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Sample records for diabetes benefits risks

  1. A nursing case management program for low-income high-risk diabetic clients: a projected cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Crow, Carolyn S; Lakes, Shelley A; Carter, Melondie R

    2006-01-01

    Case management has been widely promoted as a method that can improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. This article describes a cost-benefit analysis for a proposed nursing case management program that provides care for a low-income high-risk diabetic population in a rural county. Industry trends, objectives and functions of the case management program, timeline, financial plan, and cost analysis are described. The analysis indicated a potential net savings of 149,544 dollars annually. This would be a significant cost savings for the healthcare provider and funding source.

  2. Benefits & risks of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Asian Indians - a population with the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease & diabetes.

    PubMed

    Enas, Enas A; Kuruvila, Arun; Khanna, Pravien; Pitchumoni, C S; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2013-10-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses have demonstrated the incontrovertible benefits of statin therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the role for statins in primary prevention remained unclear. The updated 2013 Cochrane review has put to rest all lingering doubts about the overwhelming benefits of long-term statin therapy in primary prevention by conclusively demonstrating highly significant reductions in all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs). More importantly, these benefits of statin therapy are similar at all levels of CVD risk, including subjects at low (<1% per year) risk of a MACE. In addition to preventing myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death, primary prevention with statins is also highly effective in delaying and avoiding expensive CARPs such as angioplasties, stents, and bypass surgeries. There is no evidence of any serious harm or threat to life caused by statin therapy, though several adverse effects that affect the quality of life, especially diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported. Asian Indians have the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. When compared with Whites, Asian Indians have double the risk of CAD and triple the risk of DM, when adjusted for traditional risk factors for these diseases. Available evidence supports the use of statin therapy for primary prevention in Asian Indians at a younger age and with lower targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL-C), than those currently recommended for Americans and Europeans. Early and aggressive statin therapy offers the greatest potential for reducing the continuing epidemic of CAD among Indians.

  3. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24532291

  4. Bariatric surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes: benefits, risks, indications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A-J; De Flines, J; De Roover, A; Paquot, N

    2009-12-01

    Obesity plays a key role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and weight loss is a major objective, although difficult to achieve with medical treatments. Bariatric surgery has proven its efficacy in obtaining marked and sustained weight loss, and is also associated with a significant improvement in glucose control and even diabetes remission. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass appears to be more effective in diabetic patients than the restrictive gastroplasty procedure. This may be explained not only by greater weight reduction, but also by specific hormonal changes. Indeed, increased levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) may lead to improved beta-cell function and insulin secretion as well as reduced insulin resistance associated with weight loss. The presence of T2DM in obese individuals is a further argument to propose bariatric surgery, and even more so when diabetes is difficult to manage by medical means and other weight-related complications may occur. Bariatric surgery is associated with a better cardiovascular prognosis and reduced mortality, even though acute and long-term complications are present. The observation that surgical rerouting of nutrients triggers changes in the release of incretin hormones that, in turn, ameliorate the diabetic state in the absence of weight loss has led to the recent development of innovative surgical procedures. Thus, bariatric surgery may be said to be progressing towards so-called 'metabolic surgery', which merits further evaluation in patients with T2DM within a multidisciplinary approach that involves both surgeons and endocrinologists.

  5. [Benefits and risks of current pharmacotherapy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Schindler, C; Barthel, A; Fischer, S; Bornstein, S R; Kirch, W

    2012-04-01

    The development of new drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and metabolic disorders is currently one of the most innovative areas of drug development. However, a considerable number of newly developed drugs have either not reached the market and were stopped late in development or have been withdrawn after initial approval soon after market authorization due to serious safety concerns. How can drug safety problems be anticipated and, even more important, how can adverse events definitely caused by a drug be differentiated from incidences of naturally occurring diseases? This review article will provide an update about the state of the art treatment of type 2 diabetes and reflect on the newest available study evidence on glitazones, incretin mimetics (GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors), SGLT-2 inhibitors (gliflocines) and pan-PPAR agonists (glitazars). Furthermore, new and still experimental approaches for the treatment of T2DM, such as bardoxolone, salsalate and anakinra will be briefly reviewed. PMID:22388922

  6. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  7. [Risk and benefit of sulfonylureas--their role in view of new treatment options for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2016-02-01

    Currently, the therapy with oral antidiabetic drugs undergoes major changes. The use of sulfonylureas is in marked decline. The major argument in favor of newer oral antidiabetic drugs is the lower risk of hypoglycemia. At the present time however, it is unclear whether DDP4 inhibitors or SGLT2 inhibitors lead to better outcomes with respect to cardiovascular events and overall mortality. Most evidence on the therapeutic use of sulfonylureas has been gained with glibenclamide and to some degree sulfonylureas and glibenclamide have become synonymous. Since sulfonylureas vary considerably in their affinity for the K(ATP) channel subtypes and in their pharmacokinetic properties, the epidemiological evidence that outcomes tend to be less favorable with glibenclamide than with glimepiride or gliclazide has gained some attention. Beyond debate is the efficacy of metformin to diminish cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetes, probably due to effects beyond the lowering of blood glucose. PMID:26983335

  8. Metformin Is Associated With Slightly Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Moderate Survival Benefits in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    He, Xing-kang; Su, Ting-ting; Si, Jian-min; Sun, Lei-min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To systematically assess the effect of metformin on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library databases for relevant articles before August 2015. Two investigators identified and extracted data independently. We adopted adjusted estimates to calculate summary estimates with 95% confidence interval (CI) using either a fixed-effects or a random-effects model. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the robustness of the pooled results. The risk of publication bias was assessed by examining funnel plot asymmetry as well as Begg test and Egger test. Fifteen studies on CRC incidence and 6 studies on CRC survival were finally included in our meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) of observational studies illustrated that a slight 10% reduction of CRC incidence was associated with metformin use (OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.85–0.96). Furthermore, the pooled hazard ratio (HR) revealed an improved survival outcome for metformin users in CRC patients compared to nonusers (HR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.58–081). There was no publication bias across studies. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that metformin therapy could slightly reduce CRC incidence and moderately improve the survival outcomes in patients with T2DM. More prospective studies are warranted to certify this protective association. PMID:26886616

  9. Aspirin for primary prevention in diabetes mellitus: from the calculation of cardiovascular risk and risk/benefit profile to personalised treatment.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by persistent thromboxane (TX)-dependent platelet activation, regardless of disease duration. Low-dose aspirin, that induces a permanent inactivation of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, thus inhibiting TXA2 biosynthesis, should be theoretically considered the drug of choice. The most up-to-date meta-analysis of aspirin prophylaxis in this setting, which includes three trials conducted in patients with diabetes and six other trials in which such patients represent a subgroup within a broader population, reported that aspirin is associated with a non-significant decrease in the risk of vascular events, although the limited amount of available data precludes a precise estimate of the effect size. An increasing body of evidence supports the concept that less-than-expected response to aspirin may underlie mechanisms related to residual platelet hyper-reactivity despite anti-platelet treatment, at least in a fraction of patients. Among the proposed mechanisms, the variable turnover rate of the drug target (platelet COX-1) appears to represent the most convincing determinant of the inter-individual variability in aspirin response. This review intends to develop the idea that the understanding of the determinants of less-than-adequate response to aspirin in certain individuals, although not changing the paradigm of the indication to low-dose aspirin prescription in primary prevention, may help identifying, in terms of easily detectable clinical or biochemical characteristics, individuals who would attain inadequate protection from aspirin, and for whom different strategies should be challenged.

  10. Risk/benefit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, E.A.C.; Wilson, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Reagan administration is intent on rolling back regulations it considers unwise to give new life to American industry, but regulations were instituted to protect individuals against long-term hazards. The authors believe these hazards must be assessed before a regulation is modified, suspended, or implemented. They point out the problems inherent in defining, perceiving, and estimating risk. Throughout, they combine theoretical discussions with actual case studies covering the risk associated with nuclear power plants, saccharin use, mass chest radiography, and others. They believe that risk assessment should be distinct from decision making, with the risk assessor supplying clear and objective information about hazards and the probability of damage as well as pointing out the uncertainties to policy makers. 149 references, 29 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Nuclear Energy: Benefits Versus Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Walter H.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the benefits as well as the risks of nuclear-power plants. Suggests that critics who dwell on the risks to the public from nuclear-power plants should compare these risks with the present hazards that would be eliminated. Bibliography. (LC)

  12. Gestational Diabetes and Future Risk of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Subash Chander; Vinnamala, Sudheer; Jenkins, David

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study of women with gestational diabetes we attempted to (a) Determine the magnitude of the long term risk of progression to diabetes and (b) Identify factors that predict the development of diabetes. Methods All women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK from 1995 to 2003 were included in this observational cohort study and followed up till 2009. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, random/two-hour glucose following 75 gram oral glucose test (OGTT) ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Results The risk of developing diabetes was 6.9% at five years and 21.1% at ten years following the initial diagnosis of GDM. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels in the oral glucose tolerance test during pregnancy were associated with future risk of diabetes. There was no association with age, gestational age at diagnosis of GDM, numbers of previous and subsequent pregnancies. Conclusion Risk of progression to diabetes in a UK based cohort of women with GDM is estimated. Women with fasting antenatal glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and/or an antenatal two-hour glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L are at higher risk and need close follow up. PMID:23519363

  13. Phytoremediation: Risk or benefit?

    SciTech Connect

    Beath, J.M.; Allen, B.J.

    1999-07-01

    The proposed use of phytoremediation at an increasing variety of contaminated sites has resulted in concerns by regulating agencies that a successful removal of constituents from contaminated sludge or soil by plants might result in the unwanted transfer of these constituents to the food chain. As part of the basis for a corrective measures study for a potential remedy, this pathway may need to be evaluated. Different constituents of concern result in different transport issues. For volatile compounds, the evolution of gases from plants as part of evapotranspiration may be an issue. This paper discusses the risks associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are frequently present at hazardous waste surface impoundments for which phytoremediation may have attractive cost advantages over conventional closure methods. Central to an analysis of potential uptake effects is an evaluation of constituent transport, exposure pathway and toxicity. Methods by which each of these can be estimated are presented. Regulatory frameworks under which these evaluations may be performed at the state level are still evolving, in fact Texas issued new proposed regulatory language pertaining to ecological risk as this paper was going to print. The attractiveness of phytoremediation in a RCRA setting is greater if a phytoremediation-based cover can be substituted for a traditional RCRA landfill cap. At the federal level some flexibility has now been provided, but it must be adopted by RCRA- delegated states to be useful. Alternatively, a demonstration that the phytoremediation-based cover somehow meets the RCRA closure design criteria for caps must be made. Work to make this kind of demonstration compelling is underway under the oversight of EPA.

  14. Diabetes benefit management: evolving strategies for payers.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert L

    2011-11-01

    Over the next quarter century, the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is expected to at least double. Currently, 1 in every 10 healthcare dollars is spent on diabetes management; by 2050, it has been projected that the annual costs of managing T2DM will rise to $336 billion. Without substantial, systemic changes, T2DM management costs will lead to a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system. However, the appropriate management of diabetes can reduce associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, adequate glycemic control can improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce diabetes-related complications. This article provides an overview of key concepts associated with a value-based insurance design (VBID) approach to T2DM coverage. By promoting the use of services or treatments that provide high benefits relative to cost, and by alternatively discouraging patients from utilizing services whose benefits do not justify their cost, VBID improves the quality of healthcare while simultaneously reining in spending. VBID initiatives tend to focus on chronic disease management and generally target prescription drug use. However, some programs have expanded their scope by incorporating services traditionally offered by wellness and disease management programs. The concept of VBID is growing, and it is increasingly being implemented by a diverse and growing number of public and private entities, including pharmacy benefit managers, health plans, and employers. This article provides key background on VBID strategies, with a focus on T2DM management. It also provides a road map for health plans seeking to implement VBID as part of their programs.

  15. Risk taking among diabetic clients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H; Schwartz-Barcott, D; Patterson, B

    1992-01-01

    Diabetic clients must make daily decisions about their health care needs. Observational and anecdotal evidence suggests that vast differences exist between the kinds of choices diabetic clients make and the kinds of chances they are willing to take. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a diabetic risk-assessment tool. This instrument, which is based on subjective expected utility theory, measures risk-prone and risk-averse behavior. Initial findings from a pilot study of 18 women clients who are on insulin indicate that patterns of risk behavior exist in the areas of exercise, skin care, and diet. PMID:1729123

  16. Carotid revascularization: risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Marlene; Chandra, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Despite a decline during the recent decades in stroke-related death, the incidence of stroke has remained unchanged or slightly increased, and extracranial carotid artery stenosis is implicated in 20%–30% of all strokes. Medical therapy and risk factor modification are first-line therapies for all patients with carotid occlusive disease. Evidence for the treatment of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis greater than 70% with either carotid artery stenting (CAS) or carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is compelling, and several trials have demonstrated a benefit to carotid revascularization in the symptomatic patient population. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is more controversial, with the largest trials only demonstrating a 1% per year risk stroke reduction with CEA. Although there are sufficient data to advocate for aggressive medical therapy as the primary mode of treatment for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, there are also data to suggest that certain patient populations will benefit from a stroke risk reduction with carotid revascularization. In the United States, consensus and practice guidelines dictate that CEA is reasonable in patients with high-grade asymptomatic stenosis, a reasonable life expectancy, and perioperative risk of less than 3%. Regarding CAS versus CEA, the best-available evidence demonstrates no difference between the two procedures in early perioperative stroke, myocardial infarction, or death, and no difference in 4-year ipsilateral stroke risk. However, because of the higher perioperative risks of stroke in patients undergoing CAS, particularly in symptomatic, female, or elderly patients, it is difficult to recommend CAS over CEA except in populations with prohibitive cardiac risk, previous carotid surgery, or prior neck radiation. Current treatment paradigms are based on identifying the magnitude of perioperative risk in patient subsets and on using predictive factors to stratify patients with high-risk asymptomatic stenosis. PMID

  17. Physical Activity, Health Benefits, and Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinos, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A plethora of epidemiologic evidence from large studies supports unequivocally an inverse, independent, and graded association between volume of physical activity, health, and cardiovascular and overall mortality. This association is evident in apparently healthy individuals, patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, regardless of body weight. Moreover, the degree of risk associated with physical inactivity is similar to, and in some cases even stronger than, the more traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The exercise-induced health benefits are in part related to favorable modulations of cardiovascular risk factors observed by increased physical activity or structured exercise programs. Although the independent contribution of the exercise components, intensity, duration, and frequency to the reduction of mortality risk is not clear, it is well accepted that an exercise volume threshold defined at caloric expenditure of approximately 1,000 Kcal per week appears to be necessary for significant reduction in mortality risk. Further reductions in risk are observed with higher volumes of energy expenditure. Physical exertion is also associated with a relatively low and transient increase in risk for cardiac events. This risk is significantly higher for older and sedentary individuals. Therefore, such individuals should consult their physician prior to engaging in exercise. “Walking is man’s best medicine”Hippocrates PMID:23198160

  18. Jogging: cardiovascular benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Estok, P J; Rudy, E B

    1986-05-01

    The cardiovascular benefits and risks of jogging are frequently debated. This article presents information on the effects of jogging and other aerobic exercise on heart rate, cardiac output, tissue oxygen consumption and blood pressure. The indirect effects of jogging on cardiac risk factors, such as serum lipids, blood clotting and glucose metabolism, are discussed. Along with the positive outcomes from jogging, the risks to the cardiovascular system are presented. These risks include a sudden drop in blood pressure at the cessation of intense jogging, cardiac arrhythmias and ischemia. The primary care nurse practitioner can play an important role in prescribing a level of exercise that is safe and will enhance physical fitness, particularly cardiovascular fitness. Guidelines for prescribing an exercise program for a variety of patient populations are reviewed, and the need for exercise monitoring by the individual is stressed.

  19. Calcium supplements: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Reid, I R; Bristow, S M; Bolland, M J

    2015-10-01

    Calcium is an essential element in the diet, but there is continuing controversy regarding its optimal intake, and its role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Most studies show little evidence of a relationship between calcium intake and bone density, or the rate of bone loss. Re-analysis of data from the placebo group from the Auckland Calcium Study demonstrates no relationship between dietary calcium intake and rate of bone loss over 5 years in healthy older women with intakes varying from <400 to >1500 mg day(-1) . Thus, supplements are not needed within this range of intakes to compensate for a demonstrable dietary deficiency, but might be acting as weak anti-resorptive agents via effects on parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. Consistent with this, supplements do acutely reduce bone resorption and produce small short-term effects on bone density, without evidence of a cumulative density benefit. As a result, anti-fracture efficacy remains unproven, with no evidence to support hip fracture prevention (other than in a cohort with severe vitamin D deficiency) and total fracture numbers are reduced by 0-10%, depending on which meta-analysis is considered. Five recent large studies have failed to demonstrate fracture prevention in their primary analyses. This must be balanced against an increase in gastrointestinal side effects (including a doubling of hospital admissions for these problems), a 17% increase in renal calculi and a 20-40% increase in risk of myocardial infarction. Each of these adverse events alone neutralizes any possible benefit in fracture prevention. Thus, calcium supplements appear to have a negative risk-benefit effect, and so should not be used routinely in the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26174589

  20. Calcium supplements: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Reid, I R; Bristow, S M; Bolland, M J

    2015-10-01

    Calcium is an essential element in the diet, but there is continuing controversy regarding its optimal intake, and its role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Most studies show little evidence of a relationship between calcium intake and bone density, or the rate of bone loss. Re-analysis of data from the placebo group from the Auckland Calcium Study demonstrates no relationship between dietary calcium intake and rate of bone loss over 5 years in healthy older women with intakes varying from <400 to >1500 mg day(-1) . Thus, supplements are not needed within this range of intakes to compensate for a demonstrable dietary deficiency, but might be acting as weak anti-resorptive agents via effects on parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. Consistent with this, supplements do acutely reduce bone resorption and produce small short-term effects on bone density, without evidence of a cumulative density benefit. As a result, anti-fracture efficacy remains unproven, with no evidence to support hip fracture prevention (other than in a cohort with severe vitamin D deficiency) and total fracture numbers are reduced by 0-10%, depending on which meta-analysis is considered. Five recent large studies have failed to demonstrate fracture prevention in their primary analyses. This must be balanced against an increase in gastrointestinal side effects (including a doubling of hospital admissions for these problems), a 17% increase in renal calculi and a 20-40% increase in risk of myocardial infarction. Each of these adverse events alone neutralizes any possible benefit in fracture prevention. Thus, calcium supplements appear to have a negative risk-benefit effect, and so should not be used routinely in the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis.

