be related more to heart pump or haemodynamic failure. The presence of HF, however

  9. [The clinical practice guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología on the automatic implantable defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villacastín, J; Carmona Salinas, J R; Hernández Madrid, A; Marín Huerta, E; Merino Llorens, J L; Ormaetxe Merodio, J; Moya i Mitjans, A

    1999-12-01

    Since the first implantation in man in 1980 implantable cardioverter defibrillator technology has greatly improved and the number of devices implanted has increased considerably every year. Non thoracotomy lead systems and biphasic shocks are now the approach of choice, offering an almost 100% success rate. This document reviews the recommendations for qualification of personnel and for the centres implanting and carrying out follow-ups on defibrillators. The current indications for the implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator are also addressed.

  10. Relation between detection rate and inappropriate shocks in single versus dual chamber cardioverter-defibrillator--an analysis from the OPTION trial.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Sturmer, Marcio; Babuty, Dominique; Sick, Peter; Davy, Jean Marc; Molon, Giulio; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Wickliffe, Andrew; Lennerz, Carsten; Semmler, Verena; Siot, Pierre-Henri; Reif, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The programming of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) influences inappropriate shock rates. The aim of the study is to analyse rates of patients with appropriate and inappropriate shocks according to detection zones in the OPTION trial. All patients received dual chamber (DC) ICDs randomly assigned to be programmed either to single chamber (SC) or to DC settings including PARAD+ algorithm. In a post-hoc analysis, rates of patients with inappropriate and appropriate shocks were calculated for shocks triggered at heart rates ≥ 170 bpm (ventricular tachycardia zone) and at rates ≥ 200 bpm (ventricular fibrillation zone). In the SC group, higher rates of patients with total and inappropriate shocks were delivered at heart rates ≥ 170 bpm than at rates ≥ 200 bpm (total shocks: 21.1% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.002; inappropriate shocks: 7.6% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.016; appropriate shocks: 15.2% vs. 13.5%; p = n.s.). No such differences were observed in the DC group (total shocks: 14.3% vs. 12.6%; p = n.s.; inappropriate shocks: 3.9% vs. 3.6%; p = n.s.; appropriate shocks: 12.2% vs. 10.4%; p = n.s.). The higher frequency of patients with total shocks with SC settings than with DC settings that benefit from PARAD+ was driven by a higher percentage of patients with inappropriate shocks in the VT zone (170-200 bpm) in the SC population. PMID:26892534

  11. Experience of cardioverter-defibrillators inserted without thoracotomy: evaluation of transvenously inserted intracardiac leads alone or with a subcutaneous axillary patch.

    PubMed Central

    Jordaens, L; Trouerbach, J W; Vertongen, P; Herregods, L; Poelaert, J; Van Nooten, G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the efficacy of a purely transvenous cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) system with that of a system with a supplementary subcutaneous patch. To evaluate clinical follow up of these lead arrangements that do not require thoracotomy. DESIGN--A simplified defibrillation protocol to test two different lead arrangements during implantation, with routine clinical follow up after implantation. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for treatment of arrhythmia. PATIENTS--22 consecutive patients selected for implantation of an ICD because of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias (ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachycardia) of whom 20 entered the test protocol. INTERVENTION--Implantation of an ICD with transvenously inserted intracardiac leads and a subcutaneous patch and assessment of effective defibrillation followed by testing of the purely transvenous approach. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Reproducible conversion of ventricular fibrillation to sinus rhythm at a certain energy level, providing a safety margin of at least 10 J for both lead arrangements. Confirmation of efficacy during clinical follow up (mean 6 months). RESULTS--A transvenous lead system combined with a subcutaneous axillary patch was implanted in 20/22 patients and it provided adequate and acceptable energy levels. In 10/20 tested patients a purely transvenous lead configuration provided an acceptable safety margin as well. Nine patients had clinical recurrences: all these arrhythmias were successfully converted. CONCLUSION--A transvenous lead system was sufficient in 50% of the patients at the time of implantation. Data on long-term clinical follow up of this arrangement are not available. The approach without thoracotomy with a subcutaneous patch is feasible and effective in most patients selected for ICD treatment. Images PMID:8457387

  12. Successful use of wearable cardioverter defibrillator in a patient with dextrocardia and persistent left superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chingping; Oren, Jess W; Szymkiewicz, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    Congenital disorders, such as dextrocardia and persistent left superior vena cava, are rare. However, their presence is often associated with other cardiac anomalies, and may lead to lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which result in sudden cardiac death. Treating patients with these disorders can present a challenge to clinicians, as it may cause technical difficulties during interventional procedures, and more often, altered defibrillation techniques in a setting of prehospital sudden cardiac arrest. This report describes the first case of successful defibrillation therapy delivered by the wearable cardioverter defibrillator to a patient with dextrocardia and persistent left superior vena cava during a ventricular tachycardia arrest.

  13. New horizon for infection prevention technology and implantable device.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yusuke; Ueda, Marehiko; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Schwab, Joerg O

    2016-08-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of patients receiving cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) over the last two decades. CIED infection represents a serious complication after CIED implantation and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, newly advanced technologies have offered attractive and suitable therapeutic alternatives. Notably, the leadless pacemaker and anti-bacterial envelope decrease the potential risk of CIED infection and the resulting mortality, when it does occur. A completely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator is also an alternative to the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), as it does not require implantation of any transvenous or epicardial leads. Among the patients who require ICD removal and subsequent antibiotics secondary to infection, the wearable cardioverter defibrillator represents an alternative approach to inpatient monitoring for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this review paper, we aimed to introduce the advanced technologies and devices for prevention of CIED infection. PMID:27588153

  14. Battery drain in daily practice and medium-term projections on longevity of cardioverter-defibrillators: an analysis from a remote monitoring database

    PubMed Central

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Ritter, Philippe; Biffi, Mauro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Diemberger, Igor; Martignani, Cristian; Valzania, Cinzia; Valsecchi, Sergio; Padeletti, Luigi; Gadler, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Aims The longevity of generators is a crucial determinant of the cost-effectiveness of therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D). We evaluated the trend of device-measured residual battery capacity and longevity projections over 5-year follow-up. We also investigated possible factors associated with battery drain. Methods and results Data from 4851 patients in the European LATITUDE® database who were followed up for a minimum of 3 years were analysed. The factors associated with battery drain (i.e. year-to-year decrease in residual battery capacity), and thus potentially impacting on device longevity, were mainly the pacing parameters in CRT-D devices and the number of shocks delivered and diverted in both ICD and CRT-D (all P < 0.01 on linear regression analysis). Over the first 5 years, the longevity estimates provided by devices showed low intra-patient variability and increased with time. The estimates exceeded 10 years for CRT-D and 13 and 12 years for single- and dual-chamber ICDs, respectively. In CRT-D patients, the expected patient age on replacement was 80 ± 12 years, and the expected probability of undergoing device replacement was 63 ± 13% for New York Heart Association (NYHA) II patients and 37 ± 16% for NYHA III patients. For comparison, the probabilities of replacing a CRT-D lasting 5 years were 78 ± 8 and 59 ± 13%, respectively (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Battery drain was mainly associated with pacing output in CRT-D devices and with the number of capacitor charges in both ICD and CRT-D devices. The longevity estimates provided by the devices were consistent and conservative. According to these estimates, among CRT-D recipients a low proportion of patients should require device replacement. PMID:26847076

  15. Relation between detection rate and inappropriate shocks in single versus dual chamber cardioverter-defibrillator – an analysis from the OPTION trial

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Christof; Sturmer, Marcio; Babuty, Dominique; Sick, Peter; Davy, Jean Marc; Molon, Giulio; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Wickliffe, Andrew; Lennerz, Carsten; Semmler, Verena; Siot, Pierre-Henri; Reif , Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The programming of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) influences inappropriate shock rates. The aim of the study is to analyse rates of patients with appropriate and inappropriate shocks according to detection zones in the OPTION trial. All patients received dual chamber (DC) ICDs randomly assigned to be programmed either to single chamber (SC) or to DC settings including PARAD+ algorithm. In a post-hoc analysis, rates of patients with inappropriate and appropriate shocks were calculated for shocks triggered at heart rates ≥170 bpm (ventricular tachycardia zone) and at rates ≥200 bpm (ventricular fibrillation zone). In the SC group, higher rates of patients with total and inappropriate shocks were delivered at heart rates ≥170 bpm than at rates ≥200 bpm (total shocks: 21.1% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.002; inappropriate shocks: 7.6% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.016; appropriate shocks: 15.2% vs. 13.5%; p = n.s.). No such differences were observed in the DC group (total shocks: 14.3% vs. 12.6%; p = n.s.; inappropriate shocks: 3.9% vs. 3.6%; p = n.s.; appropriate shocks: 12.2% vs. 10.4%; p = n.s.). The higher frequency of patients with total shocks with SC settings than with DC settings that benefit from PARAD+ was driven by a higher percentage of patients with inappropriate shocks in the VT zone (170–200 bpm) in the SC population. PMID:26892534

  16. T-wave oversensing by an implantable cardioverter defibrillator after successful ablation of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Strohmer, Bernhard; Schernthaner, Christiana; Pichler, Maximilian

    2006-04-01

    Focal ablation of trigger premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) from the Purkinje system helped to suppress idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (VF) in an athlete who had suffered from frequent appropriate shock therapies. However, only a few days after successful ablation T-wave oversensing occurred during exercise and resulted in repetitive distressing defibrillator shocks. Despite lack of any changes on the surface ECG, the endocardially recorded electrogram revealed an unfavorable ratio of R-to-T-wave amplitude predisposing to double counting with accelerated heart rates. This case illustrates that T-wave oversensing may complicate the clinical course after successful ablation of malignant Purkinje ectopy.

  17. Coping with Trauma and Stressful Events As a Patient with an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... 29, 2013 Jessica Ford From the Departments of Psychology (J.F., S.F.S.) and Department of Cardiovascular Sciences (S. ... site Samuel F. Sears From the Departments of Psychology (J.F., S.F.S.) and Department of Cardiovascular Sciences (S. ...

  18. My Child Needs or Has an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: What Should I Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association . Circulation . 2011 ; 123 : 1454 – 1485 . OpenUrl FREE Full Text 5. ↵ Brown RT DeMaso DR . Pediatric heart disease . ... shock . Circulation . 2005 ; 111 : e380 – e382 . OpenUrl FREE Full Text 8. ↵ MedTees . http://www.cafepress.com/medtees/s_icd . ...

  19. 77 FR 20873 - Qualification of Drivers; Application for Exemptions; Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... on January 17, 2008 (73 FR 3316), or you may visit http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2008/pdf/E8-785.pdf... final rule implementing section 4007 (69 FR 51589). Under this rule, FMCSA must publish a notice of each... person has no current clinical diagnosis of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris,...

  20. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shock after Stenting Across the Device Leads.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Sanjay; Chelu, Mihail Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    A 45-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease had lived uneventfully with a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) for 5 years. Less than a month before presenting at our institution, he had undergone stenting of his partially occluded subclavian vein, to relieve stenosis of the ipsilateral arteriovenous fistula that was used for his hemodialysis. The CRT-D subsequently discharged. Device interrogation revealed that electrical noise originating from leads damaged by the stent had caused the inappropriate shock and intermittent electrical discharges thereafter. The patient was highly traumatized by these events and insisted upon device removal, which deprived him of a potentially life-saving intervention. He later had a cardiac arrest that resulted in sustained profound hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with minimal neurologic recovery: his family placed him in a long-term care facility on ventilator support, with a tracheostomy and feeding tube. This situation might have been avoided through collaboration between the interventional radiologist and the electrophysiologist. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease who presented with inappropriate defibrillator discharge caused by lead damage secondary to stenting across the leads. PMID:27047295

  1. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shock after Stenting Across the Device Leads

    PubMed Central

    Chelu, Mihail Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease had lived uneventfully with a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) for 5 years. Less than a month before presenting at our institution, he had undergone stenting of his partially occluded subclavian vein, to relieve stenosis of the ipsilateral arteriovenous fistula that was used for his hemodialysis. The CRT-D subsequently discharged. Device interrogation revealed that electrical noise originating from leads damaged by the stent had caused the inappropriate shock and intermittent electrical discharges thereafter. The patient was highly traumatized by these events and insisted upon device removal, which deprived him of a potentially life-saving intervention. He later had a cardiac arrest that resulted in sustained profound hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with minimal neurologic recovery: his family placed him in a long-term care facility on ventilator support, with a tracheostomy and feeding tube. This situation might have been avoided through collaboration between the interventional radiologist and the electrophysiologist. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease who presented with inappropriate defibrillator discharge caused by lead damage secondary to stenting across the leads. PMID:27047295

  2. Rationale and design of WEBCARE: A randomized, controlled, web-based behavioral intervention trial in cardioverter-defibrillator patients to reduce anxiety and device concerns and enhance quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is generally well accepted, but 25-33% of patients experience clinical levels of anxiety, depression, and impaired quality of life (QoL) following implantation. Few trials in ICD patients have investigated whether behavioral intervention may mitigate the development of these adjustment problems. We present the rationale and study design of the WEB-based distress management program for implantable CARdioverter dEfibrillator patients (WEBCARE) trial. Methods WEBCARE is a multi-center, multi-disciplinary, randomized, controlled behavioral intervention trial designed to examine the effectiveness of a web-based approach in terms of reducing levels of anxiety and device concerns and enhancing QoL. Consecutive patients hospitalized for the implantation of an ICD will be approached for study participation while in hospital and randomized to the intervention arm (n = 175) versus usual care (n = 175) at baseline (5-10 days post implantation). Patients will complete assessments of patient-centered outcomes at baseline, 14, 26, and 52 weeks after implantation. Patients randomized to the intervention arm will receive a 12-week web-based behavioral intervention starting 2 weeks after implantation. Primary endpoints include (ii) patient-centered outcomes (i.e., anxiety, depression, ICD acceptance, QoL); (iii) health care utilization; and (iiii) cost-effectiveness. All primary endpoints will be assessed with standardized and validated disease-specific or generic questionnaires. Secondary endpoints include (iii) cortisol awakening response; and (iiii) ventricular arrhythmias. Discussion WEBCARE will show whether a behavioral intervention using a web-based approach is feasible and effective in reducing anxiety and ICD concerns and improving QoL in ICD patients. Trial Registration http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00895700. PMID:20030843

  3. Shock whilst gardening--implantable defibrillators & lawn mowers.

    PubMed

    Von Olshausen, G; Lennerz, C; Grebmer, C; Pavaci, H; Kolb, C

    2014-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) can cause inappropriate shock delivery or temporary inhibition of ICD functions. We present a case of electromagnetic interference between a lawn mower and an ICD resulting in an inappropriate discharge of the device due to erroneous detection of ventricular fibrillation.

  4. Runaway implantable defibrillator--a rare complication of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Jan

    2007-05-01

    A case of a patient with runaway implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) due to radiation therapy of a lung cancer is reported. This manifested as poorly tolerated wide complex tachycardia due to inappropriate rapid ventricular pacing, The event terminated with polymorphic VT, which inhibited pacing and ceased spontaneously before ICD discharge. The likely cause was corruption of device random access memory by ionizing radiation.

  5. Enhanced detection criteria in implantable cardioverter defibrillators: sensitivity and specificity of the stability algorithm at different heart rates.

    PubMed

    Kettering, K; Dörnberger, V; Lang, R; Vonthein, R; Suchalla, R; Bosch, R F; Mewis, C; Eigenberger, B; Kühlkamp, V

    2001-09-01

    The lack of specificity in the detection of ventricular tachyarrhythmias remains a major clinical problem in the therapy with ICDs. The stability criterion has been shown to be useful in discriminating ventricular tachyarrhythmias characterized by a small variation in cycle lengths from AF with rapid ventricular response presenting a higher degree of variability of RR intervals. But RR variability decreases with increasing heart rate during AF. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine if the sensitivity and specificity of the STABILITY algorithm for spontaneous tachyarrhythmias is related to ventricular rate. Forty-two patients who had received an ICD (CPI Ventak Mini I, II, III or Ventak AV) were enrolled in the study. Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of AF with rapid ventricular response and 817 episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmias were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity in the detection of ventricular tachyarrhythmias were calculated at different heart rates. When a stability value of 30 ms was programmed the result was a sensitivity of 82.7% and a specificity of 91.4% in the detection of slow ventricular tachyarrhythmias (heart rate < 150 beats/min). When faster ventricular tachyarrhythmias with rates between 150 and 169 beats/min (170-189 beats/min) were analyzed, a stability value of 30 ms provided a sensitivity of 94.5% (94.7%) and a specificity of 76.5% (54.0%). For arrhythmia episodes > or = 190 beats/min, the same stability value resulted in a sensitivity of 78.2% and a specificity of 41.0%. Even when other stability values were taken into consideration, no acceptable sensitivity/specificity values could be obtained in this subgroup. RR variability decreases with increasing heart rate during AF while RR variability remains almost constant at different cycle lengths during ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Thus, acceptable performance of the STABILITY algorithm appears to be limited to ventricular rate zones < 170 beats/min.

  6. How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heartbeats that can trigger the ICD. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator The illustration shows the location of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in the upper chest. The electrodes are inserted ...

  7. [Implantation of a biventricular ICD in a patient with dextrocardia with situs inversus].

    PubMed

    Vurgun, Veysel Kutay; Gerede, Menekşe; Altın, Ali Timuçin; Candemir, Başar; Akyürek, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce sudden cardiac death and heart failure symptoms, biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is a treatment method commonly used in selected patients with cardiomyopathy. The frequency of dextrocardia in congenital heart defects is approximately 0.4/10000. In this group, the frequency of cardiomyopathy development is rare. In this case report we present a patient with dextrocardia undergoing implantation of biventricular ICD.

  8. Acute perforation in spite of implantation with an "antiperforation" defibrillator lead.

    PubMed

    Chien, Walter W; Chin, John

    2009-12-01

    A 74-year-old male underwent implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator per multicenter automatic defibrillator trial two criteria. The new St. Jude Medical Riata STS Durata defibrillator lead (St. Jude Medical, Sylmar, CA, USA) was used. This lead has a slight curve at the right ventricle shock coil and a silicone tip designed to decrease tip pressure at the endocardium interface. We presented a case of acute perforation during implantation of this lead. The patient was treated with pericardiocentesis and recovered.

  9. Implantation of a defibrillator in a patient with an upper airway stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Ong, Adrian A; O'Brien, Terrence X; Nguyen, Shaun A; Gillespie, M Boyd

    2016-02-01

    The patient is a 62-year-old man with continuous positive airway pressure-intolerant obstructive sleep apnea who was enrolled in a study for a hypoglossal nerve upper airway stimulation device (UAS). Nearly 2.5 years later, he was admitted to the hospital for unstable angina. Diagnostic workup revealed a prior myocardial infarction, an ejection fraction of 30% on maximal medical therapy, and episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. During hospitalization, the patient received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). This is the first reported case of simultaneous use of a UAS and an ICD, and we report no untoward device interference between the two implantable devices.

  10. Electrophysiology Studies (EPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you need medicine, a pacemaker , an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) , cardiac ablation or surgery. These studies take ... catheter ablation . If a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) might help you. If you are at ...

  11. What to Expect Before a Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Rehabilitation Heart Failure Heart Surgery Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Ventricular Assist Device Send a link to NHLBI ... at the transplant centers may place implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in patients before surgery. ICDs are small ...

  12. Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Atrial Fibrillation Heart Block Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Long QT Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI ... arrhythmias with another device called an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). An ICD is similar to a pacemaker. ...

  13. Implant healing in experimental animal models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Le, Nga N; Rose, Michael B; Levinson, Howard; Klitzman, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Additionally, there is an increasing number of patients receiving implantable devices such as glucose sensors and orthopedic implants. Thus, it is likely that the number of diabetic patients receiving these devices will also increase. Even though implantable medical devices are considered biocompatible by the Food and Drug Administration, the adverse tissue healing that occurs adjacent to these foreign objects is a leading cause of their failure. This foreign body response leads to fibrosis, encapsulation of the device, and a reduction or cessation of device performance. A second adverse event is microbial infection of implanted devices, which can lead to persistent local and systemic infections and also exacerbates the fibrotic response. Nearly half of all nosocomial infections are associated with the presence of an indwelling medical device. Events associated with both the foreign body response and implant infection can necessitate device removal and may lead to amputation, which is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Diabetes mellitus is generally indicated as a risk factor for the infection of a variety of implants such as prosthetic joints, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, penile implants, and urinary catheters. Implant infection rates in diabetic patients vary depending upon the implant and the microorganism, however, for example, diabetes was found to be a significant variable associated with a nearly 7.2% infection rate for implantable cardioverter defibrillators by the microorganism Candida albicans. While research has elucidated many of the altered mechanisms of diabetic cutaneous wound healing, the internal healing adjacent to indwelling medical devices in a diabetic model has rarely been studied. Understanding this healing process is crucial to facilitating improved device design. The purpose of this article is to summarize the physiologic factors that

  14. [Postmarketing surveillance in patients with cardiac pace-makers or automatic implantable defibrillators].

    PubMed

    Fauchier, L; de Bouët du Portal, H; Giraudeau, C; Froger, S; Cosnay, P; Babuty, D

    2005-01-01

    This article includes an overview of the actual French control and regulation system of the safety alerts involving pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and an evaluation of the general information and trends about the characteristics of the reported incidents obtained in the last years in that field. The national security agencies have the mission to collect the data on safety and efficacy of medical devices but manufacturers, physicians and patients also have a role to play. The technical appreciation of the necessity of a notification is not easy in some cases but the lack of notification of a severe incident may lead to heavy penal consequences. If doubtful cases, one should keep in mind the spirit of these safety systems: a collective insurance against the risks related to the use of medical devices. In the 10 last years, the annual advisory rate was increased. The pacemakers were recalled more frequently than implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in absolute value but less frequently in relative value (advisories per 100 person-years). This increase may be related to the growing number of device implants and expanding indications for device therapy, to the increasing sophistication of the devices and to the modifications in the regulation aspects of these problems with a closer attention of users and physicians to the several types of malfunctions.

  15. Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Treatment for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... phone, and has two main parts: a pulse generator and one or more leads. The pulse generator constantly keeps track of your heartbeat. It’s like ... say: "leed") is a wire from the pulse generator to the inside of your heart. The lead ...

  16. Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Lead Failure and Management.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Charles D; Kalahasty, Gautham; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-03-22

    The implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead is the most vulnerable component of the ICD system. Despite advanced engineering design, sophisticated manufacturing techniques, and extensive bench, pre-clinical, and clinical testing, lead failure (LF) remains the Achilles' heel of the ICD system. ICD LF has a broad range of adverse outcomes, ranging from intermittent inappropriate pacing to proarrhythmia leading to patient mortality. ICD LF is often considered in the context of design or construction defects, but is more appropriately considered in the context of the finite service life of a mechanical component placed in chemically stressful environment and subjected to continuous mechanical stresses. This clinical review summarizes LF mechanisms, assessment, and differential diagnosis of LF, including lead diagnostics, recent prominent lead recalls, and management of LF and functioning, but recalled leads. Despite recent advances in lead technology, physicians will likely continue to need to understand how to manage patients with transvenous ICD leads. PMID:26988958

  17. Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Lead Failure and Management.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Charles D; Kalahasty, Gautham; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-03-22

    The implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead is the most vulnerable component of the ICD system. Despite advanced engineering design, sophisticated manufacturing techniques, and extensive bench, pre-clinical, and clinical testing, lead failure (LF) remains the Achilles' heel of the ICD system. ICD LF has a broad range of adverse outcomes, ranging from intermittent inappropriate pacing to proarrhythmia leading to patient mortality. ICD LF is often considered in the context of design or construction defects, but is more appropriately considered in the context of the finite service life of a mechanical component placed in chemically stressful environment and subjected to continuous mechanical stresses. This clinical review summarizes LF mechanisms, assessment, and differential diagnosis of LF, including lead diagnostics, recent prominent lead recalls, and management of LF and functioning, but recalled leads. Despite recent advances in lead technology, physicians will likely continue to need to understand how to manage patients with transvenous ICD leads.

