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Sample records for dgeba epoxy resin

  1. Assessment of cross-reactivity of new less sensitizing epoxy resin monomers in epoxy resin-allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Lina; Niklasson, Ida B; Rudbäck, Johanna; O'Boyle, Niamh M; Niklasson, Eva; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2016-09-01

    Measures to prevent occupational exposure to epoxy resins, including education, medical examination, and voluntary agreements between employers and workers, have not been effective enough to protect against skin sensitization. Therefore, alternatives to the major epoxy resin haptens that have been found to be less sensitizing in the local lymph node assay have been developed. To study the cross-reactivity of two newly designed epoxy resin monomers, with decreased skin-sensitizing potency and good technical properties as compared with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), in subjects with known contact allergy to epoxy resin of DGEBA type. Eleven individuals with previous positive patch test reactions to epoxy resin of DGEBA participated in the study. The two alternative epoxy resin monomers were synthesized and patch tested in dilution series in parallel with epoxy resin of DGEBA from the baseline series (containing 92% DGEBA). All participants reacted to epoxy resin of DGEBA on retesting. Three participants reacted to monomer 1. No reactions were seen to monomer 2. The alternative monomers studied showed little or no cross-reactivity with epoxy resin of DGEBA. Decreasing the risk of sensitization by using less sensitizing compounds is important, as contact allergy to epoxy resins is common in spite of thorough preventive measures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Complex Cure Kinetics of the Tertiary Amine activated Reaction in DGEBA Epoxy Hardened with Diethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancipink, Windy; McCoy, John; Clarkson, Caitlyn; Kropka, Jamie; Celina, Mathias; Giron, Nicholas; Hailesilassie, Lebelo; Fredj, Narjes

    The curing of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy with diethanolamine (DEA) involves a well understood fast amine-epoxide reaction followed by a more complicated slower hydroxyl-epoxide reaction. The time scale of these two reactions are well separated and can be studied independently from one another. The initial amine-epoxide reaction results in a tertiary amine adduct which is a product of the direct reaction of a secondary amine from the DEA reacting with a single DGEBA epoxide. The second hydroxyl-epoxide reaction results in a highly crosslinked glassy epoxy resin. The deviation in the mechanisms between high and low temperatures are discerned through the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) data. Observations of reaction rates at temperatures ranging from 30° C to 110° C have led to the determination that the hydroxyl-epoxide reaction is temperature sensitive. The hydroxyl-epoxide reaction occurs through two different mechanisms: at low temperatures, the reaction is catalyzed by the tertiary amine adduct; at higher temperatures, the reaction does not appear to be catalyzed. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  3. Epoxy resin

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  4. Can simultaneous contact allergies to phenyl glycidyl ether and epoxy resins of the bisphenol A/F-types be explained by contamination of the epoxy resins?

    PubMed

    Pontén, Ann; Zimerson, Erik; Bruze, Magnus

    2008-11-01

    Simultaneous contact allergies to epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA-R) or epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type and the reactive diluent phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) have been reported. The reason might be cross-reactivity, exposure to an epoxy resin system with PGE as a component, or contamination by PGE in the epoxy resin. To study contamination by PGE, 20 commercial epoxy resins were analysed for the presence of PGE. To study contact allergy to PGE and its relation to epoxy resins by inserting PGE in the standard series. Among 2227 patients, 7 reacted to PGE. Of 23 (30%) patients, 7 with contact allergy to DGEBA-R and 7/19 (37%) with contact allergy to an epoxy resin of the bisphenol F-type reacted to PGE. All 7 patients with contact allergy to PGE reacted both to the DGEBA-R and to the epoxy resin of the bisphenol F-type. PGE was found in 90% of the investigated resins. The amounts of PGE ranged between 0.004% w/w and 0.18% w/w. Most probably, the presence of PGE as a contaminant in epoxy resins is of minor importance for the sensitization, but possibly the contamination of PGE might elicit contact dermatitis in individuals with a high reactivity to PGE.

  5. Epoxy resin monomers with reduced skin sensitizing potency.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Niamh M; Niklasson, Ida B; Tehrani-Bagha, Ali R; Delaine, Tamara; Holmberg, Krister; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2014-06-16

    Epoxy resin monomers (ERMs), especially diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A and F (DGEBA and DGEBF), are extensively used as building blocks for thermosetting polymers. However, they are known to commonly cause skin allergy. This research describes a number of alternative ERMs, designed with the aim of reducing the skin sensitizing potency while maintaining the ability to form thermosetting polymers. The compounds were designed, synthesized, and assessed for sensitizing potency using the in vivo murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). All six epoxy resin monomers had decreased sensitizing potencies compared to those of DGEBA and DGEBF. With respect to the LLNA EC3 value, the best of the alternative monomers had a value approximately 2.5 times higher than those of DGEBA and DGEBF. The diepoxides were reacted with triethylenetetramine, and the polymers formed were tested for technical applicability using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Four out of the six alternative ERMs gave polymers with a thermal stability comparable to that obtained with DGEBA and DGEBF. The use of improved epoxy resin monomers with less skin sensitizing effects is a direct way to tackle the problem of contact allergy to epoxy resin systems, particularly in occupational settings, resulting in a reduction in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis.

  6. Chemical analysis of monomers in epoxy resins based on bisphenols F and A.

    PubMed

    Pontén, A; Zimerson, E; Sörensen, O; Bruze, M

    2004-05-01

    Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) is the monomer and most important contact allergen in epoxy resin(s) based on bisphenol A (DGEBA-R). Both thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods are available for the analysis of products containing DGEBA-R. With respect to detection and quantification, epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type, i.e. epoxy resins containing the isomers of diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol F (DGEBF), are not as well investigated as DGEBA-R. The isomers of DGEBF are p,p'-DGEBF, o,p'-DGEBF and o,o'-DGEBF. Both p,p'-DGEBF and o,p'-DGEBF have been shown to be contact allergens in humans, and all 3 isomers are sensitizers in the guinea pig maximization test. We aimed (i). to develop HPLC methods for separation and purification of the individual DGEBF isomers, (ii). to detect and quantify the DGEBF isomers in epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type and (iii). to evaluate and develop the TLC as a method for the detection of the DGEBF monomers. We found the total content of the DGEBF isomers in the investigated epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type to vary from 17.0 to 81.7% w/w. Some of them also contained 0.1-2.4% w/w DGEBA. The HPLC method showed a sensitivity that was 2000-20 000x higher than that obtained with the TLC method for the DGEBF monomers. We concluded that the range of the DGEBF isomer content in epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type is approximately the same as the monomer content in liquid compared to solid DGEBA-R. The relevance of contact allergy to DGEBA-R can remain unrecognized if the suspected product is an epoxy resin of the bisphenol F-type, which is analysed with the TLC method.

  7. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  8. Screening occupational contact allergy to bisphenol F epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Suuronen, Katri; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Jolanki, Riitta

    2014-09-01

    Epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) are widely used as such in applications requiring chemical resistance, and also together with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R). Concomitant patch test reactions to DGEBA-R and DGEBF resin (DGEBF-R) are common. Previous studies have yielded conflicting results on the frequency of independent DGEBF-R contact allergies. To report the results of over 11 years of screening with DGEBF-R. An in-house test substance of DGEBF-R (Epikote 862) was tested in the baseline patch test series, first at 1% and later at 0.25%. Test files were screened for allergic reactions to DGEBF-R and DGEBA-R, and the clinical records of positively reacting patients were analysed for occupation and exposure. Among 1972 patients, 66 (3.3%) reacted to DGEBF-R and 96 (4.9%) to DGEBA-R. Independent DGEBF-R allergies were seen in 5 patients only, and independent DGEBA-R allergies in 35. Specific exposure to DGEBF-R was found in 26 patients. The main occupational fields were the aircraft industry, the electrical and sports equipment industry, boat building, painting/floor coating, tile setting, and pipe relining. Independent contact allergies to DGEBF-R were rare, and screening with it was not found to be useful. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Contact allergy to reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-06-01

    Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R) is the most common sensitizer in epoxy systems, but a minority of patients also develop contact allergy to reactive diluents. To analyse the frequency and clinical relevance of allergic reactions to different epoxy reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins. Test files (January 1991 to June 2014) were screened, and the clinical records of patients with allergic reactions were analysed for occupation, concomitant allergic reactions, and exposure. A total of 67 patients reacted to at least one of the compounds. The largest numbers of allergic reactions were to phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE; n = 41), 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE; n = 34), and p-tert-butylphenyl glycidyl ether (PTBPGE; n = 19). Ten of the patients did not have contact allergy to DGEBA-R. The reactions of 5 of these were related to the use of BDDGE-containing products. We found no significant exposure to PGE or PTBPGE in patients sensitized to them, but some of the patients had used cresyl glycidyl ether-containing products. Allergic reactions to reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins usually occurred together with reactions to DGEBA-R. BDDGE was the clinically most significant compound, and was the sole cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in 3 patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  11. The stability of new transparent polymeric materials: The epoxy trimethoxyboroxine system. Part 1: The preparation, characterization and curing of epoxy resins and their copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, E.; Lin, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resin composition, curing conditions fillers, and flame retardant additives on the flammability of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as measured by the oxygen index is examined. The oxygen index of DGEBA cured with various curing agents was between 0.198 to 0.238. Fillers and flame retardant additives can increase the oxygen index dependent on the material and the amount used. Changes in the basic cured resin properties can be anticipated with the addition of noncompatible additives. High flame resistant epoxy resins with good stability and mechanical properties are investigated.

  12. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  13. Synthesis and properties of a bio-based epoxy resin with high epoxy value and low viscosity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songqi; Liu, Xiaoqing; Fan, Libo; Jiang, Yanhua; Cao, Lijun; Tang, Zhaobin; Zhu, Jin

    2014-02-01

    A bio-based epoxy resin (denoted TEIA) with high epoxy value (1.16) and low viscosity (0.92 Pa s, 258C) was synthesized from itaconic acid and its chemical structure was confirmed by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Its curing reaction with poly(propylene glycol) bis(2-aminopropyl ether) (D230) and methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) was investigated. For comparison, the commonly used diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was also cured with the same curing agents. The results demonstrated that TEIA showed higher curing reactivity towards D230/MHHPA and lower viscosity compared with DGEBA, resulting in the better processability. Owing to its high epoxy value and unique structure, comparable or better glass transition temperature as well as mechanical properties could be obtained for the TEIA-based network relative to the DGEBA-based network. The results indicated that itaconic acid is a promising renewable feedstock for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resin with high performance.

  14. Glass Reinforcement of Various Epoxy Resins-Polyurea Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Medha; Jauhari, Smita

    2012-07-01

    Polyureas (PUs) were prepared by the polycondensation reaction of disperse dyes containing -NH2 group and toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate. The disperse dyes have been prepared by coupling of various 2-diazobenzothiazoles with 1,3-benzenediamine. All the PUs were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral studies, number average molecular weight ( {overline{{Mn}} } ), and thermogravimetry. Further reaction of PUs was carried out with an epoxy resin (i.e., DGEBA). The curing study of prepared resins was monitored by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Based on DSC, thermograms glass fiber-reinforced composites have been laminated and characterized by chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties. The unreinforced cured resins were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The laminated composites showed excellent resistance properties against chemicals and good mechanical and electrical properties.

  15. Formulation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Copolymer for Graphite Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    Maximum char yield was obtained with a copolymer containing 25% mol fraction DGEBE and 75% mol fraction DGEBA (Epon 828). To achieve the high values (above 40%), a large quantity of catalyst (trimethoxyboroxine) was necessary. Although a graphite laminate 1/8" thick was successfully fabricated, the limited life of the catalyzed epoxy copolymer system precludes commercial application. Char yields of 45% can be achieved with phenolic cured epoxy systems as indicated by data generated under NAS2-10207 contract. A graphite laminate using this type of resin system was fabricated for comparison purposes. The resultant laminate was easier to process and because the graphite prepreg is more stable, the fabrication process could readily be adapted to commercial applications.

  16. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  17. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  18. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship betweenmore » chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)« less

  19. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from epoxy resin in a golf club repairman.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Marléne; Möller, Halvor; Pontén, Ann

    2008-01-01

    A golfer presented with facial and hand eczema. He had exacerbations of his hand eczema prior to golf tournaments. Being an authorized golf club repairman, he had been working with a two-part glue containing an epoxy resin (ER) based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and the hardener diethylenetriamine (DETA) for approximately 4 years before he developed any skin problems. He was patch-tested with the standard, which contains an ER based on DGEBA (DGEBA-R), epoxy (containing DETA), and rubber glove series and had positive reactions to DGEBA-R only. Other work materials (a latex glove, a golf glove made of leather, and part of the handle of his own golf club "as is" and in a methyl tert-butyl ether extract) were tested, with negative results. Allergic contact dermatitis from ER affects the skin by direct contact; the dermatitis is usually localized to the hands and forearms. If the face and eyelids are involved, the dermatitis may be due to exposure to airborne hardeners or reactive diluents, exposure to airborne dust from residual monomers, or ectopic allergic reactions. Our repairman had sandpapered an old glued surface, which may have led to possible airborne dust formation, thus explaining the facial eczema. Therefore, a worker with contact allergy to ER may continue working provided the skin is protected from contamination.

  20. Cross-reactivity among epoxy acrylates and bisphenol F epoxy resins in patients with bisphenol A epoxy resin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han N; Pokorny, Christopher D; Law, Sandra; Pratt, Melanie; Sasseville, Denis; Storrs, Frances J

    2002-09-01

    The study's objective was 2-fold: first, to evaluate the potential cross-reactivity between Bis-A epoxy resins and epoxy acrylates and second, to study the cross reactivity between Bis-A epoxy resins and newer Bis-F epoxy resins in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resins and had positive patch test to the standard epoxy resin based on bisphenol A. Forty-one patients were patch tested to 23 chemicals including epoxy acrylates, Bis-A epoxy resins, and Bis-F epoxy resins, as well as reactive diluents and nonbisphenol epoxy resins. Questions concerning exposure to epoxy resins, occupational history, and problems with dental work were completed. All patients included in the study had positive reactions to the standard Bis-A epoxy resin. Twenty percent (8 of 41) of the patients reacted to at least one of the epoxy acrylates; the most common reaction was to Bis-GMA. Five of 8 patients who reacted to the epoxy acrylates had dental work, but only one patient had problems from her dental work. Six of 8 patients (75%) who reacted to epoxy resins and epoxy acrylates did not react to aliphatic acrylates. Thirty-two percent (13 of 41) reacted to tosylamide epoxy resin, and none reacted to triglycidyl isocyanurate resin. In addition, all patients (100%) had positive reactions to at least one of the Bis-F epoxy resins that were tested. Most patients with sensitivity to Bis-A epoxy resins do not cross-react with epoxy acrylates. Patients with positive patch test reactions to epoxy acrylates used in dentistry usually do not have symptoms from their dental work. To our knowledge, this is the largest series of patients with sensitivity to the standard Bis-A epoxy resin that have been patch tested with the more recently introduced Bis-F epoxy resins. There is significant cross-reactivity between Bis-A and Bis-F epoxy resins, which can be explained by their structural similarity. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Epoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-07

    1. INTRODUCTION ..................................................... ..... ol 2. EPR EXPERIMENTS ON EPOXY RESINS...Calculated sizes of cube-shaped rigid regions.......................... 59 1. INTRODUCTION Epoxy resin polymers are important matrix materials for... information on this network microstructure. The experiments involved measurements made as a function of either temperature or solvent content. In the latter

  2. Flexible Epoxy Resin Formed Upon Blending with a Triblock Copolymer through Reaction-Induced Microphase Separation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a matrix, the ABA block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide–b–propylene oxide–b–ethylene oxide) (Pluronic F127) as an additive, and diphenyl diaminosulfone (DDS) as a curing agent to prepare flexible epoxy resins through reaction-induced microphase separation (RIMPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the existence of hydrogen bonding between the poly(ethylene oxide) segment of F127 and the OH groups of the DGEBA resin. Small-angle X-ray scattering, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy all revealed evidence for the microphase separation of F127 within the epoxy resin. Glass transition temperature (Tg) phenomena and mechanical properties (modulus) were determined through differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively, of samples at various blend compositions. The modulus data provided evidence for the formation of wormlike micelle structures, through a RIMPS mechanism, in the flexible epoxy resin upon blending with the F127 triblock copolymer. PMID:28773571

  3. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  4. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  5. Syringaresinol: A Renewable and Safer Alternative to Bisphenol A for Epoxy-Amine Resins.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Marine; Hollande, Louis; Jaufurally, Abdus Samad; Pernes, Miguel; Ménard, Raphaël; Grimaldi, Marina; Beaugrand, Johnny; Balaguer, Patrick; Ducrot, Paul-Henri; Allais, Florent

    2017-02-22

    A renewable bisepoxide, SYR-EPO, was prepared from syringaresinol, a naturally occurring bisphenol deriving from sinapic acid, by using a chemo-enzymatic synthetic pathway. Estrogenic activity tests revealed no endocrine disruption for syringaresinol. Its glycidylation afforded SYR-EPO with excellent yield and purity. This biobased, safe epoxy precursor was then cured with conventional and renewable diamines for the preparation of epoxy-amine resins. The resulting thermosets were thermally and mechanically characterized. Thermal analyses of these new resins showed excellent thermal stabilities (T d5 % =279-309 °C) and T g ranging from 73 to 126 °C, almost reaching the properties of those obtained with the diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), extensively used in the polymer industry (T d5 % =319 °C and T g =150 °C for DGEBA/isophorone diamine resins). Degradation studies in NaOH and HCl aqueous solutions also highlighted the robustness of the syringaresinol-based resins, similar to bisphenol A (BPA). All these results undoubtedly confirmed the potential of syringaresinol as a greener and safer substitute for BPA. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers.

  7. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  8. Mobility restrictions and glass transition behaviour of an epoxy resin under confinement.

    PubMed

    Djemour, A; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J

    2015-04-07

    Confinement can have a big influence on the dynamics of glass formers in the vicinity of the glass transition. Already 40 to 50 K above the glass transition temperature, thermal equilibration of glass formers can be strongly influenced by the confining substrate. We investigate the linear thermal expansion and the specific heat capacity cp of an epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) in a temperature interval of 120 K around the glass transition temperature. The epoxy resin is filled into controlled pore glasses with pore diameters between 4 and 111 nm. Since DGEBA can form H-bonds with silica surfaces, we also investigate the influence of surface silanization of the porous substrates. In untreated substrates a core/shell structure of the epoxy resin can be identified. The glass transition behaviours of the bulk phase and that of the shell phase are different. In silanized substrates, the shell phase disappears. At a temperature well above the glass transition, a second transition is found for the bulk phase - both in the linear expansion data as well as in the specific heat capacity. The cp data do not allow excluding the glass transition of a third phase as being the cause for this transition, whereas the linear expansion data do so. The additional transition temperature is interpreted as a separation between two regimes: above this temperature, macroscopic flow of the bulk phase inside the porous structure is possible to balance the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between DGEBA and the substrate. Below the transition temperature, this degree of freedom is hindered by geometrical constraints of the porous substrates. Moreover, this second transition could also be found in the linear expansion data of the shell phase.

  9. Preparation of waterborne dispersions of epoxy resin by ultrasonic-assisted supercritical CO2 nanoemulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanyang; Hu, Guoxin; Liu, Kun; Wu, Liqun

    2017-11-01

    Waterborne nanoemulsion of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A type epoxy resin (DGEBA) with droplet size of around 124nm was prepared by using an ultrasonic-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2 ) technique in an autoclave reactor at a low temperature (32°C). A view cell positioned in-line with the ultrasonic probe allowed observation of the emulsification process. From the image analysis and droplet size measurement, the influence mechanisms of the ultrasonic power, the degree of mixing of scCO 2 with DGEBA, the adding amount of emulsifier, and the system pressure on emulsification process and emulsion droplet size were investigated. In the emulsification process, scCO 2 penetrated into the mixture and absorbed on the DGEBA molecular. The interactions between CO 2 and the functional groups of DGEBA reduced the chain-chain interactions of polymer segments and therefore efficiently reduced the viscosity of DGEBA at a low temperature. Meantime, the cavitation and acoustic streaming of ultrasound provided a shear force for the nanoemulsification and a disturbance force for the homogeneity of the emulsion. Therefore, the combination of scCO 2 and ultrasonication made it possible to prepare a long-term stable nanoemulsion under a low temperature. This ultrasonic-assisted scCO 2 emulsification method provides an efficient and solvent-free process for the preparation of waterborne nanoemulsions of, for example, some heat-sensitive and water-insoluble active substances at low temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Siloxane Modifiers for Epoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    similarly prepared ATBN- and CTBN -modified epoxies. Wear rate was quite dramatically reduced with some of the modifiers. Wear results are discussed in...similarly prepared ATBN- and CTBN -modified epoxies. Wear rate was quite dramatically reduced with some of the modifiers. Wear results are discussed...acrylonitrile copolymers having both carboxyl ( CTBN ) and amine (ATBN) end groups have been widely used as epoxy modifiers (4-11). During the curing process, the

  11. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  12. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  7. Prediction of the Formulation Dependence of the Glass Transition Temperature for Amine-Epoxy Copolymers Using a Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Based on the AM1 Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    Products and Chemicals , Inc . The stoichiometry of the DGEBA-PACM polymerization reaction was varied to yield epoxy/amine ratios ranging from ~2:1 through...equivalent). The DGEBA epoxy resin was cured with bis(p-aminocyclohexyl)methane (PACM) (EEW = 52.5 g/equivalent), which was acquired from Air

  8. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  9. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  10. Contact allergy to epoxy resin: risk occupations and consequences.

    PubMed

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mortz, Charlotte G; Paulsen, Evy; Sommerlund, Mette; Veien, Niels Kren; Laurberg, Grete; Kaaber, Knud; Thormann, Jens; Andersen, Bo Lasthein; Danielsen, Anne; Avnstorp, Christian; Kristensen, Berit; Kristensen, Ove; Vissing, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels Henrik; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2012-08-01

    Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis patients patch tested during 2005-2009. All patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test were sent a questionnaire. A positive patch test reaction to epoxy resin was found in 275 patients (1.3%), with a higher proportion in men (1.9%) than in women (1.0%). The prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated in an educational programme. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. The application of epoxy resin coating in grounding grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Chen, Z. R.; Xi, L. J.; Wang, X. Y.; Wang, H. F.

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy resin anticorrosion coating is widely used in grounding grid corrosion protection because of its wide range of materials, good antiseptic effect and convenient processing. Based on the latest research progress, four kinds of epoxy anticorrosive coatings are introduced, which are structural modified epoxy coating, inorganic modified epoxy coating, organic modified epoxy coating and polyaniline / epoxy resin composite coating. In this paper, the current research progress of epoxy base coating is analyzed, and prospected the possible development direction of the anti-corrosion coating in the grounding grid, which provides a reference for coating corrosion prevention of grounding materials.

  12. Method for Improving Acoustic Impedance of Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    neoprene, ethylene propylene diene monomer ( EPDM ) and polyurethane rubbers . Typical applications of these materials encapsulate and protect acoustic...different material (e.g., rubber ) cannot be used. Thus, a hard, strong and acoustically transparent material is needed. Suitable high modulus...epoxy resin. In this method, an epoxy resin component is mixed with a rubber component. The epoxy resin component is preferably a bisphenol A

  13. Method for Improving Acoustic Impedance of Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-21

    include neoprene, ethylene propylene diene monomer ( EPDM ) and polyurethane rubbers . Typical applications of these materials encapsulate and protect...a different material (e.g., rubber ) cannot be used. Thus, a hard, strong and acoustically transparent material is needed. Suitable high modulus...an epoxy resin. In this method, an epoxy resin component is mixed with a rubber component. The epoxy resin component is preferably a bisphenol A

  14. Analogues of the epoxy resin monomer diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F: effects on contact allergenic potency and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Niamh M; Delaine, Tamara; Luthman, Kristina; Natsch, Andreas; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2012-11-19

    Diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and bisphenol F (DGEBF) are widely used as components in epoxy resin thermosetting products. They are known to cause occupational and nonoccupational allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study is to investigate analogues of DGEBF with regard to contact allergy and cytotoxicity. A comprehensive knowledge of the structural features that contribute to the allergenic and cytotoxic effects of DGEBF will guide the development of future novel epoxy resin systems with reduced health hazards for those coming into contact with them. It was found that the allergenic effects of DGEBF were dependent on its terminal epoxide groups. In contrast, it was found that the cytotoxicity in monolayer cell culture was dependent not only on the presence of epoxide groups but also on other structural features.

  15. Reduced sensitizing capacity of epoxy resin systems: a structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Ida B; Broo, Kerstin; Jonsson, Charlotte; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2009-11-01

    Epoxy resins can be prepared from numerous chemical compositions. Until recently, alternatives to epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A (DGEBA) or bisphenol F (DGEBF) monomers have not received commercial interest, but are presently doing so, as epoxy resins with various properties are desired. Epoxy resin systems are known to cause allergic contact dermatitis because of contents of uncured monomers, reactive diluents, and hardeners. Reactive diluents, for example, glycidyl ethers, which also contain epoxide moieties, are added to reduce viscosity and improve polymerization. We have investigated the contact allergenic properties of a series of six analogues to phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE), all with similar basic structures but with varying carbon chain lengths and degrees of saturation. The chemical reactivity of the compounds in the test series toward the hexapeptide H-Pro-His-Cys-Lys-Arg-Met-OH was investigated. All epoxides were shown to bind covalently to both cysteine and proline residues. The percent depletion of nonreacted peptide was also studied resulting in 88% depletion when using PGE and 46% when using butyl glycidyl ether (5) at the same time point, thus revealing a large difference between the fastest and the slowest reacting epoxide. The skin sensitization potencies of the epoxides using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) were evaluated in relation to the observed physicochemical and reactivity properties. To enable determination of statistical significance between structurally closely related compounds, a nonpooled LLNA was performed. It was found that the compounds investigated ranged from strong to weak sensitizers, congruent with the reactivity data, indicating that even small changes in chemical structure result in significant differences in sensitizing capacity.

  16. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  17. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The resins identified in paragraph (a) of... condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to...

  18. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  19. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    PubMed

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)). Several affordable glove and clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material

  20. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-03-10

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  1. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  2. Determination of Hydrophobic Contact Angle of Epoxy Resin Compound Silicon Rubber and Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syakur, Abdul; Hermawan; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-04-01

    Epoxy resin is a thermosetting polymeric material which is very good for application of high voltage outdoor insulator in electrical power system. This material has several advantages, i.e. high dielectric strength, light weight, high mechanical strength, easy to blend with additive, and easy maintenance if compared to that of porcelain and glass outdoor insulators which are commonly used. However, this material also has several disadvantages, i.e. hydrophilic property, very sensitive to aging and easily degraded when there is a flow of contaminants on its surface. The research towards improving the performance of epoxy resin insulation materials were carried out to obtain epoxy resin insulating material with high water repellent properties and high surface tracking to aging. In this work, insulating material was made at room temperature vulcanization, with material composition: Diglycidyl Ether Bisphenol A (DGEBA), Metaphenylene Diamine (MPDA) as hardener with stoichiometric value of unity, and nanosilica mixed with Silicon Rubber (SiR) with 10% (RTV21), 20% (RTV22), 30% (RTV23), 40% (RTV24) and 50% (RTV25) variation. The usage of nanosilica and Silicon Rubber (SIR) as filler was expected to provide hydrophobic properties and was able to increase the value of surface tracking of materials. The performance of the insulator observed were contact angle of hydrophobic surface materials. Tests carried out using Inclined Plane Tracking procedure according to IEC 60-587: 1984 with Ammonium Chloride (NH4Cl) as contaminants flowed using peristaltic pumps. The results show that hydrophobic contact angle can be determined from each sample, and RTV25 has maximum contact angle among others.

  3. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  4. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  5. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  6. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  7. Health Problems of Epoxy Resins and Amine-curing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.; Alberman, K. B.

    1959-01-01

    Epoxy resins were first introduced about 10 years ago. Toxic effects, particularly dermatitis, have been frequently described. An investigation into the possible causes of pathological sequelae following the use of epoxy resin/amine mixtures has been undertaken. The cause of most cases of dermatitis and sensitization appears to be uncombined amine which is present in recent mixtures and persists in hardened resin for long periods. The results of experiments with two of the most commonly used resin/amine mixtures confirm this. Cold-cured resins are more dangerous and remain so even when hardened. A simple theory is suggested for the mechanism of the reaction between epoxy resins, amines, and biological systems. This theory leads logically to the handling precautions outlined. Images PMID:13651551

  8. Biobased Epoxy Resins from Deconstructed Native Softwood Lignin.

    PubMed

    van de Pas, Daniel J; Torr, Kirk M

    2017-08-14

    The synthesis of novel epoxy resins from lignin hydrogenolysis products is reported. Native lignin in pine wood was depolymerized by mild hydrogenolysis to give an oil product that was reacted with epichlorohydrin to give epoxy prepolymers. These were blended with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether or glycerol diglycidyl ether and cured with diethylenetriamine or isophorone diamine. The key novelty of this work lies in using the inherent properties of the native lignin in preparing new biobased epoxy resins. The lignin-derived epoxy prepolymers could be used to replace 25-75% of the bisphenol A diglycidyl ether equivalent, leading to increases of up to 52% in the flexural modulus and up to 38% in the flexural strength. Improvements in the flexural strength were attributed to the oligomeric products present in the lignin hydrogenolysis oil. These results indicate lignin hydrogenolysis products have potential as sustainable biobased polyols in the synthesis of high performance epoxy resins.

  9. Study of Hyperbranched Poly(ethyleneimine) Polymers of Different Molecular Weight and Their Interaction with Epoxy Resin

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Two different commercial hyperbranched poly(ethyleneimine)s (HBPEI), with molecular weights (MW) of 800 and 25,000 g/mol, and denoted as PEI800 and PEI25000, respectively, as well as the mixtures with a Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy resin, have been studied using thermal analysis techniques (DSC, TGA), dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Only a single glass transition is observed in these mixtures by DSC. DRS of the HBPEIs shows three dipolar relaxations: γ, β, and α. The average activation energy for the γ-relaxation is similar for all HBPEIs and is associated with the motion of the terminal groups. The β-relaxation has the same average activation energy for both PEI800 and PEI25000; this relaxation is attributed to the mobility of the branches. The α-relaxation peak for all the HBPEIs is an asymmetric peak with a shoulder on the high temperature side. This shoulder suggests the existence of ionic charge trapped in the PEI. For the mixtures, the γ- and β-relaxations follow the behaviour of the epoxy resin alone, indicating that the epoxy resin dominates the molecular mobility. The α-relaxation by DRS is observed only as a shoulder, as a consequence of an overlap with conductivity effects, whereas by DMA, it is a clear peak. PMID:29522480

  10. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or "whiskers" and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of approximately 10 and approximately 84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185-192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtures and subsequent curing. The whisker content was systematically varied between 4 and 24% v/v. Electron microscopy studies suggest that the whiskers are evenly dispersed within the epoxy matrix. Dynamic mechanical thermoanalysis revealed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the materials was not significantly influenced by the incorporation of the cellulose filler. Between room temperature and 150 degrees C, i.e., below T(g), the tensile storage moduli (E') of the nanocomposites increased modestly, for example from 1.6 GPa for the neat polymer to 4.9 and 3.6 GPa for nanocomposites comprising 16% v/v tunicate or cotton whiskers. The relative reinforcement was more significant at 185 degrees C (i.e., above T(g)), where E' was increased from approximately 16 MPa (neat polymer) to approximately 1.6 GPa (tunicate) or approximately 215 MPa (cotton). The mechanical properties of the new materials are well-described by the percolation model and are the result of the formation of a percolating whisker network in which stress transfer is facilitated by strong interactions between the whiskers.

  11. Comparative investigation of thermal and mechanical properties of cross-linked epoxy polymers with different curing agents by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jeyranpour, F; Alahyarizadeh, Gh; Arab, B

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to predict the thermal and mechanical properties of the cross-linked epoxy system composed of DGEBA resin and the curing agent TETA. To investigate the effects of curing agents, a comprehensive and comparative study was also performed on the thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA epoxy systems such as density, glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and elastic properties of different cross-linking densities and different temperatures. The results indicated that the glass transition temperature of DGEBA/TETA system calculated through density-temperature data, ∼ 385-395 °K, for the epoxy system with the cross-linking density of 62.5% has a better agreement with the experimental value (Tg, ∼ 400 °K) in comparison to the value calculated through the variation of cell volume in terms of temperature, 430-440 °K. They also indicated that CTE related parameters and elastic properties including Young, Bulk, and shear's moduli, and Poisson's ratio have a relative agreement with the experimental results. Comparison between the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy systems of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA showed that the DGEBA/DETDA has a higher Tg in all cross linking densities than that of DGEBA/TETA, while higher mechanical properties was observed in the case of DGEBA/TETA in almost all cross linking densities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical aging of linear and network epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S.-W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Banthia, A. K.; Mohajer, Y.; Tant, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Network and linear epoxy resins principally based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and its oligomers are prepared and studied using diamine and anhydride crosslinking agents. Rubber modified epoxies and a carbon fiber reinforced composite are also investigated. All materials display time-dependent changes when stored at temperatures below the glass transition temperature after quenching (sub-T/g/ annealing). Solvent sorption experiments initiated after different sub-T(g) annealing times demonstrate that the rate of solvent uptake can be indirectly related to the free volume of the epoxy resins. Residual thermal stresses and water are found to have little effect on the physical aging process, which affects the sub-T(g) properties of uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy material. Finally, the importance of the recovery phenomenon which affects the durability of epoxy glasses is considered.

  13. Glass Fibre/Epoxy Resin Interface Life-Time Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    RD-Ai32 26 GLASS FIBRE /POXY RESIN INTERFACE LIFE-TIME PREDICTION 1/1 (U) BRISTOL UNIV (ENGLAND) H H WILLS PHYSICS LAB K H RSHBEE ET AL. APR 83...D 3005-MS GLASS FIBRE /EPOXY RESIN INTERFACE LIFE-TIME PREDICTION - Final Report by K H G Ashbee, Principal Investigator R Ho~l J P Sargent Elizabeth...REPORT h PERIOD COVERED. Glass Fibre /Epoxy Resin Interface Life-time F-inal Technical 11’ port PreictonApril 1981 - A:’ril 1983 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  14. Physical Aging of Linear and Network Epoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-13

    8217 - methylene dianiline (MDA) (Tm=39°C) 6 00 n0 Polyglycidyl ether of phenol -formaldehyde Novolac (n : 1.6) The resin components 3 and 4 were supplied by...k AO-A097 017 VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST AND STATE UNIV BLACKSBURG -ETC F/G 11/9 PH YSI CAL AGING OF LINEAR AND NETWORK EPOXY RESINS U) IMAR Al J E...0629 Task No. NR 356-692 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 3 Physical Aging of Linear and Network Epoxy Resins by Eric Siu-Wai Kong, Garth L. Wilkes, James E. McGrath

  15. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  16. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  17. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  18. Sensitization to epoxy resin systems in special flooring workers.

    PubMed

    Condé-Salazar, L; Gonzalez de Domingo, M A; Guimaraens, D

    1994-09-01

    The use of new products in building and public works is increasing, among them being special floor coverings containing epoxy resins and derivatives. These are used principally in heavily frequented areas, such as shopping precincts, hospitals, civic centres, etc., due to their high resistance to wear and tear, environmental factors, etc. In the last 2 years, we have studied 15 cases of men sensitized to epoxy resin, or derivatives, who worked with special floorings. Speed of sensitization, severity of lesions, and localization to the hands, face and legs were characteristic.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10603 - Epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially neutralized (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10603 Epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially neutralized (generic). (a... generically as epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially neutralized (PMN P-11-280) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10603 - Epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially neutralized (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10603 Epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially neutralized (generic). (a... generically as epoxy modified alkyd resin, partially neutralized (PMN P-11-280) is subject to reporting under...

  1. IMPROVEMENTS IN EPOXY RESIN EMBEDDING METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Luft, John H.

    1961-01-01

    Epoxy embedding methods of Glauert and Kushida have been modified so as to yield rapid, reproducible, and convenient embedding methods for electron microscopy. The sections are robust and tissue damage is less than with methacrylate embedding. PMID:13764136

  2. Synthesis and characterizations of melamine-based epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-09-05

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

  3. Synthesis and Characterizations of Melamine-Based Epoxy Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials. PMID:24013372

  4. Occupational dermatoses from exposure to epoxy resin compounds in a ski factory.

    PubMed

    Jolanki, R; Tarvainen, K; Tatar, T; Estlander, T; Henriks-Eckerman, M L; Mustakallio, K K; Kanerva, L

    1996-06-01

    Of 22 workers in a ski factory, occupational allergic contact dermatitis was found in 8. 6 were sensitive to epoxy resin compounds, i.e., epoxy resins, hardeners or diluents, 1 to cobalt in glass-fiber reinforcements, and 1 to formaldehyde in a urea-formaldehyde glue and a lacquer. 4 workers had irritant contact dermatitis from epoxy resin compounds, lacquers, sanding dust, or glass-fiber dust. 3 had contact allergy from a new sensitizer, diethyleneglycol diglycidyl ether, in a reactive diluent. Immediate transfer of workers sensitized to epoxy resin from epoxy exposure prevents aggravation of their dermatitis and broadening of the sensitization to epoxy hardeners, diluents and other compounds.

  5. Allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resin in a hemodialysis cannula.

    PubMed

    Ng, P P; Leow, Y H; Ng, S K; Goh, C L

    1998-03-01

    A patient with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis presented with dermatitis, particularly over the arteriovenous fistulae sites on the forearm. Patch testing revealed a positive reaction to epoxy resin present in the glue that fixed the needle of the hemodialysis cannula.

  6. Nonlinear Inelastic Mechanical Behavior Of Epoxy Resin Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yekani Fard, Masoud

    Polymer and polymer matrix composites (PMCs) materials are being used extensively in different civil and mechanical engineering applications. The behavior of the epoxy resin polymers under different types of loading conditions has to be understood before the mechanical behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) can be accurately predicted. In many structural applications, PMC structures are subjected to large flexural loadings, examples include repair of structures against earthquake and engine fan cases. Therefore it is important to characterize and model the flexural mechanical behavior of epoxy resin materials. In this thesis, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken combining experiments and theoretical modeling to investigate the mechanical behavior of epoxy resins subject to different loading conditions. Epoxy resin E 863 was tested at different strain rates. Samples with dog-bone geometry were used in the tension tests. Small sized cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical samples were used in compression tests. Flexural tests were conducted on samples with different sizes and loading conditions. Strains were measured using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, extensometers, strain gauges, and actuators. Effects of triaxiality state of stress were studied. Cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical compression samples undergo stress drop at yield, but it was found that only cubic samples experience strain hardening before failure. Characteristic points of tensile and compressive stress strain relation and load deflection curve in flexure were measured and their variations with strain rate studied. Two different stress strain models were used to investigate the effect of out-of-plane loading on the uniaxial stress strain response of the epoxy resin material. The first model is a strain softening with plastic flow for tension and compression. The influence of softening localization on material behavior was investigated using the DIC system. It was found that

  7. Toughening mechanism in elastomer-modified epoxy resins, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The role of matrix ductility on the toughenability and toughening mechanism of elastomer-modified DGEBRA epoxies was investigated. Matrix ductility was varied by using epoxide resins of varying epoxide monomer molecular weights. These epoxide resins were cured using 4,4' diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) and, in some cases, modified with 10% HYCAR(r)CTBN 1300X8. Fracture roughness values for the neat epoxies were found to be almost independent on the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used. However, it was found that the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified epoxies was very dependent upon the epoxide monomer molecular weight. Tensile dilatometry indicated that the toughening mechanism, when present, is similar to the mechanisms found for the piperidine cured epoxies in Part 1. SEM and OM corroborate this finding. Dynamic mechanical studies were conducted to shed light on the toughenability of the epoxies. The time-dependent small strain behavior of these epoxies were separated into their bulk and shear components. The bulk component is related to brittle fracture, whereas the shear component is related to yielding. It can be shown that the rates of shear and bulk strain energy buildup for a given stress are uniquely determined by the values of Poisson's ratio, nu. It was found that nu increases as the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used increases. This increase in nu can be associated with the low temperature beta relaxation. The effect of increasing cross-link density is to shift the beta relaxation to higher temperatures and to decrease the magnitude of the beta relaxation. Thus, increasing cross-link density decreases nu and increases the tendency towards brittle fracture.

  8. Synthesis and Structure Property Studies of Toughened Epoxy Resins Via Functionalized Polysiloxanes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-30

    34 87S N4 SYNTHESIS RNO STRUCTURE PROPERTY STUDIES OF OP NDD mEPOXY RESINS YIN FU.. (U) VIROINIR POLYTECHNIC INST OM STNTE UNIY RCKSBURG DEPT OF C.. J...Classification) Synthesis and Structure Property Studies of Toughened Epoxy Resins Via Functionalized Polysiloxanes 12. PERSONALAUTHOR(S) J. 5. HitTIe... Resins , Toughening 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Epoxy resins chemically modified with functionally

  9. Homogeneous Liquid Phase Transfer of Graphene Oxide into Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Amirova, Lyaysan; Surnova, Albina; Balkaev, Dinar; Musin, Delus; Amirov, Rustem; Dimiev, Ayrat M

    2017-04-05

    The quality of polymer composite materials depends on the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Due to the presence of the oxygen functional groups, graphene oxide (GO) has a strong affinity to epoxy resins, providing potential opportunity for the uniform distribution of GO sheets in the matrix. Another advantage of GO over its nonoxidized counterpart is its ability to exfoliate to single-atomic-layer sheets in water and in some organic solvents. However, these advantages of GO have not yet been fully realized due to the lack of the methods efficiently introducing GO into the epoxy resin. Here we develop a novel homogeneous liquid phase transfer method that affords uniform distribution, and fully exfoliated condition of GO in the polymer matrix. The most pronounced alteration of properties of the cured composites is registered at the 0.10%-0.15% GO content. Addition of as little as 0.10% GO leads to the increase of the Young's modulus by 48%. Moreover, we demonstrate successful introduction of GO into the epoxy matrix containing an active diluent-modifier; this opens new venues for fabrication of improved GO-epoxy-modifier composites with a broad range of predesigned properties. The experiments done on reproducing the two literature methods, using alternative GO introduction techniques, lead to either decrease or insignificant increase of the Young's modulus of the resulting GO-epoxy composites.

  10. Processing Science of Epoxy Resin Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-15

    3 2.2 LAMINATE FABRICATION 30 2.2.1 Baseline Laminate Fabrication 30 2.2.2 Large Laminate Fabrication 36 2.3 DIFFUSIVITY AND SOLUBILITY...Thick Laminate 42 28 Baseline Cure Cycle With Specimen Advancement Levels 45 29 Composite Panel Fabrication 47 30 Composite Panel Fabrication 48 31...first change was the elimination of the different 1 resin formulations and concentration on the normal or baseline 5208/T300 prepreg as produced by

  11. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  12. High performance, rapid thermal/UV curing epoxy resin for additive manufacturing of short and continuous carbon fiber epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Lewicki, James

    2018-04-17

    An additive manufacturing resin system including an additive manufacturing print head; a continuous carbon fiber or short carbon fibers operatively connected to the additive manufacturing print head; and a tailored resin operatively connected to the print head, wherein the tailored resin has a resin mass and wherein the tailored resin includes an epoxy component, a filler component, a catalyst component, and a chain extender component; wherein the epoxy component is 70-95% of the resin mass, wherein the filler component is 1-20% of the resin mass, wherein the catalyst component is 0.1-10% of the resin mass, and wherein the chain extender component is 0-50% of the resin mass.

  13. Investigation of the effect of resin material on impact damage to graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental program are described which establishes the feasibility and guide lines for resin development. The objective was to identify the basic epoxy neat resin properties that improve low velocity impact resistance and toughness to graphite-epoxy laminates and at the same time maintain useful structural laminate mechanical properties. Materials tests from twenty-three toughened epoxy resin matrix systems are included.

  14. Fracture behavior of silica nanoparticle filled epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittanet, Peerapan

    This dissertation involves the addition of silica nanoparticles to a lightly crosslinked, model epoxy resin and investigates the effect of nanosilica content and particle size on glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young's modulus (E), yield stress, and fracture toughness. This study aims to understand the influence of silica nanoparticle size, bimodal particle size distribution and silica content on the toughening behavior. The toughening mechanisms were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission optical microscopy (TOM). The approach identifies toughening mechanisms and develops a toughening model from unimodal-particle size systems first, then extends these concepts to various mixtures micron- and nanometer-size particles in a similar model epoxy. The experimental results revealed that the addition of nanosilica did not have a significant effect on Tg or the yield stress of epoxy resin, i.e. the yield stress and Tg remained constant regardless of nanosilica particle size. As expected, the addition of nanosilica had a significant impact on CTE, modulus and fracture toughness. The CTE values of nanosilica-filled epoxies were found to decrease with increasing nanosilica content, which can be attributed to the much lower CTE of the nanosilica fillers. Interestingly, the decreases in CTE showed strong particle size dependence. The Young's modulus was also found to significantly improve with addition of nanosilica and increase with increasing filler content. However, the particle size did not exhibit any effect on the Young's modulus. Finally, the fracture toughness and fracture energy showed significant improvements with the addition of nanosilica, and increased with increasing filler content. The effect of particle size on fracture toughness was negligible. Observation of the fracture surfaces using SEM and TOM showed evidence of debonding of nanosilica particles

  15. Effects of colloidal nanosilica on the rheological properties of epoxy resins filled with organoclay.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dinh Huong; Song, Gwang Seok; Lee, Dai Soo

    2011-05-01

    The rheological properties of epoxy resins filled with organoclay and colloidal nanosilica were investigated by employing a parallel plate rheometer in flow mode at 25 degrees C. Shear thickening and shear thinning behaviors were observed in the epoxy resins filled with a mixture of organoclay and colloidal nanosilica. Minima were observed in the relaxation time of the systems consisting of epoxy resins filled with organoclay and colloidal silica as the content of colloidal nanosilica was increased. It seems that the colloidal nanosilica increased the mobility of the filled epoxy resins and reduced the interactions between the silicate layers in the systems.

