Science.gov

Sample records for devices mounting process

  1. Isolation Mounting for Charge-Coupled Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Salomon, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    CCD's suspended by wires under tension. Remote thermoelectric cooling of charge coupled device allows vibration isolating mounting of CCD assembly alone, without having to suspend entire mass and bulk of thermoelectric module. Mounting hardware simple and light. Developed for charge-coupled devices (CCD's) in infrared telescope support adaptable to sensors in variety of environments, e.g., sensors in nuclear reactors, engine exhausts and plasma chambers.

  2. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1994-09-13

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor of the transmission line has an aperture formed therein for receiving the device. The aperture splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material. One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the center conductor and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface. The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device. 10 figs.

  3. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device (50) in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor (52) of the transmission line has an aperture (58) formed therein for receiving the device (50). The aperture (58) splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface (54), which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material (56). One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device (50) is directly connected to the center conductor 52 and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface (54). The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage ( 60) formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device.

  4. Frame-mounted wire management device

    DOEpatents

    Grushkowitz, Tyler; Fischer, Kevin; Danning, Matthew

    2016-09-20

    A wire management device is disclosed. The device comprises a clip comprising an upper planar member and a lower planar member, each planar member having an inner and outer surface, wherein the inner surface of the upper planar member includes a post extending toward the inner surface of the lower planar member, a stem extending from the outer surface of the lower planar member, the stem including two outwardly-extending flanges, each of the first and second outwardly-extending flanges including an edge portion extending toward the outer surface of the lower planar member, and a transverse passage extending along the outer surface of the lower planar member, the transverse passage extending across the stem, wherein the stem has a recessed portion along the transverse passage.

  5. Direct mounted photovoltaic device with improved adhesion and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Boven, Michelle L; Keenihan, James R; Lickly, Stan; Brown, Jr., Claude; Cleereman, Robert J; Plum, Timothy C

    2014-12-23

    The present invention is premised upon a photovoltaic device suitable for directly mounting on a structure. The device includes an active portion including a photovoltaic cell assembly having a top surface portion that allows transmission of light energy to a photoactive portion of the photovoltaic device for conversion into electrical energy and a bottom surface having a bottom bonding zone; and an inactive portion immediately adjacent to and connected to the active portion, the inactive portion having a region for receiving a fastener to connect the device to the structure and having on a top surface, a top bonding zone; wherein one of the top and bottom bonding zones comprises a first bonding element and the other comprises a second bonding element, the second bonding element designed to interact with the first bonding element on a vertically overlapped adjacent photovoltaic device to bond the device to such adjacent device or to the structure.

  6. Fixture for mounting small parts for processing

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Larry R.; Gomez, Veronica M.; Thomas, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    A fixture for mounting small parts, such as fusion target spheres or microelectronic components. A glass stalk is drawn and truncated near its tip. The truncated end of the glass stalk is dipped into silicone rubber forming an extending streamer. After the rubber cures for approximately 24 hours, a small part is touched to the streamer, and will be held securely throughout processing.

  7. Fixture for mounting small parts for processing

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, L.R.; Gomez, V.M.; Thomas, M.H.

    1990-05-29

    A fixture for mounting small parts, such as fusion target spheres or microelectronic components is disclosed. A glass stalk is drawn and truncated near its tip. The truncated end of the glass stalk is dipped into silicone rubber forming an extending streamer. After the rubber cures for approximately 24 hours, a small part is touched to the streamer, and will be held securely throughout processing. 5 figs.

  8. Regenerative braking device with rotationally mounted energy storage means

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1982-03-16

    A regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (30) and an output shaft (32), clutches (50, 56) and brakes (52, 58) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. In a second embodiment the clutches and brakes are dispensed with and the variable ratio transmission is connected directly across the input and output shafts. In both embodiments the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft rotates faster or relative to the output shaft and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft rotates faster or relative to the input shaft.

  9. Hydrothermal processes at Mount Rainier, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Field studies and thermal-infrared mapping at Mount Rainier indicate areas of active hydrothermal alteration where excess surface heat flux is about 9 megawatts. Three representative settings include: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82/sup 0/C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit; (2) A small area (less than 500 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60/sup 0/C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver, and other probably similar areas at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls; (3) Sulfate and carbon dioxide enriched thermal springs at 9-24/sup 0/C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers where maximum spring temperatures are 19-25/sup 0/C, respectively, and where extensive travertine deposits have developed. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration products indicate that a narrow, central hydrothermal system exists within Mount Rainier forming steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 kilometers of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is limited in that only sparse, neutral sulfate-enriched thermal water issues from the lower flank of the cone. Simulations of geochemical mass transfer suggest that the thermal springs may be derived from an acid sulfate-chloride parent fluid which has been neutralized by reaction with andesite and highly diluted with shallow ground water.

  10. Electrical wiring box with structure for fast device mounting

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Earl S.

    1991-01-08

    An electrical wiring box of molded insulating material is provided with bosses having screw holes for receiving a mounting screw that include two colinear portions of which a first portion proximate the front surface has an internal configuration, such as molded threads, that engage the mounting screw while permitting the mounting screw to be manually inserted therethrough without turning because of flexibility built into the boss structure. A second portion of the screw hole is of greater restriction for securely engaging the screw such as by self tapping. The flexibility of the boss is provided by a first center slot that extends from the screw hole to the boss exterior over a length substantially equal to the first portion of the screw hole. Second and third slots are located respectively on each side of the screw hole and provide projections respectively between the first and second slots and the first and third slots that flex to allow easy screw insertion through the first portion of the screw hole.

  11. Direct mounted photovoltaic device with improved front clip

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R; Boven, Michelle; Brown, Jr., Claude; Gaston, Ryan S; Hus, Michael; Langmaid, Joe A; Lesniak, Mike

    2013-11-05

    The present invention is premised upon a photovoltaic assembly system for securing and/or aligning at least a plurality of vertically adjacent (overlapping) photovoltaic device assemblies to one another. The securing function being accomplished by a clip member that may be a separate component or integral to one or more of the photovoltaic device assemblies.

  12. Direct mounted photovoltaic device with improved side clip

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R; Boven, Michelle L; Brown, Jr., Claude; Eurich, Gerald K; Gaston, Ryan S; Hus, Michael

    2013-11-19

    The present invention is premised upon a photovoltaic assembly system for securing and/or aligning at least a plurality of vertically adjacent photovoltaic device assemblies to one another. The securing function being accomplished by a clip member that may be a separate component or integral to one or more of the photovoltaic device assemblies.

  13. Comparing two input devices for virtual walkthroughs using a Head Mounted Display (HMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Santos, Beatriz; Dias, Paulo; Santos, Paulo; Ferreira, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Selecting input and output devices to be used in virtual walkthroughs is an important issue as it may have significant impact in usability and comfort. This paper presents a user study meant to compare the usability of two input devices used for walkthroughs in a virtual environment with a Head-Mounted Display. User performance, satisfaction, ease of use and comfort, were compared with two different input devices: a two button mouse and a joystick from a gamepad. Participants also used a desktop to perform the same tasks in order to assess if the participant groups had similar profiles. The results obtained by 45 participants suggest that both input devices have a comparable usability in the used conditions and show that participants generally performed better with the desktop; a discussion of possible causes is presented.

  14. GaAs/GaAlAs device structures prepared by molecular beam epitaxy using indium-free mounting techniques

    SciTech Connect

    SpringThorpe, A.J.; Mandeville, P.

    1986-07-01

    A simple indium-free mount is described for the VG-Semicon V80-H MBE system. In conjunction with nonstandard substrate preparation techniques, the use of this mount has enabled GaAs/GaAlAs device structures to be prepared with consistently low (< or =200/cm/sup 2/) oval defect concentrations. Both 2DEG structures, with high 4 K mobilities, and GRINSCH lasers, with low thresholds, have been prepared to demonstrate the capabilities of the mounting procedures.

  15. Influence of Steering Control Devices Mounted in Cars for the Disabled on Passive Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiá, J.; Eixerés, B.; Dols, J. F.; Colomina, F. J.

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the influence of steering control devices for disabled people on passive safety. It is based on the advances made in the modelling and simulation of the driver position and in the suit verification test. The influence of these devices is studied through airbag deployment and/or its influence on driver safety. We characterize the different adaptations that are used in adapted cars that can be found mounted in vehicles in order to generating models that are verified by experimental test. A three dimensional design software package was used to develop the model. The simulations were generated using a dynamic simulation program employing LSDYNA finite elements. This program plots the geometry and assigns materials. The airbag is shaped, meshed and folded just as it is mounted in current vehicles. The thermodynamic model of expansion of gases is assigned and the contact interfaces are defined. Static tests were carried out on deployment of the airbag to contrast with and to validate the computational models and to measure the behaviour of the airbag when there are steering adaptations mounted in the vehicle.

  16. Wheelchair-mounted robotic arm to hold and move a communication device - final design.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Graham; Kurley, Kyle; Brauchie, Casey; Morton, Scott; Barrett, Steven

    2015-01-01

    At the 51st Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium we presented a preliminary design for a robotic arm to assist an individual living within an assistive technology smart home. The individual controls much of their environment with a Dynavox Maestro communication device. However, the device obstructs the individual’s line of site when navigating about the smart home. A robotic arm was developed to move the communication device in and out of the user’s field of view as desired. The robotic arm is controlled by a conveniently mounted jelly switch. The jelly switch sends control signals to a four state (up, off, down, off) single-axis robotic arm interfaced to a DC motor by high power electronic relays. This paper describes the system, control circuitry, and multiple safety features. The arm will be delivered for use later in 2015.

  17. In vivo evaluation of a novel, wrist-mounted arterial pressure sensing device versus the traditional hand-held tonometer.

    PubMed

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Saponas, T Scott; Morris, Dan; Villar, Nicolas; Smith, Greg; Patel, Shwetak; Tan, Desney

    2016-10-01

    Although hemodynamic parameters can be assessed non-invasively, state-of-the-art non-invasive systems generally require an expert operator and are not applicable for ambulatory measurements. These limitations have restricted our understanding of the continuous behavior of hemodynamic parameters. In this manuscript, we introduce a novel wrist-mounted device that incorporates an array of pressure sensors which can be used to extract arterial waveforms and relevant pulse wave analysis biomarkers. In vivo evaluation is performed with Bland-Altman analysis to compare the novel sensor to a gold-standard hand-held tonometer by assessing their reproducibility and agreement in peripheral augmentation index (AIx) estimation at the radial artery. Arterial waves from 28 randomly selected participants were recorded in a controlled environment. Initially we assess the reproducibility of AIx results for both devices. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and mean difference ± SD were [0.913, 0.033±0.048] and [0.859, 0.039±0.076] for the hand-held and the wrist-mounted tonometer respectively. We then show that the AIx values derived from the novel tonometer have good agreement, accuracy, and precision when compared against the AIx values derived from the reference hand-held tonometer (ICC 0.927, mean difference 0.026±0.049). In conclusion, we have presented evidence that the new wrist-mounted arterial pressure sensor records arterial waveforms that can be processed to yield AIx values that are in good agreement with its traditional hand-held counterpart.

  18. Adjustable mounting device for high-volume production of beam-shaping systems for high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Bernhardt, Henning; Rübenach, Olaf; Haverkamp, Tobias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Brecher, Christian

    2015-02-01

    In many applications for high-power diode lasers, the production of beam-shaping and homogenizing optical systems experience rising volumes and dynamical market demands. The automation of assembly processes on flexible and reconfigurable machines can contribute to a more responsive and scalable production. The paper presents a flexible mounting device designed for the challenging assembly of side-tab based optical systems. It provides design elements for precisely referencing and fixating two optical elements in a well-defined geometric relation. Side tabs are presented to the machine allowing the application of glue and a rotating mechanism allows the attachment to the optical elements. The device can be adjusted to fit different form factors and it can be used in high-volume assembly machines. The paper shows the utilization of the device for a collimation module consisting of a fast-axis and a slow-axis collimation lens. Results regarding the repeatability and process capability of bonding side tab assemblies as well as estimates from 3D simulation for overall performance indicators achieved such as cycle time and throughput will be discussed.

  19. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor); Cassanto, John M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microencapsulation and electrostatic processing (MEP) device is provided for forming microcapsules. In one embodiment, the device comprises a chamber having a filter which separates a first region in the chamber from a second region in the chamber. An aqueous solution is introduced into the first region through an inlet port, and a hydrocarbon/ polymer solution is introduced into the second region through another inlet port. The filter acts to stabilize the interface and suppress mixing between the two immiscible solutions as they are being introduced into their respective regions. After the solutions have been introduced and have become quiescent, the interface is gently separated from the filter. At this point, spontaneous formation of microcapsules at the interface may begin to occur, or some fluid motion may be provided to induce microcapsule formation. In any case, the fluid shear force at the interface is limited to less than 100 dynes/sq cm. This low-shear approach to microcapsule formation yields microcapsules with good sphericity and desirable size distribution. The MEP device is also capable of downstream processing of microcapsules, including rinsing, re-suspension in tertiary fluids, electrostatic deposition of ancillary coatings, and free-fluid electrophoretic separation of charged microcapsules.

  20. Eyetracked optical see-through head-mounted display as an AAC device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Hong; Hu, Xinda; Gao, Chunyu; Qin, Xiao

    2014-06-01

    An eye-tracked head-mounted display (ET-HMD) system is able to display virtual images as a classical headmounted display (HMD) does, while additionally tracking the gaze direction of the user. An HMD with fullyintegrated eyetracking capability offers multi-fold benefits, not only to fundamental scientific research but also to emerging applications of such technology. A key limitation of the state-of-the-art ET-HMD technology is the lack of compactness and portability. In this paper, we present an innovative design of a high resolution optical see-through ET-HMD system based on freeform optical technology. A prototype system is demonstrated, which offers a goggle-like compact form factor, non-obstructive see-through field of view, true high-definition image resolution for the virtual display, and better than 0.5 arc minute of angular resolution for the see-through view. We will demonstrate the application of the technology as an assistive and augmentative communication (AAC) device.

  1. Development of pulse laser processing for mounting fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Aikihko; Shimada, Yukihiro; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ishibashi, Hisayoshi

    2012-07-01

    Pulse laser processing has been developed for the application of industrial plants in monitoring and maintenance. Surface cleaning by nano-second laser ablation was demonstrated for decontamination of oxide layers of Cr contained steel. Direct writing by femtosecond processing induced a Bragg grating in optical fiber to make it a seismic sensor for structural health monitoring. Adhesive cement was used to fix the seismic sensor on the surface of reactor coolant pipe material. Pulse laser processing and its related technologies were presented to overcome the severe accidents of nuclear power plants.

  2. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.; Bender, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for "X" and "Y" tilts of the mirror only. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time.

  3. Optical processing for semiconductor device fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for semiconductor device processing is described that uses optical energy to produce local heating/melting in the vicinity of a preselected interface of the device. This process, called optical processing, invokes assistance of photons to enhance interface reactions such as diffusion and melting, as compared to the use of thermal heating alone. Optical processing is performed in a 'cold wall' furnace, and requires considerably lower energies than furnace or rapid thermal annealing. This technique can produce some device structures with unique properties that cannot be produced by conventional thermal processing. Some applications of optical processing involving semiconductor-metal interfaces are described.

  4. Magnetic core mounting system

    DOEpatents

    Ronning, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    A mounting apparatus for an electromagnetic device such as a transformer of inductor includes a generally planar metallic plate as a first heat sink, and a metallic mounting cup as a second heat sink. The mounting cup includes a cavity configured to receive the electromagnetic device, the cavity being defined by a base, and an axially-extending annular sidewall extending from the base to a flange portion of the mounting cup. The mounting cup includes first and second passages for allowing the leads of first and second windings of the electromagnetic device to be routed out of the cavity. The cavity is filled with a polyurethane potting resin, and the mounting cup, including the potted electromagnetic device, is mounted to the plate heat sink using fasteners. The mounting cup, which surrounds the electromagnetic device, in combination with the potting resin provides improved thermal transfer to the plate heat sink, as well as providing resistance to vibration and shocks.

  5. An externally head-mounted wireless neural recording device for laboratory animal research and possible human clinical use.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Li, Hao; Bull, Christopher; Borton, David A; Aceros, Juan; Larson, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of head-mounted wireless neural recording device in a highly compact package, dedicated for untethered laboratory animal research and designed for future mobile human clinical use. The device, which takes its input from an array of intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEA) has ninety-seven broadband parallel neural recording channels and was integrated on to two custom designed printed circuit boards. These house several low power, custom integrated circuits, including a preamplifier ASIC, a controller ASIC, plus two SAR ADCs, a 3-axis accelerometer, a 48MHz clock source, and a Manchester encoder. Another ultralow power RF chip supports an OOK transmitter with the center frequency tunable from 3GHz to 4GHz, mounted on a separate low loss dielectric board together with a 3V LDO, with output fed to a UWB chip antenna. The IC boards were interconnected and packaged in a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) enclosure which is compatible with both animal and human use (e.g. sterilizable). The entire system consumes 17mA from a 1.2Ahr 3.6V Li-SOCl2 1/2AA battery, which operates the device for more than 2 days. The overall system includes a custom RF receiver electronics which are designed to directly interface with any number of commercial (or custom) neural signal processors for multi-channel broadband neural recording. Bench-top measurements and in vivo testing of the device in rhesus macaques are presented to demonstrate the performance of the wireless neural interface.

  6. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.; Bender, D.A.

    1994-10-04

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for ''X'' and ''Y'' tilts of the mirror only is disclosed. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time. 4 figs.

  7. Flexible hybrid circuit fully inkjet-printed: Surface mount devices assembled by silver nanoparticles-based inkjet ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrese, J.; Vescio, G.; Xuriguera, E.; Medina-Rodriguez, B.; Cornet, A.; Cirera, A.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, inkjet-printed devices such as transistors are still unstable in air and have poor performances. Moreover, the present electronics applications require a high degree of reliability and quality of their properties. In order to accomplish these application requirements, hybrid electronics is fulfilled by combining the advantages of the printing technologies with the surface-mount technology. In this work, silver nanoparticle-based inkjet ink (AgNP ink) is used as a novel approach to connect surface-mount devices (SMDs) onto inkjet-printed pads, conducted by inkjet printing technology. Excellent quality AgNP ink-junctions are ensured with high resolution picoliter drop jetting at low temperature (˜150 °C). Electrical, mechanical, and morphological characterizations are carried out to assess the performance of the AgNP ink junction. Moreover, AgNP ink is compared with common benchmark materials (i.e., silver epoxy and solder). Electrical contact resistance characterization shows a similar performance between the AgNP ink and the usual ones. Mechanical characterization shows comparable shear strength for AgNP ink and silver epoxy, and both present higher adhesion than solder. Morphological inspections by field-emission scanning electron microscopy confirm a high quality interface of the silver nanoparticle interconnection. Finally, a flexible hybrid circuit on paper controlled by an Arduino board is manufactured, demonstrating the viability and scalability of the AgNP ink assembling technique.

  8. Design and User Evaluation of a Wheelchair Mounted Robotic Assisted Transfer Device

    PubMed Central

    Grindle, Garrett G.; Jeannis, Hervens; Teodorski, Emily; Cooper, Rory A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to describe the robotic assisted transfer device (RATD) and an initial focus group evaluation by end users. The purpose of the device is to aid in the transfers of people with disabilities to and from their electric powered wheelchair (EPW) onto other surfaces. The device can be used for both stand-pivot transfers and fully dependent transfers, where the person being transferred is in a sling and weight is fully on the robot. The RATD is fixed to an EPW to allow for its use in community settings. Method. A functional prototype of the RATD was designed and fabricated. The prototype was presented to a group of 16 end users and feedback on the device was obtained via a survey and group discussion. Results. Thirteen out of sixteen (83%) participants agreed that it was important to develop this type of technology. They also indicated that user, caregiver, and robotic controls were important features to be included in the device. Conclusions. Participants in this study suggested that they would be accepting the use of robotic technology for transfers and a majority did not feel that they would be embarrassed to use this technology. PMID:25793190

  9. 78 FR 12785 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason...

  10. Design and Implementation of Foot-Mounted Inertial Sensor Based Wearable Electronic Device for Game Play Application

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Lari, Zahra; Liu, Zhenbo; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Wearable electronic devices have experienced increasing development with the advances in the semiconductor industry and have received more attention during the last decades. This paper presents the development and implementation of a novel inertial sensor-based foot-mounted wearable electronic device for a brand new application: game playing. The main objective of the introduced system is to monitor and identify the human foot stepping direction in real time, and coordinate these motions to control the player operation in games. This proposed system extends the utilized field of currently available wearable devices and introduces a convenient and portable medium to perform exercise in a more compelling way in the near future. This paper provides an overview of the previously-developed system platforms, introduces the main idea behind this novel application, and describes the implemented human foot moving direction identification algorithm. Practical experiment results demonstrate that the proposed system is capable of recognizing five foot motions, jump, step left, step right, step forward, and step backward, and has achieved an over 97% accuracy performance for different users. The functionality of the system for real-time application has also been verified through the practical experiments. PMID:27775673

  11. Design and Implementation of Foot-Mounted Inertial Sensor Based Wearable Electronic Device for Game Play Application.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Lari, Zahra; Liu, Zhenbo; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-10-21

    Wearable electronic devices have experienced increasing development with the advances in the semiconductor industry and have received more attention during the last decades. This paper presents the development and implementation of a novel inertial sensor-based foot-mounted wearable electronic device for a brand new application: game playing. The main objective of the introduced system is to monitor and identify the human foot stepping direction in real time, and coordinate these motions to control the player operation in games. This proposed system extends the utilized field of currently available wearable devices and introduces a convenient and portable medium to perform exercise in a more compelling way in the near future. This paper provides an overview of the previously-developed system platforms, introduces the main idea behind this novel application, and describes the implemented human foot moving direction identification algorithm. Practical experiment results demonstrate that the proposed system is capable of recognizing five foot motions, jump, step left, step right, step forward, and step backward, and has achieved an over 97% accuracy performance for different users. The functionality of the system for real-time application has also been verified through the practical experiments.

  12. Production of A357 motor mount bracket by the metal compression forming process

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Brinkman, C.R.; Porter, W.D.; Purgert, R.M.

    1997-09-01

    The use of aluminum alloy castings for safety critical structural components such as engine mount brackets, steering knuckles, and control arms, offers significant opportunities for achieving weight reduction in automobiles, since they are typically about half the weight of the steel, cast iron, or ductile iron component that they replace. Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process. The paper describes the casting process development involved in the production of an aluminum A357 alloy motor mount bracket, including the use of a filling and solidification model to design the gating and determine process parameters. Tensile properties of the component are presented and correlated with those of forged components. Limited fatigue properties obtained by fully reversed strain controlled testing are also presented.

  13. A Device for Logic Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinskiy, L. S.; Vissonova, I. A.

    Two essential components of the information-logic problem are: (1) choosing some known part of the total information block for parallel review of the entire block and (2) parallel logic processing of a sequence of codes. The described device fulfills these essential components thereby improving information processing and increasing the speed of…

  14. Stability analysis of electrical powered wheelchair-mounted robotic-assisted transfer device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Jeannis, Hervens; Chung, Cheng-Shiu; Kelleher, Annmarie; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-01-01

    The ability of people with disabilities to live in their homes and communities with maximal independence often hinges, at least in part, on their ability to transfer or be transferred by an assistant. Because of limited resources and the expense of personal care, robotic transfer assistance devices will likely be in great demand. An easy-to-use system for assisting with transfers, attachable to electrical powered wheelchairs (EPWs) and readily transportable, could have a significant positive effect on the quality of life of people with disabilities. We investigated the stability of our newly developed Strong Arm, which is attached and integrated with an EPW to assist with transfers. The stability of the system was analyzed and verified by experiments applying different loads and using different system configurations. The model predicted the distributions of the system's center of mass very well compared with the experimental results. When real transfers were conducted with 50 and 75 kg loads and an 83.25 kg dummy, the current Strong Arm could transfer all weights safely without tip-over. Our modeling accurately predicts the stability of the system and is suitable for developing better control algorithms to enhance the safety of the device.

  15. Evaluation of Manufacturing Processes for Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura Jáuregui, Ana; Siller, Héctor R.; Rodriguez, Ciro A.; Elías-Zúñiga, Alex

    2009-11-01

    In this paper several micro-mechanical manufacturing technologies were studied in order to characterize their performance for making miniaturized geometries known as micro-channels, which are the main geometric features of micro-fluidic devices. The technologies used were Micro-End Milling, Wire Electro Discharge Machiningesol Sandblasting and Abrasive Water Jet. Their capabilities were compared with Lithography capabilities, which is the conventional process for micro-channel manufacturing. The evaluation consists in a comprehensive study of surface quality and topography, made with the help of advanced contact and non-contact devices over each prototype made by each technology. Also economical considerations have been taken into account in order to choose the most appropriate manufacturing process for the prototyping of micro-fluidic devices. The results show that Micro-End Milling process can compete with Lithography, in terms of achieving acceptable levels of product quality and economics.

  16. Compact device for cleaning scanner-mounted scanning tunneling microscope tips using electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, D.; Worbes, L.; Kittel, A.

    2011-08-01

    Most scanning probe techniques rely on the assumption that both sample and tip are free from adsorbates, residues, and oxide not deposited intentionally. Getting a clean sample surface can be readily accomplished by applying ion sputtering and subsequent annealing, whereas finding an adequate treatment for tips is much more complicated. The method of choice would effectively desorb undesired compounds without reducing the sharpness or the general geometry of the tip. Several devices which employ accelerated electrons to achieve this are described in the literature. To minimize both the effort to implement this technique in a UHV chamber and the overall duration of the cleaning procedure, we constructed a compact electron source fitted into a sample holder, which can be operated in a standard Omicron variable-temperature (VT)-STM while the tip stays in place. This way a maximum of compatibility with existing systems is achieved and short turnaround times are possible for tip cleaning.

  17. Semiconductors: In Situ Processing of Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The possible processing of semiconductor photovoltaic devices is discussed. The requirements for lunar PV cells is reviewed, and the key challenges involved in their manufacturing are investigated. A schematic diagram of a passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) is presented. The possible fabrication of large photovoltaic arrays in space from lunar materials is also discussed.

  18. An ultrasonic device for signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakov, S. V.; Leks, A. G.; Semenov, S. P.; Ulyanov, G. K.

    1985-11-01

    The invention concerns the field of radioengineering and can be used in analog processors of the signals of phased antenna arrays. There are familiar devices for processing the signals of phased antenna arrays. However these are large in size, structurally complicated, and contain expensive parts. In the proposed device, for the purpose of simplification and cheapening the design and reducing the dimensions, the counting system is in the form of a receiving acoustical array, the elements of which are hooked up to a television-type indicator.

  19. Processing and interpretation of microbarograph signals generated by the explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Delclos, C.; Blanc, E. ); Broche, P. ); Glangeaud, F.; Lacoume, J.L. )

    1990-04-20

    Following the eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano on May 18, 1980, atmospheric waves were recorded by a network of micrographs located over 7,000 km from the source. Analysis of these data requires the use of complex processing techniques based on a high-resolution method to extract the signals produced by the St. Helens source from spurious waves or noise in each record. This facilitates interpretation of the wave trains in terms of propagation modes. It is thus shown that Lamb mode L{sub 0} is present in the low-frequency part of all signals, whereas acoustic modes (more probably A{prime}{sub 2}) are needed to explain all the properties of the high-frequency part, which is clearly observed for a westward and a southward propagation.

  20. Seasonal geomorphic processes and rates of sand movement at Mount Baldy dune in Indiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilibarda, Zoran; Kilibarda, Vesna

    2016-12-01

    Winds are very strong, frequent, and have high energy (annual DP ∼800 VU) along the southern shores of Lake Michigan, allowing the coexistence of fixed and active dunes. Six years (2007-13) of monitoring Mount Baldy in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore reveals that this is the most active coastal dune in the Great Lakes region. This paper documents aeolian processes and changes in the dune's morphology that occur temporarily, following storms, or seasonally, due to weather (climate) variations. Most of the sand transport in this area takes place during strong storms with gale force (>17.5 m/s) winds, which occur in the autumn and winter months. A single storm, such as the October 28-31, 2013 event, can contribute 25% of the annual sand transport and dune movement inland. In its most active year (June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2012), Mount Baldy moved inland on average 4.34 m, with a maximum of 6.52 m along the blowout's axis (155° azimuth). During this particularly active season, there were six storms with sustained gale force winds, winter air temperatures were warmer than average, and shelf ice on Lake Michigan lasted only one day. The dune is least active during the summer season, when the winds are weakest. The late fall and winter winds are the strongest. But in a typical year, most of the dune's advance inland takes place during the spring thaw when sand is released from over-steepened and lumpy slip face, allowing it to avalanche to the toe of the slip face. However, with a warming air temperatures, a reduction in the duration of winter shelf ice, and rising Lake Michigan levels, the annual rates of sand transport and dune movement may increase. The recent Mount Baldy management strategy, which includes planting vegetation and installing wind barriers on the dune's stoss side in an effort to fix the dune and stop its further movement inland, may potentially cause the destruction of the mobile sand, open dune habitat, resulting in the extinction of rare

  1. 78 FR 24775 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... United States after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and...

  2. Research on Superconductive Signal-Processing Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    LABORATORY RESEARCH ON SUPERCONDUCTIVE SIGNAL-PROCESSING DEVICES ANNUAIL REPORT To THlE AIR FORCE OFF ICE O1P SCIENT [F[C RESEARCH ELE(;TRONICS ANI... J .,.-,.c.t n......... :.. u ll.. . . -1i1611tiC /.. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract iii 1.0 Introduction 1 2.0 Background 3 2.1 Summary of early program...desirable at the present time. 30 30 ............ j . . . ... .o.o. -....... ’’•."".-’,-.-.-............ -. . i 3.2.2 Extension of Time-Bandwidth

  3. 77 FR 58576 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and... importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers....usitc.gov . The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic...

  4. 77 FR 52759 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc... importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices,...

  5. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R. F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2004-10-05

    An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

  6. Advanced colour processing for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Eugen; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are going to play an important role in professionally image processing tasks. However, mobile systems were not designed for such applications, especially in terms of image processing requirements like stability and robustness. One major drawback is the automatic white balance, which comes with the devices. It is necessary for many applications, but of no use when applied to shiny surfaces. Such an issue appears when image acquisition takes place in differently coloured illuminations caused by different environments. This results in inhomogeneous appearances of the same subject. In our paper we show a new approach for handling the complex task of generating a low-noise and sharp image without spatial filtering. Our method is based on the fact that we analyze the spectral and saturation distribution of the channels. Furthermore, the RGB space is transformed into a more convenient space, a particular HSI space. We generate the greyscale image by a control procedure that takes into account the colour channels. This leads in an adaptive colour mixing model with reduced noise. The results of the optimized images are used to show how, e. g., image classification benefits from our colour adaptation approach.

  7. Solution-processable singlet fission photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Tabachnyk, Maxim; Bayliss, Sam L; Böhm, Marcus L; Broch, Katharina; Greenham, Neil C; Friend, Richard H; Ehrler, Bruno

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate the successful incorporation of a solution-processable singlet fission material, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), into photovoltaic devices. TIPS-pentacene rapidly converts high-energy singlet excitons into pairs of triplet excitons via singlet fission, potentially doubling the photocurrent from high-energy photons. Low-energy photons are captured by small-bandgap electron-accepting lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. This is the first solution-processable singlet fission system that performs with substantial efficiency with maximum power conversion efficiencies exceeding 4.8%, and external quantum efficiencies of up to 60% in the TIPS-pentacene absorption range. With PbSe nanocrystal of suitable bandgap, its internal quantum efficiency reaches 170 ± 30%.

  8. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and a device for simultaneously locking the post assembly and the key assembly in a fixed position.

  9. The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens - Physical and chemical processes in the stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.; Keesee, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The large and diverse set of observational data collected in the high-altitude plumes of the May 18, May 25, and June 13, 1980 eruptions is organized and analyzed with a view to discerning the processes at work. The data serve to guide and constrain detailed model simulations of the volcanic clouds. For this purpose, use is made of a comprehensive one-dimensional model of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, sulfur precursor gases, and volcanic ash and dust. The model takes into account gas-phase and condensed-phase (heterogeneous) chemistry in the clouds, aerosol nucleation and growth, and cloud expansion. Computational results are presented for the time histories of the gaseous species concentrations, aerosol size distributions, and ash burdens of the eruption clouds. Also investigated are the long-term buildup of stratospheric aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere and the persistent effects of injected chlorine and water vapor on stratospheric ozone. It is concluded that SO2, water vapor, and ash were probably the most important substances injected into the stratosphere by the Mount St. Helens volcano, both with respect to their widespread effects on composition and their effect on climate.

  10. Signal processing device to control microwave output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. G.

    1989-08-01

    The development of an electronic device to control the operation of a commercial microwave oven is discussed. This device when installed in conjunction with the existing circuitry of SHARP MICROWAVE OVEN (model R-9524) is capable of automatically advancing through a sequence of thawing recipes programmed and stored in the memory bank of the oven. The device therefore eliminates or minimizes human operator action needed in previous prototype version of a blood thawing device.

  11. Amphibole trace elements as indicators of magmatic processes at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, T. R.; Rowe, M. C.; Kent, A.; Thornber, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Amphibole has the capability of incorporating a wide variety of trace elements resulting from a range of magmatic processes. Prior studies have used trace elements such as Li and Cu in amphibole to investigate volatile mobility associated with magma ascent regarding the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Rowe et al. 2008). In order to investigate magmatic processes associated with the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens we have measured a range of fluid-mobile trace elements in conjunction with major element compositions of amphibole phenocrysts in dacite lava. Major elements and volatiles (Cl, F) were measured by electron microprobe analysis at Washington State University and trace elements (Li, Sc, Co, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, W, and Pb) were analyzed by laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS at Oregon State University. Amphibole crystallization temperatures were calculated after Ridolfi et al. (2010). Core to rim transects were measured by electron microprobe to evaluate volatile concentrations and temperature profiles across individual phenocrysts. Core temperatures from 17 days and 226 days post eruption are consistently hotter than the rim temperatures 997 to 881 degrees C, respectively. Amphiboles from the end of the eruption (811 days post eruption) appear to be more complex, with phenocrysts having both increasing and decreasing temperatures toward the rims. The overall calculated temperature range of the amphiboles at the end of the eruption is 1022 to 919 degrees C. There is much diversity in the concentrations of Li and Cu within the phenocrysts in both the samples and throughout the eruption. Concentrations steadily increase in the beginning of the eruption then drop dramatically toward the middle, slowly increase toward the end eruption. Overall concentrations of Sr, Sb, Co, Sn, Mo, Ba, Ce, Sc, and Y do not change over the course of the eruption but do vary sample to sample. Preliminary data for Zn, Sb, Ag, and W suggest the

  12. 77 FR 38826 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov . Hearing-impaired persons are..., portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of infringement...

  13. Open-path FTIR spectroscopy of magma degassing processes during eight lava fountains on Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Alessandro; Burton, Mike; Allard, Patrick; Alparone, Salvatore; Muré, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    In June-July 2001 a series of 16 discrete lava fountain paroxysms occurred at the Southeast summit crater (SEC) of Mount Etna, preceding a 28-day long violent flank eruption. Each paroxysm was preceded by lava effusion, growing seismic tremor and a crescendo of Strombolian explosive activity culminating into powerful lava fountaining up to 500 m in height. During 8 of these 16 events we could measure the chemical composition of the magmatic gas phase (H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl, HF and CO), using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometry at ∼1-2 km distance from SEC and absorption spectra of the radiation emitted by hot lava fragments. We show that each fountaining episode was characterized by increasingly CO2-rich gas release, with CO2/SO2 and CO2/HCl ratios peaking in coincidence with maxima in seismic tremor and fountain height, whilst the SO2/HCl ratio showed a weak inverse relationship with respect to eruption intensity. Moreover, peak values in both CO2/SO2 ratio and seismic tremor amplitude for each paroxysm were found to increase linearly in proportion with the repose interval (2-6 days) between lava fountains. These observations, together with a model of volatile degassing at Etna, support the following driving process. Prior to and during the June-July 2001 lava fountain sequence, the shallow (∼2 km) magma reservoir feeding SEC received an increasing influx of deeply derived carbon dioxide, likely promoted by the deep ascent of volatile-rich primitive basalt that produced the subsequent flank eruption. This CO2-rich gas supply led to gas accumulation and overpressure in SEC reservoir, generating a bubble foam layer whose periodical collapse powered the successive fountaining events. The anti-correlation between SO2/HCl and eruption intensity is best explained by enhanced syn-eruptive degassing of chlorine from finer particles produced during more intense magma fragmentation.

  14. Open-path FTIR spectroscopy of magma degassing processes during eight lava fountains on Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Alessandro; Burton, Mike; Allard, Patrick; Alparone, Salvatore; Murè, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    In June-July 2001 a series of 16 discrete lava fountain paroxysms occurred at the Southeast summit crater (SEC) of Mount Etna, preceding a 28-day long violent flank eruption. Each paroxysm was preceded by lava effusion, growing seismic tremor and a crescendo of Strombolian explosive activity culminating into powerful lava fountaining up to 500m in height. During 8 of these 16 events we could measure the chemical composition of the magmatic gas phase (H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl, HF and CO), using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometry at ˜1-2km distance from SEC and absorption spectra of the radiation emitted by hot lava fragments. We show that each fountaining episode was characterized by increasingly CO2-rich gas release, with CO2/SO2and CO2/HCl ratios peaking in coincidence with maxima in seismic tremor and fountain height, whilst the SO2/HCl ratio showed a weak inverse relationship with respect to eruption intensity. Moreover, peak values in both CO2/SO2ratio and seismic tremor amplitude for each paroxysm were found to increase linearly in proportion with the repose interval (2-6 days) between lava fountains. These observations, together with a model of volatile degassing at Etna, support the following driving process. Prior to and during the June-July 2001 lava fountain sequence, the shallow (˜2km) magma reservoir feeding SEC received an increasing influx of deeply derived carbon dioxide, likely promoted by the deep ascent of volatile-rich primitive basalt that produced the subsequent flank eruption. This CO2-rich gas supply led to gas accumulation and overpressure in SEC reservoir, generating a bubble foam layer whose periodical collapse powered the successive fountaining events. The anti-correlation between SO2/HCl and eruption intensity is best explained by enhanced syn-eruptive degassing of chlorine from finer particles produced during more intense magma fragmentation.

  15. Crystallization Processes and Magma Chamber Dynamics at the Mount Erebus Volcano Lava Lake: The Mineralogic Message

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Kyle, P. R.; Dunbar, N. W.

    2006-12-01

    Mount Erebus volcano, Antarctica, hosts a persistently convecting and degassing lake of crystal-rich (30-40 vol.% phenocrysts) phonolite magma, providing a direct view into an active, stable, upper-level magma chamber. Mineral phases in lava bombs ejected by small strombolian eruptions from the lava lake between 1972 and 2004 were examined. Detailed compositional profiles of Ti-magnetite and large (up to 10 cm) anorthoclase feldspar phenocrysts were obtained by electron microprobe (EMP). The EMP data provide insight into the controls on crystallization in the lava lake/shallow magmatic system as well as the processes occurring in the magma chamber. Ti-magnetite are uniform and unzoned. The anorthoclase are complexly compositionally zoned over a restricted range (An10.3-22.9Ab62.8-68.1Or11.4-27.2) and contain abundant melt inclusions (up to ~30 vol. %). Coupled, inverse variations of An and Or account for ~96% of major element compositional variability and independent Ab variations account for ~4%. The anorthoclase compositions and textures suggest crystallization proceeds at low degrees of effective undercooling and is controlled by decompression-induced degassing of water. Unlike microlites that form during a single episode of ascent and eruption, the anorthoclase phenocrysts record multiple episodes of decompression and rim growth due to shallow convection in the lava lake under variable PH2O conditions. Crystals contained within a single lava bomb do not have shared crystallization histories, suggesting that differential movement of crystals and melt occurs within the magma chamber and that lava bombs are a mechanical assembly of crystals brought together a short time before or during an eruption. Large temperature variations at the surface of the lava lake (~400°C) are not reflected in the crystal compositions. Apparently, the kinetics of mineral growth are too sluggish to record the transient cooling (estimated to be ~20 mins.) experienced by crystals at the

  16. Method and device for determining the position of a cutting tool relative to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-03

    The present invention is directed to a method and device for determining the location of a cutting tool with respect to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece. A vacuum cup supporting a machinable sacrificial pin is secured to the workpiece at a location where the pin will project along and encompass the rotational axis of the workpiece. The pin is then machined into a cylinder. The position of the surface of the cutting tool contacting the machine cylinder is spaced from the rotational axis of the workpiece a distance equal to the radius of the cylinder.