  1. Tea and its consumption: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Khizar; Iqbal, Hira; Malik, Uzma; Bilal, Uzma; Mushtaq, Sobia

    2015-01-01

    The recent convention of introducing phytochemicals to support the immune system or combat diseases is a centuries' old tradition. Nutritional support is an emerging advancement in the domain of diet-based therapies; tea and its constituents are one of the significant components of these strategies to maintain the health and reduce the risk of various malignancies. Tea is the most frequently consumed beverage worldwide, besides water. All the three most popular types of tea, green (unfermented), black (fully fermented), and oolong (semifermented), are manufactured from the leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis. Tea possesses significant antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, neuroprotective, cholesterol-lowering, and thermogenic properties. Several research investigations, epidemiological studies, and meta-analyses suggest that tea and its bioactive polyphenolic constituents have numerous beneficial effects on health, including the prevention of many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, genital warts, and obesity. Controversies regarding beneficialts and risks of tea consumption still exist but the limitless health-promoting benefits of tea outclass its few reported toxic effects. However, with significant rise in the scientific investigation of role of tea in human life, this review is intended to highlight the beneficial effects and risks associated with tea consumption.

  2. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  3. Bisphosphonates for Osteoporosis: Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... o es sis : Benefits and Risks What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which your bones become ... through menopause are especially at risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is more common in women than in ...

  4. Retinylamine Benefits Early Diabetic Retinopathy in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Lee, Chieh Allen; Golczak, Marcin; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A.; Veenstra, Alexander A.; Amengual, Jaume; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for outer retinal cells in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Here we investigated the effect of the visual cycle inhibitor retinylamine (Ret-NH2) on the development of early DR lesions. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice (male, 2 months old when diabetes was induced) were made diabetic with streptozotocin, and some were given Ret-NH2 once per week. Lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT)-deficient mice and P23H mutant mice were similarly studied. Mice were euthanized after 2 (WT and Lrat−/−) and 8 months (WT) of study to assess vascular histopathology, accumulation of albumin, visual function, and biochemical and physiological abnormalities in the retina. Non-retinal effects of Ret-NH2 were examined in leukocytes treated in vivo. Superoxide generation and expression of inflammatory proteins were significantly increased in retinas of mice diabetic for 2 or 8 months, and the number of degenerate retinal capillaries and accumulation of albumin in neural retina were significantly increased in mice diabetic for 8 months compared with nondiabetic controls. Administration of Ret-NH2 once per week inhibited capillary degeneration and accumulation of albumin in the neural retina, significantly reducing diabetes-induced retinal superoxide and expression of inflammatory proteins. Superoxide generation also was suppressed in Lrat−/− diabetic mice. Leukocytes isolated from diabetic mice treated with Ret-NH2 caused significantly less cytotoxicity to retinal endothelial cells ex vivo than did leukocytes from control diabetics. Administration of Ret-NH2 once per week significantly inhibited the pathogenesis of lesions characteristic of early DR in diabetic mice. The visual cycle constitutes a novel target for inhibition of DR. PMID:26139608

  5. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 173-199. 3 Dabelea D, Crume T. Maternal environment and the transgenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes Care , 2011;60:1849-1855. 4 Kitzmiller JL, Dang-Kilduff L, Taslimi MM. Gestational diabetes after delivery: short-term management and long-term risks. Diabetes Care. 2007;30: ...

  6. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  7. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  8. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  9. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  10. Benefits and risks of breastfeeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, the American Academy of Pediatrics extended their position concerning the superiority of human milk for feeding human infants and the reasons for encouraging breastfeeding. Yet questions have been raised whether the benefits of breastfeeding pertain to populations in the industrialized wor...

  11. Alcohol consumption: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Mukamal, Kenneth J; Rimm, Eric B

    2008-12-01

    Alcohol has had a long and complicated role in human society and health. Excessive use of alcohol causes enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide, but the health effects of alcohol use within recommended guidelines are diverse and complex. Established effects include increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and antithrombotic activity, providing plausible mechanisms for the observed association of moderate drinking with lower risk of coronary heart disease but higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke. However, moderate drinking increases sex steroid hormone levels and may interfere with folate metabolism, both of which are potential mechanisms for the observed associations of moderate drinking with several forms of cancer, particularly breast and colorectal. Genetic susceptibility to the effects of alcohol on cancer and coronary heart disease also differs across the population. Recommendations regarding moderate drinking must be individualized to reflect the potentially competing effects of alcohol on several chronic diseases.

  12. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  13. Associations and Risk Factors of Diabetic Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Islam, M M; Ali, M; Naher, Z U; Akhanda, A H; Motaleb, M A; Uddin, M S; Islam, M R

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic maculopathy is characterised by increased capillary leakage in the main retinal vessels and by alterations in the microcirculation of the macula. Maculopathy occurs frequently in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Prevalence is higher in type 2 than in type 1 diabetic patients. Factors associated with the development of maculopathy are mostly unknown. As maculopathy is the main cause of vision deprivation in diabetic patients it is essential to know the associations and risk factors of diabetic maculopathy so that appropriate measures can be taken to prevent as well as treat diabetic maculopathy. We started the research work to find out the relation between diabetic maculopathy and various associated factors and risk factors for patients with diabetic retinopathy with maculopathy. This cross-sectional observational study done at the Department of Ophthalmology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka & National Institute of Ophthalmology & Hospital (NIO & H), Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2006 to June 2006. In this study out of 50 patients, diabetes was controlled in 20(40%) patients and uncontrolled in 30(60%). A significant percentage of patients (40%) had elevated blood pressure. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 24% cases and polyneuropathy was observed in 36% cases. It is evident that diabetic maculopathy has association with dyslipidaemia, abnormal renal function due to nephropathy. This study lighted on the association of diabetic maculopathy with diabetic nephropathy, cardiac abnormalities and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27277354

  14. Psychosocial Factors in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that is increasing in prevalence globally. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in diabetes, and lifestyle and clinical risk factors do not fully account for the link between the conditions. This article provides an overview of the evidence concerning the role of psychosocial stress factors in diabetes risk, as well as in cardiovascular complications in people with existing diabetes. Several types of psychosocial factors are discussed including depression, other types of emotional distress, exposure to stressful conditions, and personality traits. The potential behavioral and biological pathways linking psychosocial factors to diabetes are presented and implications for patient care are highlighted. PMID:27566328

  15. University-Industry Relationships: Benefits and Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandelin, Jon

    2010-01-01

    University-industry relationships can bring significant benefits to the university, the company and the individual researcher, but there is also the potential for risks to all parties. This paper presents the potential rewards and risks from university-industry relationships and the related opportunities for economic growth and job creation. The…

  16. Managing benefits for diabetes: changing payer strategies for changing times.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Just as there are many ways to treat a condition such as diabetes, there are also many ways for payers to manage the diabetes benefit. Although none of these methods is specifically right or wrong, they are grounded in a payer's philosophy and created in response to the needs of the time. Yet, just as in any other business, new ideas and, for diabetes, new scientific discoveries will surely mandate new strategies to achieve goals. As payers find themselves adapting to new political realities and new partnerships, one cannot be sure if their new strategies will succeed or not. But, in actuality, this becomes moot as the 1 point we can be sure of is that benefit management will continue to evolve.

  17. Managing benefits for diabetes: changing payer strategies for changing times.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Just as there are many ways to treat a condition such as diabetes, there are also many ways for payers to manage the diabetes benefit. Although none of these methods is specifically right or wrong, they are grounded in a payer's philosophy and created in response to the needs of the time. Yet, just as in any other business, new ideas and, for diabetes, new scientific discoveries will surely mandate new strategies to achieve goals. As payers find themselves adapting to new political realities and new partnerships, one cannot be sure if their new strategies will succeed or not. But, in actuality, this becomes moot as the 1 point we can be sure of is that benefit management will continue to evolve. PMID:23725238

  18. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM.

  19. Lifestyle Interventions to Reduce Risk of Diabetes among Women with Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by more than 50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English-language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, 9 studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. PMID:25220104

  20. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly.

  1. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly. PMID:27017651

  2. MAO inhibitors: risks, benefits, and lore.

    PubMed

    Wimbiscus, Molly; Kostenko, Olga; Malone, Donald

    2010-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were the first antidepressants introduced, but their use has dwindled because of their reported side effects, their food and drug interactions, and the introduction of other classes of agents. However, interest in MAO inhibitors is reviving. Here, we discuss their use, risks, and benefits in clinical medicine.

  3. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat.

  4. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat. PMID:16581337

  5. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation.

  6. Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159557.html Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death Study points to need for better coordinated ... are much more likely to die after a heart attack than people without the blood sugar condition, a ...

  7. Update on tanning: More risks, fewer benefits.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Ryan E; Diehl, Joseph; Levins, Paul C

    2014-03-01

    The tanning response, classically defined as increased cutaneous pigmentation after solar ultraviolet light exposure, encompasses a variety of protective, reparative, and cosmetic issues. The tanning story is continuously evolving as basic science, clinical research, and public health studies shed light on topics involving: the physiologic mechanisms of tanning, the medical benefits of tanning, the role of sunscreens, the development of "sunless" self-tanners, the use of photocarcinogenic indoor tanning services, and the relatively recent development and promulgation of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues. High-risk tanning behaviors have become increasingly popular and the incidence of melanoma has risen more rapidly than any other cancer. This review will focus on the risks and benefits of each type of tanning, with an emphasis on issues pertinent to dermatologists who care for adolescents and young adults.

  8. Benefits and risks of antihypertensive medications in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Butt, D A; Harvey, P J

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in older age and accounts for a large proportion of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality worldwide. Isolated systolic hypertension is more common in the elderly than younger adults and associated with poor outcomes such as cerebrovascular disease and acute coronary events. International guidelines are inconsistent in providing recommendations on optimal blood pressure targets in hypertensive elderly patients as a result of the limited evidence in this population. Evidence from clinical trials supports the use of antihypertensive drugs in hypertensive elderly patients due to benefits in reducing CV disease and mortality. However, elderly participants in these trials may not be typical of elderly patients seen in routine clinical practice, and the potential risks associated with use of antihypertensive drugs in the elderly are not as well studied as younger participants. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of the benefits and risks of the use of antihypertensive drugs in elderly patients (aged ≥65 years), highlighting landmark clinical trials and observational studies. We will focus on specific outcomes relating to the benefits and risks of these medications in hypertensive elderly patients, such as CV disease, cognitive decline, dementia, orthostatic hypotension, falls, fractures, cancer and diabetes, in order to provide an update of the most relevant and current evidence to help inform clinical decision-making.

  9. Diabetic dyslipidaemia: effective management reduces cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Lawrence A

    2005-05-01

    Patients with diabetes are at significantly increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD); even those patients without a history of a previous myocardial infarction (MI) have as high a risk of a fatal or nonfatal MI as nondiabetic patients with a history of previous MI. As a result it is now generally recommended that cardiovascular risk factors be treated as aggressively in patients with diabetes as in nondiabetic patients with a history of CHD. Results from the recently published Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS) and meta-analysis of primary and secondary interventions trials confirm that there is a uniform relative risk reduction across a wide range of high-risk patients including diabetes patients without established CHD. A highly significant 22-24% reduction in risk of future vascular events is evident when patients with diabetes are treated with statins in trials. Current guidelines, including the recently updated National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines, endorse aggressive, early intervention in very-high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes plus cardiovascular disease (CVD), regardless of baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level in order to achieve an LDL-C goal of 70 mg/dL (1.8 mmol/L). However, despite increasing evidence and knowledge of the value of lipid lowering, a recent survey of diabetes specialists indicates that many patients with diabetes remain untreated or undertreated. The availability of more effective statins should help to close this "action gap", in concert with other measures such as initiatives to improve patient compliance.

  10. Cannabis and neuropsychiatry, 1: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis is popularly believed to be a relatively benign substance. Cannabis is also considered to have potential medical benefits, and medical marijuana has been legislated in many parts of the world. However, a recent meta-analysis found that cannabinoids were associated with only modest benefits for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, small and inconsistent benefits for pain and spasticity, and inconclusive benefits for other indications such as improvement of appetite and weight, reduction in tic severity, and improvement of mood or sleep. On the flip side, cannabinoids and cannabis have acute and long-term adverse effects. In randomized controlled trials, cannabinoids increase the risk of total adverse events, serious adverse events, and dropout due to adverse events. Cannabis impairs cognition, and driving after cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of traffic accidents, including fatal accidents. Long-term cannabis use may lead to dependence, respiratory conditions, psychosis, and possibly cancer, as well. Cannabis use during pregnancy may compromise certain pregnancy outcomes such as fetal growth, and use during adolescence may compromise neurodevelopment, social adjustment, and vocational success. The composition and bioavailability of cannabis vary across preparations of the substance and routes of administration; this limits the ability to generalize the findings of studies. The findings of older research may no longer apply to current strains of cannabis that are higher in psychotogenic content. It is important for medical professionals and the lay public to understand the limitations of the efficacy data and the seriousness of the risks associated with cannabis use in medical and recreational contexts. PMID:27249079

  11. Cannabis and neuropsychiatry, 1: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis is popularly believed to be a relatively benign substance. Cannabis is also considered to have potential medical benefits, and medical marijuana has been legislated in many parts of the world. However, a recent meta-analysis found that cannabinoids were associated with only modest benefits for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, small and inconsistent benefits for pain and spasticity, and inconclusive benefits for other indications such as improvement of appetite and weight, reduction in tic severity, and improvement of mood or sleep. On the flip side, cannabinoids and cannabis have acute and long-term adverse effects. In randomized controlled trials, cannabinoids increase the risk of total adverse events, serious adverse events, and dropout due to adverse events. Cannabis impairs cognition, and driving after cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of traffic accidents, including fatal accidents. Long-term cannabis use may lead to dependence, respiratory conditions, psychosis, and possibly cancer, as well. Cannabis use during pregnancy may compromise certain pregnancy outcomes such as fetal growth, and use during adolescence may compromise neurodevelopment, social adjustment, and vocational success. The composition and bioavailability of cannabis vary across preparations of the substance and routes of administration; this limits the ability to generalize the findings of studies. The findings of older research may no longer apply to current strains of cannabis that are higher in psychotogenic content. It is important for medical professionals and the lay public to understand the limitations of the efficacy data and the seriousness of the risks associated with cannabis use in medical and recreational contexts.

  12. Risk-benefit assessment of tocolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Wischnik, A

    1991-01-01

    beta 2-Mimetics are the principal agents used for myometrial relaxation. As all the available drugs also have beta 1-stimulant effects, the various side effects (cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic) require a critical consideration of the clinical indications, thorough supervision and combined therapeutic concepts. With regard to clinical indications, 'prophylactic tocolysis' frequently turns out to be unnecessary, as does the treatment of physiological uterine contractions during pregnacy which have no effect on the cervix. The benefit of tocolysis must be seen not so much in a reduction of preterm labour but in enabling the obstetrician and neonatologist to optimise the handling of the premature baby, e.g. by allowing lung maturation or by enabling the patient to reach a centre for perinatal medicine before the birth. Labour-dependent fetal distress situations during birth at term can also be managed successfully. Supervision involves thorough control of both mother (especially of cardiovascular and metabolic parameters, electrolyte and water balance) and fetus (cardiotocography, fetometry) in order to decide individually when possible benefits are outweighed by maternal or fetal risks. Combination of beta 2-mimetic treatment with magnesium therapy reduces the beta-mimetic dosage required, has a cardioprotective action, and reduces the development of drug tolerance and the risk of lung oedema. This combination, therefore, should become routine in tocolytic therapy. If further protection against cardiovascular and risk of lung oedema is required, administration of beta 1-blockers is advisable.

  13. Health risks and benefits of bottled water.

    PubMed

    Napier, Gena L; Kodner, Charles M

    2008-12-01

    Health and safety concerns have dramatically increased the consumption of bottled water in developed countries, including the United States. The economic and environmental impact of the many different bottled water products on the market is considerable, and the role and impact of bottled water for routine use is unclear, outside the setting of emergencies or natural disasters, when routine water sources may be unsafe. Evidence for routine health risks or benefits from using bottled water is limited. Patients who have specific health needs may wish to use bottled or filtered water. Physicians can use background information regarding the regulation, production, and possible health impact of bottled water to counsel patients.