  16. Poly(arylene ether-co-imidazole)s as toughness modifiers for epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, Patricia D. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A toughened epoxy was prepared by reacting an epoxy resin with a poly(arylene ether-co-imidazole)s (PAEI). The epoxy resin comprises N,N,N',N'tetraglycidyl-4,4'- methylenebisbenzenamine and 4-aminophenyl sulfone. The PAEI was prepared by reacting an aromatic bisphenol, a bisphenol imidazole, and an activated aromatic dihalide or dinitro compound in the presence of potassium carbonate in a polar aprotic solvent at an elevated temperature. The epoxies which were modified with these particular PAEI's showed a significant increase in toughness with only a 10 weight percent loading of the PAEI into the epoxy. These toughened epoxies were used to prepare composites and molded parts.

  17. Impact of a heteroatom in a structure-activity relationship study on analogues of phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) from epoxy resin systems.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Ida B; Delaine, Tamara; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2011-04-18

    Epoxy resins are among the most common causes of occupational contact dermatitis. They are normally used in so-called epoxy resin systems (ERS). These commercial products are combinations of epoxy resins, curing agents, modifiers, and reactive diluents. The most frequently used resins are diglycidyl ethers based on bisphenol A (DGEBA) and bisphenol F (DGEBF). In this study, we have investigated the contact allergenic properties of a series of analogues to the reactive diluent phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE), all with similar basic structures but with varying heteroatoms or with no heteroatom present. The chemical reactivity of the compounds in the test series toward the hexapeptide H-Pro-His-Cys-Lys-Arg-Met-OH was investigated. All epoxides were shown to bind covalently to both cysteine and proline residues. The percent depletion of nonreacted peptide was also studied resulting in ca. 60% depletion when using either PGE, phenyl 2,3-epoxypropyl sulfide (2), or N-(2,3-epoxypropyl)aniline (3), and only 15% when using 1,2-epoxy-4-phenylbutane (4) at the same time point. The skin sensitization potencies of the epoxides using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) were evaluated in relation to the observed physicochemical and reactivity properties. To enable determination of statistical significance between structurally closely related compounds, a nonpooled LLNA was performed. It was found that all investigated compounds containing a heteroatom in the α-position to the epoxide were strong sensitizers, congruent with the reactivity data, indicating that the impact of a heteroatom is crucial for the sensitizing capacity for this type of epoxides.

  18. Cross-Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers.

    PubMed

    Hines, Stella E; Barker, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S

    2015-12-01

    An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23-infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00-22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86-589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cross‐Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Elizabeth A.; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Methods Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. Results We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23‐infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00‐22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86‐589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. Conclusions In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. PMID:26553118

  20. Epoxy-resin patterns speed shell-molding of aluminum parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Half patterns cast from commercial epoxy resin containing aluminum powder are used for shell-molding of aluminum parts. The half patterns are cast in plastic molds of the original wooden pattern. Ten serviceable sand resin molds are made from each epoxy pattern.

  1. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Havens, Stephen J.; Dorsey, George F.; Moulton, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  2. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.; Havens, S.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Moulton, R.J.

    1999-03-02

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  3. Industrially relevant epoxy-acrylate hybrid resin photopolymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiboye, Gbenga I.

    Photopolymerization of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins takes advantages of inherent properties present in the free-radical and cationic reactions to reduce oxygen inhibition problems that plague free-radical reactions. Similarly, the combined reaction mechanisms reduce moisture sensitivity of the cationic reactions. Despite the advantages of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins, problems persist that need to be addressed. For example, low conversion and polymerization rate of the epoxides are a problem, because the fast acrylate conversion prevents the epoxide from reaching high conversion. Controlling phase separation is challenging, since two moieties with different properties are reacting. The physical properties of the polymer will be impacted by the availability of different moieties. High shrinkage stress results from the acrylate moiety, causing buckling and cracking in film and coating applications. The overall goal of this study is to use the fundamental knowledge of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins to formulate industrially viable polymers. In order to achieve this goal, the study focuses on the following objectives: (I) determine the apparent activation energy of the hybrid monomer METHB, (II) increase epoxide conversion and polymerization rate of hybrid formulations, and (III) control physical properties in epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins. In order to increase the epoxide conversion and rate of polymerization, the sensitivity of epoxides to alcohol is used to facilitate the activated monomer (AM) mechanism and induce a covalent bond between the epoxide and acrylate polymers through the hydroxyl group. It is hypothesized that if the AM mechanism is facilitated, epoxide conversion will increase. As a result, the resins can be tailored to control phase separation and physical properties, and shrinkage stress can be reduced. In pursuit of these objectives, the hybrid monomer METHB was polymerized at temperatures ranging from 30°C to 70°C to obtain apparent activation

  4. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... thermo-setting epoxy resins. 177.2280 Section 177.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlo-rohydrin thermosetting epoxy resins may be safely used as articles or components of...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... thermo-setting epoxy resins. 177.2280 Section 177.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlo-rohydrin thermosetting epoxy resins may be safely used as articles or components of...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... thermo-setting epoxy resins. 177.2280 Section 177.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlo-rohydrin thermosetting epoxy resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use in...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... thermo-setting epoxy resins. 177.2280 Section 177.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlo-rohydrin thermosetting epoxy resins may be safely used as articles or components of...

  8. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... thermo-setting epoxy resins. 177.2280 Section 177.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlo-rohydrin thermosetting epoxy resins may be safely used as articles or components of...

  9. Room Temperature Curing Resin Systems for Graphite/Epoxy Composite Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ROOM TEMPERATURE CURING RESIN SYSTEMS FOR GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOS--ETC(UI DEC 79 0 J CRABTREE N62269-79-C-G224 UNCLASSIFIE O80-46 NADC -781 1-6 NL END...Room Temperature Curing Resin Sys-U3 linal for Graphite/Epoxy Composite Repair •.Dec *79 NOR- -46h: V111IT NUM8ER(s) 4362269-79- ,722 S. PERFORMING...repair, composite repair room temperature cure resin , moderate temperature cure resins , epoxies, adhesives, vinyl eater polymers, anaerobic curing polymers

  10. Toughening mechanism in elastometer-modified epoxy resins: Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several plaques of Epon 828, cured with piperidine, modified with hycar(r) CTBN 1300X8, Hycar(R) CTBN 1300X13, and Hycar(R) CTBN 1300x15, and in some cases modified with biphenol A (BPA), yielded properly toughened epoxies with rubber particle diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10 microns. Fracture toughness experiments indicate that toughness was more a function of rubber content than the rubber particle size. Tensile volumetric behavior of the near resin exhibits two regions: an initial region where the increase in volume strain was due to the Poisson's effect, and a second region where a slower rate of increase in volume strain was due to shear deformation. Tensile volumetric deformation of an elastomer-modified epoxy exhibits the same type of behavior to that of the neat resin at low rates ( 3.2x0.01 sec(-1)). But at very high strain rates, which correspond more closely to the strain rates at the crack tip, there exists an increase in volume strain beyond the Poisson's effect. TEM, SEM and OM studies indicate that the rubber particles had voided. When a thin section from the deformed region is viewed under crossed-polarized light, shear bands are seen connecting voided rubber particles. From this information cavitation and enhanced shear band formation is proposed as the toughening mechanism.

  11. Curing Effects on Interfacial Adhesion between Recycled Carbon Fiber and Epoxy Resin Heated by Microwave Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yuji

    2018-01-01

    The interfacial adhesion of recycled carbon fiber (CF) reinforced epoxy composite heated by microwave (MW) irradiation were investigated by changing the curing state of the epoxy resin. The recycled CF was recovered from the composite, which was prepared by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding, by thermal degradation at 500 or 600 °C. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the heating at 600 °C caused rough damage to the CF surface, whereas recycled CF recovered at 500 °C have few defects. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between recycled CF and epoxy resin was measured by a single-fiber fragmentation test. The test specimen was heated by MW after mixing the epoxy resin with a curing agent or pre-curing, in order to investigate the curing effects on the matrix resin. The IFSSs of the MW-irradiated samples were significantly varied by the curing state of the epoxy resin and the surface condition of recycled CF, resulting that they were 99.5 to 131.7% of oven heated samples Furthermore, rheological measurements showed that the viscosity and shrinking behaviors of epoxy resin were affected based on the curing state of epoxy resin before MW irradiation. PMID:29587422

  12. Curing Effects on Interfacial Adhesion between Recycled Carbon Fiber and Epoxy Resin Heated by Microwave Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Yuichi; Shimamoto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yuji

    2018-03-26

    The interfacial adhesion of recycled carbon fiber (CF) reinforced epoxy composite heated by microwave (MW) irradiation were investigated by changing the curing state of the epoxy resin. The recycled CF was recovered from the composite, which was prepared by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding, by thermal degradation at 500 or 600 °C. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the heating at 600 °C caused rough damage to the CF surface, whereas recycled CF recovered at 500 °C have few defects. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between recycled CF and epoxy resin was measured by a single-fiber fragmentation test. The test specimen was heated by MW after mixing the epoxy resin with a curing agent or pre-curing, in order to investigate the curing effects on the matrix resin. The IFSSs of the MW-irradiated samples were significantly varied by the curing state of the epoxy resin and the surface condition of recycled CF, resulting that they were 99.5 to 131.7% of oven heated samples Furthermore, rheological measurements showed that the viscosity and shrinking behaviors of epoxy resin were affected based on the curing state of epoxy resin before MW irradiation.

  13. Development and characterization of soy-based epoxy resins and pultruded FRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang

    This dissertation focuses on the development, manufacture and characterization of novel soy-based epoxy FRP composites. Use of alternative epoxy resin systems derived from a renewable resource holds potential for low cost raw materials for the polymer and composite industries. Epoxidized Allyl Soyate (EAS) and Epoxidized Methyl Soyate (EMS) were developed from soybean oil with two chemical modification procedures: transesterification and epoxidation. This research investigates the curing characteristics and thermal and mechanical properties of the neat soyate resin systems. The derived soyate resins have higher reactivity and superior performance compared to commercially available epoxidized soybean oil. An efficient two-step curing method was developed in order to utilize these soyate resins to their full potential. The epoxy co-resin systems with varied soyate resin content were successfully used to fabricate composite material through pultrusion. The pultrusion resin systems with 30 wt% soyate resins yielded improved, or comparable mechanical properties with neat commercial resins. A finite element analysis of the heat transfer and curing process was performed to study the processing characterization on glass/epoxy composite pultrusion. This model can be used to establish baseline process variables and will benefit subsequent optimization. This research demonstrates that soy-based resins, especially EAS, show considerable promise as an epoxy resin supplement for use in polymer and composite structural applications. The new products derived from soybean oil can provide competitive performance, low cost and environmental advantages.

  14. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy chemicals: occupations, sensitizing products, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Pesonen, Maria; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-12-01

    Epoxy products are among the most common causes of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R) is the most important sensitizer in epoxy systems. To describe patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy products. Patients with allergic reactions to epoxy chemicals were chosen from test files (January 1991 to June 2014). Only patients with occupational contact allergy to some component of epoxy resin systems were included. We analysed patch test results, occupation, symptoms, and exposure data. We found a total of 209 cases with occupational contact allergy to epoxy chemicals. The largest occupational groups were painters (n = 41), floor layers (n = 19), electrical industry workers (n = 19), tile setters (n = 16), and aircraft industry workers (n = 15). A total of 82% of the patients reacted to DGEBA-R. Diagnosis of the DGEBA-R-negative patients required testing with m-xylylenediamine, N,N'-tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, 2,4,6-tris-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin, N,N'-diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxyaniline, isophoronediamine, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, diethylenetriamine, and cresyl glycidyl ether. The hands/upper extremities were most commonly affected (69%), but facial symptoms were also frequent (60%). Allergic contact dermatitis caused by to epoxy products cannot always be diagnosed by the use of commercial test substances. Workplace products need to be tested. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  16. Effect of matrix resin on the impact fracture characteristics of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, P. E.; Smith, B. W.; Miller, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of resin chemistry on basic impact energy absorbent mechanisms exibited by graphite-epoxy composites was investigated. Impact fracture modes and microscopic resin deformation characteristics were examined for 26 NASA-impacted graphite epoxy laminates with different resin chemistries. Discrete specimen fracture modes were identified through cross sectional examination after impact, and subsequently compared with measured glass transition temperatures, cure cycles, and residual impact capabilities. Microscopic resin deformation mechanisms and their overall relationship to impact loading conditions, voids, and resin content were also characterized through scanning electron microscopic examination of separated fracture surfaces.

  17. Adhesion at the interface in cured graphite fiber epoxy-amine resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, Howard L.; Alger, Kenneth W.; Okamoto, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The effect of high temperature curing on the interface between unsized or epoxy-sized graphite fiber tow and epoxy-amine resin was examined by scanning electron microscopy of compression and freeze fractured specimens. Little or no adhesion was found between the unsized graphite fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin on curing at 165 C for 17 hrs. Epoxy-sized graphite fibers showed a similar lack of adhesion between the fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin at 3 and 17 hr cures, although good penetration of the resin into the sized fiber tows had occurred. Interfacial bond strengths for the composites could not be effectively measured by compression fracture of specimens.

  18. Study on the Pulsed Flashover Characteristics of Solid-Solid Interface in Electrical Devices Poured by Epoxy Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Manping; Wu, Kai; Yang, Zhanping; Ding, Man; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Yonghong

    2014-09-01

    In electrical devices poured by epoxy resin, there are a lot of interfaces between epoxy resin and other solid dielectrics, i.e. solid-solid interfaces. Experiments were carried out to study the flashover characteristics of two typical solid-solid interfaces (epoxy-ceramic and epoxy-PMMA) under steep high-voltage impulse for different electrode systems (coaxial electrodes and finger electrodes) and different types of epoxy resin (neat epoxy resin, polyether modified epoxy resin and polyurethane modified epoxy resin). Results showed that, the flashover of solid-solid interface is similar to the breakdown of solid dielectric, and there are unrecoverable carbonated tracks after flashover. Under the same distance of electrodes, the electric stress of coaxial electrodes is lower than that of finger electrodes; and after the flashover, there are more severe breakdown and larger enhanced surface conductivity at interface for coaxial electrodes, as compared with the case of finger electrode. The dielectric properties are also discussed.

  19. Study on epoxy resin modified by polyether ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. C.; Guo, L. Y.; Deng, L. L.; Wu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Chloride 1-carboxyl polyether-3-methyl imidazole ionic liquid (PIIL) was synthesized. Then blended with epoxy resin(EP) to prepare the composite materials of PIIL/EP, which cured with aniline curing agent. The structure and curing performance of PIIL/EP were determined by FT-IR and DSC. The effects of the content of PIIL on strength of EP were studied. The results show that the PIIL was the target product. The strength was improved significantly with increase of the PIIL content. The obvious rubber elasticity of PIIL/EP after cured was showed when the content of PIIL accounts for 40% and the impact strength was up to 15.95kJ/m2.

  20. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Oleksy, Mariusz; Szwarc-Rzepka, Karolina; Heneczkowski, Maciej; Oliwa, Rafał; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM. PMID:28788177

  1. Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Jungewelter, Soile; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Kuuliala, Outi; Jolanki, Riitta

    2009-07-01

    Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-acryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-GA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryl-oxyethoxy)phenyl] propane (bis-EMA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryloxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-MA), and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) is often manifested together with contact allergy to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin. To analyse patterns of concomitant allergic reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates in relation to exposure. We reviewed the 1994-2008 patch test files at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) for reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates, and examined the patients' medical records for exposure. Twenty-four patients had an allergic reaction to at least one of the studied epoxy (meth)acrylates, but specific exposure was found only in five patients: two bis-GMA allergies from dental products, two bis-GA allergies from UV-curable printing inks, and one bis-GA allergy from an anaerobic glue. Only 25% of the patients were negative to DGEBA epoxy resin. The great majority of allergic patch test reactions to bis-GMA, bis-GA, GMA and bis-EMA were not associated with specific exposure, and cross-allergy to DGEBA epoxy resin remained a probable explanation. However, independent reactions to bis-GA indicated specific exposure. Anaerobic sealants may induce sensitization not only to aliphatic (meth)acrylates but also to aromatic bis-GA.

  2. The Electrical Properties for Phenolic Isocyanate-Modified Bisphenol-Based Epoxy Resins Comprising Benzoate Group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Yong; Chae, Il Seok; Park, Dongkyung; Suh, Hongsuk; Kang, Sang Wook

    2016-03-01

    Epoxy resin has been required to have a low dielectric constant (D(k)), low dissipation factor (Df), low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low water absorption, high mechanical, and high adhesion properties for various applications. A series of novel phenolic isocyanate-modified bisphenol-based epoxy resins comprising benzoate group were prepared for practical electronic packaging applications. The developed epoxy resins showed highly reduced dielectric constants (D(k)-3.00 at 1 GHz) and low dissipation values (Df-0.014 at 1 GHz) as well as enhanced thermal properties.

  3. The Physical Mechanisms Responsible for the Weathering of Epoxy Resins and Glass Fibre Reinforced Expoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    during service. Stress analysis using polarized light has been simplified by representing the changing state of polarization by the Poincare sphere...Section Page LIST OF FIGURES 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. DEBONDING OF FIBRES IN AN EPOXY RESIN MATRIX 2 2.1 POINCARE 2 2.2 DISCUSSION OF THE EXPERIMENTS 6 2.3...examined in plane and circularly polarised light. After immersion in water at 80°C for 4 days. The fibres are arranged in a periodic array. Figure 24 Shzpe

  4. Dielectric characterization of TiO2, Al2O3 - Nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, S. G.; Rana, V. A.; Vankar, H. P.

    2018-05-01

    In present work, the dielectric properties of two different nanoparticle loaded Bisphenol A-epoxy resin were carried out at room temperature. Sample of the neat epoxy resin and nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin in the form of disc were prepared of different weight fraction (i.e 0.5 wt%,0.7 wt%,1 wt%,1.5 wt%,1.7 wt%,2 wt%). TiO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles were taken as filler in the epoxy resin. Complex permittivity of the prepared samples was measured using Agilent E4980A precision LCR meter in frequency range of 103 Hz to 106 Hz. The dependency of dielectric behavior on type and concentration of nanoparticle in considered frequency range are discussed in detail.

  5. Solidifying process and flame retardancy of epoxy resin cured with boron-containing phenolic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Peng; Shi, Yan; Liu, Yuansen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-01

    For the sake of improving the charring performance and flame retardancy of epoxy resin (EP), boron-containing phenolic resin (BPR) instead of a conventional curing agent, linear phenolic resin (LPR) was employed to cure EP. Of several possible chemical structures for BPR, the existence of benzyl hydroxy groups in BPR chains has been confirmed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resonance of these groups may reasonably explain the higher curing reactivity of BPR-cured EP than that of LPR-cured EP. Thermogravimetric analysis, observation of the morphologies of the char residues and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic were performed to characterize the charring process. Due to the presence of B2O3 produced on the char surface from decomposition of phenyl borates and the facile high self-crosslinking reaction of BPR, a more continuous and stronger char barrier was formed for BPR-cured EP compared to that for the LPR-cured EP system. Therefore the former exhibited much better flame retardancy. In addition, BPR-cured EP also displayed better dynamic mechanical properties, than those observed for LPR-cured EP. It is not subject to the significant lowering the glass transition temperature of the polymer which accompanies curing with LPR. This suggests that BPR cured resin may meet the requirement for utilization at high temperature.

  6. Properties of two composite materials made of toughened epoxy resin and high-strain graphite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of IM7/8551-7 and IM6/18081, two new toughened epoxy resin, high strain graphite fiber composite materials. Data include ply-level strengths and moduli, notched tension and compression strengths and compression-after-impact assessments. The measured properties are compared with those of other graphite-epoxy materials.

  7. Occupational contact dermatitis caused by aniline epoxy resins in the aircraft industry.

    PubMed

    Pesonen, Maria; Suuronen, Katri; Jolanki, Riitta; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Valtanen, Ilona; Alanko, Kristiina

    2015-08-01

    Tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline (TGMDA) is an aniline epoxy resin used in, for example, resin systems of pre-impregnated composite materials (prepregs) of the aircraft industry. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in prepregs has been described previously. To report on 9 patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in epoxy glues used in helicopter assembly. The patients were examined with patch testing at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in 2004-2009. The first patient was diagnosed by testing both components of two epoxy glues from the workplace, and was also tested with glue ingredients, including TGMDA. The following patients were tested with the glues and TGMDA. The resin parts of the glues were analysed for their epoxy compounds, including TGMDA. All of the patients had a patch test reaction to one or both of the resin parts of the TGMDA-containing glues. Eight of them had a strong allergic reaction to TGMDA, and one had a doubtful reaction to TGMDA. Two of the patients also had an allergic reaction to triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP), another aniline epoxy resin, which was not present in the TGMDA-containing glues. In aircraft industry workers with suspected occupational dermatitis, aniline epoxy resins should be considered and patch tested as possible contact allergens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  9. Improvement of Mechanical and Dielectric Properties of Epoxy Resin Using CNTs/ZnO Nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Vu, Pham Gia; Truc, Trinh Anh; Chinh, Nguyen Thuy; Tham, Do Quang; Trung, Tran Huu; Oanh, Vu Ke; Hang, To Thi Xuan; Olivier, Marjorie; Hoang, Thai

    2018-04-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/ZnO composites had been prepared using the sol-gel method and then incorporated into an epoxy resin for reinforcement of mechanical and electrical properties. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) analyses show that the ZnO nanoparticles deposited on CNTs were crystallized in a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Average particle size of ZnO deposited on the CNT was about 8 nm. The mechanical and dielectric properties of epoxy containing CNTs/ZnO were investigated in comparison to epoxy resin and epoxy resin containing only CNT or ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicated that tensile strength and elongation at break of the nanocomposite were substantially improved with the presence of CNTs/ZnO at the equal volume. The DSC analysis associate with the dielectric results shows that the behavior of epoxy/CNTs/ZnO is identical to epoxy/ZnO composite, and the CNTs is essential to the distributed arrangement of ZnO in the epoxy resin.

  10. Epoxy resin synthesis using low molecular weight lignin separated from various lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Asada, Chikako; Basnet, Sunita; Otsuka, Masaya; Sasaki, Chizuru; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A low molecular weight lignin from various lignocellulosic materials was used for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resins. The lignin extracted with methanol from steam-exploded samples (steaming time of 5 min at steam pressure of 3.5 MPa) from different biomasses (i.e., cedar, eucalyptus, and bamboo) were functionalized by the reaction with epichlorohydrin, catalyzed by a water-soluble phase transfer catalyst tetramethylammonium chloride, which was further reacted with 30 wt% aqueous NaOH for ring closure using methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent. The glycidylated products of the lignin with good yields were cured to epoxy polymer networks with bio-based curing agents i.e., lignin itself and a commercial curing agent TD2131. Relatively good thermal properties of the bio-based epoxy network was obtained and thermal decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss (Td5) of cedar-derived epoxy resin was higher than that derived from eucalyptus and bamboo. The bio-based resin satisfies the stability requirement of epoxy resin applicable for electric circuit boards. The methanol-insoluble residues were enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce glucose. This study indicated that the biomass-derived methanol-soluble lignin may be a promising candidate to be used as a substitute for petroleum-based epoxy resin derived from bisphenol A, while insoluble residues may be processed to give a bioethanol precursor i.e., glucose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A One-Component, Fast-Cure, and Economical Epoxy Resin System Suitable for Liquid Molding of Automotive Composite Parts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiru; Qiu, Yiping; Wei, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Imidazole cured epoxy resin systems were evaluated for one-component, fast-curing resins for liquid molding of automotive composite parts according to industry requirements. It was demonstrated that an epoxy resin-1-(cyanoethyl)-2-ethyl-4-methylimidazol(EP-1C2E4MIM) system would cure in a few minutes at 120 °C, while exhibiting acceptable pot life, viscosity profiles, and low water absorption. Moreover, this system yielded high Tg parts with mechanical properties similar to the amine-epoxy systems, which are the mainstream two-component epoxy resin systems for automobiles. PMID:29702575

  12. A One-Component, Fast-Cure, and Economical Epoxy Resin System Suitable for Liquid Molding of Automotive Composite Parts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiru; Liu, Wanshuang; Qiu, Yiping; Wei, Yi

    2018-04-27

    Imidazole cured epoxy resin systems were evaluated for one-component, fast-curing resins for liquid molding of automotive composite parts according to industry requirements. It was demonstrated that an epoxy resin-1-(cyanoethyl)-2-ethyl-4-methylimidazol(EP-1C2E4MIM) system would cure in a few minutes at 120 °C, while exhibiting acceptable pot life, viscosity profiles, and low water absorption. Moreover, this system yielded high T g parts with mechanical properties similar to the amine-epoxy systems, which are the mainstream two-component epoxy resin systems for automobiles.

  13. Trifunctional Epoxy Resin Composites Modified by Soluble Electrospun Veils: Effect on the Viscoelastic and Morphological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ognibene, Giulia; Mannino, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    Electrospun veils from copolyethersulfones (coPES) were prepared as soluble interlaminar veils for carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Neat, resin samples were impregnated into coPES veils with unmodified resin, while dry carbon fabrics were covered with electrospun veils and then infused with the unmodified epoxy resin to prepare reinforced laminates. The thermoplastic content varied from 10 wt% to 20 wt%. TGAP epoxy monomer showed improved and fast dissolution for all the temperatures tested. The unreinforced samples were cured first at 180 °C for 2 h and then were post-cured at 220 °C for 3 h. These sample showed a high dependence on the curing cycle. Carbon reinforced samples showed significant differences compared to the neat resin samples in terms of both viscoelastic and morphological properties. PMID:29522444

  14. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  15. Thermosetting epoxy resin/thermoplastic system with combined shape memory and self-healing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Wang, Jingjie; Lu, Haibao; Xu, Ben; Fu, Yongqing; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    A novel and facile strategy was proposed to construct a thermosetting/thermoplastic system with both shape memory and self-healing properties based on commercial epoxy resin and poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-PCL. Thermoplastic material is capable of re-structuring and changing the stiffness/modulus when the temperature is above melting temperature. PCL microfiber was used as a plasticizer in epoxy resin-based blends, and served as a ‘hard segment’ to fix a temporary shape of the composites during shape memory cycles. In this study, the electrospun PCL membrane with a porous network structure enabled a homogenous PCL fibrous distribution and optimized interaction between fiber and epoxy resin. The self-healing capability is achieved by phase transition during curing of the composites. The mechanism of the shape memory effect of the thermosetting (rubber)/thermoplastic composite is attributed to the structural design of the thermoplastic network inside the thermosetting resin/rubber matrix.

  16. Development of silane grafted ZnO core shell nanoparticles loaded diglycidyl epoxy nanocomposites film for antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Saravanan, P; Jayamoorthy, K; Ananda Kumar, S; Karthikeyan, S

    2016-07-01

    In this article a series of epoxy nanocomposites film were developed using amine functionalized (ZnO-APTES) core shell nanoparticles as the dispersed phase and a commercially available epoxy resin as the matrix phase. The functional group of the samples was characterized using FT-IR spectra. The most prominent peaks of epoxy resin were found in bare epoxy and in all the functionalized ZnO dispersed epoxy nanocomposites (ZnO-APTES-DGEBA). The XRD analysis of all the samples exhibits considerable shift in 2θ, intensity and d-spacing values but the best and optimum concentration is found to be 3% ZnO-APTES core shell nanoparticles loaded epoxy nanocomposites supported by FT-IR results. From TGA measurements, 100wt% residue is obtained in bare ZnO nanoparticles whereas in ZnO core shell nanoparticles grafted DGEBA residue percentages are 37, 41, 45, 46 and 52% for 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7% ZnO-APTES-DGEBA respectively, which is confirmed with ICP-OES analysis. From antimicrobial activity test, it was notable that antimicrobial activity of 7% ZnO-APTES core shell nanoparticles loaded epoxy nanocomposite film has best inhibition zone effect against all pathogens under study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resin Mortar with Sand Washing Waste as Filler.

    PubMed

    Yemam, Dinberu Molla; Kim, Baek-Joong; Moon, Ji-Yeon; Yi, Chongku

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential use of sand washing waste as filler for epoxy resin mortar. The mechanical properties of four series of mortars containing epoxy binder at 10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. % mixed with sand blended with sand washing waste filler in the range of 0-20 wt. % were examined. The compressive and flexural strength increased with the increase in epoxy and filler content; however, above epoxy 20 wt. %, slight change was seen in strength due to increase in epoxy and filler content. Modulus of elasticity also linearly increased with the increase in filler content, but the use of epoxy content beyond 20 wt. % decreased the modulus of elasticity of the mortar. For epoxy content at 10 wt. %, poor bond strength lower than 0.8 MPa was observed, and adding filler at 20 wt. % adversely affected the bond strength, in contrast to the mortars containing epoxy at 15, 20, 25 wt. %. The results indicate that the sand washing waste can be used as potential filler for epoxy resin mortar to obtain better mechanical properties by adding the optimum level of sand washing waste filler.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resin Mortar with Sand Washing Waste as Filler

    PubMed Central

    Yemam, Dinberu Molla; Kim, Baek-Joong; Moon, Ji-Yeon; Yi, Chongku

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential use of sand washing waste as filler for epoxy resin mortar. The mechanical properties of four series of mortars containing epoxy binder at 10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. % mixed with sand blended with sand washing waste filler in the range of 0–20 wt. % were examined. The compressive and flexural strength increased with the increase in epoxy and filler content; however, above epoxy 20 wt. %, slight change was seen in strength due to increase in epoxy and filler content. Modulus of elasticity also linearly increased with the increase in filler content, but the use of epoxy content beyond 20 wt. % decreased the modulus of elasticity of the mortar. For epoxy content at 10 wt. %, poor bond strength lower than 0.8 MPa was observed, and adding filler at 20 wt. % adversely affected the bond strength, in contrast to the mortars containing epoxy at 15, 20, 25 wt. %. The results indicate that the sand washing waste can be used as potential filler for epoxy resin mortar to obtain better mechanical properties by adding the optimum level of sand washing waste filler. PMID:28772603

  19. Elastic properties, reaction kinetics, and structural relaxation of an epoxy resin polymer during cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heili, Manon; Bielawski, Andrew; Kieffer, John

    The cure kinetics of a DGEBA/DETA epoxy is investigated using concurrent Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Raman scattering allows us to monitor the in-situ reaction and quantitatively assess the degree of cure. Brillouin scattering yields the elastic properties of the system, providing a measure of network connectivity. We show that the adiabatic modulus evolves non-uniquely as a function of cure degree, depending on the cure temperature and the molar ratio of the epoxy. Two mechanisms contribute to the increase in the elastic modulus of the material during curing. First, there is the formation of covalent bonds in the network during the curing process. Second, following bond formation, the epoxy undergoes structural relaxation toward an optimally packed network configuration, enhancing non-bonded interactions. We investigate to what extent the non-bonded interaction contribution to structural rigidity in cross-linked polymers is reversible, and to what extent it corresponds to the difference between adiabatic and isothermal moduli obtained from static tensile, i.e. the so-called relaxational modulus. To this end, we simultaneously measure the adiabatic and isothermal elastic moduli as a function of applied strain and deformation rate.

  20. Characterization of the surface tension and solubility parameter of epoxy resin by using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fenghui; Dai, Zhishuang; Zhang, Baoyan

    2010-07-01

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to measure the surface tension and solubility parameter of E51 epoxy resin in this work. By using the Schultz method, decane, nonane, octane and heptane were chosen as the neutral probes to calculate the dispersive surface tensions (gamma(D)). Based on the Good-van Oss equation, the specific surface tension (gamma(SP)) of E51 epoxy resin was calculated with the acidic probe of dichloromethane and the basic probe of toluene. The results showed that the gamma(D) and gamma(SP) of the E51 resin decreased linearly with the increase of temperature. According to the Flory-Huggins parameters (chi) between the resin and a series of probes, the solubility parameters (delta) of E51 resin at different temperatures were estimated using the method developed by DiPaola-Baranyi and Guillet. It was found that the values of delta of the E51 resin were 11.78, 11.57, 11.48 and 11.14 MPa1/2 at 30, 40, 50 and 60 degrees C, respectively. The dispersive component (delta(D)) and the specific component (delta(SP)) of solubility parameter at different temperatures of the E51 resin were investigated according to the relationships between surface tension, cohesion energy and solubility parameter. The results showed that the values of delta(D) were higher than those of delta(SP) for the epoxy resin, and both of them decreased with the increase of temperature.

  1. Degradation of strength properties of epoxy resin filled with natural-based particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valášek, Petr; Habrová, Karolína; Müller, Miroslav

    2018-05-01

    Degradation of polymeric materials can be considered as a limiting factor for their use. Mechanical characteristics of epoxy resins are reduced, for example, by the action and changes of temperature or humidity. Degradation also occurs in composite systems where the epoxy resins function as matrices, i.e. in polymer composite materials. If a natural filler is used together with the epoxy resin, we refer to these materials as biocomposites, where also the natural character of the filler material greatly affects the degradation process. The paper focuses on the description of the shear strength of the resin filled with particles prepared from the seeds of dates of Phoenix Dactylifera plant. The degradation was evaluated experimentally in laboratory conditions via the climatic chamber. The experiment describes composites with a particle size of filler 100-200 μm with a concentration of 5 - 10 wt%. As the number of degradation cycles increased, the tensile strength of both the unfilled and the filled epoxy resin decreased. After 5 weeks, the drop was up to 50%. The presence of the particles did not significantly affect the shear strength compared to the non-filled resin. The described way of utilization of the natural-based particles is the possibility of material utilization of secondary natural materials.

  2. Vacuum Surface Flashover Characteristics and Secondary Electron Emission Characteristics of Epoxy Resin and FRP Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Yasushi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Hanada, Masaya; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

    Neutral beam injectors (NBI) used for JT-60 are required to generate negative ions of 500 keV energies. To produce such high-energy ions, the electrostatic accelerators consisting of 3-stage of electrodes and three insulator rings are applied. The insulators are made of Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) which is composed of epoxy resin and glass fibers. The surface discharges along the insulators are one of the most serious problems in the development of NBI. To increase the hold-off voltage against surface flashover events, it is necessary to investigate the FRP and epoxy resin insulator properties related to surface discharges in vacuum. This paper describes surface flashover characteristics for epoxy resin, FRP and Alumina samples under vacuum condition. In addition, the measurements of secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics are also reported. These are important parameters to analyze surface discharge characteristics of insulators in vacuum.

  3. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol...

  8. Structure-induced variation of thermal conductivity in epoxy resin fibers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Xiong, Yucheng; Fu, Qiang; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Xu, Dongyan; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-08-03

    The ability to control thermal conductivity is important in a wide variety of applications, especially in heat removal, heat insulation, and thermoelectric energy conversion. Herein, we reveal that the thermal conductivity of epoxy resin fibers increases on decreasing the fiber diameter and surpasses the bulk value (0.25 W m -1 K -1 at 300 K) for the fiber with a diameter of 211 nm. The variation of thermal conductivity in epoxy resin fibers can likely be attributed to their microstructure change-enhanced interface phonon scattering between amorphous and crystalline regions and the enhanced alignment of the molecular chain orientation.

  9. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zijun; Zhang, Tianchi; Qiao, Sen; Zhang, Luyihang

    2017-11-01

    The multilayer graphene powder as filler, epoxy modified silicone resin as film-forming agent, anticorrosion composite coating has been created using sand dispersion method, the electrochemical performance was compared with different content of graphene composite coating and pure epoxy resin coating. The open circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic polarization curves (Tafel Plot) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were tested. The test results showed that the anti-corrosion performance of multilayer graphene added has improved greatly, and the content of the 5% best corrosion performance of graphene composite coating.

  10. Nonlinear DC Conduction Behavior in Graphene Nanoplatelets/Epoxy Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yang; Wang, Qingguo; Qu, Zhaoming

    2018-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs)/Epoxy resin (ER) with a low percolation threshold were fabricated. Then the nonlinear DC conduction behavior of GNPs/ER composites was investigated, which indicates that dispersion, exfoliation level and conductivity of GNPs in specimens are closely related to the conduction of composites. Moreover, it could be seen that the modified graphene nanoplatelets made in this paper could be successfully used for increasing the electric conductivity of the epoxy resin, and the GNPs/ER composites with nonlinear conduction behavior have a good application prospects in the field of intelligent electromagnetic protection.

  11. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    DOE PAGES

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shownmore » to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.« less

  12. Tetraglycidyl epoxy resins and graphite fiber composites cured with flexibilized aromatic diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to synthesize new ether modified, flexibilized aromatic diamine hardeners for curing epoxy resins. The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperatures of a tetraglycidyl epoxy, MY 720, cured with flexibilized hardeners and a conventional aromatic diamine was studied. Unidirectional composites, using epoxy-sized Celion 6000 graphite fiber as the reinforcement, were fabricated. The room temperature and 300 F mechanical properties of the composites, before and after moisture exposure, were determined. The Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of the composites was characterized using a double cantilever beam technique to calculate the critical strain energy release rate.

  13. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    Primary diamines are prepared for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and preimpregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses a room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  14. Synthesis of a new hardener agent for self-healing epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Marialuigia; Guadagno, Liberata; Naddeo, Carlo; Longo, Pasquale; Mariconda, Annaluisa; Agovino, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Actually, the development of smart composites capable of self-repair in aeronautical structures is still at the planning stage owing to complex issues to overcome. One of the critical points in the development of self-healing epoxy resin is related to the impossibility to employ primary amines as hardeners. In this paper, the synthesis of a new hardener for self-healing resins is shown together with applicability conditions/ranges.

  15. [Contact allergy to epoxy resins plastics based on materials collected by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata

    2003-01-01

    Of the 5604 patients examined in 1984-2001 for suspected occupational dermatitis, 160 persons (2.8%) showed allergy to epoxy resins plastics. Allergy was more frequent in men (4.9%) than in women (1.2%); in 154 persons, allergy was of occupational etiology (in a group of 160 patients with allergy to epoxy resins, the following proportions were observed: bricklayers, platelayers--17.5%; fitters, turners, machinist millers--13.8%; plastics molders--13.1%; laminators--11.3%; electrical equipment assemblers--10.6%; painters--10.0%). Having compared the frequency of allergy to components of epoxy resins in the years 1984-1993 and 1994-2001, it was found that allergy to resin, reactive diluents and plasticizers was on increase, whereas allergy to amines and acid anhydrides hardeners was on decrease. In a group of 13 chemical compounds entering into the composition of epoxy resins, epoxy resin contributed to the largest number of positive patch tests (77.5% of epoxy-allergic persons). This was followed by triethylenetetramine (23.1%), ethylenediamine (13.1%), phthalic anhydride (8.1%), diethylenetetramine (6.9%) and phenylglycidylether (6.2%). In addition, three patients reacted to both epoxy resin and cycloaliphatic resin.

  16. A novel polishing technology for epoxy resin based on 355 nm UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xinling; Tao, Luqi; Liu, Zhaolin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling

    2017-06-01

    The electromagnetic shielding film has drawn much attention due to its wide applications in the integrated circuit package, which demands a high surface quality of epoxy resin. However, gaseous Cu will splash and adhere to epoxy resin surface when the Cu layer in PCB receives enough energy in the process of laser cutting, which has a negative effect on the quality of the shielding film. Laser polishing technology can solve this problem and it can effectively improve the quality of epoxy resin surface. The paper studies the mechanism of Cu powder spraying on the compound surface by 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser, including the parameters of laser polishing process and the remains of Cu content on compound surface. The results show that minimal Cu content can be realized with a scanning speed of 700 mm/s, a laser frequency of 50 kHz and the distance between laser focus and product top surface of -1.3 mm. This result is important to obtain an epoxy resin surface with high quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61574083, 61434001), the National Basic Research Program (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002), the Special Fund for Agroscientic Research in the Public Interest of China (No 201303107), the support of the Independent Research Program of Tsinghua University (No. 2014Z01006), and Advanced Sensor and Integrated System Lab of Tsinghua University Graduate School at Shenzhen (No. ZDSYS20140509172959969).

  17. Allergic Reaction to Polyether Ether Ketone Following Cross-Reactivity to Epoxy Resin.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Lukas; Wambacher, Markus; Schweinzer, Katrin; Scherl, Maritta; Kofler, Heinz

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a thermoplastic polymer frequently used in engineering but also in medical devices. Only 1 case of allergic reaction to PEEK used as an implanted medical device has been reported so far; however, the route of sensitization remained unclear. Here we report on a 62-year-old male patient with a preknown, severe type IV allergy to epoxy resin. He reported strong pain in his shoulder after implantation of a PEEK-containing device after a rotator cuff injury. For testing, the device was implanted in a small pouch subcutaneously on the abdomen. The patient reported massive pain starting 8 hours after the implantation, strictly limited to the procedural area and showing perifocal erythema. A possible explanation of the sensitization mode is the source material for PEEK and epoxy resin, as both are mainly based on bisphenols. An allergic reaction to PEEK with preknown epoxy resin sensitization has not been reported so far. As epoxy resins are a frequent cause of occupational contact dermatitis and PEEK is widely used for medical and nonmedical devices, we believe that this is of great clinical relevance.

  18. Occupational sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy (1996–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Prodi, Andrea; Rui, Francesca; Fortina, Anna Belloni; Corradin, Maria Teresa; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main health concerns of epoxy resins is their role as skin sensitizer. This sensitization is not uncommon, because the prevalence ranges around 1–12% of the general population. Objectives: Perform a cross sectional study in a patch test population from Northeastern Italy to investigate the prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization among patients with suspected contact dermatitis. Subsequently, relate findings to patients’ occupation and evaluate time trend of prevalence. Methods: The final study database included 19 088 consecutive patients, tested from 1996 to 2010 in Northeastern Italy. Results: The overall prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization was 0·89%. Dermatitis most frequently involved hands (40·25%). In both sexes, we find a significant correlation in mechanics, woodworkers, and chemical industry workers; and in males only, among farmers and fishers, construction workers, and unemployed. We found significant increase of sensitization in construction workers in the analyzed period. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy is in line with other European countries, but we found an increased risk of sensitization in some professions and an increasing trend of prevalence in construction workers. Better preventive actions are strongly advised in higher risk professions, with particular attentions towards building sector. PMID:25633931

  19. Occupational sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy (1996-2010).

    PubMed

    Prodi, Andrea; Rui, Francesca; Fortina, Anna Belloni; Corradin, Maria Teresa; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-01-01

    One of the main health concerns of epoxy resins is their role as skin sensitizer. This sensitization is not uncommon, because the prevalence ranges around 1-12% of the general population. Perform a cross sectional study in a patch test population from Northeastern Italy to investigate the prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization among patients with suspected contact dermatitis. Subsequently, relate findings to patients' occupation and evaluate time trend of prevalence. The final study database included 19 088 consecutive patients, tested from 1996 to 2010 in Northeastern Italy. The overall prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization was 0·89%. Dermatitis most frequently involved hands (40·25%). In both sexes, we find a significant correlation in mechanics, woodworkers, and chemical industry workers; and in males only, among farmers and fishers, construction workers, and unemployed. We found significant increase of sensitization in construction workers in the analyzed period. The overall prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy is in line with other European countries, but we found an increased risk of sensitization in some professions and an increasing trend of prevalence in construction workers. Better preventive actions are strongly advised in higher risk professions, with particular attentions towards building sector.

  20. Synthesis and application of polyepoxide cardanol glycidyl ether as biobased polyepoxide reactive diluent for epoxy resin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyepoxide cardanol glycidyl ether (PECGE), a novel cardanol derivative, was synthesized and used as reactive diluent for petroleum-based epoxy resin in this work. The synthetic condition was first optimized, and the resultant PECGE diluent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectro...

  1. Thermal conductivity of 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and their composites with epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Mulan; Wan, Chaoying; McNally, Tony

    2017-12-01

    The outstanding thermal conductivity (λ) of graphene and its derivatives offers a potential route to enhance the thermal conductivity of epoxy resins. Key challenges still need to be overcome to ensure effective dispersion and distribution of 2D graphitic fillers throughout the epoxy matrix. 2D filler type, morphology, surface chemistry and dimensions are all important factors in determining filler thermal conductivity and de facto the thermal conductivity of the composite material. To achieve significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites, different strategies are required to minimise phonon scattering at the interface between the nano-filler and epoxy matrix, including chemical functionalisation of the filler surfaces such that interactions between filler and matrix are promoted and interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) reduced. The combination of graphitic fillers with dimensions on different length scales can potentially form an interconnected multi-dimensional filler network and, thus contribute to enhanced thermal conduction. In this review, we describe the relevant properties of different 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and the factors which determine the translation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of these 2D materials to epoxy resins. The key challenges and perspectives with regard achieving epoxy composites with significantly enhanced thermal conductivity on addition of 2D graphitic materials are presented.

  2. Effect of epoxy resin sealing on corrosion resistance of arc spraying aluminium coating using cathode electrophoresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xuming; Wang, Runqiu; Wei, Qian; Zhou, Jianxin

    2018-01-01

    Arc-sprayed Al coating was sealed with epoxy resin using the cathode electrophoresis method. The anti-corrosion performance of the coatings sealed with epoxy resin was studied by means of a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution test at 40 °C. For comparison, the anti-corrosion performance of Al coating sealed with boiling water was also performed under the same conditions. The results show that epoxy resin with a thickness of about 20 microns can entirely cover open pores and decreases the surface roughness of the as-sprayed Al coating, and the epoxy resin even permeates into the gaps among lamellar splats from open pores. After corrosion, the thickness of the epoxy resin layer is unchanged and can still cover the as-sprayed Al coating entirely. However, the thickness of Al coating sealed with boiling water decreases from 100 to 40 microns, which indicates that the arc-sprayed Al coating has much better corrosion resistance than the Al coating sealed with boiling water. Meanwhile, the content of substituted benzene ring in the epoxy resin increases, but aromatic ring decreases according to the fourier transform infrared spectra, which will cause the rigidity of the epoxy resin to increase, but the toughness slightly decreases after corrosion.