  17. Method and device for determining the position of a cutting tool relative to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method and device for determining the location of a cutting tool with respect to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece. A vacuum cup supporting a machinable sacrifical pin is secured to the workpiece at a location where the pin will project along and encompass the rotational axis of the workpiece. The pin is then machined into a cylinder. The position of the surface of the cutting tool contacting the machine cylinder is spaced from the rotational aixs of the workpiece a distance equal to the radius of the cylinder.

  18. Internal bone transport using a cannulated screw as a mounting device in the treatment of a post-infective ulnar defect.

    PubMed

    Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Havard, Heledd; Bijlsma, Paulien; Hill, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Bone transport techniques can be used to address the segmental bone loss occurring after debridement for infection. Secure fixation of the bone transport construct to the bone transport segment can be challenging, particularly if the bone is small and osteopenic. We report a case of a segmental ulnar bone defect in a young child treated with internal bone transport using a cannulated screw as the mounting device. We found this technique particularly useful in the treatment of bone loss secondary to infection, where previous treatment and prolonged immobilisation had led to osteopenia. This technique has not been previously reported.

  19. 77 FR 51571 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music... accessed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov , and will be available...

  20. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Paul G [Madison, WI; Lagally, Max G [Madison, WI; Ma, Zhenqiang [Middleton, WI; Yuan, Hao-Chih [Lakewood, CO; Wang, Guogong [Madison, WI; Eriksson, Mark A [Madison, WI

    2012-01-03

    This invention provides thin film devices that have been processed on their front- and backside. The devices include an active layer that is sufficiently thin to be mechanically flexible. Examples of the devices include back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  1. CIGS Material and Device Stability: A Processing Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.

    2012-03-01

    This is a general overview of CIGS material and device fundamentals. In the first part, the basic features of high efficiency CIGS absorbers and devices are described. In the second part, some examples of previous collaboration with Shell Solar CIGSS graded absorbers and devices are shown to illustrate how process information was used to correct deviations and improve the performance and stability.

  2. Membrane device and process for mass exchange, separation, and filtration

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L.

    2016-11-15

    A membrane device and processes for fabrication and for using are disclosed. The membrane device may include a number of porous metal membranes that provide a high membrane surface area per unit volume. The membrane device provides various operation modes that enhance throughput and selectivity for mass exchange, mass transfer, separation, and/or filtration applications between feed flow streams and permeate flow streams.

  3. 75 FR 68619 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing... certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and... certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers...

  4. Combustor mount

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, H.S.

    1986-07-01

    For a gas turbine engine, mounting means are described for attaching the annular burner to the engine case including a mount lug having a relatively flat surface extending from and secured to the annular burner, a mount pin attached to the engine case having one end extending through an opening in the flat surface of the mount lug, a bushing frictionally engaging the pin and extending through the opening, and having a flange surrounding the opening and bearing against one side of the flat surface, a washer fitted over the pin and bearing against the opposite side of the flat surface to sandwich with the flange the mount lug, and the bushing having an increased internal diameter portion adjacent the washer and weldment means securing the washer to the mount lug.

  5. Vibration isolation mounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Sam D. (Inventor); Bastin, Paul H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system is disclosed for mounting a vibration producing device onto a spacecraft structure and also for isolating the vibration forces thereof from the structure. The system includes a mount on which the device is securely mounted and inner and outer rings. The rings and mount are concentrically positioned. The system includes a base (secured to the structure) and a set of links which are interconnected by a set of torsion bars which allow and resist relative rotational movement therebetween. The set of links are also rotatably connected to a set of brackets which are rigidly connected to the outer ring. Damped leaf springs interconnect the inner and outer rings and the mount allow relative translational movement therebetween in X and Y directions. The links, brackets and base are interconnected and configured so that they allow and resist translational movement of the device in the Z direction so that in combination with the springs they provide absorption of vibrational energy produced by the device in all three dimensions while providing rotational stiffness about all three axes to prevent undesired rotational motions.

  6. Process for fabricating a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  7. Device research task (processing and high-efficiency solar cells)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This task has been expanded since the last 25th Project Integration Meeting (PIM) to include process research in addition to device research. The objective of this task is to assist the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project in meeting its near- and long-term goals by identifying and implementing research in the areas of device physics, device structures, measurement techniques, material-device interactions, and cell processing. The research efforts of this task are described and reflect the deversity of device research being conducted. All of the contracts being reported are either completed or near completion and culminate the device research efforts of the FSA Project. Optimazation methods and silicon solar cell numerical models, carrier transport and recombination parameters in heavily doped silicon, development and analysis of silicon solar cells of near 20% efficiency, and SiN sub x passivation of silicon surfaces are discussed.

  8. Processing device with self-scrubbing logic

    SciTech Connect

    Wojahn, Christopher K.

    2016-03-01

    An apparatus includes a processing unit including a configuration memory and self-scrubber logic coupled to read the configuration memory to detect compromised data stored in the configuration memory. The apparatus also includes a watchdog unit external to the processing unit and coupled to the self-scrubber logic to detect a failure in the self-scrubber logic. The watchdog unit is coupled to the processing unit to selectively reset the processing unit in response to detecting the failure in the self-scrubber logic. The apparatus also includes an external memory external to the processing unit and coupled to send configuration data to the configuration memory in response to a data feed signal outputted by the self-scrubber logic.

  9. Semiconductors: In Situ Processing of Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Current proposals for developing an extended human presence on the Moon and Mars increasingly consider the processing of nonterrestrial materials essential for keeping the Earth launch burden reasonable. Utilization of in situ resources for construction of lunar and Mars bases will initially require assessment of resource availability followed by the development of economically acceptable and technically feasible extraction processes. In regard to materials processing and fabrication, the lower gravity level on the Moon (0.125 g) and Mars (0.367 g) will dramatically change the presently accepted hierarchy of materials in terms of specific properties, a factor that must be understood and exploited. Furthermore, significant changes are expected in the behavior of liquid materials during processing. In casting, for example, mold filling and associated solidification processes have to be reevaluated. Finally, microstructural development, and therefore material properties, presently being documented through ongoing research in microgravity science and applications, need to be understood and scaled to the reduced gravity environments.

  10. 77 FR 65580 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and... Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov . Hearing-impaired persons are advised...

  11. 77 FR 28621 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International...

  12. New Functional Device using Bio Nano Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-20

    to fabricate new dye-sensitised solar cell , we proposed a new photoresponsive electrode structure using bio nano process. Titanium dioxide ( TiO2 ) has...Abstract] In order to fabricate new dye-sensitised solar cell , we proposed a new photoresponsive electrode structure using bio nano process...Carbon nanotube- TiO2 hybrid materials having multitudious nano-sclae cavities were realized using a bifunctional cage-shaped protein possessing

  13. Process for anodizing a robotic device

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, William T [Weston, MA

    2011-11-08

    A robotic device has a base and at least one finger having at least two links that are connected in series on rotary joints with at least two degrees of freedom. A brushless motor and an associated controller are located at each joint to produce a rotational movement of a link. Wires for electrical power and communication serially connect the controllers in a distributed control network. A network operating controller coordinates the operation of the network, including power distribution. At least one, but more typically two to five, wires interconnect all the controllers through one or more joints. Motor sensors and external world sensors monitor operating parameters of the robotic hand. The electrical signal output of the sensors can be input anywhere on the distributed control network. V-grooves on the robotic hand locate objects precisely and assist in gripping. The hand is sealed, immersible and has electrical connections through the rotary joints for anodizing in a single dunk without masking. In various forms, this intelligent, self-contained, dexterous hand, or combinations of such hands, can perform a wide variety of object gripping and manipulating tasks, as well as locomotion and combinations of locomotion and gripping.

  14. Preparatory and precursory processes leading up to the 2014 phreatic eruption of Mount Ontake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Aitaro; Terakawa, Toshiko; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed seismicity linked to the 2014 phreatic eruption of Mount Ontake, Japan, on 27 September 2014. We first relocated shallow volcano tectonic (VT) earthquakes and long-period (LP) events from August to September 2014. By applying a matched-filter technique to continuous waveforms using these relocated earthquakes, we detected numerous additional micro-earthquakes beneath the craters. The relocated VT earthquakes aligned on a near-vertical plane oriented NNW-SSE, suggesting they occurred around a conduit related to the intrusion of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids into the craters. The frequency of VT earthquakes gradually increased from 6 September 2014 and reached a peak on 11 September 2014. After the peak, seismicity levels remained elevated until the eruption. b-values gradually increased from 1.2 to 1.7 from 11 to 16 September 2014 then declined gradually and dropped to 0.8 just before the eruption. During the 10-min period immediately preceding the phreatic eruption, VT earthquakes migrated in the up-dip direction as well as laterally along the NNW-SSE feature. The migrating seismicity coincided with an accelerated increase of pre-eruptive tremor amplitude and with an anomalous tiltmeter signal that indicated summit upheaval. Therefore, the migrating seismicity suggests that the vertical conduit was filled with pressurized fluids, which rapidly propagated to the surface during the final 10 min before the eruption.

  15. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  16. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    A mirror mount (10) is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror (28) while keeping the location of a point (56) on the surface of the mirror (28) fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount (10). Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders (30,32) that are bearing (52) mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell (42) that is air bearing (72,74) mounted to move between a clamp (60) and an upper pedestal bearing (44). The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell (42) lie upon the point (56). Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror (28) by a pair of pitch paddles (34) and a pair of roll paddles (36) that are independently and separately moved by control rods (76,80) driven by motors (78,82).

  17. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1986-03-21

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors.

  18. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1987-11-10

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors. 5 figs.

  19. Lithography process for patterning HgI2 photonic devices

    DOEpatents

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Hermon, Haim

    2004-11-23

    A photolithographic process forms patterns on HgI.sub.2 surfaces and defines metal sublimation masks and electrodes to substantially improve device performance by increasing the realizable design space. Techniques for smoothing HgI.sub.2 surfaces and for producing trenches in HgI.sub.2 are provided. A sublimation process is described which produces etched-trench devices with enhanced electron-transport-only behavior.

  20. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Deyoreo, James J.; Vital, Russell L.

    1999-01-01

    A device for isolation of see crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin.

  1. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, K.E.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Deyoreo, J.J.; Vital, R.L.

    1999-05-18

    A device is described for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin. 3 figs.

  2. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  3. Device and method for shortening reactor process tubes

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, Charles E.; Alexander, William K.; Lander, Walter E. B.

    1980-01-01

    This disclosure describes a device and method for in situ shortening of nuclear reactor zirconium alloy process tubes which have grown as a result of radiation exposure. An upsetting technique is utilized which involves inductively heating a short band of a process tube with simultaneous application of an axial load sufficient to cause upsetting with an attendant decrease in length of the process tube.

  4. Flat, whole-mount nerve preparations: a useful tool for studying the process of regenerating axon outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Geinisman, Y; Shipley, M T

    1983-11-01

    A method, which is based on the use of flat, whole-mount nerve preparations, has been developed for studying the process of regenerating axon outgrowth, employing the rat sciatic nerve as a model. At various intervals after a nerve crush, animals are perfused with aldehyde fixatives, the nerve dissected out, and its epineurium removed. Next the nerve is flattened between two glass slides, removed and reacted (floating), then whole-mounted on a micro slide and cover-slipped. Regenerating axons have been labeled by means of the horseradish peroxidase tracing technique, a histochemical technique for acetylcholinesterase, or an indirect immunocytochemical technique utilizing antibodies against tubulin. With all these techniques, individual outgrowing axons and their bundles can be clearly visualized. Regenerating axons labeled by horseradish peroxidase are readily traced along their entire undulating courses from the distal margin of the crush zone to axonal tips, which mark the leading edge of several waves of outgrowing axons. It appears that such flat, whole-amount nerve preparations can be useful for obtaining: (1) accurate estimates of the rate of regenerating axon elongation, (2) values characterizing the duration of the initial delay of axonal outgrowth, and (3) information concerning the nature of axonal subpopulations that elongate at different rates.

  5. Observations of paraglacial processes on glacier forelands in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The large and extensively debris-covered valley glaciers in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park immediate east of the Main Divide in the Southern Alps of New Zealand experienced a substantial frontal retreat and vertical downwasting during the past few decades, often connected with the development of a proglacial lake and retreat by calving. Their Holocene glacier forelands are characterised by huge lateral moraines and multi-ridged lateral moraine systems alongside smaller terminal moraines and frontal outwash heads. Placed within a very dynamic general geomorphological regime of various efficient process-systems, these Holocene glacier forelands are currently affected by substantial paraglacial modification. These paraglacial processes have already caused some consequences for the touristic infrastructure in the area and are likely to cause further problems for the accessibility of established tramping routes, tourist huts, and lookouts in the near and medium future. One of the first steps in a project under development presented here is a detailed visual comparison of changes documented during the past 15 Years on the glacier forelands of Hooker, Mueller and Tasman Glaciers in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park. It reveals considerable erosion especially on the proximal slopes of the lateral moraines by gully development and retreat of erosion scars at their crest in order of several metres in just a few years. Different processes contribute to high erosion rates, among others rill erosion connected to mid-slope springs that only are temporarily active following substantial rainfall events, efficient gully incision, and slumping. Although any quantification of the actual erosion rates is just preliminary and further studies are necessary in order to make reliable predictions for future development, the amount of paraglacial erosion in this environment is very high compared to other regions and highlights the current importance of the paraglacial process-system in the

  6. A novel detachable head-mounted device for simultaneous EEG and photoacoustic monitoring of epilepsy in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-02-01

    The study of neuro-hemodynamic changes in freely moving animals provides for a better understanding of brain dynamics in normal and disease states. While it has been shown that hemodynamic changes are closely related to seizures, methods for detection in freely moving animals are limited. In this work, we integrate photoacoustic sensor technology and electroencephalography into a small portable device that can be attached on the head of wake freely moving animals. We demonstrate chronic simultaneous monitoring of photoacoustic and electroencephalographic signals in an acute seizure model of epilepsy. Our results demonstrate that both the neural and vascular responses during seizures in freely moving rats have characteristics which are observed to be different and more diverse from that of anesthetized rats. This implies that the neurovascular coupling in seizure in free moving animals are more complicated, which calls for more detailed study in future. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time for hemodynamic monitoring of seizure in free moving animals. This technology also promises for other hemodynamic related research study in freely moving small animals.

  7. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  8. NIF small mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T

    1999-07-01

    A number of small mirror mounts have been identified that meet the stringent stability, wave front, and cleanliness standards of the NIF. These requirements are similar to those required in other performance critical optical design applications. Future design teams would conserve time and effort if recognized standards were established for mirror mount design and performance characteristics. Standards for stability, physical features, wave front distortion, and cleanliness would simplify the qualification process considerably. At this point such standards are not difficult to define, as the technical support work has been performed repeatedly by mirror mount consumers and suppliers.

  9. Using the virtual reality device Oculus Rift for neuropsychological assessment of visual processing capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Rebecca M.; Poth, Christian H.; Behler, Christian; Botsch, Mario; Schneider, Werner X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychological assessment of human visual processing capabilities strongly depends on visual testing conditions including room lighting, stimuli, and viewing-distance. This limits standardization, threatens reliability, and prevents the assessment of core visual functions such as visual processing speed. Increasingly available virtual reality devices allow to address these problems. One such device is the portable, light-weight, and easy-to-use Oculus Rift. It is head-mounted and covers the entire visual field, thereby shielding and standardizing the visual stimulation. A fundamental prerequisite to use Oculus Rift for neuropsychological assessment is sufficient test-retest reliability. Here, we compare the test-retest reliabilities of Bundesen’s visual processing components (visual processing speed, threshold of conscious perception, capacity of visual working memory) as measured with Oculus Rift and a standard CRT computer screen. Our results show that Oculus Rift allows to measure the processing components as reliably as the standard CRT. This means that Oculus Rift is applicable for standardized and reliable assessment and diagnosis of elementary cognitive functions in laboratory and clinical settings. Oculus Rift thus provides the opportunity to compare visual processing components between individuals and institutions and to establish statistical norm distributions. PMID:27869220

  10. Using the virtual reality device Oculus Rift for neuropsychological assessment of visual processing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Rebecca M; Poth, Christian H; Behler, Christian; Botsch, Mario; Schneider, Werner X

    2016-11-21

    Neuropsychological assessment of human visual processing capabilities strongly depends on visual testing conditions including room lighting, stimuli, and viewing-distance. This limits standardization, threatens reliability, and prevents the assessment of core visual functions such as visual processing speed. Increasingly available virtual reality devices allow to address these problems. One such device is the portable, light-weight, and easy-to-use Oculus Rift. It is head-mounted and covers the entire visual field, thereby shielding and standardizing the visual stimulation. A fundamental prerequisite to use Oculus Rift for neuropsychological assessment is sufficient test-retest reliability. Here, we compare the test-retest reliabilities of Bundesen's visual processing components (visual processing speed, threshold of conscious perception, capacity of visual working memory) as measured with Oculus Rift and a standard CRT computer screen. Our results show that Oculus Rift allows to measure the processing components as reliably as the standard CRT. This means that Oculus Rift is applicable for standardized and reliable assessment and diagnosis of elementary cognitive functions in laboratory and clinical settings. Oculus Rift thus provides the opportunity to compare visual processing components between individuals and institutions and to establish statistical norm distributions.

  11. Functionalized graphene and other two-dimensional materials for photovoltaic devices: device design and processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhike; Lau, Shu Ping; Yan, Feng

    2015-08-07

    Graphene is the thinnest two-dimensional (2D) carbon material and has many advantages including high carrier mobilities and conductivity, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility and chemical stability, which make graphene an ideal material for various optoelectronic devices. The major applications of graphene in photovoltaic devices are for transparent electrodes and charge transport layers. Several other 2D materials have also shown advantages in charge transport and light absorption over traditional semiconductor materials used in photovoltaic devices. Great achievements in the applications of 2D materials in photovoltaic devices have been reported, yet numerous challenges still remain. For practical applications, the device performance should be further improved by optimizing the 2D material synthesis, film transfer, surface functionalization and chemical/physical doping processes. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in the applications of graphene and other 2D materials in various photovoltaic devices, including organic solar cells, Schottky junction solar cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, other inorganic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells, in terms of the functionalization techniques of the materials, the device design and the device performance. Finally, conclusions and an outlook for the future development of this field will be addressed.

  12. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  13. Organic light-emitting devices using spin-dependent processes

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2010-03-23

    The maximum luminous efficiency of organic light-emitting materials is increased through spin-dependent processing. The technique is applicable to all electro-luminescent processes in which light is produced by singlet exciton decay, and all devices which use such effects, including LEDs, super-radiant devices, amplified stimulated emission devices, lasers, other optical microcavity devices, electrically pumped optical amplifiers, and phosphorescence (Ph) based light emitting devices. In preferred embodiments, the emissive material is doped with an impurity, or otherwise modified, to increase the spin-lattice relaxation rate (i.e., decrease the spin-lattice time), and hence raise the efficiency of the device. The material may be a polymer, oligomer, small molecule, single crystal, molecular crystal, or fullerene. The impurity is preferably a magnetic or paramagnetic substance. The invention is applicable to IR, UV, and other electromagnetic radiation generation and is thus not limited to the visible region of the spectrum. The methods of the invention may also be combined with other techniques used to improve device performance.

  14. The development process for a new spacer device.

    PubMed

    Watson, Paul

    The British Thoracic Society and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network recommend that children up to the age of five should use a pressurised metered dose inhaler with a spacer device to deliver inhaled steroids. However, large-volume spacers can be cumbersome, which is why I designed a smaller, more portable device to encourage spacer use. After prototypes were made, the idea was presented to the local NHS innovations department. With its advice and assistance, a collapsible spacer device has been developed. This article describes the product development process.

  15. Processing of radio signals by acoustoelectronic and acoustooptic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakov, S. V.

    Particular papers are presented on radio-signal spectrum analyzers using SAW devices; the acoustic field of a fan-type converter of surface acoustic waves; the design of devices executing the Mellin transform on the basis of SAW components; the synchronization of complex signals by acoustoelectronic convolvers; panoramic acoustooptic receivers; and wideband acoustooptic devices base on integrated optics. Consideration is also given to an acoustooptic method for the coding and recognition of images; an integral-equation method for investigating light diffraction by ultrasound; acoustooptic signal processing devices based on diffused waveguides in lithium niobate; the effect of additive noise on the operation of a time-integrating acoustooptic correlator; and a high-resolution acoustooptic spectrum-analyzer. For individual items see A84-33477 to A84-33495

  16. Formal mechanization of device interactions with a process algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, E. Thomas; Levitt, Karl; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1992-01-01

    The principle emphasis is to develop a methodology to formally verify correct synchronization communication of devices in a composed hardware system. Previous system integration efforts have focused on vertical integration of one layer on top of another. This task examines 'horizontal' integration of peer devices. To formally reason about communication, we mechanize a process algebra in the Higher Order Logic (HOL) theorem proving system. Using this formalization we show how four types of device interactions can be represented and verified to behave as specified. The report also describes the specification of a system consisting of an AVM-1 microprocessor and a memory management unit which were verified in previous work. A proof of correct communication is presented, and the extensions to the system specification to add a direct memory device are discussed.

  17. Enabling customer self service through image processing on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliche, Ingmar; Hellmann, Sascha; Kreutel, Jörn

    2013-03-01

    Our paper will outline the results of a research project that employs image processing for the automatic diagnosis of technical devices whose internal state is communicated through visual displays. In particular, we developed a method for detecting exceptional states of retail wireless routers, analysing the state and blinking behaviour of the LEDs that make up most routers' user interface. The method was made configurable by means of abstracting away from a particular device's display properties, thus being able to analyse a whole range of different devices whose displays are covered by our abstraction. The method of analysis and its configuration mechanism were implemented as a native mobile application for the Android Platform. It employs the local camera of mobile devices for capturing a router's state, and uses overlaid visual hints for guiding the user toward that perspective from where an analysis is possible.

  18. Low power signal processing electronics for wearable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Custom designed microchips, known as Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), offer the lowest possible power consumption electronics. However, this comes at the cost of a longer, more complex and more costly design process compared to one using generic, off-the-shelf components. Nevertheless, their use is essential in future truly wearable medical devices that must operate for long periods of time from physically small, energy limited batteries. This presentation will demonstrate the state-of-the-art in ASIC technology for providing online signal processing for use in these wearable medical devices.

  19. Ultrafast phase-change logic device driven by melting processes.

    PubMed

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M; Wang, Wei-Jie; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Zhao, Rong; Chong, Tow-Chong; Elliott, Stephen R

    2014-09-16

    The ultrahigh demand for faster computers is currently tackled by traditional methods such as size scaling (for increasing the number of devices), but this is rapidly becoming almost impossible, due to physical and lithographic limitations. To boost the speed of computers without increasing the number of logic devices, one of the most feasible solutions is to increase the number of operations performed by a device, which is largely impossible to achieve using current silicon-based logic devices. Multiple operations in phase-change-based logic devices have been achieved using crystallization; however, they can achieve mostly speeds of several hundreds of nanoseconds. A difficulty also arises from the trade-off between the speed of crystallization and long-term stability of the amorphous phase. We here instead control the process of melting through premelting disordering effects, while maintaining the superior advantage of phase-change-based logic devices over silicon-based logic devices. A melting speed of just 900 ps was achieved to perform multiple Boolean algebraic operations (e.g., NOR and NOT). Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations and in situ electrical characterization revealed the origin (i.e., bond buckling of atoms) and kinetics (e.g., discontinuouslike behavior) of melting through premelting disordering, which were key to increasing the melting speeds. By a subtle investigation of the well-characterized phase-transition behavior, this simple method provides an elegant solution to boost significantly the speed of phase-change-based in-memory logic devices, thus paving the way for achieving computers that can perform computations approaching terahertz processing rates.

  20. Ultrafast phase-change logic device driven by melting processes

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Wang, Wei-Jie; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Zhao, Rong; Chong, Tow-Chong; Elliott, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The ultrahigh demand for faster computers is currently tackled by traditional methods such as size scaling (for increasing the number of devices), but this is rapidly becoming almost impossible, due to physical and lithographic limitations. To boost the speed of computers without increasing the number of logic devices, one of the most feasible solutions is to increase the number of operations performed by a device, which is largely impossible to achieve using current silicon-based logic devices. Multiple operations in phase-change–based logic devices have been achieved using crystallization; however, they can achieve mostly speeds of several hundreds of nanoseconds. A difficulty also arises from the trade-off between the speed of crystallization and long-term stability of the amorphous phase. We here instead control the process of melting through premelting disordering effects, while maintaining the superior advantage of phase-change–based logic devices over silicon-based logic devices. A melting speed of just 900 ps was achieved to perform multiple Boolean algebraic operations (e.g., NOR and NOT). Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations and in situ electrical characterization revealed the origin (i.e., bond buckling of atoms) and kinetics (e.g., discontinuouslike behavior) of melting through premelting disordering, which were key to increasing the melting speeds. By a subtle investigation of the well-characterized phase-transition behavior, this simple method provides an elegant solution to boost significantly the speed of phase-change–based in-memory logic devices, thus paving the way for achieving computers that can perform computations approaching terahertz processing rates. PMID:25197044

  1. Systems, Devices, and Materials for Digital Optical Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Mark Alan

    The massive parallelism and flexibility of three -dimensional optical communication may allow the development of new parallel computers free from the constraints of planar electronic technology. To bring the optical computer from possibility to reality, however, requires technological and scientific development in new optical systems, devices, and materials. We present here research results in each of these areas. First described is a prototype optical information processing system using CdS/liquid crystal spatial light modulators for optical logic and memory. This system has been developed as the first step in the implementation of a fine-grained, globally-interconnected optical processing element array. Notable system features include the implementation of programmable electronic control and the analysis of the optical power distribution within the processor, both directly applicable to the design of new and more advanced optical information processing systems. Next presented is the design and initial performance data for a new spatial light modulator combining an array of silicon phototransistors with the electro-optic material (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O _3, opening new possibilities for "intelligent" optical logic, memory, and switching devices. Important to the optimal performance of this Si/PLZT device is the fabrication of embedded electrodes in the electro-optic material, reducing the device operating voltage and switching energy while improving the uniformity of the optical modulation. An extensive computer model of embedded electrode performance and details of the electrode fabrication by reactive ion beam etching and electroless Ni deposition are presented. Finally, in the area of optical materials development we present initial results in the RF magnetron deposition of electro -optic PLZT on r-plane sapphire. This work is important to the fabrication of a monolithic, Si/PLZT-on-sapphire spatial light modulator, promising superior performance to devices using

  2. EMU helmet mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose (Inventor); Smith, Stephen (Inventor); Plough, Alan (Inventor); Clarke, Robert (Inventor); Mclean, William (Inventor); Fournier, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A helmet mounted display device is disclosed for projecting a display on a flat combiner surface located above the line of sight where the display is produced by two independent optical channels with independent LCD image generators. The display has a fully overlapped field of view on the combiner surface and the focus can be adjusted from a near field of four feet to infinity.

  3. A mechanized process algebra for verification of device synchronization protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, E. Thomas

    1992-01-01

    We describe the formalization of a process algebra based on CCS within the Higher Order Logic (HOL) theorem-proving system. The representation of four types of device interactions and a correctness proof of the communication between a microprocessor and MMU is presented.

  4. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  5. Process Orchestration With Modular Software Applications On Intelligent Field Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfgen, Marius; Schmitt, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    The method developed by the DFKI-IFS for extending the functionality of intelligent field devices through the use of reloadable software applications (so-called Apps) is to be further augmented with a methodology and communication concept for process orchestration. The concept allows individual Apps from different manufacturers to decentrally share information. This way of communicating forms the basis for the dynamic orchestration of Apps to complete processes, in that it allows the actions of one App (e.g. detecting a component part with a sensor App) to trigger reactions in other Apps (e.g. triggering the processing of that component part). A holistic methodology and its implementation as a configuration tool allows one to model the information flow between Apps, as well as automatically introduce it into physical production hardware via available interfaces provided by the Field Device Middleware. Consequently, configuring industrial facilities is made simpler, resulting in shorter changeover and shutdown times.

  6. A new data processing and calibration method for an eye-tracking device pronunciation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Jain, Young-Jou

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, a new data processing and calibration method for a pronunciation system of an eye-tracking device is described. The eye-tracking device was created using both head mounted display (HMD) technology and remote operation capabilities. A pattern recognition computer program was used to distinguish the pupil position and calculate its coordinates. This system can be adapted to provide a digital speech function. A new method for processing the image of the eye in the PC-based system was also developed. With one video CCD camera and frame grabber analyzing a series of human pupil images while the subject is gazing at the screen, an auto-calibration algorithm is used to obtain the direction of the eye gaze in real time. The computers provide the speech sound according to the location where the eye gazes exceed 0.5 s. The availability of multipurpose in this eye-tracking system with very simple equipment will be reconfirmed for future advanced research.

  7. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  8. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  9. Mobile Devices and GPU Parallelism in Ionospheric Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascharka, D.; Pankratius, V.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific data acquisition in the field is often constrained by data transfer backchannels to analysis environments. Geoscientists are therefore facing practical bottlenecks with increasing sensor density and variety. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, offer promising solutions to key problems in scientific data acquisition, pre-processing, and validation by providing advanced capabilities in the field. This is due to affordable network connectivity options and the increasing mobile computational power. This contribution exemplifies a scenario faced by scientists in the field and presents the "Mahali TEC Processing App" developed in the context of the NSF-funded Mahali project. Aimed at atmospheric science and the study of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC), this app is able to gather data from various dual-frequency GPS receivers. It demonstrates parsing of full-day RINEX files on mobile devices and on-the-fly computation of vertical TEC values based on satellite ephemeris models that are obtained from NASA. Our experiments show how parallel computing on the mobile device GPU enables fast processing and visualization of up to 2 million datapoints in real-time using OpenGL. GPS receiver bias is estimated through minimum TEC approximations that can be interactively adjusted by scientists in the graphical user interface. Scientists can also perform approximate computations for "quickviews" to reduce CPU processing time and memory consumption. In the final stage of our mobile processing pipeline, scientists can upload data to the cloud for further processing. Acknowledgements: The Mahali project (http://mahali.mit.edu) is funded by the NSF INSPIRE grant no. AGS-1343967 (PI: V. Pankratius). We would like to acknowledge our collaborators at Boston College, Virginia Tech, Johns Hopkins University, Colorado State University, as well as the support of UNAVCO for loans of dual-frequency GPS receivers for use in this project, and Intel for loans of

  10. Dual resolution, vacuum compatible optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John Michael [Tracy, CA

    2011-10-04

    An optical mount for an optical element includes a mounting plate, a lever arm pivot coupled to mounting plate, and an adjustment plate. The optical mount also includes a flexure pivot mechanically coupling the adjustment plate to the mounting plate and a lever arm. The optical mount further includes a first adjustment device extending from the adjustment plate to make contact with the lever arm at a first contact point. A projection of a line from the first contact point to a pivot point, measured along the lever arm, is a first predetermined distance. The optical mount additionally includes a second adjustment device extending from the adjustment plate to make contact with the lever arm at a second contact point. A projection of a line from the second contact point to the pivot point, measured along the lever arm, is a second predetermined distance greater than the first predetermined distance.

  11. An in-mold packaging process for plastic fluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Y E; Lee, K H; Je, T J; Choi, D S; Kim, S K

    2011-01-01

    Micro or nanofluidic devices have many channel shapes to deliver chemical solutions, body fluids or any fluids. The channels in these devices should be covered to prevent the fluids from overflowing or leaking. A typical method to fabricate an enclosed channel is to bond or weld a cover plate to a channel plate. This solid-to-solid bonding process, however, takes a considerable amount of time for mass production. In this study, a new process for molding a cover layer that can enclose open micro or nanochannels without solid-to-solid bonding is proposed and its feasibility is estimated. First, based on the design of a model microchannel, a brass microchannel master core was machined and a plastic microchannel platform was injection-molded. Using this molded platform, a series of experiments was performed for four process or mold design parameters. Some feasible conditions were successfully found to enclosed channels without filling the microchannels for the injection molding of a cover layer over the plastic microchannel platform. In addition, the bond strength and seal performance were estimated in a comparison with those done by conventional bonding or welding processes.

  12. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  13. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2016-07-05

    A method for fabricating an organic light emitting device stack involves depositing a first conductive electrode layer over a substrate; depositing a first set of one or more organic layers, wherein at least one of the first set of organic layers is a first emissive layer and one of the first set of organic layers is deposited by a solution-based process that utilizes a first solvent; depositing a first conductive interlayer by a dry deposition process; and depositing a second set of one or more organic layers, wherein at least one of the second set of organic layers is a second emissive layer and one of the second set of organic layers is deposited by a solution-based process that utilizes a second solvent, wherein all layers that precede the layer deposited using the second solvent are insoluble in the second solvent.

  14. Process for preparing liquid metal electrical contact device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.; Berkopec, F. D.; Culp, D. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The parts of an electrical contact device are treated by sputter etching to remove the parent metal oxide. Prior to exposure of the electrodes to any oxygen, a sacrificial metal is sputter deposited on the parts. Preferably this sacrificial metal is one that oxidizes slowly and is readily dissolved by the liquid metal. The sacrificial metal may then be removed from unwanted areas. The remainder of the ring and the probe to be wet by the liquid metal are submerged in the liquid metal or the liquid metal is flushed over these areas, preferably while they are being slightly abraded, unitl all the sacrificial material on these portions is wet by the liquid metal. In doing so the liquid metal dissolves the sacrificial metal and permanently wets the parent metal. Preferred materials used in the process and for the electrodes of electrical contact devices are high purity (99.0%) nickel or AISI type 304 stainless steel for the electrical contact devices, gallium as the liquid metal, and gold as the sacrificial material.

  15. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  16. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is discussed. The following subjects are also presented: (1) demonstration of the high sensitivity of the infrared response technique by the identification of gold in a germanium diode, (2) verification that transient thermal response is significantly more sensitive to the presence of voids in die attachment than steady-state thermal resistance, and (3) development of equipment for determining susceptibility of transistors to hot spot formation by the current-gain technique.

  17. Micro-inverter solar panel mounting

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, John; Gilchrist, Phillip Charles

    2016-02-02

    Processes, systems, devices, and articles of manufacture are provided. Each may include adapting micro-inverters initially configured for frame-mounting to mounting on a frameless solar panel. This securement may include using an adaptive clamp or several adaptive clamps secured to a micro-inverter or its components, and using compressive forces applied directly to the solar panel to secure the adaptive clamp and the components to the solar panel. The clamps can also include compressive spacers and safeties for managing the compressive forces exerted on the solar panels. Friction zones may also be used for managing slipping between the clamp and the solar panel during or after installation. Adjustments to the clamps may be carried out through various means and by changing the physical size of the clamps themselves.

  18. Process for mounting and packaging of fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for use in harsh environment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, Vincent P.; Mendez, Alexis; Ferguson, Steve; Graver, Tom

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a new bonding agent and method for the surface mounting of optical fiber Bragg grating strain and temperature sensors for use in harsh environments. The compound is based on a combination of ceramic fillers with an epoxy binder that is applied with a brush technique. Samples of optical fiber Bragg gratings were successfully encapsulated and mounted on metal shims. The packaged sensors were tested for strain (+/- 1000´ɛ) and temperature (-20 to +120 °C) response. The encapsulated sensors display a linear response with an increase in the temperature sensitivity of the FBG, with a factor of 24.37pm/°C, and a strain gauge factor of 1.25pm/μɛ.

  19. Solution processed integrated pixel element for an imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swathi, K.; Narayan, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the implementation of a solid state circuit/structure comprising of a high performing polymer field effect transistor (PFET) utilizing an oxide layer in conjunction with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as the dielectric and a bulk-heterostructure based organic photodiode as a CMOS-like pixel element for an imaging sensor. Practical usage of functional organic photon detectors requires on chip components for image capture and signal transfer as in the CMOS/CCD architecture rather than simple photodiode arrays in order to increase speed and sensitivity of the sensor. The availability of high performing PFETs with low operating voltage and photodiodes with high sensitivity provides the necessary prerequisite to implement a CMOS type image sensing device structure based on organic electronic devices. Solution processing routes in organic electronics offers relatively facile procedures to integrate these components, combined with unique features of large-area, form factor and multiple optical attributes. We utilize the inherent property of a binary mixture in a blend to phase-separate vertically and create a graded junction for effective photocurrent response. The implemented design enables photocharge generation along with on chip charge to voltage conversion with performance parameters comparable to traditional counterparts. Charge integration analysis for the passive pixel element using 2D TCAD simulations is also presented to evaluate the different processes that take place in the monolithic structure.

  20. Growing perovskite into polymers for easy-processable optoelectronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Sofia; Colella, Silvia; Listorti, Andrea; Roiati, Vittoria; Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Aurora; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we conceive an innovative nanocomposite to endow hybrid perovskites with the easy processability of polymers, providing a tool to control film quality and material crystallinity. We verify that the employed semiconducting polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), controls the self-assembly of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) crystalline domains and favors the deposition of a very smooth and homogenous layer in one straightforward step. This idea offers a new paradigm for the implementation of polymer/perovskite nanocomposites towards versatile optoelectronic devices combined with the feasibility of mass production. As a proof-of-concept we propose the application of such nanocomposite in polymer solar cell architecture, demonstrating a power conversion efficiency up to 3%, to date the highest reported for MEH-PPV. On-purpose designed polymers are expected to suit the nanocomposite properties for the integration in diverse optoelectronic devices via facile processing condition. PMID:25579988

  1. Growing perovskite into polymers for easy-processable optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, Sofia; Colella, Silvia; Listorti, Andrea; Roiati, Vittoria; Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Aurora; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we conceive an innovative nanocomposite to endow hybrid perovskites with the easy processability of polymers, providing a tool to control film quality and material crystallinity. We verify that the employed semiconducting polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), controls the self-assembly of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) crystalline domains and favors the deposition of a very smooth and homogenous layer in one straightforward step. This idea offers a new paradigm for the implementation of polymer/perovskite nanocomposites towards versatile optoelectronic devices combined with the feasibility of mass production. As a proof-of-concept we propose the application of such nanocomposite in polymer solar cell architecture, demonstrating a power conversion efficiency up to 3%, to date the highest reported for MEH-PPV. On-purpose designed polymers are expected to suit the nanocomposite properties for the integration in diverse optoelectronic devices via facile processing condition.

  2. Data processing device test apparatus and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Richard Jacob; Mulig, Jason D.; Eppes, David; Bruce, Michael R.; Bruce, Victoria J.; Ring, Rosalinda M.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Hawkins, Charles F.; Louie, Arnold Y.

    2003-04-08

    A method and apparatus mechanism for testing data processing devices are implemented. The test mechanism isolates critical paths by correlating a scanning microscope image with a selected speed path failure. A trigger signal having a preselected value is generated at the start of each pattern vector. The sweep of the scanning microscope is controlled by a computer, which also receives and processes the image signals returned from the microscope. The value of the trigger signal is correlated with a set of pattern lines being driven on the DUT. The trigger is either asserted or negated depending the detection of a pattern line failure and the particular line that failed. In response to the detection of the particular speed path failure being characterized, and the trigger signal, the control computer overlays a mask on the image of the device under test (DUT). The overlaid image provides a visual correlation of the failure with the structural elements of the DUT at the level of resolution of the microscope itself.

  3. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  4. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR.