  14. Risk and Benefit of Drug Use During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Environmental teratogenic factors (e.g. alcohol) are preventable. We focus our analysis on human teratogenic drugs which are not used frequently during pregnancy. The previous human teratogenic studies had serious methodological problems, e.g. the first trimester concept is outdated because environmental teratogens cannot induce congenital abnormalities in the first month of gestation. In addition, teratogens usually cause specific congenital abnormalities or syndromes. Finally, the importance of chemical structures, administrative routes and reasons for treatment at the evaluation of medicinal products was not considered. On the other hand, in the so-called case-control epidemiological studies in general recall bias was not limited. These biases explain that the teratogenic risk of drugs is exaggerated, while the benefit of medicine use during pregnancy is underestimated. Thus, a better balance is needed between the risk and benefit of drug treatments during pregnancy. Of course, we have to do our best to reduce the risk of teratogenic drugs as much as possible, however, it is worth stressing the preventive effect of drugs for maternal diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus and hyperthermia) related congenital abnormalities. PMID:16007261

  15. Health benefits of nuts in prevention and management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Esfahani, Amin; Truan, Jennifer; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A

    2010-01-01

    The effects of tree nuts on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), in particular blood lipids, have been investigated in a number of studies and the beneficial effects are now recognized. The beneficial effects of nuts on CHD in cohort studies have also been clearly demonstrated. However, while there is also reason to believe the unique micro- and macronutrient profiles of nuts may help to control blood glucose levels, relatively few studies have investigated their role in diabetes control and prevention. Nuts are low in available carbohydrate, have a healthy fatty acid profile, and are high in vegetable protein, fiber and magnesium. Acute feeding studies indicate that when eaten alone nuts have minimal effects on raising postprandial blood glucose levels. In addition, when nuts are consumed with carbohydrate rich foods, they blunt the postprandial glycemic response of the carbohydrate meal. Despite the success of these acute studies, only a limited number of trials have been conducted with nuts in type 2 diabetes. These studies have either been of insufficient duration to observe changes in HbA1c, as the standard measure of glycemic control, or have been underpowered. Therefore, more long-term clinical trials are required to examine the role of nuts on glycemic control in patients with prediabetes and diabetes. Overall, there are good reasons to justify further exploration of the use of nuts in the prevention of diabetes and its micro- and macrovascular complications. PMID:20199995

  16. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation. PMID:27541294

  17. Sildenafil: two decades of benefits or risks?

    PubMed

    Leoni, Luís Antônio B; Leite, Gerson S; Wichi, Rogério B; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Sildenafil is a selective inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5). A patent was registered for this drug in 1990, which expired in 2010. Since expiration, the drug has been marketed under various trade names or as generic drugs. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted addressing the effectiveness of the drug for erectile dysfunction (ED) and its safety regarding the presence or absence of specific comorbidities. After over 20 years in the market, we need to ask: has the scientific community reached a general consensus as to the overall efficacy and safety of the drug? Can we firmly state that the benefits of the drug outweigh its risks? This review suggests that sildenafil is an effective and easily manageable treatment for erectile dysfunction, both in the absence and in the presence of comorbidities. After two decades of the emergence of sildenafil as a drug of choice for the treatment of ED (and the numerous studies and clinical trials undertaken during this time span), it is now possible to state that the benefits of the drug do outweigh the risks, and represent an significant improvement in the quality of life in men with ED. PMID:23758451

  18. Eye Study Underscores the Long-Lasting Benefits of Controlling Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monday, June 13, 2016 Eye study underscores the long-lasting benefits of controlling diabetes NIH-funded study ... received intensive glycemic therapy in the 10-year-long Diabetes Control and Complications Trial on average had ...

  19. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeannie D; Nelson, Michele A; Schneider, Alan L

    2016-05-18

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia.

  20. Contaminants in fish: risk-benefit considerations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G

    2007-09-01

    Fish provide a healthful source of dietary protein and are high in nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids. There is evidence of beneficial effects of fish consumption in coronary heart disease, stroke, age-related macular degeneration, and growth and development. Yet, benefits may be offset by the presence of contaminants, such as methylmercury (MeHg), dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and several other halogenated persistent organic pollutants. MeHg is a known developmental neurotoxicant, as evidenced by several animal studies and episodes of human intoxication in Japan and Iraq. Fish represent the main source of exposure to MeHg for the general population, and large predatory fish (swordfish, tuna) have the highest levels of MeHg contamination. Provisional tolerable weekly intakes of 0.7 microg kg(-1) to 1.6 microg kg(-1) have been set by regulatory agencies. Concern for contamination of fish with dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs stems from their reported carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity, and reproductive and developmental toxicities. Farmed and wild-caught fish appear to have similar levels of contaminants. Advisories are in place that recommend limited consumption of certain fish in children, pregnant women and women of childbearing age. Careful risk-benefit considerations should foster fish consumption while minimizing exposure to toxic contaminants.

  1. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24444518

  3. Pleiotropic effects of type 2 diabetes management strategies on renal risk factors.

    PubMed

    Muskiet, Marcel H A; Tonneijck, Lennart; Smits, Mark M; Kramer, Mark H H; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; van Raalte, Daniël H

    2015-05-01

    In parallel with the type 2 diabetes pandemic, diabetic kidney disease has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As established in landmark randomised trials and recommended in clinical guidelines, prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease focuses on control of the two main renal risk factors, hyperglycaemia and systemic hypertension. Treatment of systemic hypertension with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers is advocated because these drugs seem to exert specific renoprotective effects beyond blood pressure lowering. Emerging evidence shows that obesity, glomerular hyperfiltration, albuminuria, and dyslipidaemia might also adversely affect the kidney in diabetes. Control of these risk factors could have additional benefits on renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, despite multifactorial treatment approaches, residual risk for the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes remains, and novel strategies or therapies to treat the disease are urgently needed. Several drugs used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes are associated with pleiotropic effects that could favourably or unfavourably change patients' renal risk profile. We review the risk factors and treatment of diabetic kidney disease, and describe the pleiotropic effects of widely used drugs in type 2 diabetes management on renal outcomes, with special emphasis on antihyperglycaemic drugs.

  4. Integrating Biomarkers and Imaging for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, David M; Wong, Nathan D

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment has changed substantially in recent years. While older guidelines considered diabetes a coronary disease risk equivalent, more recent guidelines recommend risk stratification on the basis of global risk scoring to target intensity of therapy. While patients with diabetes as a whole are at greater risk for CVD events, these patients may also benefit from risk stratification based on circulating biomarkers like high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, as well as newer imaging modalities (coronary artery calcium, carotid intima-media thickness, and myocardial perfusion imaging). The addition of these CVD risk assessment modalities could play an important role for deciding how aggressive a physician should be with pharmacological therapy. Here, we discuss many of the current recommendations of CVD risk assessment in patients with diabetes including newer modalities for CVD risk assessment. PMID:27612474

  5. Evaluation of Major Online Diabetes Risk Calculators and Computerized Predictive Models.

    PubMed

    Stiglic, Gregor; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2015-01-01

    Classical paper-and-pencil based risk assessment questionnaires are often accompanied by the online versions of the questionnaire to reach a wider population. This study focuses on the loss, especially in risk estimation performance, that can be inflicted by direct transformation from the paper to online versions of risk estimation calculators by ignoring the possibilities of more complex and accurate calculations that can be performed using the online calculators. We empirically compare the risk estimation performance between four major diabetes risk calculators and two, more advanced, predictive models. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999-2012 was used to evaluate the performance of detecting diabetes and pre-diabetes. American Diabetes Association risk test achieved the best predictive performance in category of classical paper-and-pencil based tests with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.699 for undiagnosed diabetes (0.662 for pre-diabetes) and 47% (47% for pre-diabetes) persons selected for screening. Our results demonstrate a significant difference in performance with additional benefits for a lower number of persons selected for screening when statistical methods are used. The best AUC overall was obtained in diabetes risk prediction using logistic regression with AUC of 0.775 (0.734) and an average 34% (48%) persons selected for screening. However, generalized boosted regression models might be a better option from the economical point of view as the number of selected persons for screening of 30% (47%) lies significantly lower for diabetes risk assessment in comparison to logistic regression (p < 0.001), with a significantly higher AUC (p < 0.001) of 0.774 (0.740) for the pre-diabetes group. Our results demonstrate a serious lack of predictive performance in four major online diabetes risk calculators. Therefore, one should take great care and consider optimizing the online versions of questionnaires that were

  6. Evaluation of Major Online Diabetes Risk Calculators and Computerized Predictive Models.

    PubMed

    Stiglic, Gregor; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2015-01-01

    Classical paper-and-pencil based risk assessment questionnaires are often accompanied by the online versions of the questionnaire to reach a wider population. This study focuses on the loss, especially in risk estimation performance, that can be inflicted by direct transformation from the paper to online versions of risk estimation calculators by ignoring the possibilities of more complex and accurate calculations that can be performed using the online calculators. We empirically compare the risk estimation performance between four major diabetes risk calculators and two, more advanced, predictive models. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999-2012 was used to evaluate the performance of detecting diabetes and pre-diabetes. American Diabetes Association risk test achieved the best predictive performance in category of classical paper-and-pencil based tests with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.699 for undiagnosed diabetes (0.662 for pre-diabetes) and 47% (47% for pre-diabetes) persons selected for screening. Our results demonstrate a significant difference in performance with additional benefits for a lower number of persons selected for screening when statistical methods are used. The best AUC overall was obtained in diabetes risk prediction using logistic regression with AUC of 0.775 (0.734) and an average 34% (48%) persons selected for screening. However, generalized boosted regression models might be a better option from the economical point of view as the number of selected persons for screening of 30% (47%) lies significantly lower for diabetes risk assessment in comparison to logistic regression (p < 0.001), with a significantly higher AUC (p < 0.001) of 0.774 (0.740) for the pre-diabetes group. Our results demonstrate a serious lack of predictive performance in four major online diabetes risk calculators. Therefore, one should take great care and consider optimizing the online versions of questionnaires that were

  7. Communicating the risks, and the benefits, of nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Issues surrounding the wide spectrum of (perceived) risks and possible benefits associated with the rapid advance of modern nanotechnology are deliberated. These include the current realities of nanotechnological hazards, their impact vis-à-vis perceived nanotech-risks and perceived nanotech-benefits, and the consequent repercussions on the public and society. It is argued that both the risks and the benefits of nanoscientific advances must be properly communicated if the public is to support this emerging technology. PMID:19823594

  8. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean that the β-cell autoantibodies are pathogenic, but rather that they represent reproducible biomarkers of the pathogenesis. The primary risk factor for β-cell autoimmunity is genetic, mainly occurring in individuals with either HLA-DR3-DQ2 or HLA-DR4-DQ8 haplotypes, or both, but a trigger from the environment is generally needed. The pathogenesis can be divided into three stages: 1, appearance of β-cell autoimmunity, normoglycaemia, and no symptoms; 2, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and no symptoms; and 3, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and symptoms of diabetes. The genetic association with each one of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis. PMID:27302272

  9. Model-based benefit-risk assessment: can Archimedes help?

    PubMed

    Krishna, R

    2009-03-01

    In December 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a new draft Guidance for Industry on Diabetes Mellitus--evaluating cardiovascular risk in new antidiabetic therapies to treat Type 2 diabetes. This guidance comes at a time when recent discussions have focused on delineation of cardiovascular risk reduction for new antidiabetic drugs. Computational tools that can enable early prediction of cardiovascular risk are reviewed with specific reference to Archimedes (Kaiser Permanente), with an aim of proposing a model-based solution and enabling decisions to be made as early as possible in the drug development value chain.

  10. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah and Allison ... most common adverse effects, and recent concerns about new-onset diabetes mellitus to help patients and providers ...

  11. When Diabetes Strikes, Get Moving to Lower Risk to Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... finds association between inactivity and heightened odds for diabetic retinopathy To use the sharing features on this page, ... lifestyle does seem to raise the risk for diabetic retinopathy. According to the U.S. National Eye Institute, the ...

  12. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  13. Using employee experts to offer an interprofessional diabetes risk reduction program to fellow employees.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole D; Skrabal, Maryann Z; Faulkner, Michele A; Skradski, Jessica J; Ferguson, Liz A; Pagenkemper, Joni J; Moore, Geri A; Jorgensen, Diane

    2013-03-01

    A recent increase in the incidence of diabetes and pre-diabetes is causing many employers to spend more of their healthcare benefit budgets to manage the conditions. A self-insured university in the USA has implemented an interprofessional diabetes mellitus risk reduction program using its own employee faculty and staff experts to help fellow employees manage their diabetes and pre-diabetes. The interprofessional team consists of five pharmacists, a dietitian, an exercise physiologist, a health educator and a licensed mental health practitioner. In addition, the participant's physician serves as a consultant to the program, as does a human resources healthcare benefits specialist and a wellness coordinator. The volunteer program takes place at the worksite during regular business hours and is free of charge to the employees. The faculty and staff delivering the program justify the cost of their time through an interprofessional educational model that the program will soon provide to university students. PMID:22957897

  14. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: introduction.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, H; Tijhuis, M J; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Holm, F

    2012-01-01

    Risk-taking is normal in everyday life if there are associated (perceived) benefits. Benefit-Risk Analysis (BRA) compares the risk of a situation to its related benefits and addresses the acceptability of the risk. Over the past years BRA in relation to food and food ingredients has gained attention. Food, and even the same food ingredient, may confer both beneficial and adverse effects. Measures directed at food safety may lead to suboptimal or insufficient levels of ingredients from a benefit perspective. In BRA, benefits and risks of food (ingredients) are assessed in one go and may conditionally be expressed into one currency. This allows the comparison of adverse and beneficial effects to be qualitative and quantitative. A BRA should help policy-makers to make more informed and balanced benefit-risk management decisions. Not allowing food benefits to occur in order to guarantee food safety is a risk management decision much the same as accepting some risk in order to achieve more benefits. BRA in food and nutrition is making progress, but difficulties remain. The field may benefit from looking across its borders to learn from other research areas. The BEPRARIBEAN project (Best Practices for Risk-Benefit Analysis: experience from out of food into food; http://en.opasnet.org/w/Bepraribean) aims to do so, by working together with Medicines, Food Microbiology, Environmental Health, Economics & Marketing-Finance and Consumer Perception. All perspectives are reviewed and subsequently integrated to identify opportunities for further development of BRA for food and food ingredients. Interesting issues that emerge are the varying degrees of risk that are deemed acceptable within the areas and the trend towards more open and participatory BRA processes. A set of 6 'state of the art' papers covering the above areas and a paper integrating the separate (re)views are published in this volume. PMID:21679738

  15. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: introduction.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, H; Tijhuis, M J; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Holm, F

    2012-01-01

    Risk-taking is normal in everyday life if there are associated (perceived) benefits. Benefit-Risk Analysis (BRA) compares the risk of a situation to its related benefits and addresses the acceptability of the risk. Over the past years BRA in relation to food and food ingredients has gained attention. Food, and even the same food ingredient, may confer both beneficial and adverse effects. Measures directed at food safety may lead to suboptimal or insufficient levels of ingredients from a benefit perspective. In BRA, benefits and risks of food (ingredients) are assessed in one go and may conditionally be expressed into one currency. This allows the comparison of adverse and beneficial effects to be qualitative and quantitative. A BRA should help policy-makers to make more informed and balanced benefit-risk management decisions. Not allowing food benefits to occur in order to guarantee food safety is a risk management decision much the same as accepting some risk in order to achieve more benefits. BRA in food and nutrition is making progress, but difficulties remain. The field may benefit from looking across its borders to learn from other research areas. The BEPRARIBEAN project (Best Practices for Risk-Benefit Analysis: experience from out of food into food; http://en.opasnet.org/w/Bepraribean) aims to do so, by working together with Medicines, Food Microbiology, Environmental Health, Economics & Marketing-Finance and Consumer Perception. All perspectives are reviewed and subsequently integrated to identify opportunities for further development of BRA for food and food ingredients. Interesting issues that emerge are the varying degrees of risk that are deemed acceptable within the areas and the trend towards more open and participatory BRA processes. A set of 6 'state of the art' papers covering the above areas and a paper integrating the separate (re)views are published in this volume.