  3. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin; Li, Shengtao; Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri; Wang, Xuan; Lin, Shengjun

    2017-06-01

    The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al2O3 microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al2O3 microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  4. Preparation and properties studies of UV-curable silicone modified epoxy resin composite system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhouhui; Cui, Aiyong; Zhao, Peizhong; Wei, Huakai; Hu, Fangyou

    2018-01-01

    Modified epoxy suitable for ultraviolet (UV) curing is prepared by using organic silicon toughening. The curing kinetics of the composite are studied by dielectric analysis (DEA), and the two-phase compatibility of the composite is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tensile properties, heat resistance, and humidity resistance of the cured product are explored by changing the composition ratio of the silicone and the epoxy resin. SEM of silicone/epoxy resin shows that the degree of cross-linking of the composites decreases with an increase of silicone resin content. Differential thermal analysis indicates that the glass transition temperature and the thermal stability of the composites decrease gradually with an increase of silicone resin content. The thermal degradation rate in the high temperature region, however, first decreases and then increases. In general, after adding just 10%-15% of the silicone resin and exposing to light for 15 min, the composite can still achieve a better curing effect. Under such conditions, the heat resistance of the cured product decreases a little. The tensile strength is kept constant so that elongation at breakage is apparently improved. The change rate after immersion in distilled water at 60°C for seven days is small, which shows excellent humidity resistance.

  5. A biomimetic approach to enhancing interfacial interactions: polydopamine-coated clay as reinforcement for epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Phua, Si Lei; Teo, Jun Kai Herman; Toh, Cher Ling; Lau, Soo Khim; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong

    2011-08-01

    A facile biomimetic method was developed to enhance the interfacial interaction in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was constructed on clay surface by a controllable coating method. The modified clay (D-clay) was incorporated into an epoxy resin, it is found that the strong interfacial interactions brought by the polydopamine benefits not only the dispersion of the D-clay in the epoxy but also the effective interfacial stress transfer, leading to greatly improved thermomechanical properties at very low inorganic loadings. Rheological and infrared spectroscopic studies show that the interfacial interactions between the D-clay and epoxy are dominated by the hydrogen bonds between the catechol-enriched polydopamine and the epoxy.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of New Geopolymer-Epoxy Resin Hybrid Mortars

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Francesco; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer mortars containing an organic epoxy resin are presented here for the first time. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative in situ co-reticulation process, in mild conditions, of commercial epoxy based organic resins and geopolymeric slurry. In this way, geopolymer based hybrid mortars characterized by a different content of normalized sand (up to 66% in weight) and by a homogeneous dispersion of the organic resin have been obtained. Once hardened, these new materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the neat geopolymer and the hybrid pastes since the organic polymer provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced amount of microcracks. The microstructural characterization allows to point out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars and concretes. A correlation between microstructural features and mechanical properties has been studied too. PMID:28811418

  7. The effect of resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the matrix resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy composite laminates was investigated. The materials were evaluated on the basis of the damage incurred due to local impact and on their ability to retain compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Twenty-four different resin systems were evaluated. Five of the systems demonstrated substantial improvements compared to the baseline system including retention of compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Examination of the neat resin mechanical properties indicates the resin tensile properties influence significantly the laminate damage tolerance and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room temperature mechanical properties. Preliminary results indicate a resin volume fraction on the order of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  8. Epoxy Monomers Cured by High Cellulosic Nanocrystal Loading.

    PubMed

    Khelifa, Farid; Habibi, Youssef; Bonnaud, Leila; Dubois, Philippe

    2016-04-27

    The present study focuses on the use of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) as the main constituent of a nanocomposite material and takes advantage of hydroxyl groups, characteristic of the CNC chemical structure, to thermally cross-link an epoxy resin. An original and simple approach is proposed, based on the collective sticking of CNC building blocks with the help of a DGEBA/TGPAP-based epoxy resin. Scientific findings suggest that hydroxyl groups act as a toxic-free cross-linking agent of the resin. The enhanced protection against water degradation as compared to neat CNC film and the improvement of mechanical properties of the synthesized films are attributed to a good compatibility between the CNC and the resin. Moreover, the preservation of CNC optical properties at high concentrations opens the way to applying these materials in photonic devices.

  9. Flammability Characteristics of Some Epoxy Resins and Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    MACHIONE ET AL. SEP 83 UNCLASSIFIED AMMRC-TR-83-53 F/6 ii/9 N 1.0 M2 MICROCOP RESOUTIn TMST CHAT NiTOM BIJWfA OV SIAROPMC-1W3-A AMMRC TR 83-53 [111h do...resin systems. The increase in the oxygen index of these resin systems in the 100OC- 2000 C range could be caused by the release of some compound in the

  10. Green Preparation of Epoxy/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites Using a Glycidylamine Epoxy Resin as the Surface Modifier and Phase Transfer Agent of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinlei; Zhou, Yang; Peng, Mao

    2016-01-27

    In studies of epoxy/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites, organic solvents are commonly used to disperse GO, and vigorous mechanical processes and complicated modification of GO are usually required, increasing the cost and hindering the development and application of epoxy nanocomposites. Here, we report a green, facile, and efficient method of preparing epoxy/GO nanocomposites. When triglycidyl para-aminophenol (TGPAP), a commercially available glycidyl amine epoxy resin with one tertiary amine group per molecule, is used as both the surface modifier and phase transfer agent of GO, GO can be directly and rapidly transferred from water to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and other types of epoxy resins by manual stirring under ambient conditions, whereas GO cannot be transferred to these epoxy resins in the absence of TGPAP. The interaction between TGPAP and GO and the effect of the TGPAP content on the dispersion of GO in the epoxy matrix were investigated systematically. Superior dispersion and exfoliation of GO nanosheets and remarkably improved mechanical properties, including tensile and flexural properties, toughness, storage modulus, and microhardness, of the epoxy/GO nanocomposites with a suitable amount of TGPAP were demonstrated. This method is organic-solvent-free and technically feasible for large-scale preparation of high-performance nanocomposites; it opens up new opportunities for exploiting the unique properties of graphene or even other nanofillers for a wide range of applications.

  11. The effects of alumina nanofillers on mechanical properties of high-performance epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Longcheng; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Daijun; Zhou, Lingyun; Zhang, Zhong

    2010-11-01

    In the past decade extensive studies have been focused on mechanical properties of inorganic nanofiller/epoxy matrices. In this work we systematically investigated the mechanical properties of nano-alumina-filled E-54/4, 4-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) epoxy resins, which were prepared via combining high-speed mixing with three-roll milling. Homogeneous dispersion of nano-alumina with small agglomerates was obtained in epoxy resin, which was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The static/dynamic modulus, tensile strength and fracture toughness of the nanocomposites were found to be simultaneously enhanced with addition of nano-alumina fillers. About 50% and 80% increases of K(IC) and G(IC) were achieved in nanocomposite filled with 18.4 wt% alumina nanofillers, as compared to that of the unfilled epoxy resin. Furthermore, the corresponding fracture surfaces of tensile and compact tension samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques in order to identify the relevant fracture mechanisms involved. Various fracture features including cavities/debonding of nanofiller, local plastic deformation as well as crack pinning/deflection were found to be operative in the presence of nano-alumina fillers.

  12. Predicting the Macroscopic Fracture Energy of Epoxy Resins from Atomistic Molecular Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Zhaoxu; Bessa, Miguel A.; Xia, Wenjie; ...

    2016-12-06

    Predicting the macroscopic fracture energy of highly crosslinked glassy polymers from atomistic simulations is challenging due to the size of the process zone being large in these systems. Here, we present a scale-bridging approach that links atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to macroscopic fracture properties on the basis of a continuum fracture mechanics model for two different epoxy materials. Our approach reveals that the fracture energy of epoxy resins strongly depends on the functionality of epoxy resin and the component ratio between the curing agent (amine) and epoxide. The most intriguing part of our study is that we demonstrate that themore » fracture energy exhibits a maximum value within the range of conversion degrees considered (from 65% to 95%), which can be attributed to the combined effects of structural rigidity and post-yield deformability. Our study provides physical insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern the fracture characteristics of epoxy resins and demonstrates the success of utilizing atomistic molecular simulations towards predicting macroscopic material properties.« less

  13. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  14. Predicting the Macroscopic Fracture Energy of Epoxy Resins from Atomistic Molecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhaoxu; Bessa, Miguel A.; Xia, Wenjie

    Predicting the macroscopic fracture energy of highly crosslinked glassy polymers from atomistic simulations is challenging due to the size of the process zone being large in these systems. Here, we present a scale-bridging approach that links atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to macroscopic fracture properties on the basis of a continuum fracture mechanics model for two different epoxy materials. Our approach reveals that the fracture energy of epoxy resins strongly depends on the functionality of epoxy resin and the component ratio between the curing agent (amine) and epoxide. The most intriguing part of our study is that we demonstrate that themore » fracture energy exhibits a maximum value within the range of conversion degrees considered (from 65% to 95%), which can be attributed to the combined effects of structural rigidity and post-yield deformability. Our study provides physical insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern the fracture characteristics of epoxy resins and demonstrates the success of utilizing atomistic molecular simulations towards predicting macroscopic material properties.« less

  15. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic films with fractal structures using epoxy resin microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yun-Yun; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2014-02-01

    A simple method has been developed to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with fractal structures with epoxy resin microspheres (ERMs). The ERMs is produced by phase separation in an epoxy-amine curing system with a silica sol (SS) dispersant. The transparent epoxy solution becomes cloudy and turns into epoxy suspension (ES) in this process. The fractal structure (two tier structure) generated by synthetic epoxy resin microspheres (ERMs) and deposited nanoincrutations on the surfaces of these ERMs, which have been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The curing time of ES is an important condition to obtain films with good comprehensive performances. Superhydrophobic films can be prepared by adding extra SS into ES with a curing time longer than 5 h. The optimal curing time is 10 h to fabricate a film with good mechanical stability and high superhydrophobicity. In addition, a surface with anti-wetting property of impacting microdroplets can be fabricated by prolonging the curing time of ES to 24 h. The gradually decreased hydrophilic groups resulted from a longer curing time enable the surface to have smaller surface adhesions to water droplets, which is the main reason to keep its superhydrophobicity under impacting conditions. The coated surface is highly hydrophobic and the impacting water droplets are bounced off from the surface.

  16. Impact of structure and functionality of core polyol in highly functional biobased epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao; Webster, Dean C

    2011-09-01

    Highly functional biobased epoxy resins were prepared using dipentaerythritol (DPE), tripentaerythritol (TPE), and sucrose as core polyols that were substituted with epoxidized soybean oil fatty acids, and the impact of structure and functionality of the core polyol on the properties of the macromolecular resins and their epoxy-anhydride thermosets was explored. The chemical structures, functional groups, molecular weights, and compositions of epoxies were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The epoxies were also studied for their bulk viscosity, intrinsic viscosity, and density. Crosslinked with dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA), epoxy-anhydride thermosets were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile tests, and tests of coating properties. Epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) was used as a control. Overall, the sucrose-based thermosets exhibited the highest moduli, having the most rigid and ductile performance while maintaining the highest biobased content. DPE/TPE-based thermosets showed modestly better thermosetting performance than the control ESO thermoset. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Enhancing the Mechanical Toughness of Epoxy-Resin Composites Using Natural Silk Reinforcements

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Kang; Wu, Sujun; Guan, Juan; ...

    2017-09-20

    Strong and tough epoxy composites are developed using a less-studied fibre reinforcement, that of natural silk. Two common but structurally distinct silks from the domestic B. mori/Bm and the wild A. pernyi/Ap silkworms are selected in fabric forms. We show that the toughening effects on silk-epoxy composites or SFRPs are dependent on the silk species and the volume fraction of silk. Both silks enhance the room-temperature tensile and flexural mechanical properties of the composite, whereas the more resilient Ap silk shows a more pronounced toughening effect and a lower critical reinforcement volume for the brittle-ductile transition. Specifically, our 60 vol.%more » Ap-SFRP displays a three-fold elevation in tensile and flexural strength, as compared to pure epoxy resin, with an order of magnitude higher breaking energy via a distinct, ductile failure mode. Importantly, the 60 vol.% Ap-SFRP remains ductile with 7% flexural elongation at lower temperatures (-50 °C). Under impact, these SFRPs show significantly improved energy absorption, and the 60 vol.% Ap-SFRP has an impact strength some eight times that of pure epoxy resin. Lastly, the findings demonstrate both marked toughening and strengthening effects for epoxy composites from natural silk reinforcements, which presents opportunities for mechanically superior and "green" structural composites.« less

  18. Atomistic modeling of thermomechanical properties of SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to compute thermomechanical properties of cured epoxy resins reinforced with pristine and covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. A DGEBA-DDS epoxy network was built using the ‘dendrimer’ growth approach where 75% of available epoxy sites were cross-linked. The epoxy model is verified through comparisons to experiments, and simulations are performed on nanotube reinforced cross-linked epoxy matrix using the CVFF force field in LAMMPS. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors are obtained for the nanocomposite. Large increases in stiffness and large decreases in thermal expansion were seen along the direction of the nanotube for both nanocomposite systems when compared to neat epoxy. The direction transverse to nanotube saw a 40% increase in stiffness due to covalent functionalization over neat epoxy at 1 K whereas the pristine nanotube system only saw a 7% increase due to van der Waals effects. The functionalized SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite showed an additional 42% decrease in thermal expansion along the nanotube direction when compared to the pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. The stiffness matrices are rotated over every possible orientation to simulate the effects of an isotropic system of randomly oriented nanotubes in the epoxy. The randomly oriented covalently functionalized SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites showed substantial improvements over the plain epoxy in terms of higher stiffness (200% increase) and lower thermal expansion (32% reduction). Through MD simulations, we develop means to build simulation cells, perform annealing to reach correct densities, compute thermomechanical properties and compare with experiments.

  19. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Ran; Kim, Jung J.

    2017-01-01

    Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs) are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young’s modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins. PMID:28772822

  20. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Ran; Kim, Jung J

    2017-04-27

    Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs) are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young's modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  1. Thermomagnetic processing of liquid-crystalline epoxy resins and their mechanical characterization using nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhan; Rios, Orlando; Kessler, Michael R

    2014-11-12

    A thermomagnetic processing method was used to produce a biphenyl-based liquid-crystalline epoxy resin (LCER) with oriented liquid-crystalline (LC) domains. The orientation of the LCER was confirmed and quantified using two-dimensional X-ray diffraction. The effect of molecular alignment on the mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the LCER was investigated using nanoindentation and thermomechanical analysis, respectively. The effect of the orientation on the fracture behavior was also examined. The results showed that macroscopic orientation of the LC domains was achieved, resulting in an epoxy network with an anisotropic modulus, hardness, creep behavior, and thermal expansion.

  2. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Kelvin; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Nanocomposites of cured epoxy resin reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit a plethora of interesting behaviors at the molecular level. We have employed a combination of force-field-based molecular mechanics and first-principles calculations to study the corresponding binding and charge-transfer behavior. The simulation study of various nanotube species and curing agent configurations provides insight into the optimal structures in lieu of interfacial stability. An analysis of charge distributions of the epoxy functionalized semiconducting and metallic tubes reveals distinct level hybridizations. The implications of these results for understanding dispersion mechanism and future nano reinforced composite developments are discussed.

  3. The Effects of micro Aluminum fillers In Epoxy resin on the thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasim, Kareem A.; Fadhil, Rihab N.

    2018-05-01

    A hand lay-up molding method was used to prepare Epoxy / Aluminum composites. As a matrix used Epoxy resin (EP) with reinforced by Aluminum particles. The preparation technique includes preparing carousel mold with different weight percentage of fillers (0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35, and 0.45). Standard specimens (in 30 mm diameter) were prepared to the thermal conductivity tests. The result of experimental thermal conductivity (k), for EP/Aluminum composites show that, k increase with increasing Aluminums percentage and it have maximum values of (1.4595 W/m.K).

  4. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  5. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  6. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-DI(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl) methyl-2,4 and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  7. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-/di(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl)methyl/-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Prolongo, S G; Gude, M R; Ureña, A

    2009-10-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated using two kinds of nanofiller, amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and non-treated long carbon nanofibers (CNFs). The non-cured mixtures were analysed through viscosity measurements. The effect of the nanoreinforcement on the curing process was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Finally, the characterisation of cured nanocomposites was carried out studying their thermo-mechanical and electrical behaviour. At room temperature, the addition of CNTs causes a viscosity increase of epoxy monomer much more marked than the introduction of CNFs due to their higher specific area. It was probed that in that case exists chemical reaction between amino-functionalized CNTs and the oxirane rings of epoxy monomer. The presence of nanoreinforcement induces a decrease of curing reaction rate and modifies the epoxy conversion reached. The glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites decreases with the contents of CNTs and CNFs added, which could be related to plasticization phenomena of the nanoreinforcements. The storage modulus of epoxy resin significantly increases with the addition of CNTs and CNFs. This augment is higher with amino-functionalized CNTs due, between other reasons, to the stronger interaction with the epoxy matrix. The electrical conductivity is greatly increased with the addition of CNTs and CNFs. In fact, the percolation threshold is lower than 0.25 wt% due to the high aspect ratio of the used nanoreinforcements.

  9. Mechanical and Anticorrosive Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composites Coating Prepared by in-Situ Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Wenhui; Li, Diansen; Sun, Youyi; Wang, Zhuo; Hou, Chunling; Chen, Lu; Cao, Yang; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-01-01

    The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt %) was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO) on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C) in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, respectively. Furthermore, the erosion resistance of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results showed also that the Rrcco (ca. 0.3 mm/year) of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was far lower than neat epoxy resin (1.3 mm/year). Thus, this approach provides a novel route for improving erosion resistance and mechanical-thermal stability of polymers coating, which is expected to be used in mechanical-thermal-corrosion coupling environments. PMID:25608656

  10. Mechanical and anticorrosive properties of graphene/epoxy resin composites coating prepared by in-situ method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Wenhui; Li, Diansen; Sun, Youyi; Wang, Zhuo; Hou, Chunling; Chen, Lu; Cao, Yang; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-01-20

    The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt %) was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO) on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C) in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, respectively. Furthermore, the erosion resistance of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results showed also that the Rrcco (ca. 0.3 mm/year) of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was far lower than neat epoxy resin (1.3 mm/year). Thus, this approach provides a novel route for improving erosion resistance and mechanical-thermal stability of polymers coating, which is expected to be used in mechanical-thermal-corrosion coupling environments.

  11. Distribution and avoidance of debris on epoxy resin during UV ns-laser scanning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltrup, Markus; Lukasczyk, Thomas; Ihde, Jörg; Mayer, Bernd

    2018-05-01

    In this paper the distribution of debris generated by a nanosecond UV laser (248 nm) on epoxy resin and the prevention of the corresponding re-deposition effects by parameter selection for a ns-laser scanning process were investigated. In order to understand the mechanisms behind the debris generation, in-situ particle measurements were performed during laser treatment. These measurements enabled the determination of the ablation threshold of the epoxy resin as well as the particle density and size distribution in relation to the applied laser parameters. The experiments showed that it is possible to reduce debris on the surface with an adapted selection of pulse overlap with respect to laser fluence. A theoretical model for the parameter selection was developed and tested. Based on this model, the correct choice of laser parameters with reduced laser fluence resulted in a surface without any re-deposited micro-particles.

  12. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. Part 1: Solvent degradation of amine cured epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheineck, A. E.; Heskin, R. A.; Hill, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    The solubility and/or swelling of cured epoxy resins was studied using the solubility parameter method. Determination of solubility parameters were found in order to select solvents for solvent-assisted degradation of cured epoxy polymers used in spacecraft. A method for improving recovery of seeded spores is suggested for assay of buried contaminants. Three commercial epoxy resins were cured using four different alkyl amines. For each resin-amine combination, three levels of amine were used, corresponding to 1/3, 2/3, and all of the amine required to react with the oxirane groups of the resin. The solubility parameters of the 36 resulting model compounds were determined in poorly and moderately hydrogen-bonded solvents. No strongly hydrogen-bonded solvents caused dissolution or swelling. The tolerance of cured resins is discussed in terms of polymer structure.

  13. High temperature polymerization monitoring of an epoxy resin using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, P.; Ghodhbani, N.; Duflo, H.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the real time ultrasonic monitoring is investigated to quantify changes in physical and mechanical properties during the manufacture of composite structures. In this context, an experimental transmission was developed with the aim of characterizing a high temperature polymerization reaction and post-curing properties using an ultrasonic method. First, the monitoring of ultrasonic parameters of a thermosetting resin is carried out in a device reproducing the experimental conditions for manufacturing a composite material with a process known as RTM, that is to say an isothermal polymerization at T = 160°C. During this curing, the resin is changing from its initial viscous liquid state to its final viscous solid state. Between those states, a glassy transition stage is observed, during which the physical properties are strongly changing, i.e. an increase of the ultrasonic velocity up to its steady value and a transient increase of the ultrasonic attenuation. Second, the ultrasonic inspection of the thermosetting resin is performed during a heating and cooling process to study the temperature sensitivity after curing. This type of characterization leads to identifying the ultrasonic properties dependence before, during and after the glassy transition temperature Tg . Eventually, this study is composed of two complementary parts: the first is useful for the curing optimization, while the second one is fruitful for the post-processing characterization in a temperature range including the glassy transition temperature Tg .

  14. The separation of waste printed circuit board by dissolving bromine epoxy resin using organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Chen, Y; Wang, L Y; Zhou, M; Zhou, J

    2013-02-01

    Separation of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) has been a bottleneck in WPCBs resource processing. In this study, the separation of WPCBs was performed using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. Various parameters, which included solid to liquid ratio, temperature, WPCB sizes, and time, were studied to understand the separation of WPCBs by dissolving bromine epoxy resin using DMSO. Experimental results showed that the concentration of dissolving the bromine epoxy resin increased with increasing various parameters. The optimum condition of complete separation of WPCBs was solid to liquid ratio of 1:7 and WPCB sizes of 16 mm(2) at 145°C for 60 min. The used DMSO was vapored under the decompression, which obtained the regenerated DMSO and dissolved bromine epoxy resin. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to separate valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent the environmental pollution of waste printed circuit boards effectively. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of toughened epoxy resin on partial discharge at solid-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Manping; Wu, Kai; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Yonghong

    2017-02-01

    A series of solid-solid interfaces, consisting of ceramic-epoxy resin interface samples with a tip-plate electrode, were investigated by performing partial discharge tests and real-time electrical tree observations. A toughening agent was added to the epoxy resin at different ratios for comparison. The impact strength, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dielectric properties of the cured compositions and ceramic were tested. The electric field strength at the tip was calculated based on Maxwell’s theory. The test results show that the addition of a toughener can improve the impact strength of epoxy resin but it decreases the partial discharge inception voltage (PDIV) of the interface sample. At the same time, toughening leads to complex branches of the electrical tree. The simulation result suggests that this reduction of the PDIV cannot be explained by a change of permittivity due to the addition of a toughening agent. The microstructural change caused by toughening was considered to be the key factor for lower PDIV and complex electrical tree branches. Supported by China Academy of Engineering Physics (Project 2014B05005).

  16. Drinking water contaminants from epoxy resin-coated pipes: A field study.

    PubMed

    Rajasärkkä, Johanna; Pernica, Marek; Kuta, Jan; Lašňák, Jonáš; Šimek, Zdenĕk; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-10-15

    Rehabilitation of aged drinking water pipes is an extensive renovation and increasingly topical in many European cities. Spray-on-lining of drinking water pipes is an alternative cost-effective rehabilitation technology in which the insides of pipes are relined with organic polymer. A commonly used polymer is epoxy resin consisting of monomer bisphenol A (BPA). Leaching of BPA from epoxy lining to drinking water has been a concern among public and authorities. Currently epoxy lining is not recommended in some countries. BPA leaching has been demonstrated in laboratory studies but the behavior and ageing process of epoxy lining in situ is not well known. In this study 6 locations with different age epoxy linings of drinking water pipes done using two distinct technologies were studied. While bisphenol F, 4-n-nonylphenol, and 4-t-octylphenol were rarely found and in trace concentrations, BPA was detected in majority of samples. Pipes lined with the older technology (LSE) leached more BPA than those with more recent technology (DonPro): maxima in cold water were 0.25 μg/L and 10 ng/L, respectively. Incubation of water in pipes 8-10 h prior to sampling increased BPA concentration in cold water 1.1-43-fold. Hot water temperature caused even more BPA leaching - at maximum 23.5 μg/L. The influence of ageing of epoxy lining on BPA leaching on could be shown in case of LSE technology: locations with 8-9 years old lining leached 4-20-fold more BPA compared to a location with 2-year-old lining. Analysis of metals showed that epoxy lining can reduce especially iron concentration in water. No significant burden to water could be shown by the analyzed 72 volatile organic compounds, including epichlorhydrin, precursor used in epoxy resin. Estrogenicity was detected in water samples with the highest BPA loads. Comparable responses of two yeast bioreporters (estrogen receptor α and BPA-targeted) indicated that bisphenol-like compounds were the main cause of estrogenicity

  17. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2018-06-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  18. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  19. Nanostructure of tetrafunctional epoxy resins and composites: Correlation to moisture absorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolan, Brett Andrew

    The effect that changes in network topology, while maintaining a constant network polarity (i.e. thermodynamic driving force was kept constant), had upon the moisture absorption properties of an aerospace grade tetrafunctional epoxy (TGMDA) cured with multifunctional amines were investigated. Utilizing Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to characterize the nanoscale structure of these epoxies, it was found that as the "static" hole volume (a measurement of packing defects at 0K) increased so did the equilibrium uptake. PALS studies of one of these resins cured to varying extents, found that this static amount increased with degree of cure indicating that the network becomes more open as a direct consequence of crosslinking. Polar groups, which are the attractive force for diffusion, are in the vicinity of these crosslinks, therefore it is believed that the increase in static hole volume results in exposing more polar groups for absorption. The diffusion coefficient, which is representative of the kinetic aspect of diffusion, was also investigated. It was discovered that the amount of nanohole volume in the polymer; whether the total, the static, or dynamic (i.e. thermally activated) does not correlate to the diffusion coefficient in anyway. Furthermore, at an isotherm the diffusion coefficients for all these materials were relatively constant. From this it is hypothesized that it is the similar sub-Tsb{g} motions of these resins which is the rate limiting step in diffusion. This was bolstered by the fact that the activation energy for diffusion and for the sub-Tsb{g} motions for these epoxies are of the same order of magnitude. The nanostructure of fiber reinforced epoxy composites (i.e. a boron/epoxy and a graphite/epoxy) were probed with the bulk PALS technique as well. It was observed that for the graphite/epoxy composite and its flash (i.e. no fibers present) cured under identical conditions, that the nanoholes in the composite were larger than

  20. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  1. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  2. Recyclable epoxy resins: An example of green approach for advanced composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicala, Gianluca; Rosa, Daniela La; Musarra, Marco; Saccullo, Giuseppe; Banatao, Rey; Pastine, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Automotive composite applications are increasingly growing due to demand for lightweight structures to comply to the requirements for fuel reduction. HP-RTM is gaining relevance as one of the preferred production technologies for high volume applications. The BMW i3 life module being a notable example of HP-RTM application. The key aspects of HP-RTM are the short injection times (i.e. less than 1min) and the fast curing of the thermoset resins (i.e. less than 10min). The choice of using thermosets poses relevant issues for their limited recycling options. The standard recycling solution is the incineration but, this solution poses some concerns in terms of global environmental impact. Novel solutions are presented in this work based on the use of recyclable epoxy systems. In our work the results of experimentation carried out by our group with cleavable ammines by Connora Technologies and bioepoxy resins by Entropy Resins will be discussed. The multiple uses of recycled matrices obtained treating the recyclable epoxy resins are discussed in the framework of a "cradle" to "crave" approach. Finally, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the environmental benefits of the proposed approach.

  3. Effect of resin on impact damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four different epoxy resin systems were evaluated by a variety of test techniques to identify materials that exhibited improved impact damage tolerance in graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Forty-eight-ply composite panels of five of the material systems were able to sustain 100 m/s impact by a 1.27-cm-diameter aluminum projectile while statically loaded to strains of 0.005. Of the five materials with the highest tolerance to impact, two had elastomeric additives, two had thermoplastic additives, and one had a vinyl modifier; all the five systems used bisphenol A as the base resin. An evaluation of test results shows that the laminate damage tolerance is largely determined by the resin tensile properties, and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room-temperature mechanical properties. The results also suggest that a resin volume fraction of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  4. Aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene cured epoxy resins and the composites, laminates, adhesives and structures thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes such as hexakis (4-aminophenoxy) cyclotriphosphazene and tris (4-aminophenoxy)-tris phenoxy cyclotriphosphazene are used as curing agents for epoxy resins. These 1,2-epoxy resins are selected from di- or polyepoxide containing organic moieties of the formula (CH2-CHO-CH2) m-W-R-W- (CH2CH-CH2O)m where R is diphenyl dimethylmethane, diphenylmethane; W is a nitrogen or oxygen atom; and m is 1 when W is oxygen and 2 when W is nitrogen. The resins are cured thermally in stages at between about 110 to 135 C for between about 1 and 10 min, then at between about 175 to 185 C for between 0.5 to 10 hr and post cured at between about 215 and 235 C for between 0.1 and 2 hr. These resins are useful for making fire resistant elevated temperature stable composites, laminates, molded parts, and adhesives and structures, usually for aircraft secondary structures and for spacecraft construction.

  5. Sensitization to reactive diluents and hardeners in epoxy resin systems. IVDK data 2002-2011. Part I: reaction frequencies.

    PubMed

    Geier, Johannes; Lessmann, Holger; Hillen, Uwe; Skudlik, Christoph; Jappe, Uta

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy resin systems (ERSs), consisting of resins, reactive diluents, and hardeners, are indispensable in many branches of industry. In order to develop less sensitizing ERS formulations, knowledge of the sensitizing properties of single components is mandatory. To analyse the frequency of sensitization in the patients concerned, as one integral part of a research project on the sensitizing potency of epoxy resin compounds (FP-0324). A retrospective analysis of data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK), 2002-2011, and a comparison of reaction frequencies with (surrogate) exposure data, were performed. Almost half of the patients sensitized to epoxy resin were additionally sensitized to reactive diluents or hardeners. Among the reactive diluents, 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether was the most frequent allergen, followed by 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, phenyl glycidyl ether, and p-tert-butylphenyl glycidyl ether. Among the hardeners, m-xylylene diamine (MXDA) and isophorone diamine (IPDA) were the most frequent allergens. According to the calculated exposure-related frequency of sensitization, MXDA seems to be a far more important sensitizer than IPDA. Up to 60% of the patients sensitized to hardeners and 15-20% of those sensitized to reactive diluents do not react to epoxy resin. In cases of suspected contact allergy to an ERS, a complete epoxy resin series must be patch tested from the start. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dielectric spectroscopy of SiO2, ZnO - nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin in the frequency range of 20 Hz to 2 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, Sanketsinh; Rana, V. A.; Vankar, H. P.

    2017-05-01

    In present work, Bisphenol A-(epichlorhydrin); epoxy resin with hardener N(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1,3-propylenediamine were used to determine the dielectric properties. Sample of the neat epoxy resin and nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin in the form of disc were prepared of different weight fraction. SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles were taken as filler in the epoxy resin. Complex permittivity of the prepared samples was measured in the frequency range of 20 Hz to 2 MHz using precision LCR meter at room temperature. The charismatic change in dielectric behavior based on type and concentration of nanoparticle are discussed in detail.

  7. Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus-Containing Flame Retardant Curing Agent and Its Application in Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkun; Xu, Miaojun; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A novel phosphorus-containing compound diphenyl-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phosphine oxide defined as DPDHPPO was synthesized and used as flame retardant and curing agent for epoxy resins (EP). The chemical structure was well characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The flame retardant properties, combusting performances and thermal degradation behaviors of the cured epoxy resins were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning tests (UL-94), cone calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. The morphologies and chemical compositions of char residues for cured epoxy resins were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The water resistant properties were evaluated by putting the samples into distilled water at 70 degrees C for 168 h. The results revealed that the EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating and the LOI value was as high as 31.9%. The cone tests results revealed that the incorporation of DPDHPPO efficiently reduced the combustion parameters of epoxy resins thermosets, such as heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR) and so on. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DPDHPPO promoted epoxy resins matrix decomposed ahead of time compared with that of pure EP and led to a higher char yield and thermal stability at high temperature. The morphological structures and analysis of XPS of char residues revealed that DPDHPPO benefited to the formation of a sufficient, compact and homogeneous char layer with rich flame retardant elements on the epoxy resins materials surface during combustion. After water resistance tests, EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets still remained excellent flame retardancy, the moisture absorption of epoxy resins thermosets decreased with the increase of DPDHPPO contents in the thermosets due to the existing

  8. Organo-modified bentonites as new flame retardant fillers in epoxy resin nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelli, Tiziana; D'Angelo, Emanuele; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Saraga, Federico; Sambri, Letizia; Franchini, Mauro Comes; Giorgini, Loris

    2016-05-01

    The present work deals with two organophilic bentonites, based on nitrogen-containing compounds: these organoclays were synthesized via an ion exchange process starting from pristine bentonite with 6-(4-butylphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (BFTDA) and 11-amino-N-(pyridine-2yl)undecanamide (APUA) and then used for the production of epoxy-based flame retardant nanocomposites. The amount of organic modifier in the organoclays Bento-BFTDA and Bento-APUA was determined with a TGA analysis and is around 0.4mmol/g for both samples. The effect of the organoclays on a commercial epoxy resin nanocomposite's thermo-mechanical and flammability properties was investigated. Composites containing 3wt% and 5wt% of the nanofillers were prepared by solventless addition of each organoclay to the epoxy resin, followed by further addition of the hardener component. For the sake of comparison a similar nanocomposite with the plain unmodified bentonite was produced in similar condition. The nanocomposites's thermo-mechanical properties of all the produced samples were measured and they resulted slightly improved or practically unaffected. On the contrary, when the flame behaviour was assessed in the cone-calorimeter, an encouraging decrease of 17% in the peak heat released rate (pHRR) was obtained at 3wt% loading level with Bento-APUA. This is a promising result, assessing that the APUA modified organoclay might act as flame retardant.

  9. Biodeterioration of epoxy resin: a microbial survey through culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Domenico; Bučková, Maria; Kraková, Lucia; Puškárová, Andrea; Šaková, Nikoleta; Grivalský, Tomaš; Chovanová, Katarina; Zemánková, Milina

    2015-02-01

    During the 20th century, synthetic polymers were greatly used in the field of art. In particular, the epoxy resins were used for both conservation and for creating sculptures. The biodeterioration of these polymers has not been adequately studied. The aim of this investigation was to examine the microflora responsible for the deterioration of an epoxy statue exposed to outdoor conditions. Fungal and bacterial microflora were isolated from the art object, clustered by fluorescence-ITS (internal transcribed spacer), identified by ITS and 16S rRNA sequencing and tested for their lipolytic abilities by three agar assays. Different algal, bacterial, cyanobacterial and fungal clone libraries were constructed. The surrounding airborne microflora was analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The results indicated the presence, on the statue surface, of an interesting and differentiate microbial community composed of rock-inhabiting members, algal photobionts (Trebouxia spp., Chloroidium ellipsoideum and Chlorella angustoellipsoidea), Cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya sp., Phormidium sp., Cylindrospermum stagnale, Hassallia byssoidea and Geitlerinema sp.), black yeasts related to the species Friedmanniomyces endolithicus, Pseudotaeniolina globosa, Phaeococcomyces catenatus and Catenulostroma germanicum and several plant-associated fungi. This investigation provides new information on the potential microfloral inhabitants of epoxy resin discovering a new ecological niche, occupied mainly by several members of rock-colonizing microbial species. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Curing and toughening of epoxy resins with phosphorus containing monomers and polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.R.; Park, I.Y.; Yoon, T.H.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy resins have been utilized in many areas, from house holds to airplanes, for the past several decades due to some exceptional properties such as low cost, good mechanical properties and excellent adhesive properties. However, low fracture toughness and flame resistance of epoxy resins have limited their applicability. Therefore, enhancing those properties have been of great interest to many researchers and scientists. As introduced by McGrath and co-workers in 1980s, the reactive thermoplastic polymers have proven to be an excellent toughener for improving not only fracture toughness but also adhesive properties without sacrificing thermo-mechanical properties and chemical resistance. Flame retardencymore » could be improved by adding flame retardent additives which are divided into two groups; additives and reactives. However, among the additives, halogen compounds are known to be toxic gas generator and ozone depleter. Moreover, additives could be potentially leached out of the material, while reactives are inferior to additives. Recently, a reactive type phosphine oxide containing flame retardants have been introduced by McGrath and co-workers and proven to be an excellent flame retardant. In this paper, phospine oxide containing monomers were prepared and utilized as curing agents for expoxy resins, and starting materials for the polymers.« less

  11. How we process trephine biopsy specimens: epoxy resin embedded bone marrow biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Krenacs, T; Bagdi, E; Stelkovics, E; Bereczki, L; Krenacs, L

    2005-01-01

    Improved cytomorphology of semithin resin sections over paraffin wax embedded sections may be important in diagnostic haematopathology. However, resin embedding can make immunohistochemical antigen detection or DNA isolation for clonal gene rearrangement assays difficult. This review describes the processing of bone marrow biopsies using buffered formaldehyde based fixation and epoxy resin embedding, with or without EDTA decalcification. Traditional semithin resin sections are completely rehydrated after etching in home made sodium methoxide solution. Resin elimination allows high resolution staining of tissue components with common histological stains. Efficient antigen retrieval and the Envision-HRP system permit the immunohistological detection of many antigens of diagnostic relevance, with retention of high quality cytomorphology. Furthermore, DNA can be extracted for clonality analysis. The technique can be completed within a similar time period to that of paraffin wax processing with only ∼30% increase in cost. This technique has been used for diagnosis in over 4000 bone marrow biopsies over the past 14 years. By meeting traditional and contemporary demands on the haematopathologist, it offers a powerful alternative to paraffin wax processing for diagnosis and research. PMID:16126867

  12. Mechanical testing of a steel-reinforced epoxy resin bar and clamp for external skeletal fixation of long-bone fractures in cats.

    PubMed

    Leitch, B J; Worth, A J

    2018-05-01

    To provide veterinarians with confidence when using a commercially available epoxy resin in external skeletal fixators (ESF), testing was conducted to determine exothermia during curing of the epoxy resin compared to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), the hardness of the epoxy resin as a bar over 16 weeks, and the strength of the epoxy resin bar compared with metal clamps in similarly constructed Type 1a ESF constructs simulating the repair of feline long bone fractures. Exothermia of the epoxy resin during curing was tested against PMMA with surface temperatures recorded over the first 15 minutes of curing, using four samples of each product. The hardness of 90 identical epoxy resin bars was tested by subjecting them to cyclic loads (1,000 cycles of 20.5 N, every 7 days) over a 16-week period and impact testing 10 bars every 2 weeks. Ten bars that were not subjected to cyclic loads were impact tested at 0 weeks and another 10 at 16 weeks. Strength of the epoxy resin product, as a bar and clamp composite, was tested against metal SK and Kirschner-Ehmer (KE) clamps and bars in Type 1a, tied-in intramedullary pin, ESF constructs with either 90° or 75° pin placement, subjected to compressive and bending loads to 75 N. The maximum temperature during curing of the epoxy resin (min 39.8, max 43.0)°C was less than the PMMA (min 85.2, max 98.5)°C (p<0.001). There was no change in hardness of the epoxy resin bars over the 16 weeks of cyclic loading (p=0.58). There were no differences between the median strength of the epoxy resin, SK or KE ESF constructs in compression or bending when tested to 75 N (p>0.05). Stiffness of constructs with 75° pin placement was greater for SK than epoxy resin constructs in compression (p=0.046), and was greater for KE than epoxy resin constructs in bending (p=0.033). The epoxy resin tested was found to be less exothermic than PMMA; bars made from the epoxy resin showed durability over an expected fracture healing timeframe and had

  13. Robust synthesis of epoxy resin-filled microcapsules for application to self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Bolimowski, Patryk A; Bond, Ian P; Wass, Duncan F

    2016-02-28

    Mechanically and thermally robust microcapsules containing diglycidyl ether bisphenol A-based epoxy resin and a high-boiling-point organic solvent were synthesized in high yield using in situ polymerization of urea and formaldehyde in an oil-in-water emulsion. Microcapsules were characterized in terms of their size and size distribution, shell surface morphology and thermal resistance to the curing cycles of commercially used epoxy polymers. The size distribution of the capsules and characteristics such as shell thickness can be controlled by the specific parameters of microencapsulation, including concentrations of reagents, stirrer speed and sonication. Selected microcapsules, and separated core and shell materials, were analysed using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It is demonstrated that capsules lose minimal 2.5 wt% at temperatures no higher than 120°C. These microcapsules can be applied to self-healing carbon fibre composite structural materials, with preliminary results showing promising performance. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. The use of Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) in the crack propagation analysis of epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, D. P.; Al-Hassani, A. H. M.; Richardson, M. O. W.

    The ESPI (electronic speckle pattern interferometry) technique at high magnification levels is demonstrated to be of considerable value in interpreting the fracture behaviour of epoxy resins. The fracture toughness of powder coating system at different thicknesses has been measured using a TDCB (tapered double cantilever beam) technique and the deformation zone at the tip of the moving crack monitored. Initial indications are that a mechanistic changeover occurs at a critical bond (coating) thickness and that this is synonymous with the occurence of a fracture toughness maximum, which in turn is associated with a deformation zone of specific diameter.

  15. Voltage-Induced Nonlinear Conduction Properties of Epoxy Resin/Micron-Silver Particles Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Lu, Pin; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Qingguo

    2018-01-01

    The nonlinear conduction properties of epoxy resin (ER)/micron-silver particles (MP) composites were investigated. Under sufficient high intensity applied constant voltage, the obvious nonlinear conduction properties of the samples with volume fraction 25% were found. With increments in the voltage, the conductive switching effect was observed. The nonlinear conduction mechanism of the ER/MP composites under high applied voltages could be attributed to the electrical current conducted via discrete paths of conductive particles induced by the electric field. The test results show that the ER/MP composites with nonlinear conduction properties are of great potential application in electromagnetic protection of electron devices and systems.

  16. The Reverse Thermal Effect in Epoxy Resins and Moisture Absorption in Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sa'Ad, Leila

    1989-12-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Epoxy resins exhibit many desirable properties which make them ideal subjects for use as matrices of composite materials in many commercial, military and space applications. However, due to their high cross-link density they are often brittle. Epoxy resin networks have been modified by incorporating tough, ductile thermoplastics. Such systems are referred to as Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (Semi-IPN). Systematic modification to the thermoplastics backbone allowed the morphology of the blend to be controlled from a homogeneous one-phase structure to fully separated structures. The moisture absorption by composites in humid environments has been found to lead to a deterioration in the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix. Therefore, in order to utilize composites to their full potential, their response to hot/wet environments must be known. The aims of this investigation were two-fold. Firstly, to study the effect of varying the temperature of exposure at different stages in the absorption process on the water absorption behaviour of a TGDDM/DDS epoxy resin system. Secondly, to study water absorption characteristics, under isothermal conditions, of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks possessing different morphologies, and develop a theoretical model to evaluate the diffusion coefficients of the two-phase structures. The mathematical treatment used in this analysis was based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Tests were performed on specimens immersed in water at 10 ^circ, 40^circ and 70^circC, their absorption behaviour and swelling behaviour, as a consequence of water absorption, were investigated. The absorption results of the variable temperature absorption tests indicated a saturation dependence on the absorption behaviour. Specimens saturated at a high temperature will undergo further absorption when transferred to a lower temperature. This behaviour was

  17. Structure and Performance of Epoxy Resin Cladded Graphite Used as Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhentao; Li, Haijun

    This paper is concerning to prepare modified natural graphite which is low-cost and advanced materials used as lithium ion battery anode using the way of cladding natural graphite with epoxy resin. The results shows that the specific capacity and circular performance of the modified natural graphite, which is prepared in the range of 600°C and 1000°C, have been apparently improved compare with the not-modified natural graphite. The first reversible capacity of the modified natural graphite is 338mAh/g and maintain more than 330mAh/g after 20 charge/discharge circles.

  18. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rakotomalala, Muriel; Wagner, Sebastian; Döring, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB). This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering), which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE) applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed. PMID:28883331

  19. Construction of an amperometric ascorbate biosensor using epoxy resin membrane bound Lagenaria siceraria fruit ascorbate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Pundir, C S; Chauhan, Nidhi; Jyoti

    2011-06-01

    Ascorbate oxidase purified from Lagenaria siceraria fruit was immobilized onto epoxy resin "Araldite" membrane with 79.4% retention of initial activity of free enzyme. The biosensor showed optimum response within 15s at pH 5.8 and 35°C, which was directly proportional to ascorbate concentration ranging from 1-100μM. There was a good correlation (R(2) = 0.99) between serum ascorbic acid values by standard enzymic colorimetric method and the present method. The enzyme electrode was used for 200 times without considerable loss of activity during the span of 90 days when stored at 4°C.

  20. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Esposito Corcione, Carola; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-01-01

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness. PMID:28788215

  1. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness.

    PubMed

    Corcione, Carola Esposito; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-09-22

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness.

  2. The synthesis and dynamics research of new curing agent for epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yongli; Huang, Hengyu; Sun, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Two-step synthesis of trimellitic anhydride trimellitic anhydride n - butyl ester (TMNB) was introduced which could be used as an epoxy resin curing agent. The kinetics of the curing reaction was analyzed by N-order model and autocatalytic model. The curing kinetics parameters, the results show that the curing activation energy (Ea) of this system was 35.79kJ / mol. The kinetic equation of curing was d/a d t =2.1061 ×104e x p (-35.79/R T ) α0.5163(l-α ) 0.366 . Combined with β-1 / T extrapolation and experimental adjustment to obtain the resin system curing process: 75°C for 1h, 140°C for 3h, 160°C for 2h.