  18. Cardiac or Other Implantable Electronic Devices and Sleep-disordered Breathing – Implications for Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Thomas; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is of growing interest in cardiology because SDB is a highly prevalent comorbidity in patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of SDB is particularly high in patients with cardiac dysrhythmias and/or heart failure. In this setting, many patients now have implantable cardiac devices, such as pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators or implanted cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices (CRT). Treatment of SDB using implantable cardiac devices has been studied previously, with atrial pacing and CRT being shown not to bring about satisfactory results in SDB care. The latest generations of these devices have the capacity to determine transthoracic impedance, to detect and quantify breathing efforts and to identify SDB. The capability of implantable cardiac devices to detect SDB is of potential importance for patients with cardiovascular disease, allowing screening for SDB, monitoring of the course of SDB in relation to cardiac status, and documenting of the effects of treatment. PMID:26835077

  19. Candida and cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: a case of lead and native aortic valve endocarditis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Vasher, Scott; Marmor, Meghan; Fine, Antonella B; Chan, Philip A; Tashima, Karen T; Lonks, John R; Kojic, Erna M

    2015-11-01

    Use of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED), including permanent pacemakers (PPM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), has increased dramatically over the past two decades. Most CIED infections are caused by staphylococci. Fungal causes are rare and their prognosis is poor. To our knowledge, there has not been a previously reported case of multifocal Candida endocarditis involving both a native left-sided heart valve and a CIED lead. Here, we report the case of a 70-year-old patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, and generalised fatigue, and was found to have Candida glabrata endocarditis involving both a native aortic valve and right atrial ICD lead. We review the literature and summarise four additional cases of CIED-associated Candida endocarditis published from 2009 to 2014, updating a previously published review of cases prior to 2009. We additionally review treatment guidelines and discuss management of CIED-associated Candida endocarditis.

  20. Reliability and Validity of the Self Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations After ICD Implantation Scales

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Thompson, Elaine Adams

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity characteristics of two new scales that measure self-efficacy expectations (SE-ICD) and outcome expectations (OE-ICD) in survivors (n=168) of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), all of whom received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Cronbach's alpha reliability demonstrated good internal consistency (SE-ICD α = 0.93 and OE-ICD α = 0.81). Correlations with other self-efficacy instruments (general self-efficacy and social self-efficacy) were consistently high. The instruments were responsive to change across time with effect sizes of 0.46 for SE-ICD, and 0.26 for OE-ICD. These reliable, valid, and responsive instruments for measurement of self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectations after an ICD can be used in research and clinical settings. PMID:17693214

  1. Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Marinskis, Germanas; Pison, Laurent; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100-199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations.

  2. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries.

  3. Prevention of infections in cardiovascular implantable electronic devices beyond the antibiotic agent.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Elia; Diemberger, Igor; Vassallo, Pier L; Pastore, Monica; Giannotti, Federica; Ronconi, Cinzia; Romandini, Andrea; Biffi, Mauro; Martignani, Cristian; Ziacchi, Matteo; Bonfatti, Federica; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pierluigi; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The increase in incidence/prevalence of infections of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators (implantable cardioverter defibrillator, ICD) is outweighing that of the implanting procedures, mainly favored by the changes in patient profile. Despite the high impact on patient's outcome and related costs for healthcare systems, we lack specific evidence on the preventive measures with the exception of antibiotic prophylaxis. The aim of this study is to focus on common approaches to pacemaker/ICD implantation to identify the practical preventive strategies and choices that can (potentially) impact on the occurrence of this feared complication. After a brief introduction on clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and risk factors, we will present the results from a survey on the preventive strategies adopted by different operators from the 25 centers of the Emilia Romagna region in the northern Italy (4.4 million inhabitants). These data will provide the basis for reviewing available literature on this topic and identifying the gray areas. The last part of the article will cover the available evidence about pacemaker/ICD implantation, focusing on prophylaxis of pacemaker/ICD infection as a 'continuum' starting before the surgical procedure (from indications to patient preparation), which follows during (operator, room, and techniques) and after the procedure (patient and device follow-up). We will conclude by evaluating the relationship between adherence to the available evidence and the volume of procedures of the implanting centers or operators' experience according to the results of our survey. PMID:24838036

  4. Cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections: associated risk factors and prevention.

    PubMed

    Rohacek, Martin; Baddour, Larry M

    2015-01-01

    Infections of cardiovascular implantable electric devices (CIED) are a burden on patients and healthcare systems and should be prevented. The most frequent pathogens are coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus. The most important risk factors for CIED infections are diabetes mellitus, renal and heart failure, corticosteroid use, oral anticoagulation, fever within 24 hours before the procedure and leucocytosis, implantable cardioverter defibrillator compared with pacemaker, especially in the case of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, lack of antibiotic prophylaxis, and postoperative haematoma and other wound complications. Other important risk factors are history of prior procedures and previous CIED infections, number of leads, use of povidone-iodine compared with chlorhexidine-alcohol, and centres and operators with a low volume of implants. To prevent CIED infections, patients undergoing CIED procedures and appropriate devices should be carefully selected, and interventions should be performed by trained operators. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be administered, and skin antisepsis should be done with chlorhexidine-alcohol. Oral anticoagulation should be continued during CIED procedures in high-risk patients for thromboembolism, instead of bridging with heparin. Early reintervention in cases of haematoma or lead dislodgement should be avoided. The implementation of infection prevention programmes reduces infection rates. More randomised controlled studies are needed to evaluate prevention strategies, especially skin preparation and antibiotic prophylaxis with glycopeptides. PMID:26230056

  5. Utilization of YouTube as a Tool to Assess Patient Perception Regarding Implanted Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Kevin; Mainali, Prajeena; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Pant, Sadip; Badheka, Apurva O; Paydak, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The outreach of YouTube may have a dramatic role in the widespread dissemination of knowledge on implantable cardioverter devices (ICD). Aims: This study was designed to review and analyze the information available on YouTube pertaining to implantable cardiac devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers. Materials and Methods: YouTube was queried for the terms “ICD”, “Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator”, and “Pacemaker”. The videos were reviewed and categorized as according to content; number of views and “likes” or “dislikes” was recorded by two separate observers. Results: Of the 55 videos reviewed, 18 of the videos were categorized as patient education, 12 were advertisements, 8 were intraoperative videos documenting the device implantation procedures, 7 of the videos were produced to document personal patient experiences, and 4 were categorized as documentation of a public event. 3 were intended to educate health care workers. The remaining 3 were intended to raise public awareness about sudden cardiac death. The videos portraying intraoperative procedures generated the most “likes” or “dislikes” per view. Conclusion: While YouTube provides a logical platform for delivery of health information, the information on this platform is not regulated. Initiative by reputed authorities and posting accurate information in such platform can be a great aid in public education regarding device therapy. PMID:25077075

  6. Subcutaneous chronic implantable defibrillation systems in humans.

    PubMed

    Cappato, Riccardo; Smith, Warren M; Hood, Margaret A; Crozier, Ian G; Jordaens, Luc; Spitzer, Stefan G; Ardashev, Andrey V; Boersma, Lucas; Lupo, Pierpaolo; Grace, Andrew A; Bardy, Gust H

    2012-09-01

    The recent introduction of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) has raised attention about the potential of this technology for clinical use in daily clinical practice. We review the methods and results of the four studies conducted in humans for approval of this innovative technology for daily practice. Two studies using a temporary S-ICD system (acute human studies) were conducted to search for an appropriate lead configuration and energy requirements. For this purpose, 4 S-ICD configurations were tested in 78 patients at the time of transvenous (TV)-ICD implantation. The optimal configuration was tested in 49 more patients to comparatively assess the subcutaneous defibrillation threshold (S-DFT) versus the standard TV-ICD. Long-term implants were evaluated in 55 patients using an implanted system (chronic human study). The acute humans studies led to an optimal S-ICD configuration comprising a parasternal electrode and left anterolateral thoracic pulse generator. Both configurations successfully terminated 98% of induced ventricular fibrillation (VF), but significantly higher energy levels were required with S-ICD than with TV-ICD systems (36.6 ± 19.8 J vs. 11.1 ± 8.5 J). In the chronic study, all 137 VF episodes induced at time of implant were detected with a 98% conversion rate. Two pocket infections and four lead revisions were required during 10 ± 1 months of follow-up. During this period, survival was 98%, and 12 spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias were detected and treated by the device. These data show that the S-ICD systems here consistently detected and converted VF induced at time of implant as well as sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurring during follow-up (248). PMID:22426601

  7. Arrhythmic death and ICD implantation after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    LOMBARDI, FEDERICO

    2006-01-01

    Arrhythmic death remains one of the most important causes of mortality after an acute myocardial infarction also in the revascularization era. As a consequence, identification of patients at risk should be performed before discharge. Unfortunately, in the clinical practice, this evaluation is mainly based on detection of a depressed left ventricular ejection. This approach, however, cannot adequately distinguish arrhythmic versus non-arrhythmic risk. This issue is of critical relevance when considering that arrhythmic death can be significantly reduced by appropriate interventions of implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Available evidence, however, indicates that in the first month after myocardial infarction, device implantation does not significantly reduce cardiac mortality: it seems that the reduction of arrhythmic death is counterbalanced by an increase in rate of death from non arrhythmic cause. It is therefore to be hoped that, in the future, arrhythmic risk evaluation will be based not only on the extent of left ventricular dysfunction but also on the analysis of other risk markers such as those reflecting autonomic dysfunction, cardiac electrical instability and presence of subclinical inflammation. PMID:21977246

  8. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  9. Active implantable medical device EMI assessment for wireless power transfer operating in LF and HF bands.

    PubMed

    Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) imposed on active implantable medical devices by wireless power transfer systems (WPTSs) is discussed based upon results of in vitro experiments. The purpose of this study is to present comprehensive EMI test results gathered from implantable-cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators exposed to the electromagnetic field generated by several WPTSs operating in low-frequency (70 kHz-460 kHz) and high-frequency (6.78 MHz) bands. The constructed in vitro experimental test system based upon an Irnich's flat torso phantom was applied. EMI test experiments are conducted on 14 types of WPTSs including Qi-compliant system and EV-charging WPT system mounted on current production EVs. In addition, a numerical simulation model for active implantable medical device (AIMD) EMI estimation based on the experimental test system is newly proposed. The experimental results demonstrate the risk of WPTSs emitting intermittent signal to affect the correct behavior of AIMDs when operating at very short distances. The proposed numerical simulation model is applicable to obtain basically the EMI characteristics of various types of WPTSs. PMID:27224201

  10. Active implantable medical device EMI assessment for wireless power transfer operating in LF and HF bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) imposed on active implantable medical devices by wireless power transfer systems (WPTSs) is discussed based upon results of in vitro experiments. The purpose of this study is to present comprehensive EMI test results gathered from implantable-cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators exposed to the electromagnetic field generated by several WPTSs operating in low-frequency (70 kHz-460 kHz) and high-frequency (6.78 MHz) bands. The constructed in vitro experimental test system based upon an Irnich’s flat torso phantom was applied. EMI test experiments are conducted on 14 types of WPTSs including Qi-compliant system and EV-charging WPT system mounted on current production EVs. In addition, a numerical simulation model for active implantable medical device (AIMD) EMI estimation based on the experimental test system is newly proposed. The experimental results demonstrate the risk of WPTSs emitting intermittent signal to affect the correct behavior of AIMDs when operating at very short distances. The proposed numerical simulation model is applicable to obtain basically the EMI characteristics of various types of WPTSs.

  11. Effect of Continued Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Ventricular Arrhythmias After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, John William; Mookadam, Farouk; Kransdorf, Evan P; Nanda, Udai; Adams, Jonathon C; Cha, Stephen; Pajaro, Octavio E; Steidley, David Eric; Scott, Robert L; Carvajal, Tomas; Saadiq, Rayya A; Srivathsan, Komandoor

    2016-08-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces ventricular arrhythmia (VA) burden in some patients with heart failure, but its effect after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is unknown. We compared VA burden in patients with CRT devices in situ who underwent LVAD implantation and continued CRT (n = 39) to those who had CRT turned off before discharge (n = 26). Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks were significantly reduced in patients with continued CRT (1.5 ± 2.7 shocks per patient vs 5.5 ± 9.3 with CRT off, p = 0.014). There was a nonsignificant reduction in cumulative VA episodes per patient with CRT continued at discharge (42 ± 105 VA per patient vs 82 ± 198 with CRT off, p = 0.29). On-treatment analysis by whether CRT was on or off identified a significantly lower burden of VA (17 ± 1 per patient-year CRT on vs 37 ± 1 per patient-year CRT off, p <0.0001) and ICD shocks (1.2 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT on vs 1.7 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT off, p = 0.018). In conclusion, continued CRT is associated with significantly reduced ICD shocks and VA burden after LVAD implantation. PMID:27328958

  12. Interference from a hand held radiofrequency remote control causing discharge of an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Man, K C; Davidson, T; Langberg, J J; Morady, F; Kalbfleisch, S J

    1993-08-01

    A 46-year-old man with a history of sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia underwent an implantation of a third generation multiprogrammable implantable cardioverter defibrillator. One year post implant, while manipulating a remote control to a radiofrequency modulated toy car, the patient experienced a defibrillator discharge not preceded by an arrhythmia prodrome. Subsequent interrogation of the defibrillator revealed that a 34-joule shock had been delivered and had been preceded by RR intervals ranging from 141-406 msec, consistent with sensing lead noise. The remote control utilizes a 12-volt battery and has a carrier frequency of 75.95 MHz and a modulating frequency of 50 Hz. Evaluation of the remote control and defibrillator interaction revealed that the remote control was able to trigger tachyarrhythmia sensing and reproduce the clinical episode. Interference was present only when the remote control was within 8 cm of the pulse generator and at specific angles relative to the device and only when the antenna length was > 45 cm. Interference was eliminated when a ground wire was attached to the antenna and when an aluminium shield was placed between the pulse generator and the remote control. This case report suggests that patients with third generation multiprogrammable defibrillators should be cautioned against close contact with potential sources of electromagnetic interference, such as remote control units.

  13. Rhetorical strategies used in the reporting of implantable defibrillator primary prevention trials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John R

    2011-06-15

    Previous studies have suggest that the authors of randomized trial reports frequently use rhetorical strategies, such as framing, the use of ratios rather than absolute values to report results, and underreporting of complications, to convince readers of treatment efficacy. The objective of this study was to determine if such rhetorical strategies were used in the publication of implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) primary prevention trials. Medline and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for all publications that described ICD primary prevention trials and that involved >100 subjects. Each publication was analyzed for evidence of message framing, the exclusive use of ratios to report outcomes, underreporting of ICD complications, and interpretation bias favoring ICD therapy. Ten publications were identified. Introductory remarks in 8 of the 10 publications cited the evaluation of ICD benefits as the sole objective and mentioned only background studies that supported ICD efficacy, suggesting message framing in support of ICD efficacy. Five publications provided no specific information about the frequency of unsuccessful ICD implantations, and 8 publications provided incomplete or no information about implantation and postimplantation complications. ICD complications were not mentioned in the discussion sections of 9 publications, and none of the publications included a comprehensive comparison of ICD benefits versus risks, consistent with interpretation bias. Ratios and statistically insignificant data were not used to emphasize ICD benefits. In conclusion, message framing, underreporting of ICD complications, and interpretation bias were used to emphasize ICD efficacy in the reporting of ICD primary prevention trials.

  14. Implanted near-infrared spectroscopy for cardiac monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Sourav K.; Cinbis, Can

    2011-02-01

    Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) provides one of the most effective therapies for the prevention of sudden cardiac death, but also delivers some high voltage shocks inappropriately, causing morbidity and mortality. Implanted near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may augment ICD arrhythmia detection by monitoring skeletal muscle perfusion. A two-wavelength, single-distance, continuous-wave implanted NIRS has been evaluated in-vivo. A weighted difference of the changes in attenuation at two wavelengths, across the isobestic point of the hemoglobin spectra, was taken to be the microvascular oxygenation trend indicator (O2 Index). Although the exact weight depends on the local vascular distribution and their oxygen levels, the hypothesis that a constant weight may be adequate for hemodynamic trending during short arrhythmic episodes, was tested. The sensor was implanted subcutaneously both on fresh tissue and inside scar tissue that formed around a pre-existing implant, in 3 animals each. Attenuations were recorded at 660 and 890 nm during normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and induced ventricular fibrillation (VF). The slope of the O2 Index over 10 seconds was computed for 7 NSR and 8 VF episodes in fresh and 13 NSR and 15 VF episodes in scar tissue pockets. The mean O2 Index slope was significantly different (p<0.0001) between NSR and VF rhythms for both the fresh and scar tissue pockets. Therefore implanted NIRS may be useful for preventing inappropriate detection of VF during electromagnetic interference, double counting of ECG T-wave as an R-wave, ICD lead failure, electrocardiographic aberrancy etc.

  15. Disease management: remote monitoring in heart failure patients with implantable defibrillators, resynchronization devices, and haemodynamic monitors.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T

    2013-06-01

    Heart failure represents a major public health concern, associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. A particular focus of contemporary heart failure management is reduction of hospital admission and readmission rates. While optimal medical therapy favourably impacts the natural history of the disease, devices such as cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillators have added incremental value in improving heart failure outcomes. These devices also enable remote patient monitoring via device-based diagnostics. Device-based measurement of physiological parameters, such as intrathoracic impedance and heart rate variability, provide a means to assess risk of worsening heart failure and the possibility of future hospitalization. Beyond this capability, implantable haemodynamic monitors have the potential to direct day-to-day management of heart failure patients to significantly reduce hospitalization rates. The use of a pulmonary artery pressure measurement system has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of heart failure hospitalization in a large randomized controlled study, the CardioMEMS Heart Sensor Allows Monitoring of Pressure to Improve Outcomes in NYHA Class III Heart Failure Patients (CHAMPION) trial. Observations from a pilot study also support the potential use of a left atrial pressure monitoring system and physician-directed patient self-management paradigm; these observations are under further investigation in the ongoing LAPTOP-HF trial. All these devices depend upon high-intensity remote monitoring for successful detection of parameter deviations and for directing and following therapy.

  16. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  17. Devices for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart an electric shock (as with a defibrillator ). For people with recurrent arrhythmias, medical devices such as a pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can help by continuously monitoring the heart's ...

  18. Mexiletine as an adjunctive therapy to amiodarone reduces the frequency of ventricular tachyarrhythmia events in patients with an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dongsheng; Van Herendael, Hugo; Alshengeiti, Lamia; Dorian, Paul; Mangat, Iqwal; Korley, Victoria; Ahmad, Kamran; Golovchiner, Gregory; Aves, Theresa; Pinter, Arnold

    2013-08-01

    The most effective pharmacological management of frequent ventricular tachyarrhythmia events in patients with an implantable defibrillator who failed or did not tolerate amiodarone is unknown. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of mexiletine in such patients. The patients served as self-controls. The number of treated ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes (primary outcome); mortality, shocks from the defibrillator, and electrical storm events (secondary outcomes) during mexiletine therapy was compared with a matched duration of observation just before initiating mexiletine in 29 patients who were treated with a median dose of 300 mg/d of mexiletine and were followed for a median of 12 months. None of the patients had to stop mexiletine due to side effect. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation episodes (median 2 vs. 12 events, P = 0.001) and shocks (median 0 vs. 2 events, P = 0.003) in the first 3 months of treatment, but long-term efficacy was only observed among patients who continued amiodarone therapy. In conclusion, mexiletine, when added to amiodarone in case of amiodarone inefficacy, reduces ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation events and appropriate therapies in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. A randomized trial should validate the efficacy and safety of mexiletine as an adjunctive therapy to amiodarone. PMID:23609328

  19. Electrical storm in patients with an implanted defibrillator: a matter of definition.

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Barold, S Serge

    2007-10-01

    The term "electrical storm" (ES) indicates a state of cardiac electrical instability manifested by several episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) within a short time. In patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), ES is best defined as 3 appropriate VT detections in 24 h, treated by antitachycardia pacing, shock or eventually untreated but sustained in a VT monitoring zone. The number of shocks and inappropriate detections are irrelevant for the definition. ES occurs in approximately 25% of ICD patients within 3 years, with typically 5-55 individual VTs within one storm. Potential triggers can be found in approximately 66% of patients and include new/worsened heart failure, changes in antiarrhythmic medication, context with other illness, psychological stress, diarrhea, and hypokalemia. In most patients, ES consists of monomorphic VT indicating the presence of reentry while ventricular fibrillation indicating acute ischemia is rare. ES seems to have a low immediate mortality (1%) but frequently (50-80%) leads to hospitalization. Long-term prognostic implications of ES are unclear. The key intervention in ES is reduction of the elevated sympathetic tone by beta blockers and frequently benzodiazepines. Amiodarone i.v. has also been successful and azimilide seems promising while class I antiarrhythmic drugs are usually unsuccessful. Substrate mapping and VT ablation may be useful in treatment and prevention of ES. Prevention of ES requires ICD programming systematically avoiding unnecessary shocks (long VT detection, antitachycardia pacing where ever possible) which otherwise can fuel the sympathetic tone and prolong ES.

  20. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position statement on the use of remote monitoring for cardiovascular implantable electronic device follow-up.

    PubMed

    Yee, Raymond; Verma, Atul; Beardsall, Marianne; Fraser, Jennifer; Philippon, Francois; Exner, Derek V

    2013-06-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) is a form of telemedicine technology that permits implanted pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators to transmit diagnostic information for review by health care professionals without patients needing to visit the device follow-up clinic. A bedside transmitter in the patient's home conveys the device data using standard telecommunication protocol to a protected internet-accessible RM data server, which authorized health care professionals can access at any time using standard web browser software. Evidence indicates it can accelerate identification of clinical events and potential device problems. RM raises important medicolegal issues concerning the protection of a patient's rights and the safeguarding of patient health information related to the collection, storage, and use of patient device information that must be addressed by follow-up centres. This position statement recommends that remote monitoring be available at all device follow-up clinics as an integral part of the standard of care of device patients and also provides helpful advice to centres for the proper design, implementation, and integration of a remote monitoring system into the clinic.

  1. Implementation and reimbursement of remote monitoring for cardiac implantable electronic devices in Europe: a survey from the health economics committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Georges H; Braunschweig, Frieder; Klersy, Katherine; Cowie, Martin R; Leyva, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias, device, and lead failure and may also be useful in risk-predicting patient-related outcomes. Financial benefits for patients and healthcare organizations have also been shown. We sought to assess the implementation and funding of RM of CIEDs, including conventional pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices in Europe. Electronic survey from 43 centres in 15 European countries. In the study sample, RM was available in 22% of PM patients, 74% of ICD patients, and 69% of CRT patients. The most significant perceived benefits were the early detection of atrial arrhythmias in pacemaker patients, lead failure in ICD patients, and worsening heart failure in CRT patients. Remote monitoring was reported to lead a reduction of in-office follow-ups for all devices. The most important reported barrier to the implementation of RM for all CIEDs was lack of reimbursement (80% of centres). Physicians regard RM of CIEDs as a clinically useful technology that affords significant benefits for patients and healthcare organizations. Remote monitoring, however, is perceived as increasing workload. Reimbursement for RM is generally perceived as a major barrier to implementation.

  2. EHRA Expert Consensus Statement on the management of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices in patients nearing end of life or requesting withdrawal of therapy.

    PubMed

    Padeletti, Luigi; Arnar, David O; Boncinelli, Lorenzo; Brachman, Johannes; Camm, John A; Daubert, Jean Claude; Hassam, Sarah K; Kassam, Sarah; Deliens, Luc; Glikson, Michael; Hayes, David; Israel, Carsten; Lampert, Rachel; Lobban, Trudie; Raatikainen, Pekka; Siegal, Gil; Vardas, Panos; Kirchhof, Paulus; Becker, Rüdiger; Cosio, Francisco; Loh, Peter; Cobbe, Stuart; Grace, Andrew; Morgan, John

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this Consensus Statement is to focus on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) deactivation in patients with irreversible or terminal illness. This statement summarizes the opinions of the Task Force members, convened by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), based on ethical and legal principles, as well as their own clinical, scientific, and technical experience. It is directed to all healthcare professionals who treat patients with implanted ICDs, nearing end of life, in order to improve the patient dying process. This statement is not intended to recommend or promote device deactivation. Rather, the ultimate judgement regarding this procedure must be made by the patient (or in special conditions by his/her legal representative) after careful communication about the deactivation's consequences, respecting his/her autonomy and clarifying that he/she has a legal and ethical right to refuse it. Obviously, the physician asked to deactivate the ICD and the industry representative asked to assist can conscientiously object to and refuse to perform device deactivation. PMID:20675674

  3. Cardiac device implantation in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Sené, Thomas; Lidove, Olivier; Sebbah, Joel; Darondel, Jean-Marc; Picard, Hervé; Aaron, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Zenone, Thierry; Joly, Dominique; Charron, Philippe; Ziza, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and predictive factors of arrhythmias and/or conduction abnormalities (ACAs) requiring cardiac device (CD) implantation are poorly characterized in Fabry disease (FD). The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with ACA requiring CD implantation in a monocentric cohort of patients with confirmed FD who were followed up in a department of internal medicine and reference center for FD. Forty-nine patients (20M, 29F) were included. Nine patients (4M, 5F; 18%) had at least one episode of ACA leading to device therapy. Six patients (4M/2F) required a pacemaker (PM) for sinus node dysfunction (n = 4) or atrioventricular disease (n = 2). One female patient required an internal cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to prevent sudden cardiac death because of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (nSVT). One female patient required PM-ICD for sinus node dysfunction and nSVT. One patient underwent CD implantation before the diagnosis of FD. The annual rate of CD implantation was estimated at 1.90 per 100 person years. On univariate analysis at the end of the follow-up period, the factors associated with ACAs requiring CD implantation were as follows: delayed diagnosis of FD, delayed initiation of enzyme replacement therapy, age at the last follow-up visit, and severe multiorgan phenotype (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, chronic kidney disease, and/or sensorineural hearing loss). On multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis of FD and age at the last follow-up visit were independently associated with an increased risk of ACAs requiring CD (P < 0.05). Considering the high frequency of ACAs requiring CD implantation and the risk of sudden death in patients with FD, regular monitoring is mandatory, especially in patients with a late diagnosis of FD and/or with a severe phenotype. Regular Holter ECGs, therapeutic education of patients, and deliverance of an emergency card including a phenotype

  4. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    SciTech Connect

    Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S. Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  5. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care.