  16. Childhood type 2 diabetes: Risks and complications

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Gao, Min; Gao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    The universal endocrine pathological state affecting young individuals and adults is type 2 diabetes mellitus, which has seen a significant increase in the last 30 years, particularly in children. Genetic and evnironmental factors are the causative agents for this pathological state in children. This rapid and wide spread of the disease can be controlled by enforcing amendments in environmental factors such as diet, physical activities and obesity. In young infants breastfeeding may be a key modulator of the disease. Associated disorders co-observed in the patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus include renal failure, heart problems and circulatory dysfunctionalities, such as cardiac failure and vision disability. These associated disorders become more pronounced in young patients when they reach puberty. To overcome the lethal outcomes of the disease, early screening of the disease is crucial. The present review focused on the latest updates in the field, as well as plausible risks and complications of this pathological state. PMID:27703500

  17. Cardiovascular and Diabetes Risk Perception in a Hispanic Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Vanessa A.; Mainous, Arch G.; Williamson, Deborah; Johnson, Sharleen P.; Knoll, Michele E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined perceptions of 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk or likelihood of having undiagnosed diabetes or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) with actual risk in a community sample of Hispanic adults. Methods We conducted a survey of 183 Hispanic adults (≥18 years) recruited at community events around Charleston, SC. Likelihood of having undiagnosed diabetes/IFG as well as 10-year CHD risk were calculated. Perceived risk was assessed with questions based on the Risk Perception Survey-Diabetes Mellitus. Results Over half of respondents (54.8%) underestimated their likelihood of undiagnosed diabetes/IFG and 14.8% underestimated their 10-year CHD risk. Older and overweight respondents were more likely to underestimate their likelihood of undiagnosed diabetes/IFG. Respondents with family history of diabetes were the least likely to underestimate their likelihood of current undiagnosed diabetes/IFG. Respondents with diagnosed hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol or a family history of heart attack were more likely to underestimate their 10-year CHD risk. Men were more likely to underestimate their risk for diabetes/IFG and CHD risk. Conclusions Health education to improve accurate risk perception could improve health promotion for this population. PMID:22774302

  18. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Eren, Mehmet Ali; Sabuncu, Tevfik; Karaaslan, Hüseyin

    2016-04-25

    In manuscript named "Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus" by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study. PMID:27114756

  19. "There Are No Known Benefits . . .": Considering the Risk/Benefit Ratio of Qualitative Research.

    PubMed

    Opsal, Tara; Wolgemuth, Jennifer; Cross, Jennifer; Kaanta, Tanya; Dickmann, Ellyn; Colomer, Soria; Erdil-Moody, Zeynep

    2016-07-01

    Institutional review boards (IRBs) are responsible for weighing the risks and benefits of research participation. Qualitative researchers note numerous instances where IRB ethical frameworks fail to align with the ethics of their research projects and point out that IRB understandings of the benefits and risks of research often differ from those of the participants they seek to protect. This qualitative cross-case research investigates participants' interview experiences in six qualitative studies that differed in their methods, subject of focus, and populations. Our findings indicate that contemporary IRBs' use of population "vulnerability" and topic "sensitivity" to assess project risk does not adequately determine the benefits, risks, or ethicality of research. We recommend that IRBs treat as real the evidence for benefits in qualitative research, recognize that sensitivity and vulnerability do not predict risk, and encourage researchers to attend to relationships in their projects.

  20. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  1. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lars J.; Leirgul, Elisabeth; Boyd, Heather A.; Priest, James; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Quertermous, Thomas; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Background— Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. Methods and Results— In a national cohort study, we identified 2 025 727 persons born from 1978 to 2011; among them were 7296 (0.36%) persons exposed to maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus. Pregestational diabetes mellitus was identified by using the National Patient Register and individual-level information on all prescriptions filled in Danish pharmacies. Persons with CHD (n=16 325) were assigned to embryologically related cardiac phenotypes. The CHD prevalence in the offspring of mothers with pregestational diabetes mellitus was 318 per 10 000 live births (n=232) in comparison with a baseline risk of 80 per 10 000; the adjusted relative risk for CHD was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 3.51–4.53). The association was not modified by year of birth, maternal age at diabetes onset, or diabetes duration, and CHD risks associated with type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (insulin-independent) diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly. Persons born to women with previous acute diabetes complications had a higher CHD risk than those exposed to maternal diabetes mellitus without complications (relative risk, 7.62; 95% confidence interval, 5.23–10.6, and relative risk, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.91–4.13, respectively; P=0.0004). All specific CHD phenotypes were associated with maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus (relative risk range, 2.74–13.8). Conclusions— The profoundly increased CHD risk conferred by maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus neither changed over time nor differed by diabetes subtype. The association with acute pregestational diabetes complications was particularly strong, suggesting a role for glucose in the causal pathway. PMID:27166384

  2. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  3. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  4. The potential of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for risk stratification of asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Bonow, Robert O; Tschöpe, Diethelm; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Barrett, Eugene

    2006-08-15

    Patients with diabetes, in particular patients with type 2 diabetes, are at a 2- to 4-fold higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with their nondiabetic peers. Patients with diabetes are also more likely to have silent ischemia and less likely to survive a myocardial infarction than nondiabetic patients. Recent studies with electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) have shown that subclinical atherosclerosis is common in patients with diabetes, and studies with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (with single-photon emission computed tomography) or stress echocardiography have demonstrated that between 25% and 50% of asymptomatic diabetic patients have ischemia during exercise or pharmacological stress and that a substantial proportion of these patients go on to develop major cardiovascular events within several years. Clearly, asymptomatic diabetic patients include a subset of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease who would benefit from improved risk stratification beyond that possible with risk factor scoring systems alone. Single-photon emission computed tomography, stress echocardiography, and possibly EBCT or multi-slice computed tomography, are emerging as valuable diagnostic tools for identifying asymptomatic diabetic patients who might require early and aggressive intervention to manage their cardiovascular risk. PMID:16904545

  5. Major Long-Term Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes: Study Reports Near-Normal Glucose Levels Lead to Large ... the latest results from a landmark government-sponsored study, reported at a special symposium held at the ...

  6. Understanding the real risks of changing employee benefit plans.

    PubMed

    Kane, Jon; St Amour, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    In an environment of constant change, corporations are looking to alter employee benefits programs to make them more responsive to employee and business needs. A complete risk assessment process is the key to preparing for changes to employee benefits programs by providing employers with an analysis of cost savings against the potential negative ramifications of change. This article outlines the steps involved in a complete review of risk assessment. It then discusses how employers can develop successful change management communication strategies if, after conducting a risk assessment, employers decide to move forward with alterations to their employee benefits programs.

  7. [Sauna: cardiac and vascular benefits and risks].

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Sauna bathing is a traditional activity in Finland that has become popular for the past decades in Europe and in the United States. However, it is still considered that patients with cardiovascular pathologies should avoid sauna bathing. Clinical studies have nevertheless showed that sauna was safe for patients with a stable heart condition (hypertension, coronary disease, stable controlled chronic heart failure). Besides, results from recent Japanese studies seem to point out potential benefits for patients with chronic congestive heart failure, but the results need confirmation.

  8. Ecological risk assessment benefits environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbrother, A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A.; Glicken, J.

    1994-12-31

    The ecological risk assessment process in its ideal form is an unbiased approach for assessing the probability of harm to the environment as a consequence of a given action. This information can then be combined with other societal values and biases in the management of such risks. However, as the process currently is understood, decision makers often are accused of manipulating information in order to generate decisions or achieve buy in from the public in support of a particular political agenda. A clear understanding of the nature of the risk management process can help define areas where information should be free from social or personal bias, and areas where values and judgments are critical. The authors do not propose to discuss the individual`s decision-making process, but rather to address the social process of risk communication and environmentally-related decision-making, identifying which parts of that process require bias-free, scientifically generated information about the consequences of various actions and which parts need an understanding of the social values which underlie the informed choices among those possible actions.

  9. Risk Related to Pre–Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Mellitus in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Søren L.; Preiss, David; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Squire, Iain; Cardoso, José Silva; Merkely, Bela; Martinez, Felipe; Starling, Randall C.; Desai, Akshay S.; Lefkowitz, Martin P.; Rizkala, Adel R.; Rouleau, Jean L.; Shi, Victor C.; Solomon, Scott D.; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R.; Packer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    Background— The prevalence of pre–diabetes mellitus and its consequences in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction are not known. We investigated these in the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial. Methods and Results— We examined clinical outcomes in 8399 patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction according to history of diabetes mellitus and glycemic status (baseline hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]: <6.0% [<42 mmol/mol], 6.0%–6.4% [42–47 mmol/mol; pre–diabetes mellitus], and ≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol; diabetes mellitus]), in Cox regression models adjusted for known predictors of poor outcome. Patients with a history of diabetes mellitus (n=2907 [35%]) had a higher risk of the primary composite outcome of heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular mortality compared with those without a history of diabetes mellitus: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 1.52; P<0.001. HbA1c measurement showed that an additional 1106 (13% of total) patients had undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and 2103 (25%) had pre–diabetes mellitus. The hazard ratio for patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (HbA1c, >6.5%) and known diabetes mellitus compared with those with HbA1c<6.0% was 1.39 (1.17–1.64); P<0.001 and 1.64 (1.43–1.87); P<0.001, respectively. Patients with pre–diabetes mellitus were also at higher risk (hazard ratio, 1.27 [1.10–1.47]; P<0.001) compared with those with HbA1c<6.0%. The benefit of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan) compared with enalapril was consistent across the range of HbA1c in the trial. Conclusions— In patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, dysglycemia is common and pre–diabetes mellitus is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes (compared with patients with no diabetes mellitus and HbA1c <6.0%). LCZ696 was beneficial compared with enalapril

  10. Think It Through: Managing the Benefits and Risks of Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... It Through: Managing the Benefits and Risks of Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... or thoughts that you may have. Know Your Medicines--Prescription and Over-the-Counter the brand and ...

  11. Medical marijuana use for chronic pain: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Garth T

    2012-01-01

    Questions from patients about medical marijuana use for chronic pain are becoming more common. The information in this report will help patients understand the potential risks and benefits of using this substance for painful conditions.

  12. Moonshot Science—Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ever since the successful Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a “moonshot” has come to signify a bold effort to achieve a seemingly impossible task. The Obama administration recently called for a moonshot to cure cancer, an initiative that has elicited mixed responses from researchers who welcome additional funding but worry about raising expectations. We suggest that a successful moonshot requires a sufficient understanding of the basic science underlying a problem in question so that efforts can be focused on engineering a solution. Current gaps in our basic knowledge of cancer biology make the cancer moonshot a uniquely challenging endeavor. Nevertheless, history has shown that intensive research efforts have frequently yielded conceptual and technological breakthroughs with unanticipated benefits for society. We expect that this effort will be no different. PMID:27578761

  13. Moonshot Science-Risks and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-08-30

    Ever since the successful Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a "moonshot" has come to signify a bold effort to achieve a seemingly impossible task. The Obama administration recently called for a moonshot to cure cancer, an initiative that has elicited mixed responses from researchers who welcome additional funding but worry about raising expectations. We suggest that a successful moonshot requires a sufficient understanding of the basic science underlying a problem in question so that efforts can be focused on engineering a solution. Current gaps in our basic knowledge of cancer biology make the cancer moonshot a uniquely challenging endeavor. Nevertheless, history has shown that intensive research efforts have frequently yielded conceptual and technological breakthroughs with unanticipated benefits for society. We expect that this effort will be no different.

  14. Moonshot Science-Risks and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the successful Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a "moonshot" has come to signify a bold effort to achieve a seemingly impossible task. The Obama administration recently called for a moonshot to cure cancer, an initiative that has elicited mixed responses from researchers who welcome additional funding but worry about raising expectations. We suggest that a successful moonshot requires a sufficient understanding of the basic science underlying a problem in question so that efforts can be focused on engineering a solution. Current gaps in our basic knowledge of cancer biology make the cancer moonshot a uniquely challenging endeavor. Nevertheless, history has shown that intensive research efforts have frequently yielded conceptual and technological breakthroughs with unanticipated benefits for society. We expect that this effort will be no different. PMID:27578761

  15. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  16. A school-based intervention for diabetes risk reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program, addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race, or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a mu...

  17. Weighing the risks and benefits of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Glickman, L T

    1999-01-01

    The following summarizes this author's current thoughts regarding veterinary vaccines and their safety: 1. Every licensed animal vaccine is probably effective, but also produces some adverse effects. 2. Prelicensing studies of vaccines are not specifically designed to detect adverse vaccine reactions. 3. An improved system of national postmarketing surveillance is required to identify most adverse vaccine reactions that occur at low and moderate frequency. 4. Even a good postmarketing surveillance system is unlikely, however, to detect delayed adverse vaccine reactions, and the longer the delay the less likely they will be associated with vaccination. 5. Analytic epidemiologic (field) studies are the best way to link vaccination with delayed adverse reactions, but these are often hindered by incomplete vaccination histories in medical records in veterinary practice and by a lack of veterinarians in industry trained in epidemiologic methods. 6. Each licensed veterinary vaccine should be subjected to a quantitative risk assessment, and these should be updated on a regular basis as new information becomes available. 7. Risk assessment should be used to identify gaps in information regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, and appropriate epidemiologic studies conducted to fill these gaps that contribute to the uncertainty in risk estimates. 8. Risk assessment is an analytical process that is firmly based on scientific considerations, but it also requires judgments to be made when the available information is incomplete. These judgments inevitably draw on both scientific and policy considerations. 9. Representatives from industry, government, veterinary medicine, and the animal-owning public should be involved in risk management, that is, deciding between policy options. The controversy regarding vaccine risks is intensifying to the point that some animal owners have stopped vaccinating their animals. They offer as justification the belief that current vaccines

  18. Integration of risk and benefit analysis-the window of benefit as a new tool?

    PubMed

    Palou, Andreu; Pico, Catalina; Keijer, Jaap

    2009-08-01

    Foods and food components can have positive and/or negative effects on our health, resulting in benefits and risks. At present these are evaluated in largely separated trajectories. In view of assessment, management, and communication, we here propose and argue for an integrated evaluation of risk and benefit of food components and foods. The window of benefit assessment concept is described as a framework to combine thresholds and scores. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) and the tolerable upper intake level (UL) delimit the range of intakes that should be considered sufficient to prevent deficiency, while avoiding toxicity. Within these thresholds, two additional thresholds, the lower and upper level of additional benefit (LLAB and ULAB), define the range of intakes that constitute an additional benefit. Intake within these limits should thus be protective against a specified health or nutritional risk of public health relevance. To faithfully predict outcomes and to obtain the tools that are necessary to support scientific valid evaluations, a mechanism based systems biology understanding of the effects of foods and nutrients is seen as the way forward. Ultimately this should lead to an integrated risk-benefit assessment, which will allow better management and, especially, communication, to the benefit of the consumer.

  19. Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan; Marquardt, Allison; Kravitz, Ben; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2009-10-01

    Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors into the stratosphere has been suggested as a means of geoengineering to cool the planet and reduce global warming. The decision to implement such a scheme would require a comparison of its benefits, dangers, and costs to those of other responses to global warming, including doing nothing. Here we evaluate those factors for stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols. Using existing U.S. military fighter and tanker planes, the annual costs of injecting aerosol precursors into the lower stratosphere would be several billion dollars. Using artillery or balloons to loft the gas would be much more expensive. We do not have enough information to evaluate more exotic techniques, such as pumping the gas up through a hose attached to a tower or balloon system. Anthropogenic stratospheric aerosol injection would cool the planet, stop the melting of sea ice and land-based glaciers, slow sea level rise, and increase the terrestrial carbon sink, but produce regional drought, ozone depletion, less sunlight for solar power, and make skies less blue. Furthermore it would hamper Earth-based optical astronomy, do nothing to stop ocean acidification, and present many ethical and moral issues. Further work is needed to quantify many of these factors to allow informed decision-making.

  20. Stress echocardiography for risk assessment of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Baur, L.H.B.; Graal, M.