  3. Halohydrination of epoxy resins using sodium halides as cationizing agents in MALDI-MS and DIOS-MS.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takehiro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Kimoto, Takashi; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2008-12-01

    Halohydrination of epoxy resins using sodium halides as cationizing agents in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and desorption ionization on porous silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) were investigated. Different mass spectra were observed when NaClO(4) and NaI were used as the cationizing agents at the highest concentration of 10.0 mM, which is much higher than that normally used in MALDI-MS. MALDI mass spectra of epoxy resins using NaI revealed iodohydrination to occur as epoxy functions of the polymers. The halohydrination also occurred using NaBr, but not NaCl, due to the differences in their nucleophilicities. On the basis of the results of experiments using deuterated CD(3)OD as the solvent, the hydrogen atom source was probably ambient water or residual solvent, rather than being derived from matrices. Halohydrination also occurred with DIOS-MS in which no organic matrix was used; in addition, reduction of epoxy functions was observed with DIOS. NaI is a useful cationizing agent for changing the chemical form of epoxy resins due to iodohydrination and, thus, for identifying the presence of epoxy functions. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Rheological and electrical properties of hybrid nanocomposites of epoxy resins filled with graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang-Trung; Lee, Seon-Suk; Lee, Dai-Soo

    2011-02-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared by microwave irradiation of natural graphites intercalated with ferric chloride in nitromethane (GIC). Intercalated structure of GIC was confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns. SEM images of GIC after microwave irradiation showed the exfoliation of GIC, the formation of GNPs. Hybrid nanocomposites of bisphenol-A type epoxy resins filled with GNP and a conductive carbon black (CB) were prepared and rheological and electrical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Viscosity and electrical surface resistivity of the nanocomposites showed minima at certain mixtures of GNP and CB in the epoxy resins.

  5. Study on the Characteristics of a Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won

    2017-09-01

    A thin plate of a plastic scintillator for detecting a beta-ray was developed. The plastic scintillator was made using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis [5-phenyl-2-oxazole] benzene (POPOP). The mixture ratio of epoxy resin and the organic scintillators was determined using their absorbance, transmittance, emission spectra, and transparency. Their optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in the organic scintillators was adjusted to 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. The prepared plastic scintillator was used to measure the standard source of Sr-90. The pulse height spectra and total counts of the prepared plastic scintillator were similar to a commercial plastic scintillator. Based on the above results, a large-area plastic scintillator was prepared for rapid investigation of a site contaminated with Sr-90. The prepared large-area plastic scintillator was evaluated for the characteristics in the laboratory. The evaluation results are expected to be usefully utilized in the development of a large-area plastic scintillation detector. The large-area plastic scintillation detector developed on the basis of the evaluation results is expected to be utilized to quickly measure the contamination of Sr-90 in the grounds used as a nuclear power facility.

  6. Effect of incorporation of conductive fillers on mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Seenaa I.; Abd-Elnaiem, Alaa M.; Asafa, Tesleem B.; Jaafar, Harith I.

    2018-07-01

    Applications of polymer-based nanocomposites continue to rise because of their special properties such as lightweight, low cost, and durability. Among the most important applications is the thermal management of high density electronics which requires effective dissipation of internally generated heat. This paper presents our experimental results on the influence of graphene, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and chopped carbon fibers on wear resistance, hardness, impact strength and thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composites. We observed that, within the range of the experimental data (epoxy resin + 1, 3, 5 wt% of graphene or 1, 3, 5 wt% MWCNT or 10, 30, 50 wt% carbon fibers), graphene-enhanced wear resistance of the nanocomposites by 75% compared to 50% and 38% obtained for MWCNT and carbon fiber composite, respectively. The impact resistance of graphene nanocomposite rose by 26% (from 7.3 to 9.2 J/m2) while that of MWCNT nanocomposite was improved by 14% (from 7.3 to 8.2 J/m2). The thermal conductivity increased 3.6-fold for the graphene nanocomposite compared to threefold for MWCNT nanocomposite and a meager 0.63-fold for carbon fiber composite. These enhancements in mechanical and thermal properties are generally linear within the experimental limits. The huge increase in thermal conductivity, especially for the graphene and MWCNT nanocomposites makes the composites readily applicable as high conductive materials for use as heat spreaders and thermal pads.

  7. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance of epoxy resin fiberglass tape at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudouy, B.; Polinski, J.

    2009-03-01

    The system of materials composed of fiberglass epoxy resin impregnated tape constitutes in many cases the electrical insulation for "dry"-type superconducting accelerator magnet such as Nb 3Sn magnets. Nb 3Sn magnet technology is still under development in a few programs to reach higher magnetic fields than what NbTi magnets can produce. The European program, Next European Dipole (NED), is one of such programs and it aims to develop and construct a 15 T class Nb 3Sn magnet mainly for upgrading the Large Hardron Collider. Superfluid helium is considered as one possible coolant and since the magnet has been designed with a "dry" insulation, the thermal conductivity and the Kapitza resistance of the electrical insulation are the key properties that must be know for the thermal design of such a magnet. Accordingly, property measurements of the epoxy resin fiberglass tape insulation system developed for the NED project was carried out in superfluid helium. Four sheets with thicknesses varying from 40 to 300 μm have been tested in a steady-state condition. The determined thermal conductivity, k, is [(25.8 ± 2.8) · T - (12.2 ± 4.9)] × 10 -3 W m -1 K -1 and the Kapitza resistance is given by R K = (1462 ± 345) · T(-1.86 ± 0.41) × 10 -6 Km 2 W -1 in the temperature range of 1.55-2.05 K.

  8. Dissolution of brominated epoxy resins by dimethyl sulfoxide to separate waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Chen, Yan; Wang, Liangyou; Qian, Guangren; Zhang, Wei Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Jin

    2013-03-19

    Improved methods are required for the recycling of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). In this study, WPCBs (1-1.5 cm(2)) were separated into their components using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 60 °C for 45 min and a metallographic microscope was used to verify their delamination. An increased incubation time of 210 min yielded a complete separation of WPCBs into their components, and copper foils and glass fibers were obtained. The separation time decreased with increasing temperature. When the WPCB size was increased to 2-3 cm(2), the temperature required for complete separation increased to 90 °C. When the temperature was increased to 135 °C, liquid photo solder resists could be removed from the copper foil surfaces. The DMSO was regenerated by rotary decompression evaporation, and residues were obtained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to verify that these residues were brominated epoxy resins. From FT-IR analysis after the dissolution of brominated epoxy resins in DMSO it was deduced that hydrogen bonding may play an important role in the dissolution mechanism. This novel technology offers a method for separating valuable materials and preventing environmental pollution from WPCBs.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cross-Linking Strategy of a Quercetin-Based Epoxidized Monomer as a Naturally-Derived Replacement for BPA in Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Kristufek, Samantha L; Yang, Guozhen; Link, Lauren A; Rohde, Brian J; Robertson, Megan L; Wooley, Karen L

    2016-08-23

    The natural polyphenolic compound quercetin was functionalized and cross-linked to afford a robust epoxy network. Quercetin was selectively methylated and functionalized with glycidyl ether moieties using a microwave-assisted reaction on a gram scale to afford the desired monomer (Q). This quercetin-derived monomer was treated with nadic methyl anhydride (NMA) to obtain a cross-linked network (Q-NMA). The thermal and mechanical properties of this naturally derived network were compared to those of a conventional diglycidyl ether bisphenol A-derived counterpart (DGEBA-NMA). Q-NMA had similar thermal properties [i.e., glass transition (Tg ) and decomposition (Td ) temperatures] and comparable mechanical properties (i.e., Young's Modulus, storage modulus) to that of DGEBA-NMA. However, it had a lower tensile strength and higher flexural modulus at elevated temperatures. The application of naturally derived, sustainable compounds for the replacement of commercially available petrochemical-based epoxies is of great interest to reduce the environmental impact of these materials. Q-NMA is an attractive candidate for the replacement of bisphenol A-based epoxies in various specialty engineering applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Strain development in curing epoxy resin and glass fibre/epoxy composites monitored by fibre Bragg grating sensors in birefringent optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehura, E.; Skordos, A. A.; Ye, C.-C.; James, S. W.; Partridge, I. K.; Tatam, R. P.

    2005-04-01

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) fabricated in linearly birefringent fibres were embedded in glass fibre/epoxy composites and in the corresponding unreinforced resin to monitor the effective transverse strain development during the cure process. The optical fibres containing the FBG sensors were aligned either normal or parallel to the reinforcement fibres in unidirectional glass fibre/epoxy prepregs. The chemical cure kinetics of the epoxy resin system used were studied using differential scanning calorimetry, in order to investigate the correlation between the strain monitoring results and the evolution of the curing reaction. A non-parametric cure kinetics model was developed and validated for this purpose. The effective transverse strain measured by the FBGs demonstrated high sensitivity to the degree of cure as a result of the densification of the resin caused by the curing reaction. The effective compressive transverse strain developed during the reaction, and thus the corresponding sensitivity to chemical changes, was higher in the case of the sensing fibre aligned normal to the reinforcement fibres than in the case of the sensor fibre parallel to the reinforcement fibres. Small but measurable sensitivity to cure induced changes was observed in the case of the unreinforced resin.

  11. Evaluation of bond strength of various epoxy resin based sealers in oval shaped root canals.

    PubMed

    Cakici, Fatih; Cakici, Elif Bahar; Ceyhanli, Kadir Tolga; Celik, Ersan; Kucukekenci, Funda Fundaoglu; Gunseren, Arif Onur

    2016-09-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of AH plus, Acroseal, and Adseal to the root canal dentin. A total of 36 single-rooted, mandibular premolar teeth were used. Root canal shaping procedures were performed with ProTaper rotary instruments (Dentsply Maillefer) up to size F4. The prepared samples were then randomly assembled into 3 groups (n = 12). For each group, an ultrasonic tip (size 15, 0.02 taper) which was also coated with an epoxy resin based sealer and placed 2 mm shorter than the working length. The sealer was then activated for 10 s. A push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentine and the sealer. Kruskal-Wallis test to evaluate the push-out bond strength of epoxy based sealer (P = 0.05). The failure mode data were statistically analyzed using Pearson's chi square test (P = 0.05). Kruskal-Wallis test indicated that there were no statistically significant difference among the push out bond strength values of 3 mm (p = 0.123) and 6 mm (P = 0.057) for groups, there was statistically significant difference push out bond strength value of 9 mm (P = 0.032). Pearson's chi square test showed statistically significant differences for the failure types among the groups. Various epoxy resin based sealers activated ultrasonically showed similar bond strength in oval shaped root canals. Apical sections for all groups have higher push out bond strength values than middle and coronal sections.

  12. [The working environment control of anhydride hardeners from an epoxy resin system].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naomi; Yokota, Kozo; Johyama, Yasushi; Takakura, Toshiyuki

    2003-07-01

    Epoxy resins are widely used in adhesives, coatings, materials for molds and composites, and encapsulation. Acid anhydrides such as methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride are being used as curing agents for epoxy resins. The anhydride hardeners are well-known industrial inhalant allergens, inducing predominantly type I allergies. In the electronic components industry, these substances have been consumed in large quantities. Therefore, safe use in the industry demands control of the levels of exposure causing allergic diseases in the workshop. We conducted a prospective survey of two electronics plants to clarify how to control the atmospheric level of the anhydrides in the work environment. Measurements of the levels of the anhydrides in air started according to the Working Environment Measurement Standards (Ministry of Labour Notification No. 46, 1976) in April 2000, along with improvements in the work environment. A value of 40 micrograms/m3 was adopted as the administrative control level to judge the propriety of the working environment control. A total of 2 unit work areas in both plants belonged to Control Class III. The exposure originated from manual loading, casting, uncured hot resins, and leaks in an impregnating-machine or curing ovens. In order to achieve the working environment control, complete enclosure of the source, installation of local exhaust ventilation, and improvement or maintenance of the local exhaust ventilation system were performed on the basis of the results of the working environment measurement, with the result that the work environment was improved (Control Class I). It became evident that these measures were effective just like other noxious substances.

  13. Literature Review: An Overview of Epoxy Resin Syntactic Foams with Glass Microballoons

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jennie

    2014-03-12

    Syntactic foams are an important category of composite materials that have abundant applications in a wide variety of fields. The bulk phase of syntactic foams is a three-part epoxy resin formulation that consists of a base resin, a curative (curing agent) and a modifier (diluent and/or accelerator) [12]. These thermoset materials [12] are used frequently for their thermal stability [9], low moisture absorption and high compressive strength [10]. The characteristic feature of a syntactic foam is a network of beads that forms pores within the epoxy matrix [3]. In this review, hollow glass beads (known as glass microballoons) are considered,more » however, solid beads or microballoons made from materials such as ceramic, polymer or metal can also be used [3M, Peter]. The network of hollow beads forms a closed-cell foam; the term closed-cell comes from the fact that the microspheres used in the resin matrix are completely closed and filled with gas (termed hollow). In contrast, the microspheres used in open-cell foams are either not completely closed or broken so that matrix material can fill the spheres [11]. Although closed foams have been found to possess higher densities than open cell foams, their rigid structures give them superior mechanical properties [12]. Past research has extensively studied the effects that changing the volume fraction of microballoons to epoxy will have on the resulting syntactic foam [3,4,9]. In addition, published literature also explores how the microballoon wall thickness affects the final product [4,9,10]. Findings detail that indeed both the mechanical and some thermal properties of syntactic foams can be tailored to a specific application by varying either the volume fraction or the wall thickness of the microballoons used [10]. The major trends in syntactic foam research show that microballoon volume fraction has an inversely proportionate relationship to dynamic properties, while microballoon wall thickness is proportional to

  14. Characteristics of epoxy resin/SiO2 nanocomposite insulation: effects of plasma surface treatment on the nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Phung, B T; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2013-05-01

    The present study compares the effects of two different material processing techniques on modifying hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles. In one method, the nanoparticles undergo plasma treatment by using a custom-developed atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma reactor. With the other method, they undergo chemical treatment which grafts silane groups onto their surface and turns them into hydrophobic. The treated nanoparticles are then used to synthesize epoxy resin-based nanocomposites for electrical insulation applications. Their characteristics are investigated and compared with the pure epoxy resin and nanocomposite fabricated with unmodified nanofillers counterparts. The dispersion features of the nanoparticles in the epoxy resin matrix are examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. All samples show evidence that the agglomerations are smaller than 30 nm in their diameters. This indicates good dispersion uniformity. The Weibull plot of breakdown strength and the recorded partial discharge (PD) events of the epoxy resin/plasma-treated hydrophilic SiO2 nanocomposite (ER/PTI) suggest that the plasma-treated specimen yields higher breakdown strength and lower PD magnitude as compared to the untreated ones. In contrast, surprisingly, lower breakdown strength is found for the nanocomposite made by the chemically treated hydrophobic particles, whereas the PD magnitude and PD numbers remain at a similar level as the plasma-treated ones.

  15. New structure of diamine curing agent for epoxy resins with self-restoration ability: Synthesis and spectroscopy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Marialuigia; Guadagno, Liberata; Naddeo, Carlo; Longo, Pasquale; Mariconda, Annaluisa; Agovino, Anna

    2017-02-01

    The development of smart materials in aeronautical structures consisting of compounds based on epoxy resins having self-repair capability has been hampered by some criticalities. One of the main critical points is related to the impossibility to use primary amines (e.g.: 4,4‧-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) as hardeners, because they can poison the catalyst responsible for the healing mechanisms. In this paper, the synthesis, characterization and some tests of applicability of a new hardener, the tetramethylated diaminodiphenyl sulfone (tm-DDS), are shown. The tm-DDS is able to rapidly react with epoxy resin, giving a composite material having some characteristics significantly better than composites hardened with different tertiary amines. The new hardener is able to increase the glass transition temperature (Tg) of about 90 °C with respect to the more common hardener, ancamine K54, already used in self-healing epoxy formulations.

  16. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  17. Curing kinetics and thermomechanical properties of latent epoxy/carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Vacche, S.; Michaud, V.; Demierre, M.; Bourban, P.-E.; Månson, J.-A. E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and a latent hardener, dicyandiamide (DICY), as well as carbon fiber (CF) composites based on them, were prepared with three commercial accelerators: a methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea), a cycloaliphatic substituted urea, and a modified polyamine. The curing kinetics of the three DGEBA/DICY/accelerator systems were investigated by chemorheology and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in isothermal and over temperature change conditions. Differences in the reaction onset temperature, and in the glass transition temperature (Tg) were highlighted. For curing of thick resin samples, a slow curing cycle at the lowest possible temperature was used, followed by high temperature (160 - 180 °C) post-curing. Indeed, fast curing at higher temperatures caused the formation of hot spots and led to local burning of the samples. The obtained thermomechanical properties, assessed by ultimate tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in single cantilever configuration, were all in the expected range for epoxy resins, with tensile moduli close to 3 GPa and Tg > 140 °C. The longterm stability of these resins at room temperature was verified by DSC. Composite samples were prepared by hand lay-up by manually impregnating four layers of 5-harness satin CF textile, and curing in vacuum bag. Impregnation quality and void content were assessed by optical microscopy. The flexural properties of the post-cured composites were assessed by three-point bending test at room temperature and showed no relevant differences, all composites having bending moduli of 45 - 50 GPa. Finally, composites cured with a faster high temperature curing cycle (20 min at 140 °C) were prepared with the DGEBA/DICY/ methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea) system, obtaining similar properties as with the slower curing cycle, showing that the prepreg system allowed more flexibility in terms of curing cycle than the bulk resin

  18. Photoluminescence of epoxy resin modified by carbazole and its halogen derivative at 82 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandowska, E.; Mandowski, A.; Tsvirko, M.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra and relative quantum yield of fluorescence and phosphorescence were measured for 9-(2,3-epoxypropyl)carbazole (EPK) added to epoxy resin (R) (R 5EPK - 5% weight content of the carbazole group in a polymer) and its mono and dihalogen derivative (Cl and Br). The materials under study have excellent mechanical properties. At 82 K photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these materials are composed of fluorescence (FL) and phosphorescence (PH) components while at 280 K, PH component is not observed. The vibrational frequencies of fluorescence and phosphorescence for R 5EPK were determined using Gaussian deconvolution. A decrease in the fluorescence and an increase in the phosphorescence quantum efficiency were observed after chemical bonding of heavy atoms Cl and Br.

  19. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  20. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2015-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease. PMID:26858557

  1. Free volumes and gas transport in polymers: amine-modified epoxy resins as a case study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pushkar N; Roilo, David; Brusa, Roberto S; Miotello, Antonio; Aghion, Stefano; Ferragut, Rafael; Checchetto, Riccardo

    2016-02-07

    The CO2 transport process was studied in a series of amine-modified epoxy resins having different cross-linking densities but the same chemical environment for the penetrant molecules. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to monitor the free volume structure of the samples and experimentally evaluate their fractional free volume fh(T) and its temperature evolution. The analysis of the free volume hole size distribution showed that all the holes have a size large enough to accommodate the penetrant molecules at temperatures T above the glass transition temperature Tg. The measured gas diffusion constants at T > Tg have been reproduced in the framework of the free volume theory of diffusion using a novel procedure based on the use of fh(T) as an input experimental parameter.

  2. Surface Flashover on Epoxy-Resin Printed Circuit Boards in Vacuum under Electron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruhisa; Hasegawa, Taketoshi; Osuga, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Katsuaki

    This paper deals with the surface flashover characteristics of dielectric material in vacuum during electron beam irradiation in order to design adequately the conductive patterns on printed circuit boards used inside a spacecraft. The dielectric material, glass-fiber reinforced epoxy resin, and the electrodes printed on it were irradiated with electrons of the energy of 3-10 keV. DC high voltage was applied between the two electrodes during electron irradiation. The voltage was increased stepwise until the surface flashover occurred on the dielectric material. We obtained the results that the surface flashover voltage increased with the insulation distance between the electrodes but electron irradiation made the flashover voltage lower. The flashover voltage characteristics were obtained as parameters of the electrode distance and the energy of the electron beam.

  3. Cure Kinetics of Benzoxazine/Cycloaliphatic Epoxy Resin by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouni, Sreeja Reddy

    Understanding the curing kinetics of a thermoset resin has a significant importance in developing and optimizing curing cycles in various industrial manufacturing processes. This can assist in improving the quality of final product and minimizing the manufacturing-associated costs. One approach towards developing such an understanding is to formulate kinetic models that can be used to optimize curing time and temperature to reach a full cure state or to determine time to apply pressure in an autoclave process. Various phenomenological reaction models have been used in the literature to successfully predict the kinetic behavior of a thermoset system. The current research work was designed to investigate the cure kinetics of Bisphenol-A based Benzoxazine (BZ-a) and Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (CER) system under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The cure characteristics of BZ-a/CER copolymer systems with 75/25 wt% and 50/50 wt% have been studied and compared to that of pure benzoxazine under nonisothermal conditions. The DSC thermograms exhibited by these BZ-a/CER copolymer systems showed a single exothermic peak, indicating that the reactions between benzoxazine-benzoxazine monomers and benzoxazine-cycloaliphatic epoxy resin were interactive and occurred simultaneously. The Kissinger method and isoconversional methods including Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Freidman were employed to obtain the activation energy values and determine the nature of the reaction. The cure behavior and the kinetic parameters were determined by adopting a single step autocatalytic model based on Kamal and Sourour phenomenological reaction model. The model was found to suitably describe the cure kinetics of copolymer system prior to the diffusion-control reaction. Analyzing and understanding the thermoset resin system under isothermal conditions is also important since it is the most common practice in the industry. The BZ-a/CER copolymer system with

  4. Thermodynamic and mechanical properties of epoxy resin DGEBF crosslinked with DETDA by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jeremy L; Ford, David M

    2008-06-01

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to predict the properties of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) crosslinked with curing agent diethyltoluenediamine (DETDA). This polymer is a commercially important epoxy resin and a candidate for applications in nanocomposites. The calculated properties were density and bulk modulus (at near-ambient pressure and temperature) and glass transition temperature (at near-ambient pressure). The molecular topology, degree of curing, and MD force-field were investigated as variables. The models were created by densely packing pre-constructed oligomers of different composition and connectivity into a periodic simulation box. For high degrees of curing (greater than 90%), the density was found to be insensitive to the molecular topology and precise value of degree of curing. Of the two force-fields that were investigated, cff91 and COMPASS, the latter clearly gave more accurate values for the density as compared to experiment. In fact, the density predicted by COMPASS was within 6% of reported experimental values for the highly crosslinked polymer. The predictions of both force-fields for glass transition temperature were within the range of reported experimental values, with the predictions of cff91 being more consistent with a highly cured resin.

  5. Cryogenic lifetime tests on a commercial epoxy resin high voltage bushing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S W; Pleva, Ed; Ha, Tam T

    2012-06-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems, SuperPower, and Southern California Edison to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen needs to bemore » verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is energized at 25 kVac around the clock. Liquid nitrogen (LN) is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.« less

  6. Dry entrapment of enzymes by epoxy or polyester resins hardened on different solid supports.

    PubMed

    Barig, Susann; Funke, Andreas; Merseburg, Andrea; Schnitzlein, Klaus; Stahmann, K-Peter

    2014-06-10

    Embedding of enzymes was performed with epoxy or polyester resin by mixing in a dried enzyme preparation before polymerization was started. This fast and low-cost immobilization method produced enzymatically active layers on different solid supports. As model enzymes the well-characterized Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase and a new threonine aldolase from Ashbya gossypii were used. It was shown that T. lanuginosus lipase recombinantly expressed in Aspergillus oryzae is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 34kDa, while A. gossypii threonine aldolase expressed in Escherichia coli is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate binding homotetramer with a mass of 180kDa. The enzymes were used freeze dried, in four different preparations: freely diffusing, adsorbed on octyl sepharose, as well as cross-linked enzyme aggregates or as suspensions in organic solvent. They were mixed with standard two-component resins and prepared as layers on solid supports made of different materials e.g. metal, glass, polyester. Polymerization led to encapsulated enzyme preparations showing activities comparable to literature values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cryogenic lifetime tests on a commercial epoxy resin high voltage bushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenterly, S. W.; Pleva, E. F.; Ha, T. T.

    2012-06-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES), SuperPower (SP), and Southern California Edison (SCE) to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen (LN) needs to be verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-rms-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is continuously energized at 25 kVac rms. LN is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.

  8. A novel specimen-preparing method using epoxy resin as binding material for LIBS analysis of powder samples.

    PubMed

    Shi, Linli; Lin, Qingyu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-11-01

    In view of the inevitable preprocessing of powder samples for LIBS detection, epoxy resin glue was investigated for the first time as a binder of powder samples due to its superior property of improved performance in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique as a quantitative analytical tool. For comparative studies of the epoxy resin and traditional polyethylene (PE) pellets in soil, sample detection, the signal intensities of Fe (I) at 404.58 nm, Ca (I) at 443.57 nm, and Cr (I) at 453.52 nm, were studied and subsequently, the calibration curves for these elements were constructed using the standard samples with variable concentrations. The signal intensities of epoxy resin samples were, on average, about 2 times greater than those obtained with the traditional PE pellet samples. Meanwhile, the resin samples showed better R square values of 0.981, 0.985 and 0.979 for curves of Fe (I) 404.58 nm, Ca (I) 443.57 nm, and Cr (I) 453.52 nm, compared to the 0.974, 0.950 and 0.934, of the PE pellet samples. Furthermore, the former represented lower limits of detection (LOD) for Fe, Ca and Cr. These experimental results indicated that this proposed novel method based on epoxy resin can attach samples of properties of high homogeneity, cohesiveness, smoothness and hardness, which are conducive to system stability, testing accuracy and signal enhancement. This method can make LIBS more practical in powder sample analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Gagani, Abedin I.; Echtermeyer, Andreas T.

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer–Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described. PMID:29641451

  10. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites.

    PubMed

    Krauklis, Andrey E; Gagani, Abedin I; Echtermeyer, Andreas T

    2018-04-11

    Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer-Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  11. Two cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis from a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin in a neat oil: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    Background Metal-working fluids contain complex mixtures of chemicals and metal workers constitute a potential risk group for the development of allergic contact dermatitis. Case presentation Two metal workers developed allergic contact dermatitis on the hands and lower arms from exposure to a neat oil used in metal processing. Patch testing revealed that the relevant contact allergen was a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin, 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, bis(oxiranylmethyl) ester, added to the oil as a stabilizer. None of the patients had positive reactions to the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin in the standard series. Conclusions These cases emphasize that well-known contact allergens may show up from unexpected sources of exposure. Further, it can be a long-lasting, laborious process to detect an occupational contact allergen and cooperation from the patient and the manufacturer of the sensitizing product is essential. PMID:12685935

  12. Effects of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Nanoparticles on the Fracture Toughness of an Epoxy Resin at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Cannon, S. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace (Registered TradeMark) MX130 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/W epoxy resin. Resulting fracture toughness was evaluated by the use of Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electric Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Up to nominal 4.6% addition of the CSR nanoparticles, resulted in a nearly 5 times increase in the measured breaking energy. However, further increases in the amount of CSR nanoparticles had no appreciable affect on the breaking energy.

  13. Comparison of the Effect of Addition of Cyanoacrylate, Epoxy Resin, and Gum Arabic on Surface Hardness of Die Stone.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Arvind; Gupta, Ashutosh; Bagchi, Soumyojeet; Mishra, Lallan; Gautam, Abhina; Madhok, Riti

    2016-04-01

    To observe the effects of incorporating cyanoacrylate, epoxy resins, and gum arabic on the abrasion resistance of type IV gypsum die materials. Forty specimens were prepared and divided into four groups (10 specimens in each group), namely group A (control), group B (die stone mixed with cyanoacrylate), group C (die stone mixed with epoxy resin), group D (die stone mixed with gum arabic). All the specimens were subjected to abrasion testing, wear volume analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Abrasion testing showed maximum wear in the control group and minimum wear in the gum arabic group. Intergroup differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The largest mean difference was between control and gum arabic. The lowest was between cyanoacrylate and the control group. The mean wear volume was lowest in the gum arabic group (4.23 mm(3) ) and highest in the control group (6.78 mm(3) ). The FT-IR graphs of the gum arabic models showed the presence of CH2 , which is responsible for its binding activity. SEM revealed that the irregular particles of gum arabic display an interlocking arrangement. This jigsaw puzzle pattern results in stronger physical bond formation. Observations from this study showed that the addition of gum arabic increases resistance to abrasion in type IV gypsum. Cyanoacrylates are good adhesives as well, but a major drawback is that they have very low resistance to chemical action with water and physical actions such as sunlight. Epoxy resins are powerful adhesives, but they attain their full efficiency when cured with heat. Cyanoacrylate and epoxy resin displayed poor physical bonding, primarily because of inhomogeneity. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. New experimental and analytical results for diffusion and swelling of resins used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C. C.; Adamson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The epoxy resins currently in use can slowly absorb moisture from the atmosphere over a long period. This reduces those mechanical properties of composites which depend strongly on the matrix, such as compressive strength and buckling instabilities. The effect becomes greater at elevated temperatures. The paper will discuss new phenomena which occur under simultaneous temperature and moisture variations. An analytical model will also be discussed and documented.

  15. Thermo-mechanical characterization of siliconized E-glass fiber/hematite particles reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. R., Arun prakash; Rajadurai, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this present work hybrid polymer (epoxy) matrix composite has been strengthened with surface modified E-glass fiber and iron(III) oxide particles with varying size. The particle sizes of 200 nm and <100 nm has been prepared by high energy ball milling and sol-gel methods respectively. To enhance better dispersion of particles and improve adhesion of fibers and fillers with epoxy matrix surface modification process has been done on both fiber and filler by an amino functional silane 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized iron(III) oxide particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Fixed quantity of surface treated 15 vol% E-glass fiber was laid along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of iron(III) oxide particles into the matrix to fabricate hybrid composites. The composites were cured by an aliphatic hardener Triethylenetetramine (TETA). Effectiveness of surface modified particles and fibers addition into the resin matrix were revealed by mechanical testing like tensile testing, flexural testing, impact testing, inter laminar shear strength and hardness. Thermal behavior of composites was evaluated by TGA, DSC and thermal conductivity (Lee's disc). The scanning electron microscopy was employed to found shape and size of iron(III) oxide particles adhesion quality of fiber with epoxy matrix. Good dispersion of fillers in matrix was achieved with surface modifier APTMS. Tensile, flexural, impact and inter laminar shear strength of composites was improved by reinforcing surface modified fiber and filler. Thermal stability of epoxy resin was improved when surface modified fiber was reinforced along with hard hematite particles. Thermal conductivity of epoxy increased with increase of hematite content in epoxy matrix.

  16. Preparation of hyperbranched poly (amidoamine)-grafted graphene nanolayers as a composite and curing agent for epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholipour-Mahmoudalilou, Meysam; Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein; Azimi, Reza; Abdollahi, Amin

    2018-01-01

    Thermal properties of epoxy resin were improved by preparation of a curing agent of poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-grafted graphene oxide (GO). Hyperbranched PAMAM-modified GO (GD) was prepared by a divergent dendrimer synthesis methodology. Modification of GO with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), Michael addition of methacrylic acid, and amidation reaction with ethylenediamine results in the curing agent of GD. Then, epoxy resin was cured in the presence of different amounts of GD and the final products were compared with ethylenediamine-cured epoxy resin (E) in their thermal degradation temperature and char contents. Functionalization of GO with APTES and hyperbranched dendrimer formation at the surface of GO were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results. TGA results showed that the weight loss associated with chemical moieties in GONH2, GOMA, and GD is estimated to be 10.1, 12.2, and 14.1%, respectively. Covalent attachment of dendrimer at the surface of GO increases its thermal stability. TGA also showed that decomposition temperature and char content are higher for composites compared with E. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies show that flat and smooth graphene nanolayers are wrinkled in GO and re-stacking and flattening of nanolayers is observed in GD.

  17. Investigation of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins for utilization in vibration assisted liquid composite molding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Kirdar, C.; Rudolph, N.; Zaremba, S.; Drechsler, K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient production and consumption of energy are of greatest importance for contemporary industries and their products. This has led to an increasing application of lightweight materials in general and of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) in particular. However, broader application of CFRP is often limited by high costs and manual labor production processes. These constraints are addressed by Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. In LCM a dry fibrous preform is placed into a cavity and infiltrated mostly by thermoset resins; epoxy resins are wide spread in CFRP applications. One crucial parameter for a fast mold filling is the viscosity of the resin, which is affected by the applied shear rates as well as temperature and curing time. The work presented focuses on the characterization of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins. Furthermore, the correlation with the conditions in vibration assisted LCM processes, where additional shear rates are created during manufacture, is discussed. Higher shear rates result from high frequencies and/or high amplitudes of the vibration motions which are created by a vibration engine mounted on the mold. In rheological investigations the shear thinning behavior of a representative epoxy resin is studied by means of rotational and oscillatory experiments. Moreover, possible effects of shear rates on the chemical curing reaction are studied. Here, the time for gelation is measured for different levels of shear rates in a pre-shearing phase. Based on the rheological studies, the beneficial effect of vibration assistance in LCM processes with respect to mold filling can further be predicted and utilized.

  18. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  19. Thermoset nanocomposites from waterborne bio-based epoxy resin and cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-min; Liu, Di; Liu, Gui-feng; Chen, Jian; Huo, Shu-ping; Kong, Zhen-wu

    2015-01-01

    Thermoset nanocomposites were prepared from a waterborne terpene-maleic ester type epoxy resin (WTME) and cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs). The curing behaviors of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites were measured with rotational rheometer. The results show that the storage modulus (G') of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites increased with the increase of CNWs content. Observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrate that the incorporation of CNWs in WTME matrix caused microphase separation and destroyed the compactness of the matrix. This effect leads to the glass transition temperatures (Tg) of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites slightly decrease with the increase of CNWs content, which were confirmed by both DSC and DMA tests. The mechanical properties of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites were investigated by tensile testing. The Yong's modulus (E) and tensile strength (σb) of the nanocomposites were significantly reinforced by the addition of CNWs. These results indicate that CNWs exhibit excellent reinforcement effect on WTME matrix, due to the formation and increase of interfacial interaction by hydrogen bonds between CNWs nano-filler and the WTME matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  1. Self-Healable and Reprocessable Polysulfide Sealants Prepared from Liquid Polysulfide Oligomer and Epoxy Resin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wentong; Bie, Mengyao; Liu, Fu; Chang, Pengshan; Quan, Yiwu

    2017-05-10

    Polysulfide sealants have been commercially applied in many industrial fields. In this article, we study the self-healing property of the epoxy resin-cured polysulfide sealants for the first time. The obtained sealants showed a flexible range of ultimate elongation of 157-478% and a tensile strength of 1.02-0.75 MPa corresponding to different polysulfide oligomers. By taking advantage of the dynamic reversible exchange of disulfide bonds, polysulfide sealants exhibited good self-healing ability under a moderate thermal stimulus. A higher molecular weight and a lower degree of cross-linking of polysulfide oligomer were helpful in improving the ultimate elongation and healing efficiency of the polysulfide sealants. After subjecting to a temperature of 75 °C for 60 min, both the tensile strength and ultimate elongation of a fully cut sample, LP55-F, were restored to 91% of the original values, without affecting the sealing property. Furthermore, the sample exhibited excellent reshaping and reprocessing abilities. These outcomes offer a paradigm toward sustainable industrial applications of the polysulfide-based sealants.

  2. Linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of a series of epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curliss, D. B.; Caruthers, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic properties have been measured for a series of bisphenol-A-based epoxy resins cured with the diamine DDS. The linear viscoelastic master curves were constructed via time-temperature superposition of frequency dependent G-prime and G-double-prime isotherms. The G-double-prime master curves exhibited two sub-Tg transitions. Superposition of isotherms in the glass-to-rubber transition (i.e., alpha) and the beta transition at -60 C was achieved by simple horizontal shifts in the log frequency axis; however, in the region between alpha and beta, superposition could not be effected by simple horizontal shifts along the log frequency axis. The different temperature dependency of the alpha and beta relaxation mechanisms causes a complex response of G-double-prime in the so called alpha-prime region. A novel numerical procedure has been developed to extract the complete relaxation spectra and its temperature dependence from the G-prime and G-double-prime isothermal data in the alpha-prime region.

  3. Isothermal relaxation current and microstructure changes of thermally aged polyester films impregnated by epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiongwei; Sun, Potao; Peng, Qingjun; Sima, Wenxia

    2018-01-01

    In this study, to understand the effect of thermal aging on polymer films degradation, specimens of polyester films impregnated by epoxy resin with different thermal aging temperatures (80 and 130 °C) and aging times (500, 1600, 2400 and 3000 h) are prepared, then charge de-trapping properties of specimens are investigated via the isothermal relaxation current (IRC) measurement, the distributions of trap level and its corresponding density are obtained based on the modified IRC model. It is found that the deep trap density increases remarkably at the beginning of thermal aging (before 1600 h), but it decreases obviously as the aging degree increases. At elevated aging temperature and, in particular considering the presence of air gap between two-layer insulation, the peak densities of deep traps decrease more significant in the late period of aging. It can be concluded that it is the released energy from de-trapping process leads to the fast degradation of insulation. Moreover, after thermal aging, the microstructure changes of crystallinity and molecular structures are analyzed via the x-ray diffraction experiment and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results indicate that the variation of the deep trap density is closely linked with the changes of microstructure, a larger interface of crystalline/amorphous phase, more defects and broken chains caused by thermal aging form higher deep trap density stored in the samples.

  4. Morphological and mechanical analyses of laminates manufactured from randomly positioned carbon fibre/epoxy resin prepreg scraps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Christiane S. R.; Cândido, Geraldo M.; Alves, Wellington; Marlet, José Maria F.; Rezende, Mirabel C.

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to contribute to sustainability by proposing the reuse of composite prepreg scrap as an added value from discards. The research evaluates the microstructure and mechanical properties of laminates processed by the reuse of uncured carbon fibre/F155-epoxy resin prepreg scraps, waste from the ply cutting area of an aeronautical industry. The composite scraps were used as collected and were randomly positioned to produce laminates to be cured at an autoclave. The mechanical characterization shows a decrease of 39% for the compression property due to the discontinuous fibres in the laminate and an increase of 34% for the interlaminar shear strength, when compared to continuous fibre laminates. This increase is attributed to the higher crosslink density of the epoxy resin, as a result of the cure temperature used in autoclave (60 °C higher than suggested by supplier) and also to the randomly positioned scraps. Microscopic analyses confirm the consolidation of laminates, although show resin rich areas with different sizes and shapes attributed to the overlapping of the scraps with different sizes and shapes. These resin rich areas may contribute to decrease the mechanical properties of laminates. The correlation between mechanical and morphological results shows potential to be used on non-critical structural application, as composite jigs, contributing to sustainability.

  5. Quantitative characterization of solid epoxy resins using comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Julka, Samir; Cortes, Hernan; Harfmann, Robert; Bell, Bruce; Schweizer-Theobaldt, Andreas; Pursch, Matthias; Mondello, Luigi; Maynard, Shawn; West, David

    2009-06-01

    A comprehensive multidimensional liquid chromatography system coupled to Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (LCxLC-ESI-MS) was developed for detailed characterization and quantitation of solid epoxy resin components. The two orthogonal modes of separation selected were size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in the first dimension and liquid chromatography at critical conditions (LCCC) in the second dimension. Different components present in the solid epoxy resins were separated and quantitated for the first time based on the functional groups and molecular weight heterogeneity. Coupling LCxLC separations with mass spectrometry enabled the identification of components resolved in the two-dimensional space. Several different functional group families of compounds were separated and identified, including epoxy-epoxy and epoxy-alpha-glycol functional oligomers, and their individual molecular weight ranges were determined. Repeatability obtained ranged from 0.5% for the main product to 21% for oligomers at the 0.4% concentration level.

  6. Synthesis and Structure Property Studies of Toughened Epoxy Resins via Functionalized Polysiloxanes. Friction and Wear Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-30

    TFP) siloxane and of ATBN and CTBN rubber modified epoxies were previously reported,,[1]. There was no significant evidence that the low surface energy...siloxane- modified epoxies reduced friction compared with the unmodified epoxy or the ATBN and CTBN modified epoxies. The reduction in wear noted for...is for the control, but their elastic moduli are lower. The CTBN samples from the previous work also had higher wear rates at the 5 percent level. It

  7. In Situ Exfoliation of Graphene in Epoxy Resins: A Facile Strategy to Efficient and Large Scale Graphene Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Han; Crespo, Maria; Porwal, Harshit; Picot, Olivier; Santagiuliana, Giovanni; Huang, Zhaohui; Barbieri, Ettore; Pugno, Nicola M; Peijs, Ton; Bilotti, Emiliano

    2016-09-14

    Any industrial application aiming at exploiting the exceptional properties of graphene in composites or coatings is currently limited by finding viable production methods for large volumes of good quality and high aspect ratio graphene, few layer graphene (FLG) or graphite nanoplatelets (GNP). Final properties of the resulting composites are inherently related to those of the initial graphitic nanoparticles, which typically depend on time-consuming, resource-demanding and/or low yield liquid exfoliation processes. In addition, efficient dispersion of these nanofillers in polymer matrices, and their interaction, is of paramount importance. Here we show that it is possible to produce graphene/epoxy nanocomposites in situ and with high conversion of graphite to FLG/GNP through the process of three-roll milling (TRM), without the need of any additives, solvents, compatibilisers or chemical treatments. This readily scalable production method allows for more than 5 wt % of natural graphite (NG) to be directly exfoliated into FLG/GNP and dispersed in an epoxy resin. The in situ exfoliated graphitic nanoplatelets, with average aspect ratios of 300-1000 and thicknesses of 5-17 nm, were demonstrated to conferee exceptional enhancements in mechanical and electrical properties to the epoxy resin. The above conclusions are discussed and interpreted in terms of simple analytical models.

  8. The nanoscale phase distinguishing of PCL-PB-PCL blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiqin; Sun, Limin; Shen, Guangxia; Liang, Qi

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we investigated the bulk phase distinguishing of the poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-polybutadiene-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL-PB-PCL) triblock copolymer blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). We found that at a set-point amplitude ratio ( r sp) less than or equal to 0.85, a clear phase contrast could be obtained using a probe with a force constant of 40 N/m. When r sp was decreased to 0.1 or less, the measured size of the PB-rich domain relatively shrank; however, the height images of the PB-rich domain would take reverse (translating from the original light to dark) at r sp = 0.85. Force-probe measurements were carried out on the phase-separated regions by TM-AFM. According to the phase shift angle vs. r sp curve, it could be concluded that the different force exerting on the epoxy matrix or on the PB-rich domain might result in the height and phase image reversion. Furthermore, the indentation depth vs. r sp plot showed that with large tapping force (lower r sp), the indentation depth for the PB-rich domain was nearly identical for the epoxy resin matrix.

  9. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  10. Rapid bonding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to various stereolithographically (STL) structurable epoxy resins using photochemically cross-linked intermediary siloxane layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a fast, low cost bonding technology for combining rigid epoxy components with soft membranes made out of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both materials are commonly used for microfluidic prototyping. Epoxy resins are often applied when rigid channels are required, that will not deform if exposed to high pressure. PDMS, on the other hand, is a flexible material, which allows integration of membrane valves on the chip. However, the integration of pressure driven components, such as membrane valves and pumps, into a completely flexible device leads to pressure losses. In order to build up pressure driven components with maximum energy efficiency a combination of rigid guiding channels and flexible membranes would be advisable. Stereolithographic (STL) structuring would be an ideal fabrication technique for this purpose, because complex 3D-channels structures can easily be fabricated using this technology. Unfortunately, the STL epoxies cannot be bonded using common bonding techniques. For this reason we propose two UV-light based silanization techniques that enable plasma induced bonding of epoxy components. The entire process including silanization and corona discharge bonding can be carried out within half an hour. Average bond strengths up to 350 kPa (depending on the silane) were determined in ISO-conform tensile testing. The applicability of both techniques for microfluidic applications was proven by hydrolytic stability testing lasting more than 40 hours.

  11. A retrospective long term study of teeth restored with prefabricated carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin posts.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Astbäck, Johnny; Ekstrand, Karl D

    2006-01-01

    The Composipost endodontic post, made of stretched aligned carbon fibers embedded in an epoxy-resin matrix, has since the beginning of the nineties been widely used for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the treatment outcome of the Composipost system up to 7 years. In a study published 1998, 236 patients treated during 1992-93 by seven Swedish general dental private practitioners were studied. Five of the former seven private practitionersi consented to participate in this follow up of that study. Thus the material was reduced to 138 patients. Thirty-nine of these were excluded due to insufficient data. For the remaining 99 patients, data were collected from dental records. All patients were offered a clinical examination but only 25 accepted. Data were collected from dental records for the remaining 74 patients. The mean follow up time was 6,7 years with a range from 1 month to 10 years (median 7.6 years, SD 2.5 years), (five teeth were extracted during the previous study). The outcome was considered successful if the post and core was in situ and showed no clinical or radiographic signs of technical failures. Sixty-four teeth (65%) restored with the Composipost system were successful after a mean time of 6.7 years. Thirty-two teeth were extracted due to fractures, periapical lesions and periodontitis. Dislodgment of post was observed in three cases. In conclusion, within the limitations of this study, after a mean time of 6.7 years, the Composipost restored teeth had shorter survival times than those of previously documented cast posts.