  6. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care. PMID:26996767

  7. Wireless microsensor network solutions for neurological implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    trigger the feed back system or contact a point-of-care office that can remotely control the implantable system. The remote monitoring technology can be adaptable to EEG monitoring of children with epilepsy, implantable cardioverters/defibrillators, pacemakers, chronic pain management systems, treatment for sleep disorders, patients with implantable devices for diabetes. In addition, the development of a wireless neural electronics interface to detect, transmit and analyze neural signals could help patients with spinal injuries to regain some semblance of mobile activity.

  8. Complications after Surgical Procedures in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices: Results of a Prospective Registry

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Katia Regina; Albertini, Caio Marcos de Moraes; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; de Carvalho, Eduardo Infante Januzzi; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Martinelli Filho, Martino; Costa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Complications after surgical procedures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) are an emerging problem due to an increasing number of such procedures and aging of the population, which consequently increases the frequency of comorbidities. Objective: To identify the rates of postoperative complications, mortality, and hospital readmissions, and evaluate the risk factors for the occurrence of these events. Methods: Prospective and unicentric study that included all individuals undergoing CIED surgical procedures from February to August 2011. The patients were distributed by type of procedure into the following groups: initial implantations (cohort 1), generator exchange (cohort 2), and lead-related procedures (cohort 3). The outcomes were evaluated by an independent committee. Univariate and multivariate analyses assessed the risk factors, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results: A total of 713 patients were included in the study and distributed as follows: 333 in cohort 1, 304 in cohort 2, and 76 in cohort 3. Postoperative complications were detected in 7.5%, 1.6%, and 11.8% of the patients in cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p = 0.014). During a 6-month follow-up, there were 58 (8.1%) deaths and 75 (10.5%) hospital readmissions. Predictors of hospital readmission included the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (odds ratio [OR] = 4.2), functional class III­-IV (OR = 1.8), and warfarin administration (OR = 1.9). Predictors of mortality included age over 80 years (OR = 2.4), ventricular dysfunction (OR = 2.2), functional class III-IV (OR = 3.3), and warfarin administration (OR = 2.3). Conclusions: Postoperative complications, hospital readmissions, and deaths occurred frequently and were strongly related to the type of procedure performed, type of CIED, and severity of the patient's underlying heart disease. PMID:27579544

  9. Implantable Defibrillators for Secondary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Cardiac Surgery Patients With Perioperative Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nageh, Maged F.; Kim, John J.; Chen, Lie‐Hong; Yao, Janis F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized studies of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) have excluded sudden cardiac death survivors who had revascularization before or after an arrhythmic event. To evaluate the role of ICD and the effects of clinical variables including degree of revascularization, we studied cardiac surgery patients who had an ICD implanted for sustained perioperative ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results The electronic database for Southern California Kaiser Foundation hospitals was searched for patients who had cardiac surgery between 1999 and 2005 and an ICD implanted within 3 months of surgery. One hundred sixty‐four patients were identified; 93/164 had an ICD for sustained pre‐ or postoperative ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation requiring resuscitation. Records were reviewed for the following: presenting arrhythmia, ejection fraction, and degree of revascularization. The primary end point was total mortality (TM) and/or appropriate ICD therapy (ICD‐T), and secondary end points are TM and ICD‐T. During the mean follow up of 49 months, the primary endpoint of TM+ICD‐T and individual end points of TM and ICD‐T were observed in 52 (56%), 35 (38%), and 28 (30%) patients, respectively, with 55% of TM, and 23% of ICD‐T occurring within 2 years of implant. In multivariate risk analysis, none of the following was associated with any of the end points: incomplete revascularization, presenting ventricular arrhythmia, and timing of arrhythmias. Conclusion Our data supports the recent guidelines for ICD in this cohort of patients, as the presence of irreversible substrate and triggers of ventricular arrhythmias, cannot be reliably excluded even with complete revascularization. Further studies are needed to understand this complex group of patients. PMID:25146702

  10. Utilization and likelihood of radiologic diagnostic imaging in patients with implantable cardiac defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ryan, Michael P.; Wolff, Steven D.; Mollenkopf, Sarah A.; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine imaging utilization in a matched cohort of patients with and without implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and to project magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilization over a 10‐year period. Materials and Methods The Truven Health MarketScan Commercial claims and Medicare Supplemental health insurance claims data were used to identify patients with continuous health plan enrollment in 2009–2012. Patients with ICDs were identified using ICD‐9 and CPT codes, and matched to patients with the same demographic and comorbidity profile, but no record of device implantation. Diagnostic imaging utilization was compared across the matched cohorts, in total, by imaging categories, and in subpopulations of stroke, back pain, and joint pain. MRI use in the nonimplant group over the 4‐year period was extrapolated out to 10 years for ICD‐indicated patients. Results A cohort of 18,770 matched patients were identified; average age 65.5 ± 13.38 and 21.9% female. ICD patients had significantly less MRI imaging (0.23 0.70 SD vs. 0.00 0.08 SD, P < 0.0001) than nonimplant patients. Among patients with records of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) (ICD 5%, nonimplant 4%) and accompanying diagnostic imaging, 44% of nonimplant patients underwent MRI vs. 1% of ICD patients (P < 0.0001). Forecast models estimated that 53% to 64% of ICD‐eligible patients may require an MRI within 10 years. Conclusion MRI utilization is lower in ICD patients compared to nonimplant patients, yet the burden of incident stroke/TIA, back, and joint pain suggests an unmet need for MR‐conditional devices. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:115–127. PMID:26118943

  11. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested.

  12. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations: an analysis of a complete, nationwide cohort in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Jørgensen, Ole Dan; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2014-01-01

    Aims Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient morbidity, healthcare costs, and possibly increased mortality. Methods and results Population-based cohort study in all Danish patients who underwent a CIED procedure from May 2010 to April 2011. Data on complications were gathered on review of all patient charts while baseline data were obtained from the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Register. Adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using binary regression. The study population consisted of 5918 consecutive patients. A total of 562 patients (9.5%) experienced at least one complication. The risk of any complication was higher if the patient was a female (aRR 1.3; 1.1–1.6), underweight (aRR 1.5; 1.1–2.3), implanted in a centre with an annual volume <750 procedures (0–249 procedures: aRR 1.6; 1.1–2.2, 250–499: aRR 2.0; 1.6–2.7, 500–749: aRR 1.5; 1.2–1.8), received a dual-chamber ICD (aRR 2.0; 1.4–2.7) or CRT-D (aRR 2.6; 1.9–3.4), underwent system upgrade or lead revision (aRR 1.3; 1.0–1.7), had an operator with an annual volume <50 procedures (aRR 1.9; 1.4–2.6), or underwent an emergency, out-of-hours procedure (aRR 1.5; 1.0–2.3). Conclusion CIED complications are more frequent than generally acknowledged. Both patient- and procedure-related predictors may identify patients with a particularly high risk of complications. This information should be taken into account both in individual patient treatment and in the planning of future organization of CIED treatment. PMID:24347317

  13. Remote monitoring of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices: a Southeast Asian, single-centre pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Paul Chun Yih; Lee, Audry Shan Yin; Chua, Kelvin Chi Ming; Lim, Eric Tien Siang; Chong, Daniel Thuan Tee; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Teo, Wee Siong; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has been shown to improve patient safety and reduce in-office visits. We report our experience with remote monitoring via the Medtronic CareLink® network. METHODS Patients were followed up for six months with scheduled monthly remote monitoring transmissions in addition to routine in-office checks. The efficacy of remote monitoring was evaluated by recording compliance to transmissions, number of device alerts requiring intervention and time from transmission to review. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate the experiences of patients, physicians and medical technicians. RESULTS A total of 57 patients were enrolled; 16 (28.1%) had permanent pacemakers, 34 (59.6%) had implantable cardioverter defibrillators and 7 (12.3%) had cardiac resynchronisation therapy defibrillators. Overall, of 334 remote transmissions scheduled, 73.7% were on time, 14.5% were overdue and 11.8% were missed. 84.6% of wireless transmissions were on time, compared to 53.8% of non-wireless transmissions. Among all transmissions, 4.4% contained alerts for which physicians were informed and only 1.8% required intervention. 98.6% of remote transmissions were reviewed by the second working day. 73.2% of patients preferred remote monitoring. Physicians agreed that remote transmissions provided information equivalent to in-office checks 97.1% of the time. 77.8% of medical technicians felt that remote monitoring would help the hospital improve patient management. No adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION Remote monitoring of CIED is safe and feasible. It has possible benefits to patient safety through earlier detection of arrhythmias or device malfunction, permitting earlier intervention. Wireless remote monitoring, in particular, may improve compliance to device monitoring. Patients may prefer remote monitoring due to possible improvements in quality of life. PMID:27439396

  14. Performance of 2014 NICE defibrillator implantation guidelines in heart failure risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Lorraine C; Gierula, John; Byrom, Rowenna; Paton, Maria; Sengupta, Anshuman; Patel, Peysh A; MN Walker, Andrew; Cairns, David A; Rajwani, Adil; Hall, Alistair S; Sapsford, Robert J; Kearney, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Objective Define the real-world performance of recently updated National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines (TA314) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) use in people with chronic heart failure. Methods Multicentre prospective cohort study of 1026 patients with stable chronic heart failure, associated with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% recruited in cardiology outpatient departments of four UK hospitals. We assessed the capacity of TA314 to identify patients at increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) or appropriate ICD shock. Results The overall risk of SCD or appropriate ICD shock was 2.1 events per 100 patient-years (95% CI 1.7 to 2.6). Patients meeting TA314 ICD criteria (31.1%) were 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.6 to 3.9) more likely to suffer SCD or appropriate ICD shock; they were also 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 2.2) more likely to die from non-cardiovascular causes and 1.6-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 2.3) more likely to die from progressive heart failure. Patients with diabetes not meeting TA314 criteria experienced comparable absolute risk of SCD or appropriate ICD shock to patients without diabetes who met TA314 criteria. Patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy not meeting TA314 criteria experienced comparable absolute risk of SCD or appropriate ICD shock to patients with non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy who met TA314 criteria. Conclusions TA314 can identify patients with reduced LVEF who are at increased relative risk of sudden death. Clinicians should also consider clinical context and the absolute risk of SCD when advising patients about the potential risks and benefits of ICD therapy. PMID:26857212

  15. [Shock-induced, but not terminated ventricular tachycardia in a patient with implantable defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Kühlkamp, V; Dörnberger, V; Mermi, J; Mewis, C; Seipel, L

    1996-05-01

    A 62-year-old male patient with coronary artery disease and drug refractory sustained ventricular tachycardia received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (PRX III, model 1720, CPI) with a transvenous lead system (Endotak, model 0115, CPI) in combination with a subcutaneous array electrode (SQ array, model 049, CPI). The intraoperative defibrillation threshold was 15 J and was confirmed 1 week later at the hospital discharge test. Three months after discharge from hospital the patient reported 5 shocks during moderate physical exertion followed by a tachycardia associated with dizziness which terminated spontaneously. The print out of the stored electrogram showed a supraventricular tachycardia (probably sinus tachycardia) with a heart rate of 154/min which activated the device. Antitachycardia pacing did not terminate the supraventricular tachycardia, and hence shock therapy was delivered. The first shock (34 J) converted the supraventricular tachycardia to a ventricular tachycardia with a heart rate of 178/min, which was not terminated by four consecutive 34 J DC shocks. There was no hint of a device or lead failure. Determination of the defibrillation threshold reconfirmed the 15 J value for termination of ventricular fibrillation. However, neither a 1 J shock nor a 34 J shock terminated a monomorphic sustained ventricular tachycardia (cycle length 340 ms) induced by noninvasive programmed electrical stimulation. The ventricular tachycardia was, however, reproducibly terminate by antitachycardia pacing. It is concluded that an inappropriate high-energy DC shock might induce a sustained ventricular tachycardia. However, a sufficient defibrillation threshold for the termination of ventricular fibrillation does not necessarily mean that a sustained ventricular tachycardia will be terminated by a high-energy DC shock.

  16. [Long-term outcome of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment for ventricular arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, S; Kasanuki, H

    2000-03-01

    Recent advances of nonpharmacological therapy such as catheter ablation and implantable cardioverter defibrillator and lessons from the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial(CAST) have changed the strategy for ventricular arrhythmias. The safety and efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation of symptomatic sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia without structural heart disease has made ablation the firstline curative therapy. In idiopathic ventricular fibrillation such as Brugada syndrome, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death. In patients with asymptomatic ventricular tachyarrhythmias in heart failure, class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided due to proarrhythmic and negative inotropic effects that may be responsible for increased mortality in some trials. In such patients, amiodarone and beta-blocker may reduce sudden cardiac death. For patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in heart failure, amiodarone or implantable cardioverter defibrillator should be considered. In comparison with amiodarone, implantable cardioverter defibrillator markedly reduced sudden death in ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation survivors in Antiarrhythmics Versus Implantable Defibriltors(AVID). Although better patient selection and clarification of mapping criteria improved the successful ablation rate in patients with structural heart disease, candidates of ablation are few. In patients with extensive structural heart disease, multiple ventricular tachycardias are often present. Catheter ablation of a single ventricular tachycardia may be only palliative. Therefore, implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death, with amiodarone and ablation as the adjunctive therapy to prevent frequent ventricular tachycardia. Furthermore, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator improved survival in selected

  17. Overreaction to noncompaction in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, Parkinson disease, migraine and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Stix, Alexander; Finsterer, Josef

    2011-07-01

    A patient with ankylosing spondylitis, migraine, Parkinson syndrome, renal insufficiency and myopathy, received an implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator because of asymptomatic left ventricular hypertrabeculation/noncompaction as primary prophylaxis against sudden cardiac death. Inadvertently the ventricular lead was placed in a cardiac vein, the patient suffered from pericardial effusion and it was impossible to remove the lead. Implantation of an implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator simply upon the presence of LVHT appears not justified and may be more harmful than beneficial. Studies about the risk of SCD in adults with LVHT are necessary and will hopefully clarify if primary prevention of SCD is indicated.

  18. Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia in Apparently Normal Hearts: Ablation Should Be the First Step in Management.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joshua D; Tung, Roderick

    2016-09-01

    Patients without structural heart disease tend to have fewer morphologies of ventricular tachycardia, with automaticity and triggered activity a more common mechanism than re-entry associated with extremely low risk of sudden death. Ablation can be curative in patients with a single morphology of ventricular tachycardia that is focal in origin, particularly in patients without overt structural heart disease. There are limited data in secondary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator literature to support the routine implementation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator in normal hearts. Antiarrhythmic drugs have not been shown to reduce all-cause mortality in patients with and without structural heart disease. PMID:27521095

  19. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  20. Long-term efficacy of implantable cardiac resynchronization therapy plus defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with mild heart failure: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Ping; Li, Chun-Lei; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Xin; Liu, Ran; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Ling

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies of implantable cardiac resynchronization therapy plus defibrillator (CRT-D) therapy used for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death have suggested that CRT-D therapy is less effective in patients with mild heart failure and a wide QRS complex. However, the long-term benefits are variable. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials identified in systematic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database. Three studies (3858 patients) with a mean follow-up of 66 months were included. Overall, CRT-D therapy was associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality than was implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy (OR, 0.78; 95 % CI, 0.63-0.96; P = 0.02; I (2) = 19 %). However, the risk of cardiac mortality was comparable between two groups (OR, 0.74; 95 % CI, 0.53-1.01; P = 0.06). CRT-D treatment was associated with a significantly lower risk of hospitalization for heart failure (OR, 0.67; 95 % CI, 0.50-0.89; P = 0.005; I (2) = 55 %). The composite outcome of all-cause mortality and hospitalization for heart failure was also markedly lower with CRT-D therapy than with ICD treatment alone (OR, 0.67; 95 % CI, 0.57-0.77; P < 0.0001; I (2) = 0 %). CRT-D therapy decreased the long-term risk of mortality and heart failure events in patients with mild heart failure with a wide QRS complex. However, long-term risk of cardiac mortality was similar between two groups. More randomized studies are needed to confirm these findings, especially in patients with NYHA class I heart failure or patients without LBBB.

  1. Pacemaker implantation in a patient with brugada and sick sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Bundgaard, Henning; Jabbari, Reza; Haunsø, Stig; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2013-03-26

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare and inherited primary arrhythmic syndrome characterized by ST-segment elevations in the right precordial leads (V1-V3) with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Arrhythmias in BrS are often nocturne, and brady-arrhythmias are often seen in patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A. In this case-report we present a 75-year old woman referred to our outpatient clinic for inherited cardiac diseases for a familial clinical work-up. Since childhood she had suffered from dizziness, absence seizures, and countless Syncope's. In 2004 sick sinus syndrome was suspected and she was treated with implantation of a pacemaker (PM) at another institution. An inherited cardiac disease was one day suddenly suspected, as the patient had a 61-year old brother who was diagnosed with symptomatic BrS, and treated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) after aborted SCD. A mutation screening revealed a SCN5A [S231CfsX251 (c.692-693delCA)] loss-of-function mutation not previously reported, and as a part of the cascade screening in relatives she was therefore referred to our clinic. In the 7 year period after PM implantation she had experienced no cardiac symptoms, although her electrocardiogram changes now were consistent with a BrS type 1 pattern. A genetic test confirmed that she had the same mutation in SCN5A as her brother. In this case-report we present a loss-of function mutation in SCN5A not previously associated with BrS nor presented in healthy controls. Sinus node dysfunction has previously been documented in patients with symptomatic BrS, which suggests it is not a rare concomitant. The only accepted treatment of BrS is today implantation of an ICD. In the future studies should evaluate if PM in some cases of symptomatic BrS can be used instead of ICDs in patients with a loss-of-function SCN5A mutations.

  2. Adhoc electromagnetic compatibility testing of non-implantable medical devices and radio frequency identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of radiofrequency identification (RFID) in healthcare is increasing and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have documented that RFID can interfere with medical devices. The majority of past studies have concentrated on implantable medical devices such as implantable pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). This study examined EMC between RFID systems and non-implantable medical devices. Methods Medical devices were exposed to 19 different RFID readers and one RFID active tag. The RFID systems used covered 5 different frequency bands: 125–134 kHz (low frequency (LF)); 13.56 MHz (high frequency (HF)); 433 MHz; 915 MHz (ultra high frequency (UHF])) and 2.4 GHz. We tested three syringe pumps, three infusion pumps, four automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), and one ventilator. The testing procedure is modified from American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C63.18, Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Radiated Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Specific Radio-Frequency Transmitters. Results For syringe pumps, we observed electromagnetic interference (EMI) during 13 of 60 experiments (22%) at a maximum distance of 59 cm. For infusion pumps, we observed EMI during 10 of 60 experiments (17%) at a maximum distance of 136 cm. For AEDs, we observed EMI during 18 of 75 experiments (24%) at a maximum distance of 51 cm. The majority of the EMI observed was classified as probably clinically significant or left the device inoperable. No EMI was observed for all medical devices tested during exposure to 433 MHz (two readers, one active tag) or 2.4 GHz RFID (two readers). Conclusion Testing confirms that RFID has the ability to interfere with critical medical equipment. Hospital staff should be aware of the potential for medical device EMI caused by RFID systems and should be encouraged to

  3. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Poenisch, Falk; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Sheu, Tommy; Chang, Joe Y.; Memon, Nada; Mohan, Radhe; Rozner, Marc A.; Dougherty, Anne H.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving

  4. Teenage pregnancy with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and documented ICD discharges.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aziez; Phillips, John R

    2016-04-01

    We report the first case of pregnancy in a pediatric patient with catecholiminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Pregnant adolescents with CPVT are at high risk for NSVT and malignant VT during pregnancy, despite antiarrhythmic medication. They may receive multiple implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies. Such patients require close monitoring with special care during the first trimester. PMID:27099728

  5. Update in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    García-Bolao, Ignacio; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco; Bazan, Victor; Berruezo, Antonio; Alcalde, Oscar; Leal del Ojo, Juan; Acosta, Juan; Martínez Sellés, Manuel; Mosquera, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the main advances in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published between 2013 and 2014. Special attention is given to the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias, and on advances in cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, with particular reference to the elderly patient.

  6. Insulation failure and externalized conductor of a single-coil Kentrox lead: an ongoing story?

    PubMed

    Bogossian, Harilaos; Mijic, Dejan; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Winter, Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Conductor externalization is a frequent complication with the St. Jude Medical Riata lead. Single case reports also reported externalization of conductors for dual-coil Biotronik leads. Up to now, conductor externalization has not yet been reported for any single coil leads. We report for the first time an externalization of conductors in a Biotronik Kentrox single-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead.

  7. Combined etiology of anaphylactic cardiogenic shock: amiodarone, epinephrine, cardioverter defibrillator, left ventricular assist devices and the Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Davlouros, Periklis; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition which needs detailed and mediculous clinical assessment and thoughtful treatment. Several causes can join forces in order to degranulate mast cells. Amiodarone which is an iodine-containing highly lipophilic benzofuran can induce allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock in sensitized patients. Epinephrine is a life saving drug, but in sulfite allergic patients it should be given with caution due its metabisulfite preservative. Metals covering cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers can act as antigens attached to serum proteins and induce allergic reactions. In anaphylactic shock, myocardial involvement due to vasospasm-induced coronary blood flow reduction manifesting as Kounis syndrome should be always considered. Clinically, combined treatment targeting the primary cause of anaphylaxis together with protection of cardiac tissue seems to be of paramount importance.

  8. Combined etiology of anaphylactic cardiogenic shock: Amiodarone, epinephrine, cardioverter defibrillator, left ventricular assist devices and the Kounis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G.; Soufras, George D.; Davlouros, Periklis; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition which needs detailed and mediculous clinical assessment and thoughtful treatment. Several causes can join forces in order to degranulate mast cells. Amiodarone which is an iodine-containing highly lipophilic benzofuran can induce allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock in sensitized patients. Epinephrine is a life saving drug, but in sulfite allergic patients it should be given with caution due its metabisulfite preservative. Metals covering cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers can act as antigens attached to serum proteins and induce allergic reactions. In anaphylactic shock, myocardial involvement due to vasospasm-induced coronary blood flow reduction manifesting as Kounis syndrome should be always considered. Clinically, combined treatment targeting the primary cause of anaphylaxis together with protection of cardiac tissue seems to be of paramount importance. PMID:25849705

  9. Position paper for management of elderly patients with pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators Groupe de rythmologie et stimulation cardiaque de la Société française de cardiologie et Société française de gériatrie et gérontologie.