  5. Investigations of semiconductor devices using SIMS; diffusion, contamination, process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Cheol; Won, Jeongyeon; Chung, Youngsu; Lee, Hyungik; Lee, Eunha; Kang, Donghun; Kim, Changjung; Choi, Jinhak; Kim, Jeomsik

    2008-12-01

    We have surveyed 22,155 analyses issues to know the portion of surface analysis at the total analyses activities. According to the survey result, the contribution of SIMS in the total analyses issues was about 7%. The portions of semiconductor process control, composition and contamination in the SIMS analyses issues are 25%, 29% and 16%, respectively. In this article, some examples of the semiconductor device process control, identification of contaminants, and failure analyses have been reviewed. The behavior of H, O, and Ti at the Pt/Ti/GaInZnO interfaces and their influences on the electrical property of thin film transistor are demonstrated. Also discolor issues including organic material contamination problem on Au pad are discussed in detail.

  6. Solution-Processable Silicon Phthalocyanines in Electroluminescent and Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Zysman-Colman, Eli; Ghosh, Sanjay S; Xie, Guohua; Varghese, Shinto; Chowdhury, Mithun; Sharma, Nidhi; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2016-04-13

    Phthalocyanines and their main group and metal complexes are important classes of organic semiconductor materials but are usually highly insoluble and so frequently need to be processed by vacuum deposition in devices. We report two highly soluble silicon phthalocyanine (SiPc) diester compounds and demonstrate their potential as organic semiconductor materials. Near-infrared (λ(EL) = 698-709 nm) solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated and exhibited external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of up to 1.4%. Binary bulk heterojunction solar cells employing P3HT or PTB7 as the donor and the SiPc as the acceptor provided power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 2.7% under simulated solar illumination. Our results show that soluble SiPcs are promising materials for organic electronics.

  7. Solution-Processable Silicon Phthalocyanines in Electroluminescent and Photovoltaic Devices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Phthalocyanines and their main group and metal complexes are important classes of organic semiconductor materials but are usually highly insoluble and so frequently need to be processed by vacuum deposition in devices. We report two highly soluble silicon phthalocyanine (SiPc) diester compounds and demonstrate their potential as organic semiconductor materials. Near-infrared (λEL = 698–709 nm) solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated and exhibited external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of up to 1.4%. Binary bulk heterojunction solar cells employing P3HT or PTB7 as the donor and the SiPc as the acceptor provided power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 2.7% under simulated solar illumination. Our results show that soluble SiPcs are promising materials for organic electronics. PMID:26990151

  8. Memory devices based on self-assembled materials and processes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-09-01

    Device fabrication based on top-down approach will reach its limit due to difficulties in patterning and processes below 10 nm node. The bottom-up approach using self-assembled materials and processes can be a viable candidate for further device scaling, but the fabrication processes are mostly not compatible with current device fabrication. In this presentation, device fabrication strategy for next-generation data-storage devices will be discussed in detail based on self-assembled materials and processes. The emphasis is placed on compatibility with current device fabrication strategies. Ordered array of various materials and systems based on bottom-up nanotechnology can be utilized as the charge storage layer for memory devices and the templates for nanoscale device fabrication. Novel device applications, for example, printed/flexible/transparent electronic devices, will be explored based on the self-assembly processes.

  9. A review of test results on parabolic dish solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Rankine engines and for production of process steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of development testing of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies. Most of the tests were at modules and assemblies that used a dish-mounted, organic Rankine cycle turbine for production of electric power. Some tests were also run on equipment for production of process steam or for production of electricity using dish-mounted reciprocating steam engines. These tests indicate that early modules achieve efficiencies of about 18 percent in converting sunlight to electricity (excluding the inverter but including parasitics). A number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other operating experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  10. Phase Change Heat Transfer Device for Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2010-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to approx.1300 K) and industrial scale power transport (=50MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a thermal device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization/condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e., without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) of vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  11. Mafic magmas from Mount Baker in the northern Cascade arc, Washington: probes into mantle and crustal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nicole E.; Debari, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Five mafic lava flows located on the southern flank of Mount Baker are among the most primitive in the volcanic field. A comprehensive dataset of whole rock and mineral chemistry reveals the diversity of these mafic lavas that come from distinct sources and have been variably affected by ascent through the crust. Disequilibrium textures present in all of the lavas indicate that crustal processes have affected the magmas. Despite this evidence, mantle source characteristics have been retained and three primitive endmember lava types are represented. These include (1) modified low-K tholeiitic basalt (LKOT-like), (2) typical calc-alkaline (CA) lavas, and (3) high-Mg basaltic andesite and andesite (HMBA and HMA). The Type 1 endmember, the basalt of Park Butte (49.3-50.3 wt% SiO2, Mg# 64-65), has major element chemistry similar to LKOT found elsewhere in the Cascades. Park Butte also has the lowest overall abundances of trace elements (with the exception of the HREE), indicating it is either derived from the most depleted mantle source or has undergone the largest degree of partial melting. The Type 2 endmember is represented by the basalts of Lake Shannon (50.7-52.6 wt% SiO2, Mg# 58-62) and Sulphur Creek (51.2-54.6 wt% SiO2, Mg# 56-57). These two lavas are comparable to calc-alkaline rocks found in arcs worldwide and have similar trace element patterns; however, they differ from each other in abundances of REE, indicating variation in degree of partial melting or fractionation. The Type 3 endmember is represented by the HMBA of Tarn Plateau (51.8-54.0 wt% SiO2, Mg# 68-70) and the HMA of Glacier Creek (58.3-58.7 wt% SiO2, Mg# 63-64). The strongly depleted HREE nature of these Type 3 units and their decreasing Mg# with increasing SiO2 suggests fractionation from a high-Mg basaltic parent derived from a source with residual garnet. Another basaltic andesite unit, Cathedral Crag (52.2-52.6 wt% SiO2, Mg# 55-58), is an Mg-poor differentiate of the Type 3 endmember. The calc

  12. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Antisocial Process Screening Device.

    PubMed

    Pechorro, Pedro; Hidalgo, Victoria; Nunes, Cristina; Jiménez, Lucía

    2016-12-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine the factor structure, internal consistency, and some additional psychometric properties of the Antisocial Process Screening Device-Self-Report (APSD-SR) among a large forensic sample of incarcerated male juvenile offenders ( N = 438). The results, based on this forensic sample, support the use of the APSD-SR in terms of its factor structure, and internal consistency despite the fact an item had to be removed from the callous-unemotional (CU) dimension. Statistically significant positive associations were found with measures of psychopathic traits, CU traits, narcissism, and aggression, as well as negative associations with a measure of empathy. Findings provide support for the use of the APSD-SR among the incarcerated male juvenile offender population.

  14. 40 CFR 63.139 - Process wastewater provisions-control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-control... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.139 Process wastewater provisions—control devices. (a) For each control device or combination of control devices used...

  15. 40 CFR 63.139 - Process wastewater provisions-control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-control... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.139 Process wastewater provisions—control devices. (a) For each control device or combination of control devices used...

  16. 40 CFR 63.139 - Process wastewater provisions-control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-control... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.139 Process wastewater provisions—control devices. (a) For each control device or combination of control devices used...

  17. Device Processing of II-VI Semiconductor Films and Quantum Well Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-07

    The objectives of this program is to develop a device processing technology necessary for proper utilization of Hg-based heterostructures and...superlattices in device applications. The specific focus or long term goal guiding the direction of the program is to develop the devices and processing ... technology required for an IR focal plane integrated with on-board signal processing electronics.

  18. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of a Hematite-bearing Ridge on Mauna Kea, Hawaii: A Potential Mineralogical Process Analog for the Mount Sharp Hematite Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Adams, M.; Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity landed in Gale Crater in August 2012 and is currently roving towards the layered central mound known as Mount Sharp [1]. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) hyperspectral data indicate Mount Sharp contains an 5 km stratigraphic sequence including Fe-Mg smectites, hematite, and hydrated sulfates in the lower layers separated by an unconformity from the overlying anhydrous strata [1,2,3]. Hematite was initially detected in CRISM data to occur in the lower sulfate layers on the north side of the mound [2]. [3] further mapped a distinct hematite detection occurring as part of a 200 m wide ridge that extends 6.5 km NE-SW, approximately parallel with the base of Mount Sharp. It is likely a target for in-situ analyses by Curiosity. We document here the occurrence of a stratum of hematite-bearing breccia that is exposed on the Puu Poliahu cinder cone near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano (Hawaii) (Fig.1). The stratum is more resistant to weathering than surrounding material, giving it the appearance of a ridge. The Mauna Kea hematite ridge is thus arguably a potential terrestrial mineralogical and process analog for the Gale Crater hematite ridge. We are acquiring a variety of chemical and mineralogical data on the Mauna Kea samples, with a focus on the chemical and mineralogical information already available or planned for the Gale hematite ridge.

  19. 21 CFR 801.150 - Medical devices; processing, labeling, or repacking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; processing, labeling, or... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Other Exemptions § 801.150 Medical devices... shipment or other delivery of a device which is, in accordance with the practice of the trade, to...

  20. 21 CFR 801.150 - Medical devices; processing, labeling, or repacking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; processing, labeling, or... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Other Exemptions § 801.150 Medical devices... shipment or other delivery of a device which is, in accordance with the practice of the trade, to...

  1. 21 CFR 801.150 - Medical devices; processing, labeling, or repacking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; processing, labeling, or... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Other Exemptions § 801.150 Medical devices... shipment or other delivery of a device which is, in accordance with the practice of the trade, to...

  2. Influence of material quality and process-induced defects on semiconductor device performance and yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Mckee, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of major causes of device yield degradation is presented. The relationships of device types to critical processes and typical defects are discussed, and the influence of the defect on device yield and performance is demonstrated. Various defect characterization techniques are described and applied. A correlation of device failure, defect type, and cause of defect is presented in tabular form with accompanying illustrations.

  3. Process for making photovoltaic devices and resultant product

    DOEpatents

    Foote, James B.; Kaake, Steven A. F.; Meyers, Peter V.; Nolan, James F.

    1993-09-28

    A process and apparatus (70) for making a large area photovoltaic device (22) that is capable of generating low cost electrical power. The apparatus (70) for performing the process includes an enclosure (126) providing a controlled environment in which an oven (156) is located. At least one and preferably a plurality of deposition stations (74,76,78) provide heated vapors of semiconductor material within the oven (156) for continuous elevated temperature deposition of semiconductor material on a sheet substrate (24) including a glass sheet (26) conveyed within the oven. The sheet substrate (24) is conveyed on a roller conveyor (184) within the oven (156) and the semiconductor material whose main layer (82) is cadmium telluride is deposited on an upwardly facing surface (28) of the substrate by each deposition station from a location within the oven above the roller conveyor. A cooling station (86) rapidly cools the substrate (24) after deposition of the semiconductor material thereon to strengthen the glass sheet of the substrate.

  4. Process for making photovoltaic devices and resultant product

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, James B.; Kaake, Steven A. F.; Meyers, Peter V.; Nolan, James F.

    1995-11-28

    A process and apparatus (70) for making a large area photovoltaic device (22) that is capable of generating low cost electrical power. The apparatus (70) for performing the process includes an enclosure (126) providing a controlled environment in which an oven (156) is located. At least one and preferably a plurality of deposition stations (74,76,78) provide heated vapors of semiconductor material within the oven (156) for continuous elevated temperature deposition of semiconductor material on a sheet substrate (24) including a glass sheet (26) conveyed within the oven. The sheet substrate (24) is conveyed on a roller conveyor (184) within the oven (156) and the semiconductor material whose main layer (82) is cadmium telluride is deposited on an upwardly facing surface (28) of the substrate by each deposition station from a location within the oven above the roller conveyor. A cooling station (86) rapidly cools the substrate (24) after deposition of the semiconductor material thereon to strengthen the glass sheet of the substrate.

  5. Process for making photovoltaic devices and resultant product

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, James B.; Kaake, Steven A. F.; Meyers, Peter V.; Nolan, James F.

    1996-07-16

    A process and apparatus (70) for making a large area photovoltaic device (22) that is capable of generating low cost electrical power. The apparatus (70) for performing the process includes an enclosure (126) providing a controlled environment in which an oven (156) is located. At least one and preferably a plurality of deposition stations (74,76,78) provide heated vapors of semiconductor material within the oven (156) for continuous elevated temperature deposition of semiconductor material on a sheet substrate (24) including a glass sheet (26) conveyed within the oven. The sheet substrate (24) is conveyed on a roller conveyor (184) within the oven (156) and the semiconductor material whose main layer (82) is cadmium telluride is deposited on an upwardly facing surface (28) of the substrate by each deposition station from a location within the oven above the roller conveyor. A cooling station (86) rapidly cools the substrate (24) after deposition of the semiconductor material thereon to strengthen the glass sheet of the substrate.

  6. Rates and processes of channel development and recovery following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Martinson, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Stream channel development in response to the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980, resulted in some of the largest sediment yields documented anywhere on earth. Development of new channels on the 2.7 km3 debris-avalanche deposit in the North Fork Toutle River caused net erosion of as much as 1.3 X 105 t km-2 annually. The principal effect of the blast on channels throughout the 550 km2 devastated area was the subsequent rapid delivery of sand- and silt-size sediment eroded from hillslopes. Since 1984, instability and sedimentation in lahar and blast-affected channels have been within the range of pre-1980 levels. -from Authors

  7. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1770 - Diagnostic x-ray tube mount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. 892.1770 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1770 Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube mount is a device intended to support and to position the diagnostic...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1770 - Diagnostic x-ray tube mount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. 892.1770 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1770 Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube mount is a device intended to support and to position the diagnostic...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1770 - Diagnostic x-ray tube mount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. 892.1770 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1770 Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube mount is a device intended to support and to position the diagnostic...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1770 - Diagnostic x-ray tube mount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. 892.1770 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1770 Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube mount is a device intended to support and to position the diagnostic...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1770 - Diagnostic x-ray tube mount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. 892.1770 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1770 Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube mount is a device intended to support and to position the diagnostic...

  13. Surface mount component jig

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  14. Frameless Stereotactic Insertion of Viewsite Brain Access System with Microscope-Mounted Tracking Device for Resection of Deep Brain Lesions: Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Lall, Rohan; Fanous, Andrew A; Boockvar, John; Langer, David J

    2017-01-01

    The surgical management of deep brain tumors is often challenging due to the limitations of stereotactic needle biopsies and the morbidity associated with transcortical approaches. We present a novel microscopic navigational technique utilizing the Viewsite Brain Access System (VBAS) (Vycor Medical, Boca Raton, FL, USA) for resection of a deep parietal periventricular high-grade glioma as well as another glioma and a cavernoma with no related morbidity. The approach utilized a navigational tracker mounted on a microscope, which was set to the desired trajectory and depth. It allowed gentle continuous insertion of the VBAS directly to a deep lesion under continuous microscopic visualization, increasing safety by obviating the need to look up from the microscope and thus avoiding loss of trajectory. This technique has broad value for the resection of a variety of deep brain lesions. PMID:28331774

  15. Multipass optical device and process for gas and analyte determination

    DOEpatents

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2011-01-25

    A torus multipass optical device and method are described that provide for trace level determination of gases and gas-phase analytes. The torus device includes an optical cavity defined by at least one ring mirror. The mirror delivers optical power in at least a radial and axial direction and propagates light in a multipass optical path of a predefined path length.

  16. Mount St. Helens Rebirth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    could be seen falling from the sky over the Great Plains, more than 1500 km distant. This image was acquired by Landsat 7 on Aug. 22, 1999. It was produced at 30-m resolution using bands 3, 2, and 1 to display red, green, and blue, respectively ('true color'). Some of the effects of the massive eruption on May 18, 1980, can still be seen clearly, especially on the northern and eastern flanks of Mount St. Helens, which are still mostly barren (shades of white and gray). The crater is in the center of the image. Note the streaking from the crater (gray on the image). These are the remnants of pyroclastic flows (superheated avalanches of gas, ash and pieces of rock) that carved deep channels down the slopes and onto the relatively flat areas near the base of the mountain. The partially-filled Spirit Lake can be seen just to the northeast of the crater (blue-black on the image), and the where most of the energy was directed during the blast is the gray area immediately to the northwest of the crater. However, on other parts of the mountain, the rejuvenation process is obvious. Ash deposits have supplied minerals which have accelerated vegetation growth (various shades of green). Though far from what it looked like 20 years ago, Mount St Helens is actively recovering. Data courtesy Landsat 7 project and EROS Data Center. Caption by James Foster, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  17. Device processing of wide bandgap semiconductors - challenges and directions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    The wide gap materials SiC, GaN and to a lesser extent diamond are attracting great interest for high power/high temperature electronics. There are a host of device processing challenges presented by these materials because of their physical and chemical stability, including difficulty in achieving stable, low contact resistances, especially for one conductivity type, absence of convenient wet etch recipes, generally slow dry etch rates, the high temperatures needed for implant activation, control of suitable gate dielectrics and the lack of cheap, large diameter conducting and semi-insulating substrates. The relatively deep ionization levels of some of the common dopants (Mg, in GaN; B, Al in SiC; P in diamond) means that carrier densities may be low at room temperature even if the impurity is electrically active - this problem will be reduced at elevated temperature, and thus contact resistances will be greatly improved provided the metallization is stable and reliable. Some recent work with CoSi{sub x} on SiC and W-alloys on GaN show promise for improved ohmic contacts. The issue of unintentional hydrogen passivation of dopants will also be covered - this leads to strong increases in resistivity of p-SiC and GaN, but to large decreases in resistivity of diamond. Recent work on development of wet etches has found recipes for AlN (KOH), while photochemical etching of SiC and GaN has been reported. In the latter cases p-type materials is not etched, which can be a major liability in some devices. The dry etch results obtained with various novel reactors, including ICP, ECR and LE4 will be compared - the high ion densities in the former techniques produce the highest etch rates for strongly-bonded materials, but can lead to preferential loss of N from the nitrides and therefore to a highly conducting surface. This is potentially a major problem for fabrication of dry etched, recessed gate FET structures.

  18. PV module mounting method and mounting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.S.; Johnson, Kurt M.

    2013-04-23

    A method for mounting PV modules to a deck includes selecting PV module layout pattern so that adjacent PV module edges are spaced apart. PV mounting and support assemblies are secured to the deck according to the layout pattern using fasteners extending into the deck. The PV modules are placed on the PV mounting and support assemblies. Retaining elements are located over and secured against the upper peripheral edge surfaces of the PV modules so to secure them to the deck with the peripheral edges of the PV modules spaced apart from the deck. In some examples a PV module mounting assembly, for use on a shingled deck, comprises flashing, a base mountable on the flashing, a deck-penetrating fastener engageable with the base and securable to the deck so to secure the flashing and the base to the shingled deck, and PV module mounting hardware securable to the base.

  19. Measurement and structural invariance of the antisocial process screening device.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lu; Wu, Hao; Waldman, Irwin D

    2014-06-01

    Despite increasing study of psychopathic traits in children and adolescents, evidence regarding the factor structure of these traits has been inconsistent across community, clinic-referred, and incarcerated samples. Empirical support exists for both 2-factor (Impulsivity-Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional) and 3-factor (Narcissism, Callous-Unemotional, and Impulsivity) models, and factorial invariance across various samples has not been either tested or supported in the extant literature. We conducted confirmatory factor analyses of the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001) in 838 nonreferred twin pairs (M = 10.57 years, SD = 3.19 years) and 251 clinic-referred children (M = 10.82 years, SD = 3.39 years). Factorial invariance was tested across zygosity (monozygotic vs. dizygotic twins), sex (males vs. females), and age (younger vs. older children, divided by median age of 10.37 years) in the community sample and across sample type in both the community and clinic-referred samples. Results suggested that the 3-factor model fit better than did the 2-factor model in both community and clinic-referred samples. Using the best fitting 3-factor model, full measurement and structural invariance were found across zygosity, sex, and age in the community sample. Full measurement and structural invariance were also found across sample type except for differences in factor means across samples, suggesting excellent psychometric properties of the APSD. These results strongly support the robustness of the 3-factor model of psychopathic traits in children as well as the generalizability of the APSD across samples.

  20. Quality management for the processing of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Klosz, Kerstin

    2008-09-03

    Rules on the reprocessing of medical devices were put into place in Germany in 2001. The present article explains the background situation and the provisions that are currently in force.The implementation of these statutory requirements is described using the example of the quality management system of Germany's market leader, Vanguard AG. This quality management system was successfully certified pursuant to DIN EN ISO 13485:2003 for the scope "reprocessing of medical devices", including class "critical C", in accordance with the recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) on the "Hygiene requirements for reprocessing of medical devices".

  1. Initial effects of the mount st. Helens eruption on nitrogen cycle and related chemical processes in ryan lake.

    PubMed

    Dahm, C N; Baross, J A; Ward, A K; Lilley, M D; Sedell, J R

    1983-05-01

    Ryan Lake, a 1.6-hectare basin lake near the periphery of the tree blowdown area in the blast zone 19 km north of Mount St. Helens, was studied from August to October 1980 to determine the microbial and chemical response of the lake to the eruption. Nutrient enrichment through the addition of fresh volcanic material and the organic debris from the surrounding conifer forest stimulated intense microbial activity. Concentrations of such nutrients as phosphorus, sulfur, manganese, iron, and dissolved organic carbon were markedly elevated. Nitrogen cycle activity was especially important to the lake ecosystem in regulating biogeochemical cycling owing to the limiting abundance of nitrogen compounds. Nitrogen fixation, both aerobic and anaerobic, was active from aerobic benthic and planktonic cyanobacteria with rates up to 210 nmol of N(2) cm h and 667 nmol of N(2) liter h, respectively, and from anaerobic bacteria with rates reaching 220 nmol of N(2) liter h. Nitrification was limited to the aerobic epilimnion and littoral zones where rates were 43 and 261 nmol of NO(2) liter day, respectively. Potential denitrification rates were as high as 30 mumol of N(2)O liter day in the anaerobic hypolimnion. Total bacterial numbers ranged from 1 x 10 to 3 x 10 ml with the number of viable sulfur-metal-oxidizing bacteria reaching 2 x 10 ml in the hypolimnion. A general scenario for the microbial cycling of nitrogen, carbon, sulfur, and metals is presented for volcanically impacted lakes. The important role of nitrogen as these lakes recover from the cataclysmic eruption and proceed back towards their prior status as oligotrophic alpine lakes is emphasized.

  2. Initial Effects of the Mount St. Helens Eruption on Nitrogen Cycle and Related Chemical Processes in Ryan Lake

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Clifford N.; Baross, John A.; Ward, Amelia K.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Sedell, James R.

    1983-01-01

    Ryan Lake, a 1.6-hectare basin lake near the periphery of the tree blowdown area in the blast zone 19 km north of Mount St. Helens, was studied from August to October 1980 to determine the microbial and chemical response of the lake to the eruption. Nutrient enrichment through the addition of fresh volcanic material and the organic debris from the surrounding conifer forest stimulated intense microbial activity. Concentrations of such nutrients as phosphorus, sulfur, manganese, iron, and dissolved organic carbon were markedly elevated. Nitrogen cycle activity was especially important to the lake ecosystem in regulating biogeochemical cycling owing to the limiting abundance of nitrogen compounds. Nitrogen fixation, both aerobic and anaerobic, was active from aerobic benthic and planktonic cyanobacteria with rates up to 210 nmol of N2 cm−1 h−1 and 667 nmol of N2 liter−1 h−1, respectively, and from anaerobic bacteria with rates reaching 220 nmol of N2 liter−1 h−1. Nitrification was limited to the aerobic epilimnion and littoral zones where rates were 43 and 261 nmol of NO2 liter−1 day−1, respectively. Potential denitrification rates were as high as 30 μmol of N2O liter−1 day−1 in the anaerobic hypolimnion. Total bacterial numbers ranged from 1 × 106 to 3 × 108 ml−1 with the number of viable sulfur-metal-oxidizing bacteria reaching 2 × 106 ml−1 in the hypolimnion. A general scenario for the microbial cycling of nitrogen, carbon, sulfur, and metals is presented for volcanically impacted lakes. The important role of nitrogen as these lakes recover from the cataclysmic eruption and proceed back towards their prior status as oligotrophic alpine lakes is emphasized. Images PMID:16346298

  3. 75 FR 10294 - Strengthening the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's 510(k) Review Process; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    .... FDA-2010-N-0054] Strengthening the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's 510(k) Review Process... with the 510(k) process. The agency is taking this action to allow interested persons additional time... related to the premarket notification (or 510(k)) process for the review of medical devices....

  4. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  5. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  6. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  7. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  8. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  9. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  10. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  11. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  12. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  13. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  14. Process for fabricating device structures for real-time process control of silicon doping

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon device structures designed to allow measurement of important doping process parameters immediately after the doping step has occurred. The test structures are processed through contact formation using standard semiconductor fabrication techniques. After the contacts have been formed, the structures are covered by an oxide layer and an aluminum layer. The aluminum layer is then patterned to expose the contact pads and selected regions of the silicon to be doped. Doping is then performed, and the whole structure is annealed with a pulsed excimer laser. But laser annealing, unlike standard annealing techniques, does not effect the aluminum contacts because the laser light is reflected by the aluminum. Once the annealing process is complete, the structures can be probed, using standard techniques, to ascertain data about the doping step. Analysis of the data can be used to determine probable yield reductions due to improper execution of the doping step and thus provide real-time feedback during integrated circuit fabrication.

  15. The Processing of High Temperature Ceramic Superconducting Devices. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-31

    vacuum packaging of HTS devices. I STI further recognized that there is an urgent need for these components. Based on experience from the infrared...develop "common modules" which are produced at low cost, reliable, industry standardized, flexible, and universally accepted for vacuum packaging cryogenically

  16. Germanium accumulation-mode charge-injection-device process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. G.

    1981-01-01

    Gallium doped germanium is suitable for applications in the detection of far infrared radiation. Measurements were made on experimental photoconductors (PCs), accumulation mode charge injection devices (AMCIDs), and the SSPC (a switched, sampled PC alternative to the AMCID). The results indicate that the SSPC, which had a responsivity near 1.5 amp/watt, is desirable for use in two dimensional detector arrays.

  17. Evaporant feed device facilitates flash vapor deposition process in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, W. A.; Stirn, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism using a helix sequentially feeds prescribed amounts of metal charges into an evaporation boat used for flash vapor deposition of the evaporants onto a substrate in a vacuum chamber. The helix is advanced by external manual controls extending through sealed feed- through devices into the chamber wall.

  18. Inplementation of an automated signal processing approach for the analysis of chemical spectral signatures collected from FT-IR mounted in an aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kroutil, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    The automated detection of chemical spectral signatures using a passive infrared Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer mounted in an aircraft is a difficult challenge due to the small total infrared energy contribution of a particular chemical species compared to the background signature. The detection of spectral signatures is complicated by the fact that a large, widely varying infrared background is present that is coupled with the presence of a number of chemical interferents in the atmosphere. This paper describes a mathematical technique that has been demonstrated to automatically detect specific chemical species in an automated processing environment. The data analysis methodology has been demonstrated to be effective using data of low spectral resolution at low aircraft altitudes. An overview of the implementation and basic concepts of the approach are presented.

  19. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N; Holland, Rodney H

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  20. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N; Holland, Rodney H

    2012-09-18

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  1. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Significant accomplishments include development of a procedure to correct for the substantial differences of transistor delay time as measured with different instruments or with the same instrument at different frequencies; association of infrared response spectra of poor quality germanium gamma ray detectors with spectra of detectors fabricated from portions of a good crystal that had been degraded in known ways; and confirmation of the excellent quality and cosmetic appearance of ultrasonic bonds made with aluminum ribbon wire. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon, development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  2. Signal processing applications of massively parallel charge domain computing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in a charge coupled device (CCD)/charge injection device (CID) architecture capable of performing a Fourier transform by simultaneous matrix vector multiplication (MVM) operations in respective plural CCD/CID arrays in parallel in O(1) steps. For example, in one embodiment, a first CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a first matrix operator based upon permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. A second CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a second matrix operator based upon different permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. The incoming vector is applied to the inputs of the two CCD/CID arrays simultaneously, and the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform are produced simultaneously in the time required to perform a single MVM operation in a CCD/CID array.

  3. 76 FR 54777 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance... Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance Process at 35 Years''; Public Meeting; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug... Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance Process at 35 Years.' '' The document...

  4. A Review of the Design Process for Implantable Orthopedic Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, G.A; Hukins, D.W.L; Parry, J.J; Shepherd, D.E.T; Trotman, S.G

    2009-01-01

    The design process for medical devices is highly regulated to ensure the safety of patients. This paper will present a review of the design process for implantable orthopedic medical devices. It will cover the main stages of feasibility, design reviews, design, design verification, manufacture, design validation, design transfer and design changes. PMID:19662153

  5. Process for attaching molecular wires and devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed towards processes for covalently attaching molecular wires and molecular electronic devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof. Such processes utilize diazonium chemistry to bring about this marriage of wire-like nanotubes with molecular wires and molecular electronic devices.

  6. 76 FR 11891 - Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations for thermally processed low-acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed containers to allow for use of other temperature- indicating devices, in addition to mercury-in-glass thermometers, during processing. This final rule also establishes recordkeeping requirements relating to temperature-indicating devices and reference......

  7. Investigation of Charge Coupled Devices for Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    capacitor biased into inversion range but neglecting the interface edge effect to be illustrated in Fig.5.5. . 31 5.4 Lumped equivalent circuit model...Complete and simplifed equivalent circuit models for n-type MOS capacitor in inversion with interface edge effect . (a) Two-dimensional model. (b), (c...device is biased into inversion and the interface edge effect is neglected, the equivalent circuit of Figure 3.1 can be 29 OXIDE 1 BULK SEMICONDUCTOR

  8. Guided-Wave Optic Devices for Integrated Optic Information Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-08

    integrating miniature optical components such as laser light sources, modulators, switches, deflectors , lenses, prisms, and detectors in a common substrate...ZnO composite waveguides, and 2 . Planar Guided-Wave Magneto- Optic Bragg Diffraction and Devices in YIG-GGG Waveguides. Some very significant progress... optical wavelength. We have recently obtained further theoretical results. ( 2 ) For example, as shown in Fig. l(a) and 1(b), the topographical

  9. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Associated Software; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution... processing systems, components thereof, and associated software by reason of infringement of certain claims... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software...

  10. 76 FR 81363 - Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically Sealed Containers; Correction AGENCY... (76 FR 11892). The final rule amended FDA's regulations for thermally processed low-acid...

  11. Mounting and Alignment of IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William; Evans, Tyler; McClelland, Ryan; Hong, Melinda; Mazzarella, James; Saha, Timo; Jalota, Lalit; Olsen, Lawrence; Byron, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    A suspension-mounting scheme is developed for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) mirror segments in which the figure of the mirror segment is preserved in each stage of mounting. The mirror, first fixed on a thermally compatible strongback, is subsequently transported, aligned and transferred onto its mirror housing. In this paper, we shall outline the requirement, approaches, and recent progress of the suspension mount processes.

  12. The Fixture Device of the Horizontal Machining Center for the Input Tray Part Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping

    The input tray part is key parts on the production of auto parts of the on the automatic line, this paper mainly studies on the horizontal machining center using the fixture device, the device to ensure the machining accuracy of the input tray part. Through the analysis of the positioning and clamping of the input tray part, design a clamp device, the device is applied in on the horizontal machining center, and on the basis of the fixture add auxiliary support device, in order to improve the input tray part rigidity and stability of processing.

  13. Direct coupled microwave thermal processing for photovoltaic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidici, D. C.

    A microwave thermal processing technology has been developed which reduces cycle time and energy requirements for solar cell manufacture through the direct coupling of a tuned microwave field to the material processed. The microwave processing is shown to be feasible for both junction formation and metallization sintering; cells produced have an efficiency of 8%. Diffusion throughput is satisfactory if multiple wafer processing (coin stacks) is used. Metallization sintering throughput is, however, limited by the single wafer process capability, and another form of applicator would be necessary to make microwave heating economically attractive for this process.

  14. Mount Holyoke College Reshapes Reengineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Madeline; Beretska, Sandra; Morrissey, Debra

    1999-01-01

    Reports on two reengineering projects at Mount Holyoke College (Massachusetts) that led participants to conclude that business process reengineering (BPR) in higher education involves a magnitude of cultural change that differentiates it significantly from BPR in the corporate world. The two projects involved redesigning a library department and…

  15. Orthopaedic Device Approval Through the Premarket Approval Process: A Financial Feasibility Analysis for a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Brian W; Iorio, Matthew L; Day, Charles S

    2017-03-15

    The 2 main routes of medical device approval through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are the premarket approval (PMA) process, which requires clinical trials, and the 510(k) premarket notification, which exempts devices from clinical trials if they are substantially equivalent to an existing device. Recently, there has been growing concern regarding the safety of devices approved through the 510(k) premarket notification. The PMA process decreases the potential for device recall; however, it is substantially more costly and time-consuming. Investors and medical device companies are only willing to invest in devices if they can expect to recoup their investment within a timeline of roughly 7 years. Our study utilizes financial modeling to assess the financial feasibility of approving various orthopaedic medical devices through the 510(k) and PMA processes. The expected time to recoup investment through the 510(k) process ranged from 0.585 years to 7.715 years, with an average time of 2.4 years; the expected time to recoup investment through the PMA route ranged from 2.9 years to 24.5 years, with an average time of 8.5 years. Six of the 13 orthopaedic device systems that we analyzed would require longer than our 7-year benchmark to recoup the investment costs of the PMA process. With the 510(k) premarket notification, only 1 device system would take longer than 7 years to recoup its investment costs. Although the 510(k) premarket notification has demonstrated safety concerns, broad requirements for PMA authorization may limit device innovation for less-prevalent orthopaedic conditions. As a result, new approval frameworks may be beneficial. Our report demonstrates how current regulatory policies can potentially influence orthopaedic device innovation.

  16. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage.

  17. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  18. Timescale of Petrogenetic Processes Recorded in the Mount Perkins Magma System, Northern Colorado River Extension Corridor, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa R.; Metcalf, Rodney V.; Miller, Calvin F.; Rhodes Gregory T.; Wooden, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Miocene Mt. Perkins Pluton is a small composite intrusive body emplaced in the shallow crust as four separate phases during the earliest stages of crustal extension. Phase 1 (oldest) consists of isotropic hornblende gabbro and a layered cumulate sequence. Phase 2 consists of quartz monzonite to quartz monzodiorite hosting mafic microgranitoid enclaves. Phase 3 is composed of quartz monzonite and is subdivided into mafic enclave-rich zones and enclave-free zones. Phase 4 consists of aphanitic dikes of mafic, intermediate and felsic compositions hosting mafic enclaves. Phases 2-4 enclaves record significant isotopic disequilibrium with surrounding granitoid host rocks, but collectively enclaves and host rocks form a cogenetic suite exhibiting systematic variations in Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes that correlate with major and trace elements. Phases 2-4 record multiple episodes of magma mingling among cogenetic hybrid magmas that formed via magma mixing and fractional crystallization at a deeper crustal. The mafic end-member was alkali basalt similar to nearby 6-4 Ma basalt with enriched OIB-like trace elements and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes. The felsic end-member was a subalkaline crustal-derived magma. Phase 1 isotropic gabbro exhibits elemental and isotopic compositional variations at relatively constant SiO2, suggesting generation of isotropic gabbro by an open-system process involving two mafic end-members. One end-member is similar in composition to the OIB-like mafic end-member for phases 2-4; the second is similar to nearby 11-8 Ma tholeiite basalt exhibiting low epsilon (sub Nd), and depleted incompatible trace elements. Phase 1 cumulates record in situ fractional crystallization of an OIB-like mafic magma with isotopic evidence of crustal contamination by partial melts generated in adjacent Proterozoic gneiss. The Mt Perkins pluton records a complex history in a lithospheric scale magma system involving two distinct mantle-derived mafic magmas and felsic magma sourced in the

  19. The stratigraphy, depositional processes, and environment of the late Pleistocene Polallie-period deposits at Mount Hood Volcano, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude

    2005-08-01

    The Polallie eruptive period of Mt. Hood, Oregon, is the last major episode of eruption and dome growth, before the late Holocene activity which was centered at Crater Rock. A volume of 4-8 km 3 of Polallie deposits forms an apron of ca. 60 km 2 on the east, northeast and southeast flanks. The Polallie deposits can be divided, stratigraphically, into four groups: Group I rockslide avalanche and pyroclastic-flow deposits; Group II debris-flow and pyroclastic-flow deposits that suggest some explosive activity and remobilization of pyroclastic debris in a glacial environment; Group III block-and-ash flow deposits that attest to summit dome growth; Group IV alternating debris-flow deposits, glacial sediments, and reworked pyroclastic-flow deposits that indicate a decrease in dome activity and an increase in erosion and transport. Group III clearly indicates frequent episodes of dome growth and collapse, whereas Groups II and IV imply increasing erosion and, conversely, decreasing volcanic activity. The Polallie period occurred in the late Pleistocene during and just after the last Alpine glaciation, which is named Evans Creek in the Cascade Range. According to four K-Ar age dates on lava flows interbedded with Polallie deposits and to published minimum 14C ages on tephra and soils overlying these deposits, the Polallie period had lasted 15,000-22,000 years between 28-34 ka and 12-13 ka. From stratigraphic subdivisions, sedimentary lithofacies and features and from the grain-size and geochemical data, we infer that the Polallie depositional record is a result of the interplay of several processes acting during a long-lasting period of dome growth and destruction. The growth of several domes near the present summit was intermittent, because each group of sediments encompasses primary (pyroclastic) and secondary (volcaniclastic and epiclastic) deposition. Direct deposition of primary material has occurred within intervals of erosion that have probably included meltwater

  20. Solution processed nickel oxide anodes for organic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Bestoon; Griffin, Jonathan; Alsulami, Abdullah S.; Lidzey, David G.; Buckley, Alastair R.

    2014-02-10

    Nickel oxide thin films have been prepared from a nickel acetylacetonate (Ni(acac)) precursor for use in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices. The conversion of Ni(acac) to NiO{sub x} has been investigated. Oxygen plasma treatment of the NiO layer after annealing at 400 °C affords solar cell efficiencies of 5.2%. Photoelectron spectroscopy shows that high temperature annealing converts the Ni(acac) to a reduced form of nickel oxide. Additional oxygen plasma treatment further oxidizes the surface layers and deepens the NiO work function from 4.7 eV for the annealed film, to 5.0 eV allowing for efficient hole extraction at the organic interface.

  1. Sensory processing and world modeling for an active ranging device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Tsai-Hong; Wu, Angela Y.

    1991-01-01

    In this project, we studied world modeling and sensory processing for laser range data. World Model data representation and operation were defined. Sensory processing algorithms for point processing and linear feature detection were designed and implemented. The interface between world modeling and sensory processing in the Servo and Primitive levels was investigated and implemented. In the primitive level, linear features detectors for edges were also implemented, analyzed and compared. The existing world model representations is surveyed. Also presented is the design and implementation of the Y-frame model, a hierarchical world model. The interfaces between the world model module and the sensory processing module are discussed as well as the linear feature detectors that were designed and implemented.

  2. Using electrochemistry in device processing on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.J.; Rye, R.R.; Ricco, A.J.; Rieger, D.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Sloan, L.R.; Mitchell, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    By combining electrochemical and electroless metal deposition processes with standard optical lithography and wet chemical etching, the authors have developed techniques for the fabrication of fine (<20 {mu}m), adherent, conducting features on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrates. These techniques are less expensive and have demonstrated resolution of at least a factor of five better than existing printed wiring board-based processes. Using these PTFE-based processes, the authors have fabricated {approximately} 10 GHz coupled-line quadrature (Lange) couplers, for which test results will be presented.

  3. Mount St. Augustine volcano fumarole wall rock alteration: Mineralogy, zoning, composition and numerical models of its formation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getahun, A.; Reed, M.H.; Symonds, R.