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Composites Filled with Combustion Synthesized h-BN Particles.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shyan-Lung; Lin, Jeng-Shung

    2016-05-20

    The thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composites filled with combustion-synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) particles was investigated. The mixing of the composite constituents was carried out by either a dry method (involving no use of solvent) for low filler loadings or a solvent method (using acetone as solvent) for higher filler loadings. It was found that surface treatment of the h-BN particles using the silane 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) increases the thermal conductivity of the resultant composites in a lesser amount compared to the values reported by other studies. This was explained by the fact that the combustion synthesized h-BN particles contain less -OH or active sites on the surface, thus adsorbing less amounts of GPTMS. However, the thermal conductivity of the composites filled with the combustion synthesized h-BN was found to be comparable to that with commercially available h-BN reported in other studies. The thermal conductivity of the composites was found to be higher when larger h-BN particles were used. The thermal conductivity was also found to increase with increasing filler content to a maximum and then begin to decrease with further increases in this content. In addition to the effect of higher porosity at higher filler contents, more horizontally oriented h-BN particles formed at higher filler loadings (perhaps due to pressing during formation of the composites) were suggested to be a factor causing this decrease of the thermal conductivity. The measured thermal conductivities were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Nielsen and Lewis theory. The theoretical predictions were found to be lower than the experimental values at low filler contents (< 60 vol %) and became increasing higher than the experimental values at high filler contents (> 60 vol %).

  13. Polymer blends based on epoxy resin and polyphenylene ether as a matrix material for high-performance composites

    SciTech Connect

    Venderbosch, R.W.; Nelissen, J.G.L.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.

    1993-12-31

    The application of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether), PPE, as a matrix material for continuous carbon fiber reinforced composites was studied. PPE is an amorphous thermoplastic exhibiting a high glass transition temperature (220 C) and outstanding mechanical properties with respect to e.g. toughness. However, due to the limited thermal stability at temperatures above T{sub g}, PPE can be regarded as an intractable polymer. Consequently, the introduction of PPE in a composite structure via a melt impregnation route is not feasible. In this investigation a solution impregnation route, using epoxy resin as a reactive solvent, was developed. During impregnation epoxy resin acts as amore » solvent which results in enhanced flow and a reduced processing temperature enabling the preparation of high quality composites, avoiding any degradation. Upon curing of the neat system, phase separation and phase inversion occurs resulting in a continuous PPE matrix filled with glassy epoxy spheres. As a result of this morphology the mechanical and thermal properties of the final material are mainly dominated by the PPE component. In composite applications, a strong influence of the polarity of the carbon fiber surface on the resulting matrix morphology was found. Upon curing, phase separation is initiated at the fiber surface resulting in an epoxy `interlayer` at the fiber surface. This phenomenon can provide a high level of interfacial adhesion. A preliminary investigation of the resulting composite materials revealed outstanding mechanical properties with respect to e.g. interlaminar toughness and strength.« less

  14. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  15. Semi-thin sections of epoxy resin-embedded mouse embryos in morphological analysis of whole mount in situ RNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mitrecić, D; Cunko, V F; Gajović, S

    2008-12-01

    Descriptive morphological studies are often combined with gene expression pattern analyses. Unembedded vibratome or cryotome sections are compatible with in situ RNA hybridization, but spatial resolution is rather low for precise microscopic studies necessary in embryology. Therefore, use of plastic embedding media, which allow semi-thin and ultra-thin sectioning for light and electron microscopy, could be an important advantage. This work suggested a new approach based on the whole mount hybridization of mouse embryos and subsequent epoxy resin embedding. Epoxy resin allowed serial sectioning of semi-thin sections with preserved in situ RNA hybridization signal, which was a necessary prerequisite for precise morphological analysis of embryo development.

  16. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  17. Filled and Unfilled Temperature-Dependent Epoxy Resin Blends for Lossy Transducer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Matthew D.C.; Hossack, John A.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of our ongoing investigation of low-cost 2-dimensional (2-D) arrays, we studied the temperature-dependent acoustic properties of epoxy blends that could serve as an acoustically lossy backing material in compact 2-D array-based devices. This material should be capable of being machined during array manufacture, while also providing adequate signal attenuation to mitigate backing block reverberation artifacts. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of 5 unfilled epoxy blends and 2 filled epoxy blends—tungsten and fiberglass fillers—were analyzed across a 35°C temperature range in 5°C increments. Unfilled epoxy materials possessed an approximately linear variation of impedance and sigmoidal variation of attenuation properties over the range of temperatures of interest. An intermediate epoxy blend was fitted to a quadratic trend line with R2 values of 0.94 and 0.99 for attenuation and impedance, respectively. It was observed that a fiberglass filler induces a strong quadratic trend in the impedance data with temperature, which results in increased error in the characterization of attenuation and impedance. The tungsten-filled epoxy was not susceptible to such problems because a different method of fabrication was required. At body temperature, the tungsten-filled epoxy could provide a 44 dB attenuation of the round-trip backing block echo in our application, in which the center frequency is 5 MHz and the backing material is 1.1 mm thick. This is an 11 dB increase in attenuation compared with the fiberglass-filled epoxy in the context of our application. This work provides motivation for exploring the use of custom-made tungsten-filled epoxy materials as a substitute PCB-based substrate to provide electrical signal interconnect. PMID:19406716

  18. Epoxy resin reinforced with nanothin polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes: a study of the interfacial polymer layer thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Yang; Li, Weizhen; Wang, Baoyu; ...

    2016-03-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized by a nanothin poly(dopamine) (PDA) layer were produced by a one-pot, nondestructive approach, with direct polymerization of dopamine on the CNT surface. The thickness of the PDA layer can be well-controlled by the reaction time and the proportion of dopamine, and this thickness is found to be the key factor in controlling the dispersion of CNTs and the extent of the interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy resin. SEM results indicated that the dispersion of CNTs in epoxy was improved significantly by coating a nanothin PDA layer onto the CNT surface. In agreeme nt withmore » this finding, the CNTs functionalized with the thinnest PDA layer provided the best mechanical and thermal properties. This result confirmed that a thinner PDA layer could provide optimized interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy matrix and weaken the self-agglomeration of CNTs, which led to an improved effective stress and heat transfer between the CNTs and the polymer matrix.« less

  19. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  20. A New Epoxy-Based Layered Silicate Nanocomposite Using a Hyperbranched Polymer: Study of the Curing Reaction and Nanostructure Development

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Pilar; Fraga, Iria; Calventus, Yolanda; Román, Frida; Hutchinson, John M.; Ferrando, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Polymer layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites have been prepared with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy resin as the matrix and organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) as the clay nanofiller. Resin-clay mixtures with different clay contents (zero, two, five and 10 wt%) were cured, both isothermally andnon-isothermally, using a poly(ethyleneimine) hyperbranched polymer (HBP), the cure kinetics being monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanostructure of the cured nanocomposites was characterized by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their mechanical properties were determined by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and impact testing. The results are compared with an earlier study of the structure and properties of the same DGEBA-MMT system cured with a polyoxypropylene diamine, Jeffamine. There are very few examples of the use of HBP as a curing agent in epoxy PLS nanocomposites; here, it is found to enhance significantly the degree of exfoliation of these nanocomposites compared with those cured with Jeffamine, with a corresponding enhancement in the impact energy for nanocomposites with the low clay content of 2 wt%. These changes are attributed to the different cure kinetics with the HBP, in which the intra-gallery homopolymerization reaction is accelerated, such that it occurs before the bulk cross-linking reaction. PMID:28788542

  1. A New Epoxy-Based Layered Silicate Nanocomposite Using a Hyperbranched Polymer: Study of the Curing Reaction and Nanostructure Development.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Pilar; Fraga, Iria; Calventus, Yolanda; Román, Frida; Hutchinson, John M; Ferrando, Francesc

    2014-03-04

    Polymer layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites have been prepared with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy resin as the matrix and organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) as the clay nanofiller. Resin-clay mixtures with different clay contents (zero, two, five and 10 wt%) were cured, both isothermally and non-isothermally, using a poly(ethyleneimine) hyperbranched polymer (HBP), the cure kinetics being monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanostructure of the cured nanocomposites was characterized by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their mechanical properties were determined by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and impact testing. The results are compared with an earlier study of the structure and properties of the same DGEBA-MMT system cured with a polyoxypropylene diamine, Jeffamine. There are very few examples of the use of HBP as a curing agent in epoxy PLS nanocomposites; here, it is found to enhance significantly the degree of exfoliation of these nanocomposites compared with those cured with Jeffamine, with a corresponding enhancement in the impact energy for nanocomposites with the low clay content of 2 wt%. These changes are attributed to the different cure kinetics with the HBP, in which the intra-gallery homopolymerization reaction is accelerated, such that it occurs before the bulk cross-linking reaction.

  2. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  3. Effects of silica-coated carbon nanotubes on the curing behavior and properties of epoxy composites

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Ao; Li, Weizhen; Ling, Yang; ...

    2016-02-22

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were coated with silica by a sol–gel method to improve interfacial bonding and dispersion of nanotubes in the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) matrix. TEM and FE-SEM measurements showed that the silica shell was successfully coated on the surface of r-MWCNTs (as-received MWCNTs), and that the dispersion of MWCNT@SiO 2 in the epoxy matrix and interfacial adhesion between MWCNTs and epoxy were improved through the silica shell formation. The effects of silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT@SiO 2) addition on the curing behavior of epoxy resin, and on the physical and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites,more » were studied. FT-IR measurements of different blends at different curing times indicated that the curing reaction was accelerated with the presence of MWCNTs and increased with the content of MWCNT@SiO 2. DSC results confirmed that the value of activation energy decreased with the introduction of MWCNTs in the order of MWCNT@SiO 2 < r-MWCNTs < epoxy. It was found that the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites were significantly enhanced by incorporation of MWCNT@SiO 2, relative to composites with r-MWCNTs, while the values of the glass transition temperature slightly increased, and the high electrical resistivity of these composites was retained overall.« less

  4. Rapid embedding methods into epoxy and LR White resins for morphological and immunological analysis of cryofixed biological specimens.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kent L

    2014-02-01

    A variety of specimens including bacteria, ciliates, choanoflagellates (Salpingoeca rosetta), zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, nematode worms (Caenorhabditis elegans), and leaves of white clover (Trifolium repens) plants were high pressure frozen, freeze-substituted, infiltrated with either Epon, Epon-Araldite, or LR White resins, and polymerized. Total processing time from freezing to blocks ready to section was about 6 h. For epoxy embedding the specimens were freeze-substituted in 1% osmium tetroxide plus 0.1% uranyl acetate in acetone. For embedding in LR White the freeze-substitution medium was 0.2% uranyl acetate in acetone. Rapid infiltration was achieved by centrifugation through increasing concentrations of resin followed by polymerization at 100°C for 1.5-2 h. The preservation of ultrastructure was comparable to standard freeze substitution and resin embedding methods that take days to complete. On-section immunolabeling results for actin and tubulin molecules were positive with very low background labeling. The LR White methods offer a safer, quicker, and less-expensive alternative to Lowicryl embedding of specimens processed for on-section immunolabeling without traditional aldehyde fixatives.

  5. Morphology and properties of amine terminated poly(arylene ether ketone) and poly(arylene ether sulfone) modified epoxy resin systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecere, J. A.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Hedrick, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Epoxy resin networks cured with DDS were modified by incorporating tough ductile thermoplastics such as the amine terminated polyether sulfones and amine terminated polyether ketones. Both linear copolymers were able to significantly improve the fracture toughness values at the 15 and 30 weight percent concentrations examined. These improvements in fracture toughness were achieved without any significant change in the flexural modulus.

  6. Modified Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of a rubber-modified experimental epoxy resin and a standard epoxy as composite matrices were studied. In addition, a brominated epoxy resin was used in varying quantities to improve the fire resistance of the composite. The experimental resin was tris-(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether, known as tris epoxy novolac (TEN). The standard epoxy resin used was tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM). The above resins were modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber. It is concluded that: (1) modification of TEN resin with bromine gives better impact resistance than rubber modification alone; (2) 25% rubber addition is necessary to obtain significant improvement in impact resistance; (3) impact resistance increases with bromine content; (4) impact velocity does not significantly affect the energy absorbed by the test sample; (5) Tg did not decline with rubber modification; and (6) TEN resin had better hot/wet properties than TGDDM resin.

  7. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Epoxy Resins from Fatty Acids as a Versatile Route for the Formation of Polymer Thermosets with Tunable Properties.

    PubMed

    Torron, Susana; Semlitsch, Stefan; Martinelle, Mats; Johansson, Mats

    2016-12-12

    The work herein presented describes the synthesis and polymerization of series of bio-based epoxy resins prepared through lipase catalyzed transesterification. The epoxy-functional polyester resins with various architectures (linear, tri-branched, and tetra-branched) were synthesized through condensation of fatty acids derived from epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oil with three different hydroxyl cores under bulk conditions. The selectivity of the lipases toward esterification/transesterification reactions allowed the formation of macromers with up to 12 epoxides in the backbone. The high degree of functionality of the resins resulted in polymer thermosets with T g values ranging from -25 to over 100 °C prepared through cationic polymerization. The determining parameters of the synthesis and the mechanism for the formation of the species were determined through kinetic studies by 1 H NMR, SEC, and molecular modeling studies. The correlation between macromer structure and thermoset properties was studied through real-time FTIR measurements, DSC, and DMA.

  8. Bisimide amine cured epoxy /IME/ resins and composites. II - Ten-degree off-axis tensile and shear properties of Celion 6000/IME composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Bisimide amines (BIAs), which are presently used as curing agents in a state-of-the-art epoxy resin, are oligomeric and polymeric mixtures. A series of composites consisting of the novel BIA-cured epoxy resin reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fibers were fabricated and evaluated, and the ten-degree, off-axis uniaxial tensile and shear properties of these composites were determined. The use of the intralaminar shear strain-to-failure was used in the calculation of resin shear strain-to-failure. Study results indicate that several of these novel composite systems exhibit shear strain properties that are superior to those of the control composite system of the present experiments, which employed a sulfone curing agent.

  9. Fabrication of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device Magnetometers on a Glass Epoxy Polyimide Resin Substrate with Copper Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Jun; Kawabata, Miki; Oyama, Daisuke; Uehara, Gen

    We have developed fabrication technique of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers based on Nb/AlAlOx/Nb junctions directly on a glass epoxy polyimide resin substrate, which has copper terminals embedded in advance. The advantage of this method is that no additional substrate and wirebonds are needed for assembly. Compared to conventional SQUID magnetometers, which are assembled with a SQUID chip fabricated on a Si substrate and wirebonding technique, low risk of disconnection can be expected. A directly-coupled multi-loop SQUID magnetometer fabricated with this method has as good noise performance as a SQUID magnetometer with the same design fabricated on a Si wafer. The magnetometer sustained its performance through thermal cycle test 13 times so far.

  10. Local lymph node assay (LLNA): comparison of different protocols by testing skin-sensitizing epoxy resin system components.

    PubMed

    Gamer, Armin O; Nies, Eberhard; Vohr, Hans-Werner

    2008-12-01

    Thirteen epoxy resin system components were tested in the LLNA with regard to their sensitizing potency. Lymph node stimulation was quantified not only by measuring the incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into the ear lymph nodes but also the counts of cells recovered from these organs. Equivalent figures were obtained with both endpoints used for the evaluation of lymph node cell proliferation if the reference stimulation indices were adjusted. When dissolved in acetone, all test substances showed skin-sensitizing potential, mainly on the boundary between "strong" and "moderate" according to common potency evaluation schemes. Replacing acetone with acetone/olive oil (4:1) as a vehicle for four selected test items, resulted in considerably lower estimated concentrations for sensitization induction. The challenges in comparing the results obtained by different LLNA variations are discussed.

  11. A retrospective study of 236 patients with teeth restored by carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy resin posts.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, M; Astbäck, J; Pamenius, M; Arvidson, K

    1998-08-01

    The Composipost dowel is made of stretched, aligned carbon fibres embedded in an epoxy-resin matrix. It is widely used in Europe and Canada for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth and was introduced in the United States 2 years ago as the C-Post dowel. This retrospective study evaluated treatment outcome of the Composipost system after 2 to 3 years. A total of 236 patients treated during a 1-year period by seven Swedish dental practitioners were included. Of those, 146 patients consented and data were collected from the dental records of the remaining patients. Thus, the material comprised 236 teeth restored with carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy resin post, 130 maxillary and 106 mandibular teeth, with a mean restoration time of 32 months (range 27 to 41). Periodontal conditions, radiographic signs, and prosthodontic results were recorded. Five teeth (2%) had been extracted for reasons unrelated to the Composipost system. Periodontal conditions such as plaque accumulation, gingival health, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth around the teeth with Composipost dowels were similar to the control teeth. No dislodgment or root or post fractures were observed clinically or on radiographs. Radiographic examination of bone height measured from the apex to the bone margin mesially and distally showed differences on the mesial side but not on the distal surface (p < 0.05) between the Composipost-treated teeth and the controls. Promising results after 2 to 3 years of clinical service indicate that this system can be a viable alternative to conventional post-and-core systems.

  12. Continuous chelation irrigation improves the adhesion of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentine.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, P; Varughese, A A; Sharma, S; Subbarao, C V; Zehnder, M; De-Deus, G

    2012-12-01

    To test the impact of continuous chelation by NaOCl+ etidronic acid (HEBP) during instrumentation, and a final rinse of EDTA or NaOCl + HEBP on the dentine bond strength of an epoxy resin sealer (AH Plus). Single-rooted teeth (n = 100) were divided into five groups (n = 20) based on the irrigation protocol and their root canals instrumented using a rotary Ni-Ti system: 2.5% NaOCl during instrumentation followed by bi-distilled water (G1) or 17% EDTA (G2) as final rinse; 1 : 1 mixture of 5% NaOCl and 18% HEBP during instrumentation, and the same mixture (G3), 17% EDTA (G4) or bi-distilled water (G5) as final rinse. Canals were filled with AH Plus. Roots were sectioned, and push-out tests were performed in coronal, middle and apical root thirds. Results were analysed using analysis of variance (anova) and Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05 for all the analyses. Push-out bond strength was highest in coronal and lowest in apical root thirds (P < 0.05). Groups that used NaOCl + HEBP irrigation during instrumentation had significantly higher bond strengths than groups following the NaOCl-EDTA irrigation in all root thirds (P < 0.05). The use of a strong chelator as final flush further increased bond strengths (G4, P < 0.05). The continuous chelation irrigation protocol optimizes the bond strength of an epoxy resin sealer to dentine. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  13. Characterization, optical properties and laser ablation behavior of epoxy resin coatings reinforced with high reflectivity ceramic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenzhi; Kong, Jing; Wu, Taotao; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Zhuang; Liu, Yanbo; Wang, Fuchi; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    Thermal damage induced by high power energy, especially high power laser, significantly affects the lifetime and performance of equipment. High-reflectance coating/film has attracted considerable attention due to its good performance in the damage protection. Preparing a high-reflectance coating with high reaction endothermal enthalpy will effectively consume a large amount of incident energy and in turn protect the substrate from thermal damage. In this study, a low temperature process was used to prepare coatings onto substrate with complex shape and avoid thermal effect during molding. An advanced high reflection ceramic powder, La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ , was added in the epoxy adhesive matrix to improve the reflectivity of coating. The optical properties and laser ablation behaviors of coatings with different ceramic additive ratio of La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ and modified epoxy-La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ with ammonium polyphosphate coatings were investigated, respectively. We found that the reflectivity of coatings is extremely high due to mixed high-reflection La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ particles, up to 96% at 1070 nm, which can significantly improve the laser resistance. In addition, the ammonium polyphosphate modifies the residual carbon structure of epoxy resin from discontinuous fine particles structure to continuous and porous structure, which greatly enhances the thermal-insulation property of coating. Furthermore, the laser ablation threshold is improved obviously, which is from 800 W cm‑2 to 1000 W cm‑2.

  14. Mechanical and thermal properties of biocomposites from nonwoven industrial Fique fiber mats with Epoxy Resin and Linear Low Density Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Salazar, Miguel A.; Correa, Juan P.

    2018-03-01

    In this work Linear Low Density Polyethylene-nonwoven industrial Fique fiber mat (LLDPE-Fique) and Epoxy Resin-nonwoven industrial Fique fiber mat (EP-Fique) biocomposites were prepared using thermocompression and resin film infusion processes. Neat polymeric matrices and its biocomposites were tested following ASTM standards in order to evaluate tensile and flexural mechanical properties. Also, thermal behavior of these materials has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Tensile and flexural test revealed that nonwoven Fique reinforced composites exhibited higher modulus and strength but lower deformation capability as compared with LLDPE and EP neat matrices. TG thermograms showed that nonwoven Fique fibers incorporation has an effect on the thermal stability of the composites. On the other hand, Fique fibers did not change the crystallization and melting processes of the LLDPE matrix but restricts the motion of EP macromolecules chains thus increases the Tg of the EP-Fique composite. Finally, this work opens the possibility of considering non-woven Fique fibers as a reinforcement material with a high potential for the manufacture of biocomposites for automotive applications. In addition to the processing test specimens, it was also possible to manufacture a part of LLDPE-Fique, and one part of EP-Fique.

  15. Sensitization to reactive diluents and hardeners in epoxy resin systems. IVDK data 2002-2011. Part II: concomitant reactions.

    PubMed

    Geier, Johannes; Lessmann, Holger; Hillen, Uwe; Skudlik, Christoph; Jappe, Uta

    2016-02-01

    Beside the basic resins, reactive diluents and hardeners are important sensitizers in epoxy resin systems (ERSs). Because of chemical similarities, immunological cross-reactivity may occur. To analyse concomitant reactivity among reactive diluents and hardeners in the patients concerned, as one integral part of a research project on the sensitizing capacity of ERSs (FP-0324). A retrospective analysis of data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK), 2002-2011, was performed. There was close concomitant reactivity to 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE), and to phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) and cresyl glycidyl ether (CGE), whereas reactions to p-tert-butylphenyl glycidyl ether occurred more independently from those to PGE and CGE. Concomitant reactions to butyl glycidyl ether and 1,4-BDDGE may point to a common allergenic compound derived from the metabolism of 1,4-BDDGE. Among the structurally more diverse group of hardeners, there was no evidence of immunological cross-reactions. More detailed knowledge of cross-reactivity among ERS components facilitates the interpretation of patch test results and will allow safer ERSs to be composed in the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effects of carbon fiber surface characteristics on interfacial bonding of epoxy resin composite subjected to hygrothermal treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Liu, Hongxin; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Yanxia; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-01-01

    The changes of interfacial bonding of three types of carbon fibers/epoxy resin composite as well as their corresponding desized carbon fiber composites subjecting to hygrothermal conditions were investigated by means of single fiber fragmentation test. The interfacial fracture energy was obtained to evaluate the interfacial bonding before and after boiling water aging. The surface characteristics of the studied carbon fiber were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of activated carbon atoms and silicon element at carbon fiber surface on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance were further discussed. The results show that the three carbon fiber composites with the same resin matrix possess different hygrothermal resistances of interface and the interfacial fracture energy after water aging can not recovery to the level of raw dry sample (irreversible changes) for the carbon fiber composites containing silicon. Furthermore, the activated carbon atoms have little impact on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance. The irreversible variations of interfacial bonding and the differences among different carbon fiber composites are attributed to the silicon element on the carbon fiber bodies, which might result in hydrolyzation in boiling water treatment and degrade interfacial hygrothermal resistance.

  17. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    SciTech Connect

    Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-basedmore » compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.« less

  18. Study on Synthesis of Thoreau-modified 3, 5-Dimethyl-Thioltoluenediamine Used as Epoxy Resin Curing Agent and Its Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yongli; Xiao, Wenzheng

    2017-06-01

    A novel curing agent Thoreau modified 3, 5-Dimethyl-thioltoluenediamine was synthesized and its molecular structure was characterized by FTIR and DSC. The curing kinetics of a high toughness and low volume shrinkage ratio epoxy system (modified DMTDA/DGEBA) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under noni so thermal conditions. The data were fitted to an order model and autocatalytic model respectively. The results indicate that in order model deviates significantly from experimental data. Malik’s method was used to prove that the curing kinetics of the system concerned follow single-step autocatalytic model, and a “single-point model-free” approach was employed to calculate meaningful kinetic parameters. The DSC curves derived from autocatalytic model gave satisfactory agreement with that of experiment in the range 5K/min∼25K/min. As the heating rate increased, the predicted DSC curves deviated from experimental curves, and the total exothermic enthalpy declined owing to the transition of competition relationship between kinetics control and diffusion control.

  19. Process for epoxy foam production

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias C [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-23

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  20. Sorption of uranyl ions from various acido systems by amphoteric epoxy amine ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Rychkov, V.N.; Radionov, B.K.; Molochnikov, L.S.

    1995-03-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions by epoxy amine ampholytes with N-monomethylenephosphonic acid groups modified with pyridine or quaternary ammonium groups was studied under dynamic conditions. Heterocyclic nitrogen favors sorption of uranyl ion from fluoride, sulfate, and fluoride-sulfate solutions. The ESR studies of mono- and bimetallic forms of nitrogen-containing ampholytes with copper(II) as paramagnetic marker revealed the characteristics of uranium(VI) interaction with cation- and anion-exchange groups and its dependence on the fluoride content in solution.

  1. 4He permeation and H2O uptake of cyanate ester resins — an alternative to commonly used epoxy resins at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Sachiko; Fujii, Takenori; Matsukawa, Shoji; Katagiri, Masayuki; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Cyanate ester (CE) thermoset is a polymer with a high glass-transition temperature of ≈ 300 °C. CE is expected to be an alternative to Stycast 1266 as a sealing and casting glue for low temperature experiments, especially for adsorption experiments where baking of the substrate at T > 100 °C before cooling is required to eliminate surface contaminations. We experimentally confirmed that thermosets of CE monomers are non-porous and absorbs/desorbs water very little from measurements of (1) 4He permeation properties at temperatures from room temperature (RT) to 77 K and of (2) weight gains (δW) after storage for days in water and in air at RT. The 4He permeation is rather large at RT but negligibly small at T ⪅ 130 K where the diffusion constant of 4He in CE is vanishingly small. δW in water and air are 0.3–0.5% and 0.5–1.0%, respectively, which are much smaller than those of Stycast 1266. Therefore, cyanate ester is an excellent alternative to commonly used epoxy resins especially in surface-sensitive experiments at low temperature.

  2. Mechanical Property Analysis on Sandwich Structured Hybrid Composite Made from Natural Fibre, Glass Fibre and Ceramic Fibre Wool Reinforced with Epoxy Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat, K. R.; Abhishek, S.; Palanikumar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibre composites find wide range of applications and usage in the automobile and manufacturing industries. They find lack in desired properties, which are required for present applications. In current scenario, many developments in composite materials involve the synthesis of Hybrid composite materials to overcome some of the lacking properties. In this present investigation, two sandwich structured hybrid composite materials have been made by reinforcing Aloe Vera-Ceramic Fibre Wool-Glass fibre with Epoxy resin matrix and Sisal fibre-Ceramic Fibre Wool-Glass fibre with Epoxy resin matrix and its mechanical properties such as Tensile, Flexural and Impact are tested and analyzed. The test results from the two samples are compared and the results show that sisal fibre reinforced hybrid composite has better mechanical properties than aloe vera reinforced hybrid composite.

  3. Effects of Al(OH)O nanoparticle agglomerate size in epoxy resin on tension, bending, and fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jux, Maximilian; Finke, Benedikt; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Sinapius, Michael; Kwade, Arno; Schilde, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Several epoxy Al(OH)O (boehmite) dispersions in an epoxy resin are produced in a kneader to study the mechanistic correlation between the nanoparticle size and mechanical properties of the prepared nanocomposites. The agglomerate size is set by a targeted variation in solid content and temperature during dispersion, resulting in a different level of stress intensity and thus a different final agglomerate size during the process. The suspension viscosity was used for the estimation of stress energy in laminar shear flow. Agglomerate size measurements are executed via dynamic light scattering to ensure the quality of the produced dispersions. Furthermore, various nanocomposite samples are prepared for three-point bending, tension, and fracture toughness tests. The screening of the size effect is executed with at least seven samples per agglomerate size and test method. The variation of solid content is found to be a reliable method to adjust the agglomerate size between 138-354 nm during dispersion. The size effect on the Young's modulus and the critical stress intensity is only marginal. Nevertheless, there is a statistically relevant trend showing a linear increase with a decrease in agglomerate size. In contrast, the size effect is more dominant to the sample's strain and stress at failure. Unlike microscaled agglomerates or particles, which lead to embrittlement of the composite material, nanoscaled agglomerates or particles cause the composite elongation to be nearly of the same level as the base material. The observed effect is valid for agglomerate sizes between 138-354 nm and a particle mass fraction of 10 wt%.

  4. Effect of Graphene Addition on Shape Memory Behavior of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany; Meador, Michael; Miller, Sandi; Scheiman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) and composites are a special class of smart materials known for their ability to change size and shape upon exposure to an external stimulus (e.g. light, heat, pH, or magnetic field). These materials are commonly used for biomedical applications; however, recent attempts have been made towards developing SMPs and composites for use in aircraft and space applications. Implementing SMPs and composites to create a shape change effect in some aircraft structures could potentially reduce drag, decrease fuel consumption, and improve engine performance. This paper discusses the development of suitable materials to use in morphing aircraft structures. Thermally responsive epoxy SMPs and nanocomposites were developed and the shape memory behavior and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. Overall, preliminary results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that thermally actuated shape memory epoxies and nanocomposites possessed Tgs near approximately 168 C. When graphene nanofiller was added, the storage modulus and crosslinking density decreased. On the other hand, the addition of graphene enhanced the recovery behavior of the shape memory nanocomposites. It was assumed that the addition of graphene improved shape memory recovery by reducing the crosslinking density and increasing the elasticity of the nanocomposites.

  5. The impact of nano-coating on surface charge accumulation of epoxy resin insulator: characteristic and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bo; Gao, Chunjia; Lv, Yuzhen; Li, Chengrong; Tu, Youping; Xiong, Jun

    2018-06-01

    The flashover phenomenon of the insulator is the main cause for insulating failure of GIS/GIL, and one of the most critical impacting factors is the accumulation of surface charge. The common methods to restrain the surface charge accumulation are reviewed in this paper. Through the reasonable comparison and analysis of these methods, nano-coatings for the insulator were selected as a way to restrain the surface charge accumulation. Based on this, six nano-coated epoxy resin samples with different concentrations of P25-TiO2 nanoparticles were produced. A high precision 3D surface charge measurement system was developed in this paper with a spatial resolution of 4.0 mm2 and a charge resolution of 0.01 µC (m2 · mV)‑1. The experimental results for the epoxy resin sample showed that with the concentration of nanoparticles of the coating material increasing, the surface charge density tended to first decrease and then increase. In the sample coated with 0.5% concentration of nanoparticles, the suppression effect is the optimum, leading to a 63.8% reduction of charge density under DC voltage. The application test for actual nano-coated GIS/GIL basin insulator indicated that the maximum suppression degree for the charge density under DC voltage could reach 48.3%, while it could reach 22.2% for switching impulse voltage and 12.5% for AC context. The control mechanism of nano-coatings on charge accumulation was proposed based on the analysis for surface morphology features and traps characteristics; the shallow traps dominate in the migration of charges while the deep traps operate on the charge accumulation. With the concentration of nanoparticles in nano-coating material mounting up, the density of shallow traps continuously increases, while for deep traps, it first decreases and then increases. For the sample with 0.5% concentration of nanoparticles coated, the competition between shallow traps and deep traps comes to the most balanced state, producing the most

  6. Structural Testing of a Stitched/Resin Film Infused Graphite-Epoxy Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with non-visible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole.

  7. A Carboxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene Liquid Rubber Modified Epoxy Resin with Enhanced Toughness and Excellent Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lina; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Wang, Zijun; Cai, Huiwu; Wu, Peng; Zuo, Jing; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-07-01

    The modification of epoxy (EP) resin with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene (CTPB) liquid rubber was carried out in this work. The chemical reaction between the oxirane ring of EP and the carboxyl group of CTPB and kinetic parameters were investigated by Fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. The resulting pre-polymers were cured with methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that the micro-sized CTPB particles dispersed uniformly in the EP matrix formed a two-phase morphology, mainly contributing to the improved toughness of the modified network. The best overall mechanical performance was achieved with 20 phr CTPB; above it, a fall in the strength and modulus was observed. The storage modulus and loss declined with the CTPB concentration due to its lower modulus and plasticizing effect from dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Moreover, due to the weak polarity and excellent electrical insulation of CTPB, the CTPB-modified EP presented higher electrical resistivities and breakdown strength, and low dielectric permittivity and loss compared with neat EP.

  8. A Comparative Chemical Study of Calcium Silicate-Containing and Epoxy Resin-Based Root Canal Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Reszka, Przemysław; Dura, Włodzimierz; Droździk, Agnieszka; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The present study assessed the chemical elements in two novel calcium silicate-containing root canal sealers, BioRoot RCS and Well-Root ST, compared to a calcium silicate-containing root canal sealer that has been on the market for several years, MTA Fillapex, and epoxy resin-based sealer AHPlus. Material and Methods. The sealers were mixed and manipulated according to the manufacturers' instructions. Twelve cylindrical molds (inner diameter 4 mm; height 3 mm) were placed on a glass petri dish and packed with the materials. The dish was transferred to an incubator. After 72 h the molds were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Results. BioRoot RCS and Well-Root ST had high peaks of calcium, zirconium, oxygen, carbon, silicon, and chlorine. Well-Root ST also had sodium, magnesium, aluminum, and titanium peaks. MTA Fillapex and AHPlus had carbon, oxygen, calcium, titanium, and bismuth peaks. A silicon peak was also observed for MTA Fillapex, and zirconium and tungsten peaks for AHPlus. Conclusion. BioRoot RSC had the highest degree of purity. The clinical implication of metals contained in the other sealers needs to be investigated. PMID:28097154

  9. Mechanical characterization and modeling of the deformation and failure of the highly crosslinked RTM6 epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelle, X. P.; Chevalier, J.; Bailly, C.; Pardoen, T.; Lani, F.

    2017-08-01

    The nonlinear deformation and fracture of RTM6 epoxy resin is characterized as a function of strain rate and temperature under various loading conditions involving uniaxial tension, notched tension, uniaxial compression, torsion, and shear. The parameters of the hardening law depend on the strain-rate and temperature. The pressure-dependency and hardening law, as well as four different phenomenological failure criteria, are identified using a subset of the experimental results. Detailed fractography analysis provides insight into the competition between shear yielding and maximum principal stress driven brittle failure. The constitutive model and a stress-triaxiality dependent effective plastic strain based failure criterion are readily introduced in the standard version of Abaqus, without the need for coding user subroutines, and can thus be directly used as an input in multi-scale modeling of fibre-reinforced composite material. The model is successfully validated against data not used for the identification and through the full simulation of the crack propagation process in the V-notched beam shear test.

  10. Application of supercritical water to decompose brominated epoxy resin and environmental friendly recovery of metals from waste memory module.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuo; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-02-03

    Waste Memory Modules (WMMs), a particular kind of waste printed circuit board (WPCB), contain a high amount of brominated epoxy resin (BER), which may bring a series of environmental and health problems. On the other hand, metals like gold and copper are very valuable and are important to recover from WMMs. In the present study, an effective and environmental friendly method using supercritical water (SCW) to decompose BER and recover metals from WMMs was developed instead of hydrometallurgy or pyrometallurgy simultaneously. Experiments were conducted under external-catalyst-free conditions with temperatures ranging from 350 to 550 °C, pressures from 25 to 40 MPa, and reaction times from 120 to 360 min in a semibatch-type reactor. The results showed that BER could be quickly and efficiently decomposed under SCW condition, and the mechanism was possibly free radical reaction. After the SCW treatments, the glass fibers and metal foils in the solid residue could be easily liberated and recovered, respectively. The metal recovery rate reached 99.80%. The optimal parameters were determined as 495 °C, 33 MPa, and 305 min on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM). This study provides an efficient and environmental friendly approach for WMMs recycling compared with electrolysis, pyrometallurgy, and hydrometallurgy.

  11. Study of AC Magnetic Properties and Core Losses of Fe/Fe3O4-epoxy Resin Soft Magnetic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxminarayana, T. A.; Manna, Subhendu Kumar; Fernandes, B. G.; Venkataramani, N.

    Soft Magnetic Composites (SMC) were prepared by coating of nanocrystalline Fe3O4 particles, synthesized by co-precipitation method, on atomized iron powder of particle size less than 53 μm in size using epoxy resin as a binder between iron and Fe3O4. Fe3O4 was chosen, for its high electric resistivity and suitable magnetic properties, to keep the coating layer magnetic and seek improvement to the magnetic properties of SMC. SEM images and XRD patterns were recorded in order to investigate the coatings on the surface of iron powder. A toroid was prepared by cold compaction of coated iron powder at 1050 MPa and subsequently cured at 150˚C for 1 hr in argon atmosphere. For comparison of properties, a toroid of uncoated iron powder was also compacted at 1050 MPa and annealed at 600˚C for 2 hr in argon atmosphere. The coated iron powder composite has a resistivity of greater than 200 μΩm, measured by four probe method. A comparison of Magnetic Hysteresis loops and core losses using B-H Loop tracer in the frequency range 0 to 1500 Hz on the coated and uncoated iron powder is reported.

  12. Anti-corrosion mechanism of epoxy-resin and different content Fe2O3 coatings on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Tao; Kong, Fan-mei; Bai, Rui-qin; Zhang, Ru-liang

    2016-12-01

    In this study, anti-corrosion coatings were prepared and coated successfully on magnesium alloy substrates by mixing nanopowders, solvent, curing agent with epoxy resin. The effect of the amount of iron trioxide (Fe2O3) on the adhesion strength and corrosion resistance on magnesium alloy was investigated with standard protocols, and electrochemical measurements were also made in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions. The surface morphology and corrosion mechanism after corrosion tests was characterized using FESEM analysis. Nanoparticles in matrix acted as filler, and interstitial cross-linked spaces and other coating artifacts regions (micro cracks and voids) would all affect the anti-corrosion properties of coating. The results showed the proper powder content not only provided adhesion strength to these coatings but also improved obviously their anticorrosion. Hydrogen bound to the amine nitrogen (1N) could take part in the curing process rather than hydrogen of the amide site due to the smaller Δ G and the more stable configuration.

  13. A Comparative Chemical Study of Calcium Silicate-Containing and Epoxy Resin-Based Root Canal Sealers.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Przemysław; Nowicka, Alicja; Lipski, Mariusz; Dura, Włodzimierz; Droździk, Agnieszka; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The present study assessed the chemical elements in two novel calcium silicate-containing root canal sealers, BioRoot RCS and Well-Root ST, compared to a calcium silicate-containing root canal sealer that has been on the market for several years, MTA Fillapex, and epoxy resin-based sealer AHPlus. Material and Methods. The sealers were mixed and manipulated according to the manufacturers' instructions. Twelve cylindrical molds (inner diameter 4 mm; height 3 mm) were placed on a glass petri dish and packed with the materials. The dish was transferred to an incubator. After 72 h the molds were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Results. BioRoot RCS and Well-Root ST had high peaks of calcium, zirconium, oxygen, carbon, silicon, and chlorine. Well-Root ST also had sodium, magnesium, aluminum, and titanium peaks. MTA Fillapex and AHPlus had carbon, oxygen, calcium, titanium, and bismuth peaks. A silicon peak was also observed for MTA Fillapex, and zirconium and tungsten peaks for AHPlus. Conclusion. BioRoot RSC had the highest degree of purity. The clinical implication of metals contained in the other sealers needs to be investigated.

  14. Hierarchical Polyphosphazene@Molybdenum Disulfide Hybrid Structure for Enhancing the Flame Retardancy and Mechanical Property of Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Qiu, Shuilai; Xing, Weiyi; Gangireddy, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Gui, Zhou; Hu, Yuan

    2017-08-30

    A novel polyphosphazene (PZS) microsphere@molybdenum disulfide nanoflower (MoS 2 ) hierarchical hybrid architecture was first synthesized and applied for enhancing the mechanical performance and flame retardancy of epoxy (EP) resin via a cooperative effect. Herein, using PZS microsphere as the template, a layer of MoS 2 nanoflowers were anchored to PZS spheres via a hydrothermal strategy. The well-designed PZS@MoS 2 exhibits excellent fire retardancy and a reinforcing effect. The obtained PZS@MoS 2 significantly enhanced the flame-retardant performance of EP composites, which can be proved by thermogravimetric and cone calorimeter results. For instance, the incorporation of 3 wt % PZS@MoS 2 brought about a 41.3% maximum reduction in the peak heat-release rate and decreased by 30.3% maximum in the total heat release, accompanying the higher graphitized char layer. With regard to mechanical property, the storage modulus of EP/PZS@MoS 2 3.0 in the glassy state was dramatically increased to 22.4 GPa in comparison with that of pure EP (11.15 GPa). It is sensible to know that the improved flame-retardant performance for EP composites is primarily assigned to a physical barrier effect of the MoS 2 nanoflowers and the polyphosphazene structure has an positive impact on promoting char formation in the condensed phase.

  15. Flow injection spectrophotometric method for chloride determination in natural waters using Hg(SCN)(2) immobilized in epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudineia R; Vieira, Heberth J; Canaes, Larissa S; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2005-02-28

    A flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric method was proposed for the determination of chloride ion in natural waters. The determination of chloride was carried out by reaction with Hg(SCN)(2) immobilized in an epoxy resin bead in a solid-phase reactor (SPR) and the thiocyanate ions released were determined spectrophotometrically at 480nm after complexing reaction with Fe(III). The analytical curve for chloride was linear in the concentration range from 5.6 x 10(-5) to 2.2 x 10(-4)moll(-1) with a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-5)moll(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 2.2% for a solution containing 2.2 x 10(-4)moll(-1) (n = 10). The simple manifold allows a routine analytical frequency of 100 determinations per hour. The main advantage of the developed method is the 400% reduction of the Hg waste solution generated when compared to conventional methods for chloride determination based on the same spectrophotometric reaction.

  16. Impact of a novel phosphorus-nitrogen flame retardant curing agent on the properties of epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Bing

    2017-12-01

    A phosphorus-nitrogen flame retardant curing agent diethyl phosphonic p-Phenylenediamine diamide (DEPPPD) was synthesized. The chemical structure of the obtained compound was identified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR), and mass spectroscopies. A series of t hermosetting systems were prepared by conventional epoxy resins (E-44) and DEPPPD. The effects of DEPPPD on flame retardancy, thermal degradation behavior, mechanical properties and the morphologies of char residues of EP/DEPPPD thermosets were investigated. The results demonstrated that when the phosphorus content of 2.88 wt%, EP-3 successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating, the LOI value was as high as 31.1%, the impact strength and tensile strength of it was 6.50 KJ m-2 and 48.21 MPa, the adhesive strength could reach 14.61 MPa, respectively. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DEPPPD promoted EP matrix decomposed at a lower temperature, the rate of the thermal decomposition also decreased compared with EP-0. The residual char ratio of 800 °C was increased whether in nitrogen or in the air. The morphological structures of char residue were more compact and homogeneous which could prevent the heat transmission and diffusion, limit the production of combustible gases and reduced the heat release rate.

  17. Photobleaching effect in azo-dye containing epoxy resin films: the potentiality of carbon nanotubes as azo-dye dispensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Azo-dye molecules may suffer from bleaching under certain illumination conditions. When this photoinduced process occurs, it generates an irreversible effect that is characterized by the loss of absorption of the dye molecule. Moreover, the well-known isomerization of azodye molecules does not occur anymore. In this work it is shown how the addition of a small amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) helps to decrease the bleaching effect in a photosensitive guest-host azo-polymer film. Two different systems were fabricated using an epoxy resin as polymer matrix. An azo-dye, Disperse Orange 3, was used as photosensitive material in both systems and MWCNTs were added into one of them. The optical response of the polymeric systems was studied considering the degree of photoinduced birefringence. Photobleaching of the azo-dye was observed in all cases however, the effect is lower for the composite material containing 0.2 wt % MWCNTs. The weak interaction between MWCNTs and dye molecules is less favorable when the material is heated. The optical behavior of the heated composite material suggests that carbon nanotubes can be potentially used as azo dye dispensers. The results are interpreted in terms of the non-covalent interaction between azo-dye molecules and MWCNTs.

  18. Wear-resistant and electromagnetic absorbing behaviors of oleic acid post-modified ferrite-filled epoxy resin composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zang, Chongguang; Jiao, Qingjie

    2015-03-01

    The post-modified Mn-Zn ferrite was prepared by grafting oleic acid on the surface of Mn-Zn ferrite to inhibit magnetic nanoparticle aggregation. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the particle surfaces. The friction and electromagnetic absorbing properties of a thin coating fabricated by dispersing ferrite into epoxy resin (EP) were investigated. The roughness of the coating and water contact angle were measured using the VEECO and water contact angle meter. Friction tests were conducted using a stainless-steel bearing ball and a Rockwell diamond tip, respectively. The complex permittivity and complex permeability of the composite coating were studied in the low frequency (10 MHz-1.5 GHz). Surface modified ferrites are found to improve magnetic particles dispersion in EP resulting in significant compatibility between inorganic and organic materials. Results also indicate that modified ferrite/EP coatings have a lower roughness average value and higher water contact angle than original ferrite/EP coatings. The enhanced tribological properties of the modified ferrite/EP coatings can be seen from the increased coefficient value. The composite coatings with modified ferrite are observed to exhibit better reflection loss compared with the coatings with original ferrite.