    PubMed

    Fauchier, Laurent; Alonso, Christine; Anselme, Frédéric; Blangy, Hugues; Bordachar, Pierre; Boveda, Serge; Clementy, Nicolas; Defaye, Pascal; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Friocourt, Patrick; Gras, Daniel; Halimi, Franck; Klug, Didier; Mansourati, Jacques; Obadia, Benjamin; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Pavin, Dominique; Sadoul, Nicolas; Taieb, Jérôme; Piot, Olivier; Hanon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Despite the increasingly high rate of implantation of pacemakers (PM) and cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) in elderly patients, data supporting their clinical and cost-effectiveness in this age stratum are ambiguous and contradictory. We reviewed the data regarding the applicability, safety, and effectiveness of the conventional pacing, ICD and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in elderly patients. Although peri-procedural risk may be slightly higher in the elderly, the procedure of implantation of PMs and ICDs is still relatively safe in this age group. In older patients with sinus node disease, a general consensus is that dual chamber pacing, along with the programming of an algorithm to minimise ventricular pacing is preferred. In very old patients presenting with intermittent or suspected AV block, VVI pacing may be appropriate. In terms of correcting potentially life-threatening arrhythmias, the effectiveness of ICD therapy is comparable in older and younger individuals. However, the assumption of persistent ICD benefit in the elderly population is questionable, as any advantage of the device on arrhythmic death may be attenuated by a higher total non-arrhythmic mortality. While septuagenarians and octogenarians have higher annual all-cause mortality rates, ICD therapy may remain effective in selected patients at high risk of arrhythmic death and with minimum comorbidities despite advanced age. ICD implantation among the elderly, as a group, may not be cost-effective, but the procedure may reach cost-effectiveness in those expected to live >5-7 years after implantation. The elderly patients usually experience a significant functional improvement after CRT, similar to that observed in middle-aged patients. Management of CRT non responders remains globally the same, while considering a less aggressive approach in terms of re interventions (revision of LV lead placement, addition of a RV or LV lead, LV endocardial pacing configuration). Overall, age

  10. Development and feasibility testing of decision support for patients who are candidates for a prophylactic implantable defibrillator: a study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients, identified to be at risk for but who have never experienced a potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia, have the option of receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) as prophylaxis against sudden cardiac death - a primary prevention indication. In Canada, there is no clear framework to support patients’ decision-making for these devices. Decision support, using a decision aid, could moderate treatment-related uncertainty and prepare patients to make well-informed decisions. Patient decision aids provide information on treatment options, risks, and benefits, to help patients clarify their values for outcomes of treatment options. The objectives of this research are: 1) develop a decision aid, 2) evaluate the decision aid, and 3) determine the feasibility of conducting a trial. Methods/design A development panel comprised of the core investigative team, health service researchers, decision science experts, cardiovascular healthcare practitioners, and ICD patient representatives will collaborate to provide input on the content and format of the aid. To generate probabilities to include in the aid, we will synthesize primary prevention ICD evidence. To obtain anonymous input about the facts and content, we will employ a modified Delphi process. To evaluate the draft decision aid will invite ICD patients and their families (n = 30) to rate its acceptability. After we evaluate the aid, to determine the feasibility, we will conduct a feasibility pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) in new ICD candidates (n = 80). Participants will be randomized to receive a decision aid prior to specialist consultation versus usual care. Results from the pilot RCT will determine the feasibility of research processes; inform sample size calculation, measure decision quality (knowledge, values, decision conflict) and the influence of health related quality of life on decision-making. Discussion Our study seeks to develop a decision aid, for patients

  11. Delayed right-ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead; a rare complication in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Akın, Alper; Ertuğrul, İlker; Karagöz, Tevfik

    2015-03-01

    Developments in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases have led to an increase in the need for intracardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Various complications related to these interventions can be seen in the short term (pneumothorax, pericardial effusion, cardiac perforation, etc…) and in the long term (infection, subclavian vein thrombosis, sensing and pacing problems, battery erosion and cardiac perforation). In this report, we present a rare case of cardiac perforation occurring 2 years after pacemaker implantation.

  12. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope.

  13. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope. PMID:24774592

  14. Optimal antiarrhythmic drug therapy for electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Sorajja, Dan; Munger, Thomas M.; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Electrical storm, defined as 3 or more separate episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation within 24 hours, carries significant morbidity and mortality. These unstable ventricular arrhythmias have been described with a variety of conditions including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, and genetic conditions. While implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation and ablation may be indicated and required, antiarrhythmic medication remains an important adjunctive therapy for these persons. PMID:25745472

  15. Arrhythmic storm: Short-coupled variant torsade de pointes.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Frutuoso, Cecília; Vasconcelos, Mariana; Dias, Paula; Garcia, Raquel; Pinho, Teresa; Araújo, Vítor; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2016-05-01

    A 49-year-old woman, with no relevant family history, was admitted in 1996 for arrhythmic storm with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes) which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation. Iatrogenic causes were excluded, the electrocardiogram (ECG) was normal and there was no structural heart disease. She refused cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Treatment was begun with amiodarone, which she took irregularly. She remained asymptomatic until 2014 when she was admitted for a new arrhythmic storm with torsade de pointes, refractory to antiarrhythmic therapy and aggravated by ventricular pacing (65 defibrillations). She had frequent ventricular extrasystoles (with short-coupled period <300 ms) preceding the tachycardia. After administration of isoprenaline infusion electric stability was maintained. In this setting and in the absence of structural heart disease or iatrogenic cause, a diagnosis of short-coupled variant torsade de pointes was established. A cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted and she was treated with verapamil, without recurrence of arrhythmias.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  17. [Magnets, pacemaker and defibrillator: fatal attraction?].

    PubMed

    Bergamin, C; Graf, D

    2015-05-27

    This article aims at clarifying the effects of a clinical magnet on pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators. The effects of electromagnetic interferences on such devices, including interferences linked to electrosurgery and magnetic resonance imaging are also discussed. In general, a magnet provokes a distinctive effect on a pacemaker by converting it into an asynchronous mode of pacing, and on an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator by suspending its own antitachyarythmia therapies without affecting the pacing. In the operating room, the magnet has to be used cautiously with precisely defined protocols which respect the type of the device used, the type of intervention planned, the presence or absence of EMI and the pacing-dependency of the patient.

  18. Chest pain associated with moderator band pacing.

    PubMed

    Goli, Anil K; Kaszala, Karoly; Osman, Mohammed N; Lucke, John; Carrillo, Roger

    2014-10-01

    A 65-year-old man was evaluated for chronic chest pain that had been present for 8 years after placement of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to treat inducible ventricular tachycardia. Previous coronary angiography had revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.45 to 0.50, consistent with mild idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation with chest radiography and transthoracic echocardiography showed the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead to be embedded within the right ventricle at the moderator band, which had mild calcification. Treatment included extraction of the dual-coil lead and placement of a new single-coil right ventricular lead at the mid septum. The patient had complete relief of symptoms after the procedure. This case shows that chest pain can be associated with the placement of a right ventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in the moderator band and that symptomatic relief can occur after percutaneous lead extraction and the implantation of a new right ventricular lead to the mid septal region.

  19. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  20. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  1. Laser extraction of a trapped infected port catheter in a child using existing experience from pacemaker and ICD lead removal.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Dirk; Fessele, Klaus; Bednarski, Piotr; Bodenschatz, Karl; Pauschinger, Matthias; Göhl, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl presented with systemic infection related to a Port-a-Cath system (PAC); therefore, the urgent removal of the PAC was indicated. However, the catheter was trapped and not extractable by conventional means. Using existing comprehensive experience in the removal of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads, the entrapped PAC was successfully extracted by laser technique, thus avoiding open heart surgery. PMID:20345621

  2. Insulation failure with externalized conductor of a Linox SD lead: a case report.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Joseph A; Smithgall, Steven M; Kircher, Charles M; Lollis, Mary A

    2014-04-01

    A 53-year-old man with a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator presented to the electrophysiology (EP) lab for an EP study in evaluation of supraventricular tachycardia despite medical therapy. Fluoroscopic imaging during placement of diagnostic catheters demonstrated insulation failure with an externalized conductor on the right ventricular defibrillator lead just distal to the proximal defibrillator coil. Device interrogation revealed normal pacing, and shock impedances, normal sensing, and stable pacing thresholds.

  3. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians.

  4. Portuguese National Registry on Cardiac Electrophysiology, 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Diogo; Morgado, Francisco; Bonhorst, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the results of the national registry of electrophysiology of the Portuguese Association for Arrhythmology, Pacing and Electrophysiology (APAPE) for 2013 and 2014. The registry is annual and voluntary, and data are collected retrospectively. Data for electrophysiological studies, ablations and cardioverter-defibrillator implantations for 2013 and 2014 are presented. Developments over the years and their implications are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27396627

  5. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians. PMID:25707735

  6. Impact of expanding indications on the safety of pacemakers and defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Maisel, William H

    2003-01-01

    The number of patients living with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) increased markedly during the 1990's. Expanding device indications and increasing device sophistication has important implications for patient and device safety. While the FDA is responsible for assessing the safety and efficacy of medical devices, manufacturers, physicians, patients, medical professional societies, and legislators will all play a role in ensuring that medical device patients continue to receive safe, quality medical care. PMID:12766513

  7. Electromagnetic Interference in a Private Swimming Pool

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Sandia; Lavu, Madhav; Atoui, Moustapha; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2016-01-01

    Although current lead design and filtering capabilities have greatly improved, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) from environmental sources has been increasingly reported in patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) [1]. Few cases of inappropriate intracardiac Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) associated with swimming pool has been described [2]. Here we present a case of 64 year old male who presented with an interesting EMI signal that was subsequently identified to be related to AC current leak in his swimming pool. PMID:27479205

  8. The evaluation and management of electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Eifling, Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Massumi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Electrical storm is an increasingly common and life-threatening syndrome that is defined by 3 or more sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or appropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator within 24 hours. The clinical presentation can be dramatic. Electrical storm can manifest itself during acute myocardial infarction and in patients who have structural heart disease, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or an inherited arrhythmic syndrome. The presence or absence of structural heart disease and the electrocardiographic morphology of the presenting arrhythmia can provide important diagnostic clues into the mechanism of electrical storm. Electrical storm typically has a poor outcome.The effective management of electrical storm requires an understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms, therapeutic options, device programming, and indications for radiofrequency catheter ablation. Initial management involves determining and correcting the underlying ischemia, electrolyte imbalances, or other causative factors. Amiodarone and β-blockers, especially propranolol, effectively resolve arrhythmias in most patients. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including radiofrequency ablation, can control electrical storm in drug-refractory patients. Patients who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can present with multiple shocks and may require drug therapy and device reprogramming. After the acute phase of electrical storm, the treatment focus should shift toward maximizing heart-failure therapy, performing revascularization, and preventing subsequent ventricular arrhythmias. Herein, we present an organized approach for effectively evaluating and managing electrical storm.

  9. A novel mutation in the RYR2 gene leading to catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: dose-dependent arrhythmia-event suppression by β-blocker therapy.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, Pedram; Gollob, Michael H; Pantano, Alfredo; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2011-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a genetic condition that presents with exercise-induced polymorphic arrhythmias. We describe a case report of a 25-year-old woman who had a cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. Genetic analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in exon 90 of the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) gene resulting in substitution of arginine for serine at residue 4153 (S4153R). The patient received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and low-dose β-blocker therapy. She had recurrent polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias treated with appropriate cardioverter-defibrillator shocks and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Titration of β-blocker to a much higher dose suppressed further episodes of ventricular arrhythmia and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, resulting in reduction in device therapies.

  10. Apical aneurysm and myocardial bridging in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: association or consequence of the myocardial bridging?

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anthony; Hilpert, Loic; Hédoire, Francois; Saloux, Eric; Gomes, Sophie; Pellissier, Arnaud; Scanu, Patrice; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Milliez, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The identification of high-risk patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains a challenging issue, since major risk factors sometimes lack specificity. We report the case of a patient with HC and association of apical aneurysm and myocardial bridging who had been initially not implanted because she had only one major risk factor. She subsequently experienced a sustained ventricular tachycardia that finally motivated the implantation. We conclude that it is never an easy decision to implant a preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Nevertheless, additional criteria for a better selection of patients who would benefit from an ICD implant are certainly useful.

  11. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  12. [Cardiac resynchronisation therapy as a cause of the electrical storm].

    PubMed

    Krupa, Wojciech; Lackowski, Jacek; Sielski, Sławomir; Dobosiewicz, Ryszard; Kubica, Jacek

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of young patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and implanted cardioverter-defibrillator in which resynchronisation therapy (CRT-D) induced an electrical storm. One month after implantation of a cardiac resynchronisation pacemaker (CRT-P) the patient suffered from ventricular tachycardia with poor haemodynamic status and was treated by implantation of a CRT-D with a Y adaptor. After replacement of the CRT-D due to Y adaptor damage (new device without a Y adaptor) we observed an electrical storm during ventricular pacing (biventricular, right and left ventricular pacing respectively). Changing pacing mode from DDDR to AAIR resolved ventricular tachycardias in that patient.

  13. Arrhythmia management after device removal.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmic management is needed after removal of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Patients completely dependent on CIEDs need temporary device back-up until new CIEDs are implanted. Various methods are available for device back-up, and the appropriate management varies among patients. The duration from CIED removal to implantation of a new CIED also differs among patients. Temporary pacing is needed for patients with bradycardia, a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) or catheter ablation is needed for patients with tachyarrhythmia, and sequential pacing is needed for patients dependent on cardiac resynchronization therapy. The present review focuses on arrhythmic management after CIED removal. PMID:27588151

  14. Outer insulation failure in a multilumen ICD lead.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxing; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Geng

    2013-08-01

    Insulation defects in the leads are a common complication in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Although the new multilumen leads have significantly reduced the incidence of insulation defects, they have introduced the new and rare problem of outer-insulation abrasions. In this report, we present the case of a 53-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy who was found to have an outer-insulation abrasion on fluoroscopy 3 years after the implantation of an ICD. Several electrical storms experienced by the patient were considered to be responsible for the abrasions; results of routine evaluations were normal. A CRT-D device was finally implanted.

  15. Alternative approach for management of an electrical storm in Brugada syndrome:Importance of primary ablation within a narrow time window.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Yui, Yoshiaki; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Nogami, Akihiko; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2016-06-01

    Placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only powerful treatment modality for Brugada syndrome in patients presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF). For those whose first presentation is an electrical storm, pharmacologic therapy is typically used to control VF followed by ICD implantation. We report an alternative approach whereby, before ICD implantation, emergency catheter ablation of the VF-triggering premature ventricular contraction (PVC) resulted in long-term VF-free survival. The results suggest that, because VF triggers appear in a narrow time window, ablation of the culprit PVCs that initiate VF before the index PVCs subside is a reasonable alternative approach.

  16. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  17. Electrical storm of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after a cardiac-resynchronization-therapy-defibrillator upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kantharia, Bharat K; Patel, Jigar A; Nagra, Bipinpreet S; Ledley, Gary S

    2006-08-01

    In patients with significant left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure despite optimal medical therapy, implantation of cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillation (CRT-D) devices has been shown to improve symptoms and mortality. In this report, we describe a case of a patient with ischaemic cardiomyopathy who developed incessant ventricular tachycardia (VT) after undergoing an upgrade from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to a CRT-D device. The patient required multiple anti-arrhythmic agents, removal of the coronary sinus lead, and radiofrequency ablation to control VT. Thus, in rare patients, the CRT devices may potentially cause 'proarrhythmia' with serious consequences.

  18. Impedance rise, only clue to severe insulation damage in a transvenous single-lead AICD-system.

    PubMed

    Schibgilla, V; Diem, B; Mahmout, O; Janssen, G; van der Emde, J; Bachmann, K

    1998-06-01

    We report a case of severe insulation damage 10 months after implantation of a fourth-generation single-lead implantable cardioverter defibrillator in a 45-year-old patient with dilative cardiomyopathy. The measured impedance was > 2000 Ohm and decreased to < 100 Ohm after slight pressure was applied to the device. All other parameters including intracardiac ECGs and markers were normal. Despite this delicate finding operative exploration revealed severe insulation damage of the pace-sense arm of the plug and insulation loss proximal to the distal coil of the lead.

  19. Tachycardiomyopathy with familial predisposition masquerading as peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alings, M.; Thornton, A.; Scholten, M.; Jordaens, L.

    2006-01-01

    A 28-year-old pregnant lady presented with cardiomyopathy and atrial tachycardia. The patient had severe heart failure and syncope. Her past medical history was uneventful. Her mother, however, had received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. The patient was scheduled for programmed stimulation, during which a monomorphic ventricular tachycardia was induced. An ICD was then implanted. Following radiofrequency ablation of the atrial tachycardia, left ventricular function recovered completely. Given the family history, a genetic predisposition to both arrhythmias and tachycardiomyopathy needs to be considered. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:25696647

  20. Case report: use caution when applying magnets to pacemakers or defibrillators for surgery.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Peter M; Rozner, Marc A

    2013-08-01

    The application of a magnet to a pacemaker (intended to cause asynchronous pacing) or implanted cardioverter defibrillator (intended to prevent shocks) during surgery without a clear understanding of actual magnet function(s) or precautions can have unexpected, untoward, or harmful consequences. In this report, we present 3 cases in which inadequate assessment of cardiac implanted electronic device (CIED) function, coupled with magnet application, contributed to or resulted in inappropriate antitachycardia pacing or shocks, CIED damage, or patient injury. Although these cases might be rare, they reinforce the need for a timely, detailed preoperative review of CIED function and programming as recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Heart Rhythm Society.

  1. A case of Long QT syndrome type 3 aggravated by beta-blockers and alleviated by mexiletine: the role of epinephrine provocation test.

    PubMed

    Park, Junbeom; Kim, Sook Kyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2013-03-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTs) is an uncommon genetic disease causing sudden cardiac death with Torsade de Pointes (TdP). The first line drug treatment has been known to be β-blocker. We encountered a 15-year-old female student with LQTs who had prolonged QTc and multiple episodes of syncope or agonal respiration during sleep. Although her T wave morphology in surface electrocardiography resembled LQTs type 1, her clinical presentation was unusual. During the epinephrine test, TdP was aggravated during β-blocker medication, but alleviated by sodium channel blocker (mexiletine). Therefore, she underwent implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation. PMID:23364992

  2. Relevance of guideline-based ICD indications to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Jefairi, Nora; Burri, Haran

    2014-01-01

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has established itself as life-saving therapy in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. Remarkable technological advances have made ICDs easier and safer to implant, with improved therapeutic and diagnostic functions and reduced morbidity. Guidelines on ICD indications have been proposed by American and European scientific societies since a number of years, based upon trials and expert opinion. In the context of variable economic and political constraints, it is questionable whether these guidelines may be applied to all settings. This review discusses the guideline-based indications, critically examines their applicability to clinical practice, and discusses alternatives to ICD therapy.

  3. Recurrent ventricular fibrillation under sufficient medical treatment in patient with coronary artery spasm

    PubMed Central

    Hiki, Masaru; Tokano, Takashi; Nakazato, Yuji; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In cases of coronary artery spasm, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias are possible and can lead to sudden cardiac death. Treatment for this condition includes implantable cardioverter defibrillators, but their effectiveness in patients who present with ventricular fibrillation is debated. Our patient presented with intractable ventricular fibrillation episodes that triggered shocks from her implanted defibrillator. At 2 years of follow-up, we placed her on 200 mg/day of oral amiodarone, after identifying short-coupled premature contractions as the trigger for the ventricular fibrillation. In the 2 years following initiation of this drug therapy, the patient had no further fibrillation episodes. PMID:23821622

  4. Recurrent ventricular fibrillation under sufficient medical treatment in patient with coronary artery spasm.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Masaru; Tokano, Takashi; Nakazato, Yuji; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-02

    In cases of coronary artery spasm, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias are possible and can lead to sudden cardiac death. Treatment for this condition includes implantable cardioverter defibrillators, but their effectiveness in patients who present with ventricular fibrillation is debated. Our patient presented with intractable ventricular fibrillation episodes that triggered shocks from her implanted defibrillator. At 2 years of follow-up, we placed her on 200 mg/day of oral amiodarone, after identifying short-coupled premature contractions as the trigger for the ventricular fibrillation. In the 2 years following initiation of this drug therapy, the patient had no further fibrillation episodes.

  5. A rare type of ventricular oversensing in ICD therapy--inappropriate ICD shock delivery due to triple counting.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Michael; Rauwolf, Thomas P; Bock, Manja; Strasser, Ruth H; Braun, Martin U

    2010-02-01

    Irregular sensing by triple counting of wide QRS complexes resulted in inappropriate shocks in a patient with a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD): A 66-year-old male patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy, left bundle branch block, and impaired left ventricular function received a biventricular ICD for optimal therapy of heart failure (CHF). Two years after implantation, the patient experienced recurrent unexpected ICD shocks without clinical symptoms of malignant tachyarrhythmia, or worsened CHF. The patient's condition rapidly worsened, with progressive cardiogenic shock and electrical-mechanical dissociation. After unsuccessful resuscitation of the patient the interrogation of the ICD showed an initial triple counting of extremely wide and fragmented QRS complexes with inappropriate shocks.

  6. Cardiac calmodulin kinase: a potential target for drug design.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Szentandrássy, N; Tóth, A; Nánási, P P; Magyar, J; Chen-Izu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as ßblockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  7. Validation of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Prediction Model in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a Reference Center in South America.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Adrián; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ochoa, Juan Pablo; Mysuta, Mauricio; Casabé, José Horacio; Biagetti, Marcelo; Guevara, Eduardo; Favaloro, Liliana E; Fava, Agostina M; Galizio, Néstor

    2016-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a common cause of death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Our aim was to conduct an external and independent validation in South America of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) SCD risk prediction model to identify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. This study included 502 consecutive patients with HC followed from March, 1993 to December, 2014. A combined end point of SCD or appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy was assessed. For the quantitative estimation of individual 5-year SCD risk, we used the formula: 1 - 0.998(exp(Prognostic index)). Our database also included the abnormal blood pressure response to exercise as a risk marker. We analyzed the 3 categories of 5-year risk proposed by the ESC: low risk (LR) <4%; intermediate risk (IR) ≥4% to <6%, and high risk (HR) ≥6%. The LR group included 387 patients (77%); the IR group 39 (8%); and the HR group 76 (15%). Fourteen patients (3%) had SCD/appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy (LR: 0%; IR: 2 of 39 [5%]; and HR: 12 of 76 [16%]). In a receiver-operating characteristic curve, the new model proved to be an excellent predictor because the area under the curve for the estimated risk is 0.925 (statistical C: 0.925; 95% CI 0.8884 to 0.9539, p <0.0001). In conclusion, the SCD risk prediction model in HC proposed by the 2014 ESC guidelines was validated in our population and represents an improvement compared with previous approaches. A larger multicenter, independent and external validation of the model with long-term follow-up would be advisable.

  8. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  9. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  10. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  11. Long QT syndrome with mutations in three genes: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marina; Martins Ribeiro, Sílvia; Sanfins, Victor; Lourenço, António

    2015-05-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a rare hereditary disease, with an incidence of 1 in 2000, characterized by prolonged ventricular repolarization and malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, previously diagnosed with neurocardiogenic syncope, in whom LQTS was identified. The patient received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia under beta-blocker therapy. Molecular genetic testing identified three mutations in heterozygosity in the KCNH2, KCNQ1 and SCN5A genes, which is a rare finding and is associated with worse prognosis.

  12. Sick sinus syndrome in a patient with extensive cardiac lipomatosis (sinus node dysfunction in lipomatosis).

    PubMed

    Kadmon, Ehud; Paz, Rami; Kusniec, Jairo; Strasberg, Boris

    2010-04-01

    We present a case of a 45-year-old man with an incidental and longstanding diagnosis of extensive mediastinal and cardiac lipomatosis. Along the years, he had experienced various arrhythmias, mainly bradyarrhythmias, mostly asymptomatic. Recently after documenting a sinus pause of 6 seconds and runs of nonsustained ventricular tachycardias, he underwent an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator. There are many reports of cardiac lipomatosis in the literature, including reports of related ventricular arrhythmias, some of which are fatal. (PACE 2010; 513-515).