    1996-01-01

    ), sulfates (anhydrite) and halides (halite). The cooling calculations produce: (a) anhydrite, halite, sylvite; (b) Cu, Mo, Fe and Zn sulfides; (c) Mg fluoride at high temperature (> 370??C); (d) chlorides, fluorides and sulfates of Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu and Al at intermediate temperature (170-370??C); and (e) hydrated sulfates, liquid sulfur, crystalline sulfur, hydrated sulfuric acid and water at low temperature ( 0.41 (> 628??C). This is followed by precipitation of sulfates of Fe, Cu, Pb, Zn and Al at lg/a ratios between 0.41 and -0.4 (628-178??C). At a lg/r ratio of < - 0.4 (178??C), anhydrous sulfates are replaced by their hydrated forms and hygroscopic sulfuric acid forms. At these low g/a ratios, hydrated sulfuric acid becomes the dominant phase in the system. Comparison of the thermochemical modeling results with the natural samples suggests that the alteration assemblages include: (1) minerals that precipitate from direct cooling of the volcanic gas; (2) phases that form by volcanic gases mixing with air; and (3) phases that form by volcanic gas-air-rock reaction. A complex interplay of the three processes produces the observed mineral zoning. Another implication of the numerical simulation results is that most of the observed incrustation and sublimate minerals apparently formed below 700??C.

  4. FinFET Doping; Material Science, Metrology, and Process Modeling Studies for Optimized Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, R.; Shayesteh, M.

    2011-01-07

    In this review paper the challenges that face doping optimization in 3-dimensional (3D) thin-body silicon devices will be discussed, within the context of material science studies, metrology methodologies, process modeling insight, ultimately leading to optimized device performance. The focus will be on ion implantation at the method to introduce the dopants to the target material.

  5. 21 CFR 820.80 - Receiving, in-process, and finished device acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Receiving, in-process, and finished device acceptance. 820.80 Section 820.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Acceptance Activities § 820.80 Receiving,...

  6. Toward lightweight biometric signal processing for wearable devices.

    PubMed

    Francescon, Roberto; Hooshmand, Mohsen; Gadaleta, Matteo; Grisan, Enrico; Yoon, Seung Keun; Rossi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Wearable devices are becoming a natural and economic means to gather biometric data from end users. The massive amount of information that they will provide, unimaginable until a few years ago, owns an immense potential for applications such as continuous monitoring for personalized healthcare and use within fitness applications. Wearables are however heavily constrained in terms of amount of memory, transmission capability and energy reserve. This calls for dedicated, lightweight but still effective algorithms for data management. This paper is centered around lossy data compression techniques, whose aim is to minimize the amount of information that is to be stored on their onboard memory and subsequently transmitted over wireless interfaces. Specifically, we analyze selected compression techniques for biometric signals, quantifying their complexity (energy consumption) and compression performance. Hence, we propose a new class of codebook-based (CB) compression algorithms, designed to be energy efficient, online and amenable to any type of signal exhibiting recurrent patterns. Finally, the performance of the selected and the new algorithm is assessed, underlining the advantages offered by CB schemes in terms of memory savings and classification algorithms.

  7. Solution-processing of chalcogenide materials for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yunlai

    Chalcogenide glasses are well-known for their desirable optical properties, which have enabled many infrared applications in the fields of photonics, medicine, environmental sensing and security. Conventional deposition methods such as thermal evaporation, chemical vapor deposition, sputtering or pulse laser deposition are efficient for fabricating structures on flat surfaces. However, they have limitations in deposition on curved surfaces, deposition of thick layers and component integration. In these cases, solution-based methods, which involve the dissolution of chalcogenide glasses and processing as a liquid, become a better choice for their flexibility. After proper treatment, the associated structures can have similar optical, chemical and physical properties to the bulk. This thesis presents an in-depth study of solution-processing chalcogenide glasses, starting from the "solution state" to the "film state" and the "structure state". Firstly, chalcogenide dissolution is studied to reveal the mechanisms at molecular level and build a foundation for material processing. Dissolution processes for various chalcogenide solvent pairs are reviewed and compared. Secondly, thermal processing, in the context of high temperature annealing, is explained along with the chemical and physical properties of the annealed films. Another focus is on nanopore formation in propylamine-processed arsenic sulfide films. Pore density changes with respect to annealing temperatures and durations are characterized. Base on a proposed vacancy coalescence theory, we have identified new dissolution strategies and achieved the breakthrough of pore-free film deposition. Thirdly, several solution methods developed along with the associated photonic structures are demonstrated. The first example is "spin-coating and lamination", which produces thick (over 10 mum) chalcogenide structures. Both homogeneous thick chalcogenide structures and heterogeneous layers of different chalcogenide glasses

  8. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1983-11-04

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and means for simultaneously locking said post assembly and said key assembly in a fixed position.

  9. Spherical mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Jay L. (Inventor); Messick, Glenn C. (Inventor); Nardell, Carl A. (Inventor); Hendlin, Martin J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A spherical mounting assembly for mounting an optical element allows for rotational motion of an optical surface of the optical element only. In that regard, an optical surface of the optical element does not translate in any of the three perpendicular translational axes. More importantly, the assembly provides adjustment that may be independently controlled for each of the three mutually perpendicular rotational axes.

  10. Instructions included? Make safety training part of medical device procurement process.

    PubMed

    Keller, James P

    2010-04-01

    Before hospitals embrace new technologies, it's important that medical personnel agree on how best to use them. Likewise, hospitals must provide the support to operate these sophisticated devices safely. With this in mind, it's wise for hospitals to include medical device training in the procurement process. Moreover, purchasing professionals can play a key role in helping to increase the amount of user training for medical devices and systems. What steps should you take to help ensure that new medical devices are implemented safely? Here are some tips.

  11. Heck coupling of haloaromatics with octavinylsilsesquioxane: solution processable nanocomposites for application in electroluminescent devices.

    PubMed

    Sellinger, Alan; Tamaki, Ryo; Laine, Richard M; Ueno, Kazunori; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Williams, Evan; Jabbour, Ghassan E

    2005-08-07

    A new solution processable nanocomposite material has been prepared via the Heck coupling of octavinylsilsesquioxane with a selected bromoaromatic hole transport compound. Resultant electroluminescent devices show an 18% improvement in external quantum efficiencies over their small molecule analogues.

  12. Electronic Devices With Diffusion Barrier and Process for Making Same

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-03

    under ultrahigh vacuum conditions of less than 10"u Torr chamber background pressure , and then the metal halide vapor is discontinued while the coated...such as damascene patterning, in lieu of subtractive processing. 5 Among the barrier materials under development within the semiconductor industry...then is resumed under the ultra high vacuum conditions so that a single crystal homoepitaxial film portion of the barrier material, which is formed of

  13. Electronic Devices with Diffusion Barrier and Process for Making Same

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-09

    processing. 5 Among the barrier materials under development within the semiconductor industry, nitrides or silico-nitrides of the transition metals...metal halide upon a clean, hot surface of a semiconducting substrate material under ultrahigh vacuum conditions of less than 10~n Torr chamber...background pressure , and then the metal halide vapor is discontinued while the coated substrate is heated for a time period such that the metal 15

  14. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    U AD-A274 325 Semiannual Technical Report U Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and Their... Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin 414v001---01 Films, Devices and Their Characterization 1114SS S. AUTHOS) N00179 Robert F. Davis, Salah... Conformal deposition of SiC has been demonstrated within trenches etched into Si(100) wafers. P-type films have also been achieved using Al as a

  15. Highly sensitive devices for primary signal processing of the micromechanical capacitive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, B.; Ryndin, E.; Lysenko, I.; Denisenko, M.; Isaeva, A.

    2016-12-01

    A method of signal processing devices design for micromechanical accelerometers with capacitive transducers is proposed. This method provides the complex solution of the sensibility increasing and noise immunity problems by finding of the difference frequency of signals, which are formed by two identical generators with micromechanical capacitive transducers in frequency control circuits. In this study the analog and digital versions of the highly sensitive signal processing devices circuits with frequency output were developed. The breadboards of these devices are fabricated and studied and the project of their integral realization is designed.

  16. Advanced Silicon Microring Resonator Devices for Optical Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Ashok Prabhu

    Chip level optical interconnects has gained momentum with recent demonstrations of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based photonic modules such as lasers, modulators, wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) filters, etc. A fundamental building block that has enabled many of these silicon photonic modules is the compact, high Q factor microring resonator cavity. However, most of these demonstrations have WDM processing components based on simple add-drop filters that cannot realize the dense WDM systems required for the chip level interconnects. Dense WDM filters have stringent spectral shape requirements such as flat-top filter passband, steep band transition etc. Optical filters that can meet these specifications involve precise placement of the poles and zeros of the filter transfer function. Realization of such filters requires the use of multiple coupled microring resonators arranged in complex coupling topologies. In this thesis we have proposed and demonstrated new multiple coupled resonator topologies based on compact microring resonators in SOI material system. First we explored novel microring architectures which resulted in the proposal of two new coupled microring architectures, namely, the general 2D microring array topology and the general cascaded microring network topology. We also developed the synthesis procedures for these two microring architectures. The second part of this thesis focussed on the demonstration of the proposed architectures in the SOI material system. To accomplish this, a fabrication process for SOI was developed at the UofA Nanofab facility. Using this process, ultra-compact single microring filters with microring radii as small as 1mum were demonstrated. Higher order filter demonstration with multiple microrings necessitated post-fabrication microring resonance tuning. We developed additional fabrication steps to install micro heaters on top of the microrings to thermally tune its resonance. Subsequently, a thermally tuned fourth

  17. High-speed optical processing using digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Walker, Brian; Reyes, George

    2014-04-01

    We have designed optical processing architecture and algorithms utilizing the DMD as the input and filter Spatial Light Modulators (SLM). Detailed system analysis will be depicted. Experimental demonstration, for the first time, showing that a complex-valued spatial filtered can be successfully written on the DMDSLM using a Computer Generated Hologram (CGH) [1] encoding technique will also be provided. The high-resolution, high-bandwidth provided by the DMD and its potential low cost due to mass production will enable its vast defense and civil application.

  18. Electronic Devices with Barrier Film and Process for Making Same

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-20

    technique 20 must be developed that will prevent the diffusion of copper into silicon. Among the possible solutions currently under development...processing tool. The pressure within the deposition chamber 30 should be 10Ŝ mbar or less, more -15- preferably 10ŝ mbar or less, and still more...as a precursor in forming the diffusion barrier film, the precursor, e.g., BaF2 or SrF2 , can be deposited for a sufficient duration of time to

  19. Addressable inverter matrix for process and device characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Sayah, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    The addressable inverter matrix consists of 222 inverters each accessible with the aid of a shift register. The structure has proven useful in characterizing the variability of inverter transfer curves and in diagnosing processing faults. For good 3-micron CMOS bulk inverters investigated in this study, the percent standard deviation of the inverter threshold voltage was less than one percent and the inverter gain (the slope of the inverter transfer curve at the inverter threshold voltage) was less than 3 percent. The average noise margin for the inverters was near 2 volts for a power supply voltage of 5 volts. The specific faults studied included undersize pull-down transistor widths and various open contacts in the matrix.

  20. Addressable inverter matrix for process and device characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Sayah, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    The addressable inverter matrix consists of 222 inverters each accessible with the aid of a shift register. The structure has proven useful in characterizing the variability of inverter transfer curves and in diagnosing processing faults. For good 3-micron CMOS bulk inverters investigated, the percent standard deviation of the inverter threshold voltage was less than one percent and the inverter gain (the slope of the inverter transfer curve at the inverter threshold vltage) was less than 3 percent. The average noise margin for the inverters was near 2 volts for a power supply voltage of 5 volts. The specific faults studied included undersize pull-down transistor widths and various open contacts in the matrix.

  1. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  2. Comprehensive design and process flow configuration for micro and nano tech devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kai; Schmidt, Thilo; Mielke, Matthias; Ortloff, Dirk; Popp, Jens; Brück, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    The development of micro and nano tech devices based on semiconductor manufacturing processes comprises the structural design as well as the definition of the manufacturing process flow. The approach is characterized by application specific fabrication flows, i.e. fabrication processes (built up by a large variety of process steps and materials) depending on the later product. Technology constraints have a great impact on the device design and vice-versa. In this paper we introduce a comprehensive methodology and based on that an environment for customer-oriented product engineering of MEMS products. The development is currently carried out in an international multi-site research project.

  3. Laser Processed Silver Nanowire Network Transparent Electrodes for Novel Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spechler, Joshua Allen

    Silver nanowire network transparent conducting layers are poised to make headway into a space previously dominated by transparent conducting oxides due to the promise of a flexible, scaleable, lab-atmosphere processable alternative. However, there are many challenges standing in the way between research scale use and consumer technology scale adaptation of this technology. In this thesis we will explore many, and overcome a few of these challenges. We will address the poor conductivity at the narrow nanowire-nanowire junction points in the network by developing a laser based process to weld nanowires together on a microscopic scale. We address the need for a comparative metric for transparent conductors in general, by taking a device level rather than a component level view of these layers. We also address the mechanical, physical, and thermal limitations to the silver nanowire networks by making composites from materials including a colorless polyimide and titania sol-gel. Additionally, we verify our findings by integrating these processes into devices. Studying a hybrid organic/inorganic heterojunction photovoltaic device we show the benefits of a laser processed electrode. Green phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes fabricated on a solution phase processed silver nanowire based electrode show favorable device metrics compared to a conductive oxide electrode based control. The work in this thesis is intended to push the adoption of silver nanowire networks to further allow new device architectures, and thereby new device applications.

  4. Shaft mount for data coupler system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, James R., Jr. (Inventor); Lord, Mark T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for mounting a data transmission apparatus to a rotating, tapered, and instrumented shaft is provided. This device permits attachment without interfering with shaft rotation or the accuracy of data output, and prevents both radial and axial slippage of the data transmission apparatus. The mounting device consists of a sleeve assembly which is attached to the shaft by means of clamps that are situated at some distance removed from the instrumented area of the shaft. The data transmission device is secured to the sleeve such that the entire assembly rotates with the shaft. Shim adjustments between sleeve sections assure that a minimum compressive load is transferred to the instrumented area of the shaft and a rubber lining is affixed to a large portion of the interior surface of the sleeve to absorb vibration.

  5. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  6. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  7. Integrated acoustooptic device modules for optical information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chen S.

    1988-07-01

    The objectives of this program year are focused on design, fabrication, and testing of wideband guided wave AO Bragg diffraction from surface acoustic waves in Gallium arsenide optical waveguides and conception/realization of multichannel integrated acousto-optics and electrooptics Bragg modulator modules in TIPE microlenses-based lithium niobates and GaAs channel-planar composite waveguides with applications to signal processing and computing. Wideband GaAs waveguide AO Bragg cells that operate in the acoustic frequency range from 300 to 1200 MHz have been realized. This represents realization of GHz GaAs waveguide AO Bragg cells shows that monolithically integrated optic signal processors such as radiofrequency spectrum analyzers may be fabricated in a common GaAs chip. Multichannel single-mode electrooptic cutoff modulator arrays and Bragg diffraction modulator arrays have been successfully realized in GaAs. One of the vital and remaining components toward monolithic (total) integration in GaAs is the waveguide microlens and linear lens array. Fabrication of negative index-change planar waveguide microlenses in both LiNbO3 and GaAs using ion milling. The waveguide lenses that have been fabricated and tested include single lenses and lens arrays of analog Fresnel, chirp grating, and hybrid analog Fresnel chirp grating types. We have obtained near diffraction-limited spot sizes and good efficiencies in such preliminary components.

  8. Value driven innovation in medical device design: a process for balancing stakeholder voices.

    PubMed

    de Ana, F J; Umstead, K A; Phillips, G J; Conner, C P

    2013-09-01

    The innovation process has often been represented as a linear process which funnels customer needs through various business and process filters. This method may be appropriate for some consumer products, but in the medical device industry there are some inherent limitations to the traditional innovation funnel approach. In the medical device industry, there are a number of stakeholders who need to have their voices heard throughout the innovation process. Each stakeholder has diverse and unique needs relating to the medical device, the needs of one may highly affect the needs of another, and the relationships between stakeholders may be tenuous. This paper describes the application of a spiral innovation process to the development of a medical device which considers three distinct stakeholder voices: the Voice of the Customer, the Voice of the Business and the Voice of the Technology. The process is presented as a case study focusing on the front-end redesign of a class III medical device for an orthopedics company. Starting from project initiation and scope alignment, the process describes four phases, Discover, Envision, Create, and Refine, and concludes with value assessment of the final design features.

  9. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOEpatents

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  10. Photonic materials and devices for optical information processing and computing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, Armand R., Jr.

    1991-02-01

    The research program is focused on a critical evaluation of advanced photonic materials and device concepts for the implementation of optical information processing and computing systems. The effort ranges from a detailed investigation of the fundamental physical and technological limitations that impact the potential computational gain (e.g., increases in throughput, decreases in decision time subsequent to processing, or minimization of the energy expended during computation) of optical information processing and computing systems, through the invention and characterization of key enabling devices such as two dimensional spatial light modulators and volume holographic optical elements, to the development of advanced techniques for materials growth, deposition, and processing that have a critical impact on potential device performance. This multifaceted evaluation of novel materials, device, and system concepts has been directly responsible for the invention and characterization of a number of photonic devices and materials processing techniques that exhibit both high performance and capacity for practical manufacturing. The primary program thrusts can be organized into three principal categories: (1) fundamental and technological limitations of optical information processing and computing; (2) electrically and optically addressed spatial light modulators; and (3) volume holographic optical elements.

  11. Absolute and relative locations of earthquakes at Mount St. Helens, Washington, using continuous data: implications for magmatic processes: Chapter 4 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.; Crosson, Robert S.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a combination of absolute and relative locations from earthquake multiplets to investigate the seismicity associated with the eruptive sequence at Mount St. Helens between September 23, 2004, and November 20, 2004. Multiplets, a prominent feature of seismicity during this time period, occurred as volcano-tectonic, hybrid, and low-frequency earthquakes spanning a large range of magnitudes and lifespans. Absolute locations were improved through the use of a new one-dimensional velocity model with excellent shallow constraints on P-wave velocities. We used jackknife tests to minimize possible biases in absolute and relative locations resulting from station outages and changing station configurations. In this paper, we show that earthquake hypocenters shallowed before the October 1 explosion along a north-dipping structure under the 1980-86 dome. Relative relocations of multiplets during the initial seismic unrest and ensuing eruption showed rather small source volumes before the October 1 explosion and larger tabular source volumes after October 5. All multiplets possess absolute locations very close to each other. However, the highly dissimilar waveforms displayed by each of the multiplets analyzed suggest that different sources and mechanisms were present within a very small source volume. We suggest that multiplets were related to pressurization of the conduit system that produced a stationary source that was highly stable over long time periods. On the basis of their response to explosions occurring in October 2004, earthquakes not associated with multiplets also appeared to be pressure dependent. The pressure source for these earthquakes appeared, however, to be different from the pressure source of the multiplets.

  12. Selective Processing Techniques for Electronics and Opto-Electronic Applications: Quantum-Well Devices and Integrated Optic Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-10

    new technology is to have sufficient control of processing to *- describable by an appropriate elecromagnetic model . build useful devices. For example...3. W aveguide Modulators .................................. 7 B. Integrated Optical Device and Circuit Modeling ... ................... .. 10 C...following categories: A. Integrated Optical Devices and Technology B. Integrated Optical Device and Circuit Modeling C. Cryogenic Etching for Low

  13. Impact of Alternative Medical Device Approval Processes on Costs and Health

    PubMed Central

    George, Benjamin P.; Venkataraman, Vinayak; Dorsey, E. Ray; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical devices are often introduced prior to randomized-trial evidence of efficacy and this slows completion of trials. Alternative regulatory approaches include restricting device use outside of trials prior to trial evidence of efficacy (like the drug approval process) or restricting out-of-trial use but permitting coverage within trials such as Medicare’s Coverage with Study Participation (CSP). Methods We compared the financial impact to manufacturers and insurers of three regulatory alternatives: (1) limited regulation (current approach), (2) CSP, and (3) restrictive regulation (like the current drug approval process). Using data for patent foramen ovale closure devices, we modeled key parameters including recruitment time, probability of device efficacy, market adoption, and device cost/price to calculate profits to manufacturers, costs to insurers, and overall societal impact on health. Results For manufacturers, profits were greatest under CSP—driven by faster market adoption of effective devices—followed by restrictive regulation. Societal health benefit in total quality-adjusted life years was greatest under CSP. Insurers’ expenditures for ineffective devices were greatest with limited regulation. Findings were robust over a reasonable range of probabilities of trial success. Conclusions Regulation restricting out-of-trial device use and extending limited insurance coverage to clinical trial participants may balance manufacturer and societal interests. PMID:25185975

  14. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is the summary of the third workshop on the role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. The workshop was organized: (1) to discuss recent progress in the material quality produced by photovoltaic Si manufacturers, (2) to foster the understanding of point defect issues in Si device processing, (3) to review the effects of inhomogeneities on large- area solar cell performance, (4) to discuss how to improve Si solar cell processing, and (5) to develop a new understanding of gettering, defect passivation, and defect annihilation. Separate abstract were prepared for the individual papers, for the database.

  15. Glass composition and process for sealing void spaces in electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Kirby, Brent W [Kennewick, WA

    2012-05-01

    A glass foaming material and method are disclosed for filling void spaces in electrochemical devices. The glass material includes a reagent that foams at a temperature above the softening point of the glass. Expansion of the glass fills void spaces including by-pass and tolerance channels of electrochemical devices. In addition, cassette to cassette seals can also be formed while channels and other void spaces are filled, reducing the number of processing steps needed.

  16. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  17. Integral Flexure Mounts for Metal Mirrors for Cryogenic Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zewari, S. Wahid; Hylan, Jason E.; Irish, Sandra M.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Conkey, Shelly B.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-kinematic, six-degree-of-freedom flexure mounts have been incorporated as integral parts of metal mirrors designed to be used under cryogenic conditions as parts of an astronomical instrument. The design of the mirrors and their integral flexure mounts can also be adapted to other instruments and other operating temperatures. In comparison with prior kinematic cryogenic mirror mounts, the present mounts are more compact and can be fabricated easily using Ram-EDM (electrical discharge machining) process

  18. Characterization of an oxygen plasma process for cleaning packaged semiconductor devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to experimentally determine the operating {open_quotes}window{close_quotes} for an oxygen plasma cleaning process to be used on microelectronics components just prior to wire bonding. The process was being developed to replace one that used vapor degreasing with trichlorotrifluoroethane, an ozone-depleting substance. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to generate data from which the oxygen plasma cleaning process could be characterized. Auger electron spectrophotometry was used to measure the contamination thickness on the dice after cleaning. An empirical equation correlating the contamination thickness on the die surface with the operating parameters of the plasma system was developed from the collected Auger data, and optimum settings for cleaning semiconductor devices were determined. Devices were also tested for undesirable changes in electrical parameters resulting from cleaning in the plasma system. An increase in leakage current occurred for bipolar transistors and diodes after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Although an increase in leakage current occurred, each device`s parameter remained well below the acceptable specification limit. Based upon the experimental results, the optimum settings for the plasma cleaning process were determined to be 200 watts of power applied for five minutes in an enclosure maintained at 0.7 torr. At these settings, all measurable contamination was removed without compromising the reliability of the devices.

  19. Processing Device for High-Speed Execution of an Xrisc Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-Kwong (Inventor); Mills, Carl S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A processing device for high-speed execution of a computer program is provided. A memory module may store one or more computer programs. A sequencer may select one of the computer programs and controls execution of the selected program. A register module may store intermediate values associated with a current calculation set, a set of output values associated with a previous calculation set, and a set of input values associated with a subsequent calculation set. An external interface may receive the set of input values from a computing device and provides the set of output values to the computing device. A computation interface may provide a set of operands for computation during processing of the current calculation set. The set of input values are loaded into the register and the set of output values are unloaded from the register in parallel with processing of the current calculation set.

  20. Disposable patient-mounted geared robot for image-guided needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Charles; Kato, Takahisa; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Patient-mounted robotic needle guidance is an emerging method of needle insertion in percutaneous ablation therapies. During needle insertion, patient-mounted robots can account for patient body movement, unlike gantry or floor mounted devices, and still increase the accuracy and precision of needle placement. Patient-mounted robots, however, require repeated sterilisation, which is often a difficult process with complex devices; overcoming this challenge is therefore key to the success of a patient mounted robot. To eliminate the need for repeated sterilization, we have developed a disposable patient-mounted robot with two rings as a kinematic structure: an angled upper ring both rotates and revolves about the lower ring. Using this structure, the robot has a clinically suitable range of needle insertion angles with a remote center of motion. To achieve disposability, our structure applies a disposable gear transmission component which detachably interfaces with non-disposable driving motors. With a manually driven prototype of the gear trains, we assessed whether the kinematic structure of the two rings can be operated only by using input pinions locating at outside of the kinematic structure. Our tests confirmed that the input pinions were able to rotate both upper and lower rings independently. We also determined a linear relationship of rotation transmission with the gear trains and determined that the rotation transmission between the pinions and the two rings were within 3 % of error from the designed value. Our robot introduces a novel approach to patient-mounted robots, and has potential to enable sterile and accurate needle guidance in percutaneous ablation therapies.

  1. Safety-cost trade-offs in medical device reuse: a Markov decision process model.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Thomas W

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare expenditures in the US are approaching 2 trillion dollars, and hospitals and other healthcare providers are under tremendous pressure to rein in costs. One cost-saving approach which is gaining popularity is the reuse of medical devices which were designed only for a single use. Device makers decry this practice as unsanitary and unsafe, but a growing number of third-party firms are willing to sterilize, refurbish, and/or remanufacture devices and resell them to hospitals at a fraction of the original price. Is this practice safe? Is reliance on single-use devices sustainable? A Markov decision process (MDP) model is formulated to study the trade-offs involved in these decisions. Several key parameters are examined: device costs, device failure probabilities, and failure penalty cost. For each of these parameters, expressions are developed which identify the indifference point between using new and reprocessed devices. The results can be used to inform the debate on the economic, ethical, legal, and environmental dimensions of this complex issue.

  2. Support for equipment - Quick mounting with quick release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, W. W., II; Jacobson, H. B.

    1970-01-01

    Temporary support device for equipment consists of pin bracket for attachment to item and socket bracket for mounting on any structure. System is adaptable to broad range of temporary storage media. No engagement, release, or adjustment of components is required.

  3. Thermo-optic silica PLC devices for applications in high speed optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchetiere, Chantal; Callender, Claire L.; Jacob, Sarkis; Ledderhof, Christopher J.; Dumais, Patrick; Celo, Dritan; Chen, Lawrence R.; Samadi, Payman

    2011-08-01

    The optimization of a 2×2 silica-on-silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) thermo-optic switch is presented. The device consists of 2 multimode interference (MMI) couplers as splitter and combiner with metal heater strips for phase control. The switching characteristics of the devices have been examined in detail as a function of several parameters. The electrical power consumption of the switch has been reduced by a factor of 2 by etching trenches alongside the waveguide heaters located on the arms of the MZI, and the polarization dependent loss has been controlled and reduced through adjustment of top cladding properties. The effect on the response time of the switch of these design changes has been investigated. Detailed characterization of the devices will be presented, and trade-offs in optimization discussed. Incorporation of these device elements into increasingly complex components for new applications in optical signal processing will be demonstrated.

  4. Development and process control of magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic random access memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Chen, Eugene; Koutny, William

    2003-05-01

    We report on the development and process control of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. It is demonstrated that MTJs with high magnetoresistance ˜40% at 300 mV, resistance-area product (RA) ˜1-3 kΩ μm2, low intrinsic interlayer coupling (Hin) ˜2-3 Oe, and excellent bit switching characteristics can be developed and fully integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuitry into MRAM devices. MTJ uniformity and repeatability level suitable for mass production has been demonstrated with the advanced processing and monitoring techniques.

  5. Air processed organic photovoltaic devices incorporating a MoOx anode buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovill, Edward S. R.; Griffin, Jonathan; Wang, Tao; Kingsley, James W.; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Buckley, Alastair R.; Lidzey, David G.

    2013-05-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOx) has been shown to act as an efficient hole extraction layer in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. However, exposing MoOx films to air is problematic as it is hygroscopic; the uptake of moisture having a negative impact on its electronic properties. Here, we use spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the uptake of water, and fabricate PCDTBT:PC70BM based OPVs to determine its effects on device performance. We then show that thermally annealing MoOx reduces its hygroscopicity, permitting it to be processed in air. Using this process, we create air-processsed OPVs having PCEs (power conversion efficiencies) of up to 5.36%.

  6. Pressure vessel bottle mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A mounting assembly for mounting a composite pressure vessel to a vehicle includes a saddle having a curved surface extending between two pillars for receiving the vessel. The saddle also has flanged portions which can be bolted to the vehicle. Each of the pillars has hole in which is mounted the shaft portion of an attachment member. A resilient member is disposed between each of the shaft portions and the holes and loaded by a tightening nut. External to the holes, each of the attachment members has a head portion to which a steel band is attached. The steel band circumscribes the vessel and translates the load on the springs into a clamping force on the vessel. As the vessel expands and contracts, the resilient members expand and contract so that the clamping force applied by the band to the vessel remains constant.

  7. Mounted drilling apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Manten, H.

    1982-07-20

    The drilling apparatus includes a mount in the form of a cylindrical member defining an elongated passageway and being provided with two opposite guiding rails each being formed with an elongated recessed channel communicating with the passageway; a rotary drive for holding a drill rod has a non-rotating casing provided with guiding elements movable in the recesses of the guiding rails; a feeding mechanism for advancing the rotary drive includes either tooth racks arranged in the recesses of the guiding rails and driving pinions mounted on the casing of the rotary drive or cylinder and piston units located in the recesses of the guide rails and cooperating with feed cables or chains. The mount is supported on a mobile undercarriage which is provided with two pairs of vertically adjustable supporting legs.

  8. MOUNT BALDY WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finnell, Tommy L.; Soule, John H.

    1984-01-01

    The Mount Baldy Wilderness, Arizona, was surveyed for mineral resources and was judged to have little or no promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. No mineral deposits, mining claims, or concentrations of trace metals were recognized within the area. No oil test holes have been drilled within the area; holes drilled about 35 mi north of the area were not productive. Further study of the Mount Baldy Wilderness would seem warranted only in the event that economic deposits of minerals or petroleum are found in nearby areas.

  9. Technology development of high-quality semiconductor devices using solution-processed crystallization of pentacene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hung-Wei

    Organic electronic materials and processing techniques have attracted considerable attention for developing organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs), since they may be patterned on flexible substrates which may be bent into a variety of shapes for applications such as displays, smart cards, solar devices and sensors Various fabrication methods for building pentacene-based OTFTs have been demonstrated. Traditional vacuum deposition and vapor deposition methods have been studied for deposition on plastic and paper, but these are unlikely to scale well to large area printing. Researchers have developed methods for processing OTFTs from solution because of the potential for low-cost and large area device manufacturing, such as through inkjet or offset printing. Most methods require the use of precursors which are used to make pentacene soluble, and these methods have typically produced much lower carrier mobility than the best vacuum deposited devices. We have investigated devices built from solution-processed pentacene that is locally crystallized at room temperature on the polymer substrates. Pentacene crystals grown in this manner are highly localized at pre-determined sites, have good crystallinity and show good carrier mobility, making this an attractive method for large area manufacturing of semiconductor devices.

  10. A process for the agile product realization of electromechanical devices (A-primed)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes a product realization process developed at Sandia National Laboratories by the A-PRIMED project that integrates many of the key components of ``agile manufacturing`` (Nagel & Dove, 1992) into a complete, step-by-step, design-to-production process. For two separate product realization efforts, each geared to a different set of requirements, A-PRIMED demonstrated product realization of a custom device in less than a month. A-PRIMED used a discriminator (a precision electro mechanical device) as the demonstration device, but the process is readily adaptable to other electro mechanical products. The process begins with a qualified design parameter space (Diegert et al, 1995). From that point, the product realization process encompasses all facets of requirements development, analysis and testing, design, manufacturing, robot assembly and quality assurance, as well as product data management and concurrent engineering. In developing the product realization process, A-PRIMED employed an iterative approach whereby after each build, the process was reviewed and refinements were made on the basis of lessons learned. This paper describes the integration of project functions and product realization technologies to develop a product realization process that on repeated iterations, was proven successful.

  11. Device and method to enhance availability of cluster-based processing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupia, David J. (Inventor); Ramos, Jeremy (Inventor); Samson, Jr., John R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electronic computing device including at least one processing unit that implements a specific fault signal upon experiencing an associated fault, a control unit that generates a specific recovery signal upon receiving the fault signal from the at least one processing unit, and at least one input memory unit. The recovery signal initiates specific recovery processes in the at least one processing unit. The input memory buffers input data signals input to the at least one processing unit that experienced the fault during the recovery period.

  12. Effect of Back Contact and Rapid Thermal Processing Conditions on Flexible CdTe Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Meysing, D. M.; Rance, Will L.; Burst, James M.; Reese, Matthew O.; Wolden, C. A.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Garner, S.; Barnes, Teresa M.

    2015-06-14

    Flexible CdTe solar cells on ultra-thin glass substrates can enable new applications that require high specific power, unique form-factors, and low manufacturing costs. To be successful, these cells must be cost competitive, have high efficiency, and have high reliability. Here we present back contact processing conditions that enabled us to achieve over 16% efficiency on flexible Corning (R) Willow (R) Glass substrates. We used co-evaporated ZnTe:Cu and Au as our back contact and used rapid thermal processing (RTP) to activate the back contact. Both the ZnTe to Cu ratio and the RTP activation temperature provide independent control over the device performance. We have investigated the influence of various RTP conditions to Cu activation and distribution. Current density-voltage, capacitance-voltage measurements along with device simulations were used to examine the device performance in terms of ZnTe to Cu ratio and rapid thermal activation temperature.

  13. Apollo Telescope Mount Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) served as the first marned astronomical observatory in space. It was designed for solar research from Earth orbit aboard the Skylab. This image is a cutaway illustration of the ATM canister with callouts and characteristics. The ATM was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  14. Apollo Telescope Mount Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) served as the first marned astronomical observatory in space. It was designed for solar research from Earth orbit aboard the Skylab. This image is a cutaway illustration of the ATM canister. The ATM was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. Apollo Telescope Mount Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) served as the first marned astronomical observatory in space. It was designed for solar research from Earth orbit aboard the Skylab. This image is a cutaway illustration of the ATM canister with callouts. The ATM was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

    2005-03-08

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  17. Internal Consistency Reliability of the Self-Report Antisocial Process Screening Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poythress, Norman G.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Falkenbach, Diana; Cruise, Keith; Lee, Zina; Murrie, Daniel C.; Vitacco, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The self-report version of the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) has become a popular measure for assessing psychopathic features in justice-involved adolescents. However, the internal consistency reliability of its component scales (Narcissism, Callous-Unemotional, and Impulsivity) has been questioned in several studies. This study…

  18. "Split Cast Mounting: Review and New Technique".

    PubMed

    Gundawar, S M; Pande, Neelam A; Jaiswal, Priti; Radke, U M

    2014-12-01

    For the fabrication of a prosthesis, the Prosthodontist meticulously performs all the steps. The laboratory technician then make every effort/strives to perform the remaining lab procedures. However when the processed dentures are remounted on the articulator, some changes are seen. These changes may be divided into two categories: Pre-insertion and post-insertion changes, which deal with the physical properties of the materials involved (Parker, J Prosthet Dent 31:335-342, 1974). Split cast mounting is the method of mounting casts on the articulator. It is essentially a maxillary cast constructed in two parts with a horizontal division. The procedure allows for the verification of the accuracy of the initial mounting and the ease of removal and replacement of the cast. This provides a precise means of correcting the changes in occlusion occurring as a result of the processing technique (Nogueira et al., J Prosthet Dent 91:386-388, 2004). Instability of the split mounting has always been a problem to the Prosthodontist thereby limiting its use. There are various materials mentioned in the literature. The new technique by using Dowel pins and twill thread is very easy, cheaper and simple way to stabilize the split mounting. It is useful and easy in day to day laboratory procedures. The article presents different methods of split cast mounting and the new procedure using easily available materials in prosthetic laboratory.

  19. Physics-based process modeling, reliability prediction, and design guidelines for flip-chip devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, Stylianos

    Flip Chip on Board (FCOB) and Chip-Scale Packages (CSPs) are relatively new technologies that are being increasingly used in the electronic packaging industry. Compared to the more widely used face-up wirebonding and TAB technologies, flip-chips and most CSPs provide the shortest possible leads, lower inductance, higher frequency, better noise control, higher density, greater input/output (I/O), smaller device footprint and lower profile. However, due to the short history and due to the introduction of several new electronic materials, designs, and processing conditions, very limited work has been done to understand the role of material, geometry, and processing parameters on the reliability of flip-chip devices. Also, with the ever-increasing complexity of semiconductor packages and with the continued reduction in time to market, it is too costly to wait until the later stages of design and testing to discover that the reliability is not satisfactory. The objective of the research is to develop integrated process-reliability models that will take into consideration the mechanics of assembly processes to be able to determine the reliability of face-down devices under thermal cycling and long-term temperature dwelling. The models incorporate the time and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior of various materials in the assembly to be able to predict failure modes such as die cracking and solder cracking. In addition, the models account for process-induced defects and macro-micro features of the assembly. Creep-fatigue and continuum-damage mechanics models for the solder interconnects and fracture-mechanics models for the die have been used to determine the reliability of the devices. The results predicted by the models have been successfully validated against experimental data. The validated models have been used to develop qualification and test procedures for implantable medical devices. In addition, the research has helped develop innovative face

  20. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  1. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  2. Characterizing Information Processing With a Mobile Device: Measurement of Simple and Choice Reaction Time.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daniel; Linder, Susan; Hirsch, Joshua; Dey, Tanujit; Kana, Daniel; Ringenbach, Shannon; Schindler, David; Alberts, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Information processing is typically evaluated using simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) paradigms in which a specific response is initiated following a given stimulus. The measurement of reaction time (RT) has evolved from monitoring the timing of mechanical switches to computerized paradigms. The proliferation of mobile devices with touch screens makes them a natural next technological approach to assess information processing. The aims of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of using of a mobile device (Apple iPad or iTouch) to accurately measure RT. Sixty healthy young adults completed SRT and CRT tasks using a traditional test platform and mobile platforms on two occasions. The SRT was similar across test modality: 300, 287, and 280 milliseconds (ms) for the traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. The CRT was similar within mobile devices, though slightly faster on the traditional: 359, 408, and 384 ms for traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.79 to 0.85 for SRT and from 0.75 to 0.83 for CRT. The similarity and reliability of SRT across platforms and consistency of SRT and CRT across test conditions indicate that mobile devices provide the next generation of assessment platforms for information processing.

  3. 76 FR 45825 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance... Medicine (IOM) report entitled: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance...

  4. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  5. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  6. Embedded processing for SHM with integrated software control of a wireless impedance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Carroll, Joetta; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R.; Todd, Michael D.

    2011-04-01

    Wireless sensor nodes with impedance measurement capabilities, often based on the Analog Devices AD5933 impedance chip and Atmel's 8-bit ATMega 1281 microcontroller, have been demonstrated to be effective in collecting data for localized damage detection (such as for loose bolt detection) and for sensor self-diagnostics. Previouslydeveloped nodes rely on radio telemetry and off-board processing (usually via a PC) to ascertain damage presence or sensor condition. Recent firmware improvements for the wireless impedance device (WID) now allow seamless integration of the WID with SHMTools and mFUSE, an open-source function sequencer and SHM process platform for Matlab. Furthermore, SHM processes developed using mFUSE can be implemented in hardware on the WID, allowing greater autonomy among the sensor nodes to identify and report damage in real time. This paper presents the capabilities of the newly integrated hardware and software, as well as experimental validation.

  7. A dicing-free SOI process for MEMS devices based on the lag effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Hao, Y.; Shen, Q.; Chang, H.; Yuan, W.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a dicing-free process for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In the process, the lag effect in deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is used to form the breaking trenches. In the backside DRIE, the wide backside cavities are etched down to the buried oxide layer. The narrow breaking trenches, in contrast, are not etched to the buried oxide layer. Therefore, the narrow trench can be used to break the wafer after the entire process; in addition, the handle layer can still act as a bracing structure before ‘breaking’. Finally, the device layer is patterned, and a DRIE step is used to form the MEMS devices. In this way, the dicing step can be omitted to prevent further damages from high pressure water jets and silicon dust. Meanwhile, the process can also prevent notching simply because the insulating layer is removed before device etching. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed fabrication process, a micromachined gyroscope is designed and fabricated.