  19. Effect of Monomer Structure on Curing Behavior, CO2 Solubility, and Gas Permeability of Ionic Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Resins and Ion-Gels

    SciTech Connect

    McDanel, WM; Cowan, MG; Barton, JA

    2015-04-29

    New imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based bis(epoxide)-functionalized ionic liquid (IL) monorners were synthesized: and reacted with multifunctional amine monomers to produce cross-linked, epoxy-amine poly(ionic liquid) (PIL) resins and PIL/IL ion-gel membranes. The length and chemical nature (i.e., alkyl versus ether) between the irrildazolium group and epokitie groups were studied to determine their effects on CO2 affinity. The CO2 uptake (millimoles per gram) of the epoxy amine resins (between 0.1 and 1 mmol/g) was found to depend predominately on the epoxide-to-amine ratio and the bis(epoxide) IL molecular weight. The effect of using a primary versus a secondary amine-containing multifunctional monoiner was also assessedmore » for the resin-synthesis. Secondary amines can increase CO2 permeability but also increase the iime required for biS(epoxide) coriversion. When either the epoxide or athine monomer structure is changed, the CO2 solubility and permeability of the resulting PIL resins and ion-sel membranes can be tuned.« less

  20. Influence of ultrasonic and sonic activation of epoxy-amine resin-based sealer on penetration of sealer into lateral canals.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Abbas, Aneesh; Karatas, Ertugrul

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sonic and ultrasonic activation of epoxy-amine resin-based root canal sealer (2Seal; VDW GmbH, München, Germany) on penetration of the sealer into lateral canals compared to non-activated filling. Thirty-six single-rooted human anterior teeth were decoronated and prepared, using the ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) to F4. After the completion of the clearing procedures, lateral canals were created at 2, 4, and 6 mm from the working length. The specimens were randomly divided into a control group (non-activated sealer application) and two experimental groups that received a sealer application with either sonic or ultrasonic activation. The root canals were filled using cold lateral compaction and images were obtained from each lateral canals at 40× magnification using a stereomicroscope. The sealer penetration was evaluated using a four-grade scoring system. The data were evaluated statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests with a 95 % confidence level (P = 0.05). The ultrasonic activation resulted in a better sealer penetration compared with the non-activated and sonically activated groups (P < 0.001). Sonic activation also resulted in better sealer penetration compared to the non-activated group (P < 0.001). The use of the ultrasonic activation of an epoxy-amine resin-based sealer promoted greater sealer penetration into the lateral canals. Sonic activation was not effective as ultrasonic activation, but was more effective than the non-activated group. The ultrasonic activation of an epoxy-amine resin-based sealer could be beneficial in filling procedures.

  1. A new technology for separation and recovery of materials from waste printed circuit boards by dissolving bromine epoxy resins using ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Chen, Y; Wang, L Y; Qian, G Y; Zhou, M; Zhou, J

    2012-11-15

    Recovery of valuable materials from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) is quite difficult because WPCBs is a heterogeneous mixture of polymer materials, glass fibers, and metals. In this study, WPCBs was treated using ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimizadolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIM+][BF4-]). Experimental results showed that the separation of the solders went to completion, and electronic components (ECs) were removed in WPCBs when [EMIM+][BF4-] solution containing WPCBs was heated to 240 °C. Meanwhile, metallographic observations verified that the WPCBs had an initial delamination. When the temperature increased to 260 °C, the separation of the WPCBs went to completion, and coppers and glass fibers were obtained. The used [EMIM+][BF4-] was treated by water to generate a solid-liquid suspension, which was separated completely to obtain solid residues by filtration. Thermal analyses combined with infrared ray spectra (IR) observed that the solid residues were bromine epoxy resins. NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) showed that hydrogen bond played an important role for [EMIM+][BF4-] dissolving bromine epoxy resins. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to recycle valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent environmental pollution from WPCBs effectively. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmi, T.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.

    2014-01-27

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricatedmore » using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.« less

  3. A study of the influence of micro and nano phase morphology on the mechanical properties of a rubber-modified epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Bobby Glenn

    Epoxy resins are thermosets with extraordinary adhesion; high strength; good resistance to creep, heat, and chemicals; and they have low shrinkage. Conversely, these polymers are brittle, they are sensitive to moisture, and they exhibit poor toughness. To improve their toughness, they are often modified by introducing dispersed rubber particles in the primary phase. In this study, the epoxy resin was modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN), liquid-reactive rubbers. The initiator concentration, percent acrylonitrile in the CTBN rubber, and cure temperatures were altered to give varying materials properties. Statistical analysis of the morphology data showed that the percentage of rubber acrylonitrile had an effect on both the rubber particle size and volume fraction. The cure temperature had an effect on the rubber particle volume and modulus. Plots of the rubber particle size, volume fraction, and modulus versus bulk elastic storage modulus and fracture toughness revealed that rubber particle size had no effect on bulk properties, volume fraction and rubber particle modulus had an effect on both the bulk storage elastic modulus and fracture toughness.

  4. High-Performance Epoxy-Resin-Bonded Magnets Produced from the Sm2Fe17Nx Powders Coated by Copper and Zinc Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Machida, Ken-ichi; Adachi, Gin-ya

    2001-04-01

    Fine powders of Sm2Fe17Nx coated with copper metal reduced from CuCl2 and/or zinc metal subsequently derived by photo-decomposition of diethylzinc [Zn(C2H5)2] were prepared, and their magnetic properties were characterized in addition to those of epoxy-resin-bonded magnets produced from the coated powders (Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx, Zn/Sm2Fe17Nx and Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx). The remanence (Br) and maximum energy product [(\\mathit{BH})max] of double metal-coated Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx powders were maintained at higher levels than those of single Zn metal-coated Sm2Fe17Nx ones (Zn/Sm2Fe17Nx) even after heat treatment at 673 K since the oxidation resistance and thermal stability were effectively improved by formation of the thick and uniform protection layer on the surface of Sm2Fe17Nx particles. Moreover, the epoxy-resin-bonded magnets produced from the Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx powders possessed good corrosion resistance in air at 393 K which it resulted in the smaller thermal irreversible flux loss than that of uncoated and single Zn metal-coated Sm2Fe17Nx powders in the temperature range of above 393 K.

  5. Nanostructures and surface hydrophobicity of self-assembled thermosets involving epoxy resin and poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acrylate)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) amphiphilic diblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fangping; Zheng, Sixun; Liu, Tianxi

    2009-02-19

    Poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acrylate)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PTFEA-b-PEO) amphiphilic diblock copolymer was synthesized via the reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization of 2,2,2-triffluroethyl acrylate with dithiobenzoyl-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) as a chain-transfer agent. The amphiphilic diblock copolymer was incorporated into epoxy resin to prepare the nanostructured epoxy thermosets. The nanostructures were investigated by means of atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and dynamic mechanical analysis. In terms of the miscibility of the subchains of the block copolymer with epoxy after and before curing reaction, it is judged that the formation of the nanostructures follows the mechanism of self-assembly. The static contact angle measurements indicate that the nanostructured thermosets containing PTFEA-b-PEO diblock copolymer displayed a significant enhancement in surface hydrophobicity as well as a reduction in surface free energy. The improvement in surface properties was ascribed to the enrichment of the fluorine-containing subchain (i.e., PTFEA block) of the amphiphilic diblock copolymer on the surface of the nanostructured thermosets, which was evidenced by surface atomic force microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. Microwave absorption properties of polypyrrole-SrFe12O19-TiO2-epoxy resin nanocomposites: Optimization using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed Dorraji, M. S.; Rasoulifard, M. H.; Amani-Ghadim, A. R.; Khodabandeloo, M. H.; Felekari, M.; Khoshrou, M. R.; hajimiri, I.

    2016-10-01

    At a few works are discussed about formation of heterogeneous composites with different distribution of particle shape and size that are used for electromagnetic absorption purposes. In this study a novel heterogeneous nanocpmposites is investigated. The nanocomposite has been successfully prepared based on epoxy resin including various nano-metal oxides (TiO2, SrFe12O19) and polypyrrole (PPy) by sol-gel and the solution chemistry method, respectively. The performance of prepared nanocomposite in absorption of microwave in X-band range was investigated and transmission line method by X-band waveguide straight was used to measure EM parameters of nanocomposites. The Response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was utilized to study the effects of the wt.% TiO2 in SrFe12O19, wt.% Tio2-SrFe12O19 in PPy and wt.% TiO2-SrFe12O19-PPy in epoxy resin, on the microwave absorption properties with the absorber thickness of only 2 mm. The proposed quadratic model was in accordance with the experimental results with correlation coefficient of 96.5%. The optimum condition for maximum microwave absorption efficiency were wt.% TiO2 in SrFe12O19 of 70, wt.% TiO2-SrFe12O19 in PPy of 10 and wt.% TiO2-SrFe12O19-PPy in epoxy of 25. The sample prepared in optimal conditions indicated reflection loss of -15 dB corresponding to 97% absorption, at the range of 9.2-10.8 GHz.

  7. Characterization of cure kinetics and physical properties of a high performance, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy prepreg and a novel fluorine-modified, amine-cured commercial epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyeu, Bryan

    Kinetic equation parameters for the curing reaction of a commercial glass fiber reinforced high performance epoxy prepreg composed of the tetrafunctional epoxy tetraglycidyl 4,4-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM), the tetrafunctional amine curing agent 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) and an ionic initiator/accelerator, are determined by various thermal analysis techniques and the results compared. The reaction is monitored by heat generated determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by high speed DSC when the reaction rate is high. The changes in physical properties indicating increasing conversion are followed by shifts in glass transition temperature determined by DSC, temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC), step scan DSC and high speed DSC, thermomechanical (TMA) and dynamic mechanical (DMA) analysis and thermally stimulated depolarization (TSD). Changes in viscosity, also indicative of degree of conversion, are monitored by DMA. Thermal stability as a function of degree of cure is monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The parameters of the general kinetic equations, including activation energy and rate constant, are explained and used to compare results of various techniques. The utilities of the kinetic descriptions are demonstrated in the construction of a useful time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram and a continuous heating transformation (CHT) diagram for rapid determination of processing parameters in the processing of prepregs. Shrinkage due to both resin consolidation and fiber rearrangement is measured as the linear expansion of the piston on a quartz dilatometry cell using TMA. The shrinkage of prepregs was determined to depend on the curing temperature, pressure applied and the fiber orientation. Chemical modification of an epoxy was done by mixing a fluorinated aromatic amine (aniline) with a standard aliphatic amine as a curing agent for a commercial Diglycidylether of Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy. The resulting cured network

  8. Rubberized, Brominated Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W.; Kourtides, D.; Parker, J.; Nir, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite materials made with resins containing bromine and rubber additives. New composites tougher and more resistant to fire. Flame resistance increased by introducing bromine via commercial brominated flame-retartant polymeric additives.

  9. Investigation of nanoscopic free volume and interfacial interaction in an epoxy resin/modified clay nanocomposite using positron annihilation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pushkar N; Sudarshan, Kathi; Sharma, Sandeep K; Maheshwari, Priya; Rath, Sangram K; Patri, Manoranjan; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2012-12-07

    Epoxy/clay nanocomposites are synthesized using clay modified with the organic modifier N,N-dimethyl benzyl hydrogenated tallow quaternary ammonium salt (Cloisite 10A). The purpose is to investigate the influence of the clay concentration on the nanostructure, mainly on the free-volume properties and the interfacial interactions, of the epoxy/clay nanocomposite. Nanocomposites having 1, 3, 5 and 7.5 wt. % clay concentrations are prepared using the solvent-casting method. The dispersion of clay silicate layers and the morphologies of the fractured surfaces in the nanocomposites are studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The observed XRD patterns reveal an exfoliated clay structure in the nanocomposite with the lowest clay concentration (≤1 wt. %). The ortho-positronium lifetime (τ(3)), a measure of the free-volume size, as well as the fractional free volume (f(v)) are seen to decrease in the nanocomposites as compared to pristine epoxy. The intensity of free positron annihilation (I(2)), an index of the epoxy-clay interaction, decreases with the addition of clay (1 wt. %) but increases linearly at higher clay concentrations. Positron age-momentum correlation measurements are also carried out to elucidate the positron/positronium states in pristine epoxy and in the nanocomposites. The results suggest that in the case of the nanocomposite with the studied lowest clay concentration (1 wt. %), free positrons are primarily localized in the epoxy-clay interfaces, whereas at higher clay concentrations, annihilation takes place from the intercalated clay layers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Spin-coated epoxy resin embedding technique enables facile SEM/FIB thickness determination of porous metal oxide ultra-thin films.

    PubMed

    Peña, B; Owen, G Rh; Dettelbach, K E; Berlinguette, C P

    2018-01-25

    A facile nonsubjective method was designed to measure porous nonconductive iron oxide film thickness using a combination of a focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy. Iron oxide films are inherently nonconductive and porous, therefore the objective of this investigation was to optimize a methodology that would increase the conductivity of the film to facilitate high resolution imaging with a scanning electron microscopy and to preserve the porous nature of the film that could potentially be damaged by the energy of the FIB. Sputter coating the sample with a thin layer of iridium before creating the cross section with the FIB decreased sample charging and drifting, but differentiating the iron layer from the iridium coating with backscattered electron imaging was not definitive, making accurate assumptions of the delineation between the two metals difficult. Moreover, the porous nature of the film was lost due to beam damage following the FIB process. A thin layer plastication technique was therefore used to embed the porous film in epoxy resin that would provide support for the film during the FIB process. However, the thickness of the resin created using conventional thin layer plastication processing varied across the sample, making the measuring process only possible in areas where the resin layer was at its thinnest. Such variation required navigating the area for ideal milling areas, which increased the subjectivity of the process. We present a method to create uniform thin resin layers, of controlled thickness, that are ideal for quantifying the thickness of porous nonconductive films with FIB/scanning electron microscopy. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Surface modification of epoxy resin using He/CF4 atmospheric pressure plasma jet for flashover withstanding characteristics improvement in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sile; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yibo; Guo, Baohong; Li, Guoqiang; Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2017-08-01

    For enhancing the surface electric withstanding strength of insulating materials, epoxy resin (EP) samples are treated by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with different time interval from 0 to 300s. Helium (He) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4) mixtures are used as working gases with the concentration of CF4 ranging 0%-5%, and when CF4 is ∼3%, the APPJ exhibits an optimal steady state. The flashover withstanding characteristics of modified EP in vacuum are greatly improved under appropriate APPJ treatment conditions. The surface properties of EP samples are evaluated by surface roughness, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. It is considered that both physical and chemical effects lead to the enhancement of flashover strength. The physical effect is reflected in the increase of surface roughness, while the chemical effect is reflected in the graft of fluorine groups.

  12. Thickness dependence of the poling and current-voltage characteristics of paint films made up of lead zirconate titanate ceramic powder and epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, Shigenori; Iwasawa, Naozumi

    1995-11-01

    A specially prepared paint made up of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic powder and epoxy resin was coated on an aluminum plate and was cured at room temperature, thus forming the paint film of 25-300 μm thickness with a PZT volume fraction of 53%. The paint film was then poled at room temperature, and the poling behavior was determined by measuring the piezoelectric activity as a function of poling field. The poling behavior shows that the piezoelectric activity obtained at a given poling field increases with an increase in the film thickness from 25 to 300 μm. The current-voltage characteristic of the paint film, on the other hand, shows that the increase in the film thickness leads not only to an increase in the magnitude of the current density at a given electric field but also to an increase in the critical electric field at which the transition from the ohmic to space-charge-limited conduction takes place. This fact indicates that the amount of the space charge of electrons injected into the paint film decreases as the film thickness increases. Furthermore, comparison of the current-voltage characteristic of the paint film with that of a pure epoxy film reveals that the space charge is accumulated largely at the interface between the PZT and epoxy phases in the paint film. On the basis of this finding, a model is developed for the poling behavior of the paint film by taking into account a possible effect of the space-charge accumulation and a broad distribution of the electric field in the PZT phase. This model is shown to give an excellent fit to the experimental data of the piezoelectric activity obtained here as a function of poling field and film thickness.

  13. Flame-retardant-wrapped polyphosphazene nanotubes: A novel strategy for enhancing the flame retardancy and smoke toxicity suppression of epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuilai; Wang, Xin; Yu, Bin; Feng, Xiaming; Mu, Xiaowei; Yuen, Richard K K; Hu, Yuan

    2017-03-05

    The structure of polyphosphazene nanotubes (PZS) is similar to that of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before modification. For applications of CNTs in polymer composites, surface wrapping is an economically attractive route to achieve functionalized nanotubes. Based on this idea, functionalized polyphosphazene nanotubes (FR@PZS) wrapped with a cross-linked DOPO-based flame retardant (FR) were synthesized via one-step strategy and well characterized. Then, the obtained FR@PZS was introduced into epoxy resin (EP) to investigate flame retardancy and smoke toxicity suppression performance. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that FR@PZS significantly enhanced the thermal stability of EP composites. Cone calorimeter results revealed that incorporation of FR@PZS obviously improved flame retardant performance of EP, for example, 46.0% decrease in peak heat release rate and 27.1% reduction in total heat release were observed in the case of epoxy composite with 3wt% FR@PZS. The evolution of toxic CO and other volatile products from the EP decomposition was significantly suppressed after the introduction of FR@PZS, Therefore, the smoke toxicity associates with burning EP was reduced. The presence of both PZS and a DOPO-based flame retardant was probably responsible for this substantial diminishment of fire hazard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Samad, Ubair Abdus; Center of excellence for research in engineering materials; Khan, Rawaiz

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust freemore » environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.« less

  15. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Ubair Abdus; Khan, Rawaiz; Alam, Mohammad Asif; Al-Othman, Othman Y.; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  16. Cloning SU8 silicon masters using epoxy resins to increase feature replicability and production for cell culture devices.

    PubMed

    Kamande, J W; Wang, Y; Taylor, A M

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devices for cell-based studies. Commonly, the negative tone photoresist, SU8, is used to pattern features onto silicon wafers to create masters (SU8-Si) for PDMS replica molding. However, the complexity in the fabrication process, low feature reproducibility (master-to-master variability), silane toxicity, and short life span of these masters have been deterrents for using SU8-Si masters for the production of cell culture based PDMS microfluidic devices. While other techniques have demonstrated the ability to generate multiple devices from a single master, they often do not match the high feature resolution (∼0.1 μm) and low surface roughness that soft lithography masters offer. In this work, we developed a method to fabricate epoxy-based masters that allows for the replication of features with high fidelity directly from SU8-Si masters via their PDMS replicas. By this method, we show that we could obtain many epoxy based masters with equivalent features to a single SU8-Si master with a low feature variance of 1.54%. Favorable feature transfer resolutions were also obtained by using an appropriate Tg epoxy based system to ensure minimal shrinkage of features ranging in size from ∼100 μm to <10 μm in height. We further show that surface coating epoxy masters with Cr/Au lead to effective demolding and yield PDMS chambers that are suitable for long-term culturing of sensitive primary hippocampal neurons. Finally, we incorporated pillars within the Au-epoxy masters to eliminate the process of punching media reservoirs and thereby reducing substantial artefacts and wastage.

  17. Cloning SU8 silicon masters using epoxy resins to increase feature replicability and production for cell culture devices

    PubMed Central

    Kamande, J. W.; Wang, Y.; Taylor, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devices for cell-based studies. Commonly, the negative tone photoresist, SU8, is used to pattern features onto silicon wafers to create masters (SU8-Si) for PDMS replica molding. However, the complexity in the fabrication process, low feature reproducibility (master-to-master variability), silane toxicity, and short life span of these masters have been deterrents for using SU8-Si masters for the production of cell culture based PDMS microfluidic devices. While other techniques have demonstrated the ability to generate multiple devices from a single master, they often do not match the high feature resolution (∼0.1 μm) and low surface roughness that soft lithography masters offer. In this work, we developed a method to fabricate epoxy-based masters that allows for the replication of features with high fidelity directly from SU8-Si masters via their PDMS replicas. By this method, we show that we could obtain many epoxy based masters with equivalent features to a single SU8-Si master with a low feature variance of 1.54%. Favorable feature transfer resolutions were also obtained by using an appropriate Tg epoxy based system to ensure minimal shrinkage of features ranging in size from ∼100 μm to <10 μm in height. We further show that surface coating epoxy masters with Cr/Au lead to effective demolding and yield PDMS chambers that are suitable for long-term culturing of sensitive primary hippocampal neurons. Finally, we incorporated pillars within the Au-epoxy masters to eliminate the process of punching media reservoirs and thereby reducing substantial artefacts and wastage. PMID:26180572

  18. Steady-shear rheological properties of graphene-reinforced epoxy resin for manufacturing of aerospace composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausi, Marialaura; Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Laurenzi, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the steady-shear rheological behavior and the absolute viscosity of epoxy matrix reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (xGnP) before cure. Three different grades of xGnP (grades C, M and H) were dispersed homogenously at different weight percentages (wt%) into the epoxy matrix, ranging from 0.5 to 5 wt%. It is found that nanocomposite fluids with xGnP-C exhibit a Newtonian behavior at shear rate in the range 0.1-100 s-1, conversely, nanocomposite fluids with xGnP of grade M and H exhibit a shear-thinning behavior with the increase of nanoplatelet loading. Results from this analysis indicate how the steady shear rheological properties of the nano-reinforced polymer fluids depend on the geometrical characteristics of the graphene nanoplatelets.

  19. Fracture behavior of block copolymer and graphene nanoplatelet modified epoxy and fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamar, Nicholas T.

    Glass and carbon fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites (GFRPs and CFRPs) have high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. Thus, GFRPs and CFRPs are used to lightweight aircraft, marine and ground vehicles to reduce transportation energy utilization and cost. However, GFRP and CFRP matrices have a low resistance to crack initiation and propagation; i.e. they have low fracture toughness. Current methods to increase fracture toughness of epoxy and corresponding GFRP and CFRPs often reduce composite mechanical and thermomechanical properties. With the advent of nanotechnology, new methods to improve the fracture toughness and impact properties of composites are now available. The goal of this research is to identify the fracture behavior and toughening mechanisms of nanoparticle modified epoxy, GFRPs and CFRPs utilizing the triblock copolymer poly(styrene)-block-poly(butadiene)-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) (SBM) and graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) as toughening agents. The triblock copolymer SBM was used to toughen the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) resin cured with m-phenylenediamine (mPDA) and corresponding AS4-12k CFRPs. SBM self assembled in epoxy to form nanostructured domains leading to larger increases in fracture toughness, KQ (MPa*m 1/2) than the traditional, phase separating carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber. Additionally, SBM increased the mode-I fracture toughness, GIc (J/m2) of CFRPs without corresponding reductions in composite three-point flexural properties and glass transition temperature (Tg). Fractography of SBM modified epoxy and CFRPs via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that sub 100 nm spherical micelles cavitated to induce void growth and matrix shear yielding toughening mechanisms. Furthermore, SBM did not suppress epoxy Tg, while CTBN decreased Tg with both increasing concentration and acrylonitrile content. Graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) consist of a few layers of graphene sheets, which

  20. Suppression of surface charge accumulation on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin insulator under dc voltage by direct fluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Guixin, E-mail: guixin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Chuanyang

    2015-12-15

    Surface charge accumulation on insulators under high dc voltage is a major factor that may lead to the reduction of insulation levels in gas insulated devices. In this paper, disc insulators made of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin were surface fluorinated using a F{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture (12.5% F{sub 2}) at 50 °C and 0.1 MPa for different durations of 15 min, 30 min and 60 min. A dc voltage was applied to the insulator for 30 min and the charge density on its surface was measured by an electrostatic probe. The results revealed significant lower surface charge densities on themore » fluorinated insulators in comparison with the original one. Surface conductivity measurements indicated a higher surface conductivity by over three orders of magnitude after fluorination, which would allow the charges to transfer along the surface and thus may suppress their accumulation. Further, attenuated total reflection infrared analysis and surface morphology observations of the samples revealed that the introduction of fluoride groups altered the surface physicochemical properties. These structure changes, especially the physical defects reduced the depth of charge traps in the surface layer, which was verified by the measurement of energy distributions of the electron and hole traps based on the isothermal current theory. The results in this paper demonstrate that fluorination can be a promising and effective method to suppress surface charge accumulation on epoxy insulators in gas insulated devices.« less

  1. Evaluation of the filling ability of artificial lateral canals using calcium silicate-based and epoxy resin-based endodontic sealers and two gutta-percha filling techniques.

    PubMed

    Fernández, R; Restrepo, J S; Aristizábal, D C; Álvarez, L G

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the ability of a calcium silicate-based sealer (iRoot SP) and an epoxy resin-based sealer (Topseal) using two gutta-percha filling techniques to fill artificial lateral canals (ALCs). Seventy single-rooted human teeth were selected. Ten of these were used to obtain pilot data. Three ALCs were produced on mesial and distal surfaces of each root, one in each third, using size 10 engine reamers. The roots were randomly assigned to four experimental groups according to the filling technique and sealer used: 1, cold gutta-percha (single-point technique) with iRoot SP (SP-iR); 2, cold gutta-percha (single-point technique) with Topseal (SP-T); 3, continuous wave of condensation technique with iRoot SP (CWC-iR); and 4, continuous wave of condensation technique with Topseal (CWC-T). Digital periapical radiographs were taken. After the sealer had set, the roots were demineralized, cleared in methyl-salicylate and examined under a stereomicroscope. The depth of penetration of sealer and/or gutta-percha into the ALC was scored using a 5-point system, conducting an analysis on four surfaces. Filling scores of 0-1 were considered not acceptable, whilst scores of 2-4 were considered acceptable. Pearson's chi-square test was used to compare the experimental groups (P < 0.05). CWC-T was associated with the highest acceptable filling (57.8%), followed by CWC-iR (53.3%), SP-T (48.9%) and SP-iR (36.7%). Only when SP-iR was compared to the other groups, was the difference significant (P < 0.05). The apical third was associated with the lowest acceptable filling (37.5%). It was followed, in ascending order, by the middle (51.6%) and coronal thirds (58.3%). These differences were significant only when the apical thirds were compared to the other root thirds (P < 0.05). The calcium silicate-based sealer with continuous wave of condensation was more effective in artificial filling lateral canals than the single-point technique. The epoxy resin-based sealer with both filling

  2. Rubber-Modified Epoxies. I. Cure, Transitions, and Morphology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    thermosetting systems has been developed. An aromatic tetrafunctional diamine-cured diglycidyl ether of bis- phenol A epoxy resin [maximum glass transition...systems has been developed. An aromatic tetrafunctional diamine-cured digly- cidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin [maximum glass transition...epoxy resins are brittle materials. The crack resistance can be improved by the addition of reactive liquid rubber to uncured neat epoxy systems (1-3

  3. Monomers for thermosetting and toughening epoxy resins. [glycidyl amine derivatives, propargyl-containing amines, and mutagenic testing of aromatic diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Eight glycidyl amines were prepared by alkylating the parent amine with epichlorohydrin to form chlorohydrin, followed by cyclization with aqueous NaOH. Three of these compounds contained propargyl groups with postcuring studies. A procedure for quantitatively estimating the epoxy content of these glycidyl amines was employed for purity determination. Two diamond carbonates and several model propargly compounds were prepared. The synthesis of three new diamines, two which contain propargyloxy groups, and another with a sec-butyl group is in progress. These materials are at the dinitro stage ready for the final hydrogenation step. Four aromatic diamines were synthesized for mutagenic testing purposes. One of these compounds rapidly decomposes on exposure to air.

  4. Influence of airborne-particle abrasion on mechanical properties and bond strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pereira, Janaina Carla; Araujo, Tatiana Santos; Menezes, Murilo Souza

    2008-06-01

    Controversy exists concerning the use of fiber-reinforced posts to improve bond strength to resin cement because some precementation treatments can compromise the mechanical properties of the posts. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of airborne-particle abrasion on the mechanical properties and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts. Flexural strength (delta(f)), flexural modulus (E(f)), and stiffness (S) were assessed using a 3-point bending test for glass fiber-reinforced and carbon fiber-reinforced resin posts submitted to airborne-particle abrasion (AB) with 50-microm Al(2)O(3), and for posts without any surface treatment (controls) (n=10). Forty glass fiber (GF) and 40 carbon fiber (CF) posts were submitted to 1 of 4 surface treatments (n=10) prior to MTBS testing: silane (S); silane and adhesive (SA); airborne-particle abrasion with 50-microm Al(2)O(3) and silane (ABS); airborne-particle abrasion, silane, and adhesive (ABSA). Two composite resin restorations (Filtek Z250) with rounded depressions in the lateral face were bilaterally fixed to the post with resin cement (RelyX ARC). Next, the specimen was sectioned with a precision saw running perpendicular to the bonded surface to obtain 10 bonded beam specimens with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). Each beam specimen was tested in a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2,000 DL), under stress, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3-point bending test demonstrated significant differences among groups only for the post type factor for flexural strength, flexural modulus, and stiffness. The carbon fiber posts exhibited significantly higher mean flexural strength (P=.001), flexural modulus (P=.003), and stiffness (P=.001) values when compared with glass

  5. Improved Dielectric Properties and Energy Storage Density of Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) Nanocomposite with Hydantoin Epoxy Resin Coated BaTiO3.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hang; Zhang, Dou; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Chao; Zhou, Kechao

    2015-04-22

    Energy storage materials are urgently demanded in modern electric power supply and renewable energy systems. The introduction of inorganic fillers to polymer matrix represents a promising avenue for the development of high energy density storage materials, which combines the high dielectric constant of inorganic fillers with supernal dielectric strength of polymer matrix. However, agglomeration and phase separation of inorganic fillers in the polymer matrix remain the key barriers to promoting the practical applications of the composites for energy storage. Here, we developed a low-cost and environmentally friendly route to modifying BaTiO3 (BT) nanoparticles by a kind of water-soluble hydantoin epoxy resin. The modified BT nanoparticles exhibited homogeneous dispersion in the ferroelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) matrix and strong interfacial adhesion with the polymer matrix. The dielectric constants of the nanocomposites increased significantly with the increase of the coated BT loading, while the dielectric loss of the nanocomposites was still as low as that of the pure P(VDF-HFP). The energy storage density of the nanocomposites was largely enhanced with the coated BT loading at the same electric field. The nanocomposite with 20 vol % BT exhibited an estimated maximum energy density of 8.13 J cm(-3), which was much higher than that of pure P(VDF-HFP) and other dielectric polymers. The findings of this research could provide a feasible approach to produce high energy density materials for practical application in energy storage.

  6. Light and transmission electron microscopy of the intact interfaces between non-submerged titanium-coated epoxy resin implants and bone or gingiva.

    PubMed

    Listgarten, M A; Buser, D; Steinemann, S G; Donath, K; Lang, N P; Weber, H P

    1992-02-01

    This experiment was aimed at studying the intact tissue/implant interface of non-submerged dental implants with a titanium surface. Epoxy-resin replicas were fabricated from 3.05 x 8 mm cylindrical titanium implants with a plasma-sprayed apical portion and a smooth coronal collar. The replicas were coated with a 90-120-nm-thick layer of pure titanium and autoclaved. The coated replicas were inserted as non-submerged endosseous implants in the edentulous premolar region of dog mandibles and allowed to heal for three months. Jaw sections containing the implants were processed for light and electron microscopic study of the intact tissue/implant interface with and without prior demineralization. Gingival connective tissue fibers were closely adapted to the titanium layer, in an orientation more or less parallel to the implant surface. There was no evidence of any fiber insertions into the surface irregularities of the smooth or rough titanium surface. Undemineralized bone was intimately adapted to the titanium surface without any intervening space. In demineralized sections, the collagen fibers of the bone matrix tended to be somewhat thinner and occasionally less densely packed in the vicinity of the implant surface. However, they extended all the way to the titanium surface, without any intervening fibril-free layer.

  7. Paper Microzone Plates as Analytical Tools for Studying Enzyme Stability: A Case Study on the Stabilization of Horseradish Peroxidase Using Trehalose and SU-8 Epoxy Novolac Resin.

    PubMed

    Ganaja, Kirsten A; Chaplan, Cory A; Zhang, Jingyi; Martinez, Nathaniel W; Martinez, Andres W

    2017-05-16

    Paper microzone plates in combination with a noncontact liquid handling robot were demonstrated as tools for studying the stability of enzymes stored on paper. The effect of trehalose and SU-8 epoxy novolac resin (SU-8) on the stability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied in both a short-term experiment, where the activity of various concentrations of HRP dried on paper were measured after 1 h, and a long-term experiment, where the activity of a single concentration of HRP dried and stored on paper was monitored for 61 days. SU-8 was found to stabilize HRP up to 35 times more than trehalose in the short-term experiment for comparable concentrations of the two reagents, and a 1% SU-8 solution was found to stabilize HRP approximately 2 times more than a 34% trehalose solution in both short- and long-term experiments. The results suggest that SU-8 is a promising candidate for use as an enzyme-stabilizing reagent for paper-based diagnostic devices and that the short-term experiment could be used to quickly evaluate the capacity of various reagents for stabilizing enzymes to identify and characterize new enzyme-stabilizing reagents.

  8. Matrix effect on leaching of Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) from epoxy resin based inner lacquer of aluminium tubes into semi-solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Lipke, Uwe; Haverkamp, Jan Boris; Zapf, Thomas; Lipperheide, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    To study the impact of different semi-solid dosage form components on the leaching of Bisphenol A (BPA) and Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) from the epoxy resin-based inner lacquer of aluminium tubes, the tubes were filled with different matrix preparations and stored at an elevated temperature. Despite compliance with the European Standards EN 15348 and EN 15766 on porosity and polymerisation of internal coatings of aluminium tubes, the commercially available tubes used in the study contained an increased amount of polymerisation residues, such as unbound BPA, BADGE and BADGE derivatives in the lacquer, as determined by acetonitrile extraction. Storage of Macrogol ointments in these tubes resulted in an almost quantitative migration of the unbound polymerisation residues from the coating into the ointment. In addition, due to alterations observed in the RP-HPLC chromatograms of the matrix spiked with BADGE and BADGE derivatives it is supposed that the leachates can react with formulation components. The contamination of the medicinal product by BPA, BADGE and BADGE derivatives can be precluded by using aluminium tubes with an internal lacquer with a low degree of unbound polymerisation residues. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of glutathione in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection with a carbon-epoxy resin composite electrode chemically modified with cobalt phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Wring, S A; Hart, J P; Birch, B J

    1989-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (LCEC), incorporating a novel carbon-epoxy resin working electrode modified with cobalt phthalocyanine, has been employed for preliminary studies directed towards the determination of normal circulating levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in human plasma. The mobile phase consisted of 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 3) containing 0.1% m/m ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); the calibration graph was linear in the range 0.24-30.7 ng of GSH injected. The mean recovery of GSH added to a control serum over the physiological concentration range (0.38-3.07 ng ml-1) was 99%; this was achieved following a simple sample pre-treatment method, prior to LCEC, involving chelation of divalent cations with EDTA and subsequent acidification with orthophosphoric acid. Using the LCEC method, the mean circulating level of GSH in plasma, found in three normal subjects, was 2.69 microM, GSH; this indicates that the method might be applicable to the determination of depressed circulating levels of GSH.

  10. One-step synthesis of graphene/Au nanoparticle composite by epoxy resin: electrocatalytic detection of H2O2 and catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yonghang; Zhang, Qixian; Lü, Wei

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, graphene/gold nanoparticle (AuNP) composites were synthesized via a one-step and green method using modified epoxy resin E-44 (AB-EP-44)—a phenolic—as both stabilizer and reductant in aqueous solution. The as-prepared samples were further characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), proving the successful synthesis of graphene/AuNP composites, and that the small AuNPs with an average diameter of ~3 nm were uniformly dispersed on graphene sheets. The composites exhibited excellent electrochemical activity towards reduction of H2O2 with a good linear response from 0-130 µM and a high sensitivity of 0.283 µA µM-1 cm-2 in addition, a detection limit of ~0.45 µM (the signal/noise:3) was achieved by using a graphene/AuNP sensor. Furthermore, the graphene/AuNP composites showed highly catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) reduction. The present green and simple synthesis approach also could be used to prepare other metal/graphene nanomaterials.

  11. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Kanimozhi, K.; Sethuraman, K.; Selvaraj, V.; Alagar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix. PMID:25279372

  12. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Kanimozhi; Sethuraman, K.; V, Selvaraj; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix.

  13. Stronger Fire-Resistant Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fohlen, George M.; Parker, John A.; Kumar, Devendra

    1988-01-01

    New curing agent improves mechanical properties and works at lower temperature. Use of aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene curing agents yields stronger, more heat- and fire-resistant epoxy resins. Used with solvent if necessary for coating fabrics or casting films.

  14. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  15. Bond strength of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to human root dentin irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Keila de Almeida; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Lopes, Fabiane Carneiro; Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; de Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation associated with different final irrigation protocols on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentin, on the dentin/filling material interface and in the temperature variation during irradiation. Ninety-six maxillary canines were prepared with K3 rotary system up to #45/0.02 instrument, irrigating with distilled water between files. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups-final irrigation (distilled water, 1% NaOCl, and 17% EDTAC) and four subgroups (n = 8)-laser parameters (non-irradiated, 2 W/20 Hz, 3 W/20 Hz, and 4 W/20 Hz). During irradiation, the temperatures were measured on the outer root dentin wall in the three thirds, and root apex. Canals were filled with lateral condensation of AHPlus sealer and gutta-percha cones. Two slices from each third were submitted to a push-out test in Instron machine and the failure mode was analyzed. One slice from each third was analyzed by confocal laser microscopy to evaluate the percentage of the perimeter of the root canal cross-section with sealer tags and depth of tags. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Tukey's tests (P < 0.05). Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation increased sealer bond strength to dentin, regardless of the final irrigation. The highest values were obtained for 3 W (4.02 ± 1.32) and 4 W (4.18 ± 0.98) powers and different from the non-irradiated group (2.64 ± 0.58) (P < 0.05). The 2 W irradiation produced similar results to 3 W and 4 W when associated with 17% EDTA. Final irrigation with 17% EDTAC provided higher bond strength (4.01 ± 1.02) compared with distilled water (3.11 ± 1.09) and 1% NaOCl (3.47 ± 1.18) (P < 0.05). The cervical third (4.01 ± 1.21) presented significantly higher bond strength than the apical third (3.04 ± 0.89). There was a greater percentage of adhesive and mixed failure. In the groups

  16. Influence of nanofillers on the thermal and mechanical behavior of DGEBA-based adhesives for bonded-in timber connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Z.; Ansell, M. P.; Smedley, D.

    2006-09-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into the thermal behavior and mechanical properties of a room-temperature-cured epoxy adhesive (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) cross-linked with polyetheramines and filled with different fillers, namely nanosilica, liquid rubber (CTBN), and clay, are reported. The nanosilica and liquid rubber increased the flexural strength and elastic modulus of the adhesive systems; the addition of clay particles raised the elastic modulus significantly, but embrittled the adhesive. Establishing a correct cure time is very important for bonded-in timber structures, as it will affect the bond strength. A study on the effect of cure time on the flexural strength was carried out, from which it follows that the adhesives should be cured for at least 20 days at room temperature. The damping characteristics and the glass-transition temperature of the adhesives were determined by using a dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. The results showed that the filled adhesives had a higher storage modulus, which was in agreement with the elastic moduli determined from static bending tests. The introduction of the fillers increased its glass-transition temperature considerably.

  17. In vitro fracture resistance of roots obturated with epoxy resin-based, mineral trioxide aggregate-based, and bioceramic root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Tuncay, Öznur; Karataş, Ertuğrul; Arslan, Hakan; Yeter, Kübra

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of teeth filled with 3 different endodontic sealers. Seventy-five single-rooted extracted mandibular premolars were decoronated to a length of 13 mm. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 15 for each group). In group 1, the teeth were left unprepared and unfilled (negative control), and in group 2, the teeth were left unobturated (positive control). The rest of the roots were prepared by using the ProTaper System up to a master apical file size of F3: group 3, bioceramic sealer (Endosequence BC sealer) + gutta-percha; group 4, mineral trioxide aggregate-based sealer (Tech Biosealer Endo) + gutta-percha; and group 5, epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus Jet) + gutta-percha. All root specimens were stored for 2 weeks at 100% humidity to allow the complete setting of the sealers. Each specimen was then subjected to fracture testing by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min(-1) until the root fractured. The force required to fracture each specimen was recorded, and the data were analyzed statistically. The fracture values of groups 3 and 5 were significantly higher than those of group 4 (P < .05). There was no significant difference between groups 3 and 5 (P > .05). In contrast to Tech Biosealer Endo, Endosequence BC and AH Plus Jet sealer increased the force to fracture in root-filled single-rooted premolar teeth. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advanced degradation of brominated epoxy resin and simultaneous transformation of glass fiber from waste printed circuit boards by improved supercritical water oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-10-01

    This work investigated various supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) systems, i.e. SCWO1 (only water), SCWO2 (water+H2O2) and SCWO3 (water+H2O2/NaOH), for waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) detoxification and recycling. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the operating conditions of the optimal SCWO3 systems. The optimal reaction conditions for debromination were found to be the NaOH of 0.21g, the H2O2 volume of 9.04mL, the time of 39.7min, maximum debromination efficiency of 95.14%. Variance analysis indicated that the factors influencing debromination efficiency was in the sequence of NaOH>H2O2>time. Mechanism studies indicated that the dissociated ions from NaOH in supercritical water promoted the debromination of brominated epoxy resins (BERs) through an elimination reaction and nucleophilic substitution. HO2, produced by H2O2 could induce the oxidation of phenol ring to open (intermediates of BERs), which were thoroughly degraded to form hydrocarbons, CO2, H2O and NaBr. In addition, the alkali-silica reaction between OH(-) and SiO2 induced the phase transformation of glass fibers, which were simultaneously converted into anorthite and albite. Waste PCBs in H2O2/NaOH improved SCWO system were fully degraded into useful products and simultaneously transformed into functional materials. These findings are helpful for efficient recycling of waste PCBs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of different final irrigant activation techniques on the bond strength of an epoxy resin-based endodontic sealer: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Tuncay, Öznur; Demirbuga, Sezer; Dinçer, Asiye Nur; Arslan, Hakan

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not different final irrigation activation techniques affect the bond strength of an epoxy resin-based endodontic sealer (AH Plus; Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) to the root canal walls of different root thirds. Eighty single-rooted human mandibular premolars were prepared by using the ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) to size F4, and a final irrigation regimen using 3% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA was performed. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20) according to the final irrigation activation technique used as follows: no activation (control), manual dynamic activation (MDA), CanalBrush (Coltene Whaledent, Altststten, Switzerland) activation, and ultrasonic activation. Five specimens from each group were prepared for scanning electron microscopic observation to assess the smear layer removal after the final irrigation procedures. All remaining roots were then obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. A push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentin and AH Plus sealer. The data obtained from the push-out test were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests. The bond strength values mostly decreased in the coronoapical direction (P < .001). In the coronal and middle thirds, ultrasonic activiation showed a higher bond strength than other groups (P < .05). In the apical third, MDA displayed the highest bond strength to root dentin (P < .05). The majority of specimens exhibited cohesive failures. The bond strength of AH Plus sealer to root canal dentin may improve with ultrasonic activation in the coronal and middle thirds and MDA in the apical third. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deposition of SiC x H y O z thin film on epoxy resin by nanosecond pulsed APPJ for improving the surface insulating performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, XIE; Haofan, LIN; Shuai, ZHANG; Ruixue, WANG; Fei, KONG; Tao, SHAO

    2018-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma surface modification for epoxy resin (EP) to improve the insulation properties has wide application prospects in gas insulated switchgear and gas insulated transmission line. In this paper, a pulsed Ar dual dielectrics atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used for SiC x H y O z thin film deposition on EP samples. The film deposition was optimized by varying the treatment time while other parameters were kept at constants (treatment distance: 10 mm, precursor flow rate: 0.6 l min-1, maximum instantaneous power: 3.08 kW and single pulse energy: 0.18 mJ). It was found that the maximum value of flashover voltages for negative and positive voltage were improved by 18% and 13% when the deposition time was 3 min, respectively. The flashover voltage reduced as treatment time increased. Moreover, all the surface conductivity, surface charge dissipation rate and surface trap level distribution reached an optimal value when thin film deposition time was 3 min. Other measurements, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscope for EP surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for EP surface compositions, optical emission spectra for APPJ deposition process were carried out to better understand the deposition processes and mechanisms. The results indicated that the original organic groups (C-H, C-C, C=O, C=C) were gradually replaced by the Si containing inorganic groups (Si-O-Si and Si-OH). The reduction of C=O in ester group and C=C in p-substituted benzene of the EP samples might be responsible for shallowing the trap level and then enhancing the flashover voltage. However, when the plasma treatment time was longer than 3 min, the significant increase of the surface roughness might increase the trap level depth and then deteriorate the flashover performance.

  1. Influence of non-smooth surface on tribological properties of glass fiber-epoxy resin composite sliding against stainless steel under natural seawater lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaofeng; Gao, Dianrong; Liang, Yingna; Chen, Bo

    2015-11-01

    With the development of bionics, the bionic non-smooth surfaces are introduced to the field of tribology. Although non-smooth surface has been studied widely, the studies of non-smooth surface under the natural seawater lubrication are still very fewer, especially experimental research. The influences of smooth and non-smooth surface on the frictional properties of the glass fiber-epoxy resin composite (GF/EPR) coupled with stainless steel 316L are investigated under natural seawater lubrication in this paper. The tested non-smooth surfaces include the surfaces with semi-spherical pits, the conical pits, the cone-cylinder combined pits, the cylindrical pits and through holes. The friction and wear tests are performed using a ring-on-disc test rig under 60 N load and 1000 r/min rotational speed. The tests results show that GF/EPR with bionic non-smooth surface has quite lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance than GF/EPR with smooth surface without pits. The average friction coefficient of GF/EPR with semi-spherical pits is 0.088, which shows the largest reduction is approximately 63.18% of GF/EPR with smooth surface. In addition, the wear debris on the worn surfaces of GF/EPR are observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. It is shown that the primary wear mechanism is the abrasive wear. The research results provide some design parameters for non-smooth surface, and the experiment results can serve as a beneficial supplement to non-smooth surface study.

  2. Design of Epoxy based Resin Composites for Automotive Applications: A Case Study on IC Engine Valve Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, J. S.; Lathkar, G. S.; Sharma, S. B.