    2004-01-01

    Coronary artery disease in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus will become an increasing problem in the future. Because diabetic patients benefit from treatment of symptomatic but also asymptomatic coronary artery disease, early diagnosis is warranted. The diagnostic techniques used to detect ischaemia, with a focus on stress echocardiography, are described. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696265

  1. Perceptions of the risks and benefits of fish consumption: Individual choices to reduce risk and increase health benefits

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption often focus on awareness of and adherence to advisories, how much fish people eat, and contaminant levels in those fish. This paper examines knowledge and accuracy of risks and benefits of fish consumption among fishers and other recreationists in the New York Bight, indicative of whether they could make sound dietary decisions. While most respondents knew about health risks (70%) and benefits (94%) of consuming fish, far fewer could name specific risks and benefits. Less than 25% of respondents mentioned mercury and less than 15% mentioned that pregnant women and children were at risk. Far fewer people mentioned polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Nearly 70% said it was healthy to eat fish, and 45% were aware that fish were rich in healthful oils. Despite the lack of details about what specific risks and benefits of fish, well over a third did not feel they needed more information. Other respondents had basic questions, but did not pose specific questions about the fish they caught or ate that would have clarified their individual risk-balancing decisions. Knowledge of which fish were high in contaminants did not match the mercury or PCB levels in those fish. There was a disconnect between the information base about specific risks and benefits of fish consumption, levels of mercury and PCBs in fish, and the respondent’s desire for more information. These data indicate that respondents did not have enough accurate information about contaminants in fish to make informed risk-balancing decisions. PMID:19193369

  2. Planned home birth: benefits, risks, and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Ruth; Ackerson, Kelly; Kane Low, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While the number of women in developed countries who plan a home birth is low, the number has increased over the past decade in the US, and there is evidence that more women would choose this option if it were readily available. Rates of planned home birth range from 0.1% in Sweden to 20% in the Netherlands, where home birth has always been an integrated part of the maternity system. Benefits of planned home birth include lower rates of maternal morbidity, such as postpartum hemorrhage, and perineal lacerations, and lower rates of interventions such as episiotomy, instrumental vaginal birth, and cesarean birth. Women who have a planned home birth have high rates of satisfaction related to home being a more comfortable environment and feeling more in control of the experience. While maternal outcomes related to planned birth at home have been consistently positive within the literature, reported neonatal outcomes during planned home birth are more variable. While the majority of investigations of planned home birth compared with hospital birth have found no difference in intrapartum fetal deaths, neonatal deaths, low Apgar scores, or admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, there have been reports in the US, as well as a meta-analysis, that indicated more adverse neonatal outcomes associated with home birth. There are multiple challenges associated with research designs focused on planned home birth, in part because conducting randomized controlled trials is not feasible. This report will review current research studies published between 2004 and 2014 related to maternal and neonatal outcomes of planned home birth, and discuss strengths, limitations, and opportunities regarding planned home birth. PMID:25914559

  3. Planned home birth: benefits, risks, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Ruth; Ackerson, Kelly; Kane Low, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While the number of women in developed countries who plan a home birth is low, the number has increased over the past decade in the US, and there is evidence that more women would choose this option if it were readily available. Rates of planned home birth range from 0.1% in Sweden to 20% in the Netherlands, where home birth has always been an integrated part of the maternity system. Benefits of planned home birth include lower rates of maternal morbidity, such as postpartum hemorrhage, and perineal lacerations, and lower rates of interventions such as episiotomy, instrumental vaginal birth, and cesarean birth. Women who have a planned home birth have high rates of satisfaction related to home being a more comfortable environment and feeling more in control of the experience. While maternal outcomes related to planned birth at home have been consistently positive within the literature, reported neonatal outcomes during planned home birth are more variable. While the majority of investigations of planned home birth compared with hospital birth have found no difference in intrapartum fetal deaths, neonatal deaths, low Apgar scores, or admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, there have been reports in the US, as well as a meta-analysis, that indicated more adverse neonatal outcomes associated with home birth. There are multiple challenges associated with research designs focused on planned home birth, in part because conducting randomized controlled trials is not feasible. This report will review current research studies published between 2004 and 2014 related to maternal and neonatal outcomes of planned home birth, and discuss strengths, limitations, and opportunities regarding planned home birth. PMID:25914559

  4. Exercise and Cardiac Complications: Do the Benefits Outweigh the Risks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Barry A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    In a roundtable discussion, a panel of experts address how physicians can identify active patients for whom exercise poses the risk of serious heart complications, how useful stress tests are, what exercise intensity is best, and what physicians can tell patients about the risks of exercise versus its benefits. (SM)

  5. Risk of Cancer in Diabetes: The Effect of Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Mojtaba; Emami, Zahra; Khamseh, Mohammad E.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death. Association of diabetes as a growing and costly disease with cancer is a major health concern. Meanwhile, preexisting diabetes is associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortalities. Presence of diabetes related comorbidities, poorer response to cancer treatment, and excess mortality related to diabetes are among the most important explanations. Although diabetes appear to be a risk factor for cancer and is associated with the mortality risk in cancer patients, several factors such as diabetes duration, multiple drug therapy, and the presence of diabetes comorbidities make the assessment of the effect of diabetes treatment on cancer risk and mortality difficult. Metformin is the drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The available evidence from basic science, clinical, and population-based research supports the anticancer effect of metformin. However, randomized controlled clinical trials do not provide enough evidence for a strong protective effect of metformin on cancer incidence or mortality. One of the most important limitations of these trials is the short duration of the followup. Further long-term randomized controlled clinical trials specifically designed to determine metformin effect on cancer risk are needed to provide the best answer to this challenge. PMID:24224094

  6. Minocycline in acne vulgaris: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, Falk

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline is a semi-synthetic, second-generation tetracycline. It was introduced in 1972 and has both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Minocycline is used for a variety of infectious diseases and in acne. Even today, new indications beyond the antibacterial indications are being investigated such as its use in neurologic diseases. Formerly, minocycline was thought to have a superior efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory acne, especially with respect to antibacterial-resistant Propionibacterium acnes. A thorough review of the literature, however, shows that minocycline is not more effective in acne than other tetracyclines. Compared with first-generation tetracyclines, minocycline has a better pharmacokinetic profile, and compared with doxycycline it is not phototoxic. However, minocycline has an increased risk of severe adverse effects compared with other tetracyclines. It may induce hypersensitivity reactions affecting the liver, lung, kidneys, or multiple organs (Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms [DRESS] syndrome) in the first weeks of treatment and, with long-term treatment, may cause autoimmune reactions (systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune hepatitis). In addition, CNS symptoms, such as dizziness, are more frequent compared with other tetracyclines. Long-term treatment may induce hyperpigmentation of the skin or other organs. Resistance of P. acnes to minocycline also occurs, dependent on the prescribing behavior. Considering the aspects of efficacy, its adverse effect profile, resistance, price, and alternatives, minocycline is no longer considered the first-line antibacterial in the treatment of acne.

  7. Risk-benefit perception: The research challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, E.

    1987-01-01

    Factors predisposing to perception of repositories as risky include the nuclear track record of secrecy and ineptitude, the overconfidence of some pro-nukes and the premature commercialization of an immature technology. Then, in parallel, we have the AEC-DOE track record including a bureaucratic approach involving premature policy decisions and continual changes in nuclear waste policy as demanded by Congress. The confusion of nuclear power with nuclear weapons is encouraged by those whose goal is to get rid of nuclear power. Media coverge feeds on controversy and a crisis, is a major factor in public perception of N-power and repositories as risky. Beyond their actual physical effects, there is the signal value of accidents such as Browns Ferry, Chernobyl, the Hanford tank leaks, Challenger, and TMI. These accidents have signaled that either the managers and operators don't understand the technology well enough to manage it, or worse yet, that the technology itself may not be manageable. With wodefully inadequate science and technology eduation, US citizens are unprepared to make decisions about management and uses of technology or to conduct their own risk evaluations. All of the above is occurring against the backdrop of the widespread and pervasive decline of trust in government and institutions in the past 25 years. And finally, there is Murphy's Law - everyone has some personal knowledge that whatever can go wrong will go wrong some day. In this social context, the tilt is toward perception of repositories as risky.

  8. Cumulative Benefit Analysis for Ranking Risk Reduction Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Leverenz, Fred L.; Aysa Jimenez, Julio

    2007-04-25

    The Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study approach, and other similar methods, are very effective ways to qualitatively identify a comprehensive set of accident scenarios for a facility. If these analyses are modified to incorporate a simple system for evaluating relative risk, such as an order-of-magnitude scoring system, the resultant study can be a very powerful input to developing risk reduction strategies. By adding the concept of Risk Reduction Worth evaluations for all accident Causes, Safeguards, and proposal Action Items, an analyst can then formulate a strategy to select the minimal set of risk reduction actions that maximizes risk reduction. One strategy for doing this involves the iterative evaluation of RRW after postulation of risk reduction actions, until the residual risk reaches a tolerable value, termed Cumulative Risk Benefit Analysis. This concept was developed for the evaluation of a set of pipeline pumping stations, and provided valuable insight into how to reduce risk in a sensible, prioritized fashion.

  9. Benefit and risk of organic ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, G J; Schaefer, H

    2001-06-01

    marketing, new UV filters undergo stringent human testing to confirm their efficacy as well as the absence of irritation, sensitization, photoirritation, and photosensitization potential in man. UV filters not only protect against acute skin injury, such as sunburn, but also against long-term and chronic skin damage, including cellular DNA damage, photoinduced immune suppression, and, by extension, skin cancer. The protection provided by modern sunscreens against UV-induced skin cancer was shown in animal photocarcinogenicity studies and confirmed by numerous in vitro, animal, and human investigations: UV filters protect the p53 tumor suppressor gene from damage and prevent UV-induced immune suppression. Recent studies suggest that sunscreens protect against precursor lesions of skin cancer, such as actinic keratoses. Additional benefits of ultraviolet filters include prevention of photodermatoses, such as polymorphic light eruption, and, possibly, photoaging. Modern sunscreens are safe for children and adults. Percutaneous penetration and irritation rates of topically applied substances in children and adults are similar. The principal protective measure is to keep children out of the sun and/or to cover them with protective clothes; however, sunscreens are a safe and effective and often the only feasible defense of children against UV radiation. In conclusion, sunscreens are safe protective devices that undergo stringent safety and efficacy evaluation.

  10. Environmental contaminants as risk factors for developing diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the incidence of diabetes has received little attention until recently. A number of reports have emerged, however, concerning elevated diabetes in persons occupationally exposed to dioxin. United States (US) Air Force personnel in Vietnam who sprayed Agent Orange containing dioxin as a contaminant had elevated rates of diabetes, leading to US government compensation for diabetes in these veterans. Recent studies in populations exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides found a dose-dependent elevated risk of diabetes. An elevation in risk of diabetes in relation to levels of several POPs has been demonstrated by two different groups using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a random sampling of US citizens. The strong associations seen in quite different studies suggest the possibility that exposure to POPs could cause diabetes. One striking observation is that obese persons that do not have elevated POPs are not at elevated risk of diabetes, suggesting that the POPs rather than the obesity per se is responsible for the association. Although a specific mechanism is not known, most POPs induce a great number and variety of genes, including several that alter insulin action. Because diabetes is a dangerous disease that is increasing in frequency throughout the world, further study of the possibility that exposure to POPs contributes to the etiology of diabetes is critical. PMID:18557598

  11. Values, perceived risks and benefits, and acceptability of nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Judith I M; Steg, Linda; Poortinga, Wouter

    2013-02-01

    We examined how personal values and perceptions of risks and benefits are associated with the acceptability of nuclear energy (NE). A theoretical model is tested in which beliefs about the risks and benefits of NE mediate the relationship between values and acceptability. The results showed that egoistic values are positively related to the perceived benefits and acceptability of NE. In contrast, altruistic and biospheric values were positively related to the perceived risks of NE. Although it has been argued that NE may help to combat climate change through lower CO(2) emissions, these environmental benefits were not acknowledged by people with strong biospheric values. Furthermore, results confirmed that the more risks respondents perceived, the less they were inclined to accept NE. In contrast, the more a person believed that NE has beneficial consequences, the more acceptable NE was. Finally, as expected, perceived risks and benefits were found to partly mediate the relationship between personal values and acceptability. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  12. Sedentary behavior, gestational diabetes mellitus, and type 2 diabetes risk: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven T; Lynch, Brigid; Vallance, Jeff; Davenport, Margie H; Gardiner, Paul A; Butalia, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A substantial number of pregnancies are complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and up to 70 % of women with GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Given the extensive body of research suggesting physical activity reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, facilitating physical activity, and reducing sedentary time may be effective approaches to promote the health of women with a previous GDM diagnosis. Here, we discuss physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior, in the context of GDM and the potential for type 2 diabetes risk reduction. PMID:26823010

  13. Benefits of modest weight loss on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lau, David C W; Teoh, Hwee

    2013-04-01

    The epidemic of overweight and obesity is a major driver of the growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus globally. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases exponentially as body mass index rises above 25 kg/m(2). Obesity currently costs the Canadian economy approximately $7.1 billion annually whereas per capita health care cost for individuals with diabetes are 3 to 4 times that for persons without the disease. Each kilogram of weight lost through health behaviour changes in people with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a relative diabetes risk reduction of 16%. As 80% to 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and adiposity worsens the metabolic and physiologic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes, weight loss is recommended as the cornerstone management measure. A modest weight loss of 5% to 10% is an achievable and realistic goal for preventing type 2 diabetes in susceptible individuals and improving glycemic and metabolic control in people with type 2 diabetes. When health behaviour modification fails to achieve glycemic and metabolic goal targets, priority should be given to antihyperglycemic agents that are associated with weight loss or weight neutrality. Every pound of body fat loss matters and every kilogram counts in the management of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity: risks and benefits in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C; McCullough, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Obesity is one of the most preventable causes of morbidity and mortality of the 21st century. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been a largely overlooked consequence of obesity; however, accumulating evidence elucidates the association. Obesity is at the core, promoting a cascade of secondary pathologies including diabetes, dyslipidemia, inflammation, hypertension, and the metabolic syndrome; these comorbidities constitute great risk for CKD. With the diagnosis of CKD, there is an increased threat of cardiovascular disease and the attendant increase in morbidity and mortality rates. Substantial weight loss in the obese population can be effectively achieved and maintained through bariatric surgery, which confers major health benefits by producing resolution or improvement of obesity-related comorbidities. This surgical procedure presents an early hazard of acute on chronic kidney failure, which is offset by a potential improvement in the risk of CKD progression with anticipated improvement in hypertension, diabetes, and CKD risk factors. Future research is needed to describe the clinical course and risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the CKD population.

  15. Insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes: what is 'double diabetes' and what are the risks?

    PubMed

    Cleland, S J; Fisher, B M; Colhoun, H M; Sattar, N; Petrie, J R

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we explore the concept of 'double diabetes', a combination of type 1 diabetes with features of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. After considering whether double diabetes is a useful concept, we discuss potential mechanisms of increased insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes before examining the extent to which double diabetes might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We then go on to consider the proposal that weight gain from intensive insulin regimens may be associated with increased CV risk factors in some patients with type 1 diabetes, and explore the complex relationships between weight gain, insulin resistance, glycaemic control and CV outcome. Important comparisons and contrasts between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are highlighted in terms of hepatic fat, fat partitioning and lipid profile, and how these may differ between type 1 diabetic patients with and without double diabetes. In so doing, we hope this work will stimulate much-needed research in this area and an improvement in clinical practice. PMID:23613085

  16. Safety impact--the risk/benefits of functional foods.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Gérard

    2009-12-01

    It is amazing to see how much the approach of the food risk analysis evolved in the recent years. For half a century and the birth of the risk assessment methodology in the food domain, only no appreciable health risk was considered acceptable by the manager. This is the vocabulary used in the case of a voluntary, deliberated human action, as the use of food additives (definition of ADI). In the case of risks not resulting from such an action, as that of the presence of contaminants, the risk assessor allocates provisional tolerable daily, weekly or monthly intake that are the basis for regulation. This vocabulary is in agreement with the objective which consists in approaching closer possible of the zero risk which is the wish of a majority of the consumers. Some years ago, the risk managers insisted to obtain from the assessors as often as possible a quantitative risk evaluation. More recently even, the managers would like to decide on the basis of a balance of risk and benefit acceptable for management purposes. Finally, they hope that general principles and tools will be available for conducting a quantitative risk-benefit analysis for foods and food ingredients. What is possible in the case of functional foods (FF)? Based on the definition of FF proposed in the programme FUFOSE, one has to distinguish between different situations in order to assess the risk: that of a micro-, that of a macro-component or that of a whole food. These situations have been clearly described in the document resulting from FOSIE. The standardized methodology relevant to assess micro-components is not well adapted to the assessment of whole food. Concepts of substantial equivalence and of history of safe use could be useful tools in this case. However, quantitative risk assessment remains a very difficult exercise. If a process for the assessment of health benefit of FF has been proposed as an outcome of the PASSCLAIM action, the quantification of this benefit needs adequate tools

  17. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  18. Understanding the type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease risk paradox.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer B

    2014-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have approximately a 2-fold increase in the risk for coronary heart disease, stroke, and death from vascular causes compared with patients who do not have diabetes. Interventions targeted at modifiable risk factors, such as smoking cessation and management of hypertension and dyslipidemia, reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Paradoxically, large randomized studies have failed to conclusively show that intensively lowering glucose reduces CVD event rates in patients with T2DM, despite pathophysiologic and epidemiologic evidence suggesting that hyperglycemia contributes to CVD. Although initiation of intensive glycemic control early in the disease course may be associated with a reduction in the long-term risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, this approach in those with long-standing or complicated T2DM is not of clear benefit and may even be harmful in some. Failure to mitigate risk with antihyperglycemic therapy and the potential for some treatments to increase CVD risk underlies a treatment paradox. New glucose-lowering therapies are now subject to close scrutiny for CV safety before and after drug approval. Results from the first trials designed to meet the recent CV regulatory requirements have shown no increased risk of major adverse CV events but also no CV benefit from dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor therapy, as well as a potentially increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure. Conclusive evidence of CV risk reduction with glucose-lowering therapy is still lacking and scrutiny of additional agents is necessary. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous disease, for which patient-centered, individualized care, and goal-setting is appropriate. Interventions that focus on the management of CV risk factors and glucose lowering with medications that are not cardiotoxic represent an optimal and attainable treatment approach.

  19. Birthright Denied: The Risks and Benefits of Breast-feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stephanie G.; Highland, Joseph H.

    This document compares the benefits and risks of breastfeeding in light of recent evidence that mothers' milk contains high levels of chemical contaminants. Information is presented on the occurrence and toxicity of agricultural and industrial chemicals found in breast milk and on the lead, industrial chemicals, nitrates, and bacterial…

  20. The role of risk and cost benefit in program budgeting

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C.J.; Alchowiak, J.

    1995-12-31

    The primary Environmental Management (EM) program mission is protecting human health and the environment. EM is currently facing a decreasing budget while still having to deal with competing requirements and risks to workers, public, and environment. There has been no consistent framework for considering in an integrated fashion the multiple types of risks and hazards present in the nuclear weapons complex. Therefore, to allocate resources during the budget process, EM is using risk, long term costs, mortgage reduction, compliance issues, and stakeholders concerns to prioritize the funding of activities. Risk and cost-benefit analysis are valuable tools to help make decisions to reduce risks to health, safety, and the environment in a sensible and cost-effective manner. Principles for priority setting using risk analysis are to seek to compare risks by grouping them into broad categories of concern (e.g., high, medium, and low); to set priorities in managing risks to account for relevant management and social considerations; to inform priorities by as broad a range of views as possible, ideally with consensus; and, to try to coordinate risk reduction efforts among programs. The Draft Risk Report to Congress, Risks and the Risk Debate: Searching for Common Ground {open_quote}The First Step,{close_quote} provides the first link between budget, compliance requirements, and risk reduction/pollution prevention activities. The process used for the report provides an initial framework to capture the spectrum of risks associated with environmental management activities and to link these risks in a qualitative fashion to compliance and the budget.