  8. Tropical forest phenology and metabolism: Integrated analysis of tower-mounted camera images and tower derived GPP for interpreting ecosystem scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Hayek, M.; Stark, S. C.; Smith, M.; Wiedemann, K.; Marostica, S.; Ferreira, M.; Woodcock, T.; Prohaska, N.; da Silva, R.; Nelson, B. W.; Huete, A. R.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Seasonal and interannual patterns of leaf development and metabolism are a central topic of global change ecology. However, the seasonality of leaf development in tropical forests remains poorly understood due to the relatively low variation in climate, the high biodiversity of tropical biomes and the limitations of current observation techniques. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of using near-surface remote sensing techniques to understand the phenology of an evergreen tropical forest (Tapajos National Forest or TNF site, Santarem, Para, Brazil), and how this phenology affects the metabolism of tropical vegetation. Two continuous years (2010-2011) of daily images from a tower mounted three-channel (red, green, and near-infrared) TetraCAM ADC camera were analyzed for this study. A new approach was developed based on an automatic image classification scheme which decomposed the images into two components (leaves and bare wood) to extract seasonality of leaf development. A confusion matrix method was used to assess the accuracy of image classification. MODIS EVI composites (MOD13Q1) were also acquired and processed for the TNF site (5km*5km). The camera based phenology information was first compared with MODIS EVI, and then combined with tower based eddy covariance measurements at the same site to quantify the effect of canopy-scale phenology on ecosystem metabolism. We found that: (1) Tower-based images revealed a clear seasonal pattern in leaf phenology that was supported by confusion matrix analysis. Matrix analysis gave a 96.7% user accuracy (user accuracy represents the probability that an image pixel classification actually corresponds to that category on the ground) for the leaf component, based on 24 images in 2010 (2 images per month). The tower-based pattern matched that retrieved from satellites (camera-sensed leaf phenology vs monthly MODIS EVI (01/2010-12/2011, R2=0.57, P-value<0.01). This suggests that quality-controlled MODIS EVI

  9. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  10. Mount Erebus activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An international team of scientists reports that unusually high seismic activity joggled Mount Erebus last fall. However, the Antarctic volcano showed no external signs of an eruption.When scientists from the United States, Japan, and New Zealand returned to the world's southernmost active volcano last November for their annual field expedition, they found that seismic stations recorded 650 small tremors on October 8; prior to that, the number of quakes had averaged between 20 and 80 per day. The October 8 maximum was followed by 140 on October 9 and 120 on October 10. Philip R. Kyle, assistant professor of geochemistry at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro and leader of the team studying Mount Erebus, noted that some of the strongest earthquakes recorded during the team's 3 years of observations occurred on October 8; these registered less than 2 on the Richter scale.

  11. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  12. Mount Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mount Wilson Observatory, located in the San Gabriel Mountains near Pasadena, California, was founded in 1904 by George Ellery Hale with financial support from Andrew Carnegie. In the 1920s and 1930s, working at the 2.5 m Hooker telescope, Edwin Hubble made two of the most important discoveries in the history of astronomy: first, that `nebulae' are actually island universes—galaxies—each with bil...

  13. Thread-Mounted Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Stanley W.

    1988-01-01

    Thread-mounted thermocouple developed to accurately measure temperature of surrounding material. Comprised of threaded rod or bolt drilled along length, dual-hole ceramic insulator rod, thermocouple wire, optional ceramic filler, and epoxy resin. In contact with and takes average temperature of, surrounding material. Fabricated easily in size and metal to suit particular application. Because of simplicity and ability to measure average temperature, widespread use of design foreseen in varity of applications.

  14. Process-induced bias: a study of resist design, device node, illumination conditions, and process implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcasi, Michael; Scheer, Steven; Fonseca, Carlos; Shibata, Tsuyoshi; Kosugi, Hitoshi; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Saito, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    Critical dimension uniformity (CDU) has both across field and across wafer components. CD error generated by across wafer etching non-uniformity and other process variations can have a significant impact on CDU. To correct these across wafer systematic variations, compensation by exposure dose and/or post exposure bake (PEB) temperature have been proposed. These compensation strategies often focus on a specific structure without evaluating how process compensation impacts the CDU of all structures to be printed in a given design. In one previous study limited to a single resist and minimal coater/developer and scanner variations, the authors evaluated the relative merits of across wafer dose and PEB temperature compensation on the process induced CD bias and CDU. For the process studied, it was found that using PEB temperature to control CD across wafer was preferable to using dose compensation. In another previous study, the impact of resist design was explored to understand how resist design, as well as coater/developer and scanner processing, impact process induced bias (PIB). The previous PIB studies were limited to a single illumination case and explore the effect of PIB on only L/S structures. It is the goal of this work to understand additionally how illumination design and mask design, as well as resist design and coater/developer and scanner processing, impact process induced bias (PIB)/OPC integrity.

  15. Solar panel mounting assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.E.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes a mounting assembly for pivotally connecting a solar panel or collector to a base. The mounting assembly comprising: a frame whereupon the solar panel or collector can be mounted; a first plate connected to the frame, the plate having a pivot hole and a plurality of angle displacement holes each being equidistant from the pivot hole; a second plate connected to the base and situated substantially parallel to the first plate. The second plate having a pivot hole and an angle displacement hole being situated substantially the same distance apart from the second plate pivot hole as the distance between the pivot and displacement holes of the first plate; a pivot shaft received through the plate pivot hole and the second plate pivot hole whereby the frame and first plate can pivot with respect to the second plate and the base; an angle displacement shaft selectively received through the second plate angle displacement hole and any one of the first plate angle displacement holes whereby the frame and first plate can be selectively angularly fixed with respect to the second plate and the base; a U-member having two legs, the second plate being connected to the U-member; and, a selectively rotable shaft.

  16. Monitoring Mount Baker Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malone, S.D.; Frank, D.

    1976-01-01

    Hisotrically active volcanoes in the conterminous United States are restricted to the Cascade Range and extend to the Cascade Range and extend from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Lassen Peak in northern California. Since 1800 A.D, most eruptive activity has been on a relatively small scale and has not caused loss of life or significant property damage. However, future  volcanism predictably will have more serious effects because of greatly increased use of land near volcanoes during the present century. (See "Appraising Volcanic Hazards of the Cascade Range of the Northwestern United States," Earthquake Inf. Bull., Sept.-Oct. 1974.) The recognition an impending eruption is highly important in order to minimize the potential hazard to people and property. Thus, a substantial increase in hydrothermal activity at Mount Baker in March 1975 ( see "Mount Baker Heating Up," July-Aug. 1975 issue) was regarded as a possible first signal that an eruption might occur, and an intensive monitoring program was undertaken. 

  17. A process for the agile product realization of electro-mechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a product realization process developed and demonstrated at Sandia by the A-PRIMED (Agile Product Realization for Innovative Electro MEchanical Devices) project that integrates many of the key components of ``agile manufacturing`` into a complete, design-to-production process. Evidence indicates that the process has reduced the product realization cycle and assured product quality. Products included discriminators for a robotic quick change adapter and for an electronic defense system. These discriminators, built using A-PRIMED, met random vibration requirements and had life cycles that far surpass the performance obtained from earlier efforts.

  18. Linking the Regulatory and Reimbursement Processes for Medical Devices: The Need for Integrated Assessments.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Oriana; Wilcher, Britni; van Giessen, Anoukh; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-02-01

    Much criticism has been directed at the licencing requirements for medical devices (MDs) as they often result in a lack of robust evidence to inform health technology assessment (HTA) decisions. To better understand the current international decisional framework on MD technologies, we undertook three linked research studies: a review of the device regulatory procedures, a survey of current HTA practices and an empirical comparison of HTA reports of drugs versus MDs. Our review confirms that current device regulatory processes across the globe are substantially less stringent than drugs. As a result, international HTA agencies report that they face a number of challenges when assessing MDs, including reliance on suboptimal data to make clinical and cost-effectiveness decisions. Whilst many HTA agencies have adapted their processes and procedures to handle MD technology submissions, in our comparison of HTA reports we found little evidence of the application of methodologies that take account of device-specific issues, such as incremental development. Overall, our research reinforces the need for better linkage between licencing and HTA and the development and application of innovative HTA methodologies with the objective of securing faster patient access for those technologies that can be shown to represent good value for money. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  20. Multichannel Integrated Acoustooptic Device Modules for Signal Processing, Computing and Optical Interconnect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Phat Duc

    A variety of lithium niobate (LiNbO_3 )-based multichannel integrated optic (IO) device modules for applications in signal processing, computing, and optical interconnect have been realized. The key to the realization of these device modules is the titanium -indiffusion proton-exchange (TIPE) technique developed recently at our laboratory for fabrication of microlenses and microlens arrays. First, two ten-channel IO device modules have been constructed and tested. These two high -packing density devices modules represent the highest degree of integration and the largest number of components that have been accomplished thus far. The architecture common to both modules consists of a composite waveguide 1.0 x 2.0 cm^2 in size in which a channel -waveguide array, a planar waveguide, a linear microlens array, an electrooptic Bragg modulator array or an acoustooptic and electrooptic Bragg modulator array, and a large-aperture lens are integrated. These device modules have been used to perform matrix-matrix multiplications and digital correlations with encouraging results. In performing these computations, a convenient scheme that utilizes a linear ion-milled planar microlens array, devised specifically for these multichannel device modules, has been employed for simultaneous and efficient excitation of the entire channel-waveguide array. Secondly, a new type of strictly nonblocking IO switching network has been conceived and realized in LiNbO_3 . In this new optical switching network module two arrays of channel waveguides, a pair of large-aperture TIPE lenses, and a set of surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) transducers are configured such that the acoustooptic Bragg diffraction serves as a means to activate the connection between any input and any output channels. The working principle of this guided-wave acoustooptic switching network has been verified by using a 4 x 4 switching network module with encouraging performance such as a typical crosstalk level of -16 dB.

  1. —Part II. Development of the Electrolysis Devices and Process Technology Approval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikov, Yurii P.; Shurov, Nikolay I.; Batukhtin, Victor P.; Molostov, Oleg G.

    2014-06-01

    The electrolyzers used to extract calcium from copper-calcium alloys at 0.5 to 3.0 kA were designed, manufactured, and utilized to study the process parameters more precisely. The pilot electrolysis device used to produce calcium from copper-calcium alloys at 12 to 15 kA was developed. The calcium production using the bipolar electrolyzer was proved to be possible and was experimentally tested.

  2. [Preliminary Study on Error Control of Medical Devices Test Reports Based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhong; Xu, Honglei; Tu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the common errors in medical devices test reports are classified and analyzed. And then the main 11 influence factors for these inspection report errors are summarized. The hierarchy model was also developed and verified by presentation data using MATLAB. The feasibility of comprehensive weights quantitative comparison has been analyzed by using the analytic hierarchy process. In the end, this paper porspects the further research direction.

  3. Precision tuning of silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlton J.

    In recent years, silicon photonics has begun to transition from research to commercialization. Decades of relentless advances in the field of computing have led to fundamental bottlenecks in the design of computers, especially in interconnect bandwidth density. For IBM, silicon photonics has become a potential technological solution for enabling the future of server systems and cutting-edge supercomputers. For Intel, silicon photonics has become a cost-effective solution for supplying the necessary bandwidth needed by future generations of consumer computing products. While the field of silicon photonics is now advancing at a rapid pace there is still a great deal of research to be done. This thesis investigates ways of improving the performance of fundamental silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes. These devices include numerous optical resonator designs as well as slow-light waveguides. Optical resonators are used to confine photons both spatially and temporally. In recent years, there has been much research, both theoretical and experimental, into improving the design of optical resonators. Improving these devices through fabrication processes has generally been less studied. Optical waveguides are used to guide the flow of photons over chip-level distances. Slow-light waveguides have also been studied by many research groups in recent years and can be applied to an increasingly wide-range of applications. The work can be divided into several parts: Chapter 1 is an introduction to the field of silicon photonics as well as an overview of the fabrication, experimental and computational techniques used throughout this work. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 describe our investigations into the precision tuning of nanophotonic devices using laser-assisted thermal oxidation and atomic layer deposition. Chapters 5 and 6 describe our investigations into improving the sidewall roughness of silicon photonic devices using hydrogen annealing and excimer laser

  4. Focused-ion-beam post-processing technology for active devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Chyng Wen; Lau, Fat Kit; Zhao, Xin; Penty, Richard; White, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) etching technology is a highly efficient post-processing technique with the functionality to perform sputter etching and deposition of metals or insulators by means of a computer-generated mask. The high resolution and the ability to remove material directly from the sample in-situ make FIB etching the ideal candidate for device prototyping of novel micro-size photonic component design. Furthermore, the fact that arbitrary profile can be etched directly onto a sample without the need to prepare conventional mask and photolithography process makes novel device research with rapid feedback from characterisation to design activities possible. In this paper, we present a concise summary of the research work in Cambridge based on FIB technology. We demonstrate the applicability of focussed ion beam post processing technology to active photonic devices research. Applications include the integration of advanced waveguide architectures onto active photonic components. We documents details on the integration of lens structure on tapered lasers, photonic crystals on active SOA-integrated waveguides and surface profiling of low-cost gain-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. Furthermore, we discuss additional functions of FIB in the measurement of buried waveguide structures or the integration of total-internal-reflection (TIR) mirror in optical interconnect structures.

  5. Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices

    DOEpatents

    Laadan, Oren; Nieh, Jason; Phung, Dan

    2012-10-02

    Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices are provided. In some embodiments, a method includes running one or more processes associated with the distributed application in virtualized operating system environments on a plurality of digital processing devices, suspending the one or more processes, and saving network state information relating to network connections among the one or more processes. The method further include storing process information relating to the one or more processes, recreating the network connections using the saved network state information, and restarting the one or more processes using the stored process information.

  6. Real Time Signal Processing and Data Handling with dedicated hardware in handheld OCT Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, P.; Valverde, J. J.; Martin, A.; Ledesma, M. J.; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Santos, A.

    2015-11-01

    The manuscript presents the topics on real time signal processing with dedicated hardware presented at the INFIERI Summer School 2014. The focus of this work is on real-time signal processing, filtering and massive parallel computing. In general, medical devices have stringed demands on energy consumption as well as on data processing and handling. In fact, the development of novel medical devices has led to significant advances in fields such as instrumentation, algorithm development and image processing. In this manuscript, two aspects of the design are brought into consideration: the transformation of a conventional signal processing algorithm into an equivalent version that is suitable for hardware implementation and the use of on-chip modules originally developed for mass-electronics applications, for high speed data transmission. The development of a novel state-of-the-art hand-held OCT probe is used to exemplify theses aspects. In particular, the ``design process'' behind the implementation of a multichannel quadrature coherent demodulator is disclosed.

  7. Dynamic switching mechanism of conduction/set process in Cu/a-Si/Si memristive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ligang; Lee, Shin Buhm; Hoskins, Brian; Yoo, Hyang Keun; Kang, Bo Soo

    2013-07-01

    The conduction/set processes of resistive switching have been systemically investigated for Cu/a-Si/Si electrochemical memristive devices. Experimental results indicate that the set process was driven by two different mechanisms, depending on the programming pulse amplitude: a purely electrical dielectric breakdown and a thermally assisted dielectric breakdown. For the latter process, we observe that the set time decreased exponentially with the increase in the programming pulse amplitude, whereas the former process shows amplitude independence. Through the temperature-dependent set transition characteristics, we argue that the filament growth in set process could be dominated by cation transport in the dielectric film. The thermal activation energy of Cu hopping in a-Si is extracted to be 0.16 eV.

  8. Three-dimensional integration (3DI) of semiconductor circuit layers: New devices and fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehari, Babak E.

    1998-12-01

    The device density of Integrated Circuits (ICs) manufactured by current VLSI technology is reaching its theoretical limit. Nevertheless, the demand for integration of more devices per chip is growing. To accommodate this need three main possibilities can be explored: Wafer Scale Integration (WSI), Ultra Large Scale Integration (ULSI), and Three Dimensional Integration (3DI). A brief review of these techniques along with their comparative advantages and disadvantages is presented. It has been concluded that 3DI technology is superior to others. Therefore, an attempt is made to develop a viable fabrication process for this technology. This is done by first reviewing the current technologies that are utilized for fabrication of Integrated Circuits (ICs) and their compatibility with 3DI stringent requirements. Based on this review, a set of fabrication procedure for realization of 3DI technology, are presented in chapter 3. In Chapter 1 the compatibility of the currently used devices, such as BJTs and FETs, with 3DI technology is examined. Moreover, a new active device is developed for 3DI technology to replace BJTs and FETs in circuits. This new device is more compatible to the constrains of 3DI technology. Chapter 2 is devoted to solving the overall problems of 3DI circuits. The problem of heat and power dispassion and signal coupling (Cross-Talk) between the layers are reviewed, and an inter-layer shield is proposed to overcome these problems. The effectiveness of such a thin shield is considered theoretically. In Chapter 3 a fabrication process for 3DI technology is proposed. This is done after a short analysis of previous attempts in developing 3DI technologies. Chapter 4 focuses on analog extension of 3DI technology. Moreover, in this chapter microwave 3DI circuits or 3DI MMIC is investigated. Practical considerations in choice of material for the proposed device is the subject of study in Chapter 5. Low temperature ohmic contact and utilization of metal

  9. Ultra-Smooth, Fully Solution-Processed Large-Area Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Organic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Won-Yong; Ginting, Riski Titian; Ko, Keum-Jin; Kang, Jae-Wook

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of ultra-smooth and highly bendable substrates consisting of metal grid-conducting polymers that are fully embedded into transparent substrates (ME-TCEs) was successfully demonstrated. The fully printed ME-TCEs exhibited ultra-smooth surfaces (surface roughness ~1.0 nm), were highly transparent (~90% transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm), highly conductive (sheet resistance ~4 Ω ◻−1), and relatively stable under ambient air (retaining ~96% initial resistance up to 30 days). The ME-TCE substrates were used to fabricate flexible organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes exhibiting devices efficiencies comparable to devices fabricated on ITO/glass substrates. Additionally, the flexibility of the organic devices did not degrade their performance even after being bent to a bending radius of ~1 mm. Our findings suggest that ME-TCEs are a promising alternative to indium tin oxide and show potential for application toward large-area optoelectronic devices via fully printing processes. PMID:27808221

  10. Ultra-Smooth, Fully Solution-Processed Large-Area Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Organic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Won-Yong; Ginting, Riski Titian; Ko, Keum-Jin; Kang, Jae-Wook

    2016-11-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of ultra-smooth and highly bendable substrates consisting of metal grid-conducting polymers that are fully embedded into transparent substrates (ME-TCEs) was successfully demonstrated. The fully printed ME-TCEs exhibited ultra-smooth surfaces (surface roughness ~1.0 nm), were highly transparent (~90% transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm), highly conductive (sheet resistance ~4 Ω ◻‑1), and relatively stable under ambient air (retaining ~96% initial resistance up to 30 days). The ME-TCE substrates were used to fabricate flexible organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes exhibiting devices efficiencies comparable to devices fabricated on ITO/glass substrates. Additionally, the flexibility of the organic devices did not degrade their performance even after being bent to a bending radius of ~1 mm. Our findings suggest that ME-TCEs are a promising alternative to indium tin oxide and show potential for application toward large-area optoelectronic devices via fully printing processes.

  11. Ultra-Smooth, Fully Solution-Processed Large-Area Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Organic Devices.

    PubMed

    Jin, Won-Yong; Ginting, Riski Titian; Ko, Keum-Jin; Kang, Jae-Wook

    2016-11-03

    A novel approach for the fabrication of ultra-smooth and highly bendable substrates consisting of metal grid-conducting polymers that are fully embedded into transparent substrates (ME-TCEs) was successfully demonstrated. The fully printed ME-TCEs exhibited ultra-smooth surfaces (surface roughness ~1.0 nm), were highly transparent (~90% transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm), highly conductive (sheet resistance ~4 Ω ◻(-1)), and relatively stable under ambient air (retaining ~96% initial resistance up to 30 days). The ME-TCE substrates were used to fabricate flexible organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes exhibiting devices efficiencies comparable to devices fabricated on ITO/glass substrates. Additionally, the flexibility of the organic devices did not degrade their performance even after being bent to a bending radius of ~1 mm. Our findings suggest that ME-TCEs are a promising alternative to indium tin oxide and show potential for application toward large-area optoelectronic devices via fully printing processes.

  12. Sol-gel processed alumina based materials in microcalorimeter sensor device fabrication for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nakouzi, S.R.; McBride, J.R.; Nietering, K.E.; Narula, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    The application of sol-gel processed materials in a variety of sensors has been proposed. The authors describe microcalorimeter sensor devices employing sol-gel processed alumina based materials which can be used to monitor pollutants in automotive exhaust. These sensors operate by measuring changes in resistance upon catalysis and are economically acceptable for automotive applications. It is important to point out that automobiles will be required to have a means of monitoring exhaust gases by on-board sensors as mandated by the EPA and the California Air Resources Board (OBD-II).

  13. Frictional processes during flank motion at Mount Etna (Italy): experimental characterisation of slip on similar and dissimilar volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanski, Wojciech; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Castagna, Angela; Mitchell, Thomas; Heap, Michael; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Hirose, Takehiro; Dingwell, Donald

    2015-04-01

    The edifice of Mount Etna (Italy) is structurally unstable, exhibiting a near continuous ESE seaward sliding along a set of faults due to interplay between regional tectonics, gravity instability and magma intrusion. Continuous seismic and ground deformation monitoring reveals the resulting large-scale flank motion at variable rates. The mechanisms controlling this faulting kinetic remains, however, poorly constrained. Examination of the fault zones reveals a range of rock types along the different fault segments: fresh and altered basalt, clay and limestone. As lithological contrasts can jeopardise the structural stability of an edifice, we experimentally investigate the frictional properties of these rocks using low- to high-velocity-rotary shear tests on similar and dissimilar rocks to better understand episodes of slow flank motion as well as rapid and catastrophic sector collapse events. The first set of experiments was performed at velocities up to 1.2 m/s and at normal stresses of 1.5 MPa, commensurate with depths of the contacts seen in the Etna edifice. Friction experiments on clay gouge shows the strong rate-weakening dependence of slip in this material as well as the release of carbon dioxide. Friction experiments on solid rocks show a wider range of mechanical behaviour. At high velocity (>0.6 m/s) volcanic rocks tend to melt whereas the clay and limestone do not; rather they decarbonate, which prevents the rock from achieving the temperature required for melting. Experiments on dissimilar rocks clearly show that composition of host rocks affects the composition and viscosity of the resultant frictional melt, which can have a dramatic effect on shear stress leading to fault weakening or strengthening depending on the combination of host rock samples. A series of low- to moderate-slip velocity experiments is now being conducted to complement our dataset and provide a more complete rock friction model applicable to Mount Etna.

  14. The Mount Wilson magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.; Boyden, J. E.; Bruning, D. H.; Clark, M. K.; Crist, H. W.; Labonte, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    In the summer of 1957, an instrument quite similar to the prototype solar magnetograph described by Babcock (1953) was installed at the 150-foot tower telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, and daily magnetograph observations of the full disk of the sun were started. During the following years, the instrument was modified and improved on several occasions. The present investigation is concerned with the present state of the magnetograph, which was largely rebuilt during 1981. Attention is given to the spectrograph entrance slit, the diffraction grating, the exit slit, the employed microprocessor, the setup procedure, the magnetic signal, the Doppler signal, and a solar magnetogram.

  15. MOUNT WASHINGTON WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Edward M.; Causey, J. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, Mount Washington Wilderness, Oregon has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources. Abundant cinder resources occur in the wilderness, but other large volume cinder deposits are available outside the wilderness and closer to markets. Analysis of the geothermal potential of the High Cascades province cannot be made without data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regimes which can only be provided by deep drill holes. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas outside the wildernesses of the High Cascades, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the wildernesses could be made.

  16. Rebuilding Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.; Ramsey, David W.; Messerich, James A.; Thompson, Ren A.

    2006-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens, Washington exploded in a spectacular and devastating eruption that shocked the world. The eruption, one of the most powerful in the history of the United States, removed 2.7 cubic kilometers of rock from the volcano's edifice, the bulk of which had been constructed by nearly 4,000 years of lava-dome-building eruptions. In seconds, the mountain's summit elevation was lowered from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters, leaving a north-facing, horseshoe-shaped crater over 2 kilometers wide. Following the 1980 eruption, Mount St. Helens remained active. A large lava dome began episodically extruding in the center of the volcano's empty crater. This dome-building eruption lasted until 1986 and added about 80 million cubic meters of rock to the volcano. During the two decades following the May 18, 1980 eruption, Crater Glacier formed tongues of ice around the east and west sides of the lava dome in the deeply shaded niche between the lava dome and the south crater wall. Long the most active volcano in the Cascade Range with a complex 300,000-year history, Mount St. Helens erupted again in the fall of 2004 as a new period of dome building began within the 1980 crater. Between October 2004 and February 2006, about 80 million cubic meters of dacite lava erupted immediately south of the 1980-86 lava dome. The erupting lava separated the glacier into two parts, first squeezing the east arm of the glacier against the east crater wall and then causing equally spectacular crevassing and broad uplift of the glacier's west arm. Vertical aerial photographs document dome growth and glacier deformation. These photographs enabled photogrammetric construction of a series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) showing changes from October 4, 2004 to February 9, 2006. From the DEMs, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications were used to estimate extruded volumes and growth rates of the new lava dome. The DEMs were also used to quantify dome

  17. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. . Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  18. Manufacturing process and material selection in concurrent collaborative design of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuan F.; Du, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present knowledge of an intensive approach and system for selecting suitable manufacturing processes and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices in concurrent collaborative design environment. In the paper, fundamental issues on MEMS manufacturing process and material selection such as concurrent design framework, manufacturing process and material hierarchies, and selection strategy are first addressed. Then, a fuzzy decision support scheme for a multi-criteria decision-making problem is proposed for estimating, ranking and selecting possible manufacturing processes, materials and their combinations. A Web-based prototype advisory system for the MEMS manufacturing process and material selection, WebMEMS-MASS, is developed based on the client-knowledge server architecture and framework to help the designer find good processes and materials for MEMS devices. The system, as one of the important parts of an advanced simulation and modeling tool for MEMS design, is a concept level process and material selection tool, which can be used as a standalone application or a Java applet via the Web. The running sessions of the system are inter-linked with webpages of tutorials and reference pages to explain the facets, fabrication processes and material choices, and calculations and reasoning in selection are performed using process capability and material property data from a remote Web-based database and interactive knowledge base that can be maintained and updated via the Internet. The use of the developed system including operation scenario, use support, and integration with an MEMS collaborative design system is presented. Finally, an illustration example is provided.

  19. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  20. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-06

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  1. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.

    1997-11-01

    During the third phase of the subcontract, IEC researchers have continued to provide the thin film PV community with greater depth of understanding and insight into a wide variety of issues including: the deposition and characterization of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, a-Si, CdTe, CdS, and TCO thin films; the relationships between film and device properties; and the processing and analysis of thin film PV devices. This has been achieved through the systematic investigation of all aspects of film and device production and through the analysis and quantification of the reaction chemistries involved in thin film deposition. This methodology has led to controlled fabrications of 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} solar cells over a wide range of Ga compositions, improved process control of the fabrication of 10% efficient a-Si solar cells, and reliable and generally applicable procedures for both contacting and doping films. Additional accomplishments are listed below.

  2. Polymer Device of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) with a Cathode Fabricated from Silver Nanoparticles by Wet Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajii, Hirotake; Maki, Hideki; Kin, Zenken; Morimune, Taichiro; Ohmori, Yutaka

    2005-06-01

    The fabrication and characteristics of a polymer device of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PAT6) with a cathode fabricated from silver (Ag) nanoparticles were investigated. As the formation temperature is 210°C, the cathode electrode can be formed by wet processing on the organic layer with an amorphous carbon nitride buffer layer and a bank to prevent Ag nanoparticles from penetrating into the organic layer. The PAT6 device with a cathode fabricated from Ag nanoparticles shows a photo-response and a red emission in the reverse and forward bias regions, respectively. We demonstrated the possibility of a polymer photodiode and an organic light-emitting diode with a cathode utilizing Ag nanoparticles.

  3. Paper-based analytical devices for electrochemical study of the breathing process of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang-Yun; Wu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Zhong-Qin; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Herein we utilized the filter paper to physically trap red blood cells (RBC) to observe the breathing process of red blood cells based on the permeability of the filter paper. By integrating double-sided conductive carbon tape as the working electrodes, the device could be applied to monitor electrochemical responses of RBC for up to hundreds of minutes. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) peak currents increased under oxygen while decreased under nitrogen, indicating that RBC could take in and release oxygen. Further studies demonstrated that the RBC suspension could more effectively take in oxygen than the solution of hemoglobin and the supernatant of RBC, suggesting the natural advantage of RBC on oxygen transportation. This study implied that simple paper-based analytical devices might be effectively applied in the study of gas-participating reactions and biochemical detections.

  4. Critical problems of ion implantation in processing small geometry integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuyama, Takashi

    1989-02-01

    A brief review is described on the critical problems of ion implantation in processing small geometry integrated devices. The commonly recognized critical paths of the technology, i.e. formation of shallow junctions, impurity doping of vertical side walls, shadowing and the scattering effect of the incident beam are discussed based on recent data. Discussion is also given of the annealing behavior and residual defects of small and isolated implanted regions, and the considerable difference from those of the continuous implanted layers is shown. These problems are more or less related to the fundamental principles of implantation that impurities are doped by the incidence of energetic ions. Based on these facts, attempts are made to estimate the final size of the future devices to which implantation can be applied.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory CHIMRA: A Device for Processing Powdered Martian Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunshine, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The CHIMRA is an extraterrestrial sample acquisition and processing device for the Mars Science Laboratory that emphasizes robustness and adaptability through design configuration. This work reviews the guidelines utilized to invent the initial CHIMRA and the strategy employed in advancing the design; these principles will be discussed in relation to both the final CHIMRA design and similar future devices. The computational synthesis necessary to mature a boxed-in impact-generating mechanism will be presented alongside a detailed mechanism description. Results from the development testing required to advance the design for a highly-loaded, long-life and high-speed bearing application will be presented. Lessons learned during the assembly and testing of this subsystem as well as results and lessons from the sample-handling development test program will be reviewed.

  6. Material structure and processes required for the manufacture of micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrobis, Kenneth J.; Christenson, J.; Staller, Steve E.; Freeman, J.; Gadgil, Prashant

    1997-09-01

    The field of micromechanics is rapidly expanding in both the number of research groups and the number of materials being employed. Although this diversity is a strong indication of a healthy field, care must be taken to keep the focus on producing products and processes which can be transferred to the manufacturing facility. During the 1980s polysilicon was shown to contain a significant amount of process flexibility and economic potential. Although the demonstration of polysilicon sensors was noticed and in some cases pursued by industry, single-crystal silicon sensors continue to dominate the products used by the primary sensor customer, the automotive industry. A similar trend which also began in the 1980s was the use of the LIGA process for sensor fabrication. Once again, this field showed a significant amount of economic promise. However, for the resources being invested and the number of research groups pursuing this process, significant problems exist with respect to product manufacturability. Although LIGA remains an exciting field of research, new micromechanical processes or materials may greatly reduce the window of device profitability before the difficulties associated with LIGA can be brought under control. Oddly enough, it is the same material which polysilicon has failed to displace which may limit the LIGA process to only one application area, that area being magnetics. New deep anisotropic etching systems and new substrate suppliers for micromachining applications, along with the knowledge and experience industry already possesses, will maintain single crystal silicon as the sensor material of choice for the 1990s and beyond. This article reviews the material stability and processes associated with polysilicon, single crystal silicon, and electrodeposits. Emphasis will be placed on the inherent material structure and processes required to manufacture a profitable device.

  7. Modelling of Optical Guided Wave Devices in Lithium Niobate Using Test Structures for Process Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Eddie Lynn

    This dissertation presents a study of the modelling of optical guided wave devices in LiNbO_3 with emphasis on experimental verification of the models. The goals are to identify the main sources of error in the modelling process, construct a model capable of achieving qualitative and quantitative accuracy, and develop a method of determining the correct set of input parameters to the model for a given fabrication process. The investigation is limited to mode interference type devices and the switching voltage is used as a basis for comparison. The finite element method is used for calculation of optical modes in waveguides with graded refractive index profiles. The integral equation method is used for calculation of the static electric field due to electrodes in a three layer anisotropic structure. It is proposed that the main source of error in the modelling process is not in the model itself, but in determining the correct input parameters to the model. The investigation of the input parameters focusses on a priori knowledge of the parameters and the sensitivity of the model to each parameter. The five parameters responsible for the largest errors in Ti:LiNbO_3 devices are identified as the Ti diffusion coefficients, the peak index change in the waveguides, the electrooptic coefficient, and the buffer layer dielectric constant. A method is presented for determining each of the selected parameters using a set of test devices fabricated on a single chip. The test set includes a planar waveguide, Mach-Zehnder modulators, and symmetrically perturbed directional couplers. Several sets of these devices have been fabricated using different fabrication conditions. The parameter values determined using this method compare favorably to those reported in the literature. The diffusion of Ti for x-cut crystals is found to be highly anisotropic, with the lateral diffusion length being about twice as large as the diffusion depth. The dependence of the diffusion lengths on

  8. Toward practical gas sensing with highly reduced graphene oxide : a new signal processing method to circumvent run-to-run and device-to-device variations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, L. E.; Park, S.; Yu, K.; Ruoff, R. S.; Ocola, L. E.; Rosenmann, D.; Chen, J.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee; Univ. of Texas at Austin

    2011-01-04

    Graphene is worth evaluating for chemical sensing and biosensing due to its outstanding physical and chemical properties. We first report on the fabrication and characterization of gas sensors using a back-gated field-effect transistor platform with chemically reduced graphene oxide (R-GO) as the conducting channel. These sensors exhibited a 360% increase in response when exposed to 100 ppm NO{sub 2} in air, compared with thermally reduced graphene oxide sensors we reported earlier. We then present a new method of signal processing/data interpretation that addresses (i) sensing devices with long recovery periods (such as required for sensing gases with these R-GO sensors) as well as (ii) device-to-device variations. A theoretical analysis is used to illuminate the importance of using the new signal processing method when the sensing device suffers from slow recovery and non-negligible contact resistance. We suggest that the work reported here (including the sensor signal processing method and the inherent simplicity of device fabrication) is a significant step toward the real-world application of graphene-based chemical sensors.

  9. High density interconnection technology - Surface mount technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menozzi, G.

    The design features of surface mount technology (SMT) circuits for data transmission, engineering and aerospace applications are examined. Details of pin out, dual face, and interconnection techniques employed for SMT circuits mounted on plastic or ceramic leadless chip carriers are explored. The industrial processes applied to obtain the SMT boards are discussed, along with methods for quality assurance, especially for the soldered connections. SMT installations in the form of 4 Mbit multilayer circuits for an ESA project and a 32-bit mainframe computer are described.

  10. 3D-additive manufactured optical mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Ciscel, David; Wooten, John

    2015-09-01

    The Area Defense Anti-Munitions (ADAM) is a low cost and effective high power laser weapon system. It's designed to address and negate important threats such as short-range rockets, UAVs, and small boats. Many critical optical components operate in the system. The optics and mounts must accommodate thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain an exceptional wave front during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) developed, designed, and currently operates ADAM. This paper covers the design and development of a key monolithic, flexured, titanium mirror mount that was manufactured by CalRAM using additive processes.

  11. Rapid thermal processing in the manufacturing technology of contacts to InP-based photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Avishay

    1991-04-01

    Rapid thermal alloying and sintering of metal ohmic contacts such as AuBe PtTFi and W to InP-based materials is shown to perform with better electrical properties than the same contacts heated by means of conventional furnace. The metalsemiconductor interfacial reactions induced by the rapid thermal processing were much shallower than those formed during the conventional heating cycle at the same temperature however with a negligible influence on the overall stresses developed in the film. These results demonstrate the superiority of the rapid thermal processing over the conventional furnace heating in sintering the metal electrical contacts and its potential while integrated into the overall manufacturing process sequence of the InP based photonic devices.

  12. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  13. Toward high-performance quality meeting IC device manufacturing requirements with AZ SMART DSA process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JiHoon; Yin, Jian; Cao, Yi; Her, YoungJun; Petermann, Claire; Wu, Hengpeng; Shan, Jianhui; Tsutsumi, Tomohiko; Lin, Guanyang

    2015-03-01

    Significant progresses on 300 mm wafer level DSA (Directed Self-Assembly) performance stability and pattern quality were demonstrated in recent years. DSA technology is now widely regarded as a leading complementary patterning technique for future node integrated circuit (IC) device manufacturing. We first published SMARTTM DSA flow in 2012. In 2013, we demonstrated that SMARTTM DSA pattern quality is comparable to that generated using traditional multiple patterning technique for pattern uniformity on a 300 mm wafer. In addition, we also demonstrated that less than 1.5 nm/3σ LER (line edge roughness) for 16 nm half pitch DSA line/space pattern is achievable through SMARTTM DSA process. In this publication, we will report impacts on SMARTTM DSA performances of key pre-pattern features and processing conditions. 300mm wafer performance process window, CD uniformity and pattern LER/LWR after etching transfer into carbon-hard mask will be discussed as well.

  14. Environment for thin-film manufacturing process development for product engineering of micro and nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortloff, Dirk; Hahn, Kai; Popp, Jens; Schmidt, Thilo; Brück, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Product engineering of micro and nano technology (MNT) devices differs substantially from product engineering in more traditional industries. The general development approach is mostly bottom up, as it centers around the available fabrication techniques and is characterised by application specific fabrication flows, i.e. fabrication processes depending on the later product. In the first part of this paper we introduce a comprehensive customer-oriented product engineering methodology for MNT products that regards the customer as the driving force behind new product developments. The MNT product engineering process is analyzed with regard to application-specific procedures and interfaces. An environment for the development of MNT manufacturing processes has been identified as a technical foundation for the methodology and will be described in the second part of this paper.

  15. Mount Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. Vesuvius, Italy was acquired September 26, 2000. The full-size false-color image covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. (Popocatepetl and Mount Fuji are other volcanos surrounded by dense urban areas.) In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  16. Controlling the freezing process: a robotic device for rapidly freezing biological tissues with millisecond time resolution.

    PubMed

    Tikunov, Boris A; Rome, Lawrence C

    2007-10-01

    A robotic cryogenic device was developed which allows freezing of thick biological tissues with millisecond time resolution. The device consists of two horizontally oriented hammers (pre-cooled with liquid N(2)) driven by two linear servo-motors. The tissue sample is bathed in Ringers contained in a chamber which drops rapidly out of the way just as the hammers approach. A third linear motor is vertically oriented, and permits the rapidly dropping chamber to smoothly decelerate. All movements were performed by the three motors and four solenoids controlled by a PC. Mechanical adjustments, that change the size of the gap between the hammers at the end position, permit the final thickness of the frozen tissue to be varied. Here we show that the freezing time increased with the square of the final thickness of the frozen bundle. However, when bundles of different original thicknesses (up to at least 1mm) were compressed to the same final thickness (e.g., 0.2mm), they exhibited nearly equal freezing times. Hence, by being able to adjust the final thickness of the frozen bundles, the device not only speeds the rate of freezing, but standardizes the freezing time for different diameter samples. This permits the use of freezing for accurate determination of the kinetics of cellular processes in biological tissue.

  17. Multilayered Microelectronic Device Package With An Integral Window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-10-26

    A microelectronic package with an integral window mounted in a recessed lip for housing a microelectronic device. The device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can be formed of a low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) or high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayered material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined (e.g. co-fired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that a light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The result is a compact, low profile package, having an integral window mounted in a recessed lip, that can be hermetically sealed.

  18. Analysis of impact of suspension rubber mounts on ride comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bao; Chen, Zheming; Lei, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Two multi-body car models with rubber mounts and without rubber mounts have been built up to research how the suspension rubber mounts impact ride comfort. The comfort mount was used to simulate the impact process. Two scenarios have been set up, and time integrations have been performed to get the acceleration-time histories of seat surface in the x-, y-, and z-direction. A MATLAB program was compiled to calculate the weighted RMS acceleration. For the first scenario, the relative difference of weighted RMS acceleration between the car models with rubber mounts and without rubber mounts gradually decreases as the road roughness increases. For the second scenario, the relative difference increases as the driving speed increases. The conclusion shows that the change of driving speed or road roughness impacts ride comfort. Especially for high driving speed this impact is quite obvious.