    2018-01-01

    The present attempt in this project is to reduce the vibrations, temperature due to friction, noise and weight of I C engine valve guide by replacing conventional metal valve guide with composite valve guide. Composite materials have been used in automotive components because of their properties such as low weight, high specific stiffness, corrosion resistance, ability to produce complex shapes, high specific strength and good impact energy absorption etc. The Internal combustion engine valve guides are the parts that support the valves in the cylinder head, besides this it keeps lubricating oil from getting sucked into the combustion chamber past the intake valve stem, it keeps exhaust gases from getting into the crankcase past the exhaust valve stem and it also keeps the valve face in perfect alignment with the valve seat. A valve guide test rig is indigenously fabricated. Valve guides are manufactured using the developed composite material (Resin ARL-136, Hardener AH-126 and 4 vol% WS2), on a CNC lathe. The performance of the developed composite guide under varied conditions of speeds, that is, fixed change in rpm and modulated changes in rpm is assessed. Noise, temperature and vibrations are measured. The experimental data revealed that contribution of composite guide in respect of acceleration, velocity and displacement components of vibration is not substantial. A substantial reduction in noise levels is seen. As far as temperature rise due to friction is concerned maximum components fail at elevated temperatures, with composite guides the temperature generated due to friction at higher speeds is less, a considerable weight reduction is also observed.

  3. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  4. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmetli, Gulnare; Gungor, Ahmet; Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-01

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  5. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  6. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  7. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  8. Material Properties of a Tricalcium Silicate-containing, a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate-containing, and an Epoxy Resin-based Root Canal Sealer.

    PubMed

    Prüllage, Raquel-Kathrin; Urban, Kent; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to compare the solubility, radiopacity, and setting times of a tricalcium silicate-containing (BioRoot RCS; Septodont, St Maur-des-Fossés, France) and a mineral trioxide aggregate-containing sealer (MTA Fillapex; Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) with an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus; Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). Solubility in distilled water, radiopacity, and setting time were evaluated in accordance with ISO 6876:2012. The solubility was also measured after soaking the materials in phosphate-buffered saline buffer (PBS). All data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test. After immersion for 1 minute in distilled water, BioRoot RCS was significantly less soluble than AH Plus and MTA Fillapex (P < .05). At all other exposure times, AH Plus was significantly less soluble than BioRoot RCS, whereas BioRoot RCS was significantly more soluble than the other 2 sealers (P < .05). All sealers had the same solubility in PBS and distilled water, except for BioRoot RCS after 28 days. At this exposure time, BioRoot RCS was significantly less soluble in PBS than in distilled water and less soluble than MTA Fillapex (P < .05). All BioRoot RCS specimens immersed in PBS had a surface precipitate after 14 and 28 days. The radiopacity of all sealers was greater than 3 mm aluminum with no statistical significant difference between the sealers (P > .05). The final setting time was 324 (±1) minutes for BioRoot RCS and 612 (±4) minutes for AH Plus. The difference was statistically significant (P < .05). MTA Fillapex did not set completely even after 1 week. The solubility and radiopacity of the sealers were in accordance with ISO 6876:2012. PBS decreased the solubility of BioRoot RCS. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis from a nonbisphenol A epoxy in a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy laminate.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C G

    1987-09-01

    An employee of the Composites Division of an aircraft engine manufacturing firm developed dermatitis associated with the handling of a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy laminate (epoxy prepreg). Patch test investigation demonstrated that the responsible causal agent was the nonbisphenol A epoxy binder, 4-glycidyloxy-N, N-diglycidylaniline. A patch test with bisphenol A epoxy from a standard patch test screening series was negative. Subsequent interviews with employees of the Composites Division suggested that a relative lack of awareness of the cutaneous hazards of fiber reinforced epoxy laminates, compared with liquid epoxy resin systems, may be an important risk factor for allergic sensitization to these composite materials.

  10. Contact allergy to epoxy hardeners.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Suuronen, Katri; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Jolanki, Riitta

    2014-09-01

    Diglycidylether of bisphenol A resin is the most important sensitizer in epoxy systems, but a minority of patients develop concomitant or solitary contact allergy to epoxy hardeners. At the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, several in-house test substances of epoxy hardeners have been tested in a special epoxy compound patch test series. To analyse the frequency and clinical relevance of allergic reactions to different epoxy hardeners. Test files (January 1991 to March 2013) were screened for contact allergy to different epoxy hardeners, and the clinical records of patients with allergic reactions were analysed for occupation, concomitant allergic reactions, and exposure. The most commonly positive epoxy hardeners were m-xylylenediamine (n = 24), 2,4,6-tris-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol (tris-DMP; n = 14), isophorone-diamine (n = 12), and diethylenetriamine (n = 9). Trimethylhexamethylenediamine (n = 7), tetraethylenepentamine (n = 4), and triethylenetetramine (n = 2) elicited some reactions, although most patients were found to have no specific exposure. Allergic reactions to hexamethylenetetramine, dimethylaminopropylamine and ethylenediamine dihydrochloride were not related to epoxy products. Tris-DMP is an important sensitizer in epoxy hardeners, and should be included in the patch test series of epoxy chemicals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ionic Liquid Epoxy Resin Monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paley, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquid epoxide monomers capable of reacting with cross-linking agents to form polymers with high tensile and adhesive strengths. Ionic liquid epoxide monomers comprising at least one bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cation are made from nitrogen heterocycles corresponding to the bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cations by a method involving a non-nucleophilic anion, an alkali metal cation, epichlorohydrin, and a strong base.

  12. Mechanical Spectroscopy for Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    extensometer into a Hewlett Packard Model 320 two channel recorder with sufficiently high response (DC to 50 cycles at 50 mm peak to peak). A Tinius Olsen...conditioned the signals for simultaneous-recording on a two channel oscillograph. Care was observed in calibration and balancing the output of one gage...off at a greater rate. KVl is also comparable but starts to tail off after only about 10 minutes time at 177 C (350 F). G(t)/G o for variation KV7 at

  13. In vitro bond strength of an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentin irradiated with high-power lasers and adhesive interface analyses.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Vanessa Lessa C; Cruvinel, Pedro Basto; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Gariba-Silva, Ricardo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of high-power lasers (Nd:YAG and diode 980 nm) associated with mineral coal as fotopotencializer on bond strength of an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentin, using the pushout test, and on the dentin/filling material interface, using confocal laser microscopy. For this purposes, 50 canines were instrumented with Mtwo rotary system up to #50.04 instrument and randomly assigned to five groups (n = 10): group I-control EDTAC; group II-EDTAC and Nd:YAG laser; group III-EDTAC and diode laser 980 nm; group IV-EDTAC, Nd:YAG laser and mineral coal 5 g/100 mL; and group V-EDTAC, diode laser 980 nm and mineral coal 5 g/100 mL. All data were analyzed by ANOVA (at 5% significance level) following the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn and Tukey tests. The group I increased more bond strength of the sealer to root dentin that treated with only EDTAC 17% (17.21 ± 21.75 MPa), similar to the group II (12.21 ± 18.20 MPa) and group IV (14.92 ± 28.06 MPa), both treated with Nd:YAG laser, with the exception of group IV, which was added to mineral coal. The group V (8.75 ± 13.42 MPa) had similar results to the groups II and IV, but the same similarity were found when compared with group III (7.11 + 11.28 MPa), with lower results. Regarding the root thirds, the apical third (23.27 ± 29.21 MPa) presented a statistically higher value on bond strength than the cervical third (5.92 ± 5.33 MPa) and middle third (6.93 ± 7, 11 MPa) (p > 0.05). Group II (86.27 μm) showed the highest tags penetration values, with a statistically difference to the group III (51.57 μm), IV (36.77 μm) and V (32.37 μm) (p < 0.05). Group I (71.63 μm) was statistically similar to groups II and III (p > 0.05). Group IV had the lowest values and was statistically similarity to groups III and V (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the treatment with Nd:YAG laser provides better results than the diode 980

  14. Surface Modifier-Free Organic-Inorganic Hybridization To Produce Optically Transparent and Highly Refractive Bulk Materials Composed of Epoxy Resins and ZrO2 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Kazushi; Kikuchi, Moriya; Narumi, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Seigou

    2018-04-25

    Surface modifier-free hybridization of ZrO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) with epoxy-based polymers is demonstrated for the first time to afford highly transparent and refractive bulk materials. This is achieved by a unique and versatile hybridization via the one-pot direct phase transfer of ZrO 2 NPs from water to epoxy monomers without any aggregation followed by curing with anhydride. Three types of representative epoxy monomers, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE), 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3',4'-epoxycyclohexane carboxylate (CEL), and 1,3,5-tris(3-(oxiran-2-yl)propyl)-1,3,5-triazinane-2,4,6-trione (TEPIC), are used to produce transparent viscous dispersions. The resulting ZrO 2 NPs are thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and solid-state 13 C CP/MAS NMR measurements. The results from DLS and TEM analyses indicate nanodispersion of ZrO 2 into epoxy monomers as a continuous medium. A surface modification mechanism and the binding fashion during phase transfer are proposed based on the FT-IR and solid-state 13 C CP/MAS NMR measurements. Epoxy-based hybrid materials with high transparency and refractive index are successfully fabricated by heat curing or polymerizing a mixture of monomers containing epoxy-functionalized ZrO 2 NPs and methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride in the presence of a phosphoric catalyst. The TEM and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of the hybrids show a nanodispersion of ZrO 2 in the epoxy networks. The refractive index at 594 nm ( n 594 ) increases up to 1.765 for BADGE-based hybrids, 1.667 for CEL-based hybrids, and 1.693 for TEPIC-based hybrids. Their refractive indices and Abbe's numbers are quantitatively described by the Lorentz-Lorenz effective medium expansion theory. Their transmissivity is also reasonably explained using Fresnel refraction, Rayleigh scattering, and the Lambert-Beer theories. This surface modifier-free hybridization

  15. Evaluation of experimental epoxy monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.; Ficklin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Future generation aircraft need higher performance polymer matrices to fully achieve the weight savings possible with composite materials. New resins are being formulated in an effort to understand basic polymer behavior and to develop improved resins. Some polymer/curing agent combinations that could be useful are difficult to process. In the area of epoxies, a major problem is that some components have physical properties which make them difficult to utilize as matrix resins. A previous study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy can be advantageous in the mixing of curing agents into a standard epoxy resin, such as MY 720 (Ciba-Geigy designation). This work is expanded to include three novel epoxides.

  16. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOEpatents

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  17. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares and kinetic modeling applied to near-infrared data from curing reactions of epoxy resins: mechanistic approach and estimation of kinetic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2006-02-01

    This study describes the combination of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares with a kinetic modeling strategy for obtaining the kinetic rate constants of a curing reaction of epoxy resins. The reaction between phenyl glycidyl ether and aniline is monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy under isothermal conditions for several initial molar ratios of the reagents. The data for all experiments, arranged in a column-wise augmented data matrix, are analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. The concentration profiles recovered are fitted to a chemical model proposed for the reaction. The selection of the kinetic model is assisted by the information contained in the recovered concentration profiles. The nonlinear fitting provides the kinetic rate constants. The optimized rate constants are in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  18. Solving the problem of building models of crosslinked polymers: an example focussing on validation of the properties of crosslinked epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stephen A; Howlin, Brendan J; Hamerton, Ian; Baidak, Alex; Billaud, Claude; Ward, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The construction of molecular models of crosslinked polymers is an area of some difficulty and considerable interest. We report here a new method of constructing these models and validate the method by modelling three epoxy systems based on the epoxy monomers bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE) and triglycidyl-p-amino phenol (TGAP) with the curing agent diamino diphenyl sulphone (DDS). The main emphasis of the work concerns the improvement of the techniques for the molecular simulation of these epoxies and specific attention is paid towards model construction techniques, including automated model building and prediction of glass transition temperatures (T(g)). Typical models comprise some 4200-4600 atoms (ca. 120-130 monomers). In a parallel empirical study, these systems have been cast, cured and analysed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) to measure T(g). Results for the three epoxy systems yield good agreement with experimental T(g) ranges of 200-220°C, 270-285°C and 285-290°C with corresponding simulated ranges of 210-230°C, 250-300°C, and 250-300°C respectively.

  19. Solving the Problem of Building Models of Crosslinked Polymers: An Example Focussing on Validation of the Properties of Crosslinked Epoxy Resins

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Stephen A.; Howlin, Brendan J; Hamerton, Ian; Baidak, Alex; Billaud, Claude; Ward, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The construction of molecular models of crosslinked polymers is an area of some difficulty and considerable interest. We report here a new method of constructing these models and validate the method by modelling three epoxy systems based on the epoxy monomers bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE) and triglycidyl-p-amino phenol (TGAP) with the curing agent diamino diphenyl sulphone (DDS). The main emphasis of the work concerns the improvement of the techniques for the molecular simulation of these epoxies and specific attention is paid towards model construction techniques, including automated model building and prediction of glass transition temperatures (Tg). Typical models comprise some 4200–4600 atoms (ca. 120–130 monomers). In a parallel empirical study, these systems have been cast, cured and analysed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) to measure Tg. Results for the three epoxy systems yield good agreement with experimental Tg ranges of 200–220°C, 270–285°C and 285–290°C with corresponding simulated ranges of 210–230°C, 250–300°C, and 250–300°C respectively. PMID:22916182

  20. Structural Peculiarities of Ion-Conductive Organic-Inorganic Polymer Composites Based on Aliphatic Epoxy Resin and Salt of Lithium Perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Matkovska, Liubov; Iurzhenko, Maksym; Mamunya, Yevgen; Tkachenko, Igor; Demchenko, Valeriy; Synyuk, Volodymyr; Shadrin, Andriy; Boiteux, Gisele

    2017-12-01

    The article is concerned with hybrid amorphous polymers synthesized basing on epoxy oligomer of diglycide aliphatic ester of polyethylene glycol that was cured by polyethylene polyamine and lithium perchlorate salt. Structural peculiarities of organic-inorganic polymer composites were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-ray spectra, infrared spectroscopic, scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and transmission and reflective optical microscopy. On the one hand, the results showed that the introduction of LiClO 4 salt into epoxy polymer leads to formation of the coordinative metal-polymer complexes of donor-acceptor type between central Li + ion and ligand. On the other hand, the appearance of amorphous microinclusions, probably of inorganic nature, was also found.

  1. Mechanical properties and strengthening mechanism of epoxy resin reinforced with nano-SiO2 particles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chufan; Tan, Yefa; Yang, Xupu; Xu, Ting; Wang, Lulu; Qi, Zehao

    2018-03-01

    Nano-SiO2 particles and MWCNTs were used to reinforce the EPs. The mechanical properties of the composites and the strengthening mechanisms of nano-SiO2 and MWCNTs on the mechanical properties of epoxy composites were studied. The results show that the mechanical properties of the reinforced epoxy composites are greatly improved. Especially, nano-SiO2/MWCNTs/EP composites exhibit the most excellent mechanical properties. The synergistic strengthening mechanisms of nano-SiO2 and MWCNTs on the EP are the micro plastic deformation effect, micro-cracks and their divarication effect, and the pull-out effect of MWCNTs in EP matrix, which can reduce the extent of stress concentration and absorb more energy.

  2. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  3. Modified Epoxy Adhesives and Primers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    Shear Stress max Bulk Resin (MPa) Control 66.52±3.1 100 67.84 ±23 +20 VCDHAA 79.59 ±2.8 120 78.18 ±2.6 +15 CTBN 51.81 ±3.8 78 53.88 ±2.4 +15 CTBN ...unlimited. 0 3. ABSTRACT (MaX,UM, wor At range of monepoxy additives for epoxy resins , and non-reactive additives for3 polyimides, have been examined...a modified failure mechanism. These properties of the bulk resin translate into modest improvements in adhesive bond performance, particularly for low

  4. The evaluation of epoxy thermoplastic pavement marking material in Virginia : the application : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-01-01

    Epoxy Thermoplastic (ETP) is a recently developed epoxy-resin-based thermoplastic pavement marking material being promoted by the Federal Highway Administration as a possible substitute for conventional traffic paints and thermoplastics. Its reported...

  5. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Shultz, William J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  6. Technical assessment for quality control of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Survey visits to companies involved in the manufacture and use of graphite-epoxy prepregs were conducted to assess the factors which may contribute to variability in the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy composites. In particular, the purpose was to assess the contributions of the epoxy resins to variability. Companies represented three segments of the composites industry - aircraft manufacturers, prepreg manufacturers, and epoxy resin manufacturers. Several important sources of performance variability were identified from among the complete spectrum of potential sources which ranged from raw materials to composite test data interpretation.

  7. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  8. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  9. Kinetic analysis of reactions of Si-based epoxy resins by near-infrared spectroscopy, 13C NMR and soft-hard modelling.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Mariano; Larrechi, Maria Soledad; Rius, F Xavier; Mercado, Luis Adolfo; Galià, Marina

    2007-02-05

    Soft- and hard-modelling strategy was applied to near-infrared spectroscopy data obtained from monitoring the reaction between glycidyloxydimethylphenyl silane, a silicon-based epoxy monomer, and aniline. On the basis of the pure soft-modelling approach and previous chemical knowledge, a kinetic model for the reaction was proposed. Then, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares optimization was carried out under a hard constraint, that compels the concentration profiles to fulfil the proposed kinetic model at each iteration of the optimization process. In this way, the concentration profiles of each species and the corresponding kinetic rate constants of the reaction, unpublished until now, were obtained. The results obtained were contrasted with 13C NMR. The joint interval test of slope and intercept for detecting bias was not significant (alpha=5%).

  10. Synthesis and characterization of non halogen fire retardant composite through combination of epoxy resin, Al(OH)3 additive and filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Asep Handaya; Sungkar, Faraj

    2017-11-01

    Epoxy has a wide range of applications in many sectors, but it still has deficiency in fire retardancy. Therefore, it is combined with fire retardant additives. Fire retardant additive commonly contains halogen compounds that causes environmental and health problems. Therefore Al (OH)3 additive is used to improve the fire retardancy properties of composite through decomposition that produced water vapour and formation of oxide layer on its surface. In this research, synthesis of fire retardant composite has been conducted by varying filler carbon black and silica (1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%wt) with composition of Al (OH)3 50%wt and epoxy 50%wt. Fire retardancy of composite was observed by UL-94V standard, while thermal degradation behaviour of composite was analyzed by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Whereas, mechanical properties was studied based on its tensile strength and hardness. It was found that the best concentration for carbon black and silica is 1%wt and 2.5%wt respectively. The addition of carbon black 1%wt and silica 2.5%wt could improve the flame retardancy and gives V-0 flammability rating. Besides that, the addition of carbon black 1%wt is able to increase the thermal stability of composite by reducing mass loss rate until 10.75%/minute and total mass loss until 53.76%. While adding silica 2.5%wt could also enhance its thermal stability by decreasing mass loss rate until 9.32%/minute and total mass loss until 51.06%. Furthermore, the addition of carbon black and silica could decrease its tensile strength and hardness. The addition of carbon black 1%wt yields composite with 6.59 MPa for tensile strength and 65.8 shore D for hardness. Whereas the addition of of silica 2.5%wt produces composite with the tensile strength up to 9.89MPa and hardness up to71.2 shore D.

  11. Airborne occupational allergic contact dermatitis from triglycidyl-p-aminophenol and tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylene dianiline in preimpregnated epoxy products in the aircraft industry.

    PubMed

    Kanerva, L; Jolanki, R; Estlander, T; Henriks-Eckerman, M; Tuomi, M; Tarvainen, K

    2000-01-01

    Very little is known about allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from preimpregnated epoxy products (prepregs). To describe a patient with occupational ACD from prepregs, and report new quantitative data on the content of prepregs. A laminator developed work-related vesicular hand dermatitis. He worked in an aircraft plant assembling aircraft parts, being exposed to preimpregnated carbon fiber and fiberglass sheets (prepregs), and epoxy adhesive tapes and foams. Triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP; 1-0.25%, 2+; 0.05%, 1+) and tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylene dianiline (TGMDA; 1%, 3+; 0.5-0.05%, 2+) provoked allergic patch test reactions, whereas o-diglycidyl phthalate was negative (1-0.05% pet) and standard epoxy provoked a weak (?+) reaction. Six prepreg products provoking allergic patch test reactions were analyzed for their TGPAP, TGMDA and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) content using gas and liquid chromatographic methods, showing up to 10% of TGPAP, 19% of TGMDA and 5% of DGEBA in the prepregs. An epoxy primer contained 61% of TGPAP. TGPAP and TGMDA caused occupational ACD. These chemicals need to be used when patch testing patients are exposed to prepregs, because patch testing with DGEBA may be negative. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  13. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmetli, Gulnare, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Gungor, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr; Kocaman, Suheyla, E-mail: ahmetli@selcuk.edu.tr

    2014-05-15

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization ofmore » the composites.« less

  14. Thermochemical tests on resins: Char resistance of selected phenolic cured epoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Curing epoxy resins with novalac phenolic resins is a feasible approach for increasing intact char of the resin system. Char yields above 40% at 700 C were achieved with epoxy novalac (DEN 438)/novalac phenolic (BRWE 5833) resin systems with or without catalyst such as ethyl tri-phenyl phosphonium iodide. These char yields are comparable to commercially used epoxy resin systems like MY-720/DDS/BF3. Stable prepregs are easily made from a solvent solution of the epoxy/phenolic system and this provides a feasible process for fabrication of same into commercial laminates.

  15. Incorporation of the Fe3O4 and SiO2 nanoparticles in epoxy-modified silicone resin as the coating for soft magnetic composites with enhanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dahao; Wu, Chen; Yan, Mi

    2018-04-01

    Three inorganic-organic hybrids have been designed by incorporating epoxy-modified silicone resin (ESR) with SiO2, Fe3O4 and their mixture in the application as the coating of Fe soft magnetic composites (SMCs). The introduced SiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersed in the ESR, while the Fe3O4 tends to agglomerate or even separate from the ESR. Simultaneous addition of the SiO2 and Fe3O4 gives rise to satisfactory distribution of both nanoparticles and optimized magnetic performance of the SMCs with high permeability (124.6) and low loss (807.8 mW/cm3). On one hand, introduction of the ferromagnetic Fe3O4 reduces the magnetic dilution effect, which is beneficial for improved magnetization and permeability. On the other hand, SiO2 incorporation prevents the agglomeration of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles and gives rise to increased electrical resistivity for reduced core loss as well as enhanced mechanical strength of the SMCs.

  16. Validation of the concentration profiles obtained from the near infrared/multivariate curve resolution monitoring of reactions of epoxy resins using high performance liquid chromatography as a reference method.

    PubMed

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2007-03-07

    This paper reports the validation of the results obtained by combining near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) and using high performance liquid chromatography as a reference method, for the model reaction of phenylglycidylether (PGE) and aniline. The results are obtained as concentration profiles over the reaction time. The trueness of the proposed method has been evaluated in terms of lack of bias. The joint test for the intercept and the slope showed that there were no significant differences between the profiles calculated spectroscopically and the ones obtained experimentally by means of the chromatographic reference method at an overall level of confidence of 5%. The uncertainty of the results was estimated by using information derived from the process of assessment of trueness. Such operational aspects as the cost and availability of instrumentation and the length and cost of the analysis were evaluated. The method proposed is a good way of monitoring the reactions of epoxy resins, and it adequately shows how the species concentration varies over time.

  17. A Study of the Curing and Flammability Properties of Bisphenol A Epoxy Diacrylate Resin Utilizing a Novel Flame Retardant Monomer, bis[di-acryloyloxyethyl]-p-tert-butyl-phenyl Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Syang-Peng; Chen, Yu-Ming; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Ting, Yi-Tien

    2017-01-01

    A UV-curable, flame-retardant monomer, DAPP (bis[di-acryloyloxyethyl]-p-tert-butyl-phenyl-phosphate), was synthesized based on BPDCP (4-tert-butylphenyl-dichloro phosphate) and HEA (2-hydroxy ethyl acrylate). DAPP was blended with regular bisphenol A epoxy acrylate (BAEA) in various ratios to yield various phosphorus contents. The TGA-IR (thermogravimetric analyzer interface with an infrared spectrometer) results demonstrate that compounding 30 mol % DAPP with BAEA significantly reduced the amount of released CO gas. In contrast, the peak intensity of CO2 is independent of phosphorus content. The limiting oxygen index (LOI), reaching the saturated value of 26, and the heat release rate (HRR) measured using a cone-calorimeter, 156.43 KW/m2, confirm the saturation point when 30 mol % DAPP was compounded into BAEA. A study of the kinetics of pyrolysis reveals that Ea decreases as the phosphorus content increases. Both the TGA-IR and pyrolysis results reveal that the phosphorus compound DAPP is easily decomposed during the initial stage of burning to form an insulating layer, which inhibits further burning of the resin and the consequent release of other flammable gases. PMID:28772562

  18. Phthalocyanine Tetraamine Epoxy-Curing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fohlen, G. M.; Achar, B. N.; Parker, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Tough fire- and chemical-resistant epoxies produced by using metalphthalocyanine tetraamines (MPT's) of copper, cobalt, or nickel as curing agents. Synthesis of MPT's commercially realizable and gives pure compounds with almost 90-percent yield. Synthesis applicable for metals with atomic radii of about 1.35 angstroms, including Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Fe, Pt, Al, and V. Possible to use metal phthalocyanines to cure epoxy resins in homogeneous reaction.

  19. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure atmore » long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.« less

  20. High performance UV and thermal cure hybrid epoxy adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. F.; Iwasaki, S.; Kanari, M.; Li, B.; Wang, C.; Lu, D. Q.

    2017-06-01

    New type one component UV and thermal curable hybrid epoxy adhesive was successfully developed. The hybrid epoxy adhesive is complete initiator free composition. Neither photo-initiator nor thermal initiator is contained. The hybrid adhesive is mainly composed of special designed liquid bismaleimide, partially acrylated epoxy resin, acrylic monomer, epoxy resin and latent curing agent. Its UV light and thermal cure behavior was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Adhesive samples cured at UV only, thermal only and UV + thermal cure conditions were investigated. By calculated conversion rate of double bond in both acrylic component and maleimide compound, satisfactory light curability of the hybrid epoxy adhesive was confirmed quantitatively. The investigation results also showed that its UV cure components, acrylic and bismalimide, possess good thermal curability too. The initiator free hybrid epoxy adhesive showed satisfactory UV curability, good thermal curability and high adhesion performance.

  1. Large boron--epoxy filament-wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, W. M.; Bailey, R. L.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Advanced composite material used to fabricate pressure vessel is prepeg (partially cured) consisting of continuous, parallel boron filaments in epoxy resin matrix arranged to form tape. To fabricate chamber, tape is wound on form which must be removable after composite has been cured. Configuration of boron--epoxy composite pressure vessel was determined by computer program.

  2. Interpretation of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Heavy Duty Epoxy Based Floor Coating Doped by Nanosilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikje, M. M. Alavi; Khanmohammadi, M.; Garmarudi, A. Bagheri

    Epoxy-nano silica composites were prepared using Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (Araldite® GY 6010) resin obtained from in situ polymerization or blending method. SiO2 nanoparticles were pretreated by a silan based coupling agent. Surface treated nano silica was dispersed excellently by mechanical and ultrasonic homogenizers. A dramatic increase in the interfacial area between fillers and polymer can significantly improve the properties of the epoxy coating product such as tensile, elongation, abrasion resistance, etc.

  3. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor); Cranston, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  4. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  5. SciTech Connect

    Smith, C H

    The chemistry of the various types of reactions possible between a carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile (CBTN) liquid copolymer and a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) type epoxy resin to prepare a CTBN/DGEBA adduct is discussed. Both a dilution and a non-dilution synthesis techniqu are described. Several properties of the CTBN precursor and the modified epoxy resin were determined and are presented.

  6. Characterization and Curing Kinetics of Epoxy/Silica Nano-Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Fu; Wang, Li-Fen; Wu, Song-Mao; Su, Chean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The sol-gel technique was used to prepare epoxy/silica nano-hybrids. The thermal characteristics, curing kinetics and structure of epoxy/silica nano-hybrids were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To improve the compatibility between the organic and inorganic phases, a coupling agent was used to modify the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy. The sol-gel technique enables the silica to be successfully incorporated into the network of the hybrids, increasing the thermal stability and improving the mechanical properties of the prepared epoxy/silica nano-hybrids. An autocatalytic mechanism of the epoxy/SiO2 nanocomposites was observed. The low reaction rate of epoxy in the nanocomposites is caused by the steric hindrance in the network of hybrids that arises from the consuming of epoxide group in the network of hybrids by the silica. In the nanocomposites, the nano-scale silica particles had an average size of approximately 35 nm, and the particles were well dispersed in the epoxy matrix, according to the TEM images. PMID:28793616

  7. Fabrication and characterization of amine terminated poly(arylene ether sulfone) modified epoxy-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecere, James A.; Senger, James S.; Mcgrath, James E.; Steiner, Paul A.; Wong, Raymond S.

    1987-01-01

    Multifunctional epoxy resin networks were chemically modified with thermoplastic amine terminated poly(arylene ether sulfones) of controlled molecular weights. This system was then examined as both neat resin and as a matrix resin for carbon fiber composites. The neat resin displayed a significant increase in both fracture toughness and energy release rate values. This was attributed to the altered morphology, which could be varied from particles of polysulfone in an epoxy matrix to that of a quasi-continuous polysulfone phase.

  8. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  9. Effects of Nanofillers on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties and Chemical Resistivity of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Atchudan, Raji; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Joo, Jin

    2015-06-01

    MWCNTs was synthesized using Ni-Cr/MgO by CVD method and were purified. The purified MWCNT was used as a filler material for the fabrication of epoxy nanocomposites. The epoxy nanocomposites with different amount (wt% = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) of nanofillers (CB, SiO2 and MWCNTs) were prepared by casting method. The effects of nanofillers on the properties of neat epoxy matrix were well studied. The thermal properties of nanocomposites were studied using DSC, TGA and flame retardant, and also the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, compressive strength, impact strength, determination of hardness and chemical resistance were studied extensively. Based on the experiment's results, 2 wt% MWCNTs loading in epoxy resin showed the highest improvement in tensile strength, as compared to neat epoxy and to other epoxy systems (CB/epoxy, SiO2/epoxy). Improvements in tensile strength, glass transition temperature and decomposition temperature were observed by the addition of MWCNTs. The mechanical properties of the epoxy nanocomposites were improved due to the interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and epoxy resin. Strain hardening behavior was higher for MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites compared with CB/epoxy and SiO2/epoxy nanocomposites. The investigation of thermal and mechanical properties reveals that the incorporation of MWCNTs into the epoxy nanocomposites increases its thermal stability to a great extent. Discrete increase of glass transition temperature of nanocomposites is linearly dependent on MWCNTs content. Due to strong interfacial bonding between MWCNTs and epoxy resin, the chemical resistivity of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites is superior to neat epoxy and other epoxy systems.

  10. High char yield epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Vanucci, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Class of imide-amine curing agents preserves structural integrity, prevents fiber release, and is fully compatible with conventional epoxy resins; agents do not detract from composite properties while greatly reducing char yield. Materials utilizing curing are used in aerospace, automotive, and other structural components where deterioration must be minimized and fiber release avoided in event of fire.

  11. Resistance of Plastics to Outdoor Weathering. Glass Filament Wound Epoxies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report presents results on the aging and natural weathering of filament-wound, glass -reinforced epoxy resin systems for use as engineering...materials for Army rocket motor cases. Specimens (cylinders 9 inches long and 3 inches in diameter, using either E or S glass with various resin systems

  12. Behaviour of Epoxy Silica Nanocomposites Under Static and Creep Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Picu, Radu Catalin; Sandu, Marin; Apostol, Dragos Alexandru; Sandu, Adriana; Baciu, Florin

    2017-12-01

    Specific manufacturing technologies were applied for the fabrication of epoxy-based nanocomposites with silica nanoparticles. For dispersing the fillers in the epoxy resin special equipment such as a shear mixer and a high energy sonicator with temperature control were used. Both functionalized and unfunctionalized silica nanoparticles were added in three epoxy resins. The considered filling fraction was in most cases 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 wt%.. The obtained nanocomposites were subjected to monotonic uniaxial and creep loading at room temperature. The static mechanical properties were not significantly improved regardless the filler percentage and type of epoxy resin. Under creep loading, by increasing the stress level, the nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% silica creeps less than all other materials. Also the creep rate is reduced by adding silica nanofillers.

  13. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  14. Mechanical Reinforcement of Epoxy Composites with Carbon Fibers and HDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, R.; Chang, Q.; Huang, X.; Li, J.

    2018-01-01

    Silanized carbon fibers (CFs) and a high-density polyethylene with amino terminal groups (HDPE) were introduced into epoxy resins to fabricate high-performance composites. A. mechanical characterization of the composites was performed to investigate the effect of CFs in cured epoxy/HDPE systems. The composites revealed a noticeable improvement in the tensile strength, elongation at break, flexural strength, and impact strength in comparison with those of neat epoxy and cured epoxy/HDPE systems. SEM micrographs showed that the toughening effect could be explained by yield deformations, phase separation, and microcracking.

  15. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  16. Postbuckling behavior of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Dickson, J. N.; Rouse, M.

    1984-01-01

    Structurally efficient fuselage panels are often designed to allow buckling to occur at applied loads below ultimate. Interest in applying graphite-epoxy materials to fuselage primary structure led to several studies of the post-buckling behavior of graphite-epoxy structural components. Studies of the postbuckling behavior of flat and curved, unstiffened and stiffened graphite-epoxy panels loaded in compression and shear were summarized. The response and failure characteristics of specimens studied experimentally were described, and analytical and experimental results were compared. The specimens tested in the studies described were fabricated from commercially available 0.005-inch-thick unidirectional graphite-fiber tapes preimpregnated with 350 F cure thermosetting epoxy resins.

  17. Network Formation in Piperidine-Cured Epoxy and Epoxy-Rubber Systems: Effects of Cure Time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oyen, Raquel M.; Carr, Stephen H.

    1996-03-01

    The system, piperidine-cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) to which various amounts of carboxyl terminated acrylonitrile-butadiene (CTBN) have been added, is used as a model rubber modified thermoset. The glass transition temperatures (T_g) of a low molecular weight (374 g/eq) epoxy, cured with piperidine at 120 degC, have been measured by differential scanning calorimetry in order to follow the curing process. The maximum Tg is found after curing for 16 hours. Systems that have been modified with varied concentrations of an adducted CTBN, also show Tg maxima at this time. Addition of 5-20in long-time T_gs, indicating complete segregation of the rubber. The T_gs of the CTBN modified systems at short times are higher than in the unmodified epoxy. This acceleration of the initial stage of cure indicates that the CTBN acts as a diluent, increasing the initial rate of reaction by changing the mobility of the reactive sites. The mechanical properties--toughness, yield and modulus--are related to the CTBN content and to the degree of cure of the system.

  18. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  19. Evaluation of the Epoxy/Antimony Trioxide Nanocomposites as Flame Retardant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheyaa, Balqees M.; Jassim, Widad H.; Hameed, Noor A.

    2018-05-01

    Antimony trioxide nanopowder was added for epoxy resin in various amount weight percentages (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10) wt% to increase the combustion resistance and decrease the flammability for it. The study included three standard tests used to measure: limiting oxygen index (LOI), rate of burning (R.B), burning extent (E.B), burning time (T.B), maximum flame height (H) and residue percentage after burning in order to determine the effectiveness of the used additives to decrease the flammability of epoxy resin and increase the combustion resistance. Thermal test was done by using Lee’s disk to measure the thermal conductivity coefficient. The thermal stability and degradation kinetics of epoxy resin without reinforcement and with reinforcement by (10 wt%) were studied by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The recorded results indicated that epoxy reinforced by (10 wt%) has a good effect as flame retardants for epoxy resin and active to inhibit burning and reduce the flammability.

  20. Colorless triphenylamine-based aliphatic thermoset epoxy for multicolored and near-infrared electrochromic applications.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Wen; Yen, Hung-Ju; Wu, Jia-Hao; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2014-03-12

    In this study, two novel colorless thermoset epoxy resins with anodically electrochromism were prepared from the thermal curing of two triphenylamine-based diamine monomers, 4,4'-diamino-4″-methoxytriphenylamine (1) and N,N'-bis(4-aminophenyl)-N,N'-di(4-methoxylphenyl)-1,4-phenylenediamine (2) with aliphatic epoxy triglycidyl isocyanurate, respectively. The resulting thermoset epoxy resins showed excellent softening temperature (Ts, 270 and 280 °C) due to the rigid structure and highly crosslinking density. In addition, novel colorless epoxy resin films revealed good reversible electrochemical oxidation and interesting multi-electrochromic behavior with high contrast ratio both in visible and near-infrared regions. The aliphatic thermoset epoxy resins also exhibited high transparency in visible region as colorless and great potential for practical electrochromic applications.

  1. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2017-01-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature ( T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature ( T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  2. A criterion for maximum resin flow in composite materials curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo I.; Um, Moon-Kwang

    1993-06-01

    On the basis of Springer's resin flow model, a criterion for maximum resin flow in autoclave curing is proposed. Validity of the criterion was proved for two resin systems (Fiberite 976 and Hercules 3501-6 epoxy resin). The parameter required for the criterion can be easily estimated from the measured resin viscosity data. The proposed criterion can be used in establishing the proper cure cycle to ensure maximum resin flow and, thus, the maximum compaction.

  3. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  4. The Fracture of Thermosetting Resins after Exposure to Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    formaldehyde , urea - formaldehyde and melamine - formaldehyde resins , epoxides, unsaturated polyesters, diallyl phthalate resins , furanes and certain kinds...linked phenol- formaldehyde (27) and epoxy resins (22), but some work on the fracture surfaces of polyesters with varying flexibiliser additions has been...AO0-A099 975 KINGSTON POLYTECHNIC KINGSTON UPON THAMES (ENGLAND) F/G 11/9 THE FRACTURE OF THERMOSETTING RESINS AFTER EXPOSURE TO WATER.(U) SEP 80 6

  5. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  6. New processable modified polyimide resins for adhesive and matrix applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A broad product line of bismaleimide modified epoxy adhesives which are cured by conventional addition curing methods is described. These products fill a market need for 232 C (450 F) service adhesives which are cured in a manner similar to conventional 177 C (350 F) epoxy adhesives. The products described include film adhesives, pastes, and a primer. Subsequent development work has resulted in a new bismaleimide modified epoxy resin which uses a unique addition curing mechanism. This has resulted in products with improved thermomechanical properties compared to conventional bismaleimide epoxy resins. A film adhesive, paste, and matrix resin for composites using this new technology are described. In all cases, the products developed are heat cured by using typical epoxy cure cycles i.e., 1 hour at 177 C (350 F) followed by 2 hours postcure at 246 C (475 F).

  7. Quick mixing of epoxy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, D. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Two materials are mixed quickly, thoroughly, and in precise proportion by disposable cartridge. Cartridge mixes components of fast-curing epoxy resins, with no mess, just before they are used. It could also be used in industry and home for caulking, sealing, and patching. Materials to be mixed are initially isolated by cylinder wall within cartridge. Cylinder has vanes, with holes in them, at one end and handle at opposite end. When handle is pulled, grooves on shaft rotate cylinder so that vanes rotate to extrude material A uniformly into material B.

  8. A novel hydroxyl epoxy phosphate monomer enhancing the anticorrosive performance of waterborne Graphene/Epoxy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jiheng; Rahman, Obaid ur; Peng, Wanjun; Dou, Huimin; Yu, Haibin

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel hydroxyl epoxy phosphate monomer (PGHEP) as an efficient dispersant for graphene to enhance the compatibility of the graphene in epoxy resin. Raman spectroscopy, Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies were confirmed the π-π interactions between PGHEP and graphene. Well-dispersed states of PGHEP functionalized graphene (G) sheets in water were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, microstructure of prepared G/waterborne epoxy coatings containing 0.5-1.0 wt.% of PGHEP functionalized G sheets were also observed with the help of SEM and TEM. The PGHEP functionalized G sheets dispersed composite coatings displayed enhanced corrosion resistance compared with pure epoxy resin, these coatings have higher contact angle, lower water absorption as evident from the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray tests. The superior corrosion protection performances of G/epoxy coatings were mainly attributed to the formed passive film from uniformly dispersed PGHEP functionalized G sheets which act as physical barrier on the steel surface. Therefore, this work provides a novel bio-based efficient dispersant for G sheets and an important method for preparing G/waterborne epoxy coatings with superior corrosion resistance properties.

  9. Toward a computational and experimental model of a poly-epoxy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguet, Thomas; Bessaguet, Camille; Aufray, Maëlenn; Esvan, Jérôme; Charvillat, Cédric; Vahlas, Constantin; Lacaze-Dufaure, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    A model poly-epoxy surface formed by the reaction of DGEBA and EDA is studied by the combination of experiments and DFT calculations. A special synthesis protocol is presented leading to the formation of a surface that is smooth (Sa < 1 nm), chemically homogeneous, and that presents a low-defect density (0.21 μm-2), as shown by AFM characterizations. Then, XPS is used for the determination of the elemental and functional groups' surface composition. DFT allows the identification and assignment of individual bonds contributions to the experimental 1s core-level peaks. Overall, we demonstrate that such a model sample is perfectly suitable for a use as a template for the study of poly-epoxy surface functionalization.

  10. Fabrication of graphite/epoxy cases for orbit insertion motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, W. W.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication procedures are described for filament-wound rocket motor cases, approximately 26.25 inches long by 25.50 inches diameter, utilizing graphite fibers. The process utilized prepreg tape which consists of Fortafil 4-R fibers in the E-759 epoxy resin matrix. This fabrication effect demonstrated an ability to fabricate high quality graphite/epoxy rocket motor cases in the 26.25 inch by 25.50 inch size range.

  11. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  12. Development of quality assurance methods for epoxy graphite prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. S.; Hunter, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    Quality assurance methods for graphite epoxy/prepregs were developed. Liquid chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and gel permeation chromatography were investigated. These methods were applied to a second prepreg system. The resin matrix formulation was correlated with mechanical properties. Dynamic mechanical analysis and fracture toughness methods were investigated. The chromatography and calorimetry techniques were all successfully developed as quality assurance methods for graphite epoxy prepregs. The liquid chromatography method was the most sensitive to changes in resin formulation. The were also successfully applied to the second prepreg system.

  13. Enhancing Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Epoxy Nanocomposites via Alignment of Magnetized SiC Whiskers.

    PubMed

    Townsend, James; Burtovyy, Ruslan; Aprelev, Pavel; Kornev, Konstantin G; Luzinov, Igor

    2017-07-12

    This research is focused on the fabrication and properties of epoxy nanocomposites containing magnetized SiC whiskers (MSiCWs). To this end, we report an original strategy for fabrication of magnetically active SiCWs by decorating the whiskers with magnetic (iron oxide) nanoparticles via polymer-polymer (poly(acrylic acid)/poly(2-vinyl pyridine)) complexation. The obtained whiskers demonstrated a substantial magnetic response in the polymerizing epoxy resin, with application of only a 20 mT (200 G) magnetic field. We also found that the whiskers chemically reacted with the epoxy resin, causing formation of an extended interphase near the boundary of the whiskers. The SiC whiskers oriented with the magnetic field demonstrated positive effects on the behavior of epoxy-based nanocomposites. Namely, the aligned MSiCWs enhanced the thermomechanical properties of the materials significantly above that of the neat epoxy and epoxy nanocomposite, with randomly oriented whiskers.

  14. ABA and ABC type thermoplastic elastomer toughening of epoxy matrices and its effect on carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchiaya, Gomatheeshwar

    Epoxy-matrices have high modulus, strength, excellent creep resistance, but lacks ductility. One approach to improve the mechanical toughness is the addition of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). The TPEs investigated here are triblock copolymers of styrene-butadiene-methyl methacrylate (SBM) and methylmethacrylate-butylacrylate-methylmethacrylate (MAM) of the ABC and ABA type, respectively. The effect of concentration (1-12.5 wt %) of these TPEs on a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy cured with metaphenylenediamine (mPDA), has been investigated. The TPE-DGEBA epoxies were characterized by TGA, DMA, SEM and impact. The flexural modulus, flexural strength and thermal resistance remained unaffected up to 5 wt% loading of TPEs, and exhibited less than 10% decrease at higher weight percent. T g was unaffected for all concentrations. Fracture toughness was improved 250% and up to 375% (when non- stoichiometric amount of curing agent was used) with TPE addition to epoxy/mPDA matrix. A SBM(1phr)EPON system was chosen to be the matrix of choice for a fiber reinforced composite system with a 4wt% aromatic epoxy sizing on a AS4 (UV-treated) carbon fiber. The 0° and 90° flexural modulus and strength of a SBM modified system was compared with the neat and their fracture surfaces were analyzed. A 89% increase in flexural strength was observed in a 90° flexural test for the modified system when compared with the neat. Novel sizing agents were also developed to enhance interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and the fiber-matrix adhesion and their birefringence pattern were analyzed.

  15. Electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-SU8 epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Claudio; Mionić, Marijana; Gaal, Richard; Forró, László; Magrez, Arnaud

    2013-06-01

    We have characterized the electrical conductivity of the composite which consists of multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in SU8 epoxy resin. Depending on the processing conditions of the epoxy (ranging from non-polymerized to cross-linked), we obtained tunneling and percolating-like regimes of the electrical conductivity of the composites. We interpret the observed qualitative change of the conductivity behavior in terms of reduced separation between the nanotubes induced by polymerization of the epoxy matrix.

  16. Evaluation of epoxy compounds as a material for patching and protecting concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-01-01

    The final report summarizes the results of a study of the use of epoxy compounds in the shallow surface repair and sealing of concrete bridge decks. The research effort concentrated on the use of epoxy resin systems as bonded overlays and included ev...

  17. Space environmental effects on graphite-epoxy compressive properties and epoxy tensile properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Derek J.; Sykes, George F., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the effects of electron radiation and temperature on a graphite-epoxy composite material. Compressive properties of the T300/934 material system were obtained at -250 F (-157 C), room temperature, and 250 F (121 C). Tensile specimens of the Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were fabricated and tested at room temperature and 250 F (121 C). Testing was conducted in the baseline (nonirradiated) and irradiated conditions. The radiation exposure was designed to simulate 30 year, worst-case exposure in geosynchronous Earth orbit. Mechanical properties tended to degrade at elevated temperature and improve at cryogenic temperature. Irradiation generally degraded properties at all temperatures.