  1. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved

  2. Structural role of perceived benefits and barriers to self-care in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mohebi, Siamak; Azadbakht, Leila; Feizi, Avat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Kargar, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Goal: In diseases and disorders such as diabetes, treatment and disease management depends mostly on patient's performance. So, self-care is very important in these patients and they can affect their own welfare, functional capabilities, and disease processes by achieving self-care skills. Nowadays, we know that self care follows individual, psychological and social factors which its recognition can assist health care providing systems to carry out educational programs. This study aimed to investigate the role of perceived benefits and barriers in doing self-care behaviors among diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This study is a narrative review and articles with sectional, cohort, and interventional, clinical trial, qualitative and narrative designs were chosen using databases and academic search engines such as PubMed, SCOPUS, ProQuest, Elsevier and key words like self-care diabetes, perceived benefits and barriers. Persian articles were also selected using databases like IRANMEDEX, MEDLIB, as well as searching the articles in sites of domestic scientific magazines. Results: Reviewed articles’ findings show the average situation of perceived benefits and barriers in diabetic patients regarding self-care. Qualified blood sugar (glucose) control, weight control, happiness feeling and expenses reduction are the most important perceived benefits. The most significant perceived barriers in self-care consist of lack of family support, shame feeling, forgetfulness and not being able to ignore foods’ flavor. Conclusion: Perceived benefits and barriers, as central constructs in some patterns and theories of behavior change, were related to self-care, so that it was directly related to perceived benefits and reversely related to perceived barriers. Therefore, these two constructs can be considered as strategies for promoting self-care behaviors in diabetic patients. PMID:24083287

  3. The effect of past antibiotic exposure on diabetes risk

    PubMed Central

    Boursi, Ben; Mamtani, Ronac; Haynes, Kevin; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gut microbiota influence metabolic pathways relevant to the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin-resistance and diabetes. Antibiotic therapy can alter the microbiota and is commonly used in western countries. We sought to evaluate whether past antibiotic exposure increases diabetes risk. Research design and methods We conducted a nested case-control study using a large population-based database from the United Kingdom (UK). Cases were defined as those with incident diagnosis of diabetes. For every case, 4 eligible controls matched on age, sex, practice-site, and duration of follow-up before index-date were selected using incidence-density sampling. Exposure of interest was antibiotic therapy >1 year before index-date. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. The risk was adjusted for body mass index (BMI), smoking, last glucose level and number of infections before index-date, as well as past medical history of coronary artery disease and hyperlipidemia. Results The study included 208,002 diabetic cases and 815,576 matched controls. Exposure to a single antibiotic prescription was not associated with higher adjusted diabetes risk. Treatment with 2–5 antibiotic courses was associated with increase in diabetic risk for penicillin, cephalosporins, macrolides and quinolones with adjusted OR ranging from 1.08 (95%CI 1.05–1.11) for penicillin to 1.15 (95%CI 1.08–1.23) for quinolones. The risk increased with the number of antibiotic courses and reached 1.37 (95%CI 1.19–1.58) for >5 courses of quinolones. There was no association between exposure to anti-virals and anti-fungals and diabetes risk. Conclusions Exposure to certain antibiotic groups increases diabetes risk. PMID:25805893

  4. Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... level is: High 1 Average 0 Low Your health care provider: Will test you as soon as you know you are ... their lifetime. If you had gestational diabetes, your health care provider will test you for diabetes 6 weeks after you give ...

  5. Falls risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Vinik, Etta J; Colberg, Sheri R; Morrison, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a major health issue for older adults, especially for those who develop type 2 diabetes who must contend with age-related declines in balance, muscle strength, and walking ability. They must also contend with health-related issues specific to the disease process. Given the general association between these variables and falls, being able to identify which measures negatively impact on balance in older diabetic persons is a critical step. Moreover, designing specific interventions to target these physiologic functions underlying balance and gait control will produce the greatest benefit for reducing falls in older persons with diabetes.

  6. Diabetic retinopathy and the associated risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Razia A.; Khalil, Shamsun N.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the proportion and grades of retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 401 type 2 diabetic patients. A questionnaire and checklist were used to collect the data. Retinopathy was diagnosed and graded by fundus photographs and slit lamp examination. The duration of diabetes, age of patients, age at onset of diabetes, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and complications were noted. Results: The mean age of male and female patients was 54.93 and 54.25 years; 57.6% were males. The mean age of onset and mean duration of diabetes were 43.91 and 13.4 years, respectively. The proportion of retinopathy was 36.4%. Grades of retinopathy were: Mild 57.5%, moderate 19.9%, severe nonproliferative 11%, and proliferative retinopathy 11.6%; 7.2% of patients had maculopathy. Retinopathy was significantly associated with older age, younger age at onset, longer duration of disease, poorly controlled blood sugar, hypertension, insulin use; the presence of neuropathy and nephropathy appeared as a significant risk. Younger age at onset, longer duration, and insulin use appeared as the strongest predictors for diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: More than a third (36.4%) of the diabetic patients attending a diabetic center had retinopathy. The control of the risk factors may reduce both prevalence and consequences of retinopathy. PMID:26929725

  7. Sulfonylurea pharmacogenomics in Type 2 diabetes: the influence of drug target and diabetes risk polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Aquilante, Christina L

    2010-01-01

    The sulfonylureas stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β cells, and have been a cornerstone of Type 2 diabetes pharmacotherapy for over 50 years. Although sulfonylureas are effective antihyperglycemic agents, interindividual variability exists in drug response (i.e., pharmacodynamics), disposition (i.e., pharmacokinetics) and adverse effects. The field of pharmacogenomics has been applied to sulfonylurea clinical studies in order to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of this response variability. Historically, most studies have sought to determine the influence of polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzyme genes on sulfonylurea pharmacokinetics in humans. More recently, polymorphisms in sulfonylurea drug target genes and diabetes risk genes have been implicated as important determinants of sulfonylurea pharmacodynamics in patients with Type 2 diabetes. As such, the purpose of this review is to discuss sulfonylurea pharmacogenomics in the setting of Type 2 diabetes, specifically focusing on polymorphisms in drug target and diabetes risk genes, and their relationship with interindividual variability in sulfonylurea response and adverse effects. PMID:20222815

  8. [Continuing peripheral nerve blocks - benefit for orthopedic patients with diabetes mellitus?].

    PubMed

    Doležal, David; Saleh, Abdo Islam

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in population of developed countries. And there is also, together with this fact, an increasing frequency of surgical not only orthopedic procedures for diabetic complications or for other reasons. However, thanks to modern sophisticated perioperative approaches, diabetes itself is no longer main risk factor for worsening of perioperative morbidity and mortality. The organ complications of diabetes still remain the crucial for patients outcome. The individual approach to each patient is important when we are plann-ing anesthesiological perioperative strategy. Assessment of long term diabetes compensation before elective surgical procedures, assessment and optimization of organ functions with searching for possible secondary complications of diabetes is also crucial. Generally, it is necessary to maintain compensation of diabetes through the whole perioperative period, avoid episodes of hypotension and tissue hypoperfusion and all anesthesiological interventions have to be targeted to rapid recovery (chronic medication, oral feeding and early rehabilitation). Technics of regional anesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks particularly, may be very useful for the objective especially for ortho-pedic patients.Key words: anesthesia - diabetes mellitus - perioperative period - peripheral nerve blocks.

  9. Risks and Benefits of Consumption of Great Lakes Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Satyendra P.; Bowerman, William; Boysen, Eric; Clark, Milton; Diamond, Miriam; Mergler, Donna; Pantazopoulos, Peter; Schantz, Susan; Carpenter, David O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Beneficial effects of fish consumption on early cognitive development and cardiovascular health have been attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids in fish and fish oils, but toxic chemicals in fish may adversely affect these health outcomes. Risk–benefit assessments of fish consumption have frequently focused on methylmercury and omega-3 fatty acids, not persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, and none have evaluated Great Lakes fish consumption. Objectives: The risks and benefits of fish consumption have been established primarily for marine fish. Here, we examine whether sufficient data are available to evaluate the risks and benefits of eating freshwater fish from the Great Lakes. Methods: We used a scoping review to integrate information from multiple state, provincial, and federal agency sources regarding the contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and fish consumers, consumption rates and fish consumption advisories, and health effects of contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids. Data synthesis: Great Lakes fish contain persistent contaminants—many of which have documented adverse health effects —that accumulate in humans consuming them. In contrast, data are sparse on omega-3 fatty acids in the fish and their consumers. Moreover, few studies have documented the social and cultural benefits of Great Lakes fish consumption, particularly for subsistence fishers and native communities. At this time, federal and state/provincial governments provide fish consumption advisories based solely on risk. Conclusions: Our knowledge of Great Lakes fish has critical gaps, particularly regarding the benefits of consumption. A risk–benefit analysis requires more information than is currently available on the concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and their absorption by fish eaters in addition to more information on the social, cultural, and health consequences of changes in the amount of fish consumed. PMID

  10. Treatment of the diabetic patient: focus on cardiovascular and renal risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Kevin C; Bakris, George L

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus increases the risk for hypertension and associated cardiovascular diseases, including coronary, cerebrovascular, renal and peripheral vascular disease. The risk for developing cardiovascular disease is increased when both diabetes and hypertension co-exist; in fact, over 11 million Americans have both diabetes and hypertension. These numbers will continue to climb, internationally, since the leading associated risk for diabetes development, obesity, has reached epidemic proportions, globally. Moreover, the frequent association of diabetes with dyslipidemia, as well as coagulation, endothelial, and metabolic abnormalities also aggravates the underlying vascular disease process in patients who possess these comorbid conditions. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are overactivated in both hypertension and diabetes. Drugs that inhibit this system, such as ACE inhibitors and more recently angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs), have proven beneficial effects on the micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes, especially the kidney. The BRILLIANT study showed that lisinopril reduces microalbuminuria better than CCB therapy. Numerous other long-term studies confirm this association with ACE inhibitors including the HOPE trial. Furthermore, the European Controlled trial of Lisinopril in Insulin-dependent Diabetes (EUCLID) study, showed that lisinopril slowed the progression of renal disease, even in individuals with mild albuminuria. In fact, there are now five appropriately powered randomized placebo-controlled trials to show that both ACE inhibitors and ARBs slow progression of diabetic nephropathy in people with type 2 diabetes. These effects were shown to be better than conventional blood pressure lowering therapy, including dihydropyridine CCBs. In patients with microalbuminuria, ACE inhibitors and ARBs reduce the progression of microalbuminuria to proteinuria and provide a risk reduction of between

  11. Cardiovascular risk stratification and management in pre-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Færch, Kristine; Vistisen, Dorte; Johansen, Nanna Borup; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2014-06-01

    Prediabetes, covering individuals with impaired fasting glycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, or high-risk HbA1c levels, is associated with a ∼20 % increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with normoglycemic individuals. It is well-known that lifestyle or pharmacologic interventions can prevent diabetes in prediabetic people; however, the evidence is less clear regarding prevention of CVD. Most diabetes prevention trials have failed to show beneficial effects on CVD morbidity and mortality despite significant improvements of CVD risk factors in individuals with prediabetes. Another challenge is how to estimate CVD risk in prediabetic people. In general, prediction models for CVD do not take glucose levels or prediabetes status into account, thereby underestimating CVD risk in these high-risk individuals. More evidence within risk stratification and management of CVD risk in prediabetes is needed in order to recommend useful and effective strategies for early prevention of CVD.

  12. Children's understanding of the risks and benefits associated with research

    PubMed Central

    Burke, T; Abramovitch, R; Zlotkin, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the current study was to maximise the amount of information children and adolescents understand about the risks and benefits associated with participation in a biomedical research study. Design: Participants were presented with one of six hypothetical research protocols describing how to fix a fractured thigh using either a "standard" cast or "new" pins procedure. Risks and benefits associated with each of the treatment options were manipulated so that for each one of the six protocols there was either a correct or ambiguous choice. Participants and setting: Two hundred and fifty one children, ages 6–15 (53% boys), and 237 adults (30% men) were interviewed while waiting for a clinic appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children. Results: Using standardised procedures and questionnaires, it was determined that most participants, regardless of age group, were able to understand the basic purpose and procedures involved in the research, and most were able to choose the "correct" operation. The younger children, however, showed an overall preference for a cast operation, whereas the older participants were more likely to choose the pins. Conclusions: By creating age appropriate modules of information, children as young as six years can understand potentially difficult and complex concepts such as the risks and benefits associated with participation in biomedical research. It appears, however, that different criteria were used for treatment preference, regardless of associated risks; older participants tended to opt for mobility (the pins procedure) whereas younger participants stayed with the more familiar cast operation. PMID:16319237

  13. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Bell, K.; Bernow, S.; Duckworth, M.; Spinney P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents preliminary results of a study to evaluate the risk-reduction benefits of wind power for a case study utility system using decision analysis techniques. The costs and risks of two alternative decisions-whether to build a 400 MW gas-fired combined cycle plant or a 1600 MW wind plant in 2003-were compared through computer simulations as fuel prices, environmental regulatory costs, wind and conventional power plant availability, and load growth were allowed to vary. Three different market scenarios were examined: traditional regulation, a short-term power pool, and fixed-price contracts of varying duration. The study concludes that, from the perspective of ratepayers, wind energy provides a net levelized risk-reduction benefit of $3.4 to $7.8/MWh under traditional regulation, and less in the other scenarios. From the perspective of the utility plant owners, wind provides a significant risk benefit in the unregulated market scenarios but none in a regulated market. The methodology and findings should help inform utility resource planning and industry restructuring efforts. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rewers, Marian; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen considerably in the past 30 years due to changes in the environment that have been only partially identified. In this Series paper, we critically discuss candidate triggers of islet autoimmunity and factors thought to promote progression from autoimmunity to overt type 1 diabetes. We revisit previously proposed hypotheses to explain the growth in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in light of current data. Finally, we suggest a unified model in which immune tolerance to β cells can be broken by several environmental exposures that induce generation of hybrid peptides acting as neoautoantigens. PMID:27302273

  15. Organizing care for persons with psychotic disorders and risk of or existing diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Hultsjö, S M; Hjelm, K

    2012-12-01

    This literature review aimed to explore previous knowledge about specific care requirements for persons with psychotic disorders and risk of or existing type 2 diabetes. Sixteen qualitative and quantitative studies in the area were identified and summarized. The studies together indicate that mental health nurses play an important role in motivating people to perform diabetes care as they are often known to and trusted by the patients. A holistic approach to the person's health, with close follow-ups by psychiatric care and cooperation with diabetes care, may have benefits for the person with diabetes. Screening for and treating psychotic symptoms is an important task for the mental health nurse, as these symptoms drain energy from the person and prevent diabetes self-care. Lifestyle and diabetes education needs to be practical, adapted to the individual and focused on maintaining a healthy diet, regular exercise, changing smoking habits and preventing diabetes complications. Treatment with antipsychotic drugs increases the need for follow-ups of glycaemic control.

  16. Levothyroxine treatment of mild subclinical hypothyroidism: a review of potential risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Zeeshan; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4). SCH is further classified into a milder condition with TSH levels between 4.0 and 10.0 milli-international units (mIU)/l (mild-SCH) and a severe form with TSH >10.0 mIU/l (severe-SCH). SCH is a common problem (prevalence is greater in women than men), which increases further with increasing age and TSH levels. Even though the risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism is higher in patients with severe-SCH, the risk is also significant in patients having mild-SCH; it has been suggested that every twofold rise in serum TSH would increase the risk from 1 to 4%, which further increases to 38% if thyroid antibodies are positive. Current data have shown increased cardiovascular risk in patients with mild-SCH and have demonstrated some benefits of levothyroxine treatment in reducing these events. However, evidence on the association of mild-SCH and musculoskeletal system, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and goitre is conflicting. Similarly, the discussion regarding the exact upper limit of normal for serum TSH remains controversial. The data have also shown increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in patient with mild-SCH, with some benefits of thyroxine treatment. The recent available guidelines related to management of patients with serum TSH <10 mIU/l have suggested decisions should be made taking into account the age of the patient, associated risk factors and comorbid conditions. This chronicle review assesses current evidence regarding the risks associated and the recommendations related to benefits of levothyroxine treatment in patients having mild-SCH. PMID:26885359

  17. Assisted Death: The Risks and Benefits of Tribunal Approval.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Should every request for physician-assisted death require approval from some kind of independent tribunal? The benefits include consistent interpretation of statutory or judge-created guidelines from hospital to hospital, accurate reporting of assisted deaths, a process that protects vulnerable patients and health practitioners, and assurance to the public that the process has sufficient safeguards. On the other hand, such a process might cause delays for persons suffering intolerably. Accessibility might be a problem, and there is the risk that the patient's personal health information becomes fodder for media sensationalism. The author weighs these risks and benefits and concludes that a tribunal approval process is a transparent system capable of helping the law clearly gel in a way that provides guidelines, encourages trust in the healthcare process generally and the assisted death process specifically. I PMID:27169206

  18. Cultural cognition of the risks and benefits of nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, Dan M.; Braman, Donald; Slovic, Paul; Gastil, John; Cohen, Geoffrey

    2009-02-01

    How is public opinion towards nanotechnology likely to evolve? The `familiarity hypothesis' holds that support for nanotechnology will likely grow as awareness of it expands. The basis of this conjecture is opinion polling, which finds that few members of the public claim to know much about nanotechnology, but that those who say they do are substantially more likely to believe its benefits outweigh its risks. Some researchers, however, have avoided endorsing the familiarity hypothesis, stressing that cognitive heuristics and biases could create anxiety as the public learns more about this novel science. We conducted an experimental study aimed at determining how members of the public would react to balanced information about nanotechnology risks and benefits. Finding no support for the familiarity hypothesis, the study instead yielded strong evidence that public attitudes are likely to be shaped by psychological dynamics associated with cultural cognition.