  19. Life Distribution Properties of Devices Subject to a Levy Wear Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    and1 Pr,)schan A . , it suff ices to provi. tl,, properties of ) t(-rtns of those, of Vanm) -, and tnen draw thca conclu’- on for tlhV non-stat ionarv...AD1A27 062 LFOSTRIBUTION PROPERTIES OF DEVICES SUBJECT 0O A 1 LEVY WEAR PROCESS(U) NORTH CAROLINA UNIV AT CHAPEL HIL DEPT OF MATHEMATICS M ABOEL...BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963- A AFOSR-TR. 83-0261 , - LECTE Department ’ A ,2.- ’..<APR 2 2 1983. >- of " C’- Q. of A C.’) Mathematics __J The

  20. A device for conducting a dynamic modes of UIAB therapy with automatic process testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barylo, Hryhoriy I.; Hotra, Zenon Yu.; Kozhukhar, Oleksandr T.; Ivakh, Mariya S.; Surtel, Wojciech; Maciejewski, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The structure and circuit of the implemented device is using an environmentally friendly radiation sources and pulse photo stimulus modes with frequencies that correspond frequencies processes in BL to create bio resonance effects to accelerate the procedures. Proposed one of the possible hardware solutions are based on usage of dynamic irradiation modes and automatic continuous optical testing procedures UIAB and PP. The changes of the optical characteristics of BL provides the doctor continuous information on the effectiveness of the procedure on the patient's condition.

  1. High resolution infrared ``vision'' of dynamic electron processes in semiconductor devices (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared cameras have been traditionally used in semiconductor industry for noncontact measurements of printed circuit boards (PCBs) local overheating. While an effective way to prevent defective PCB application in a "find-problems-before-your-customer-do" manner, this conventional static (25-50 frames/s) and small spatial resolution (>100 μm) approach is incapable, in principle, of explaining the physical reason for the PCB failure. What follows in this report is the demonstration of an IR camera based new approach in high-resolution dynamic study of electron processes responsible for single device performance. More specifically, time resolved two-dimensional visualization of current carrier drift and diffusion processes across the device base that happen in microsecond scale is of prime concern in the work. Thus, contrary to the conventional visualization-through-heating measurements, objective is mapping of electron processes in a device base through negative and positive luminescence (provoked by band-to-band electron transitions) and nonequilibrium thermal emission (provoked by intraband electron transitions) studies inside the region in which current flows. Therefore, the parameters of interest are not only a device thermal mass and thermal conductance, but also free carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity, diffusion length, and contact properties. The micro-mapping system developed consists of reflective type IR microscope coaxially attached to calibrated scanning IR thermal imaging cameras (3-5 and 8-12 μm spectral ranges, HgCdTe cooled photodetectors, scene spatial resolution of some 20 μm, minimum time resolved interval of 10 μs, and temperature resolution of about 0.5 °C at 30 °C). Data acquisition and image processing (emissivity equalization, noise reduction by image averaging, and external triggering) are computer controlled. Parallel video channel equipped with a CCD camera permits easy positioning and focusing of <1×1 mm2 object

  2. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  3. Dip molding to form intricately-shaped medical elastomer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Preshaped mandrel mounted on rotating mechanism is partically immersed in tank filled with liquid elastomer. While mandrel rotates, elastomer film forms om mandrel surface due to surface tension and capillary behavior of liquid. Devices with well-defined flanges can be made using process.

  4. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  5. Mount Zion Cemetery, 1975 Plot Plan Mount Zion Cemetery/ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Mount Zion Cemetery, 1975 Plot Plan - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. [Discussion on Quality Evaluation Method of Medical Device During Life-Cycle in Operation Based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Caixian; Zheng, Kun; Shen, Yunming; Wu, Yunyun

    2016-01-01

    The content related to the quality during life-cycle in operation of medical device includes daily use, repair volume, preventive maintenance, quality control and adverse event monitoring. In view of this, the article aims at discussion on the quality evaluation method of medical devices during their life cycle in operation based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The presented method is proved to be effective by evaluating patient monitors as example. The method presented in can promote and guide the device quality control work, and it can provide valuable inputs to decisions about purchase of new device.

  7. Process monitor of 3D-device features by using FIB and CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Sakai, Hideo; Torikawa, Shota; Tomimatsu, Satoshi; Onishi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    For yield improvement of 3D-device manufacturing, metrology for the variability of individual device-features is on hot issue. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) can be used for monitoring the individual cross-section. However, efficiency of process monitoring is limited by the speed of measurement including preparation of lamella sample. In this work we demonstrate speedy 3D-profile measurement of individual line-features without the lamella sampling. For instance, we make a-few-micrometer-wide and 45-degree-descending slope in dense line-features by using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) tool capable of 300mm-wafer. On the descending slope, obliquely cut cross-section of the line features appears. Then, we transfer the wafer to Critical-Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope (CDSEM) to measure the oblique cross-section in normal top-down view. As the descending angle is 45 degrees, the oblique cross-section looks like a cross-section normal to the wafer surface. For every single line-features the 3D dimensions are measured. To the reference metrology of the Scanning TEM (STEM), nanometric linearity and precision are confirmed for the height and the width under the hard mask of the line features. Without cleaving wafer the 60 cells on the wafer can be measured in 3 hours, which allows us of near-line process monitor of in-wafer uniformity.

  8. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field. PMID:25892711

  9. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  10. Tunable high-refractive index hybrid for solution-processed light management devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachevillier, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    After the use of highly efficient but expensive inorganic optical materials, solution-processable polymers and hybrids have drawn more and more interest. Our group have recently developed a novel polymer-based hybrid optical material from titanium oxide hydrate exhibiting an outstanding set of optical and material properties. Firstly, their low cost, processability and cross-linked states are particularly attractive for many applications. Moreover, a high refractive index can be repeatedly achieved while optical losses stays considerably low over the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. Indeed, the formation of inorganic nanoparticles, usually present in nanocomposites, is avoided by a specific formulation process. Even more remarkably, the refractive index can be tuned by either changing the inorganic content, using different titanium precursors or via a low-temperature curing process. A part of our work is focused on the reliable optical characterization of these properties, in particular a microscope-based setup allowing in-situ measurement and sample mapping has been developed. Our efforts are also concentrated on various applications of these exceptional properties. This hybrid material is tailored for photonic devices, with a specific emphasis on the production of highly efficient solution processable Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBR) and anti-reflection coatings. Furthermore, waveguides can be fabricated from thin films along with in-coupling and out-coupling structures. These light managements structures are particularly adapted to organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) and light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  11. Mount St. Helens Flyover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington State was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a 'natural' color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief. Landsat7 aquired an image of Mt. St. Helens on August 22, 1999. Image and animation courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  12. The compact electromagnetic device optimization modeling of seismo-electromagnetic processes for the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengor, T.

    2009-04-01

    modeling of seismo-electromagnetic processes," IUGG Perugia 2007. [2] T. Sengor,"The electromagnetic device optimization modeling of seismo-electromagnetic Processes for Marmara Sea earthquakes," EGU Vienna 2008. [3] T. Sengor,"On the exact interaction mechanism of electromagnetically generated phenomena with significant earthquakes and the observations related the exact predictions before the significant earthquakes at July 1999-May 2000 period," HelsinkiUniv. Tech. Electrom. Lab. Rept. 368, May 2001. [4] T. Sengor,"The Observational Findings Before The Great Earthquakes Of December 2004 And The Mechanism Extraction From Associated Electromagnetic Phenomena," Book of XXVIIIth URSI GA 2005, pp. 191, EGH.9 (01443) and Proceedings 2005 CD, New Delhi, India, Oct. 23-29, 2005. [5] T. Sengor, "The interaction mechanism among electromagnetic phenomena and geophysical-seismic-ionospheric phenomena with extraction for exact earthquake prediction genetics," 10th SA of the IAGA 2005, Abst. CD,. GAI, C109, No.: IAGA2005-A-0134, Toulouse, France, July18-29, 2005.

  13. Understanding wax screen-printing: a novel patterning process for microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Chunsun; Liu, Feifei

    2015-09-03

    In this work, we first introduce the fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) using a wax screen-printing approach that is suitable for simple, inexpensive, rapid, low-energy-consumption and high-throughput preparation of cloth-based analytical devices. We have carried out a detailed study on the wax screen-printing of μCADs and have obtained some interesting results. Firstly, an analytical model is established for the spreading of molten wax in cloth. Secondly, a new wax screen-printing process has been proposed for fabricating μCADs, where the melting of wax into the cloth is much faster (∼5 s) and the heating temperature is much lower (75 °C). Thirdly, the experimental results show that the patterning effects of the proposed wax screen-printing method depend to a certain extent on types of screens, wax melting temperatures and melting time. Under optimized conditions, the minimum printing width of hydrophobic wax barrier and hydrophilic channel is 100 μm and 1.9 mm, respectively. Importantly, the developed analytical model is also well validated by these experiments. Fourthly, the μCADs fabricated by the presented wax screen-printing method are used to perform a proof-of-concept assay of glucose or protein in artificial urine with rapid high-throughput detection taking place on a 48-chamber cloth-based device and being performed by a visual readout. Overall, the developed cloth-based wax screen-printing and arrayed μCADs should provide a new research direction in the development of advanced sensor arrays for detection of a series of analytes relevant to many diverse applications.

  14. All-optical devices realized by the post-growth processing of multiquantum-well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LiKamWa, Patrick; Kan'an, Ayman M.; Dutta, Mitra; Pamulapati, Jagadeesh

    1997-01-01

    An inexpensive and reliable process for the area-selective disordering of MQW structures is reported. The method relies on the diffusion, by rapid thermal annealing, of surface vacancies into the quantum wells thereby intermixing the Ga and Al atoms between the wells and barriers. A silicon oxide cap that is formed by curing a spun-on solution of glass forming compound acts as porous layer that enhances the formation of surface vacancies by allowing out-diffusion of Ga and Al atoms. This technique has been applied to the fabrication of two integrated optical devices. One is the nonlinear zero-gap directional coupler with disordered input and output branching waveguides, and the other is the symmetric nonlinear integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer with one arm containing a non-intermixed MQW section. In both devices, the mechanism for the switching is the nonlinear refractive index that is caused by photo-generated carriers. Since this mechanism entails absorption of some of the pump beam, it is hence very important that the optical absorption be confined to the active sections only. Selective area disordering is shown to be very effective at defining regions of different bandgap energies. Hence it can be ensured that the energy of the pump laser beam is too low in comparison to the bandgap energy of the passive regions to be absorbed and the free carriers are only created in the non-intermixed active sections. The devices investigated using a pump-probe setup, exhibited strong all-optical switching behavior with a contrast ratio of better than 7:1. The controlled selective area intermixing of MQW structures will potentially play a significant role in the advancement of photonic integrated circuits.

  15. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-07

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy.

  16. Proceedings of defect engineering in semiconductor growth, processing and device technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ashok, S.; Chevallier, J.; Sumino, K.; Weber, E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume results from a symposium that was part of the 1992 Spring Meeting of the Materials Research Society, held in San Francisco from April 26 to May 1, 1992. The symposium, entitled Defect Engineering in Semiconductor Growth, Processing and Device Technology, was the first of its kind at MRS and brought together academic and industrial researchers with varying perspectives on defects in semiconductors. Its aim was to go beyond defect control, and focus instead on deliberate and controlled introduction and manipulation of defects in order to engineer some desired properties in semiconductor materials and devices. While the concept of defect engineering has at least a vague perception in techniques such as impurity/defect gettering and the use of the EL2 level in GaAs, more extensive as well as subtle uses of defects are emerging to augment the field. This symposium was intended principally to encourage creative new applications of defects in all aspects of semiconductor technology. The organization of this proceedings volume closely follows the topics around which the sessions were built. The papers on grown-in defects in bulk crystals deal with overviews of intrinsic and impurity-related defects, their influence on electrical, optical and mechanical properties, as well as the use of impurities to arrest certain types of defects during growth and defects to control growth. The issues addressed by the papers on defects in thin films include impurity and stoichiometry control, defects created by plasmas and the use of electron/ion irradiation for doping control.

  17. Mount Rainier National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Robert; Woodward, Andrea; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Griffin, Paul C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hagar, Joan; Cummings, Tonnie; Duriscoe, Dan; Kopper, Karen; Riedel, Jon; Samora, Barbara; Marin, Lelaina; Mauger, Guillaume S.; Bumbaco, Karen; Littell, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural Resource Condition Assessments (NRCAs) evaluate current conditions for a subset of natural resources and resource indicators in national parks. NRCAs also report on trends in resource condition (when possible), identify critical data gaps, and characterize a general level of confidence for study findings. The resources and indicators emphasized in a given project depend on the park’s resource setting, status of resource stewardship planning and science in identifying high-priority indicators, and availability of data and expertise to assess current conditions for a variety of potential study resources and indicators. Although the primary objective of NRCAs is to report on current conditions relative to logical forms of reference conditions and values, NRCAs also report on trends, when appropriate (i.e., when the underlying data and methods support such reporting), as well as influences on resource conditions. These influences may include past activities or conditions that provide a helpful context for understanding current conditions and present-day threats and stressors that are best interpreted at park, watershed, or landscape scales (though NRCAs do not report on condition status for land areas and natural resources beyond park boundaries). Intensive cause-andeffect analyses of threats and stressors, and development of detailed treatment options, are outside the scope of NRCAs. It is also important to note that NRCAs do not address resources that lack sufficient data for assessment. For Mount Rainier National Park, this includes most invertebrate species and many other animal species that are subject to significant stressors from climate change and other anthropogenic sources such as air pollutants and recreational use. In addition, we did not include an analysis of the physical hydrology associated with streams (such as riverine landforms, erosion and aggradation which is significant in MORA streams), due to a loss of staff expertise from the USGS

  18. Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mount St. Helens was captured one week after the March 8, 2005, ash and steam eruption, the latest activity since the volcano's reawakening in September 2004. The new lava dome in the southeast part of the crater is clearly visible, highlighted by red areas where ASTER's infrared channels detected hot spots from incandescent lava. The new lava dome is 155 meters (500 feet) higher than the old lava dome, and still growing.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 21.9 by 24.4 kilometers (13.6 by 15.1 miles) Location: 46.2 degrees North latitude, 122.2 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 8, 3, and 1 Original Data Resolution

  19. Bi-level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-01-06

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The package has at least two levels of circuits for making electrical interconnections to a pair of microelectronic devices. The result is a compact, low-profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device(s).

  20. Helmet-Mounted Display Of Clouds Of Harmful Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Barengoltz, Jack B.; Schober, Wayne R.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed helmet-mounted opto-electronic instrument provides real-time stereoscopic views of clouds of otherwise invisible toxic, explosive, and/or corrosive gas. Display semitransparent: images of clouds superimposed on scene ordinarily visible to wearer. Images give indications on sizes and concentrations of gas clouds and their locations in relation to other objects in scene. Instruments serve as safety devices for astronauts, emergency response crews, fire fighters, people cleaning up chemical spills, or anyone working near invisible hazardous gases. Similar instruments used as sensors in automated emergency response systems that activate safety equipment and emergency procedures. Both helmet-mounted and automated-sensor versions used at industrial sites, chemical plants, or anywhere dangerous and invisible or difficult-to-see gases present. In addition to helmet-mounted and automated-sensor versions, there could be hand-held version. In some industrial applications, desirable to mount instruments and use them similarly to parking-lot surveillance cameras.

  1. OLED Fundamentals: Materials, Devices, and Processing of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Blochwitz-Nimoth, Jan; Bhandari, Abhinav; Boesch, Damien; Fincher, Curtis R.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Gotthold, David W.; Greiner, Mark T.; Kido, Junji; Kondakov, Denis; Korotkov, Roman; Krylova, Valentina A.; Loeser, Falk; Lu, Min-Hao; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Lussem, Bjorn; Moro, Lorenza; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rostovtsev, Vsevolod V.; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Silverman, Gary; Thompson, Mark E.; Tietze, Max; Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Weaver, Michael; Xin , Xu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2015-05-26

    -efficiency OLED demonstrated in 1987. Thus, we expect to see exciting advances in the science, technology and commercialization in the coming years. We hope that this book helps to advance the field in some small way. Contributors to this monograph are experts from top academic institutions, industry and national laboratories who provide comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of the rapidly evolving field of OLEDs. Furthermore, this monograph collects in one place, for the first time, key topics across the field of OLEDs, from fundamental chemistry and physics, to practical materials science and engineering topics, to aspects of design and manufacturing. The monograph synthesizes and puts into context information scattered throughout the literature for easy review in one book. The scope of the monograph reflects the necessity to focus on new technological challenges brought about by the transition to manufacturing. In the Section 1, all materials of construction of the OLED device are covered, from substrate to encapsulation. In Section 2, for the first time, additional challenges in devices and processing are addressed. This book is geared towards a broad audience, including materials scientists, device physicists, synthetic chemists and electrical engineers. Furthermore, this book makes a great introduction to scientists in industry and academia, as well as graduate students interested in applied aspects of photophysics and electrochemistry in organic thin films. This book is a comprehensive source for OLED R&D professionals from all backgrounds and institutions.

  2. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vook, F.L.

    1988-06-16

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  3. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.; Vook, Frederick L.

    1989-01-01

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  4. A miniature rigid/flex salinity measurement device fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, H. A.; Ketterl, T. P.; Reid, C. S.

    2010-08-01

    The design, fabrication and initial performance of a single substrate, miniature, low-cost conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD) sensor board with interconnects are presented. In combination these sensors measure ocean salinity. The miniature CTD device board was designed and fabricated as the main component of a 50 mm × 25 mm × 25 mm animal-attached biologger. The board was fabricated using printed circuit processes and consists of two distinct regions on a continuous single liquid crystal polymer substrate: an 18 mm × 28 mm rigid multi-metal sensor section and a 72 mm long flexible interconnect section. The 95% confidence intervals for the conductivity, temperature and pressure sensors were demonstrated to be ±0.083 mS cm-1, 0.01 °C, and ±0.135 dbar, respectively.

  5. Using mobile devices to improve the safety of medication administration processes.

    PubMed

    Navas, H; Graffi Moltrasio, L; Ares, F; Strumia, G; Dourado, E; Alvarez, M

    2015-01-01

    Within preventable medical errors, those related to medications are frequent in every stage of the prescribing cycle. Nursing is responsible for maintaining each patients safety and care quality. Moreover, nurses are the last people who can detect an error in medication before its administration. Medication administration is one of the riskiest tasks in nursing. The use of information and communication technologies is related to a decrease in these errors. Including mobile devices related to 2D code reading of patients and medication will decrease the possibility of error when preparing and administering medication by nurses. A cross-platform software (iOS and Android) was developed to ensure the five Rights of the medication administration process (patient, medication, dose, route and schedule). Deployment in November showed 39% use.

  6. MCF (Magnetic Compound Fluid) Polishing Process for Free-formed Resin Device using Robotic Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Sato, T.; Lin, W.; Yamamoto, K.; Shimada, K.

    2011-01-01

    The automatic polishing process for three-dimensional forms, such as prototype models of products made of acrylic resin, are being required to develop in order to reduce cost and time consumption. This paper proposes a new polishing technique using magnetic compound fluid (MCF) and robotic arm. Firstly, a polishing unit, which can generate a dynamic magnetic field and be attachable to the robotic arm, is developed. This unit can hold MCF slurry that acts as a flexible and restorable polishing tool for the sake of magnetic force. Secondly, the effects of the clearance between workpiece and polishing unit, the composition of MCF slurry, the relative motion, the dynamic magnetic field and the supplied amount of slurry on polishing characteristics of acrylic resin are experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the smoothest surface roughness is achieved to below 10 nm Ra in a few min, and the feasibility of polishing the free-formed device by controlling robotic arm has been confirmed.

  7. A Comparative Study of Measuring Devices Used During Space Shuttle Processing for Inside Diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    During Space Shuttle processing, discrepancies between vehicle dimensions and per print dimensions determine if a part should be refurbished, replaced or accepted "as-is." The engineer's job is to address each discrepancy by choosing the most accurate procedure and tool available, sometimes with up to ten thousands of an inch tolerance. Four methods of measurement are commonly used at the Kennedy Space Center: 1) caliper, 2) mold impressions, 3) optical comparator, 4) dial bore gage. During a problem report evaluation, uncertainty arose between methods after measuring diameters with variations of up to 0.0004" inches. The results showed that computer based measuring devices are extremely accurate, but when human factor is involved in determining points of reference, the results may vary widely compared to more traditional methods. iv

  8. Confirmatory factor analysis of the antisocial process screening device with a clinical inpatient population.

    PubMed

    Fite, Paul J; Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura; Fabiano, Gregory A

    2009-03-01

    Research linking psychopathic tendencies to childhood behavior problems is predicated on the assumption that the findings are based on using psychometrically sound measures of psychopathic tendencies. Although evaluated with community samples, the psychometric properties of such measures have not been evaluated with inpatient clinical populations thereby limiting conclusions. Hence, the goal of the present study was to evaluate the factor structure of a widely used measure-the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD)-with an inpatient population. Parents of 328 children (M age = 8.90 years) completed the APSD at the time of their child's admission for treatment. Although confirmatory factor analyses supported the three- and two-factor solutions proposed by the authors of the measure, the two-factor structure was more parsimonious. Factors of the two-factor model were also related to symptoms of childhood behavior disorders. The findings extend current research on the APSD's factor structure to an inpatient population.

  9. Adjustable Optical Mount Is More Rigid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Bill G.; Coombs, David S.; Jones, Irby W.; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mount for lens or mirror in laser offers rigidity similar to that of nonadjustable optical mount. In comparison with older adjustable optical mounts, this one less susceptible to movements and distortions caused by vibrations and by thermal expansions and contractions. Mount contains neither adjustment rods (which grow or shrink as temperature varies) nor springs (which transmit vibrations to mounted optic).

  10. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  11. Enhanced functionality in GaN and SiC devices by using novel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.; Gila, B. P.; Ren, F.; Zavada, J. M.; Park, Y. D.

    2004-11-01

    Some examples of recent advances in enhancing or adding functionality to GaN and SiC devices through the use of novel processing techniques are discussed. The first example is the use of ion implantation to incorporate transition metals such as Mn, Cr and Co at atomic percent levels in the wide bandgap semiconductors to produce room temperature ferromagnetism. A discussion is given of the phase space within which single-phase material can be obtained and the requirements for demonstrating the presence of a true dilute magnetic semiconductor. The ability to make GaN and SiC ferromagnetic leads to the possibility of magnetic devices with gain, spin FETs operating at low voltages and spin polarized light emitters. The second example is the use of novel oxides such as Sc 2O 3 and MgO as gate dielectrics or surface passivants on GaN. True inversion behavior has been demonstrated in gated MOS-GaN diodes with implanted n-regions supplying the minority carriers need for inversion. These oxide layers also effectively mitigate current collapse in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs through their passivation of surface states in the gate-drain region. The third example is the use of laser drilling to make through-wafer via holes in SiC, sapphire and GaN. The ablation rate is sufficiently high that this maskless, serial process appears capable of achieving similar throughput to the more conventional approach of plasma etching of vias. The fourth example is the use of either ungated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs or simple GaN and SiC Schottky diodes as sensors for chemicals, biogens, radiation, combustion gases or strain. The sensitivity of either the channel carrier density or the barrier height to changes in surface condition make these materials systems ideal for compact robust sensors capable of operating at elevated temperatures.

  12. 75 FR 4402 - Strengthening the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's 510(k) Review Process; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... not always initially provide sufficient engineering and design information for their devices under... context, or tool-type devices such as scalpels or lasers that may be cleared to cut and coagulate...

  13. Low-temperature optical processing of semiconductor devices using photon effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Cudzinovic, M.; Symko, M.

    1995-08-01

    In an RTA process the primary purpose of the optical energy incident on the semiconductor sample is to increase its temperature rapidly. The activation of reactions involved in processes such as the formation of junctions, metal contacts, deposition of oxides or nitrides, takes place purely by the temperature effects. We describe the observation of a number of new photonic effects that take place within the bulk and at the interfaces of a semiconductor when a semiconductor device is illuminated with a spectrally broad-band light. Such effects include changes in the diffusion properties of impurities in the semiconductor, increased diffusivity of impurities across interfaces, and generation of electric fields that can alter physical and chemical properties of the interface. These phenomena lead to certain unique effects in an RTA process that do not occur during conventional furnace annealing under the same temperature conditions. Of particular interest are observations of low-temperature alloying of Si-Al interfaces, enhanced activation of phosphorus in Si during drive-in, low-temperature oxidation of Si, and gettering of impurities at low-temperatures under optical illumination. These optically induced effects, in general, diminish with an increase in the temperature, thus allowing thermally activated reaction rates to dominate at higher temperatures.

  14. Mount Meager landslide flow history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, L.; Allstadt, K.; Mangeney, A.; Capdeville, Y.; Stutzmann, E.; Bouchut, F.

    2013-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities, such as landslides, avalanches, or debris flows, play a key role in erosional processes and represent one of the major natural hazards in mountainous, coastal, and volcanic regions. Despite the great amount of field, experimental and numerical work devoted to this problem, the understanding of the physical processes at work in gravitational flows is still an open issue, in particular due to the lack of observations relevant to their dynamics. In this context, the seismic signal generated by gravitational flows is a unique opportunity to obtain information on their dynamics. Indeed, as shown recently by Favreau et al., (2010), simulation of the seismic signal generated by landslides makes it possible to discriminate different flow scenarios and estimate rheological parameters. Global and regional seismic networks continuously record gravitational instabilities, so this new method will help gather new data on landslide behavior, particularly when combined with a landslide numerical modeling. Using this approach, we focus on the 6 August 2010 Mount Meager landslide: a 48.5 Mm3 rockslide-debris flow occurring in the Mount Meager Volcanic complex in the Southwest British Columbia. This landslide traveled over 12.7 km in just a few minutes time and was recorded by 25 broadband seismic stations. The time history of the forces exerted by the landslide on the ground surface was inverted from the seismic waveforms. The forcing history revealed the occurrence of a complicated initiation and showed features attributable to flow over a complicated path that included two sharp turns and runup at a valley wall barrier. To reliably interpret this signal and thus obtain detailed information about the dynamics of the landslide, we ran simulations for a range of scenarios by varying the coefficient of friction and the number, mass, and timings of subevents and compute the forces generated in each case. By comparing the results of these simulations to the

  15. Mount Meager landslide flow history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Laurent; Allstadt, Kate; Mangeney, Anne; Yann, capdeville; Eleonore, Stutzmann; François, Bouchut

    2014-05-01

    Gravitational instabilities, such as landslides, avalanches, or debris flows, play a key role in erosional processes and represent one of the major natural hazards in mountainous, coastal, and volcanic regions. Despite the great amount of field, experimental and numerical work devoted to this problem, the understanding of the physical processes at work in gravitational flows is still an open issue, in particular due to the lack of observations relevant to their dynamics. In this context, the seismic signal generated by gravitational flows is a unique opportunity to obtain information on their dynamics. Indeed, as shown recently by Favreau et al., (2010), simulation of the seismic signal generated by landslides makes it possible to discriminate different flow scenarios and estimate rheological parameters. Global and regional seismic networks continuously record gravitational instabilities, so this new method will help gather new data on landslide behavior, particularly when combined with a landslide numerical modeling. Using this approach, we focus on the 6 August 2010 Mount Meager landslide: a 48.5 Mm3 rockslide-debris flow occurring in the Mount Meager Volcanic complex in the Southwest British Columbia. This landslide traveled over 12.7 km in just a few minutes time and was recorded by 25 broadband seismic stations. The time history of the forces exerted by the landslide on the ground surface was inverted from the seismic waveforms. The forcing history revealed the occurrence of a complicated initiation and showed features attributable to flow over a complicated path that included two sharp turns and runup at a valley wall barrier. To reliably interpret this signal and thus obtain detailed information about the dynamics of the landslide, we ran simulations for a range of scenarios by varying the coefficient of friction and the number, mass, and timings of subevents and compute the forces generated in each case. By comparing the results of these simulations to the

  16. 21 CFR 801.150 - Medical devices; processing, labeling, or repacking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Other Exemptions § 801.150 Medical devices... interstate commerce and the time of holding in such establishment, from compliance with the labeling and... or delivery into interstate commerce is the operator of the establishment where such device is to...

  17. 21 CFR 801.150 - Medical devices; processing, labeling, or repacking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Other Exemptions § 801.150 Medical devices... interstate commerce and the time of holding in such establishment, from compliance with the labeling and... or delivery into interstate commerce is the operator of the establishment where such device is to...

  18. Apollo Telescope Mount Spar Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, served as the primary scientific instrument unit aboard the Skylab. The ATM contained eight complex astronomical instruments designed to observe the Sun over a wide spectrum from visible light to x-rays. This image shows the ATM spar assembly. All solar telescopes, the fine Sun sensors, and some auxiliary systems are mounted on the spar, a cruciform lightweight perforated metal mounting panel that divides the 10-foot long canister lengthwise into four equal compartments. The spar assembly was nested inside a cylindrical canister that fit into the rack, a complex frame, and was protected by the solar shield.

  19. Device for removing blackheads

    DOEpatents

    Berkovich, Tamara

    1995-03-07

    A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

  20. Processing and Device Oriented Approach to CIGS Module Reliability; SunShot Initiative, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.; Mansfield, L.; Garris, R.; Deline, C.; Silverman, T.

    2015-02-24

    Abstract: A device level understanding of thin film module reliability has been lacking. We propose that device performance and stability issues are strongly coupled and simultaneous attention to both is necessary. Commonly discussed technical issues such as light soaking, metastability, reverse bias breakdown and junction breakdown can be understood by comparing the behaviors of cells made inAbstract: A device level understanding of thin film module reliability has been lacking. We propose that device performance and stability issues are strongly coupled and simultaneous attention to both is necessary. Commonly discussed technical issues such as light soaking, metastability, reverse bias breakdown and junction breakdown can be understood by comparing the behaviors of cells made in the laboratory and industry. It will then be possible to attribute the observed effects in terms of processing and cell design. Process connection to stability studies can help identify root causes and a path for mitigating the degradation.

  1. Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe photovoltaic devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

  2. Efficient and mechanically robust stretchable organic light-emitting devices by a laser-programmable buckling process

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Da; Feng, Jing; Ma, Rui; Liu, Yue-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Bi, Yan-Gang; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable organic light-emitting devices are becoming increasingly important in the fast-growing fields of wearable displays, biomedical devices and health-monitoring technology. Although highly stretchable devices have been demonstrated, their luminous efficiency and mechanical stability remain impractical for the purposes of real-life applications. This is due to significant challenges arising from the high strain-induced limitations on the structure design of the device, the materials used and the difficulty of controlling the stretch-release process. Here we have developed a laser-programmable buckling process to overcome these obstacles and realize a highly stretchable organic light-emitting diode with unprecedented efficiency and mechanical robustness. The strained device luminous efficiency −70 cd A−1 under 70% strain - is the largest to date and the device can accommodate 100% strain while exhibiting only small fluctuations in performance over 15,000 stretch-release cycles. This work paves the way towards fully stretchable organic light-emitting diodes that can be used in wearable electronic devices. PMID:27187936

  3. Efficient and mechanically robust stretchable organic light-emitting devices by a laser-programmable buckling process.

    PubMed

    Yin, Da; Feng, Jing; Ma, Rui; Liu, Yue-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Bi, Yan-Gang; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-05-17

    Stretchable organic light-emitting devices are becoming increasingly important in the fast-growing fields of wearable displays, biomedical devices and health-monitoring technology. Although highly stretchable devices have been demonstrated, their luminous efficiency and mechanical stability remain impractical for the purposes of real-life applications. This is due to significant challenges arising from the high strain-induced limitations on the structure design of the device, the materials used and the difficulty of controlling the stretch-release process. Here we have developed a laser-programmable buckling process to overcome these obstacles and realize a highly stretchable organic light-emitting diode with unprecedented efficiency and mechanical robustness. The strained device luminous efficiency -70 cd A(-1) under 70% strain - is the largest to date and the device can accommodate 100% strain while exhibiting only small fluctuations in performance over 15,000 stretch-release cycles. This work paves the way towards fully stretchable organic light-emitting diodes that can be used in wearable electronic devices.

  4. Efficient and mechanically robust stretchable organic light-emitting devices by a laser-programmable buckling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Da; Feng, Jing; Ma, Rui; Liu, Yue-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Bi, Yan-Gang; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-05-01

    Stretchable organic light-emitting devices are becoming increasingly important in the fast-growing fields of wearable displays, biomedical devices and health-monitoring technology. Although highly stretchable devices have been demonstrated, their luminous efficiency and mechanical stability remain impractical for the purposes of real-life applications. This is due to significant challenges arising from the high strain-induced limitations on the structure design of the device, the materials used and the difficulty of controlling the stretch-release process. Here we have developed a laser-programmable buckling process to overcome these obstacles and realize a highly stretchable organic light-emitting diode with unprecedented efficiency and mechanical robustness. The strained device luminous efficiency -70 cd A-1 under 70% strain - is the largest to date and the device can accommodate 100% strain while exhibiting only small fluctuations in performance over 15,000 stretch-release cycles. This work paves the way towards fully stretchable organic light-emitting diodes that can be used in wearable electronic devices.

  5. Fabricating process of hollow out-of-plane Ni microneedle arrays and properties of the integrated microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Cao, Ying; Wang, Hong; Li, Yigui; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Di

    2013-07-01

    Although microfluidic devices that integrate microfluidic chips with hollow out-of-plane microneedle arrays have many advantages in transdermal drug delivery applications, difficulties exist in their fabrication due to the special three-dimensional structures of hollow out-of-plane microneedles. A new, cost-effective process for the fabrication of a hollow out-of-plane Ni microneedle array is presented. The integration of PDMS microchips with the Ni hollow microneedle array and the properties of microfluidic devices are also presented. The integrated microfluidic devices provide a new approach for transdermal drug delivery.

  6. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis.

  7. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1995-03-21

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis. 7 figures.

  8. 78 FR 29140 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers About 517A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes... Radiological Health (CDRH) Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers About 517A.'' This draft document provides...), which were added by the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), as those provisions pertain to...

  9. Novel Materials, Processing, and Device Technologies for Space Exploration with Potential Dual-Use Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, A. F.; Bailey, S. G.; McNatt, J. S.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Harris, J. D.; Rusch, A. W.; Nogales, K. A.; Goettsche, K. V.; Hanson, W.; Amos, D.; Vendra, V. K.; Woodbury, C.; Hari, P.; Roberts, K. P.; Jones, A. D., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight results of a broad spectrum of efforts on lower-temperature processing of nanomaterials, novel approaches to energy conversion, and environmentally rugged devices. Solution-processed quantum dots of copper indium chalcogenide semiconductors and multi-walled carbon nanotubes from lower-temperature spray pyrolysis are enabled by novel (precursor) chemistry. Metal-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructured components of photovoltaic cells have been grown in solution at low temperature on a conductive indium tin oxide substrate. Arrays of ZnO nanorods can be templated and decorated with various semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles. Utilizing ZnO in a more broadly defined energy conversion sense as photocatalysts, unwanted organic waste materials can potentially be re-purposed. Current efforts on charge carrier dynamics in nanoscale electrode architectures used in photoelectrochemical cells for generating solar electricity and fuels are described. The objective is to develop oxide nanowire-based electrode architectures that exhibit improved charge separation, charge collection and allow for efficient light absorption. Investigation of the charge carrier transport and recombination properties of the electrodes will aid in the understanding of how nanowire architectures improve performance of electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells. Nanomaterials can be incorporated in a number of advanced higher-performance (i.e. mass specific power) photovoltaic arrays. Advanced technologies for the deposition of 4H-silicon carbide are described. The use of novel precursors, advanced processing, and process studies, including modeling are discussed from the perspective of enhancing the performance of this promising material for enabling technologies such as solar electric propulsion. Potential impact(s) of these technologies for a variety of aerospace applications are highlighted throughout. Finally, examples are given of technologies with potential spin-offs for dual

  10. Novel Materials, Processing and Device Technologies for Space Exploration with Potential Dual-Use Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, A. F.; Bailey, S. G.; McNatt, J. S.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Harris, J. D.; Rusch, A. W.; Nogales, K. A.; Goettsche, K.V.; Hanson, W.; Amos, D.; Vendra, M. K.; Woodbury, C.; Hari, P.; Roberts, K. P.; Jones, A. D., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    We highlight results of a broad spectrum of efforts on lower-temperature processing of nanomaterials, novel approaches to energy conversion, and environmentally rugged devices. Solution-processed quantum dots of copper indium chalcogenide semiconductors and multiwalled carbon nanotubes from lower-temperature spray pyrolysis are enabled by novel (precursor) chemistry. Metal-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructured components of photovoltaic cells have been grown in solution at low temperature on a conductive indium tin oxide substrate. Arrays of ZnO nanorods can be templated and decorated with various semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles. Utilizing ZnO in a more broadly defined energy conversion sense as photocatalysts, unwanted organic waste materials can potentially be repurposed. Current efforts on charge carrier dynamics in nanoscale electrode architectures used in photoelectrochemical cells for generating solar electricity and fuels are described. The objective is to develop oxide nanowire-based electrode architectures that exhibit improved charge separation, charge collection and allow for efficient light absorption. Investigation of the charge carrier transport and recombination properties of the electrodes will aid in the understanding of how nanowire architectures improve performance of electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells. Nanomaterials can be incorporated in a number of advanced higher-performance (i.e. mass specific power) photovoltaic arrays. Advanced technologies for the deposition of 4H-silicon carbide are described. The use of novel precursors, advanced processing, and process studies, including modeling are discussed from the perspective of enhancing the performance of this promising material for enabling technologies such as solar electric propulsion. Potential impact(s) of these technologies for a variety of aerospace applications are highlighted throughout. Finally, examples are given of technologies with potential spin-offs for dual-use or

  11. Thermal resistance of ridge-waveguide lasers mounted upside down

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.

    1987-01-05

    The heat dissipation in upside down mounted ridge-waveguide lasers equipped with a double-channel structure is analyzed by a simplified device model. Assuming an isothermal active region, the thermal resistance is obtained by means of conformal mapping. A comparison to published experimental results shows good agreement.

  12. Fracture Control for NIRSpec Kinematic Mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorel, M.; Novo, F.; Jollet, D.; Sinnema, G.; Jentsch, M.

    2014-06-01

    An ESA contribution to the JWST is the Near Infra-Red Spectrograph (NIRSpec) capable of high-resolution spectroscopy. The development of the NIRSpec was commissioned to Astrium. This contribution deals with the fracture control for the optical bench kinematic (OBK) mounts which are critical structural elements of the NIRSpec platform. A summary of the main activities is given as well as difficulties encountered throughout the process and solutions adopted.

  13. Processing challenges for GaN-based photonic and electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The wide gap materials SiC, GaN and to a lesser extent diamond are attracting great interest for high power/high temperature electronics. There are a host of device processing challenges presented by these materials because of their physical and chemical stability, including difficulty in achieving stable, low contact resistances, especially for one conductivity type, absence of convenient wet etch recipes, generally slow dry etch rates, the high temperatures needed for implant activation, control of suitable gate dielectrics and the lack of cheap, large diameter conducting and semi-insulating substrates. The relatively deep ionization levels of some of the common dopants (Mg in GaN; B, Al in SiC; P in diamond) means that carrier densities may be low at room temperature, and thus contact resistances will be greatly improved provided the metallization is stable and reliable. Some recent work with CoSi{sub x} on SiC and W-alloys on GaN show promise for improved ohmic contacts. The issue of unintentional hydrogen passivation of dopants will also be covered - this leads to strong increases in resistivity of p-SiC and GaN, but to large decreases in resistivity of diamond. Recent work on development of wet etches has found recipes for AlN (KOH), while photochemical etching of SiC and GaN has been reported. In the latter cases p-type materials is not etched, which can be a major liability in some devices. The dry etch results obtained with various novel reactors, including ICP, ECR and LE4 will be compared - the high ion densities in the former techniques produce the highest etch rates for strongly-bonded materials, but can lead to preferential loss of N from the nitrides and therefore to a highly conducting surface. This is potentially a major problem for fabrication of dry etched, recessed gate FET structures.