  13. Why We Have to Use Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy-Pacemaker More.

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Martins, Raphaël; Leclercq, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Both cardiac resynchronization therapy with a pacemaker (CRT-P) and with a biventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) are electrical treatment modalities validated for the management of chronic heart failure. There is no strong scientific evidence that a CRT-D must be offered to all candidates. Common sense should limit the prescription of these costly and complicated devices. The choice of CRT-P is currently acceptable. A direction to explore could be to downgrade from CRT-D to CRT-P at the time of battery depletion in patients with large reverse remodeling and no ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation detected. PMID:26596813

  14. [Recurrent failed ICD therapy of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Hein, W; Ellringmann, U; Vollmann, D; Rostock, T; Schott, P

    2012-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) are used as standard therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death in heart failure patients. Today, physicians in emergency and intensive care medicine are often confronted with problems of ICD therapy in these patients. We report a case of a patient suffering from recurrent ventricular tachycardia (VT) requiring antiarrhythmia treatment with amiodarone. With an increasing drug loading, the VT cycle length was progressively prolonged resulting in a slow VT undetectable for the ICD. Subsequently, the patient was scheduled for VT ablation after which the patient became free of arrhythmia recurrences. PMID:23070331

  15. Non-invasive evaluation of arrhythmic risk in dilated cardiomyopathy: From imaging to electrocardiographic measures

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Monitillo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias are a major adverse event and worsen the prognosis of patients affected by ischemic and non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. The main parameter currently used to stratify arrhythmic risk and guide decision making towards the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is the evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction. However, this strategy is characterized by several limitations and consequently additional parameters have been suggested in order to improve arrhythmic risk stratification. The aim of this review is to critically revise the prognostic significance of non-invasive diagnostic tools in order to better stratify the arrhythmic risk prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy patients. PMID:25068017

  16. Tools for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death: A review of the literature in different patient populations

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathi, Loheetha; Pavri, Behzad B.

    2014-01-01

    While various modalities to determine risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have been reported in clinical studies, currently reduced left ventricular ejection fraction remains the cornerstone of SCD risk stratification. However, the absolute burden of SCD is greatest amongst populations without known cardiac disease. In this review, we summarize the evidence behind current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use for the prevention of SCD in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). We also evaluate the evidence for risk stratification tools beyond clinical guidelines in the general population, patients with IHD, and patients with other known or suspected medical conditions. PMID:24568833

  17. Catheter ablation of a monofocal premature ventricular complex triggering idiopathic ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, S; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    2001-07-01

    A 62 year old man was admitted for evaluation of recurrent episodes of syncope. A surface ECG showed frequent repetitive premature ventricular complexes of right ventricular outflow tract origin. Ventricular fibrillation was inducible by programmed electrical stimulation but otherwise cardiac evaluation was unremarkable. A diagnosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation was made and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was installed. However, spontaneous ventricular fibrillation recurred, requiring repeated ICD discharges. The ventricular fibrillation was reproducibly triggered by a single premature ventricular complex with a specific QRS morphology. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was carried out to eradicate this complex. No ventricular fibrillation has developed after this procedure, and the patient does not require drug treatment.

  18. Short QT Syndrome – Review of Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schimpf, Rainer; Borggrefe, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Short QT syndrome (SQTS) is an inherited cardiac channelopathy characterised by an abnormally short QT interval and increased risk for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Diagnosis is based on the evaluation of symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest), family history and electrocardiogram (ECG) findings. Mutations of cardiac ion channels responsible for the repolarisation orchestrate electrical heterogeneity during the action potential and provide substrate for triggering and maintaining of tachyarrhythmias. Due to the malignant natural history of SQTS, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the first-line therapy in affected patients. This review summarises current data and addresses the genetic basis and clinical features of SQTS. PMID:26835070

  19. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  20. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  1. [Chronic heart failure and its consequences on the partner relationship].

    PubMed

    Sztajzel, Juan

    2015-12-01

    There are presently few data on chronic heart failure (CHF) and its consequences on the partner relationship. The aim of our study was to assess how patients with severe CHF and their female partners were affected in their relationship. First, there was a need to address the issue of sexuality with the doctor because of fear of the occurrence of a cardiac event or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock. Second, there was often a significant decrease in libido and erectile dysfunction associated with general depressive symptoms. Finally, the female partners in several couples developed an overprotective behavior leading to resentment and frustration in patients towards them. PMID:26790235

  2. [Biventricular resynchronization in the management of severe cardiac insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Chine, Samira; Kammoun, Ikram; Ben Halima, Afef; Lefi, Abdelatif; Chaabène, Olfa; Zouaoui, Walid; Essmatt, Wajih; Marrakchi, Sonia; Gargouri, Sami; Keskes, Hend; Kachboura, Salem

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure is a major problem of public health, it represents a frequent status among patients with heart disease, and its implications in term of mortality and cost are high. Non Pharmacological treatment of heart failure most commonly designed as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has demonstrate efficacy to improve functional class, exertion capacity, left ventricular ejection fraction, reduction of mitral regurgitation, and probably mortality at midterm. The most recent studies emphasize on the role of implantable cardioverter defibrillate or (ICD) combined with CRT to reduce mortality. More trials are needed to valid this concept.

  3. Comparing Drools and ontology reasoning approaches for telecardiology decision support.

    PubMed

    Van Hille, Pascal; Jacques, Julie; Taillard, Julien; Rosier, Arnaud; Delerue, David; Burgun, Anita; Dameron, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators can generate numerous alerts. Automatically classifying these alerts according to their severity hinges on the CHA2DS2VASc score. It requires some reasoning capabilities for interpreting the patient's data. We compared two approaches for implementing the reasoning module. One is based on the Drools engine, and the other is based on semantic web formalisms. Both were valid approaches with correct performances. For a broader domain, their limitations are the number and complexity of Drools rules and the performances of ontology-based reasoning, which suggests using the ontology for automatically generating a part of the Drools rules.

  4. Myocardial ischemic hyperacute T-wave oversensing leading to a defibrillator shock storm

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Nauman; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate sensing is essential for the normal functioning of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). T-wave oversensing is a potential clinical problem in ICD patients that may result in inappropriate shocks. Oversensing may have various underlying causes and can be treated with noninvasive or invasive means. We present the case of a 45-year-old man presenting with shock storm as a result of T-wave oversensing. Workup revealed a hemodynamically significant stenosis of the left anterior descending artery treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and drug-eluting stent placement. This resulted in the resolution of T-wave missensing and restoration of normal ICD functioning. PMID:25829654

  5. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  6. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  7. Wearable Sensors in Syncope Management

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christian; Carvalho, Paulo; Brinkmeyer, Christoph; Kelm, Malte; Couceiro, Ricardo; Mühlsteff, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of about 40%. Implantable cardiac electronic devices, including implantable loop recorders (ILR) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), are well established in syncope management. However, despite the successful use of ILR and ICD, diagnosis and therapy still remain challenging in many patients due to the complex hemodynamic interplay of cardiac and vascular adaptations during impending syncopes. Wearable sensors might overcome some limitations, including misdiagnosis and inappropriate defibrillator shocks, because a variety of physiological measures can now be easily acquired by a single non-invasive device at high signal quality. In neurally-mediated syncope (NMS), which is the most common cause of syncope, advanced signal processing methodologies paved the way to develop devices for early syncope detection. In contrast to the relatively benign NMS, in arrhythmia-related syncopes immediate therapeutical intervention, predominantly by electrical defibrillation, is often mandatory. However, in patients with a transient risk of arrhythmia-related syncope, limitations of ICD therapy might outweigh their potential therapeutic benefits. In this context the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator offers alternative therapeutical options for some high-risk patients. Herein, we review recent evidence demonstrating that wearable sensors might be useful to overcome some limitations of implantable devices in syncope management. PMID:25608536

  8. Wearable sensors in syncope management.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian; Carvalho, Paulo; Brinkmeyer, Christoph; Kelm, Malte; Couceiro, Ricardo; Mühlsteff, Jens

    2015-01-22

    Syncope is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of about 40%. Implantable cardiac electronic devices, including implantable loop recorders (ILR) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), are well established in syncope management. However, despite the successful use of ILR and ICD, diagnosis and therapy still remain challenging in many patients due to the complex hemodynamic interplay of cardiac and vascular adaptations during impending syncopes. Wearable sensors might overcome some limitations, including misdiagnosis and inappropriate defibrillator shocks, because a variety of physiological measures can now be easily acquired by a single non-invasive device at high signal quality. In neurally-mediated syncope (NMS), which is the most common cause of syncope, advanced signal processing methodologies paved the way to develop devices for early syncope detection. In contrast to the relatively benign NMS, in arrhythmia-related syncopes immediate therapeutical intervention, predominantly by electrical defibrillation, is often mandatory. However, in patients with a transient risk of arrhythmia-related syncope, limitations of ICD therapy might outweigh their potential therapeutic benefits. In this context the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator offers alternative therapeutical options for some high-risk patients. Herein, we review recent evidence demonstrating that wearable sensors might be useful to overcome some limitations of implantable devices in syncope management.

  9. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  10. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  11. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  12. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  13. Anger and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Although anecdotal evidence has long suggested links between emotion and ventricular arrhythmia, more recent studies have prospectively demonstrated the arrhythmogenic effects of anger, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Recent findings Epidemiological studies reveal that psychological stress increases sudden death, as well as arrhythmias, in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, in populations during emotionally devastating disasters such as earthquake or war. Diary-based studies confirm that anger and other negative emotions can trigger potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Anger alters electrophysiological properties of the myocardium, including T-wave alternans, a measure of heterogeneity of repolarization, suggesting one mechanistic link between emotion and arrhythmia. Pilot studies of behavioral interventions have shown promise in decreasing arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Summary Anger and other strong emotions can trigger polymorphic, potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable patients. Through autonomic changes including increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal, anger leads to increases in heterogeneity of repolarization as measured by T-wave alternans, known to be associated with arrhythmogenesis, as well as increasing inducibility of arrhythmia. Further delineation of mechanisms linking anger and arrhythmia, and of approaches to decrease the detrimental effects of anger and other negative emotions on arrhythmogenesis, are important areas of future investigation. PMID:19864944

  14. [Current management of patients with ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Puljević, D; Buljević, B; Milicić, D

    2001-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmia has for decades been considered as a premonitory sign and risk marker of sudden death. Novel theories about arrhythmogenesis and conditions for the occurrence of sudden death, as well as evidence about proarrhythmic effect of antiarrhythmic drugs, have changed the views on the treatment of ventricular arrhythmia. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is most often associated with structural heart disease: ischemic heart disease and previous myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy (dilated and hypertrophic), arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, valvular heart disease (mitral valve prolapse), heart failure, condition after surgical correction of a congenital heart disease. Sometimes VT occurs without structural heart disease (congenital LQTS, Brugada syndrome, idiopathic VT). Today's standpoint is to treat only symptomatic and/or prognostically significant arrhythmias. Prognostic significance of VT mostly depends on the type and degree of structural heart disease and on global cardiac function. In patients with asymptomatic non-sustained VT and low risk for sudden death no treatment is needed or antiarrhythmics are administered. Conversely, in high risk patients implantation of automatic cardioverter-defibrillator is indicated. In the treatment of acute attack of VT the following can be used: electroconversion, cardiac pacing (overdrive), lidocaine, amiodarone, beta-blockers, and occasionally magnesium or verapamil. In the prevention of recurrent arrhythmia and sudden death we can use: amiodarone, sotalol, mexiletin, phenytoin, beta-blockers, radiofrequency ablation, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, and in specific patients verapamil, pacemaker or left ganglion stellatum denervation.

  15. A Case of Arterial and Venous Tear during Single Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael S; Wu, Daniel; Patel, Vishal; Tariq, Rayhan

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous lead extraction can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The risk of causing concomitant arterial and venous injury is rare. We report a case of marginal artery rupture with coronary sinus rupture after a CS lead extraction. A 71-year-old male was admitted for extraction of a 6-year-old implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead due to fracture from insulation break. During the lead extraction, blood pressure fell precipitously and echocardiographic findings were consistent with pericardial effusion. After unsuccessful pericardiocentesis, open chest sternotomy and evacuation of hematoma was performed. Subsequent surgical repair of several injuries was completed including the distal coronary sinus, a large degloving injury of posterior portion of the heart, and first obtuse marginal branch bleed. This case demonstrates that when performing transcutaneous lead extraction (TLE) with laser sheath, a degloving injury can cause arterial rupture with concomitant coronary sinus injury. A multidisciplinary team-based approach can ensure patient safety. Learning Objective. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads will falter over time. With the advancement of new technology for extraction more frequent and serious complications will occur. Active fixation CS leads present unique challenges. In the presence of hemodynamic changes during extraction the occurrence of both an arterial and venous injury must be considered. PMID:27195154

  16. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  17. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  18. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  19. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  20. [Indications for the procedure for transvenous removing of electrodes based on the guidelines of U.S. societies].

    PubMed

    Lelakowski, Jacek

    2010-03-01

    The number of implanted the cardiovascular implantable electronic device(s) (CIED(s))--pacemakers (PM) and implantable cardioverters defibrillators (ICD)--increases each year. The number of CIED(s) exchange procedures as well as changes in models of stimulation (upgrade to dual chamber pacemakers or three chamber cardiac resynchronization therapy devices) also grows. Also increases the inactive electrode left in the cardiovascular system. The risk of infection is higher during the exchange of devices than with their implantation. Treatments for patients with multiple electrode systems are becoming a potential source of infection. The incidence of damage defibrillator is greater than pacemaker leads. Intracardiac electrodes causes the growth of connective tissue, fibrosis in the venous system and may cause obstruction subclavian vein or brachiocephalic preventing implantation needed a new electrode. Damaged and broken electrodes may migrate to the cavities of the heart. This increases the risk of thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, tricuspid valve dysfunction and serious arrhythmias. All these facts presented lead to the conclusion that the growing need to remove the electrodes (both infected and inactive) pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillator. There are two classes of indications to remove the electrodes. Procedures for removing the benefits must outweigh the risks. Should be considered for each patient individually and take into account the experience of the operator and its results. Class I indications are: lead dependent endocarditis, sepsis, arrhythmias or embolism secondary to the presence of lead, venous occlusion prevents the implantation of new electrodes, interference between the electrodes, an implantable device infection box. Class II includes: chronic pain in the area and inactive pacemaker electrodes in young people. After removal must be individually examined whether there is a need to implant the new layout. It should not be implanted in a place that

  1. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  2. Michel Mirowski and the beginning of a new era of fighting sudden arrhythmic death.

    PubMed

    Klein, Helmut U; Nisam, Seah

    2015-06-01

    Prior to the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias were treated using anti-arrhythmic drugs. The concept of an implantable defibrillator to prevent sudden arrhythmic death was first published by Michel Mirowski in 1970. Despite critical opinions by leading physicians, Michel Mirowski continued development of his vision. Hallmarks in the development of the ICD include the following: internal-external defibrillator used during surgery on humans in 1971/1972; fully implantable defibrillator tested in canines in 1975; defibrillator successfully implanted in a 57-year-old woman in 1980; second generation devices introduced in 1982; US Food and Drug Administration device approved in 1985. Today it is hard to imagine modern medicine without ICD therapy. This article provides the reader a history of the development of the ICD. PMID:26058996

  3. Health economic concerns on cardiac rhythm management devices longevity and how to overcome them.

    PubMed

    Capucci, Alessandro; Luzi, Mario; Cipolletta, Laura; Molini, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    The number of device implantations is in constant increase due to the ageing population, extended indications to implant for preventing sudden cardiac death and treating heart failure. An increase in the number of implants is directly related to a higher number of device replacements and that is one of the most important risk factors for device infection. Therefore, all the above mentioned factors contribute to an increase in the cost for health care system. Currently, several methods help to prolong device battery longevity and consequently reduce the costs, such as: a new battery, drug eluting leads, high impedance leads, algorithm to minimize unnecessary pacing, capture management and correct programming to avoid inappropriate and unnecessary shock in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy devices. Furthermore remote monitoring is very promising to reduce health system costs related to devices. PMID:26778415

  4. Sudden cardiac death markers in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mauricio; Rohde, Luis Eduardo; Zimerman, André; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is an increasingly prevalent disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. In 30-40% of patients, the etiology is non-ischemic. In this group of patients, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) prevents sudden death and decreases total mortality. However, due to burden of cost, the fact that many ICD patients will never need any therapy, and possible complications involved in implant and follow-up, the device should not be implanted in every patient with non-ischemic heart failure. There is an urgent need to adequately identify patients with highest sudden death risk, in whom the implant is most cost-effective. In the present paper, the authors discuss current available tests for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. PMID:27016256

  5. T wave pacing inducing electrical storm and multiple shocks in an ICD-recipient: a novel complication of the automatic gain control function.

    PubMed

    Jaoudé, Simon Abou; Salamé, Elie; Azar, Rabih; Kassab, Roland

    2003-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is highly effective in treating life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, but it can also have proarrhythmic effect in some cases. We report the case of a 72 years old patient with an ischemic cardiomyopathy in whom an ICD was implanted for a poorly tolerated ventricular tachycardia (Profiles MD-Ventritex). Forty-eight hours after implantation, the patient suddenly received 15 successive shocks. ECG tracings and intracardiac EGM showed the presence of several VT episodes, all induced by the antibradycardia pacing of the ICD: the automatic gain control function of the device failed to detect ventricular premature beats in this patient, leading to a bradycardia pacing falling on the T wave and inducing multiple VTs and shocks.

  6. A patch in the pectoral position lowers defibrillation threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasik, P; Solomon, A; Verdino, R; Moore, H; Rodak, D; Hannan, R; Fletcher, R

    1997-06-01

    Implantable pacemaker cardioverter defibrillators are now available with biphasic waveforms, which have been shown to markedly improve defibrillation thresholds (DFTs). However, in a number of patients the DFT remains high. Also, DFT may increase after implantation, especially if antiarrhythmic drugs are added. We report on the use of a subcutaneous patch in the pectoral position in 15 patients receiving a transvenous defibrillator as a method of easily reducing the DFT. A 660-mm2 patch electrode was placed beneath the generator in a pocket created on the pectoral fascia. The energy required for defibrillation was lowered by 56% on average, and the system impedance was lowered by a mean of 25%. This maneuver allowed all patients to undergo a successful implant with adequate safety margin.

  7. Bundle-Branch Block Morphology and Other Predictors of Outcome After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilchick, Kenneth C.; Kamath, Sandeep; DiMarco, John P.; Stukenborg, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) have enrolled a select group of patients, with few patients in subgroups such as right bundle-branch block (RBBB). Analysis of population-based outcomes provides a method to identify real-world predictors of CRT outcomes. Methods and Results Medicare Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry (2005 to 2006) data were merged with patient outcomes data. Cox proportional-hazards models assessed death and death/heart failure hospitalization outcomes in patients with CRT and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D). The 14 946 registry patients with CRT-D (median follow-up, 40 months) had 1-year, 3-year, and overall mortality rates of 12%, 32%, and 37%, respectively. New York Heart Association class IV heart failure status (1-year hazard ratio [HR], 2.23; 3-year HR, 1.98; P<0.001) and age ≥80 years (1-year HR, 1.74; 3-year HR, 1.75; P<0.001) were associated with increased mortality both early and late after CRT-D. RBBB (1-year HR, 1.44; 3-year HR, 1.37; P<0.001) and ischemic cardiomyopathy (1-year HR, 1.39; 3-year HR, 1.44; P<0.001) were the next strongest adjusted predictors of both early and late mortality. RBBB and ischemic cardiomyopathy together had twice the adjusted hazard for death (HR, 1.99; P<0.001) as left BBB and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. QRS duration of at least 150 ms predicted more favorable outcomes in left BBB but had no impact in RBBB. A secondary analysis showed lower hazards for CRT-D compared with standard implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in left BBB compared with RBBB. Conclusions In Medicare patients, RBBB, ischemic cardiomyopathy, New York Heart Association class IV status, and advanced age were powerful adjusted predictors of poor outcome after CRT-D. Real-world mortality rates 3 to 4 years after CRT-D appear higher than previously recognized. PMID:21041691

  8. Congenital left ventricular apical aneurysm presenting as ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Amado, José; Marques, Nuno; Candeias, Rui; Gago, Paula; de Jesus, Ilídio

    2016-10-01

    The authors present the case of a 34-year-old male patient seen in our department due to palpitations. On the electrocardiogram monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) was documented, treated successfully with amiodarone. The subsequent study revealed a normal echocardiogram and an apical aneurysm of the left ventricle on magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by computed tomography coronary angiography that also excluded coronary disease. He underwent an electrophysiological study to determine the origin of the VT and to perform catheter ablation using electroanatomical mapping. VT was induced and radiofrequency applications were performed in the left ventricular aneurysm area. VT was no longer inducible, with acute success. Despite this it was decided to implant a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Eight months after the ablation the patient was admitted again due to VT, treated by the ICD.

  9. Pacing and Defibrillators in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, Henry; O’Neill, Mark; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Device therapy in the complex congenital heart disease (CHD) population is a challenging field. There is a myriad of devices available, but none designed specifically for the CHD patient group, and a scarcity of prospective studies to guide best practice. Baseline cardiac anatomy, prior surgical and interventional procedures, existing tachyarrhythmias and the requirement for future intervention all play a substantial role in decision making. For both pacing systems and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, numerous factors impact on the merits of system location (endovascular versus non-endovascular), lead positioning, device selection and device programming. For those with Fontan circulation and following the atrial switch procedure there are also very specific considerations regarding access and potential complications. This review discusses the published guidelines, device indications and the best available evidence for guidance of device implantation in the complex CHD population. PMID:27403295

  10. Nonparametric inference for time-dependent incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.

    PubMed

    Yee, Laura M; Gary Chan, Kwun Chuen

    2015-12-30

    As the costs of medical care increase, more studies are evaluating cost in addition to effectiveness of treatments. Cost-effectiveness analyses in randomized clinical trials have typically been conducted only at the end of follow-up. However, cost-effectiveness may change over time. We therefore propose a nonparametric estimator to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio over time. We also derive the asymptotic variance of our estimator and present formulation of Fieller-based simultaneous confidence bands. Simulation studies demonstrate the performance of our point estimators, variance estimators, and confidence bands. We also illustrate our methods using data from a randomized clinical trial, the second Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial. This trial studied the effects of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators on patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmia. Results show that our estimator performs well in large samples, indicating promising future directions in the field of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Cardiovascular procedures/diagnostic techniques and therapeutic procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tilkian, A.G.; Daily, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book covers the technical and therapeutic aspects of cardiovascular procedures in immense detail. There are large and appropriate diagrams and tables. The topics of the chapters are tools for catheterization, venous access, arterial access, hemodynamic monitoring, cardiac catheterization and coronary arteriography, ergonovine provocation testing for coronary artery spasm, pulmonary angiography, endomyocredial biopsy, electrophysiologic studies, pericardiocentesis and drainage, intraaortic balloon pumping, direct current cardioversion and defibrilaltion, pacemaker implantation of the automatic implantable cardioverter/defibrillator, coronary angioplasty, thrombolytic therapy, transluminal catheter extraction and resolution of intracardiac catheter knots, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, contrast media toxicity and allergic reactions, radiation hazards, and medicolegal concerns. An appendix and index follow these chapters. In general, each chapter covers historical aspects, indications, complications, techniques, and preoperative and postoperative care.

  12. Silent and Malignant Early Repolarization Syndrome Mimicking Hyper-Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Tam, Weng-Chio; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiung; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Yeh, Jong-Shiuan

    2016-07-01

    A 55-year-old male with underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension presented at our emergency department with ventricular fibrillation-related cardiac arrest. Hyper-acute ST elevation myocardial infarction was the preliminary diagnosis by 12-lead electrocardiography, which simultaneously showed J point ST elevation and tall T waves. However, the echocardiography showed concentric left ventricle hypertrophy and preserved left ventricular systolic function with no regional wall motion abnormalities, and coronary angiography did not show any critical coronary artery lesion. Malignant early repolarization syndrome was diagnosed, and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted. Early repolarization syndrome is associated with J point elevation, and more involved leads and an increased J point elevation amplitude can increase the risk of arrhythmogenicity. In summary, we report a case with asymptomatic type 3 early repolarization syndrome-induced idiopathic ventricular fibrillation mimicking hyper-acute ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27471366

  13. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  14. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  15. A case of brugada syndrome presenting with ventricular fibrillation storm and prominent early repolarization.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Chifumi; Sato, Masahito; Kitazawa, Hitoshi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Okabe, Masaaki; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old man developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) while drinking alcohol and was admitted to our hospital. An electrocardiogram (ECG) on admission revealed remarkably prominent slurs on the terminal part of QRS complexes in the left precordial leads and a coved type ST elevation at higher intercostal spaces. After hypothermia therapy, he underwent implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Standard twelve-lead follow-up ECGs revealed early repolarization pattern and an intermittent coved type ST elevation. When the coved type ST elevation appeared, the early repolarization pattern in the inferior and left precordial leads was attenuated. Prominent early repolarization pattern was the most likely trigger of the VF storm in this Brugada patient.