  19. Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Retention in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manson, Spero M.; Jiang, Luohua; Zhang, Lijing; Beals, Janette; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the associations between participant and site characteristics and retention in a multisite cardiovascular disease risk reduction project. Design and Methods: Data were derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project, an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American…

  20. The Swedish childhood diabetes study. Vaccinations and infections as risk determinants for diabetes in childhood.

    PubMed

    Blom, L; Nyström, L; Dahlquist, G

    1991-03-01

    In a nationwide incident case referent study we have evaluated vaccinations, early and recent infections and the use of medicines as possible risk determinants for Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood. A total of 339 recently onset diabetic and 528 referent children, age 0-14 years, were included. Information about infections was collected from a mailed questionnaire and about vaccinations from childhood health care centres and schools. When vaccinations were considered as possible risk factors for diabetes, a significant decrease in relative risk estimated as odds ratio (OR) was noted for measles vaccination (OR = 0.69; 95% confidence limits 0.48-0.98). For vaccination against tuberculosis, smallpox, tetanus, whooping cough, rubella and mumps no significant effect on OR for diabetes was found. The odds ratios for Type 1 diabetes for children exposed to 0.1-2 or over 2 infections during the last year before diagnosis of diabetes revealed a linear increase (OR = 1.0, 1.96 and 2.55 for 0, 1-2 and over 2 infections, respectively). The trend was still significant when standardized for possible confounders such as age and sex of the children, maternal age and education and intake of antibiotics and analgetics. In conclusion, a protective effect of measles vaccination for Type 1 diabetes in childhood is indicated as well as a possible causal relationship between the onset of the disease and the total load of recent infections.

  1. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Progression to Diabetes in Patients at Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pittas, Anastassios G.; Nelson, Jason; Mitri, Joanna; Hillmann, William; Garganta, Cheryl; Nathan, David M.; Hu, Frank B.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multicenter trial comparing different strategies for prevention of diabetes in patients with prediabetes. We assessed the association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, measured repeatedly during follow-up, and incident diabetes in the combined placebo (n = 1,022) and intensive lifestyle (n = 1,017) randomized arms of the DPP. Variables measured at multiple study time points (25-hydroxyvitamin D, BMI, and physical activity) entered the analyses as time-varying “lagged” covariates, as the mean of the previous and current visits at which diabetes status was assessed. RESULTS After multivariate adjustment, including for the DPP intervention, participants in the highest tertile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (median concentration, 30.1 ng/mL) had a hazard ratio of 0.72 (95% CI 0.56–0.90) for developing diabetes compared with participants in the lowest tertile (median concentration, 12.8 ng/mL). The association was in the same direction in placebo (0.70; 0.52–0.94) versus lifestyle arm (0.80; 0.54–1.17). CONCLUSIONS Higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, assessed repeatedly, was associated with lower risk of incident diabetes in high-risk patients, after adjusting for lifestyle interventions (dietary changes, increased physical activity, and weight loss) known to decrease diabetes risk. Because of the observational nature of the study, the potential association between vitamin D and diabetes needs to be confirmed in intervention studies. PMID:22323410

  2. Balancing risk and benefit with oral hypoglycemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R; McMahon, Graham T

    2009-06-01

    Clinicians are faced with an expansive array of treatment choices when caring for patients with type 2 diabetes. Because patient compliance may be affected when media sensationalism about controversial findings is misunderstood, we sought to clarify the recent controversy surrounding the cardiovascular and bone-health risks of thiazolidinediones, the risk of lactic acidosis with metformin, and the risk of hypoglycemia with oral therapies. The side effect profile of thiazolidinediones includes fluid retention, heart failure; and an increased risk of fracture. A recent controversial meta-analysis suggested that rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction, which is possibly related to thiazolidinedione-induced lipid changes, weight gain, congestive heart failure, and anemia. Metformin is restricted to patients with normal renal function because of concerns that metformin may cause lactic acidosis. However, few cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have been reported, and most have occurred in patients with other reasons for developing lactic acidosis, such as sepsis or renal failure. Although the use of metformin continues to increase, observational studies have not been able to demonstrate an increased incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin-treated patients, even when it is used in populations with relative contraindications. Some oral hypoglycemic medications can cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is especially common in older patients, alcoholics, and patients with liver or renal disease. Patients on sulfonylureas and meglitinides have the highest incidence of hypoglycemia because of their pharmacological action of increasing insulin secretion. Of the sulfonylureas, glyburide presents the highest risk of hypoglycemia. Combination therapies, especially those regimens containing a sulfonylurea, increase the risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:19421967

  3. Diabetes and cancer I: risk, survival, and implications for screening

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer are common diseases that are frequently diagnosed in the same individual. An association between the two conditions has long been postulated. Here, we review the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. The risk for several cancers, including cancers of the pancreas, liver, colorectum, breast, urinary tract, and endometrium, is increased in patients with DM. In a pooled risk analysis weighting published meta-analytic relative risk (RR) for individual cancer by differences in their incidence rates, we found a population RR of 0.97 (95 % CI, 0.75–1.25) in men and 1.29 (95 % CI, 1.16–1.44) in women. All meta-analyses showed an increased relative risk for cancer in diabetic men, except studies of prostate cancer, in which a protective effect was observed. The relationship between diabetes and cancer appears to be complex, and at present, a clear temporal relationship between the two conditions cannot be defined. DM also impacts negatively on cancer-related survival outcomes and cancer screening rates. The overwhelming evidence for lower cancer screening rates, increased incidence of certain cancers, and poorer prognosis after cancer diagnosis in diabetic patients dictates a need for improved cancer care in diabetic individuals through improved screening measures, development of risk assessment tools, and consideration of cancer prevention strategies in diabetic patients. Part two of this review focuses on the biological and pharmacological mechanisms that may account for the association between DM and cancer. PMID:22552844

  4. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  5. Preliminary risk benefit assessment for nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Denning, R. S.; Friedlander, A. L.; Priest, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the recent work of the authors on the evaluation of health risk benefits of space disposal of nuclear waste. The paper describes a risk model approach that has been developed to estimate the non-recoverable, cumulative, expected radionuclide release to the earth's biosphere for different options of nuclear waste disposal in space. Risk estimates for the disposal of nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository and the short- and long-term risk estimates for space disposal were developed. The results showed that the preliminary estimates of space disposal risks are low, even with the estimated uncertainty bounds. If calculated release risks for mined geologic repositories remain as low as given by the U.S. DOE, and U.S. EPA requirements continue to be met, then no additional space disposal study effort in the U.S. is warranted at this time. If risks perceived by the public are significant in the acceptance of mined geologic repositories, then consideration of space disposal as a complement to the mined geologic repository is warranted.

  6. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  7. Early renal abnormalities as an indicator of cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Accurate assessment of cardiovascular (CV) risk is a prerequisite for devising effective therapeutic strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as it allows to refine prognosis and treatment targets as well as the cost-benefit ratio for specific pharmacological interventions. The presence of subclinical vascular organ damage plays a well known role in determining overall risk and a wider use of low cost, easy to perform diagnostic tools to stratify CV risk is very much needed. Besides their well known prognostic value for progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD), subclinical renal abnormalities such as microalbuminuria and/or a slight reduction in estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), have been shown to be powerful, independent predictors of CV diseases in patients with T2DM. Through the combined evaluation of these two biomarkers of chronic kidney disease (CKD), clinicians can usefully and reliably get a perspective on global and CV outcome of their diabetic patients.

  8. Bisphosphonate therapy for osteoporosis: benefits, risks, and drug holiday.

    PubMed

    McClung, Michael; Harris, Steven T; Miller, Paul D; Bauer, Douglas C; Davison, K Shawn; Dian, Larry; Hanley, David A; Kendler, David L; Yuen, Chui Kin; Lewiecki, E Michael

    2013-01-01

    The amino-bisphosphonates are first-line therapy for the treatment of most patients with osteoporosis, with proven efficacy to reduce fracture risk at the spine, hip, and other nonvertebral skeletal sites. Further, bisphosphonates have been associated with a significant decrease in morbidity and increase in survival. Following the use of bisphosphonates in millions of patients in clinical practice, some unexpected possible adverse effects have been reported, including osteonecrosis of the jaw, atypical femur fractures, atrial fibrillation, and esophageal cancer. Because bisphosphonates are incorporated into the skeleton and continue to exert an antiresorptive effect for a period of time after dosing is discontinued, the concept of a drug holiday has emerged, whereby the risk of adverse effects might be decreased while the patient still benefits from antifracture efficacy. Patients receiving bisphosphonates who are not at high risk for fracture are potential candidates for a drug holiday, while for those with bone mineral density in the osteoporosis range or previous history of fragility fracture, the benefits of continuing therapy probably far outweigh the risk of harm.

  9. Combined hormonal contraceptives: prescribing patterns, compliance, and benefits versus risks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives [combined oral contraceptives (COCs)] have been available for over 50 years and the impact of this invention may not be overestimated. Today over 100 million women are current users and in Western Europe and the United States approximately 80% of women of fertile ages can be considered as ever-users. Over the years several drawbacks have been identified and media alarms on risks are frequently presented, resulting in suboptimal compliance and low compliance and continuation rates. Poor compliance and discontinuation is a big problem and is not generally identified by prescribers. During ideal use COCs offer very good protection against unwanted pregnancies, however there is a big problem with compliance and continuation and thus the ‘real-life’ efficacy is much lower. Reasons for poor compliance include side effects and fear of side effects and it is crucial that the prescriber gives the individual woman thorough and balanced information on the benefits and risks. Most well known is the increased risk of venous thromboembolism, but also an elevated risk of arterial thrombosis and several types of cancer has been reported. The risk estimates are low but according to the large number of users a substantial number of extra cases will occur. However, use of COCs also offers several additional health benefits with significant impact on morbidity and quality of life. COC use is associated with a substantial decrease in the risk of ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer and colorectal cancer. Moreover, COCs are a major option of treatment for women suffering from heavy menstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhea as well as hirsutism and acne vulgaris. The net effect of the additional health effects of COC- use may very well be positive, i.e. a slight increase in life expectancy. PMID:25360241

  10. Liver enzymes, race, gender and diabetes risk: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A. L. C.; Lazo, M.; Ndumele, C. E.; Pankow, J. S.; Coresh, J.; Clark, J. M.; Selvin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the associations of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase with diabetes risk and to determine whether associations differ by race and/or gender. We hypothesized that all liver enzymes would be associated with diabetes risk and that associations would differ by race and gender. Methods Prospective cohort of 7495 white and 1842 black participants without diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Poisson and Cox models adjusted for demographic, socio-behavioural, and metabolic and health-related factors were used. Results During a median of 12 years of follow-up, 2182 incident cases of diabetes occurred. Higher liver enzyme levels were independently associated with diabetes risk: adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.68 (1.49–1.89), 1.16 (1.02–1.31) and 1.95 (1.70–2.24) comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), respectively. gamma-Glutamyl transferase was most strongly related to diabetes risk, even at levels considered within normal range (≤ 60 U/l) in clinical practice. Adjusted incidence rates by quartiles of liver enzymes were similar by gender but higher in black versus white participants. Nonetheless, relative associations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) with diabetes were similar by race (P for interactions > 0.05). Conclusions Compared with aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase was more strongly associated with diabetes risk. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in liver enzymes precede the diagnosis of diabetes by many years and that individuals with elevated liver enzymes, even within the normal range as defined in clinical practice, are at high risk for diabetes. PMID:23510198

  11. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  12. Risk assessment tools for identifying individuals at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Buijsse, Brian; Simmons, Rebecca K; Griffin, Simon J; Schulze, Matthias B

    2011-01-01

    Trials have demonstrated the preventability of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications or drugs in people with impaired glucose tolerance. However, alternative ways of identifying people at risk of developing diabetes are required. Multivariate risk scores have been developed for this purpose. This article examines the evidence for performance of diabetes risk scores in adults by 1) systematically reviewing the literature on available scores and 2) their validation in external populations; and 3) exploring methodological issues surrounding the development, validation, and comparison of risk scores. Risk scores show overall good discriminatory ability in populations for whom they were developed. However, discriminatory performance is more heterogeneous and generally weaker in external populations, which suggests that risk scores may need to be validated within the population in which they are intended to be used. Whether risk scores enable accurate estimation of absolute risk remains unknown; thus, care is needed when using scores to communicate absolute diabetes risk to individuals. Several risk scores predict diabetes risk based on routine noninvasive measures or on data from questionnaires. Biochemical measures, in particular fasting plasma glucose, can improve prediction of such models. On the other hand, usefulness of genetic profiling currently appears limited.

  13. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D may modify risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes is uncertain. To determine prospectively the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and risk of incident type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity and other known diabet...

  14. I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians Research Gives Hope Diabetes Can Be Prevented "After I started exercising and ... other risk factors for heart disease. What is diabetes? Diabetes causes blood glucose levels to be above ...

  15. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies.

  16. Benefits and risks of shared services in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kennewell, Suzanne; Baker, Laura

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of staff in a large, public health service involved in transitioning support services to a shared services model. It aims to understand their perceptions of the benefits and risks arising from this change. Design/methodology/approach - Thematic analysis of qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with both service provider and customer agency staff was used to identify, analyze and report patterns of benefits and risks within data. Findings - Staff expressed the need for relevant subject-matter-experts to work within customer agencies to facilitate effective communication between the customer agency and shared services provider, reflecting observations found in out-sourcing literature. Research limitations/implications - Results point to significant challenges continuing to occur for shared services in healthcare. Risks identified suggest a more intimate relationship between clinical and support services than previously discussed. Originality/value - Previous discussion of the shared services model has not considered the skills, knowledge and ability required by staff in the customer agency. This research indicates that in the absence of such consideration, the concepts of the shared services model are weakened. PMID:27119396

  17. RADIATION DOSE IN PAEDIATRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: RISKS AND BENEFITS

    PubMed Central

    Ogbole, G.I.

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for the accurate and effective diagnosis and treatment of a variety of conditions because it allows high-resolution three-dimensional images to be acquired very quickly. However as the number of CT procedures performed globally have continued to increase; with growing concerns about patient protection. Currently, no system is in place to track patient doses and the lifetime cumulative dose from medical sources. The widespread use of CT even in developing countries has raised questions regarding the possible threat to public health especially in children. The best available risk estimates suggest that paediatric CT will result in significantly increased lifetime radiation risk over adult CT. Studies have shown that lower milliampere-second (mAs) settings can be used for children without significant loss of information. Although the risk–benefit balance is still strongly tilted toward benefit, there is still need for caution. Furthermore since the frequency of paediatric CT examinations is rapidly increasing, and estimates suggest that quantitative lifetime radiation risks for children are not negligible, efforts should be made toward more active reduction of CT exposure settings in paediatric patients. This article hopes to address this concerns and draw attention to the fact that children are not ‘small adults ’ and should therefore be treated differently. PMID:25161479

  18. Outcome after regional anesthesia: weighing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lirk, P; Hollmann, M W

    2014-05-01

    Regional anesthesia has become a widely used method to provide intraoperative anesthesia, and postoperative analgesia. This review seeks to address the question whether patient outcomes are improved to an extent that justifies using regional anesthesia as a routine method. During the past decade, a very critical appraisal of risks and benefits of regional anesthetic procedures has taken place. In general, the indications for epidural blockade have decreased, and are limited to individual high-risk patients, major upper abdominal and major vascular surgery, and thoracotomy. We review the changing role of central and peripheral regional anesthesia in the perioperative management of total knee arthroplasty. Immediate perioperative outcome after knee arthroplasty concerning function and pain is improved, and rehabilitation facilitated, by peripheral nerve blockade, but this does not translate into superior functional outcome one year later. A substantial share of the beneficial effects of regional anesthesia on the immune system, hemostasis, pain, and the duration of ileus can be duplicated using intravenous administration of local anesthetics. In general, the use of regional anesthesia should always be preceded by a weighing of potential risks and proven benefits. Regional anesthesia continues to play a major role in perioperative medicine, but its role keeps getting more defined and less non-committal. PMID:24193234

  19. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  20. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  1. Patients’ Experience of therapeutic footwear whilst living at risk of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous work has found that people with diabetes do not wear their therapeutic footwear as directed, but the thinking behind this behaviour is unclear. Adherence to therapeutic footwear advice must improve in order to reduce foot ulceration and amputation risk in people with diabetes and neuropathy. Therefore this study aimed to explore the psychological influences and personal experiences behind the daily footwear selection of individuals with diabetes and neuropathy. Methods An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used to explore the understanding and experience of therapeutic footwear use in people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration. This study benefited from the purposive selection of a small sample of four people and used in-depth semi structured interviews because it facilitated the deep and detailed examination of personal thoughts and feelings behind footwear selection. Findings Four overlapping themes that interact to regulate footwear choice emerged from the analyses: a) Self-perception dilemma; resolving the balance of risk experienced by people with diabetes and neuropathy day to day, between choosing to wear footwear to look and feel normal and choosing footwear to protect their feet from foot ulceration; b) Reflective adaption; The modification and individualisation of a set of values about footwear usage created in the minds of people with diabetes and neuropathy; c) Adherence response; The realignment of footwear choice with personal values, to reinforce the decision not to change behaviour or bring about increased footwear adherence, with or without appearance management; d) Reality appraisal; A here and now appraisal of the personal benefit of footwear choice on emotional and physical wellbeing, with additional consideration to the preservation of therapeutic footwear. Conclusion For some people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration, the decision whether or not to wear

  2. Anti-diabetic medications and risk of primary liver cancer in persons with type II diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hagberg, K W; McGlynn, K A; Sahasrabuddhe, V V; Jick, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type II diabetes increases liver cancer risk but the risk may be mitigated by anti-diabetic medications. However, choice of medications is correlated with diabetes duration and severity, leading to confounding by indication. Methods: To address this association, we conducted a nested case–control study among persons with type II diabetes in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cases had primary liver cancer and controls were matched on age, sex, practice, calendar time, and number of years in the database. Exposure was classified by type and combination of anti-diabetic prescribed and compared to non-use. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results: In 305 cases of liver cancer and 1151 controls, there was no association between liver cancer and anti-diabetic medication use compared to non-use (OR=0.74 (95% CI=0.45–1.20) for metformin-only, 1.10 (95% CI=0.66–1.84) for other oral hypoglycaemic (OH)-only, 0.89 (95% CI=0.58–1.37) for metformin+other OH, 1.11 (95% CI=0.60–2.05) for metformin+insulin, 0.81 (95% CI=0.23–2.85) for other OH+insulin, and 0.72 (95% CI=0.18–2.84) for insulin-only). Stratification by duration of diabetes did not alter the results. Conclusions: Use of any anti-diabetic medications in patients with type II diabetes was not associated with liver cancer, though there was a suggestion of a small protective effect for metformin. PMID:25093492

  3. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes.