  14. New processes and materials for ultraviolet detection with solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, D.

    1977-01-01

    The three major effects that degrade external responsivity of silicon from the 1/lambda theoretical curve for a quantum detector are: surface reflectance, surface recombination, and junction depth. Since the p-n junction must be very shallow, problems relating to surface are further enhanced. MOS type of processing is necessary. HCl oxides and numerous acid clean-ups are utilized in order to obtain a contamination free surface with low Qss levels. Stringent process controls such as CV shifts, spreading resistance measurements, thickness monitoring etc., are used to analyze the surface contaminations, surface mobile charges, surface concentrations, junction depth, oxide thickness etc. Low surface concentrations of 10 to the 18th atoms/cu cm are achieved by low temperature boron nitride depositions. Shallow junction depths of the order of a few tenths of a micron are achieved by low temperature controlled diffusions. In order to improve breakdown characteristics of these shallow junction devices, field plate and deep diffused p(+) ring geometries are used.

  15. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  16. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  17. A new device to mount portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (p-ED-XRF) for semi-continuous analyses of split (sediment) cores and solid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelzmann, Philipp; Klein, Torsten; Kutz, Frank; Schütt, Brigitta

    2016-04-01

    Portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (p-ED-XRF) have become increasingly popular in sedimentary laboratories to quantify the chemical composition of a range of materials such as sediments, solid samples, and artefacts. Here, we introduce a low-cost, clearly arranged unit that functions as a sample chamber (German industrial property right no. 20 2014 106 048.0) for p-ED-XRF devices to facilitate economic, non-destructive, fast, and semi-continuous analysis of (sediment) cores and/or other solid samples. The spatial resolution of the measurements is limited to the specifications of the applied p-ED-XRF device - in our case a Thermo Scientific NITON XL3t p-ED-XRF spectrometer with a maximum spatial resolution of 1 cm and equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD)-camera to document the measurement spot. We demonstrate the strength of combining p-ED-XRF analyses with this new sample chamber to identify Holocene facies changes (e.g. marine vs terrestrial sedimentary facies) using a sediment core from an estuarine environment in context of a geoarchaeological investigation at the Atlantic coast of southern Spain.

  18. A new device to mount portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (p-ED-XRF) for semi-continuous analyses of split (sediment) cores and solid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelzmann, Philipp; Klein, Torsten; Kutz, Frank; Schütt, Brigitta

    2017-02-01

    Portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (p-ED-XRF) have become increasingly popular in sedimentary laboratories to quantify the chemical composition of a range of materials such as sediments, soils, solid samples, and artefacts. Here, we introduce a low-cost, clearly arranged unit that functions as a sample chamber (German industrial property rights no. 20 2014 106 048.0) for p-ED-XRF devices to facilitate economic, non-destructive, fast, and semi-continuous analysis of (sediment) cores or other solid samples. The spatial resolution of the measurements is limited to the specifications of the applied p-ED-XRF device - in our case a Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t p-ED-XRF spectrometer with a maximum spatial resolution of 0.3 cm and equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to document the measurement spot. We demonstrate the strength of combining p-ED-XRF analyses with this new sample chamber to identify Holocene facies changes (e.g. marine vs. terrestrial sedimentary facies) using a sediment core from an estuarine environment in the context of a geoarchaeological investigation at the Atlantic coast of southern Spain.

  19. Dry tilt network at Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Johnson, Daniel J.; Symonds, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to its primary responsibility of monitoring active Mount St. Helens, the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) has been charged with obtaining baseline geodetic and geochemical information at each of the other potentially active Cascade volcanoes. Dry tilt and/or trilateration networks were established during 1975-82 at Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Shasta, Lassen Peak, Crater Lake, and Long Valley caldera; coverage was extended during September 1982 to include Mount Rainier.

  20. Conceptual Design of a Simplified Skid-Mounted Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process for Removal of Cesium from Savannah Rive Site High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, JR.J.F.

    2004-05-12

    This report presents the results of a conceptual design of a solvent extraction process for the selective removal of {sup 137}Cs from high-level radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). This study establishes the need for and feasibility of deploying a simplified version of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process; cost/benefit ratios ranging from 33 to 55 strongly support the considered deployment. Based on projected compositions, 18 million gallons of dissolved salt cake waste has been identified as having {sup 137}Cs concentrations that are substantially lower than the worst-case design basis for the CSSX system that is to be deployed as part of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) but that does not meet the waste acceptance criteria for immobilization as grout in the Saltstone Manufacturing and Disposal Facility at SRS. Absent deployment of an alternative cesium removal process, this material will require treatment in the SWPF CSSX system, even though the cesium decontamination factor required is far less than that provided by that system. A conceptual design of a CSSX processing system designed for rapid deployment and having reduced cesium decontamination factor capability has been performed. The proposed accelerated-deployment CSSX system (CSSX-A) has been designed to have a processing rate of 3 million gallons per year, assuming 90% availability. At a more conservative availability of 75% (reflecting the novelty of the process), the annual processing capacity is 2.5 million gallons. The primary component of the process is a 20-stage cascade of centrifugal solvent extraction contactors. The decontamination and concentration factors are 40 and 15, respectively. The solvent, scrub, strip, and wash solutions are to have the same compositions as those planned for the SWPF CSSX system. As in the SWPF CSSX system, the solvent and scrub flow rates are equal. The system is

  1. The head-mounted microscope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery.

  2. Processes in construction of failure management expert systems from device design information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Lance, Nick

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyzes the tasks and problem solving methods used by an engineer in constructing a failure management expert system from design information about the device to te diagnosed. An expert test engineer developed a trouble-shooting expert system based on device design information and experience with similar devices, rather than on specific expert knowledge gained from operating the device or troubleshooting its failures. The construction of the expert system was intensively observed and analyzed. This paper characterizes the knowledge, tasks, methods, and design decisions involved in constructing this type of expert system, and makes recommendations concerning tools for aiding and automating construction of such systems.

  3. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  4. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  5. Processing of Silver-Implanted Aluminum Nitride for Energy Harvesting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alleyne, Fatima Sierre

    One of the more attractive sources of green energy has roots in the popular recycling theme of other green technologies, now known by the term "energy scavenging." In its most promising conformation, energy scavenging converts cyclic mechanical vibrations in the environment or random mechanical pressure pulses, caused by sources ranging from operating machinery to human footfalls, into electrical energy via piezoelectric transducers. While commercial piezoelectrics have evolved to favor lead zirconate titanate (PZT) for its combination of superior properties, the presence of lead in these ceramic compounds raises resistance to their application in anything "green" due to potential health implications during their manufacturing, recycling, or in-service application, if leaching occurs. Therefore in this study we have pursued the application of aluminum nitride (AlN) as a non-toxic alternative to PZT, seeking processing pathways to augment the modest piezoelectric performance of AlN and exploit its compatibility with complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) manufacturing. Such piezoelectric transducers have been categorized as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), which despite more than a decade of research in this field, is plagued by delamination at the electrode/piezoelectric interface. Consequently the electric field essential to generate and sustain the piezoelectric response of these devices is lost, resulting in device failure. Working on the hypothesis that buried conducting layers can both mitigate the delamination problem and generate sufficient electric field to engage the operation of resonator devices, we have undertaken a study of silver ion implantation to experimentally assess its feasibility. As with most ion implantation procedures employed in semiconductor fabrication, the implanted sample is subjected to a thermal treatment, encouraging diffusion-assisted precipitation of the implanted species at high enough concentrations. The objective

  6. Optical mounts for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimovich, Mark E.; Griffee, Jonathan C.; Goodding, James C.

    2009-08-01

    Development and testing of a lightweight-kinematic optical mount with integrated passive vibration-and-shock mitigation technologies and simple / robust optical alignment functionality is presented. Traditionally, optical mounts are designed for use in laboratory environments where the thermal-mechanical environments are carefully controlled to preserve beam path conditions and background disturbances are minimized to facilitate precise optically based measurements. Today's weapon and surveillance systems, however, have optical sensor suites where static and dynamic alignment performance in the presence of harsh operating environments is required to nearly the same precision and where the system cannot afford the mass of laboratory-grade stabilized mounting systems. Jitter and alignment stability is particularly challenging for larger optics operating within moving vehicles and aircraft where high shock and significant temperature excursions occur. The design intent is to have the mount be suitable for integration into existing defense and security optical systems while also targeting new commercial and military components for improved structural dynamic and thermal distortion performance. A mount suitable for moderate-sized optics and an integrated disturbance-optical metrology system are described. The mount design has performance enhancements derived from the integration of proven aerospace mechanical vibration and shock mitigation technologies (i.e. multi-axis passive isolation and integral damping), precision alignment adjustment and lock-out functionality, high dimensional stability materials and design practices which provide benign optical surface figure errors under harsh thermal-mechanical loading. Optical jitter, alignment, and wave-front performance testing of an eight-inch-aperture optical mount based on this design approach are presented to validate predicted performance improvements over an existing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) design.

  7. Calcium fluoride window mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, D. Douglas

    1982-10-01

    A technique has been developed for joining a large calcium fluoride crystal to a stainless-steel flange by means of a silver transition ring. The process involves both vacuum brazing using a copper-silver alloy and air brazing using silver chloride. This paper describes the procedure used in fabricating a high-vacuum leak-tight calcium fluoride window assembly.

  8. Climbing Mount Probable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Marc Allen

    2009-01-01

    This work attempts to explain the relationships between natural selection, information theory, and statistical inference. In particular, a geometric formulation of information theory known as information geometry and its deep connections to evolutionary game theory inform the role of natural selection in evolutionary processes. The goals of this…

  9. Collection and Processing of Data from Wrist Wearable Devices in Heterogeneous and Multiple-User Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    de Arriba-Pérez, Francisco; Caeiro-Rodríguez, Manuel; Santos-Gago, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, we have witnessed the development of mobile and wearable technologies to collect data from human vital signs and activities. Nowadays, wrist wearables including sensors (e.g., heart rate, accelerometer, pedometer) that provide valuable data are common in market. We are working on the analytic exploitation of this kind of data towards the support of learners and teachers in educational contexts. More precisely, sleep and stress indicators are defined to assist teachers and learners on the regulation of their activities. During this development, we have identified interoperability challenges related to the collection and processing of data from wearable devices. Different vendors adopt specific approaches about the way data can be collected from wearables into third-party systems. This hinders such developments as the one that we are carrying out. This paper contributes to identifying key interoperability issues in this kind of scenario and proposes guidelines to solve them. Taking into account these topics, this work is situated in the context of the standardization activities being carried out in the Internet of Things and Machine to Machine domains. PMID:27657081

  10. Collection and Processing of Data from Wrist Wearable Devices in Heterogeneous and Multiple-User Scenarios.

    PubMed

    de Arriba-Pérez, Francisco; Caeiro-Rodríguez, Manuel; Santos-Gago, Juan M

    2016-09-21

    Over recent years, we have witnessed the development of mobile and wearable technologies to collect data from human vital signs and activities. Nowadays, wrist wearables including sensors (e.g., heart rate, accelerometer, pedometer) that provide valuable data are common in market. We are working on the analytic exploitation of this kind of data towards the support of learners and teachers in educational contexts. More precisely, sleep and stress indicators are defined to assist teachers and learners on the regulation of their activities. During this development, we have identified interoperability challenges related to the collection and processing of data from wearable devices. Different vendors adopt specific approaches about the way data can be collected from wearables into third-party systems. This hinders such developments as the one that we are carrying out. This paper contributes to identifying key interoperability issues in this kind of scenario and proposes guidelines to solve them. Taking into account these topics, this work is situated in the context of the standardization activities being carried out in the Internet of Things and Machine to Machine domains.

  11. Atomic layer epitaxy of group 4 materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Bedair, Salah; El-Masry, Nadina; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    1993-12-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy of monocrystalline Beta-SiC on Si(100) and alpha (6H)-SiC(0001) substrates has been accomplished at 850 C by alternating the supplies of Si2H6, C2H4, and atomic hydrogen without the use of a carbonizing step. Conformal deposition of SiC has been demonstrated within trenches etched into Si(100) wafers. P-type films have also been achieved using Al as a dopant. Devices including HBT's with Beta-SiC emitters have been designed. Hydrogen plasma cleaning of SiC surfaces has been studied. XPS has shown that this process effectively removes C-O, C-F and C-H bonding at the surface. Temperature programmed desorption has been used to look at the amount of subsurface hydrogen generated during plasma cleaning. The diamond precursors of chlorinated methylsilanes and the substrate of Si(100) were subjected to bias enhanced high-frequency CVD. No difference in diamond nucleation density between the precursors was observed. An interface structure of single crystal CeO2/Si(111) grown by laser ablation has been investigated. An interfacial reaction occurred between these phases during deposition which resulted in the formation of an oxygen deficient amorphous (a) CeOx layer and an SiO2 layer. Post annealing in O2 caused the disappearance of the a-CeOx and the regrowth of crystalline CeO2.

  12. In situ process diagnostics of silane plasma for device-quality a-Si:H deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Perry, J. W.; Hermann, A. M.

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and mass spectrometry (MS) have been applied to in situ process diagnostics of a silane plasma for device-quality a-Si:H film deposition. Silane depletion was directly measured by CARS and is linearly dependent on RF power in the region of 4-12 W with a slope of 0.5 percent/mW-sq cm. The depletion is also dependent on SiH4 flow rate starting with a 50 percent depletion at a low flow rate of 5.6 sccm and asymptotically approaching an 8 percent depletion at a flow rate of 80 sccm. The mass spectral line signal intensity of disilane increases with RF power and shows an apparent transition at 6 W. Disilane formation in silane plasma, film deposition rate, and silane depletion ratio as a function of the RF power indicate that the film growth mechanism in the low-power region of 3.5-6.5 W is substantially different from that in the high-power region of 6.5-12 W.

  13. Unified trade-off optimization for general heat devices with nonisothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP) for general heat engines and refrigerators with nonisothermal processes is conducted under the trade-off criterion. The specific heat of the working medium has significant impacts on the optimal configurations of heat devices. For cycles with constant specific heat, the bounds of the efficiency and COP are found to be the same as those obtained through the endoreversible Carnot ones. However, they are independent of the cycle time durations. For cycles with nonconstant specific heat, whose dimensionless contact time approaches infinity, the general alternative upper and lower bounds of the efficiency and COP under the trade-off criteria have been proposed under the asymmetric limits. Furthermore, when the dimensionless contact time approaches zero, the endoreversible Carnot model is recovered. In addition, the efficiency and COP bounds of different kinds of actual heat engines and refrigerators have also been analyzed. This paper may provide practical insight for designing and operating actual heat engines and refrigerators.

  14. Processing-Induced Electrically Active Defects in Black Silicon Nanowire Devices.

    PubMed

    Carapezzi, Stefania; Castaldini, Antonio; Mancarella, Fulvio; Poggi, Antonella; Cavallini, Anna

    2016-04-27

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are widely investigated nowadays for implementation in advanced energy conversion and storage devices, as well as many other possible applications. Black silicon (BSi)-NWs are dry etched NWs that merge the advantages related to low-dimensionality with the special industrial appeal connected to deep reactive ion etching (RIE). In fact, RIE is a well established technique in microelectronics manufacturing. However, RIE processing could affect the electrical properties of BSi-NWs by introducing deep states into their forbidden gap. This work applies deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) to identify electrically active deep levels and the associated defects in dry etched Si NW arrays. Besides, the successful fitting of DLTS spectra of BSi-NWs-based Schottky barrier diodes is an experimental confirmation that the same theoretical framework of dynamic electronic behavior of deep levels applies in bulk as well as in low dimensional structures like NWs, when quantum confinement conditions do not occur. This has been validated for deep levels associated with simple pointlike defects as well as for deep levels associated with defects with richer structures, whose dynamic electronic behavior implies a more complex picture.

  15. 76 FR 50230 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... online by 5 p.m. on September 15, 2011. For those without Internet access, please call the contact person... making available a mechanism to achieve timely access of medical devices to the market. On July 29, 2011... the Internet at http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/NewsEvents/WorkshopsConferences/default.htm ....

  16. Assistive Device Use as a Dynamic Acquisition Process in Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressler, Karis A.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study identifies risk factors, including incident disability, for the use of assistive devices (ADs) among older people. Design and Methods: Three waves of data from the National Long-Term Care Survey (NLTCS) are used to examine whether upper and lower body disability lead to use of ADs (both number of devices used and number of…

  17. Atomic layer epitaxy group IV materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Bedair, Salah; El-Masry, Nadia; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    1993-06-01

    The maximum temperature at which self-terminating monolayers of Si can be formed on Si(100) from Si2H6 has been determined to be 570 deg C. As such, the chemical reactivity of C2H4 has been determined to be insufficient at this temperature, and acetylene has been selected as the successor C precursor due to its superior reactivity and chemisorption properties. A cryogenic purifier for removing acetone has been commissioned. Trenched Si(100) wafers are also being made to assess the ALE process for sidewall deposition uniformity and future bipolar devices. Nonstoichiometric, Si-rich SiC has been produced with an associated decrease in the band gap. An AES/XPS UHV analytical system and associated ALE deposition system has been commissioned and integrated into a much larger surface science system. These dual systems will allow a thorough study and characterization of both the initial nucleation of SiC and the overall ALE growth process of SiC. Tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane have been deposited onto Si substrates in a hot filament CVD chamber to investigate their ability to promote ALE of diamond under DC biasing and a variety of system parameters. An electron gun and heating stage has been added to the growth chamber to enable AES and substrate heating. Good quality diamond films have been nucleated on deposited interlayers of both precursor compounds. The films have been examined by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Good quality epitaxial films of CeO2 have been grown on Si(111) using laser ablation. Atomically clean substrates and slow growth rates were determined necessary for epitaxy.

  18. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Electrochemical Processes in Renewable Energy Storage and Conversion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Farmand, Maryam

    2013-05-19

    The development of better energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells and batteries, is crucial for reduction of our global carbon footprint and improving the quality of the air we breathe. However, both of these technologies face important challenges. The development of lower cost and better electrode materials, which are more durable and allow more control over the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface, is perhaps most important for meeting these challenges. Hence, full characterization of the electrochemical processes that occur at the electrodes is vital for intelligent design of more energy efficient electrodes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a short-range order, element specific technique that can be utilized to probe the processes occurring at operating electrode surfaces, as well for studying the amorphous materials and nano-particles making up the electrodes. It has been increasingly used in recent years to study fuel cell catalysts through application of the and #916; and mgr; XANES technique, in combination with the more traditional X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques. The and #916; and mgr; XANES data analysis technique, previously developed and applied to heterogeneous catalysts and fuel cell electrocatalysts by the GWU group, was extended in this work to provide for the first time space resolved adsorbate coverages on both electrodes of a direct methanol fuel cell. Even more importantly, the and #916; and mgr; technique was applied for the first time to battery relevant materials, where bulk properties such as the oxidation state and local geometry of a cathode are followed.

  19. Optimization of processing and modeling issues for thin film solar cell devices: Final report, February 3, 1997--September 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    2000-02-28

    This final report describes results achieved under a 20-month NREL subcontract to develop and understand thin-film solar cell technology associated to CuInSe{sub 2} and related alloys, a-Si and its alloys, and CdTe. Modules based on all these thin films are promising candidates to meet DOE's long-range efficiency, reliability and manufacturing cost goals. The critical issues being addressed under this program are intended to provide the science and engineering basis for the development of viable commercial processes and to improve module performance. The generic research issues addressed are: (1) quantitative analysis of processing steps to provide information for efficient commercial-scale equipment design and operation; (2) device characterization relating the device performance to materials properties and process conditions; (3) development of alloy materials with different bandgaps to allow improved device structures for stability and compatibility with module design; (4) development and improved window/heterojunction layers and contacts to improve device performance and reliability; and (5) evaluation of cell stability with respect to device structure and module encapsulation.

  20. Reactive bromine chemistry in Mount Etna's volcanic plume: the influence of total Br, high-temperature processing, aerosol loading and plume-air mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. J.; Martin, R. S.; Jourdain, L.

    2014-10-01

    Volcanic emissions present a source of reactive halogens to the troposphere, through rapid plume chemistry that converts the emitted HBr to more reactive forms such as BrO. The nature of this process is poorly quantified, yet is of interest in order to understand volcanic impacts on the troposphere, and infer volcanic activity from volcanic gas measurements (i.e. BrO / SO2 ratios). Recent observations from Etna report an initial increase and subsequent plateau or decline in BrO / SO2 ratios with distance downwind. We present daytime PlumeChem model simulations that reproduce and explain the reported trend in BrO / SO2 at Etna including the initial rise and subsequent plateau. Suites of model simulations also investigate the influences of volcanic aerosol loading, bromine emission, and plume-air mixing rate on the downwind plume chemistry. Emitted volcanic HBr is converted into reactive bromine by autocatalytic bromine chemistry cycles whose onset is accelerated by the model high-temperature initialisation. These rapid chemistry cycles also impact the reactive bromine speciation through inter-conversion of Br, Br2, BrO, BrONO2, BrCl, HOBr. We predict a new evolution of Br speciation in the plume. BrO, Br2, Br and HBr are the main plume species near downwind whilst BrO and HOBr are present further downwind (where BrONO2 and BrCl also make up a minor fraction). BrNO2 is predicted to be only a relatively minor plume component. The initial rise in BrO / SO2 occurs as ozone is entrained into the plume whose reaction with Br promotes net formation of BrO. Aerosol has a modest impact on BrO / SO2 near-downwind (< ~6 km, ~10 min) at the relatively high loadings considered. The subsequent decline in BrO / SO2 occurs as entrainment of oxidants HO2 and NO2 promotes net formation of HOBr and BrONO2, whilst the plume dispersion dilutes volcanic aerosol so slows the heterogeneous loss rates of these species. A higher volcanic aerosol loading enhances BrO / SO2 in the (> 6 km

  1. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  6. Cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, L.

    1984-02-21

    A cooling device is claimed for coal dust comprising a housing, a motor-driven conveyor system therein to transport the coal dust over coolable trays in the housing and conveyor-wheel arms of spiral curvature for moving the coal dust from one or more inlets to one or more outlets via a series of communicating passages in the trays over which the conveyor-wheel arms pass under actuation of a hydraulic motor mounted above the housing and driving a vertical shaft, to which the conveyor-wheel arms are attached, extending centrally downwardly through the housing.

  7. Simpler Adaptive Optics using a Single Device for Processing and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zovaro, A.; Bennet, F.; Rye, D.; D'Orgeville, C.; Rigaut, F.; Price, I.; Ritchie, I.; Smith, C.

    The management of low Earth orbit is becoming more urgent as satellite and debris densities climb, in order to avoid a Kessler syndrome. A key part of this management is to precisely measure the orbit of both active satellites and debris. The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Australian National University have been developing an adaptive optics (AO) system to image and range orbiting objects. The AO system provides atmospheric correction for imaging and laser ranging, allowing for the detection of smaller angular targets and drastically increasing the number of detectable objects. AO systems are by nature very complex and high cost systems, often costing millions of dollars and taking years to design. It is not unusual for AO systems to comprise multiple servers, digital signal processors (DSP) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), with dedicated tasks such as wavefront sensor data processing or wavefront reconstruction. While this multi-platform approach has been necessary in AO systems to date due to computation and latency requirements, this may no longer be the case for those with less demanding processing needs. In recent years, large strides have been made in FPGA and microcontroller technology, with todays devices having clock speeds in excess of 200 MHz whilst using a < 5 V power supply. AO systems using a single such device for all data processing and control may present a far simpler, cheaper, smaller and more efficient solution than existing systems. A novel AO system design based around a single, low-cost controller is presented. The objective is to determine the performance which can be achieved in terms of bandwidth and correction order, with a focus on optimisation and parallelisation of AO algorithms such as wavefront measurement and reconstruction. The AO system consists of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror to correct light from a 1.8 m telescope for the purpose of imaging orbiting satellites. The

  8. Assessing new developments in the pre-market regulatory process of medical devices in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shixuan; Kriza, Christine; Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter L

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a systematic overview of the Chinese medical device registration processes, identify challenges and suggest how these can be addressed. In addition, the paper will outline the impact of new policies and regulations since the restructuring of the China FDA. A systematic review was performed for journal articles between the year of 2009 and 2013 in the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect and Zhongguozhiwang. The review has identified 184 papers which were potentially relevant. Seventeen articles were included in the review, which highlights the challenges and opportunities related to the medical device registration process. In order to understand the actual impact of the regulation environment and its policies including the lack of regulatory guidance regular assessment updates are crucial. The results of this paper are aimed at informing regulatory bodies, health policy decision makers, national and international Health Technology Assessment networks as well as medical devices manufacturers.

  9. Ice Volumes on Cascade Volcanoes: Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Three Sisters, and Mount Shasta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn L.; Kennard, Paul M.

    1986-01-01

    During the eruptions of Mount St. Helens the occurrence of floods and mudflows made apparent the need for predictive water-hazard analysis of other Cascade volcanoes. A basic requirement for such analysis is information about the volumes and distributions of snow and ice on other volcanoes. A radar unit contained in a backpack was used to make point measurements of ice thickness on major glaciers of Mount Rainier, Wash.; Mount Hood, Oreg.; the Three Sisters, Oreg.; and Mount Shasta, Calif. The measurements were corrected for slope and were used to develop subglacial contour maps from which glacier volumes were measured. These values were used to develop estimation methods for finding volumes of unmeasured glaciers. These methods require a knowledge of glacier slope, altitude, and area and require an estimation of basal shear stress, each estimate derived by using topographic maps updated by aerial photographs. The estimation methods were found to be accurate within ?20 percent on measured glaciers and to be within ?25 percent when applied to unmeasured glaciers on the Cascade volcanoes. The estimation methods may be applicable to other temperate glaciers in similar climatic settings. Areas and volumes of snow and ice are as follows: Mount Rainier, 991 million ft2, 156 billion ft3; Mount Hood, 145 million ft2, 12 billion ft3; Three Sisters, 89 million ft2, 6 billion ft3; and Mount Shasta, 74 million ft2, 5 billion ft3. The distribution of ice and firn patches within 58 glacierized basins on volcanoes is mapped and listed by altitude and by watershed to facilitate water-hazard analysis.

  10. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  11. Mounting clips for panel installation

    DOEpatents

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph; Valdes, Francisco

    2017-02-14

    An exemplary mounting clip for removably attaching panels to a supporting structure comprises a base, spring locking clips, a lateral flange, a lever flange, and a spring bonding pad. The spring locking clips extend upwardly from the base. The lateral flange extends upwardly from a first side of the base. The lateral flange comprises a slot having an opening configured to receive at least a portion of one of the one or more panels. The lever flange extends outwardly from the lateral flange. The spring bonding flange extends downwardly from the lever flange. At least a portion of the first spring bonding flange comprises a serrated edge for gouging at least a portion of the one or more panels when the one or more panels are attached to the mounting clip to electrically and mechanically couple the one or more panels to the mounting clip.

  12. Vibration isolation of automotive vehicle engine using periodic mounting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, S.

    2005-05-01

    Customer awareness and sensitivity to noise and vibration levels have been raised through increasing television advertisement, in which the vehicle noise and vibration performance is used as the main market differentiation. This awareness has caused the transportation industry to regard noise and vibration as important criteria for improving market shares. One industry that tends to be in the forefront of the technology to reduce the levels of noise and vibration is the automobile industry. Hence, it is of practical interest to reduce the vibrations induced structural responses. The automotive vehicle engine is the main source of mechanical vibrations of automobiles. The engine is vulnerable to the dynamic action caused by engine disturbance force in various speed ranges. The vibrations of the automotive vehicle engines may cause structural failure, malfunction of other parts, or discomfort to passengers because of high level noise and vibrations. The mounts of the engines act as the transmission paths of the vibrations transmitted from the excitation sources to the body of the vehicle and passengers. Therefore, proper design and control of these mounts are essential to the attenuation of the vibration of platform structures. To improve vibration resistant capacities of engine mounting systems, vibration control techniques may be used. For instance, some passive and semi-active dissipation devices may be installed at mounts to enhance vibration energy absorbing capacity. In the proposed study, a radically different concept is presented whereby periodic mounts are considered because these mounts exhibit unique dynamic characteristics that make them act as mechanical filters for wave propagation. As a result, waves can propagate along the periodic mounts only within specific frequency bands called the "Pass Bands" and wave propagation is completely blocked within other frequency bands called the "Stop Bands". The experimental arrangements, including the design of

  13. Precision alignment and mounting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alignment and mounting apparatus for mounting two modules (10,12) includes a first portion having a cylindrical alignment pin (16) projecting normal to a module surface, a second portion having a three-stage alignment guide (18) including a shoehorn flange (34), a Y-slot (42) and a V-block (22) which sequentially guide the alignment pin (16) with successively finer precision and a third portion in the form of a spring-loaded captive fastener (20) for connecting the two modules after alignment is achieved.

  14. 40 CFR 63.497 - Back-end process provisions-monitoring provisions for control and recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Polymers and Resins § 63.497 Back-end process provisions—monitoring provisions for control and recovery devices. (a) An owner or operator complying with the residual organic HAP limitations in § 63.494(a) using... Notification of Compliance Status or the operating permit application, as required in § 63.506(e)(5) or...

  15. 40 CFR 63.496 - Back-end process provisions-procedures to determine compliance using control or recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.496 Back-end process provisions—procedures to... residual organic HAP limitations in § 63.494(a) using control or recovery devices, compliance shall be... conducted when the grade of elastomer product with the highest residual organic HAP content leaving...

  16. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1994--January 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results achieved during the second phase of a four year subcontract to develop and understand thin film solar cell technology related to a-Si and its alloys, CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, and CdTe. Accomplishments during this phase include, development of equations and reaction rates for the formation of CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} films by selenization, fabrication of a 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} cell, development of a reproducible, reliable Cu-diffused contact to CdTe, investigation of the role of CdTe-CdS interdiffusion on device operation, investigation of the substitution of HCl for CdCl{sub 2} in the post-deposition heat treatment of CdTe/CdS, demonstration of an improved reactor design for deposition of a-Si films, demonstration of improved process control in the fabrication of a ten set series of runs producing {approximately}8% efficient a-Si devices, demonstration of the utility of a simplified optical model for determining quantity and effect of current generation in each layer of a triple stacked a-Si cell, presentation of analytical and modeling procedures adapted to devices produced with each material system, presentation of baseline parameters for devices produced with each material system, and various investigations of the roles played by other layers in thin film devices including the Mo underlayer, CdS and ZnO in CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} devices, the CdS in CdTe devices, and the ZnO as window layer and as part of the back surface reflector in a-Si devices. In addition, collaborations with over ten research groups are briefly described. 73 refs., 54 figs., 34 tabs.

  17. Rapid method for design and fabrication of passive micromixers in microfluidic devices using a direct-printing process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-Lin; He, Feng-yun; Wang, Kang; Zhou, Ting; Lu, Yu; Xia, Xing-hua

    2005-09-01

    We developed a facile and rapid one-step technique for design and fabrication of passive micromixers in microfluidic devices using a direct-printing process. A laser printing mechanism was dexterously adopted to pattern the microchannels with different gray levels using vector graphic software. With the present method, periodically ordered specific bas-relief microstructures can be easily fabricated on transparencies by a simple printing process. The size and shape of the resultant microstructures are determined by the gray level of the graphic software and the resolution of the laser printer. Patterns of specific bas-relief microstructures on the floor of a channel act as obstacles in the flow path for advection mixing, which can be used as efficient mixing elements. The mixing effect of the resultant micromixer in microfluidic devices was evaluated using CCD fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that the mixing performance depends strongly on the gray level values. Under optimal conditions, fast passive mixing with our periodic ordered patterns in microfluidic devices has been achieved at the very early stages of the laminar flow. In addition, fabrication of micromixers using the present versatile technique requires less than an hour. The present method is promising for fabrication of micromixers in microfluidic devices at low cost and without complicated devices and environment, providing a simple solution to mixing problems in the micro-total-analysis-systems field.

  18. Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Frequency Modulation Devices in Improving Academic Outcomes in Children With Auditory Processing Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Stacey; Miller Kuhaneck, Heather; Pfeiffer, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review describes the published evidence related to the effectiveness of frequency modulation (FM) devices in improving academic outcomes in children with auditory processing difficulties. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses standards were used to identify articles published between January 2003 and March 2014. The Cochrane Population, Intervention, Control, Outcome, Study Design approach and the American Occupational Therapy Association process forms were used to guide the article selection and evaluation process. Of the 83 articles screened, 7 matched the systematic review inclusion criteria. Findings were consistently positive, although limitations were identified. Results of this review indicate moderate support for the use of FM devices to improve children's ability to listen and attend in the classroom and mixed evidence to improve specific academic performance areas. FM technology should be considered for school-age children with auditory processing impairments who are receiving occupational therapy services to improve functioning in the school setting.

  19. Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    coupled to a suitable buoy platform. 2. The approach of designing a device which meets the requirements for mounting on dogfish and generating...used on the tail of a marine life such as dogfish to harvest energy as it swims. The output power can be used to trickle charge battery packs to power...to be mounted to a dogfish to harvest energy from its motion. Due to the small fish size (approximate 40-50 inches, 25 pounds), the device was

  20. Characterization of recombination processes in epitaxial thin films and substrates for antimonide based thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Saroop, S.; Borrego, J.; Gutmann, R.; Dutta, P.; Ostrogorsky, A.; Charache, G.; Wang, C.

    1998-06-01

    Recombination processes in antimonide-based materials for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices have been investigated using a radio-frequency (RF) photoreflectance technique, in which a Nd-YAG pulsed laser is used to excite excess carriers, and the short-pulse response and photoconductivity decay are monitored with an inductively-coupled non-contacting RF probe. Double-capped lattice-matched GaInAsSb organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE)--grown layers on GaSb substrates have been used to evaluate bulk lifetime and surface recombination velocity with different layer thicknesses. With an active layer doping of 2 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}, effective bulk lifetimes of 95 ns and surface recombination velocities of 1,900 cm/s have been obtained. As the laser intensity is increased the lifetime decreases, which may be indicative of radiative recombination under these high level injection conditions. Similar measurements have been taken on both commercially available GaSb boules as well as in-house grown quaternary GaInAsSb boules. A two-step decay is observed with the quaternary boules, an initial decay of nominally 15 ns which is relatively independent of laser intensity and a second decay of 30--60 ns which increases with decreasing laser intensity. This behavior may be indicative of free charge separation as a result of short-range ordering in the quaternary crystals. GaSb boules, both commercially available and those grown in-house, exhibit more classical characteristics.

  1. Application of a newly developed portable NIR imaging device to monitor the dissolution process of tablets.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Daitaro; Murayama, Kodai; Awa, Kimie; Genkawa, Takuma; Komiyama, Makoto; Kazarian, Sergei G; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-11-01

    We have recently developed a novel portable NIR imaging device (D-NIRs), which has a high speed and high wavelength resolution. This NIR imaging approach has been developed by utilizing D-NIRs for studying the dissolution of a model tablet containing 20 % ascorbic acid (AsA) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient and 80 % hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, where the tablet is sealed by a special cell. Diffuse reflectance NIR spectra in the 1,000 to 1,600 nm region were measured during the dissolution of the tablet. A unique band at around 1,361 nm of AsA was identified by the second derivative spectra of tablet and used for AsA distribution NIR imaging. Two-dimensional change of AsA concentration of the tablet due to water penetration is clearly shown by using the band-based image at 1,361 nm in NIR spectra obtained with high speed. Moreover, it is significantly enhanced by using the intensity ratio of two bands at 1,361 and 1,354 nm corresponding to AsA and water absorption, respectively, showing the dissolution process. The imaging results suggest that the amount of AsA in the imaged area decreases with increasing water penetration. The proposed NIR imaging approach using the intensity of a specific band or the ratio of two bands combined with the developed portable NIR imaging instrument, is a potentially useful practical way to evaluate the tablet at every moment during dissolution and to monitor the concentration distribution of each drug component in the tablet.

  2. Visual Processing: Implications for Helmet Mounted Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    Photometer (Model 1980A-PL). A Gerbrands 300-C Digital Millisecond Timer (Model 03C6) was used to control the exposure duration of the stimuli for all...dichoptic task). The order of eye presentation was randomized to counterbalance possible order effects. 3. RESULTS Post hoc examination of the luminance

  3. The origin of polarity dependent switching type in solution processed Pt/TiO2/Pt memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biju, K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Resistive switching characteristics of sol-gel processed TiO2 thin films are investigated. The influence of polarity of the forming voltage on switching type in Pt/TiO2/Pt stack is investigated. Reliability and stability of the device is significantly improved by choosing a proper voltage polarity on electroforming. The device shows excellent switching properties such as high on/off ratio (> 20), good cycling endurance and long retention (> 104 s) and possible to use multi bit storage has been demonstrated. The switching mechanism is explained by a physical model based on localized generation/recovery of oxygen vacancy defects.

  4. Dynamics and control simulation of the Spacelab Experiment Pointing Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, E. L.; Ward, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations were developed to evaluate the performance of four Experiment Pointing Mounts (EPM) being considered for Spacelab experiments in the 1980-1990 time frame. The system modeled compromises a multibody system consisting of the shuttle, a mechanical isolation device, the EPM, celestial and inertial sensors, bearings, gimbal torque motors and associated nonlinearities, the experiment payload, and control and estimator algorithms. Each mount was subjected to a common disturbance (shuttle vernier thruster firing and man push off) and command (stellar pointing or solar raster scan) input. The fundamental limitation common to all mounts was found to be sensor noise. System dynamics and hardware nonlinearities have secondary effects on pointing performance for sufficiently high bandwidth.

  5. Automated inspection of solder joints for surface mount technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Robert M.; Park, Hyun Soo; Fan, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at NASA/GSFC evaluated various automated inspection systems (AIS) technologies using test boards with known defects in surface mount solder joints. These boards were complex and included almost every type of surface mount device typical of critical assemblies used for space flight applications: X-ray radiography; X-ray laminography; Ultrasonic Imaging; Optical Imaging; Laser Imaging; and Infrared Inspection. Vendors, representative of the different technologies, inspected the test boards with their particular machine. The results of the evaluation showed limitations of AIS. Furthermore, none of the AIS technologies evaluated proved to meet all of the inspection criteria for use in high-reliability applications. It was found that certain inspection systems could supplement but not replace manual inspection for low-volume, high-reliability, surface mount solder joints.

  6. A Discussion of Zero Spring Rate Mechanisms Used for the Active Isolation Mount Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    In the summer of 1995 the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA Langley Research Center set out to conceive a small, lightweight, low frequency isolation mount that could be used for spaceflight experiments. The Engineering Design Branch undertook the task of developing the isolation mount. This report describes the engineering process that led to three phases of a study entitled "Active Isolation Mounts" (AIM). A zero spring rate mechanism was used to achieve low fundamental frequencies for a payloads in the 1 to 10 pound range. It worked by balancing both a positive and a negative stiffness so that the net result was a small positive stiffness. The study demonstrated devices that could reduce the initial corner frequency by a factor of six for brief periods and a factor of two for extended periods. The designs were relatively simple and minimized weight, volume, and power. They could be scaled down and they were made of spaceflight compatible materials. All designs offered the ability to continuously vary the fundamental frequency. Yet, the goal of reducing the frequency by an order of magnitude was not achieved because the systems were too unstable at low frequencies. There was a trade between performance and stability.

  7. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  8. Cryogenically cooled detector pin mount

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Jr., William E; Chrisp, Michael P

    2014-06-03

    A focal plane assembly facilitates a molybdenum base plate being mounted to another plate made from aluminum. The molybdenum pin is an interference fit (press fit) in the aluminum base plate. An annular cut out area in the base plate forms two annular flexures.

  9. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  10. Analysis of process parameter effect on DIBL in n-channel MOSFET device using L27 orthogonal array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehuddin, F.; Kaharudin, K. E.; Zain, A. S. M.; Yamin, A. K. Mat; Ahmad, I.