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. PMID:26718704

  17. How are European patients at risk of malignant arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death identified and informed about their risk profile: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sciaraffia, Elena; Todd, Derick; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of screening of patients of risk of ventricular arrhythmias and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) in European countries. A systematic screening programme existed in the majority of centres and was organized by a multidisciplinary dedicated team or by an activity programme of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or heart failure clinics. In particular, high-risk subgroups of patients with ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy ICD implantation are considered strongly indicated within 90 days of myocardial revascularization or initial diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging appears as an important tool to better characterize the left ventricular arrhythmogenic substrate in patients at risk of SCD.

  18. Stratification of the Risk of Sudden Death in Nonischemic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Maurício; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe; Rohde, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant therapeutic advancements, heart failure remains a highly prevalent clinical condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In 30%-40% patients, the etiology of heart failure is nonischemic. The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is capable of preventing sudden death and decreasing total mortality in patients with nonischemic heart failure. However, a significant number of patients receiving ICD do not receive any kind of therapy during follow-up. Moreover, considering the situation in Brazil and several other countries, ICD cannot be implanted in all patients with nonischemic heart failure. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify patients at an increased risk of sudden death because these would benefit more than patients at a lower risk, despite the presence of heart failure in both risk groups. In this study, the authors review the primary available methods for the stratification of the risk of sudden death in patients with nonischemic heart failure. PMID:25352509

  19. Device Therapies: New Indications and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prabhat; Schwartz, Jennifer D

    2015-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICDs), cardiac resynchronization (CRT) and combination (CRT-D) therapy have be-come an integral part of the management of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). ICDs treat ventricular arrhythmia and CRTs improve left ventricular systolic function by resynchronizing ventricular contraction. De-vice therapies (ICD, CRT-D), have been shown to reduce all-cause mortality, including sudden cardiac death. Hospitaliza-tions are reduced with CRT and CRT-D therapy. Major device related complications include device infection, inappropriate shocks, lead malfunction and complications related to extraction of devices. Improvements in device design and implantation have included progressive miniaturization and increasing battery life of the device, optimization of response to CRT, and minimizing inappropriate device therapy. Additionally, better definition of the population with the greatest benefit is an area of active research. PMID:25391852

  20. Safety Of Mris In Patients With Pacemakers And Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Baher, Alex; Shah, Dipan

    2013-01-01

    With a burgeoning population, increases in life expectancy, and expanding indications, the number of patients with cardiac devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators continues to increase each year. A majority of these patients will develop an indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in their lifetime. MRIs have established themselves as one of the most powerful imaging tools for a variety of conditions. However, given the historic safety concerns, many physicians are reluctant to use MRIs in this patient population. In this paper, we discuss the potential adverse effects of MRIs in patients with cardiac devices, review key studies that have addressed strategies to limit adverse effects, and provide our cardiovascular MRI laboratory’s protocol for imaging patients with implanted cardiac devices. PMID:24066196

  1. The value of predischarge ICD tests in patients with a successful peroperative test.

    PubMed

    Kesek, M; Saraj, A; Blomström-Lundqvist, C

    2000-01-01

    An internal cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is normally extensively tested during implantation. The necessity of retesting prior to discharge of the patient is a matter of debate. In our material of 30 patients undergoing first-time implantation of a transvenous internal defibrillator system, we retrospectively compare the predischarge defibrillation test with the peroperative test. A successful peroperative defibrillation test with no failed shocks at 10 J below maximal energy level was followed by a successful predischarge test with the same safety margin in 18/19 patients, while one patient required a maximal energy ICD shock for conversion at the predischarge test. We conclude that the predischarge defibrillation test can be omitted if the peroperative test was successful, with no failed shocks at 10 J below maximal energy level and if the shock therapy is set to maximal energy level.

  2. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  3. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  4. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... visits, your surgeon injects a small amount of saline (salt water) through the valve into the expander. ... breast implants. Implants may be filled with either saline or a silicone gel. You may have another ...

  5. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  6. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  7. Implantation in IVF.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cristiano E; Melo, Marco A B; Fernandez, Manuel; Pellicer, Antonio; Simon, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The recent advances in assisted reproduction have made it possible to study and interfere in almost every step of the human reproductive process except for implantation. The most complex and important step remains in great part unknown. Implantation in human has proven to be less efficient compared with other species. However, in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, it has been evaluated to be even poorer. This paper highlights the factors related to infertile patients and IVF treatments that can affect implantation and implantation's clinical aspects related to these treatments: implantation failure and early pregnancy loss.

  8. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  9. Breast implants. A review.

    PubMed

    Van Zele, D; Heymans, O

    2004-04-01

    Breast implants have been used for about four decades for both reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. In 1963, the quality of the artificial implants was revolutionized by the introduction of the silicone gel-filled implant. Since, this modern prosthesis has gone through an evolution of change and improvement with several types of devices with many variations and styles within each class. Actually, for the last three decades, approximately one million women have received silicone breast implants in the USA. But, in 1992, the American FDA banned silicone from the market, leaving saline implants as the only product generally available as an alternative until now. Other filler materials were introduced, but have never progressed beyond the experimental stage in the USA (in contrast with Europe). The evolution of the different implants through time, with their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, but also the controversy on silicone implants in the USA and their suspected association with systemic diseases. PMID:15154572

  10. Incessant slow bundle branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia in a young patient with left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Barra, Sérgio; Moreno, Nuno; Providência, Rui; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João José

    2013-06-01

    A 15-year-old girl was admitted to the cardiology outpatient clinic due to mild palpitations and documented incessant slow ventricular tachycardia (VT) with left bundle branch block (LBBB) pattern. The baseline electrocardiogram revealed first-degree atrioventricular block and intraventricular conduction defect. Transthoracic echocardiography showed prominent trabeculae and intertrabecular recesses suggesting left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), which was confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. During electrophysiological study, a sustained bundle branch reentrant VT with LBBB pattern and cycle length of 480 ms, similar to the clinical tachycardia, was easily and reproducibly inducible. As there was considerable risk of need for chronic ventricular pacing following right bundle ablation, no ablation was attempted and a cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted. To the best of our knowledge, no case reports of BBR-VT as the first manifestation of LVNC have been published. Furthermore, this is an extremely rare presentation of BBR-VT, which is usually a highly malignant arrhythmia.

  11. Prophylactic left thoracic sympathectomy to prevent electrical storms in CPVT patients needing ICD placement.

    PubMed

    Moray, Amol; Kirk, Edwin P; Grant, Peter; Camphausen, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), a life threatening arrhythmia induced by sympathetic stimulation in susceptible individuals is often refractory to antiarrhythmic agents. First line of treatment, beta-blockers can be ineffective in up to 50% with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement for refractory cases. Paradoxically ICD can be arryhthmogenic from shock-associated sympathetic stimulation, initiating more shocks and "electrical storms". This has led to the use of more effective beta blockade offered by left sympathectomy, now performed by minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Sympathectomy has been traditionally performed long after ICD placement, after the patient has experienced multiple shocks, thus necessitating two procedures. We report simultaneous ICD insertion and thoracoscopic sympathectomy in a 10 year-old boy with CPVT, and suggest it as a better approach than sequential procedures. To our knowledge this is first such reported case.

  12. Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Mechanical Ventricular Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Healy, Chris; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan F; Sacher, Frederic; Coffey, James O; d'Avila, Andre

    2015-08-01

    The use of mechanical ventricular support devices in the management of patients with advanced heart failure continues to increase. These devices have been shown to prolong life as a destination therapy and to increase survival when used as a bridge to transplantation. However, they are associated with a high rate of complications, including bleeding, infection, device malfunction, and ventricular arrhythmias (VAs). The mechanical support provided by the device typically allows for VAs to be well tolerated in the acute setting, though there are numerous long-term complications related to VAs such as ventricular remodeling, right ventricular failure in patients with left ventricular assist devices, and possibly increased mortality. Controversy exists as to the appropriate role of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients. This review will focus on the management options available for patients with mechanical ventricular support devices and VAs. PMID:26072439

  13. ICD lead failure detection through high frequency impedance.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Daniel T; Swerdlow, Charles D; Kroll, Mark W; Seifert, Gregory J; Lichter, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Abrasion-induced insulation breach is a common failure mode of silicone-body, transvenous, implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. It is caused either by external compression or internal motion of conducting cables. The present method of monitoring lead integrity measures low frequency conductor impedance. It cannot detect insulation failures until both the silicone lead body and inner fluoropolymer insulation have been breached completely, exposing conductors directly to blood or tissue. Thus the first clinical presentation may be either failure to deliver a life-saving shock or painful, inappropriate shocks in normal rhythm. We present a new method for identifying lead failure based on high frequency impedance measurements. This method was evaluated in 3D electromagnetic simulation and bench testing to identify insulation defects in the St. Jude Medical Riata® lead, which is prone to insulation breach.

  14. Prevention of inappropriate ICD shocks due to lead insulation failure by continuous monitoring and automatic alert.

    PubMed

    Gelder, Robert N; Gunderson, Bruce D

    2012-06-01

    Patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator lead insulation failures may present with oversensing and/or abnormal impedance. The Lead Integrity Alert (LIA) monitors right ventricular pace/sense leads using both continuous oversensing and daily impedance measurementd. Oversensing consists of isolated short R-R intervals and nonsustained runs of short R-R intervals. The LIA algorithm has been studied for Sprint Fidelis conductor fractures, but not for lead insulation failures. We report on a patient with a failed St. Jude Riata™ ST lead (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) connected to a Medtronic Virtuoso DR (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) with the LIA. Oversensing triggered the LIA, while the impedance trend was normal.

  15. Holter Monitoring and Loop Recorders: From Research to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Francesco; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Holter monitors are tools of proven efficacy in diagnosing and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the fact their use is widely prescribed by general practitioners, little is known about their evolving role in the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, unexplained recurrent syncope and risk stratification in implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker candidates. New Holter monitoring technologies and loop recorders allow prolonged monitoring of heart rhythm for periods from a few days to several months, making it possible to detect infrequent arrhythmias in patients of all ages. This review discusses the advances in this area of arrhythmology and how Holter monitors have improved the clinical management of patients with suspected cardiac rhythm diseases.

  16. The role of antiarrhythmic therapy in the management of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J A

    1999-11-01

    The incidence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) after myocardial infarction (MI), has decreased significantly in the thrombolytic era and may not have a high enough power to predict sudden cardiac death or all-cause mortality post-MI. Nonetheless, noninvasive algorithms that utilize the combination of NSVT with left ventricular dysfunction, abnormal signal-averaged electrocardiogram, and heart rate variability can be used for better risk assessment. Recent multicenter studies have provided strong evidence for the use of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in patients with NSVT and inducible sustained ventricual tachycardia. On the other hand anti-arrhythmic drugs have no role and most are harmful in asymptomatic patients post-MI with NSVT. PMID:10980857

  17. T Wave Alternans And Ventricular Tachyarrhythmia Risk Stratification: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is one of the leading causes of mortality in industrialized countries. Thus, identifying patients at high risk of SCD is an important goal. T wave alternans (TWA) is a new method for identifying patients with lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and is dependent on heart rate. The maximal predictive accuracy is achieved at heart rates between 100 and 120 bpm, so that TWA is usually measured during exercise, phamacological stress, or atrial pacing. It has been shown that TWA has high sensitivity and negative predictive value for predicting SCD after myocardial infarction and is also useful for predicting SCD in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Although the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is now the primary therapy for preventing SCD, it is difficult to identify those patients who are susceptible to lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias for primary prevention. In the prediction of SCD, TWA can be used as a screening test of appropriate patients for further electrophysiological examination and therapy. PMID:16943959

  18. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  19. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Imaging for Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chattranukulchai, Pairoj

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and selection of patients who would benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators remains challenging. We aim to discuss the evidence of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial scar for the prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in NICM. From the 15 studies analyzed, with a total of 2747 patients, the average prevalence of myocardial scar was 41%. In patients with myocardial scar, the risk for adverse cardiac events was more than 3-fold higher, and risk for arrhythmic events 5-fold higher, as compared to patients without scar. Based on the available observational, single center studies, CMR scar assessment may be a promising new tool for SCD risk stratification, which merits further investigation. PMID:26175568

  20. Long-term Outcomes of Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation in Different Types of Structural Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jackson J; Santangeli, Pasquale; Callans, David J

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) often occurs in the setting of structural heart disease and can affect patients with ischaemic or nonischaemic cardiomyopathies. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) provide mortality benefit and are therefore indicated for secondary prevention in patients with sustained VT, but they do not reduce arrhythmia burden. ICD shocks are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and antiarrhythmic medications are often used to prevent recurrent episodes. Catheter ablation is an effective treatment option for patients with VT in the setting of structural heart disease and, when successful, can reduce the number of ICD shocks. However, whether VT ablation results in a mortality benefit remains unclear. We aim to review the long-term outcomes in patients with different types of structural heart disease treated with VT ablation. PMID:26835122

  1. Philosophy of antiarrhythmic approaches to ventricular tachyarrhythmias close to the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Breithardt, G; Haverkamp, W; Böcker, D; Borggrefe, M

    1998-12-01

    The scientific basis and the reasoning underlying the changes in antiarrhythmic approaches to ventricular arrhythmias during recent decades are discussed. The early enthusiasm in the use of antiarrhythmic drugs in patients after myocardial infarction to prevent sudden cardiac death was severely affected by the results of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST) which show an increased mortality of patients on sodium-channel antagonist antiarrhythmic drugs. A transient euphoria for drugs that prolong repolarization received criticism after premature termination of the Survival With Oral D-sotalol-trial (SWORD). Recently, attention has focused on the use of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator in both secondary and primary prevention of sudden death. In contrast, catheter ablation, although very useful in supraventricular tachycardia, still plays a limited role in the management of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in the presence of organic heart disease. PMID:9973859

  2. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  3. Holter Monitoring and Loop Recorders: From Research to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Francesco; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Holter monitors are tools of proven efficacy in diagnosing and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the fact their use is widely prescribed by general practitioners, little is known about their evolving role in the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, unexplained recurrent syncope and risk stratification in implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker candidates. New Holter monitoring technologies and loop recorders allow prolonged monitoring of heart rhythm for periods from a few days to several months, making it possible to detect infrequent arrhythmias in patients of all ages. This review discusses the advances in this area of arrhythmology and how Holter monitors have improved the clinical management of patients with suspected cardiac rhythm diseases. PMID:27617093

  4. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Arrhythmia by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies for arrhythmia using ion channel blockade, catheter ablation, or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator have limitations, and it is important to search for new antiarrhythmic therapeutic targets. Both atrial fibrillation and heart failure, a condition with increased arrhythmic risk, are associated with excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are several possible ways for ROS to induce arrhythmia. ROS can cause focal activity and reentry. ROS alter multiple cardiac ionic currents. ROS promote cardiac fibrosis and impair gap junction function, resulting in reduced myocyte coupling and facilitation of reentry. In order to design effective antioxidant drugs for treatment of arrhythmia, it is essential to explore the molecular mechanisms by which ROS exert these arrhythmic effects. Activation of Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II, c-Src tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, and abnormal splicing of cardiac sodium channels are among the recently discovered molecular mechanisms of ROS-induced arrhythmia. PMID:26981310

  5. Catheter ablation of recurrent polymorphic tachycardia: Use of sodium channel blockade to organize the tachycardia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Daljeet Kaur; Nair, Sandeep G.; Shelke, Abhijeet; Yalagudri, Sachin; Narasimhan, Calambur

    2015-01-01

    A 55 year old male presented with recurrent implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PMVT). He had undergone prior catheter ablation for VT three years ago. During the prior attempt he underwent voltage guided substrate ablation. With programmed ventricular extrastimulation (PVES), PMVT was repeatedly induced requiring DC shock. Intravenous procainamide was administered and PVES was repeated which induced sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (MMVT). This VT had pseudo delta waves with maximum deflection index of 0.68, suggestive of epicardial origin. Activation mapping was performed epicardially. Presystolic potentials were recorded in mid anterolateral wall of left ventricular epicardial region. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation at this site terminated the VT. Post ablation there was no inducible tachycardia and patient is free of arrhythmias during 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27479202

  6. Holter Monitoring and Loop Recorders: From Research to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Galli, Alessio; Ambrosini, Francesco; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Holter monitors are tools of proven efficacy in diagnosing and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the fact their use is widely prescribed by general practitioners, little is known about their evolving role in the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, unexplained recurrent syncope and risk stratification in implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker candidates. New Holter monitoring technologies and loop recorders allow prolonged monitoring of heart rhythm for periods from a few days to several months, making it possible to detect infrequent arrhythmias in patients of all ages. This review discusses the advances in this area of arrhythmology and how Holter monitors have improved the clinical management of patients with suspected cardiac rhythm diseases.

  7. Cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old man caused by anomalous right coronary artery origin.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Heather; Curtin, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    An 18-year-old man presented to hospital following an out of hospital ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, with successful resuscitation at the scene. The incident happened during a competitive football match in which the man was playing. In the course of an extensive work up, a CT coronary angiogram demonstrated an anomalous right coronary artery (RCA) origin in the left coronary sinus. The RCA followed an initial intramural and subsequent interarterial course between the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery trunk. Cardiac MRI showed a small subendocardial area of delayed gadolinium enhancement in the inferoseptal wall, consistent with a small infarct. Treatment involved elective coronary artery bypass of the RCA with a right internal mammary artery graft. The patient made a full recovery. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was not inserted and he was advised not to return to competitive sports. PMID:26961556

  8. Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Management and Treatment of Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients With Structural Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Amit K; Callans, David

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for ventricular tachycardia (VT) generally includes 1 or more of the following options: antiarrhythmic therapy, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and/or catheter ablation. Catheter ablation is performed with an electroanatomic mapping system to define the heart's 3D anatomy, as well as regions of scar. Radiofrequency energy is then applied to areas of abnormal substrate within which are located channels critical to the VT circuit. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a non-invasive modality that provides high-resolution images of cardiac structure and function. CMR has become a very useful tool for sudden cardiac death risk stratification and to facilitate successful radiofrequency ablation of VT in patients with abnormal cardiac substrate. The role of CMR in the management and treatment of VT in patients with structural heart disease is reviewed.

  9. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention.

  10. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia: a current overview.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luiz R; Henz, Benhur D; Macedo, Paula G; Santos, Simone N; Barreto, José R; Zanatta, André; Fenelon, Guilherme; Cruz Filho, Fernando E S

    2009-03-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia occurs in healthy children and young adults causing syncope and sudden cardiac death. This is a familial disease, which affect de novo mutation in 50% of the cases. At least two causative genes have been described to be localized in the chromosome 1; mutation of the ryanodine receptor gene and calsequestrin gene. The classical clinical presentation is syncope triggered by exercise and emotion in children and adolescents with no structural heart disease. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia during treadmill testing, or after isoproterenol infusion, is the most common feature. Therapeutic options include, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers and, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is indicated in high-risk patients. Risk stratification of this disease is very challenging, since some risk factors proved to be useful in some series but not in others. However, family history of sudden cardiac death and symptoms initiated in very young children are important predictors.

  11. Amiodarone for the treatment and prevention of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Van Herendael, Hugo; Dorian, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Amiodarone has emerged as the leading antiarrhythmic therapy for termination and prevention of ventricular arrhythmia in different clinical settings because of its proven efficacy and safety. In patients with shock refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and hemodynamically destabilizing ventricular arrhythmia, amiodarone is the most effective drug available to assist in resuscitation. Although the superiority of the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) over amiodarone has been well established in the preventive treatment of patients at high risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, amiodarone (if used with a beta-blocker) is the most effective antiarrhythmic drug to prevent ICD shocks and treat electrical storm. Both the pharmacokinetics and the electrophysiologic profile of amiodarone are complex, and its optimal and safe use requires careful patient surveillance with respect to potential adverse effects. PMID:20730062

  12. Holter Monitoring and Loop Recorders: From Research to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Galli, Alessio; Ambrosini, Francesco; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Holter monitors are tools of proven efficacy in diagnosing and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the fact their use is widely prescribed by general practitioners, little is known about their evolving role in the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, unexplained recurrent syncope and risk stratification in implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker candidates. New Holter monitoring technologies and loop recorders allow prolonged monitoring of heart rhythm for periods from a few days to several months, making it possible to detect infrequent arrhythmias in patients of all ages. This review discusses the advances in this area of arrhythmology and how Holter monitors have improved the clinical management of patients with suspected cardiac rhythm diseases. PMID:27617093

  13. Idiopathic Intractable Diarrhoea Leading to Torsade de Pointes.

    PubMed

    Mouyis, Kyriacos; Okonko, Darlington; Missouris, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old lady was admitted to our hospital with a 3-year history of noninfective diarrhoea and recurrent syncopal events over the last 3 months. Her initial electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed trigeminy and prolonged QTc interval. She had a structurally normal heart with no coronary artery disease. Investigations revealed low potassium at 3.0 mmol/L. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggested a possible diagnosis of diverticulitis. Soon after admission she had an unresponsive episode with spontaneous recovery. Telemetry and Holter analysis confirmed multiple episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (Torsade de Pointes). Following electrolyte supplementation the episodes of polymorphic VT improved. Due to the protracted nature of the diarrhoea, the recurrent syncopal events, and recurrent hypokalaemia documented over recent years, an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) was sanctioned by the multidisciplinary team (MDT). In summary, chronic diarrhoea may result in life threatening polymorphic VT due to hypokalaemia and QTc prolongation. In these patients an ICD may be considered. PMID:27313906

  14. Neonatal ventricular fibrillation and an elusive ALCAPA: things are not always as they seem.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tracie C; Renno, Markus S; Parra, David A; Guthrie, Scott O

    2016-01-01

    An anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare congenital cardiac condition that typically presents with poor feeding and failure to thrive from progressive myocardial ischaemia. Previous reports of ALCAPA presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) have suggested a causative relationship. In this case, we present a neonate with VF without apparent cause after an extensive evaluation. Following implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement for presumed idiopathic VF, at which time she also underwent surgical ligation of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), the neonate developed haemodynamic instability that ultimately was found to be due to ALCAPA. Numerous echocardiograms had missed the ALCAPA in the setting of mildly elevated pulmonary artery pressure. We discuss the limitations of current ultrasound technology in diagnosing ALCAPA in the setting of pulmonary hypertension and explain why the relationship between this patient's diagnosis of ALCAPA and her episode of VF is not clearly causative. PMID:27033289

  15. Is it safe to program a long tachycardia detection interval?

    PubMed

    Kühlkamp, Volker; Dörnberger, Volker; Bosch, Ralph R; Kettering, Klaus; Mewis, Christian

    2002-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy is used frequently in patients with "slow" ventricular tachycardia (VT). Hence, the tachycardia detection interval is programmed within the range of the physiologic heart rate, but this may cause serious problems. If a fast VT is converted to sinus tachycardia with a cycle length shorter than the tachycardia detection interval, the episode is not terminated and the success counter is not reset. If this happens repeatedly, therapies will be exhausted without termination of the episode. If VT recurs within such an episode, it will not be treated. This report describes a patient who died suddenly in a scenario similar to the one described. Although all documented VT/ventricular fibrillation episodes were terminated by the device, the episode was not terminated because of the ongoing supraventricular tachycardia. Therefore, no further therapies were available and the patient probably died of fast untreated VT. Programming of a long tachycardia detection interval is dangerous in currently available ICDs.