  18. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  19. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  20. The Modification of a Tetrafunctional Epoxy and Its Curing Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingming; Feng, Bin; Xie, Wang; Fang, Lin; Li, Hong; Liu, Liqi; Ren, Musu; Sun, Jinliang; Zhang, Jiabao; Hu, Hefeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental results showed that the Tg of cured resin scarcely decreased and the impact strength of resins increased by over 50% when a tetrafunctional epoxy named N,N,N',N'-tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether (TGDDE) was introduced to an appropriate flexible chain from a dimer fatty acid (DFA). In order to understand the reason for this phenomenon, the modification and the chemical structure of the prepolymer together with the curing reaction and the viscoelasticity of the cured resins were studied in detail in the present work. The results indicated that the modification would help the prepolymer improve its molecular mobility. As a result, the resins could be further cured, resulting in the cross-linking density increasing. This is because the curing efficiency was increased, but the tetrafunctional epoxy was not cured completely due to its large steric hindrance. Moreover, the flexibility of some parts of the networks was improved, which was beneficial for the toughness of the cured resins. Therefore, the toughness of the tetrafunctional resin was improved with little influence on the thermal properties when the epoxies were modified with an appropriate content of DFA.

  1. Intrinsic Flame-Retardant and Thermally Stable Epoxy Endowed by a Highly Efficient, Multifunctional Curing Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunlei; Wirasaputra, Alvianto; Luo, Qinqin; Liu, Shumei; Yuan, Yanchao; Zhao, Jianqing; Fu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to realize flame retardancy of epoxy without suffering much detriment in thermal stability. To solve the problem, a super-efficient phosphorus-nitrogen-containing reactive-type flame retardant, 10-(hydroxy(4-hydroxyphenyl)methyl)-5,10-dihydrophenophosphazinine-10-oxide (HB-DPPA) is synthesized and characterized. When it is used as a co-curing agent of 4,4′-methylenedianiline (DDM) for curing diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), the cured epoxy achieves UL-94 V-0 rating with the limiting oxygen index of 29.3%. In this case, the phosphorus content in the system is exceptionally low (0.18 wt %). To the best of our knowledge, it currently has the highest efficiency among similar epoxy systems. Such excellent flame retardancy originates from the exclusive chemical structure of the phenophosphazine moiety, in which the phosphorus element is stabilized by the two adjacent aromatic rings. The action in the condensed phase is enhanced and followed by pressurization of the pyrolytic gases that induces the blowing-out effect during combustion. The cone calorimeter result reveals the formation of a unique intumescent char structure with five discernible layers. Owing to the super-efficient flame retardancy and the rigid molecular structure of HB-DPPA, the flame-retardant epoxy acquires high thermal stability and its initial decomposition temperature only decreases by 4.6 °C as compared with the unmodified one. PMID:28774127

  2. A molecular dynamics study on the interaction between epoxy and functionalized graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melro, L. S.; Pyrz, R.; Jensen, L. R.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between graphene and epoxy resin was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The interfacial shear strength and pull out force were calculated for functionalised graphene layers (carboxyl, carbonyl, and hydroxyl) and epoxy composites interfaces. The influence of functional groups, as well as their distribution and coverage density on the graphene sheets were also analysed through the determination of the Young's modulus. Functionalisation proved to be detrimental to the mechanical properties, nonetheless according to interfacial studies the interaction between graphene and epoxy resin increases.

  3. Photocured epoxy/graphene nanocomposites with enhanced water vapor barrier properties

    SciTech Connect

    Periolatto, M.; Spena, P. Russo; Sangermano, M.

    A transparent, water vapor barrier film made of an epoxy resin and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized by photopolymerization process. The epoxy/GO film with just 0.05 wt% GO gives a 93% WVTR reduction with respect to the pristine polymer, reaching barrier properties better than other polymer composites containing higher amounts of graphene. The excellent water vapor barrier is attributed to the good dispersion of GO in the polymer matrix. Moreover, GO significantly enhances the toughness and the damping capacity of the epoxy resins. The hybrid film can have potential applications in anticorrosive coatings, electronic devices, pharmaceuticals and food packaging.

  4. Photocured epoxy/graphene nanocomposites with enhanced water vapor barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periolatto, M.; Sangermano, M.; Spena, P. Russo

    2016-05-01

    A transparent, water vapor barrier film made of an epoxy resin and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized by photopolymerization process. The epoxy/GO film with just 0.05 wt% GO gives a 93% WVTR reduction with respect to the pristine polymer, reaching barrier properties better than other polymer composites containing higher amounts of graphene. The excellent water vapor barrier is attributed to the good dispersion of GO in the polymer matrix. Moreover, GO significantly enhances the toughness and the damping capacity of the epoxy resins. The hybrid film can have potential applications in anticorrosive coatings, electronic devices, pharmaceuticals and food packaging.

  5. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  6. Degradation free epoxy impregnation of REBCO coils and cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C.; Bagrets, N.; Weiss, K.-P.; Bayer, C. M.; Bast, T.

    2013-05-01

    In applications utilizing high-temperature superconductors (HTS) under high mechanical loads as high-field magnets or rotors of generators and motors, the rare-earth-barium-copper-oxide (REBCO) tapes have to be stabilized mechanically. This is achieved using support structures of structural materials and filling the voids in the support through the impregnation of the tapes. The impregnation prevents movement of the tapes and distributes mechanical loads evenly. With high mechanical strengths and low sensitivities to rapid temperature changes, epoxy resins are desired materials for the impregnation of superconductor tapes. However, a strong decrease of the current-carrying capabilities was observed in previous epoxy-impregnated REBCO coils. In this work the thermal expansion mismatches between epoxy resins and REBCO tapes are identified as the cause of these degradations. Fillers are used to reduce the thermal expansions of glues and resins. Mixtures with varying filler contents are analyzed systematically. Their thermal expansions and the corresponding degradations of short REBCO tape samples are measured. A mixture of epoxy resin and filler is found which allows degradation-free impregnation of REBCO tapes. This mixture is validated on a 1.2 m long 15 × 5 Roebel-assembled-coated-conductor (RACC) cable from Industrial Research Limited (IRL).

  7. Effects of hydrothermal exposure on a low-temperature cured epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analysis was employed to monitor the penetration temperature of a low-temperature epoxy resin (EPON 826/D230). Both neat resin and E-glass composite samples were examined. The effects of cure temperature variation and moisture content on the apparent glass transition temperature were determined.

  8. Effects of hydrothermal exposure on a low-temperature cured epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analysis was employed to monitor the penetration temperature of a low-temperature epoxy resin. Both neat resin and E-glass composite samples were examined. The effects of cure temperature variation and moisture content on the apparent glass transition temperature were determined.

  9. Contact allergy to an epoxy reactive diluent: 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether.

    PubMed

    Jolanki, R; Estlander, T; Kanerva, L

    1987-02-01

    3 female workers in a brush factory developed contact allergy from a 2-component epoxy glue containing epoxy resin (37% w/w), reactive diluents: i.e., 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE) 3%, glycidyl ethers of aliphatic alcohols (Epoxide 8) 0.03% and phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) 0.01%; and inert fillers. All 3 patients were positive to the resin component of the glue and to BDDGE, indicating that BDDGE was the main allergen. 2 of the patients reacted to PGE, but none to the 3rd reactive diluent (Epoxide 8) in the glue. 2 of the patients did not react to epoxy resin, indicating that BDDGE may be an even stronger sensitizer in humans than epoxy resin, and that it does not cross-react with epoxy resins. Permeation studies revealed that BDDGE penetrates disposable PVC and rubber gloves in less than 30 min; thus, contaminated gloves should be replaced immediately. Reactive diluents should be included in patch test series if contact allergy to epoxy products is suspected.

  10. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  11. Design and Analysis of Drive Shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, P.; Gobinath, R.; Kumar, L. Ajith; Jenish, D. Xavier

    2017-05-01

    In automobile industry drive shaft is one of the most important components to transmit power form the engine to rear wheel through the differential gear. Generally steel drive shaft is used in automobile industry, nowadays they are more interested to replace steel drive shaft with that of composite drive shaft. The overall objective of this paper is to analyze the composite drive shaft using to find out the best replacement for conventional steel drive shaft. The uses of advanced composite materials such as Kevlar, Graphite, Carbon and Glass with proper resins ware resulted in remarkable achievements in automobile industry because of its greater specific strength and specific modulus, improved fatigue and corrosion resistances and reduction in energy requirements due to reduction in weight as compared to steel shaft. This paper is to presents, the modeling and analysis of drive shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a composite material and to find best replacement for conventional steel drive shafts with an Kevlar/epoxy or Glass/Epoxy resin composite drive shaft. Modeling is done using CATIA software and Analysis is carried out by using ANSYS 10.0 software for easy understanding. The composite drive shaft reduces the weight by 81.67 % for Kevlar/Epoxy and 72.66% for Glass/Epoxy when compared with conventional steel drive shaft.

  12. Epoxy based nanocomposites with fully exfoliated unmodified clay: mechanical and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gao, Jianming; Song, Zhihai; Qi, Guicun; Liu, Yiqun; Qiao, Jinliang

    2010-09-01

    The unmodified clay has been fully exfoliated in epoxy resin with the aid of a novel ultrafine full-vulcanized powdered rubber. Epoxy/rubber/clay nanocomposites with exfoliated morphology have been successfully prepared. The microstructures of the nanocomposites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the unmodified clay was fully exfoliated and uniformly dispersed in the resulting nanocomposite. Characterizations of mechanical properties revealed that the impact strength of this special epoxy/rubber/clay nanocomposite increased up 107% over the neat epoxy resin. Thermal analyses showed that thermal stability of the nanocomposite was much better than that of epoxy nanocomposite based on organically modified clay.

  13. The Effect of Water on the Work of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Frankland, S.J.V.; Clancy, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation can be used to explore the detailed effects of chemistry on properties of materials. In this paper, two different epoxies found in aerospace resins are modeled using molecular dynamics. The first material, an amine-cured tetrafunctional epoxy, represents a composite matrix resin, while the second represents a 177 C-cured adhesive. Surface energies are derived for both epoxies and the work of adhesion values calculated for the epoxy/epoxy interfaces agree with experiment. Adding water -- to simulate the effect of moisture exposure -- reduced the work of adhesion in one case, and increased it in the other. To explore the difference, the various energy terms that make up the net work of adhesion were compared and the location of the added water was examined.

  14. Static and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Graphene Oxide-Incorporated Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Nitai Chandra; Chhetri, Suman; Kim, Nam Hoon; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Samanta, Pranab; Kuila, Tapas

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the synergistic effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the woven carbon fiber (CF)-reinforced epoxy composites. The GO nanofiller was incorporated into the epoxy resin with variations in the content, and the CF/epoxy composites were manufactured using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process and then cured at 70 and 120 °C. An analysis of the mechanical properties of the GO (0.2 wt.%)/CF/epoxy composites showed an improvement in the tensile strength, Young's modulus, toughness, flexural strength and flexural modulus by 34, 20, 83, 55 and 31%, respectively, when compared to the CF/epoxy composite. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the composites exhibited an enhancement of 56, 114 and 22% in the storage modulus, loss modulus and damping capacity (tan δ), respectively, at its glass transition temperature. The fiber-matrix interaction was studied using a Cole-Cole plot analysis.

  15. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  16. Studies on the structural changes during curing of epoxy and its blend with CTBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Kavita; Rathore, Ashwani Kumar; Srivastava, Deepak

    2018-01-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), an agricultural renewable resource material, produces natural phenolic distillates such as cardanol. Cardanol condenses with formaldehyde at the ortho- and para-position of the phenolic ring under acidic or alkaline condition to yield a series of polymers of novolac- or resol-type phenolic resins. These phenolic resins may further be modified by epoxidation with epichlorohydrin to duplicate the performance of such phenolic-type novolacs (CFN). The structural changes during curing of blend samples of epoxy and carboxyl terminated poly (butadiene-co-acrylonitrile) (CTBN) were studies by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer. The epoxy samples were synthesized by biomass material, cardanol. Blend sample was prepared by physical mixing of CTBN ranging between 0 and 20 weight percent CTBN liquid rubber into cardanol-based epoxidized novolac (CEN) resin. The FTIR spectrum of uncured blend sample clearly indicated that there appeared a band in the region of 3200-3500 cm- 1 which might be due to the presence of phenolic hydroxyl group and sbnd OH group of the opened epoxide. Pure epoxy resin showed peaks near 856 cm- 1 which might be due to oxirane functionality of the epoxidized novolac resin. Both epoxy and its blend sample was cured with polyamine. The cure temperature of CEN resin was found to be decreased by the incorporation of CTBN. The decomposition behavior was also studied by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Two-step decomposition behavior was observed in both epoxy and its blend samples.

  17. Bearingless helicopter main rotor development. Volume 2: Combined load fatigue evaluation of weathered graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rackiewicz, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Small scale combined load fatigue tests were conducted on six artificially and six naturally weathered test specimens. The test specimen material was unidirectionally oriented A-S graphite - woven glass scrim epoxy resin laminate.

  18. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Jessica Sunshine, EPOXI Deputy Principal Investigator, University of Maryland, far right, discusses imagery sent back from the EPOXI Mission spacecraft during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  19. Epoxy/Fluoroether Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Taylor, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Composite materials made from unfilled and glass-fiber-reinforced epoxy toughened by copolymerization with elastomeric prepolymers of perfluoroalkyl ether diacyl fluoride (EDAF). Improved properties due to hydrogen bonding between rubber phase and epoxy matrix, plus formation of rubberlike phase domains that molecularly interpenetrate with epoxy matrix. With optimum rubber content, particle size, and particle shape, entire molecular structure reinforced and toughened. Improved composites also show increased failure strength, stiffness, glass-transition temperature, and resistance to water.

  20. Nanofiltration membranes of poly(styrene- co-chloro-methylstyrene)- grafted-DGEBA reinforced with gold and polystyrene nanoparticles for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Ayesha; Siddiq, Muhammad

    2017-06-01

    The matrix material for nanofiltration membranes was prepared through chemical grafting of poly(styrene- co-chloromethylstyrene) (PSCMS) to DGEBA using hexamethylenediamine as linker. The phase inversion technique was used to form PSCMS- g-DGEBA membranes. This effort also involves the designing of gold nanoparticles and its composite nanoparticles with polystyrene microspheres as matrix reinforcement. The nanoporous morphology was observed at lower filler content and there was formation of nanopattern at increased nanofiller content. The tensile strength was improved from 32.5 to 35.2 MPa with the increase in AuNPs-PSNPs loading from 0.1 to 1 wt%. The glass transition temperature was also enhanced from 132 to 159 °C. The membrane properties were measured via nanofiltration set-up. Higher pure water permeation flux, recovery, and salt rejection were measured for novel membranes. PSCMS- g-DGEBA/AuNPs-PSNPs membrane with 1 wt% loading showed flux of 2.01 mL cm-2 min-1 and salt rejection ratio of 70.4 %. Efficiency of the gold/polystyrene nanoparticles reinforced membranes for the removal of Hg2+ and Pb2 was found to be 99 %. Novel hybrid membranes possess fine characteristics to be utilized in industrial water treatment units.

  1. Aspects of the Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube Modified Epoxy Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirjalili, Vahid

    Epoxy resins used in fibre reinforced composites exhibit a brittle fracture behaviour, because they show no sign of damage prior to a catastrophic failure. Rubbery materials and micro-particles have been added to epoxy resins to improve their fracture toughness, which reduces strength and elastic properties. In this research, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated as a potential toughening agent for epoxy resins and carbon fibre reinforced composites, which can also enhance strength and elastic properties. More specifically, the toughening mechanisms of CNTs are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The effect of aligned and randomly oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the fracture toughness of polymers was modelled using Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics. Toughening from CNT pull-out and rupture were considered, depending on the CNTs critical length. The model was used to identify the effect of CNTs geometrical and mechanical properties on the fracture toughness of CNT-modified epoxies. The modelling results showed that a uniform dispersion and alignment of a high volume fraction of CNTs normal to the crack growth plane would lead to the maximum fracture toughness enhancement. To achieve a uniform dispersion, the effect of processing on the dispersion of single walled and multi walled CNTs in epoxy resins was investigated. An instrumented optical microscope with a hot stage was used to quantify the evolution of the CNT dispersion during cure. The results showed that the reduction of the resin viscosity at temperatures greater than 100 °C caused an irreversible re-agglomeration of the CNTs in the matrix. The dispersion quality was then directly correlated to the fracture toughness of the modified resin. It was shown that the fine tuning of the ratio of epoxy resin, curing agent and CNT content was paramount to the improvement of the base resin fracture toughness. For the epoxy resin (MY0510 from Hexcel), an improvement of 38% was achieved with 0.3 wt

  2. Allergic contact dermatitis from resin hardeners during the manufacture of thermosetting coating paints.

    PubMed

    Foulds, I S; Koh, D

    1992-02-01

    5 production operators from 2 factories manufacturing thermosetting coating paint developed work-related skin disorders within 12 months of the introduction of a new powdered paint product. All 5 workers were found to have allergic contact dermatitis from 2 epoxy resin hardeners, both of which were commercial preparations of triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC). 2 of the workers had concomitant sensitization to epoxy resin in the standard series and several of the epoxy resin preparations at the workplace. TGIC has been reported as a contact sensitizer both in persons producing the chemical and among end-users of TGIC-containing products. These 5 reported cases document allergic contact dermatitis from commercial TGIC among exposed workers during an intermediate process of powdered paint manufacture. The possibility of substituting this epoxy resin hardener with less sensitizing alternatives should be explored.

  3. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. T.; Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Chandran, C. S.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy polymer after exposure to different doses of electron beam irradiation. The epoxy polymer was prepared using epoxy-diane resin ED-20 cured by polyethylenepolyamine. The irradiation of the samples was carried out with doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy. The effects of doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy polymer were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal properties of the epoxy polymer slightly increased after irradiation at the heating in air. The tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the epoxy polymer increased by the action of electron beam up to dose of 100 kGy and then decreased. The elongation at break decreased with increasing the irradiation dose.

  4. Effect of Zirconia Nanoparticles in Epoxy-Silica Hybrid Adhesives to Join Aluminum Substrates.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Lara, José de Jesús; Torres-Rodríguez, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Arzaluz, Mirella; Romero-Romo, Mario

    2017-09-27

    This research presents the interaction of the epoxy polymer diglicydil ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with silica (SiO₂) nanoparticles plus zirconia (ZrO₂) nanoparticles obtained via the sol-gel method in the synthesis of an epoxy-silica-zirconia hybrid adhesive cured with polyamide. ZrO₂ nanoparticles were added to the epoxy-silica hybrid adhesive produced in situ to modify the apparent shear strength of two adhesively bonded aluminum specimens. The results showed that the addition of different amounts of ZrO₂ nanoparticles increased the shear strength of the adhesively bonded aluminum joint, previously treated by sandblasting, immersion in hot water and silanized with a solution of hydrolyzed 3-glycidoxipropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The morphology and microstructure of the nanoparticles and aluminum surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and elemental analysis was performed with the Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) detector; the chemical groups were investigated during the aluminum surface modification using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  5. Effect of Zirconia Nanoparticles in Epoxy-Silica Hybrid Adhesives to Join Aluminum Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Lara, José de Jesús; Torres-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    This research presents the interaction of the epoxy polymer diglicydil ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with silica (SiO2) nanoparticles plus zirconia (ZrO2) nanoparticles obtained via the sol-gel method in the synthesis of an epoxy-silica-zirconia hybrid adhesive cured with polyamide. ZrO2 nanoparticles were added to the epoxy-silica hybrid adhesive produced in situ to modify the apparent shear strength of two adhesively bonded aluminum specimens. The results showed that the addition of different amounts of ZrO2 nanoparticles increased the shear strength of the adhesively bonded aluminum joint, previously treated by sandblasting, immersion in hot water and silanized with a solution of hydrolyzed 3-glycidoxipropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The morphology and microstructure of the nanoparticles and aluminum surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and elemental analysis was performed with the Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) detector; the chemical groups were investigated during the aluminum surface modification using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:28953243

  6. Structure and properties of epoxy-siloxane-silica nanocomposite coatings for corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Torrico, Ruben F A O; Harb, Samarah V; Trentin, Andressa; Uvida, Mayara C; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V; Hammer, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The fraction of the silica/siloxane phase is a crucial parameter, which determines the structure and thus the properties of epoxy-siloxane-silica hybrid coatings. A careful adjustment of the colloidal precursor formulation allows tuning the nanostructure towards a highly condensed and cross-linked hybrid nanocomposite, suitable as an efficient anticorrosive coating. Novel epoxy-siloxane-silica hybrids have been prepared through the curing reaction of poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin) (DGEBA) with diethyltriamine (DETA) and (3-glycidoxypropyl)methyltriethoxysilane (GPTMS), followed by hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and GPTMS. At a constant proportion of the organic phase, the effects of the varying molar proportions of siloxane (GPTMS) and silica (TEOS) on the film properties have been investigated. A detailed structural analysis suggests for intermediate TEOS to GPTMS ratios a structure of highly condensed silica-siloxane domains covalently bonded to the embedding epoxy phase. The homogeneous distribution of the quasi-spherical sub-nonmetric silica-siloxane nodes is in agreement with low surface roughness (<5 nm), observed by atomic force microscopy. This dense nanostructure results in high thermal stability (>300 °C), strong adhesion to steel substrate and excellent barrier property in saline solution, with corrosion resistance in the GΩ cm 2 range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clay/Polyaniline Hybrid through Diazonium Chemistry: Conductive Nanofiller with Unusual Effects on Interfacial Properties of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jlassi, Khouloud; Chandran, Sarath; Poothanari, Mohammed A; Benna-Zayani, Mémia; Thomas, Sabu; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2016-04-12

    The concept of conductive network structure in thermoset matrix without sacrificing the inherent mechanical properties of thermoset polymer (e.g., epoxy) is investigated here using "hairy" bentonite fillers. The latter were prepared through the in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of 4-diphenylamine diazonium (DPA)-modified bentonite (B-DPA) resulting in a highly exfoliated bentonite-DPA/polyaniline (B-DPA/PANI). The nanocomposite filler was mixed with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), and the curing agent (4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone) (DDS) at high temperature in order to obtain nanocomposites through the conventional melt mixing technique. The role of B-DPA in the modification of the interface between epoxy and B-DPA/polyaniline (B-DPA/PANI) is investigated and compared with the filler B/PANI prepared without any diazonium modification of the bentonite. Synergistic improvement in dielectric properties and mechanical properties points to the fact that the DPA aryl groups from the diazonium precursor significantly modify the interface by acting as an efficient stress transfer medium. In DPA-containing nanocomposites, unique fibril formation was observed on the fracture surface. Moreover, dramatic improvement (210-220%) in fracture toughness of epoxy composite was obtained with B-DPA/PANI filler as compared to the weak improvement of 20-30% noted in the case of the B/PANI filler. This work shows that the DPA diazonium salt has an important effect on the improvement of the interfacial properties and adhesion of DGEBA and clay/PANI nanofillers.

  8. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  9. Interlaminar shear properties of graphite fiber, high-performance resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fish, R. H.; Varma, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short beam testing was used to determine the shear properties of laminates consisting of T-300 and Celion 3000 and 6000 graphite fibers, in epoxy, hot melt and solvent bismaleimide, polyimide and polystyrylpyridine (PSP). Epoxy, composites showed the highest interlaminar shear strength, with values for all other resins being substantially lower. The dependence of interlaminar shear properties on the fiber-resin interfacial bond and on resin wetting characteristics and mechanical properties is investigated, and it is determined that the lower shear strength of the tested composites, by comparison with epoxy resin matrix composites, is due to their correspondingly lower interfacial bond strengths. An investigation of the effect of the wettability of carbon fiber tow on shear strength shows wetting variations among resins that are too small to account for the large shear strength property differences observed.

  10. Latent Hardeners for the Assembly of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Mercado, Zoar; Galloway, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale composite structures are commonly joined by secondary bonding of molded-and-cured thermoset components. This approach may result in unpredictable joint strengths. In contrast, assemblies made by co-curing, although limited in size by the mold, result in stable structures, and are certifiable for commercial aviation because of structural continuity through the joints. Multifunctional epoxy resins were prepared that should produce fully-cured subcomponents with uncured joining surfaces, enabling them to be assembled by co-curing in a subsequent out-of-autoclave process. Aromatic diamines were protected by condensation with a ketone or aldehyde to form imines. Properties of the amine-cured epoxy were compared with those of commercially available thermosetting epoxy resins and rheology and thermal analysis were used to demonstrate the efficacy of imine protection. Optimum conditions to reverse the protecting chemistry in the solid state using moisture and acid catalysis were determined. Alternative chemistries were also investigated. For example, chain reaction depolymerization and photoinitiated catalysts would be expected to minimize liberation of volatile organic content upon deprotection and avoid residual reactive species that could damage the resin. Results from the analysis of protected and deprotected resins will be presented.

  11. Additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials from the workplace at the occupational disease specialty clinic in Toronto.

    PubMed

    Houle, Marie-Claude; Holness, D Linn; Dekoven, Joel; Skotnicki, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to epoxy resins is one of the major causes of occupationally induced ACD. Testing of custom epoxy materials from the workplace is often performed to diagnose ACD. The objective of this study was to investigate the additive value of patch testing custom-made epoxy materials. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes of 24 patients who were tested to custom epoxy resin materials between January 2002 and July 2011. For 11 patients (46%), the testing of their materials from work had no additional value (negative results). For 13 patients (54%), there was an additional value of testing custom allergens. Of those, 7 patients (54%) had positive reactions to custom epoxy materials that reinforced the test results found with the commercially available allergens, and 6 (46%) patients had positive reactions only to custom epoxy materials. Therefore, for 6 patients (25%), there was a definite additive value of testing custom epoxy materials because the allergy was discovered with custom testing and not with the commercially available allergens. Because of the high percentage (54%) of patients with additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials, we think that the inclusion of actual workplace epoxy materials should be strongly considered when patch testing patients with occupational epoxy exposure.

  12. Preparation and optical properties of indium tin oxide/epoxy nanocomposites with polyglycidyl methacrylate grafted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Viswanath, Anand; Schadler, Linda S; Benicewicz, Brian C; Siegel, Richard W

    2011-09-01

    Visibly highly transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)/epoxy nanocomposites were prepared by dispersing polyglycidyl methacrylate (PGMA) grafted ITO nanoparticles into a commercial epoxy resin. The oleic acid stabilized, highly crystalline, and near monodisperse ITO nanoparticles were synthesized via a nonaqueous synthetic route with multigram batch quantities. An azido-phosphate ligand was synthesized and used to exchange with oleic acid on the ITO surface. The azide terminal group allows for the grafting of epoxy resin compatible PGMA polymer chains via Cu(I) catalyzed alkyne-azide "click" chemistry. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation shows that PGMA grafted ITO particles were homogeneously dispersed within the epoxy matrix. Optical properties of ITO/epoxy nanocomposites with different ITO concentrations were studied with an ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectrometer. All the ITO/epoxy nanocomposites show more than 90% optical transparency in the visible light range and absorption of UV light from 300 to 400 nm. In the near-infrared region, ITO/epoxy nanocomposites demonstrate low transmittance and the infrared (IR) transmission cutoff wavelength of the composites shifts toward the lower wavelength with increased ITO concentration. The ITO/epoxy nanocomposites were applied onto both glass and plastic substrates as visibly transparent and UV/IR opaque optical coatings.

  13. Characterization of Polyimide Matrix Resins and Prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M. G.; Galeos, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide composite materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of aerospace applications. They have many of the virtues of graphite/epoxies, i.e., high specific strengths and stiffness, and also outstanding thermal/oxidative stability. Yet they are not widely used in the aerospace industry due to problems of procesability. By their nature, modern addition polyimide (PI) resins and prepregs are more complex than epoxies; the key to processing lies in characterizing and understanding the materials. Chemical and rheological characterizations are carried out on several addition polyimide resins and graphite reinforced prepregs, including those based on PMR-15, LARC 160 (AP 22), LARC 160 (Curithane 103) and V378A. The use of a high range torque transducer with a Rheometrics mechanical spectrometer allows rheological data to be generated on prepreg materials as well as neat resins. The use of prepreg samples instead of neat resins eliminates the need for preimidization of the samples and the data correlates well with processing behavior found in the shop. Rheological characterization of the resins and prepregs finds significant differences not readily detected by conventional chemical characterization techniques.

  14. Effect of Boric Acid on Volatile Products of Thermooxidative Degradation of Epoxy Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Bukhareva, P. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The polymeric materials are characterized by high flammability. The use of flame retardants in order to reduce the flammability of polymers can lead to the formation of toxic gaseous products under fire conditions. In this work we studied the effect of boric acid on the volatile products of thermooxidative degradation of epoxy polymers. The comparative investigations were carried out on the samples of the unfilled epoxy resin and epoxy resin filled with a boric acid at percentage 10 wt. %. The analysis of the volatile decomposition products and thermal stability of the samples under heating in an oxidizing medium was performed using a thermal mass-spectrometric analysis. It is found that the incorporation of boric acid into the polymer matrix increases the thermal stability of epoxy composites and leads to a reduction in the 2-2.7 times of toxic gaseous products

  15. Rubber-toughened polyfunctional epoxies - Brominated vs nonbrominated formulated for graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new, commercially available, trifunctional epoxy resin (tris-(hydroxyphenyl)-methane triglycidyl ether) was modified with synthetic rubber to increase the impact resistance of epoxy/graphite composites. These composites were reinforced with commercially available satin-weave carbon cloth using two formulations of epoxies (brominated and nonbrominated) containing various amounts of carboxy-terminated butadience acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber that had been prereacted with epoxy resin. The impact resistance was determined by measuring the interlaminar shear strength of the composites after impact. The mechanical properties, such as flexural strength and modulus at room temperature and at 93 C, were also determined. Measurements were taken of the flammability and glass transition temperature (Tg); and a thermal-gravimetric analysis was made.

  16. The fabrication, testing and delivery of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy nondestructive test standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.; Lewis, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of the boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy nondestructive test standards which were fabricated, tested and delivered to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Detailed design drawings of the standards are included to show the general structures and the types and location of simulated defects built into the panels. The panels were laminates with plies laid up in the 0 deg, + or - 45 deg, and 90 deg orientations and containing either titanium substrates or interlayered titanium perforated shims. Panel thickness was incrementally stepped from 2.36 mm (0.093 in.) to 12.7 mm (0.500 in.) for the graphite/epoxy standards, and from 2.36 mm (0.093 in.) to 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) for the boron/epoxy standards except for the panels with interlayered shims which were 2.9 mm (0.113 in.) maximum thickness. The panel internal conditions included defect free regions, resin variations, density/porosity variations, cure variations, delaminations/disbonds at substrate bondlines and between layers, inclusions, and interlayered shims. Ultrasonic pulse echo C-scan and low-kilovoltage X-ray techniques were used to evaluate and verify the internal conditions of the panels.

  17. Thermal and mechanical behavior of flame retardant epoxy-polyesterurethane blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Hirani, A. V.; Kachhia, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Polyesterurethanes are used in different applications due to their unique combination of the properties like toughness, flexibility, solvent resistance, etc. Nowadays flame retardant properties of polymers are of commercial interest because of their potential use in high performance applications. In the present study attempts have been taken to improve the flame retardant properties of conventional epoxy resin by incorporating phosphorus based polyesterurethane. Polyesterurethane has been synthesized in the laboratory and characterized by chemical and instrumental analysis techniques. Thermal stability and char value of the blends have been determined using thermogravimetric analysis technique. Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI) and UL-94 test methods have been used to determine the flame retardant properties of neat polymer and their blends in film form. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, elongation and impact resistance of the blends have been found out. Polyblend of epoxy resin with phosphorus based polyesterurethane has improved flame retardant properties compare to neat epoxy resin.

  18. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Michael A'Hearn, EPOXI Principal Investigator, University of Maryland, holds a plastic bottle containing ice to illustrate a point during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  19. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Tim Larson, EPOXI Project Manager from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Pete Schultz, EPOXI scientist from Brown University, makes a point during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  1. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  2. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

  3. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  4. Novel Formulations of Phase Change Materials-Epoxy Composites for Thermal Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Arce, Maria Elena; Alvarez Feijoo, Miguel Angel; Suarez Garcia, Andres; Luhrs, Claudia C

    2018-01-26

    This research aimed to evaluate the thermal properties of new formulations of phase change materials (PCMs)-epoxy composites, containing a thickening agent and a thermally conductive phase. The composite specimens produced consisted of composites fabricated using (a) inorganic PCMs (hydrated salts), epoxy resins and aluminum particulates or (b) organic PCM (paraffin), epoxy resins, and copper particles. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used to analyze the thermal behavior of the samples, while hardness measurements were used to determine changes in mechanical properties at diverse PCM and conductive phase loading values. The results indicate that the epoxy matrix can act as a container for the PCM phase without hindering the heat-absorbing behavior of the PCMs employed. Organic PCMs presented reversible phase transformations over multiple cycles, an advantage that was lacking in their inorganic counterparts. The enthalpy of the organic PCM-epoxy specimens increased linearly with the PCM content in the matrix. The use of thickening agents prevented phase segregation issues and allowed the fabrication of specimens containing up to 40% PCM, a loading significantly higher than others reported. The conductive phase seemed to improve the heat transfer and the mechanical properties of the composites when present in low percentages (<10 wt %); however, given its mass, the enthalpy detected in the composites was reduced as their loading further increased. The conductive phase combination (PCM + epoxy resin + hardener + thickening agent) presents great potential as a heat-absorbing material at the temperatures employed.

  5. Novel Formulations of Phase Change Materials—Epoxy Composites for Thermal Energy Storage

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Feijoo, Miguel Angel

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate the thermal properties of new formulations of phase change materials (PCMs)-epoxy composites, containing a thickening agent and a thermally conductive phase. The composite specimens produced consisted of composites fabricated using (a) inorganic PCMs (hydrated salts), epoxy resins and aluminum particulates or (b) organic PCM (paraffin), epoxy resins, and copper particles. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used to analyze the thermal behavior of the samples, while hardness measurements were used to determine changes in mechanical properties at diverse PCM and conductive phase loading values. The results indicate that the epoxy matrix can act as a container for the PCM phase without hindering the heat-absorbing behavior of the PCMs employed. Organic PCMs presented reversible phase transformations over multiple cycles, an advantage that was lacking in their inorganic counterparts. The enthalpy of the organic PCM-epoxy specimens increased linearly with the PCM content in the matrix. The use of thickening agents prevented phase segregation issues and allowed the fabrication of specimens containing up to 40% PCM, a loading significantly higher than others reported. The conductive phase seemed to improve the heat transfer and the mechanical properties of the composites when present in low percentages (<10 wt %); however, given its mass, the enthalpy detected in the composites was reduced as their loading further increased. The conductive phase combination (PCM + epoxy resin + hardener + thickening agent) presents great potential as a heat-absorbing material at the temperatures employed. PMID:29373538

  6. Selective Clay Placement within a Silicate Clay-Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite and the Effect on Physical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Scheiman, Daniel A; Kohlmman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    Many epoxy systems under consideration for composite pressure vessels are composed of toughened epoxy resins. In this work, epoxy blends containing both rigid aromatic and flexible aliphatic components were prepared, to model toughened systems, and determine the optimum route of silicate addition. Compositions were chosen such that both glassy and rubbery resins were obtained at room temperature. The physical properties of the nanocomposites varied with T(g) and silicate placement, however, nanocomposite T(g)s were observed which exceeded that of the base resin by greater than 10 C. The tensile strength of the glassy resin remained constant or decreased on the dispersion of clay while that of the rubbery material doubled. Selectively placing the clay in the aliphatic component of the rubbery blend resulted in a greater than 100% increase in material toughness.

  7. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  8. Multiple welding of long fiber epoxy vitrimer composites.

    PubMed

    Chabert, Erwan; Vial, Jérôme; Cauchois, Jean-Pierre; Mihaluta, Marius; Tournilhac, François

    2016-05-25

    Vitrimers appear as a new class of polymers that exhibit mechanical strength and are insoluble even at high temperatures, like thermosets, and yet, like thermoplastics, they are heat processable, recyclable and weldable. The question arises whether this welding property is maintained in composite materials made of more than 50 vol% of reinforcing fibers. In this paper, we quantitatively analyze the bond strength of epoxy vitrimer-based composite plates made by resin transfer molding and compare them to their non-vitrimer counterparts made of a standard thermoset epoxy. It is demonstrated that only epoxy vitrimer samples show substantial bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly welded thanks to the exchange reactions, which promote improved surface conformity and chemical bonding between the adherands at the joint interface. This opens the way towards joining composite parts without adhesives nor mechanical fasteners.

  9. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  10. Healing efficiency and dynamic mechanical properties of self-healing epoxy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Naddeo, Carlo; Longo, Pasquale; Mariconda, Annaluisa; Binder, Wolfgang H.

    2014-03-01

    Several systems to develop self-repairing epoxy resins have recently been formulated. In this paper the effect of matrix nature and curing cycle on the healing efficiency and dynamic mechanical properties of self-healing epoxy resins were investigated. We discuss several aspects by transferring self-healing systems from the laboratory scale to real applications in the aeronautic field, such as the possibility to choose systems with increased glass transition temperature, high storage modulus and high values in the healing functionality under real working conditions.

  11. Measurement of the degree of cure in epoxies with ultrasonic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of ultrasonic longitudinal velocity values to measure the degree of cure (defined for an epoxide system as the concentration of epoxide/amine bonds divided by the initial epoxide concentration) in epoxy resins is investigated. The experimental setup used to measure the changes in longitudinal velocity with time is described, together with the technique used to calculate the degree of cure from the acoustic data, using the principle of additive module. Measurements were done with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin cured with an amine adduct agent. Good qualitative agreement was shown between the time dependence of the acoustically measured degree of cure and the predicted rate of reaction.

  12. Influence of surface modification of halloysite nanotubes on their dispersion in epoxy matrix: Mesoscopic DPD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, P.; Markina, A.; Ivanov, V.

    2016-06-01

    The problems of constructing of a meso-scale model of composites based on polymers and aluminosilicate nanotubes for prediction of the filler's spatial distribution at early stages of material formation have been considered. As a test system for the polymer matrix, the mixture of 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate as epoxy resin monomers and 4-methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride as curing agent has been used. It is shown that the structure of a mixture of uncured epoxy resin and nanotubes is (mainly) determined by the surface functionalization of nanotubes. The results indicate that only nanotubes with maximum functionalization can preserve a uniform distribution in space.

  13. Effect of Montmorillonite Nanogel Composite Fillers on the Protection Performance of Epoxy Coatings on Steel Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Saeed, Ashraf M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Wahby, Mohamed

    2017-06-02

    Montmorillonite (MMT) clay mineral is widely used as filler for several organic coatings. Its activity is increased by exfoliation via chemical modification to produce nanomaterials. In the present work, the modification of MMT to form nanogel composites is proposed to increase the dispersion of MMT into epoxy matrices used to fill cracks and holes produced by the curing exotherms of epoxy resins. The dispersion of MMT in epoxy improved both the mechanical and anti-corrosion performance of epoxy coatings in aggressive marine environments. In this respect, the MMT surfaces were chemically modified with different types of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl propane sulfonic acid (AMPS) nanogels using a surfactant-free dispersion polymerization technique. The effect of the chemical structure, nanogel content and the interaction with MMT surfaces on the surface morphology, surface charges and dispersion in the epoxy matrix were investigated for use as nano-filler for epoxy coatings. The modified MMT nanogel epoxy composites showed excellent resistance to mechanical damage and salt spray resistance up to 1000 h. The interaction of MMT nanogel composites with the epoxy matrix and good response of AMPS nanogel to sea water improve their ability to act as self-healing materials for epoxy coatings for steel.

  14. Fabrication of tough epoxy with shape memory effects by UV-assisted direct-ink write printing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaijuan; Kuang, Xiao; Li, Vincent; Kang, Guozheng; Qi, H Jerry

    2018-03-07

    3D printing of epoxy-based shape memory polymers with high mechanical strength, excellent thermal stability and chemical resistance is highly desirable for practical applications. However, thermally cured epoxy in general is difficult to print directly. There have been limited numbers of successes in printing epoxy but they suffer from relatively poor mechanical properties. Here, we present an ultraviolet (UV)-assisted 3D printing of thermally cured epoxy composites with high tensile toughness via a two-stage curing approach. The ink containing UV curable resin and epoxy oligomer is used for UV-assisted direct-ink write (DIW)-based 3D printing followed by thermal curing of the part containing the epoxy oligomer. The UV curable resin forms a network by photo polymerization after the 1st stage of UV curing, which can maintain the printed architecture at an elevated temperature. The 2nd stage thermal curing of the epoxy oligomer yields an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) composite with highly enhanced mechanical properties. It is found that the printed IPN epoxy composites enabled by the two-stage curing show isotropic mechanical properties and high tensile toughness. We demonstrated that the 3D-printed high-toughness epoxy composites show good shape memory properties. This UV-assisted DIW 3D printing via a two-stage curing method can broaden the application of 3D printing to fabricate thermoset materials with enhanced tensile toughness and tunable properties for high-performance and functional applications.

  15. Thermal properties and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers filled epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidina, D. S.; Mariatti, M.; Juliewatty, J.

    2015-07-01

    This present study is aimed to enhance the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate, CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) and Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) filled epoxy thin film composites. As can be seen from the results, 20 vol% BaTiO3/epoxy thin film composite showed the lowest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value, the highest decomposition temperature (T5 and Tonset) and weight of residue among the composites as the filler has low CTE value, distributed homogeneously throughout the composite and less voids can be seen between epoxy resin and BaTiO3 filler.

  16. Improved epoxy thermosets by the use of poly(ethyleneimine) derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acebo, Cristina; Ramis, Xavier; Serra, Angels

    2017-07-01

    Epoxy resins are commonly used as thermosetting materials due to their excellent mechanical properties, high adhesion to many substrates and good heat and chemical resistances. This type of thermosets is intensively used in a wide range of fields, where they act as fiber-reinforced materials, general-purpose adhesives, high-performance coatings and encapsulating materials. These materials are formed by the chemical reaction of multifunctional epoxy monomers forming a polymer network produced through an irreversible way. In this article the improvement of the characteristics of epoxy thermosets using different hyperbranched poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) derivatives will be explained.

  17. Antibacterial activities effectuated by co-continuous epoxy-based polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takuya; Yasuda, Koji; Tominaga, Yuichi; Otsuka, Koji; Hosoya, Ken

    2013-07-01

    We report antibacterial activities of the epoxy-resin-based monolithic media (epoxy monoliths) having macroporous co-continuous structure as well as hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic surface. Utilizing epoxy monoliths containing ammonium groups, the antibacterial experiments were examined using Escherichia coli. As the results, the monolithic media prepared with an epoxy monomer having nitrogen atoms clearly showed antibacterial activities, while those prepared using the monomer without nitrogen atom showed less antibacterial activities. Additionally, the quaternization of the epoxy polymers were expressed significant antibacterial activities. Further studies elucidated that the observed antibacterial activities involved the steep effect based on pH changing of solution and hydrophobic interactions by the quaternary ammonium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility study on the development of tough, moisture-resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    The potential of cyanate resins as replacement for epoxy resins in composites with graphite fiber reinforcement was investigated in an effort to provide improved moisture resistance and toughness in laminating systems at a projected cost, handleability, and processing requirements equivalent to 400 K (260 F) curing epoxies. Monomer synthesis, formulation, blending, resin preparation, catalysis studies, prepreg preparation, laminate fabrication, and testing are discussed. A graphite fiber reinforced laminate was developed with 95 percent retention of the original 363 K (180 F) flexural strength and 70 percent retention of the 363 K (180 F) short beam shear strength after 500 hour exposure to 95 + 7 relative humidity at 324 K (120 F).

  19. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Epoxies are widely used as underfill resins throughout the microelectronics industry to mechanically couple and protect various components of flip-chip assemblies. Generally rigid materials largely surround underfill resins. Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resins to better match those of their rigid counterparts can help extend the service lifetime of flip-chip assemblies. Recently, researchers have demonstrated that silica nanoparticles are effective toughening agents for lightly-crosslinked epoxies. Improvements in the fracture toughness of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites have primarily been attributed to two toughening mechanisms: particle debonding with subsequent void growth and matrix shear banding. Various attempts have been made to model the contribution of these toughening mechanisms to the overall fracture energy observed in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. However, disparities still exist between experimental and modeled fracture energy results. In this dissertation, the thermal, rheological and mechanical behavior of eight different types of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Each nanocomposite consisted of up to 10 vol% of silica nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm, with a variety of surface treatments and particle structures. Fractographical analysis was conducted with new experimental approaches in order to accurately identify morphological evidence for each proposed toughening mechanism. Overall, three major insights into the fracture behavior of real world silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites were established. First, microcracking was observed as an essential toughening mechanism in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. Microcracking was observed on the surface and subsurface of fractured samples in each type of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposite. The additional toughening contribution of microcracking to overall fracture energy yielded excellent agreement between experimental

  20. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of aluminum based epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Sarath Chandran, C.; Melnikova, T. V.; Nazarenko, S. Yu.; Kim, J.-C.

    2017-07-01

    The epoxy resins are widely used in nuclear and aerospace industries. The certain properties of epoxy resins as well as the resistance to radiation can be improved by the incorporation of different fillers. This study examines the effect of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy composites filled with aluminum nanoparticles at percentage of 0.35 wt%. The epoxy composites were exposed to the irradiation doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy using electron beam generated by the linear electron accelerator ELU-4. The effects of the doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The results revealed that the studied epoxy composites showed good radiation resistance. The thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites increased with increasing the irradiation dose up to 100 kGy and decreased with further increasing the dose.