    2014-10-01

    In this research, the effect of the process parameters variation on drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) was investigated. The fabrication of the transistor device was performed using TCAD simulator, consisting of ATHENA and ATLAS modules. These two modules were combined with Taguchi method to optimize the process parameters. The setting of process parameters was determined by using the orthogonal array of L27 in Taguchi Method. In NMOS device, the most dominant or significant factors for S/N Ratio are halo implant energy, S/D implant dose and S/D implant energy. Meanwhile, the S/N Ratio values of DIBL after the optimization approaches for array L27 is 29.42 dB. In L27 experiments, DIBL value for n-channel MOSFET device after optimizations approaches is +37.8 mV. The results obtained were satisfied to be small as expected. As conclusions, by setting up design of experiment with the Taguchi Method and TCAD simulator, the optimal solutions on DIBL for the robust design recipe of 32nm n-channel MOSFET device was successfully achieved.

  11. [Water cults on Soratte Mount].

    PubMed

    Falchetti, Mario; Ottini, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Mount Soratte is a limestone ridge that rises on a lonely plateau of Pliocene tuff on the right of the Tiber, about forty kilometers North of Rome. Studies related to human settlements during prehistory in this territory have been sporadic and occasional. The first evidence of prehistoric cults on mount Soratte has been found in the early Fifties when ajar, dating back to Neolithic times, was discovered in the cave of the Meri. The jar was placed in a position to be always filled of water and indicates the existence of ancient practices of worship linked to groundwater. In the Middle Ages, although caves became a step towards the Hell, dripping caves were often associated with the magical-religious and therapeutic aspects of water linked to fertility in the popular imagination. In the cave church of the Saint Romana, on the eastern slope of Mount Soratte close to Meri, there is a small marble basin near the altar and the water drips from the rock above it. This water is taken out for devotion and drunk by mothers who did not get milk from their breasts. Recently, the water of the Saint Romana would have drained as a result of an act of sacrilege, albeit unintentionally, as reported in a oral testimony. Overall, the territory of Mount Soratte is characterized by a sharp and clear karst. This causes the water, that collects on the inside, coming out in many springs all around the valley. This water is collected to supply fountains used years ago by farmers and livestock and nowadays may represent a cultural space of social life with the aim to build a strong link with the territory and a new awareness of the past and history of the countryside around Mount Soratte.

  12. Organic photovoltaic devices comprising solution-processed substituted metal-phthalocyanines and exhibiting near-IR photo-sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Dominic V.; Mayukh, Mayank; Placencia, Diogenes; Armstrong, Neal R.

    2016-11-29

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices are disclosed. An exemplary device has first and second electrodes and an organic, photovoltaically active zone located between the first and second electrodes. The photovoltaically active zone includes an organic electron-donor material and an organic electron-acceptor material. The electron-donor material includes one or more trivalent- or tetravalent-metal phthalocyanines with alkylchalcogenide ring substituents, and is soluble in at least one organic solvent. This solubility facilitates liquid-processability of the donor material, including formation of thin-films, on an unlimited scale to form planar and bulk heterojunctions in organic OPVs. These donor materials are photovoltaically active in both visible and near-IR wavelengths of light, enabling more of the solar spectrum, for example, to be applied to producing electricity. Also disclosed are methods for producing the metalated phthalocyanines and actual devices.

  13. Characterization of microchip electrophoresis devices fabricated by direct-printing process with colored toner.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Ellen F M; do Lago, Claudimir L; Gobbi, Ångelo L; Carrilho, Emanuel; Coltro, Wendell K T

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports for the first time the use of colored toner to produce polyester toner (PT) ME devices. Colored PT devices were designed in drawing software and printed on a polyester film using a color laser printer with 3600 dpi resolution. The colored toner is composed of a copolymer mixture (styrene and acrylate), wax, silicon dioxide, and pigments. The presence of silica in the toner composition has enhanced the EOF magnitude and improved the analytical performance. For a pH range between 2 and 12, the EOF measured on a magenta PT chip, for example, ranged from 3.8 to 5.8 (× 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ). Typical separations of inorganic cations (K(+) , Na(+) , and Li(+) ) were used as model system to investigate the analytical feasibility of the proposed devices. The repeatability for the migration times of all analytes exhibited RSD values lower than 1% (n = 10). The separation efficiencies found on colored PT devices ranged from 10 000 to 49 000 plates/m, which means between 7 and 23% of the maximum theoretical efficiency on this microfluidic platform (1.85 × 10(5) plates/m). The improvements achieved on the proposed devices are associated with the small additional amount of silica on the toner composition as well as the printing of channels with smoother surfaces and better uniformity when compared to the conventional PT chips printed with monochromatic laser printers.

  14. Asymmetric bipolar resistive switching in solution-processed Pt/TiO2/W devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biju, Kuyyadi P.; Liu, XinJun; Bourim, El Mostafa; Kim, Insung; Jung, Seungjae; Siddik, Manzar; Lee, Joonmyoung; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2010-12-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of Pt/TiO2/W devices in a submicrometre via-hole structure are investigated. TiO2 film is grown by the sol-gel spin coating technique. The device exhibits reversible and reproducible bistable resistive switching with a rectifying effect. The Schottky contact at the Pt/TiO2 interface limits electron injection under reverse bias resulting in a rectification ratio of >60 at 2 V in the low-resistance state. The switching mechanism in our device can be interpreted as an anion migration-induced redox reaction at the tungsten bottom electrode (W). The rectifying effect can significantly reduce the sneak path current in a crossbar array and provide a feasible way to achieve high memory density.

  15. Degradation process in organic thin film devices fabricated using P3HT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi; Kapoor, Ashok K.; Kumar, Upendra; Balakrishnan, V. R.; Basu, P. K.

    2007-03-01

    The stability of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene 2,5-diyl) (P3HT) thin films sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) and aluminium (Al) electrodes have been investigated under normal environmental conditions (25°C and RH˜45-50%). Electrical and optical properties of ITO/P3HT/Al devices have been studied over a period of 30 days. Mobility μ of the order of 10^{-4} cm^{2}/V-s has been obtained from the V^{2} law in the as-deposited P3HT films. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations show blistering of Al contacts in devices with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) interlayer on application of voltage whereas no blistering is seen in devices without PEDOT. The results have been explained in terms of trap generation and propagation and the moisture-absorbing nature of PEDOT.

  16. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  17. 77 FR 68788 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function... multilumen device with two balloons mounted near the distal tip. The proximal end has a multiport...

  18. A laser-assisted process to produce patterned growth of vertically aligned nanowire arrays for monolithic microwave integrated devices.

    PubMed

    Kerckhoven, Vivien Van; Piraux, Luc; Huynen, Isabelle

    2016-06-10

    An experimental process for the fabrication of microwave devices made of nanowire arrays embedded in a dielectric template is presented. A pulse laser process is used to produce a patterned surface mask on alumina templates, defining precisely the wire growing areas during electroplating. This technique makes it possible to finely position multiple nanowire arrays in the template, as well as produce large areas and complex structures, combining transmission line sections with various nanowire heights. The efficiency of this process is demonstrated through the realisation of a microstrip electromagnetic band-gap filter and a substrate-integrated waveguide.

  19. A passive vibration-cancelling isolation mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Alan O.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of an idealized passive vibration-cancelling two-terminal mount with one degree of freedom at each mechanical terminal isolating a nonrigid machine from a nonrigid foundation is presented. To evaluate a vibration-cancelling (VC) mount, its effectiveness as a function of frequency is compared with the effectiveness of both conventional and compound mounts isolating a rigid machine from a nonrigid foundation. The comparisons indicate that a carefully designed and manufactured VC mount should provide substantially greater vibration reduction at its cancellation frequency than either a conventional or compound mount having the same low frequency stiffness, i.e., stiffness at the natural frequency of the machine mount system.

  20. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices: Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1995 -- January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R W; Phillips, J E; Buchanan, W A; Eser, E; Hegedus, S S; McCandless, B E; Meyers, P V; Shafarman, W N

    1996-08-01

    The overall mission of the Institute of Energy Conversion is the development of thin film photovoltaic cells, modules, and related manufacturing technology and the education of students and professionals in photovoltaic technology. The objectives of this four-year NREL subcontract are to advance the state of the art and the acceptance of thin film PV modules in the areas of improved technology for thin film deposition, device fabrication, and material and device characterization and modeling, relating to solar cells based on CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, on a-Si and its alloys, and on CdTe. In the area of CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, EEC researchers have produced CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} films by selenization of elemental and alloyed films with H{sub 2}Se and Se vapor and by a wide variety of process variations employing co-evaporation of the elements. Careful design, execution and analysis of these experiments has led to an improved understanding of the reaction chemistry involved, including estimations of the reaction rate constants. Investigation of device fabrication has also included studies of the processing of the Mo, US and ZnO deposition parameters and their influence on device properties. An indication of the success of these procedures was the fabrication of a 15% efficiency CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} solar cell.

  1. Factors That Influence the Diffusion Process of Mobile Devices in Higher Education in Botswana and Namibia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asino, Tutaleni I.

    2015-01-01

    This comparative study uses the Diffusion of Innovation (DoI) theoretical framework to explore factors that influence diffusion of mobile devices in higher education in Botswana and Namibia. The five attributes (Relative Avantage, Compatability, Complexity, Trialability, and Observability) of the persuasion stage, which have been found in previous…

  2. Exploitation of RF-DNA for Device Classification and Verification Using GRLVQI Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Multiplexing ( OFDM ) based 802.16 Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) and 802.11 WiFi devices. Performance using 2D GT-based RF- DNA features...12 fc Center Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 NO Number of OFDM Sub...Abbreviations Abbreviation Page OFDM Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing . . . . . . . . . . 1 IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics

  3. Solder Mounting Technologies for Electronic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    VIANCO, PAUL T.

    1999-09-23

    Soldering provides a cost-effective means for attaching electronic packages to circuit boards using both small scale and large scale manufacturing processes. Soldering processes accommodate through-hole leaded components as well as surface mount packages, including the newer area array packages such as the Ball Grid Arrays (BGA), Chip Scale Packages (CSP), and Flip Chip Technology. The versatility of soldering is attributed to the variety of available solder alloy compositions, substrate material methodologies, and different manufacturing processes. For example, low melting temperature solders are used with temperature sensitive materials and components. On the other hand, higher melting temperature solders provide reliable interconnects for electronics used in high temperature service. Automated soldering techniques can support large-volume manufacturing processes, while providing high reliability electronic products at a reasonable cost.

  4. Easy mounting interface for compact instruments at TNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedina, Adriano; Riverol Rodriguez, A. Luis

    2016-08-01

    The Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) is able to offer an F/11 Nasmyth focal station with an easy mount for small devices or compact instruments. The slit masks at the focal plane of the LRS spectrograph can be removed in few minutes from the selector stage. A FoV of 9x9arcmin2 is available and a small instrument can be mounted instead of the slit on a mechanical interface of 240x125mm. The size of the instrument along the optical axis is limited by the support of the collimation lens of the spectrograph. This solution has already been used for small devices like a CCD camera or a SH sensor and a compact Hamamatsu photometer. Furthermore from 2016 it will host the folding optical relay for the GIARPS Instrument. This interface is an opportunity to test new instruments, prototypes or demonstrators in a not invasive or time consuming manner at a 4m class telescope.

  5. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tapered tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  6. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  7. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1993--January 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Yokimcus, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of the research presented in this report is to advance the development and acceptance of thin-film photovoltaic modules by increasing the understanding of film growth and processing and its relationship to materials properties and solar cell performance. The specific means toward meeting this larger goal include: (1) investigating scalable, cost-effective deposition processes; (2) preparing thin-film materials and device layers and completed cell structures; (3) performing detailed material and device analysis; and (4) participating in collaborative research efforts that address the needs of PV-manufacturers. These objectives are being pursued with CuInSe{sub 2}, CdTe and a-Si based solar cells.

  8. Controversies about Interspinous Process Devices in the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24822224

  9. The power supply system model of the process submersible device with AC power transmission over the cable-rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulevskiy, V. M.; Bukreev, V. G.; Kuleshova, E. O.; Shandarova, E. B.; Shandarov, S. M.; Vasilyeva, Yu Z.

    2017-02-01

    A practical problem of power supply system modeling for the process submersible device with AC power transmission over the cable-rope was considered. The problem is highly relevant in developing and operation of submersible centrifugal pumps and submersibles. The results of modeling a symmetrical three-phase power supply system and their compliance with the real data are given at the paper. The obtained results in the mathematical and simulation models were similar.

  10. New Magnetic Materials and Phenomena for Radar and Microwave Signal Processing Devices - Bulk and Thin Film Ferrites and Metallic Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-15

    methods have been used to produce in-plane c-axis (IPCA) oriented barium ferrite (BaM) films on o-plane (1120) sapphire substrates with low microwave ...New magnetic materials and phenomena for radar and microwave signal processing devices - bulk and thin film ferrites and metallic films 6. AUTHOR(S...excitation properties in delay line structures. (173 words) 14. SUBJECT TERMS Microwave ferrites , yttrium iron garnet, hexagonal ferrites

  11. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  12. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  13. Mount Ararat, Turkey, Perspective with Landsat Image Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This perspective view shows Mount Ararat in easternmost Turkey, which has been the site of several searches for the remains of Noah's Ark. The main peak, known as Great Ararat, is the tallest peak in Turkey, rising to 5165 meters (16,945 feet). This southerly, near horizontal view additionally shows the distinctly conically shaped peak known as 'Little Ararat' on the left. Both peaks are volcanoes that are geologically young, but activity during historic times is uncertain.

    This image was generated from a Landsat satellite image draped over an elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The view uses a 1.25-times vertical exaggeration to enhance topographic expression. Natural colors of the scene are enhanced by image processing, inclusion of some infrared reflectance (as green) to highlight the vegetation pattern, and inclusion of shading of the elevation model to further highlight the topographic features.

    Volcanoes pose hazards for people, the most obvious being the threat of eruption. But other hazards are associated with volcanoes too. In 1840 an earthquake shook the Mount Ararat region, causing an unstable part of mountain's north slope to tumble into and destroy a village. Visualizations of satellite imagery when combined with elevation models can be used to reveal such hazards leading to disaster prevention through improved land use planning.

    But the hazards of volcanoes are balanced in part by the benefits they provide. Over geologic time volcanic materials break down to form fertile soils. Cultivation of these soils has fostered and sustained civilizations, as has occurred in the Mount Ararat region. Likewise, tall volcanic peaks often catch precipitation, providing a water supply to those civilizations. Mount Ararat hosts an icefield and set of glaciers, as seen here in this late summer scene, that are part of this beneficial natural process

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar

  14. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  15. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

  16. Non-Intrusive Device for Real-Time Circulatory System Assessment with Advanced Signal Processing Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, E.; Postolache, O.; Girão, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a device that uses three cardiography signals to characterize several important parameters of a subject's circulatory system. Using electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmogram, and ballistocardiogram, three heart rate estimates are acquired from beat-to-beat time interval extraction. Furthermore, pre-ejection period, pulse transit time (PTT), and pulse arrival time (PAT) are computed, and their long-term evolution is analyzed. The system estimates heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) from the heart rate and PAT time series, to infer the activity of the cardiac autonomic system. The software component of the device evaluates the frequency content of HRV and BPV, and also their fractal dimension and entropy, thus providing a detailed analysis of the time series' regularity and complexity evolution, to allow personalized subject evaluation.

  17. Process And Apparatus To Accomplish Autothermal Or Steam Reforming Via A Reciprocating Compression Device

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, K. David; James, Robert; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd

    2004-09-21

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas from a variety of hydrocarbons. The apparatus (device) consists of a semi-batch, non-constant volume reactor to generate a synthesis gas. While the apparatus feeds mixtures of air, steam, and hydrocarbons into a cylinder where work is performed on the fluid by a piston to adiabatically raise its temperature without heat transfer from an external source.

  18. Process to Accomplish Autothermal or Steam Reforming Via a Reciprocating Compression Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, David K.; James, Robert; Berry, David A.; Gardern, Todd

    2004-09-21

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas from a variety of hydrocarbons. The apparatus (device) consists of a semi-batch, non-constant volume reactor to generate a synthesis gas. While the apparatus feeds mixtures of air, steam, and hydrocarbons into a cylinder where work is performed on the fluid by a piston to adiabatically raise its temperature without heat transfer from an external source.

  19. Flow Through Surface Mounted Continuous Slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, A.; Ali, M. A.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2014-11-01

    Ribs are used inside certain gas-turbine blades as passive devices to enhance heat transfer. Slits in those ribs are utilized to control the primary shear layer. The role of secondary flow through a continuous slit behind a surface mounted rib is investigated herein in a rectangular duct using hotwire anemometry and particle image velocimetry. Changing the open-area-ratio and the slit's location within the rib dominate the observed shear layer. The behavior of discrete Fourier modes of the velocity fluctuations generated by different configurations is explored. Two distinct flow mechanisms are observed in the rib's wake. Both mechanisms are explained on the basis of large-scale spectral peak in the shear layer. The results show the successful impact of changing the open-area-ratio by manipulating the small-scale vortices at the leeward corner of the rib, which is suspected to be the potential cause of surface ``hot spots'' in a variety of engineering devices with heat transfer. Eventually, the size and location of the slit are seen to be an additional parameter that can be used to control the fluid flow structures behind rib turbulators.

  20. Solution-processable SWNT transistors: Toward high performance and full semiconducting device yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Lee, Chun Wei; Zhao, Jianwen; Li, Lain-Jong

    2010-03-01

    The major hurdle to scale up SWNT network field-effect transistors (FETs) is the difficulty in obtaining high mobility and full semiconductor device yield due to the co-existence of metallic and semiconducting tubes in fabricated networks. We demonstrate that the radical initiator 1,1'-azobis(cyanocyclohexane) (ACN) allows for release of radicals which preferentially react with small and metallic SWNTs. By applying this reaction to CoMoCat SWNTs, metallic tubes are electrically suppressed and semiconducting thin-film transistors can be readily made with almost full semiconductor device yield. The effective mobility can be raised to ˜10 cm2/V.s with increasing the network thickness to ˜20 nm while keeping the on-off ratio higher than 10000. Moreover, top-gated devices with polymer-ionic liquid mixture as the dielectrics are demonstrated to be almost hysteresis-free and with low threshold voltage, promising applications in low-cost printable electronics.

  1. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrat, J.

    1989-01-01

    From the south, snow-covered Mount St. Helens looms proudly under a fleecy halo of clouds, rivaling the majestic beauty of neighboring Mount Rainer, Mount Hood, and Mount Adams. Salmon fishermen dot the shores of lakes and streams in the mountain's shadow, trucks loaded with fresh-cut timber barrel down backroads, and deer peer out from stands of tall fir trees. 

  2. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  3. Computer Aided Design of Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes for VLSI Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    modeling capability. This requires the investigation of tile latest technological advances and their incorporation in the present process modeling program... Technology /Transient Process Kinetics In integrated circuits processing the annealing steps associated with ion implantation are poorly understood...experiments which will utilize this technology for characterization of transient process kinetics. References [7] Ref. [10] from "Recoil Range

  4. Solution-processed low dimensional nanomaterials with self-assembled polymers for flexible photo-electronic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheolmin

    2015-09-01

    Self assembly driven by complicated but systematic hierarchical interactions offers a qualified alternative for fabricating functional micron or nanometer scale pattern structures that have been potentially useful for various organic and nanotechnological devices. Self assembled nanostructures generated from synthetic polymer systems such as controlled polymer blends, semi-crystalline polymers and block copolymers have gained a great attention not only because of the variety of nanostructures they can evolve but also because of the controllability of these structures by external stimuli. In this presentation, various novel photo-electronic materials and devices are introduced based on the solution-processed low dimensional nanomaterials such as networked carbon nanotubes (CNTs), reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and 2 dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with self assembled polymers including field effect transistor, electroluminescent device, non-volatile memory and photodetector. For instance, a nanocomposite of networked CNTs and a fluorescent polymer turned out an efficient field induced electroluminescent layer under alternating current (AC) as a potential candidate for next generation displays and lightings. Furthermore, scalable and simple strategies employed for fabricating rGO as well as TMD nanohybrid films allowed for high performance and mechanically flexible non-volatile resistive polymer memory devices and broad band photo-detectors, respectively.

  5. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    DOEpatents

    Barth, C.H.; Cramer, C.E.

    1997-12-30

    A fixture is described for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface. 3 figs.

  6. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Cramer, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    A fixture for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface.

  7. Fabrication of dense non-circular nanomagnetic device arrays using self-limiting low-energy glow-discharge processing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Chang, Long; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Khizroev, Sakhrat; Litvinov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    We describe a low-energy glow-discharge process using reactive ion etching system that enables non-circular device patterns, such as squares or hexagons, to be formed from a precursor array of uniform circular openings in polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, defined by electron beam lithography. This technique is of a particular interest for bit-patterned magnetic recording medium fabrication, where close packed square magnetic bits may improve its recording performance. The process and results of generating close packed square patterns by self-limiting low-energy glow-discharge are investigated. Dense magnetic arrays formed by electrochemical deposition of nickel over self-limiting formed molds are demonstrated.

  8. Process for injection of fluid EG slurry in EG flue gases and a nozzle device for the accomplishment of the process

    SciTech Connect

    Glindsjo, P.

    1984-11-20

    This invention relates to a process for injection of fluid e.g. slurry into e.g. flue gases, and a nozzle device for the accomplishment of the process. The process according to the invention is characterized in that a thin stream of fluid e.g. slurry is injected into a wider stream of gas to form disintegrated drops, at which the fluid stream is peeled off on its way into the gas stream, the fluid stream is made to turn 180/sup 0/ and accelerate against a solid body, where another disintegration of the drops occurs very rapid and the nozzle device according to the invention is characterized in that it is arranged with two intakes coming into the nozzle opposite to each other, perpendicular to the passage of the flue gas through a flue gas pipe at which slurry is injected through the intake, which is formed as a wider pipe, which ends in a wearing part, in which a finer pipe is arranged and at which compressed air or steam is injected through the intake arranged as a pipe, besides which the finer pipe for slurry is centered in relation to the pipe so that a thin stream of slurry is arranged to be injected at a high speed into a wider stream of compressed air or steam to form fine slurry drops, which are arranged to be spread by the flue gas through the nozzle device.

  9. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park, but Ngurdoto Crater to the east (image top) is also prominent. The fertile slopes of both volcanoes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards, while the floor of Ngurdoto Crater hosts herds of elephants and buffaloes.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  10. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  11. Studies of ferroelectric heterostructure thin films, interfaces, and device-related processes via in situ analytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Auciello, O.; Dhote, A. M.; Gao, Y.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Irene, E. A.; Krauss, A. R.; Muller, A. H.; Ramesh, R.

    1999-06-29

    The science and technology of ferroelectric thin films has experienced an explosive development during the last ten years. Low-density non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (NVFRAMS) are now incorporated in commercial products such as ''smart cards'', while high permittivity capacitors are incorporated in cellular phones. However, substantial work is still needed to develop materials integration strategies for high-density memories. We have demonstrated that the implementation of complementary in situ characterization techniques is critical to understand film growth and device processes relevant to device development. We are using uniquely integrated time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) techniques to perform in situ, real-time studies of film growth processes in the high background gas pressure required to growth ferroelectric thin films. TOF-ISARS provides information on surface processes, while SE permits the investigation of buried interfaces as they are being formed. Recent studies on SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film growth and interface processes are discussed. Direct imaging of ferroelectric domains under applied electric fields can provide valuable information to understand domain dynamics in ferroelectric films. We discuss results of piezoresponse scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging for nanoscale studies of polarization reversal and retention loss in Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1{minus}x})O{sub 3} (PZT)-based capacitors. Another powerful technique suitable for in situ, real-time characterization of film growth processes and ferroelectric film-based device operation is based on synchrotrons X-ray scattering, which is currently being implemented at Argonne National Laboratory.

  12. Pneumatic device of the preload and dynamic loads balancing to reduce the intensity of thermal processes in the metal cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilin, A. N.; Moyzes, B. B.; Cherkasov, A. I.; Ditenberg, I. A.; Khairullin, A. R.; Glinenko, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    Improved reliability of the technological system «machine-tool-instrument-detail» is an important current task. Backlashes and insufficient stiffness of technological system lead to intensive wear of the cutting tool, increasing the heat in the cutting zone. Due to high temperature in the thin surface layers of the workpiece and tool thermal processes may occur which are similar to release and can cause the structural changes of the material. The current article presents the final design of the device which has been developed to reduce the intensity of thermal processes in metal cutting.

  13. Modified laser-annealing process for improving the quality of electrical P-N junctions and devices

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Richard F.; Young, Rosa T.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for producing improved electrical-junction devices. The invention is applicable, for example, to a process in which a light-sensitive electrical-junction device is produced by (1) providing a body of crystalline semiconductor material having a doped surface layer, (2) irradiating the layer with at least one laser pulse to effect melting of the layer, (3) permitting recrystallization of the melted layer, and (4) providing the resulting body with electrical contacts. In accordance with the invention, the fill-factor and open-circuit-voltage parameters of the device are increased by conducting the irradiation with the substrate as a whole at a selected elevated temperature, the temperature being selected to effect a reduction in the rate of the recrystallization but insufficient to effect substantial migration of impurities within the body. In the case of doped silicon substrates, the substrate may be heated to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to 500.degree. C.

  14. High-Frequency Spin-Based Devices for Nanoscale Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-20

    have found that single STNO devices that incorporate Co/Ni multilayers as the free layer routinely have power outputs of roughly 20 nW (Fig. 3), and...those in all-metal spin-valve multilayer samples that have a similar geometry for the magnetic free layer. However, we have discovered that...derivative of the spin torque with respect to current, MSVol is the total magnetic moment of the free layer, and  is the FMR linewidth. In general, d/dI

  15. Vapour processed self-rolled poly(dimethylsiloxane) microcapillaries form microfluidic devices with engineered inner surface.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Laura Piedad Chia; Bollgruen, Patrick; Egunov, Aleksandr I; Mager, Dario; Malloggi, Florent; Korvink, Jan G; Luchnikov, Valeriy A

    2013-10-07

    We propose a microfluidics device whose main functional part consists of a microcapillary produced by the self-rolling of a thin poly(dimethylsiloxane) film. Rolling is caused by inhomogeneous swelling of the film, pre-treated by oxygen plasma, in the vapour of chloroform. The capillaries are integrated with external electrical circuits by co-rolling electrodes and micro-resistors. The local control of temperature in the tubes by Joule heating is illustrated via the rate of an intra-tubular chemiluminescent reaction. The novel tubes with engineered inner structure can find numerous advanced applications such as functional elements of integrated microfluidics circuits.

  16. Fifth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing. Extended abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Luque, A.; Sopori, B.; Swanson, D.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1995-08-01

    This workshop dealt with engineering aspects and material properties of silicon electronic devices. Crystalline silicon growth, modeling, and properties are discussed in general and as applied to solar cells. Topics considered in discussions of silicon growth include: casting, string ribbons, Al backside contacts, ion implantation, gettering, passivation, and ultrasound treatments. Properties studies include: Electronic properties of defects and impurities, dopant and carrier concentrations, structure and bonding, nitrogen effects, degradation of bulk diffusion length, and recombination parameters. Individual papers from the workshop are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  17. Optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Leslie H.; Murphy, Clarence J.; Rosen, Warren A.; Jain, Himanshu

    1990-07-01

    This invention relates to acrylic polymers and more specifically to polyacrylamides and polyacrylates such as poly(2-((N-2-methyl-5-nitrophenylamino) ethyl acrylate)) and poly((N-2-methyl-4-nitrophenyl)acrylamide). These acrylic polymers are particularly useful as nonlinear optical components in various electrical devices for processing optical signals including interferometors, optical switches, optical amplifiers, generators, computational devices and the like.

  18. Switching and memory characteristics of thin films of an ambipolar organic compound: effects of device processing and electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung-Won; Pearson, Christopher; Moon, Tae Jung; Fisher, Alison L.; Petty, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the effects of device processing conditions, and of changing the electrode materials, on the switching and negative differential resistance (NDR) behaviour of metal/organic thin film/metal structures. The organic material was an ambipolar molecule containing both electron transporting (oxadiazole) and hole transporting (carbazole) chemical groups. Switching and NDR effects are observed for device architectures with both electrodes consisting of aluminium; optimized switching behaviour is achieved for structures incorporating gold nanoparticles. If one of the Al electrodes is replaced by a higher work function metal or coated with an electron-blocking layer, switching and NDR are no longer observed. The results are consistent with a model based on the creation and destruction of Al filaments within the thin organic layer.

  19. Micromechanical Machining Processes and their Application to Aerospace Structures, Devices and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedrich, Craig R.; Warrington, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Micromechanical machining processes are those micro fabrication techniques which directly remove work piece material by either a physical cutting tool or an energy process. These processes are direct and therefore they can help reduce the cost and time for prototype development of micro mechanical components and systems. This is especially true for aerospace applications where size and weight are critical, and reliability and the operating environment are an integral part of the design and development process. The micromechanical machining processes are rapidly being recognized as a complementary set of tools to traditional lithographic processes (such as LIGA) for the fabrication of micromechanical components. Worldwide efforts in the U.S., Germany, and Japan are leading to results which sometimes rival lithography at a fraction of the time and cost. Efforts to develop processes and systems specific to aerospace applications are well underway.

  20. Processing of signals recorded through smart devices: sleep-quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Anna Maria; Mendez, Martin Oswaldo; Cerutti, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of performing a sleep evaluation from signals, which are not usually used for this purpose. In particular, we take into consideration the heart rate variability (HRV) and respiratory signals for automatic sleep staging, arousals detection, and apnea recognition. This is particularly useful for wearable or textile devices that could be employed for home monitoring of sleep. The HRV and the respiration were analyzed in the frequency domain, and the statistics on the spectral and cross-spectral parameters put into evidence the possibility of a sleep evaluation on their basis. Comparison with traditional polysomnography (PSG) revealed a classification accuracy of 89.9% in rapid eye movement (REM) non-REM sleep separation and an accuracy of 88% for sleep apnea detection. Additional information can be achieved from the number of microarousals recognized in correspondence of typical modifications in the HRV signal. The obtained results support the idea of automatic sleep evaluation and monitoring through signals that are not traditionally used in clinical PSG, but can be easily recorded at home through wearable devices (for example, a sensorized T-shirt) or systems integrated into the environment (a sensorized bed). This is a first step for the development of systems for sleep screening on large populations that can constitute a complement for the traditional clinical evaluation.

  1. Lahars of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, Christopher G.; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    On June 15, 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines exploded in the second largest volcanic eruption on Earth this century. This eruption deposited more than 1 cubic mile (5 cubic kilometers) of volcanic ash and rock fragments on the volcano's slopes. Within hours, heavy rains began to wash this material down into the surrounding lowlands in giant, fast-moving mudflows called lahars. In the next four rainy seasons, lahars carried about half of the deposits off the volcano, causing even more destruction in the lowlands than the eruption itself.

  2. MOUNT MORIAH ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, Robert R.; Wood, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey identified the northeastern part of the Mount Moriah Roadless Area in extreme east-central Nevada as an area of probable potential for the occurrence of small, isolated deposits containing lead and zinc. Many active quarries in a unique high-quality decorative building stone occur in the area and have substantiated mineral-resource potential. Further studies in the roadless area might include detailed mapping of exposed Prospect Mountain Quartzite building stone units and notation of their suitability for quarrying. More detailed geochemical studies in the area of probable base-metal resource potential might include additional stream-sediment sampling and sampling along fault zones.

  3. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    DOEpatents

    Faulder, Leslie J.; Frey, deceased, Gary A.; Nielsen, Engward W.; Ridler, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion.

  4. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    DOEpatents

    Faulder, L.J.; Frey, G.A.; Nielsen, E.W.; Ridler, K.J.

    1997-08-05

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion. 3 figs.

  5. Metamorphic Mountain, Mount Jefferson State Park: An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for Grades 5-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, George K., II; Hubbard, William F.; Lambert, Michael D.; Beazley, Lea J.

    Mount Jefferson State Natural Area is located in the southern Blue Ridge highlands of North Carolina and covers 489 acres, which includes peaks and upper slopes to the Mount Jefferson mountain. This document introduces students to the geology of Mount Jefferson State Park and focuses on the geologic processes and rocks and minerals of Mount…

  6. A modular process for integrating thick polysilicon MEMS devices with sub-micron CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaitis, John A.; Judy, Michael; Brosnihan, Tim; Garone, Peter M.; Pokrovskiy, Nikolay; Sniderman, Debbie; Limb, Scott; Howe, Roger T.; Boser, Bernhard E.; Palaniapan, Moorthi; Jiang, Xuesong; Bhave, Sunil

    2003-01-01

    A new MEMS process module, called Mod MEMS, has been developed to monolithically integrate thick (5-10um), multilayer polysilicon MEMS structures with sub-micron CMOS. This process is particularly useful for advanced inertial MEMS products such as automotive airbag accelerometers where reduced cost and increased functionality is required, or low cost, high performance gyroscopes where thick polysilicon (>6um) and CMOS integration is required to increase poly mass and stiffness, and reduce electrical parasitics in order to optimize angular rate sensing. In this paper we will describe the new modular process flow, development of the critical unit process steps, integration of the module with a foundry sub-micron CMOS process, and provide test data on several inertial designs fabricated with this process.

  7. Adjustable mount for electro-optic transducers in an evacuated cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, Edward A., Jr. (Inventor); Haynes, David P. (Inventor); Jones, Howard C. (Inventor); Jones, Irby W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention is an adjustable mount for positioning an electro-optic transducer in an evacuated cryogenic environment. Electro-optic transducers are used in this manner as high sensitivity detectors of gas emission lines of spectroscopic analysis. The mount is made up of an adjusting mechanism and a transducer mount. The adjusting mechanism provided five degrees of freedom, linear adjustments and angular adjustments. The mount allows the use of an internal lens to focus energy on the transducer element thereby improving the efficiency of the detection device. Further, the transducer mount, although attached to the adjusting mechanism, is isolated thermally such that a cryogenic environment can be maintained at the transducer while the adjusting mechanism remains at room temperature. Radiation shields also are incorporated to further reduce heat flow to the transducer location.

  8. 78 FR 75571 - Independent Assessment of the Process for the Review of Device Submissions; High Priority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... contractor will evaluate the implementation of recommendations and publish a written assessment no later than... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Independent Assessment of the Process for the Review of... recommendations submitted as part of their independent assessment of the process for the review of medical...

  9. Biological implications of lab-on-a-chip devices fabricated using multi-jet modelling and stereolithography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Macdonald, Niall; Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    Current microfabrication methods are often restricted to two-dimensional (2D) or two and a half dimensional (2.5D) structures. Those fabrication issues can be potentially addressed by emerging additive manufacturing technologies. Despite rapid growth of additive manufacturing technologies in tissue engineering, microfluidics has seen relatively little developments with regards to adopting 3D printing for rapid fabrication of complex chip-based devices. This has been due to two major factors: lack of sufficient resolution of current rapid-prototyping methods (usually >100 μm ) and optical transparency of polymers to allow in vitro imaging of specimens. We postulate that adopting innovative fabrication processes can provide effective solutions for prototyping and manufacturing of chip-based devices with high-aspect ratios (i.e. above ration of 20:1). This work provides a comprehensive investigation of commercially available additive manufacturing technologies as an alternative for rapid prototyping of complex monolithic Lab-on-a-Chip devices for biological applications. We explored both multi-jet modelling (MJM) and several stereolithography (SLA) processes with five different 3D printing resins. Compared with other rapid prototyping technologies such as PDMS soft lithography and infrared laser micromachining, we demonstrated that selected SLA technologies had superior resolution and feature quality. We also for the first time optimised the post-processing protocols and demonstrated polymer features under scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Finally we demonstrate that selected SLA polymers have optical properties enabling high-resolution biological imaging. A caution should be, however, exercised as more work is needed to develop fully bio-compatible and non-toxic polymer chemistries.

  10. 77 FR 61768 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical... onset. The CoAxia NeuroFlo Catheter is a 7F multi-lumen device with two balloons mounted near the...

  11. The channeling effect of Al and N ion implantation in 4H-SiC during JFET integrated device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, M.; Laariedh, F.; Cremillieu, P.; Planson, D.; Leclercq, J.-L.

    2015-12-01

    A strong channeling effect is observed for the ions of Al and N implanted in 4H-SiC due to its crystalline structure. This effect causes difficulties in subsequent accurate estimation of the depth of junctions formed by multiple ion implantation steps. A variety of lateral JFET transistors integrated on the same 4H-SiC wafer have been fabricated. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurements and Monte-Carlo simulations were performed in order to quantify and control the channeling effect of the implanted ions. A technological process was established enabling to obtain devices working with the presence of the channeling effect.

  12. Alternative display and interaction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolas, M. T.; McDowall, I. E.; Mead, R. X.; Lorimer, E. R.; Hackbush, J. E.; Greuel, C.

    1995-01-01

    While virtual environment systems are typically thought to consist of a head mounted display and a flex-sensing glove, alternative peripheral devices are beginning to be developed in response to application requirements. Three such alternatives are discussed: fingertip sensing gloves, fixed stereoscopic viewers, and counterbalanced head mounted displays. A subset of commercial examples that highlight each alternative is presented as well as a brief discussion of interesting engineering and implementation issues.

  13. Scalable processes for fabricating non-volatile memory devices using self-assembled 2D arrays of gold nanoparticles as charge storage nodes.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Girish; Bhat, Navakanta; Santhanam, Venugopal

    2011-11-01

    We propose robust and scalable processes for the fabrication of floating gate devices using ordered arrays of 7 nm size gold nanoparticles as charge storage nodes. The proposed strategy can be readily adapted for fabricating next generation (sub-20 nm node) non-volatile memory devices.

  14. Sol-gel processing to form doped sol-gel monoliths inside hollow core optical fiber and sol-gel core fiber devices made thereby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry C. (Inventor); Ott, Melanie N. (Inventor); Manuel, Michele V. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A process of fabricating a fiber device includes providing a hollow core fiber, and forming a sol-gel material inside the hollow core fiber. The hollow core fiber is preferably an optical fiber, and the sol-gel material is doped with a dopant. Devices made in this manner includes a wide variety of sensors.

  15. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  16. Effects of Plasma Processes on the Characteristics of Optical Device Structures Based on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Akio; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Kondow, Masahiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the effects of inductively coupled O2 plasma ashing, capacitively coupled C3F8 plasma etching, and capacitively coupled C3F8/O2 plasma etching on the optical and electrical characteristics of GaAs-related optical device structures. The O2 plasma ashing produces non radiative recombination centers close to the sample surface. The sample with a cap AlGaAs layer prevents the degradation of photoluminescence (PL) intensity, probably inhibiting the penetration of damaging ions into the buried quantum well. The C3F8 plasma etching also degrades the PL intensity; however, under moderate conditions, the effect of non radiative surface recombination can be suppressed by the formation of a surface oxide layer. On the other hand, the formation of oxide increases the specific contact resistance (ρc) of the electrode. The etching with C3F8/O2 mixed plasma also deteriorates the optical characteristics presumably owing to the synthesized impact of the constituent gases, while it has limited effect on ρc.

  17. The port side view of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    The port side view of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  18. The starboard side view of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    The starboard side view of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Remote Astronomy: Connecting to the Mount Wilson Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Describes an online process that allows high school science classes to connect to the Mount Wilson Observatory to learn about astronomy. Scheduling time for remote telescope access is explained; activities to prepare students for using the software are discussed; and benefits of the experience are considered, including students' critical thought…

  20. Piezoelectric resonator assembly with thin molybdenum mounting clips

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R. Donald

    1981-01-01

    A resonator mounting assembly wherein the resonator blank is mounted agai an essentially planar surface presented by a plurality of peripherally disposed mounting clips and bonded to this surface to provide substantially all the mechanical support for the blank in a direction normal to the major faces of the resonator blank, while being flexible in the directions parallel to said major faces so as to minimize radial stresses on the resonator blank, particularly during thermal cycling of the resonator assembly. The clips are fabricated of a low thermal expansion material, such as molybdenum, which also has considerable yield strength after exposure to processing temperatures; the bonding of the clips to the edges of the resonator blank can be achieved by a polyimide containing electrically conductive particles.