  16. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  17. Role of 123I-Iobenguane Myocardial Scintigraphy in Predicting Short-term Left Ventricular Functional Recovery: An Interesting Image

    PubMed Central

    Feola, Mauro; Chauvie, Stephane; Biggi, Alberto; Testa, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    123I-iobenguane myocardial scintigraphy (MIBG) has been shown to be a predictor of sudden cardiac mortality in patients with heart failure. One patient with recent anterior myocardial infarction (MI) treated with coronary angioplasty and having left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 30% underwent early MIBG myocardial scintigraphy/tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in order to help evaluate his eligibility for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The late heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio was calculated to be 1.32% and the washout rate was 1%. At 40-day follow-up after angioplasty, LVEF proved to be 32%, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was still II–III, and an ICD was placed in order to reduce mortality from ventricular arrhythmias. MIBG myocardial scintigraphy might be a promising method for evaluating left ventricular recovery in post-MI patients. PMID:26664773

  18. The National Cardiovascular Data Registry Voluntary Public Reporting Program: An Interim Report From the NCDR Public Reporting Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Gregory J; Jennings, Jonathan; Madden, Ruth A; Malenka, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A; McKay, Charles R; Ness, Debra L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Ring, Michael E; Rumsfeld, John S; Shelton, Marc E; Simanowith, Michael C; Slattery, Lara E; Weintraub, William S; Lovett, Ann; Normand, Sharon-Lise

    2016-01-19

    Public reporting of health care data continues to proliferate as consumers and other stakeholders seek information on the quality and outcomes of care. Medicare's Hospital Compare website, the U.S. News & World Report hospital rankings, and several state-level programs are well known. Many rely heavily on administrative data as a surrogate to reflect clinical reality. Clinical data are traditionally more difficult and costly to collect, but more accurately reflect patients' clinical status, thus enhancing the validity of quality metrics. We describe the public reporting effort being launched by the American College of Cardiology and partnering professional organizations using clinical data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) programs. This hospital-level voluntary effort will initially report process of care measures from the percutaneous coronary intervention (CathPCI) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) registries of the NCDR. Over time, additional process, outcomes, and composite performance metrics will be reported. PMID:26603176

  19. Management of cardiac arrest in a parturient with Eisenmenger's syndrome and complete atrioventricular block during Cesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gaab Soo; Yang, Mikyung; Chang, Choo Hoon; Lee, Eun Kyung; Choi, Jeong Yeon

    2015-12-01

    A 26-year-old parturient with Eisenmenger's syndrome and complete atrioventricular block was presented for emergency Cesarean section due to preterm labor. Ventricular tachycardia (VT), which progressed to ventricular fibrillation (VF), started immediately after the incision. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with electric shocks was given by anesthesiologists while the obstetrician delivered the baby between the shocks. A cardiac surgeon was ready for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation institution in case of emergency but spontaneous circulation of the patient returned after the 3rd shock and the delivery of the baby. The newborn's Apgar score was 4 at 1 minute and 8 at 5 minutes. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was inserted before the discharge because the patient had recurrent episodes of VT and VF postoperatively. PMID:26634088

  20. Aborted Sudden Cardiac Death and a Mother with Suspected Metabolic Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Keller, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) has not been reported as initial manifestation of cardiac involvement in metabolic myopathy (MM). A 20-year-old female with a previous history of three syncopes, hyperhidrosis, and recurrent tick bites experienced aborted SCD. Her mother presented with MM, and a history of pituitary adenoma, nephroptosis, arterial hypertension, depression, migraine, goiter, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, hyperhidrosis, multiple muscle ruptures, and hyperlipidemia. After a few days of disorientation and amnesia, the young female recovered completely. Clinical neurological examination was noticeable for partial ophthalmoparesis and mild hyperprolactinemia. She received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which did not discharge so far. Recurrent syncopes and aborted SCD may be the initial manifestation of MM with multiple organ involvement. The family history is important in cases with aborted SCD to guide the diagnostic work-up. Phenotypic heterogeneity between the family members may be an indicator of MM. PMID:25187745

  1. The National Cardiovascular Data Registry Voluntary Public Reporting Program: An Interim Report From the NCDR Public Reporting Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Gregory J; Jennings, Jonathan; Madden, Ruth A; Malenka, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A; McKay, Charles R; Ness, Debra L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Ring, Michael E; Rumsfeld, John S; Shelton, Marc E; Simanowith, Michael C; Slattery, Lara E; Weintraub, William S; Lovett, Ann; Normand, Sharon-Lise

    2016-01-19

    Public reporting of health care data continues to proliferate as consumers and other stakeholders seek information on the quality and outcomes of care. Medicare's Hospital Compare website, the U.S. News & World Report hospital rankings, and several state-level programs are well known. Many rely heavily on administrative data as a surrogate to reflect clinical reality. Clinical data are traditionally more difficult and costly to collect, but more accurately reflect patients' clinical status, thus enhancing the validity of quality metrics. We describe the public reporting effort being launched by the American College of Cardiology and partnering professional organizations using clinical data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) programs. This hospital-level voluntary effort will initially report process of care measures from the percutaneous coronary intervention (CathPCI) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) registries of the NCDR. Over time, additional process, outcomes, and composite performance metrics will be reported.

  2. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  3. Congenital and drug-induced long-QT syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wehrens, X.H.T.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    The congenital long-QT syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition characterised clinically by prolonged QT intervals, syncope and sudden cardiac death. The abnormally prolonged repolarisation is the result of mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channels. The diagnosis of long-QT syndrome is based on clinical, electrocardiographic, and genetic criteria. Beta-blocking therapy is important in the treatment of long-QT syndrome, although pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) are useful in certain categories of patients. In the near future, mutation-specific treatment will probably become a novel approach to this potentially lethal syndrome. Drug-induced long-QT syndrome has been associated with silent mutations and common polymorphisms in potassium and sodium channel genes associated with congenital long-QT syndrome. Genetic screening for such mutations and polymorphisms may become an important instrument in preventing drug-induced 'torsades de pointes' arrhythmias in otherwise asymptomatic patients. PMID:25696318

  4. Programming ICDs in the Modern Era beyond Out-of-the Box Settings.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Fadi; Khairy, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) improve survival when used as primary or secondary prevention therapy in patients with a broad spectrum of disorders associated with a high risk of sudden death. As indications continue to be refined, attention has increasingly turned to ICD-related complications and their impact on quality of life. Foremost among these complications are inappropriate shocks. This issue remains a major challenge, despite technological advances with sophisticated recording capabilities and detection algorithms. While pharmacological and catheter-based interventions represent important adjunctive tools for the reduction of inappropriate shocks, this contemporary review focuses on customizing and optimizing ICD programming. Studies addressing ICD programming beyond "out the box" settings are reviewed for each device manufacturer and special circumstances are considered. We discuss the benefits and pitfalls of strategies such as high cutoff rates, longer detections times, antitachycardia pacing, and discriminators in reducing the incidence of inappropriate shocks and offer practical programming tips.

  5. A case of premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, and arrhythmic storm induced by right ventricular pacing during cardiac resynchronization therapy: Electrophysiological mechanism and catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Pedretti, Stefano; Vargiu, Sara; Paolucci, Marco; Lunati, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with ischemic cardiomyopathy and a cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator (CRT-D) device came to our attention due to incessant ventricular tachycardia and multiple implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. An electrocardiogram showed non-sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardias (NSVTs) constantly occurring after each biventricular stimulation. During an electrophysiological study, NSVTs reproducibly recurred only after right ventricular (RV) pacing; LV pacing did not induce any NSVTs. The activation map was consistent with a localized reentry at the interventricular septum, and a double exit; at the LV exit site, a single radiofrequency energy application immediately interrupted the occurrence of the NSVTs. Current evidence supports LV pacing to be pro-arrhythmogenic in few CRT patients. This unusual case shows that RV pacing during CRT could produce frequent ventricular arrhythmias and arrhythmic storm. Catheter ablation can be considered an effective therapeutic option, especially when CRT maintenance is highly advisable. PMID:26702324

  6. Giant cell myocarditis: a life-threatening disorder heralded by orbital myositis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Sajawal; Mba, Benjamin I; Husain, Aliya Noor; Ciftci, Farah Diba

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with a history of orbital myositis (OM) presented to the emergency department with ventricular tachycardia requiring electrical cardioversion. Postcardioversion ECG showed right bundle branch block, while an echocardiogram revealed an ejection fraction of 20% and a dilated right ventricle. Cardiac MRI produced suboptimal images because the patient was having frequent arrhythmias. The rest of the work up, including coronary angiography, was unremarkable. Given the dilated right ventricle, we suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and discharged the patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. 1 week later, he was readmitted with cardiogenic shock; endomyocardial biopsy revealed giant cell myocarditis (GCM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the seventh case report of GCM described in a patient with OM. We recommend that clinicians maintain a high degree of suspicion for GCM in patients with OM presenting with cardiac problems. PMID:27009192

  7. Nanotechnology and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

  8. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  9. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  10. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  11. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  12. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  13. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  14. Mobility implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Danz, W

    1990-01-01

    We present a brief review of mobility implants, their contribution, and the experiences derived after almost 40 years since the new concepts of full mobility implants were introduced. In early 1940, experiments with a new material for the making of plastic artificial eyes was also being considered for the making of orbital implants. Methyl-methacrylate (MMA) had proven inert and satisfactory for dental products. The Surgeon Generals office of the Armed Services encouraged further research and experimental work in the development of plastic eyes. The success of the new material sponsored the beginning of great expansion with new concepts for orbital implants. Through a period of more than a decade, the design and types of implants went through three stages. First, the buried implant was introduced, then the exposed integrated followed, and the buried integrated subsequently followed. The path of progress was not smooth. Theoretically correct designs and surgical procedures met unexpected practical difficulties for the ophthalmic surgeon, the patient, and the eye maker. Surgical and technical efforts were carefully reviewed to eliminate the problems encountered, only to have further unforeseen complications arise. Infections, extrusions, and migration of the implant were not uncommon. The exposed integrated implant was eventually abandoned. However, there were some extraordinary successes of mobility. A new era introduced fully buried mobility implants that were more successful. However, this procedure also produced some problems, causing infection (or allergy), extrusion, and migration. Tantalum mesh and gauze gave great promise with the inception of their use. Orbital tissue grew into the material in an astonishing way, making it possible to secure the extraocular muscles and tenons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  16. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  17. Spectroscopy of implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.

    1994-01-01

    The spectral criteria of selection of soft intraocular lens (IOL) implants of long service in an organism have been defined for ophthalmology. The analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra provides the required and sufficient level of material polymerization for manufacturing non-toxic lenses for the eye. The spectral limits for determining the biocompatibility of samples can be related to the intensity ratio of two bands only in the FTIR spectra of siloxane. Siloxane-poly(urethane) block copolymers and other materials for implants have been studied. Passivated surfaces of implants have been obtained and registered by methods of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy.

  18. Reference Device-Assisted Adaptive Location Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongjin; Xia, Linyuan

    2016-01-01

    Location fingerprinting suffers in dynamic environments and needs recalibration from time to time to maintain system performance. This paper proposes an adaptive approach for location fingerprinting. Based on real-time received signal strength indicator (RSSI) samples measured by a group of reference devices, the approach applies a modified Universal Kriging (UK) interpolant to estimate adaptive temporal and environmental radio maps. The modified UK can take the spatial distribution characteristics of RSSI into account. In addition, the issue of device heterogeneity caused by multiple reference devices is further addressed. To compensate the measuring differences of heterogeneous reference devices, differential RSSI metric is employed. Extensive experiments were conducted in an indoor field and the results demonstrate that the proposed approach not only adapts to dynamic environments and the situation of changing APs’ positions, but it is also robust toward measuring differences of heterogeneous reference devices. PMID:27258284

  19. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  20. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  1. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  2. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  3. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  4. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  5. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  6. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  7. Dexamethasone: intravitreal implant.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Macular oedema is one of the complications of retinal vein occlusion. About half of the patients recover spontaneously within 3 to 6 months. There is currently no drug that improves outcome. An intravitreal implant delivering 0.7 mg of dexamethasone has been authorised for the treatment of macular oedema in this setting. Clinical assessment is based on two double-blind randomised trials including a total of 1267 patients, comparing treatment with intravitreal implants delivering about 0.7 mg or 0.35 mg of dexamethasone, versus a sham procedure. Despite a more rapid initial improvement with dexamethasone, the number of patients whose reading ability improved at 6 months did not significantly differ between the groups. A retrospective subgroup analysis raised the possibility that dexamethasone implants may be beneficial in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. The adverse effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implants are the same as those of intraocular steroid injections, including elevated intraocular pressure (25% of patients), cataracts (27%), conjunctival haemorrhage (20%), and ocular pain. In practice, dexamethasone intravitreal implants do not have a positive harm-benefit balance in most patients with macular oedema following retinal vein occlusion. More rapid recovery after central vein occlusion remains to be confirmed. Pending such studies, it is better to avoid using dexamethasone implants. Patients should instead receive ophthalmologic monitoring to detect and manage possible complications, and any risk factors should be treated.

  8. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  9. Minimally Invasive Cochlear Implantation Assisted by Bi-planar Device: An Exploratory Feasibility Study in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jia; Zhang, Shao-Xing; Hu, Lei; Li, Chang-Sheng; Zhu, Yun-Feng; Sun, Shi-Long; Wang, Li-Feng; Ma, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background: A single drilled tunnel from the lateral mastoid cortex to the cochlea via the facial recess is essential for minimally invasive cochlear implant surgery. This study aimed to explore the safety profile of this kind of new image-guided and bi-planar device-assisted surgery procedure in vitro. Methods: Image-guided minimally invasive cochlear implantations were performed on eight cadaveric temporal bone specimens. The main procedures were: (1) temporal bone specimens were prepared for surgery and fiducial markers were registered. (2) computed tomography (CT) scans were performed for future reference. (3) CT scan images were processed and drill path was planned to minimize cochlear damage. (4) bi-planar device-assisted drilling was performed on the specimens using the registration. (5) surgical safety was evaluated by calculating the deviation between the drill and the planned paths, and by measuring the closest distance between the drilled path and critical anatomic structures. Results: Eight cases were operated successfully to the basal turn of the cochlear with intact facial nerves (FNs). The deviations from target points and entrance points were 0.86 mm (0.68–1.00 mm) and 0.44 mm (0.30–0.96 mm), respectively. The angular error between the planned and the drilled trajectory was 1.74° (1.26–2.41°). The mean distance from the edge of the drilled path to the FN and to the external canal was 0.60 mm (0.35–0.83 mm) and 1.60 mm (1.30–2.05 mm), respectively. In five specimens, the chorda tympani nerves were well preserved. In all cases, no injury happened to auditory ossicles. Conclusions: This exploratory study demonstrated the safety of the newly developed image-guided minimally invasive cochlear implantation assisted by the bi-planar device and established the operational procedures. Further, more in vitro experiments are needed to improve the system operation and its safety. PMID:27748341

  10. Scuba diving with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kompis, Martin; Vibert, Dominique; Senn, Pascal; Vischer, Mattheus W; Häusler, Rudolf

    2003-05-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral cochlear implants (a Med-El Combi40 and a Med-El Combi40+), as well as considerable experience in scuba diving with both of his implants. After having been exposed to 68 and 89 dives, respectively, in depths of up to 43 m, both cochlear implants are in working order and the patient continues to receive excellent speech recognition scores with both cochlear implant systems. The presented data show that scuba diving after cochlear implantation is possible over a considerable number of dives without any major negative impact on the implants.

  11. [Subretinal visual implants].

    PubMed

    Stingl, K; Greppmaier, U; Wilhelm, B; Zrenner, E

    2010-12-01

    Visual implants are medical technologies that replace parts of the visual neuronal pathway. The subretinal implant developed by our group is being used in a human trials since 2005 and replaces the function of degenerated photoreceptors by an electronic device in blind patients. The subretinal implant consists of a 70-µm thin microchip with 1500 microphotodiodes each with an amplifier and an electrode with area of 3 mm × 3 mm. The power supply is provided by a subdermal power supply cable. The microchip is implanted under the macula and transforms the light signal into an electrical one, which is referred directly to the bipolar cells. Requirements for a good function of the implant are a preserved function of the inner retina, as well as clear optic media and a good visual acuity in the earlier life. The current technology can mediate a visual field of 10 - 12° and a computed resolution of up to 0.25° visual angle (corresponding to a visual acuity of 63 / 1000 - 80 / 1000) in blind patients. The so far best results from our studies reached a visual acuity of 21 / 1000 in blind retinitis pigmentosa patients. This overview is intended to inform the ophthalmologist about the current state of the technology and help him/her to advise interested patients.

  12. Immunological aspects of implantation and implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P M; Christmas, S E; Vince, G S

    1999-12-01

    The human endometrium contains a significant proportion of leukocytes (8-35% of all cells), the absolute numbers and proportions varying during both the menstrual cycle and early in pregnancy. T cells, macrophages and a population of phenotypically unusual large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are commonly present, although B cells are absent. Relative T cell numbers decrease significantly in first trimester decidua, and hence are unlikely to play an important role in maintenance of human pregnancy, but T cells could be important in implantation where their relative numbers are greater. In addition to producing cytokines, local tissue macrophages may provide an immediate antigen non-specific host defence to infection. Most attention has, nevertheless, focused on a role for LGL in implantation and maintenance of pregnancy since, at the time of implantation, LGL comprise 70-80% of the total endometrial leukocyte population. Although endometrial LGL have been shown to express natural killer (NK) cell-type cytotoxicity against classical NK cell targets, such cytotoxicity against trophoblast is induced only after activation by interleukin (IL)-2. Selective expression of the unusual class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, HLA-G, by extravillous cytotrophoblast may assist in protecting invasive cytotrophoblast from potential maternal NK cell attack, probably via interactions with killer inhibitory receptor molecules on LGL. Many cytokines have been demonstrated to be expressed at the maternal-fetal interface although, currently, in mice only two (IL-11 and leukaemia inhibitory factor) appear to be absolutely essential for successful pregnancy outcome. Immune effector cells and cytokines may also play a role in human pregnancy pathologies, such as recurrent early pregnancy loss.

  13. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  14. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  15. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  16. Multichannel extracochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Pulec, J L; Smith, J C; Lewis, M L; Hortmann, G

    1989-03-01

    The transcutaneous eight-channel extracochlear implant has undergone continuous revision to simplify the surgical technique, to minimize patient morbidity, and to improve performance. The extracochlear electrode array has been miniaturized so that it can be inserted through the facial recess without disturbing the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane, or malleus. The use of the remote antenna placed around the external auditory canal has greatly increased battery life and patient comfort. With its simplified incisions, the surgical procedure can be performed as out-patient surgery. Preoperative cochlear nerve testing and use of evoked response cochlear nerve testing allow preadjustment of the speech processor. Current features and performance of the implant are discussed.

  17. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  18. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  19. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  20. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  1. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  2. Elementary Implantable Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Rebecca A.; Ellstein, David; Drazan, John; Healey, Colleen P.; Uhl, Richard L.; Connor, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing implantable sensors which are robust enough to maintain long term functionality inside the body remains a significant challenge. The ideal implantable sensing system is one which is simple and robust; free from batteries, telemetry, and complex electronics. We have developed an elementary implantable sensor for orthopaedic smart implants. The sensor requires no telemetry and no batteries to communicate wirelessly. It has no on-board signal conditioning electronics. The sensor itself has no electrical connections and thus does not require a hermetic package. The sensor is an elementary L-C resonator which can function as a simple force transducer by using a solid dielectric material of known stiffness between two parallel Archimedean coils. The operating characteristics of the sensors are predicted using a simplified, lumped circuit model. We have demonstrated sensor functionality both in air and in saline. Our preliminary data indicate that the sensor can be reasonably well modeled as a lumped circuit to predict its response to loading. PMID:24883335

  3. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  4. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  5. Ion implantation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  6. Peritoneal trophoblastic implant.

    PubMed

    Rachagan, S P; Kutty, K; Govindan, K S

    1997-09-01

    A case of persistent trophoblastic tissue on the pelvic peritoneum is presented. While most cases are secondary to conservative surgery for tubal ectopic pregnancy, primary implantation can also occur as highlighted by this case. A brief pathophysiology of the condition is presented. The importance of monitoring the serum for beta subunit human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is emphasised.

  7. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  8. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  9. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  10. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  11. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  12. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  13. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  14. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  15. Implants for cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, H B; McDermott, M W; Cooke, D D

    1995-04-01

    As long as there have been skull defects, there has been a recognized need to cover them in some way. Cranioplasty is the surgical correction of skull defects. The two major purposes of performing a cranioplasty are to protect the brain and to provide reasonable cosmesis. The two physical requirements of the implant are strength and malleability. Originally, foreign materials such as precious metals were used. Autogenous bone grafts have also achieved successful results. Over the past quarter-century, the popularization of acrylics and radiolucent metals has favored them over bone because of their ease of use, the absence of need to harvest donor bone, and, particularly, bone's tendency to resorb or scar. Yet foreign materials can cause excessive inflammation, producing a synovial membrane at the interface between the host bone and cranioplasty construct, increasing the risk of infection. Currently, hydroxyapatite-based ceramics, which may induce bone growth into the implant, are increasingly being used. Future applications will include antibiotic-impregnated implants and computer-generated models to improve the precision of cranioplasty fit and cosmesis.

  16. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  17. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability.

  18. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    PubMed Central

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  19. [Professional occupation after cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kós, Maria-Izabel; Degive, Colette; Boëx, Colette; Maire, Raphaël; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2006-10-01

    This study verifies whether cochlear implants helps deaf adults to maintain or develop their professional occupations. Sixty-seven patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. At the time of implantation 34 were professionally active. After the implantation 29 remained active, 4 of them reporting positive developments in their careers. Five patients became inactive. The previously inactive patients remained inactive. There was no difference in auditory performances between professionally active or inactive patients. Cochlear implants enable most implanted adults to maintain and even progress in their professions. However, deafness still represents an obstacle to social integration as inactive patients who searched for a job were rejected after the job interviews. PMID:17076153

  20. The Evolution of Breast Implants.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, shape, feel, safety, and longevity of the implants remain important areas of research. The data provided by manufacturers show the safety and efficacy of these medical devices. Clinicians should strive to provide ongoing data and sound science to continue to improve clinical outcomes in the future. This article explores the evolution of breast implants with special emphasis on the advancement of silicone implants.

  1. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  2. Professional occupation after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Kos, M-I; Degive, C; Boex, C; Guyot, J-P

    2007-03-01

    The aims of this study were to verify whether cochlear implants helped profoundly deaf adults to maintain or even to develop their professional occupations, and to identify other elements that may contribute to or, on the contrary, impede such patients' professional success. All adult patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. Demographic data, health information, hearing performance and degree of satisfaction with the implant were also considered. Sixty-seven adults had been implanted, with three different devices, since 1985. At the time of implantation, 34 had been professionally active. After implantation, 29 had remained professionally active, four of whom reported positive developments in their careers. Five patients had become professionally inactive. Those patients who had previously been professionally inactive remained so. There had been no difference in performance, either between different types of cochlear implants or between professionally active or inactive patients. The implanted patients had kept their jobs and many of them had developed their professional skills. In spite of this, cochlear implants may still be perceived as proving insufficiently satisfactory hearing to enable professionally inactive patients to reintegrate and to facilitate further learning or career developments. PMID:17052367

  3. Insulation Failure of the Linox Defibrillator Lead: A Case Report and Retrospective Review of a Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Howe, Andrew J; McKeag, Nicholas A; Wilson, Carol M; Ashfield, Kyle P; Roberts, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead insulation failure and conductor externalization have been increasingly reported. The 7.8F silicon-insulated Linox SD and Linox S ICD leads (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) were released in 2006 and 2007, respectively, with an estimated 85,000 implantations worldwide. A 39-year-old female suffered an out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation (VF) arrest with successful resuscitation. An ICD was implanted utilizing a single coil active fixation Linox(Smart) S lead (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany). A device-triggered alert approximately 3 years after implantation confirmed nonphysiological high rate sensing leading to VF detection. A chest X-ray showed an abnormality of the ICD lead and fluoroscopic screening confirmed conductor externalization proximal to the defibrillator coil. In view of the combined electrical and fluoroscopic abnormalities, urgent lead extraction and replacement were performed. A review of Linox (Biotronik) and Vigila (Sorin Group, Milan, Italy) lead implantations within our center (n = 98) identified 3 additional patients presenting with premature lead failure, 2 associated with nonphysiological sensed events and one associated with a significant decrease in lead impedance. All leads were subsequently removed and replaced. This case provides a striking example of insulation failure affecting the Linox ICD lead and, we believe, is the first to demonstrate conductor externalization manifesting both electrical and fluoroscopic abnormalities.

  4. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  5. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  6. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  7. Computer implants and death.

    PubMed

    Gert, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Although a patient whose whole brain has ceased to function may have his heart, lungs, and other organs continue to function if they are connected to the appropriate machines, the patient is still dead and the machines can be disconnected. In the future, nanotechnology, or other technology, may allow putting implants in the brainstem that can keep a patient's heart, lungs and other organs functioning, even though the whole natural brain has ceased to function. It would be useful to consider how this technology might affect the criterion of death before it is actually available.

  8. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  9. The Implantable Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, A. S.; Heimbecker, R. O.; Bigelow, W. G.

    1964-01-01

    The transistorized implanted pacemaker is proving to be an effective and reliable method for long-term pacing of the heart. All patients suffering from Stokes-Adams seizures were first given a trial period of conservative therapy, including isoproterenol (Isuprel), ephedrine, atropine and steroids. Twenty-four pacemaker implants were performed on 23 patients over a 21-month period. The preoperative insertion of a pacemaker cardiac catheter was a very valuable safety precaution. In this way the heart could be safely and reliably paced during the period of preoperative assessment and during the critical periods of anesthetic induction and thoracotomy. Infection did not occur, probably because of careful gas sterilization of the units. Various models of pacemakers are compared, and the reasons for two pacemaker failures are presented. There were two early deaths and one late death in the series. The relationship of progressive coronary disease to recent infarction is stressed. Patients having intermittent heart block frequently showed the picture of “competing pacemakers” postoperatively, but without deleterious effect. Twenty patients, between 54 and 88 years of age, are alive and well at the time of reporting, with excellent pacemaker response and no further Stokes-Adams attacks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14118681

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  11. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  12. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  13. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Francesco Dimitri; Savini, Carlo; Castelli, Andrea; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is being employed as a less invasive alternative to open heart surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Here we report the case of an awake transapical aortic valve implantation in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  14. Photonic technologies for visual implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Ruediger; Praemassing, F.; Puettjer, D.; Stawski, N.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-02-01

    In this paper two applications of photonic technologies for visual implants in the field of medicine are presented. Both are technical systems working as vision aid for people suffering from blindness due to damages in their visual system. The first system is a retinal implant (RI), the second an intraocular vision aid (IoVA) for people with opaque cornea.

  15. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  16. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  17. An Uncommon Association of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Conduction System Disease.

    PubMed

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa; Sanchez-Iglesias, S; Araujo-Vilar, D; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old African American woman presented with severe respiratory distress requiring intubation and was diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. She had the typical phenotype of familial partial lipodystrophy 2 (FPLD2). Sequence analysis of LMNA gene showed a heterozygous missense mutation at exon 8 (c.1444C>T) causing amino acid change, p.R482W. She later developed severe coronary artery disease requiring multiple percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass surgery. She was later diagnosed with diabetes, primary hyperparathyroidism, and euthyroid multinodular goiter. She had sinus nodal and atrioventricular nodal disease and had an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation due to persistent left ventricular dysfunction. The device eroded through the skin few months after implantation and needed a re-implant on the contralateral side. She had atrial flutter requiring ablation. This patient with FPLD2 had most of the reported cardiac complications of FPLD2. This case is presented to improve the awareness of the presentation of this disease among cardiologists and internists. PMID:27504462

  18. [Sport for pacemaker patients].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W

    2012-06-01

    Sport activity is an important issue in many patients with a pacemaker either because they performed sport activities before pacemaker implantation to reduce the cardiovascular risk or to improve the course of an underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease, heart failure) by sports. Compared to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) the risks from underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. ischemia, heart failure), arrhythmia, lead dysfunction or inappropriate therapy are less important or absent. Sport is contraindicated in dyspnea at rest, acute heart failure, new complex arrhythmia, acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction, valvular disease with indications for intervention and surgery and comorbidities which prevent physical activity. Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease (including hypertension) should preferably perform types and levels of physical activity that are aerobic (with dynamic exercise) such as running, swimming, cycling instead of sport with high anaerobic demands and high muscular workload. In heart failure, studies demonstrated advantages of isometric sport that increases the amount of muscle, thereby preventing cardiac cachexia. Sport with a risk of blows to the chest or physical contact (e.g. boxing, rugby, martial arts) should be avoided. Implantation, programming and follow-up should respect specific precautions to allow optimal physical activity with a pacemaker including implantation of bipolar leads on the side contralateral to the dominant hand, individual programming of the upper sensor and tracking rate and regular exercise testing. PMID:22854824

  19. Barriers to medical device innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bergsland, Jacob; Elle, Ole Jakob; Fosse, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has defined a medical device as a health care product that does not achieve it’s purpose by chemical action or by being metabolized. This means that a vast number of products are considered medical devices. Such devices play an essential role in the practice of medicine. The FDA classifies medical devices in three classes, depending on the risk of the device. Since Class I and II devices have relatively simple requirements for getting to the market, this review will focus on “implantable devices”, which, in general, belong to Class III. The European Union and Canada use a slightly different classification system. While early generations of medical devices were introduced without much testing, either technical or clinical, the process of introducing a Class III medical device from concept to clinical practice has become strongly regulated and requires extensive technological and clinical testing. The modern era of implantable medical devices may be considered to have started in the 1920s with development of artificial hips. The implantable pacemaker was another milestone and pacemakers and cardioverters/defibrillators have since saved millions of lives and created commercial giants in the medical device industry. This review will include some examples of cardiovascular devices. Similar considerations apply to the total implantable device market, although clinical and technological applications obviously vary considerably. PMID:24966699

  20. An Uncommon Association of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Conduction System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa; Sanchez-Iglesias, S.; Araujo-Vilar, D; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old African American woman presented with severe respiratory distress requiring intubation and was diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. She had the typical phenotype of familial partial lipodystrophy 2 (FPLD2). Sequence analysis of LMNA gene showed a heterozygous missense mutation at exon 8 (c.1444C>T) causing amino acid change, p.R482W. She later developed severe coronary artery disease requiring multiple percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass surgery. She was later diagnosed with diabetes, primary hyperparathyroidism, and euthyroid multinodular goiter. She had sinus nodal and atrioventricular nodal disease and had an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation due to persistent left ventricular dysfunction. The device eroded through the skin few months after implantation and needed a re-implant on the contralateral side. She had atrial flutter requiring ablation. This patient with FPLD2 had most of the reported cardiac complications of FPLD2. This case is presented to improve the awareness of the presentation of this disease among cardiologists and internists. PMID:27504462

  1. Speech Production Intelligibility of Early Implanted Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mirette G.; Waltzman, Susan B.; Tajudeen, Bobby; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the influence of age, and age at implantation, on speech production intelligibility in prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant recipients. Methods Forty prelingually, profoundly deaf children who received cochlear implants between 8 and 40 months of age. Their age at testing ranged between 2.5 – 18 years. Children were recorded repeating the ten sentences in the Beginner’s Intelligibility Test. These recordings were played back to normal-hearing listeners who were unfamiliar with deaf speech and who were instructed to write down what they heard. They also rated each subject for the intelligibility of their speech production on a 5-point rating scale. The main outcome measures were the percentage of target words correctly transcribed, and the intelligibility ratings, in both cases averaged across three normal-hearing listeners. Results The data showed a strong effect of age at testing, with older children being more intelligible. This effect was particularly pronounced for children implanted in the first 24 months of life, all of whom had speech production intelligibility scores of 80% or higher when they were tested at age 5.5 years or older. This was true for only five out of nine children implanted at age 25 to 36 months. Conclusions Profoundly deaf children who receive cochlear implants in the first two years of life produce highly intelligible speech before age 6. This is also true for most, but not all children implanted in their third year. PMID:20472308

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  3. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care.

  5. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  6. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Siebert, Sean M; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J B; Brenckle, Mark A; Amsden, Jason J; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2012-11-27

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  7. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  8. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material.

  9. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  10. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  11. Ventricular arrhythmias in congestive heart failure: clinical significance and management.

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, G R; Massumi, A

    1999-01-01

    The benefit of defibrillator therapy has been well established for patients with LV dysfunction (ejection fraction less than 35%), coronary artery disease, NSVT, and inducible and nonsuppressible ventricular tachycardia. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy is also indicated for all CHF patients in NYHA functional classes I, II, and III who present with aborted sudden cardiac death, or ventricular fibrillation, or hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia--and also in patients with syncope with no documented ventricular tachycardia but with inducible ventricular tachycardia at electrophysiology study. The ongoing MADIT II trial was designed to evaluate the benefit of prophylactic ICD implantation in these patients (ejection fraction less than 30%, coronary artery disease, and NSVT) without prior risk stratification by PES. The CABG Patch trial concluded that prophylactic placement of an ICD during coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with low ejection fraction and abnormal SAECG is not justifiable. Except for the indications described above, ICD implantation has not been proved to be beneficial as primary or secondary therapy. Until more data are available, patients should be encouraged to enroll in the ongoing clinical trials. PMID:10217470

  12. Long-term electrocardiographic follow-up from childhood of an adult patient with Brugada syndrome associated with sick sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nao; Iwamoto, Mari; Nakano, Yukiko; Sumita, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Akaike, Toru; Nishizawa, Takashi; Takigiku, Kiyohiro; Shibata, Toshimitsu; Niimura, Ichirou

    2009-03-01

    We had the unique opportunity of following the electrocardiographic (ECG) course of a 13-year-old male with sinus dysfunction and atrial flutter who subsequently developed a Brugada-type ECG pattern associated with sick sinus syndrome at 25 years old. Family history showed that the patient's mother and maternal grandfather suddenly died while sleeping at night. When the patient was 13 years old, he lost consciousness after running a marathon. The patient was diagnosed with sinus dysfunction and atrial flutter, and he underwent pacemaker implantation at 15 years old. ECG examinations performed between 13 and 20 years old showed incomplete right bundle branch block and ST elevation with early depolarization. On ECG examinations performed when the patient was 21 years old and thereafter, the V(2) lead always showed a saddleback-type ST elevation. At 25 years old, the late potential was positive and the electrophysiological study induced ventricular fibrillation. A challenge test with pilsicainide showed remarkable ST elevation by the V(2) lead. The 24-h Holter ECG monitoring showed remarkable ST elevation after eating a snack and during night time when the patient was asleep. The patient was diagnosed with Brugada syndrome and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted. Genetic analysis did not reveal mutation of the SCN5A gene.

  13. [Arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Misaki, Takuro; Fukahara, Kazuaki

    2004-07-01

    The success of the radiofrequency catheter ablation procedure for most types of supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia largely eliminated the role of surgical therapy of arrhythmias. However, there remains a subset of arrhythmia patients in whom urgent surgical treatments are required. In this review we mention recent developments of the urgent surgical treatment for arrhythmias. In cases with complete atrioventricular (AV) block and ventricular fibrillation which associated with sudden death, temporary cardiac pacing and cardiac defibrillation using direct current (DC) cardioversion must be immediately induced and followed by implantation of permanent cardiac pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), if necessary. In addition to usual cardiac pacing therapy, novel pacing therapy has been developed recently for the patients with symptomatic heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) using biventricular pacing is an emerging therapy for improvement of cardiac function in patients with heart failure in association with intraventricular conduction delay. To prevent the sudden death in patients with heart failure, biventricular pacing combined with ICD are also implanted and its efficacy are reported. With the exception of the pacing therapy, curative surgical treatments are limited in drug-refractory atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia after myocardial infarction requiring Dor's type operation. In any case surgical treatment must be performed promptly and suitably with lower invasive methods. PMID:15362552

  14. Current Developments in Microvolt T-wave Alternans

    PubMed Central

    Sredniawa, Beata; Musialik-Lydka, Agata; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Kalarus, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA), the beat-to-beat fluctuation in T wave amplitude and morphology, is closely linked to vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias in various experimental and clinical conditions. Clinically, MTWA is most commonly measured using the spectral method, although non-spectral methods for its assessment from ambulatory electrocardiographical recordings also have been developed. Recent studies suggest that the quantitative assessment of TWA may also be clinically relevant. The standardisation of the criteria for abnormal MTWA test still needs to be completed. The expansion of indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy following the positive results of the MADIT-II and SCD-HeFT trials might have unacceptable economic and medical consequences, and therefore new tests are needed to better discriminate patients who will and will not benefit from ICD implantation. A recent meta-analysis of MTWA studies revealed an overall positive predictive value for arrhythmic events of 19.3%, negative predictive value of 97.2%, and 3.77% univariate relative risk of arrhythmic events. The negative predictive value of MTWA in MADIT-II type patients has been reported to be 97.5%. The predictive value of the test varied significantly in different patient population. Current data support the use of MTWA testing for evaluation of patients with low ejection fraction who are considered for ICD implantation. The independence of the prognostic value of MTWA from other clinical and electrophysiological variables needs further confirmation. PMID:17031416

  15. Increased Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratios and Low Relative Lymphocyte Counts Predict Appropriate Shocks in Heart Failure Patients with ICDs

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Kevser Gülcihan; Balci, Mustafa Mücahit; Arslan, Ugur; Açar, Burak; Maden, Orhan; Selcuk, Hatice; Selcuk, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and relative lymphocyte count (L%) are commonly available tests that can be obtained from complete blood count. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between appropriate defibrillator therapy and PLR, and whether decreased lymphocyte count may predict appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks in heart failure (HF) patients. Methods A total of 147 patients with ischemic or non-ischemic HF who underwent ICD implantation for primary prevention were enrolled in this study. Peripheral venous blood samples were drawn on the same day as ICD implantation. White blood cell counts with differentials, red blood cell indices, and platelet counts were calculated with an automated blood cell counter. All patients were evaluated according to the presence of appropriate ICD therapy. Results Baseline ejection fraction was significantly lower in the appropriate shock received group (p = 0.040). Median PLR was significantly higher and L% was significantly lower in the appropriate shock received group (p < 0.001). In both ischemic and non-ischemic HF groups, median L% was significantly lower in the appropriate shock received group (p < 0.001; p = 0.006, respectively). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, only L% showed a strong association with appropriate shock therapy (p < 0.001). Conclusions Higher PLRs are related to appropriate shocks in patients that received ICD with lower EF. Furthermore, decreased L% is independently associated with appropriate shocks in HF. PMID:27713602

  16. Design, fabrication and characterization of a very low frequency piezoelectric energy harvester designed for heart beat vibration scavenging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, M.; Basrour, S.; Rufer, L.

    2013-05-01

    Current version of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers consists of a battery-powered pulse generator connected onto the heart through electrical leads inserted through the veins. However, it is known that long-term lead failure may occur and cause a dysfunction of the device. When required, the removal of the failed leads is a complex procedure associated with a potential risk of mortality. As a consequence, the main players in the field of intracardiac implants prepare a next generation of devices: miniaturized and autonomous leadless implants, which could be directly placed inside the heart. In this paper, we discuss the frequency content of a heart vibration spectrum, and the dimensional restrictions in the case of a leadless pacemaker. In combination with the requirements in terms of useable energy, we will present a design study of a resonant piezoelectric scavenger aimed at powering such a device. In particular, we will show how the frequency-volume-energy requirement leads to new challenges in terms of power densities, which are to be addressed through implementation of innovative piezoelectric thick films fabrication processes. This paper also presents the simulation, fabrication and the testing of an ultralow frequency (15Hz) resonant piezoelectric energy harvester prototype. Using both harmonic (50mg) and real heart-induced vibrations, we obtained an output power of 60μW and 10μW respectively. Finally, we will place emphasis on the new constraint represented by the gravitational (orientation) sensitivity inherent to these ultra low frequency resonant energy harvesters.

  17. Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients with Nonischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Ganga, Harsha V; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    One-third of all patients with heart failure have nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDM). Five-year mortality from NIDM is as high as 20% with sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the cause in 30% of the deaths. Currently, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is used as the main criteria to risk stratify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to prevent SCD. However, LVEF does not necessarily reflect myocardial propensity for electrical instability leading to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Due to the differential risk in various subgroups of patients for arrhythmic death, it is important to identify appropriate patients for ICD implantation so that we can optimize healthcare resources and avoid the complications of ICDs in individuals who are unlikely to benefit. We performed a systematic search and review of clinical trials of NIDM and the use of ICDs and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification. LGE identifies patients with NIDM who are at high risk for SCD and enables optimized patient selection for ICD placement, while the absence of LGE may reduce the need for ICD implantation in patients with NIDM who are at low risk for future VF/VT or SCD. PMID:27071516

  18. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  19. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device.

  20. Left Ventricular Dilatation Increases the Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients With Reduced Systolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Aleong, Ryan G; Mulvahill, Matthew J; Halder, Indrani; Carlson, Nichole E; Singh, Madhurmeet; Bloom, Heather L; Dudley, Samuel C; Ellinor, Patrick T; Shalaby, Alaa; Weiss, Raul; Gutmann, Rebecca; Sauer, William H; Narayanan, Kumar; Chugh, Sumeet S; Saba, Samir; London, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmias; however, LV ejection fraction has a low sensitivity to predict ventricular arrhythmias. LV dilatation and mass may be useful to further risk-stratify for ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results Patients from the Genetic Risk of Assessment of Defibrillator Events (GRADE) study (N =930), a study of heart failure subjects with defibrillators, were assessed for appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock and death, heart transplant, or ventricular assist device placement by LV diameter and mass. LV mass was divided into normal, mild, moderate, and severe classifications. Severe LV end-diastolic diameter had worse shock-free survival than normal and mild LV end-diastolic diameter (P =0.0002 and 0.0063, respectively; 2-year shock free, severe 74%, moderate 80%, mild 91%, normal 88%; 4-year shock free, severe 62%, moderate 69%, mild 72%, normal 81%) and freedom from death, transplant, or ventricular assist device compared with normal and moderate LV end-diastolic diameter (P<0.0001 and 0.0441, respectively; 2-year survival: severe 78%, moderate 85%, mild 82%, normal 89%; 4-year survival: severe 55%, moderate 64%, mild 63%, normal 74%). Severe LV mass had worse shock-free survival than normal and mild LV mass (P =0.0370 and 0.0280, respectively; 2-year shock free: severe 80%, moderate 81%, mild 91%, normal 87%; 4-year shock free: severe 68%, moderate 73%, mild 76%, normal 76%) but no association with death, transplant, or ventricular assist device (P =0.1319). In a multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis adjusted for LV ejection fraction, LV end-diastolic diameter was associated with appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks (hazard ratio 1.22, P =0.020). LV end-diastolic diameter was associated with time to death, transplant, or ventricular assist device (hazard ratio 1.29, P =0.0009). Conclusions LV dilatation may complement

  1. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  2. Orbital implants: potential new directions.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Celia R; Morrison, David; Lou, Xia; Crawford, Geoffrey J; Gadjatsy, Adam; Constable, Ian J

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews orbital implants used to replace an eye after enucleation or evisceration. Advantages of implant placement are described, with discussion of implant and wrap material, and design features that affect clinical outcomes. Implants may be porous or nonporous, pegged for linkage with a cosmetic shell or unpegged, and may be wrapped with a covering material or tissue or unwrapped. Device shape, volume and material qualities affect tissue tolerance and the risk of exposure or extrusion. Limitations of currently available devices are discussed, with factors affecting surgeon and patient choice. Ideally, a device should be easy to insert, avoid the need for wrapping or adjunctive tissues, be light, biointegratable, comfortable after implantation and provide satisfactory orbital volume replacement, movement and cosmesis without requiring further surgery or pegging. This review briefly discusses developments in implant design and aspects of design that affect function, but is not a detailed clinical review; rather, it aims to stimulate thought on optimal design and discusses recent developments. Novel technology in the form of a prototype device with a soft, biointegratable anterior surface is described as an example of newer approaches.

  3. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  4. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  5. [Implant-associated infections - Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Renz, N; Müller, M; Perka, C; Trampuz, A

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of implant-associated infections is challenging as chronic low-grade infections often only manifest as subtle clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation, patient history, imaging, histopathological and microbiological examinations build the cornerstones of the diagnostics for implant-associated infections. New onset of pain at rest, local symptoms at the surgical site and early loosening of the prosthesis or pseudarthrosis should raise suspicion for an infection and prompt further evaluation. Percutaneous sinus tracts, purulent wound secretions and skin erosions with exposure of the implant are certain signs of implant-associated infections. Elevated C‑reactive protein levels in blood support the diagnosis of infection but are neither sufficient sensitive nor specific to confirm or exclude infection. Preoperative antibiotic therapy interferes with the diagnostic evaluation and should be avoided. In periprosthetic joint infections, joint aspiration with determination of the leukocyte count and microbiological examination is a crucial first diagnostic step. Through microbiological and histopathological examinations of intraoperative tissue samples, as well as sonication of explanted implants, the causative pathogen can be identified in most cases. In osteosynthesis-associated infections imaging plays a key role to detect non-union, infection callus, sequester, peri-implant osteolysis and extraosseous and intramedullary pathologies. In prosthetic joint infections imaging provides information about the position and stability of the prosthesis. In case of hematogenic infection seeding from a distant focus, blood cultures should be sampled, followed by a meticulous investigation of potential primary focus of infection, depending on the causative agent.

  6. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability. PMID:24403565

  7. [Implantable hemodynamic monitoring devices].

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Butter, C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is one of the most frequent diagnoses in hospital admissions in Germany. In the majority of these admissions acute decompensation of an already existing chronic heart failure is responsible. New mostly wireless and remote strategies for monitoring, titration, adaptation and optimization are the focus for improvement of the treatment of heart failure patients and the poor prognosis. The implantation of hemodynamic monitoring devices follows the hypothesis that significant changes in hemodynamic parameters occur before the occurrence of acute decompensation requiring readmission. Three different hemodynamic monitoring devices have so far been investigated in clinical trials employing right ventricular pressure, left atrial pressure and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. Only one of these systems, the CardioMENS™ HF monitoring system, demonstrated a significant reduction of hospitalization due to heart failure over 6 months in the CHAMPION trial. The systematic adaptation of medication in the CHAMPION trial significantly differed from the usual care of the control arm over 6 months. This direct day to day management of diuretics is currently under intensive investigation; however, further studies demonstrating a positive effect on mortality are needed before translation of this approach into guidelines. Without this evidence a further implementation of pressure monitoring into currently used devices and justification of the substantial technical and personnel demands are not warranted.

  8. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  9. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  10. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  11. Pediatric ICD Utilization in the United States from 1997-2006

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kristin M.; Evans, Frank; Kaltman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Background Indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation in children have expanded, yet pediatric population based data on ICD implantation are lacking. Objective We characterized trends in pediatric ICD use in the United States from 1997-2006. Methods We examined national hospital administrative data from the 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) for new ICD implants in patients younger than 18 years of age and characterized patients, hospitals, and hospitalization-related outcomes. Results The number of pediatric ICD implants per year increased three-fold (from 130 in 1997 to 396 in 2006, p= 0.003). Implants with a concomitant diagnosis of life-threatening arrhythmia decreased from 77% to 45% (p=0.001). The average age decreased from 13.6 to 12.2 years (p=0.01), and the percentage of patients younger than 5 years of age tended to increase (up to 10%, p=0.09). In 2006, the number of implants per center ranged from 1 to 24 (median= 3). Over time, the complication rate tended to decrease (from 16 to 10%, p=0.07). Complication rate was not related to a diagnosis of congenital heart disease, age, or implant volume. Conclusions ICD use increased dramatically in children from 1997 to 2006, although implantation declined in patients with a concomitant diagnosis of life-threatening arrhythmia (those likely to be implanted for secondary prevention). The complication rate tended to decrease overall. Each center implants relatively few ICDs per year, which may have implications for competency and training. PMID:20887811

  12. Biomechanical load analysis of cantilevered implant systems.

    PubMed

    Osier, J F

    1991-01-01

    Historically, dental implants have been placed in areas where quality bone exists. The maxillary sinus areas and mandibular canal proximities have been avoided. From these placements, various cantilevered prosthetic applications have emerged. This analysis uses static engineering principles to define the loads (i.e., forces) placed upon the implants. These principles make use of Newton's first and third laws of mechanics by summing the forces and moments to zero. These summations then generate mathematical equations and their algebraic solutions. Three implant systems are analyzed. The first is a two-implant system. The second is a three-implant cross-arch stabilized system usually found in mandibular replacements of lower full dentures. The third is a five-implant system which is identical to the three-implant cantilevered system but which uses implants in the first molar area, thereby negating the cantilevered load magnification of the three-implant design. These analyses demonstrate that, in a cantilevered application, the implant closest to the point of load application (usually the most posterior implant) takes the largest compressive load. Implants opposite the load application (generally the anterior implant) are in tension. These loads on the implants are normally magnified over the biting force and can easily reach 2 1/2 to five times the biting load.

  13. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  14. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications.

  15. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  16. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  17. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  18. Cochlear Implantation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank R.; Chien, Wade W.; Li, Lingsheng; Niparko, John K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should cochlear implantation (CI) be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12 year experience with cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores with a mean increase of 60. 0% (S. D. 24. 1) on HINT sentences in quiet . The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1. 3 percentage points less (95% CI: 0. 6 – 1. 9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40–60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10. 0 percentage points (95% CI: 0. 4 – 19. 6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT <40%) after adjusting for age at CI and age at hearing loss onset. These results suggest that older adult CI candidates who are younger at implantation and with higher preoperative speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after cochlear implantation with possible implications for current Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into

  19. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  20. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890