  4. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes. PMID:26036406

  5. Virus infections and type 1 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Roivainen, Merja; Klingel, Karin

    2010-10-01

    Common intestinal infections caused by human enteroviruses (HEVs) are considered major environmental factors predisposing to type 1 diabetes (T1D). In spite of the active research of the field, the HEV-induced pathogenetic processes are poorly understood. Recently, after the first documented report on HEV infections in the pancreatic islets of deceased T1D patients, several groups became interested in the issue and studied valuable human material, the autopsy pancreases of diabetic and/or autoantibody-positive patients for HEV infections. In this review, the data on HEV infections in human pancreatic islets are discussed with special reference to the methods used. Likewise, mechanisms that could increase viral access to the pancreas are reviewed and discussed.

  6. Risks and benefits of dietary isoflavones for cancer.

    PubMed

    Andres, Susanne; Abraham, Klaus; Appel, Klaus Erich; Lampen, Alfonso

    2011-07-01

    A high intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of cancer. In this context, considerable attention is paid to Asian populations who consume high amounts of soy and soy-derived isoflavones, and have a lower risk for several cancer types such as breast and prostate cancers than populations in Western countries. Hence, interest focuses on soyfoods, soy products, and soy ingredients such as isoflavones with regard to their possible beneficial effects that were observed in numerous experiments and studies. The outcomes of the studies are not always conclusive, are often contradictory depending on the experimental conditions, and are, therefore, difficult to interpret. Isoflavone research revealed not only beneficial but also adverse effects, for instance, on the reproductive system. This is also the case with tumor-promoting effects on, for example, breast tissue. Isoflavone extracts and supplements are often used for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and for the prevention of age-associated conditions such as cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. In relation to this, questions about the effectiveness and safety of isoflavones have to be clarified. Moreover, there are concerns about the maternal consumption of isoflavones due to the development of leukemia in infants. In contrast, men may benefit from the intake of isoflavones with regard to reducing the risk of prostate cancer. Therefore, this review examines the risks but also the benefits of isoflavones with regard to various kinds of cancer, which can be derived from animal and human studies as well as from in vitro experiments.

  7. Diabetes among Ethiopian Immigrants to Israel: Exploring the Effects of Migration and Ethnicity on Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Giveon, Shmuel; Wulffhart, Liat; Oberman, Bernice; Freedman, Laurence; Ziv, Arnona; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes prevalence among ethnic minorities and immigrants often differs from the majority indigenous population. We compared diabetes prevalence, incidence and risk among Ethiopian and non-Ethiopian Jews. Within these main groups, we controlled for the effect of migration on diabetes risk by comparing the subgroups of Ethiopian and former Soviet Union (FSU) immigrants, and compared both with Israeli-born non-Ethiopian Jews. Methods The study cohort included adult Ethiopian (n = 8,398) and age-matched non-Ethiopian Jews (n = 15,977) and subgroups: Ethiopian immigrants (n = 7,994), FSU immigrants (n = 1,541) and Israeli-born non-Ethiopian Jews (n = 10,828). Diabetes prevalence, annual incidence, and hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for sex and metabolic syndrome (MetS)-components, were determined in three age groups (<50yrs, 50-59yrs, and ≥60yrs). Comparisons of body mass index (BMI) at diabetes incidence were made. Results Younger (<50yrs) Ethiopians had higher prevalence rates, 3.6% (95%CI: 3.1–4.1) and annual incidence, 0.9% (95%CI: 0.8–1.0) than non-Ethiopians, 2.7% (95%CI: 2.3–3.0) and 0.5% (95%CI: 0.4–0.6), respectively. These differences were particularly pronounced among Ethiopian women. Diabetes risk among Ethiopians was higher and adjustment for MetS-components was important only for BMI, which further increased hazard ratio (HR) estimates associated with Ethiopian ethnicity from 1.81 (95% CI:1.50–2.17) to 2.31 (95% CI:1.91–2.79). The same differences were seen when comparing Ethiopian to FSU immigrants. BMI before incident diabetes was lower among younger Ethiopian immigrants than younger FSU immigrants and Israeli-born. Conclusions Ethiopian ethnicity is associated with increased diabetes risk, which is age and BMI dependent. Young Ethiopians<50yrs, particularly women, had the greatest increase in risk. Lower BMI cut-offs should be defined to reflect diabetes risk among Ethiopians. PMID:27300299

  8. Disaster risk reduction in developing countries: costs, benefits and institutions.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Charles

    2012-10-01

    Some 60,000 people worldwide die annually in natural disasters, mostly due to the collapse of buildings in earthquakes, and primarily in the developing world. This is despite the fact that engineering solutions exist that can eliminate almost completely the risk of such deaths. Why is this? The solutions are expensive and technically demanding, so their cost-benefit ratio often is unfavourable as compared to other interventions. Nonetheless, there are various public disaster risk reduction interventions that are highly cost-effective. That such interventions frequently remain unimplemented or ineffectively executed points to a role for issues of political economy. Building regulations in developing countries appear to have limited impact in many cases, perhaps because of inadequate capacity and corruption. Public construction often is of low quality, perhaps for similar reasons. This suggests the need for approaches that emphasise simple and limited disaster risk regulation covering only the most at-risk structures-and that, preferably, non-experts can monitor-as well as numerous transparency and oversight mechanisms for public construction projects.

  9. Benefits of Renin-Angiotensin Blockade on Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Vary With Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Harindhanavudhi, Tasma; Mauer, Michael; Klein, Ronald; Zinman, Bernard; Sinaiko, Alan; Caramori, M. Luiza

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Optimal glycemic control slows diabetic retinopathy (DR) development and progression and is the standard of care for type 1 diabetes. However, these glycemic goals are difficult to achieve and sustain in clinical practice. The Renin Angiotensin System Study (RASS) showed that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade can slow DR progression. In the current study, we evaluate whether glycemic control influenced the benefit of RAS blockade on DR progression in type 1 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used RASS data to analyze the relationships between two-steps or more DR progression and baseline glycemic levels in 223 normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients randomized to receive 5 years of enalapril or losartan compared with placebo. RESULTS A total of 147 of 223 patients (65.9%) had DR at baseline (47 of 74 patients [63.5%] in placebo and 100 of 149 patients [67.1%] in the combined treatment groups [P = 0.67]). Patients with two-steps or more DR progression had higher baseline A1C than those without progression (9.4 vs. 8.2%, P < 0.001). There was no beneficial effect of RAS blockade (P = 0.92) in patients with baseline A1C ≤7.5%. In contrast, 30 of 112 (27%) patients on the active treatment arms with A1C >7.5% had two-steps or more DR progression compared with 26 of 56 patients (46%) in the placebo group (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS RAS blockade reduces DR progression in normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients with A1C >7.5%. Whether this therapy could benefit patients with A1C ≤7.5% will require long-term studies of much larger cohorts. PMID:21715517

  10. Reduced risk of prostate cancer among patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ye, Weimin; Vainio, Harri; Kaaks, Rudolf; Adami, Hans-Olov

    2002-11-20

    Although diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of several malignancies, a negative association with prostate cancer is biologically most plausible. The epidemiologic evidence is, however, inconsistent, limited and based mostly on small studies. We present results from a large, population-based cohort study in Sweden, where we assessed prostate cancer risk among patients hospitalized for diabetes mellitus. The cohort was composed of patients identified in the Swedish In-Patient Register as having a hospital discharge diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 1965-1994. The follow-up was done by linkages with the national cancer register and other population-based registers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), with 95% confidence interval (CI), were used as a measure of relative risk. After complete exclusion of the first year of follow-up (to avoid selection bias), 135,950 men remained in the cohort, contributing 827,099 years of follow-up to the study. A total of 2,455 incident cases of primary prostate cancer were identified during 1-31 years of follow-up, yielding an overall SIR of 0.91 (95% CI 0.87-0.94); this risk reduction was more pronounced among patients who have been hospitalized for diabetic complications (SIR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.74-0.91). We found no consistent trends in risk related to age at first hospitalization or to duration of follow-up. We did find a small, but significantly decreased risk of prostate cancer among men who had been hospitalized for diabetes mellitus.

  11. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Bell, K.; Spinney, P.

    1997-05-01

    The question of uncertainty and risk in electric utility resource planning has received considerable attention in recent years. During the 1980s, many utilities suffered financial losses because of unexpectedly high plant construction costs and low growth in electricity demand. In addition, the introduction of competition to the electric industry is creating new risks for power companies. No longer will utilities be able to count on regulatory protections and a base of captive consumers to provide a stable market and adequate return on their investments. Alternative risk management strategies will have to be considered instead. One approach to managing risk is for a utility company to invest in diverse power sources such as wind power plants. Since wind plants consume no fuel, can be built in relatively small increments with short construction lead times, and generate no pollutants, it is often said that they offer significant protection from risks associated with conventional fossil-fuel power plants. So far there have been few efforts to quantify these benefits, however. The study compares the costs and risks of two competing resource options, a gas-fired combined cycle plant and a wind plant, both utility-owned, through decision analysis. The case study utility is Texas Utilities Electric, a very large investor-owned company serving an area with substantial, high-quality wind resources. The authors chose a specific moment in the future - the year 2003 - when the utility currently plans to build a large fossil-fueled power plant, and examined the implications for the utility`s expected revenues, costs, and profits if a wind plant were to be built instead.

  12. The Impact of Hepatitis B Vaccination Status on the Risk of Diabetes, Implicating Diabetes Risk Reduction by Successful Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Feng, Wei; Samoa, Raynald; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chiu, Ken C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The liver plays a key role in fuel metabolism. It is well established that liver disease is associated with an increased risk for diabetes mellitus. Hepatitis C virus infection has been known to increase the risk of diabetes. However, much less is known about the role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in diabetes. We examined the association of diabetes based on the vaccination status for HBV. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we included adult subjects (≥20 y/o) with HBV serology available from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010. Diabetes was defined as established diabetes or fasting plasma glucose concentration ≥7.0 mmol/L, 2-hour plasma glucose concentration ≥11.1 mmol/L, or HbA1c ≥ 47.5 mmol/mol (6.5%). Vaccination was based on the reported history and immunization was determined by HBV serology. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated with consideration of the following covariates: age, gender, BMI, ethnic/racial group, current smoker, current alcohol consumption, family history of diabetes, poverty index, and education. Results This study included 15,316 subjects. Among them, 2,320 subjects was immunized based the HBV serology. Among 4,063 subjects who received HBV vaccination, successful vaccination was only noted in 39% of subjects. The HBV vaccination was not associated with diabetes (OR: 1.08, 95%CI: 0.96–1.23). Serology evidence of HBV immunization was associated with a reduced OR of diabetes (0.75, 95%CI: 0.62–0.90). Successful HBV vaccination was also associated with a reduced OR of diabetes (0.67, 95%CI: 0.52–0.84). Conclusions Although our study shows the association of HBV vaccination with the reduced odds of diabetes by 33%, a prospective study is warranted to confirm and examine the impact of HBV vaccination in prevention of diabetes. PMID:26509504

  13. Confronting the residual cardiovascular risk beyond statins: the role of fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, or niacin, in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Christou, Georgios A; Rizos, Evangelos C; Mpechlioulis, Aris; Penzo, Carlo; Pacchioni, Andrea; Nikas, Dimitrios N

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics are regarded a special category of patients known to experience higher rates of cardiovascular complications as compared to the non-diabetic ones. Despite substantial efforts to minimize these risks, with aggressive antiplatelet and lipid lowering therapy, some of the diabetic patients still have a considerable residual risk for cardiovascular adverse events. Important preclinical data with potent lipid-lowering agents, like fibrates, omega-3-fatty acids, and niacin, have shown that they can provide sufficient help in reducing rates of cardiovascular events. In the present review, we are aim to explain their basic mechanisms of action, to present all the available clinical data regarding the efficacy of those agents, and to identify specific diabetic patients' subsets, in whom supplementary therapy with those agents could provide substantial benefit in terms of clinical outcome and not only lipid profile improvement.

  14. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  15. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  16. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry.

    PubMed

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  17. Importance of cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is commonly accompanied by other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, CVD is the most common cause of death in people with T2DM. It is therefore of critical importance to minimize the risk of macrovascular complications by carefully managing modifiable CVD risk factors in patients with T2DM. Therapeutic strategies should include lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and prothrombotic factors. This article discusses the impact of modifying these CVD risk factors in the context of T2DM; the clinical evidence is summarized, and current guidelines are also discussed. The cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, and reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure are well established. For aspirin therapy, any cardiovascular benefits must be balanced against the associated bleeding risk, with current evidence supporting this strategy only in certain patients who are at increased CVD risk. Although overweight, obesity, and hyperglycemia are clearly associated with increased cardiovascular risk, the effect of their modification on this risk is less well defined by available clinical trial evidence. However, for glucose-lowering drugs, further evidence is expected from several ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials. Taken together, the evidence highlights the value of early intervention and targeting multiple risk factors with both lifestyle and pharmacological strategies to give the best chance of reducing macrovascular complications in the long term. PMID:24920930

  18. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein as cardiovascular risk marker in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pfützner, Andreas; Forst, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a liver-derived pattern recognition molecule that is increased in inflammatory states. It rapidly increases within hours after tissue injury, and it is suggested that it is part of the innate immune system and contributes to host defense. Since cardiovascular disease is at least in part an inflammatory process, CRP has been investigated in the context of arteriosclerosis and subsequent vascular disorders. Based on multiple epidemiological and intervention studies, minor CRP elevation [high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP)] has been shown to be associated with future major cardiovascular risk (hsCRP:<1 mg/L=low risk; 1-3 mg/L=intermediate risk; 3-10 mg/L=high risk; >10 mg/L=unspecific elevation). It is recommended by the American Heart Association that patients at intermediate or high risk of coronary heart disease may benefit from measurement of hsCRP with regard to their individual risk prediction. Elevation of hsCRP is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes development in patients with all levels of metabolic syndrome. In type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1c significantly correlates with hsCRP levels and future cardiovascular risk. Also, hsCRP levels increase with the stage of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. Non-diabetes drugs that have been shown to reduce hsCRP concentrations include aspirin, statins, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and fibrates. Recent intervention studies have also demonstrated the distinct efficacy of different anti-diabetes treatments on a variety of cardiovascular risk markers. Intensive insulin therapy may reduce inflammation, but this effect may be influenced by the degree of weight gain. Treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma has lead to substantial reduction of hsCRP and other cardiovascular risk markers in several comparator studies. Since this effect was shown to be independent of the degree of glycemic improvement, it can be regarded as a classspecific

  19. Spousal diabetes as a diabetes risk factor: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes history in biologically-related individuals increases diabetes risk. We assessed diabetes concordance in spouses (that is, biologically unrelated family members) to gauge the importance of socioenvironmental factors. Methods We selected cross-sectional, case–control and cohort studies examining spousal association for diabetes and/or prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance), indexed in Medline, Embase or Scopus (1 January 1997 to 28 February 2013). Effect estimates (that is, odds ratios, incidence rate ratios, and so on) with body mass index (BMI) adjustment were pooled separately from those without BMI adjustment (random effects models) to distinguish BMI-dependent and independent concordance. Results Searches yielded 2,705 articles; six were retained (n = 75,498 couples) for systematic review and five for meta-analysis. Concordance was lowest in a study that relied on women’s reports of diabetes in themselves and their spouses (effect estimate 1.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.30) and highest in a study with systematic assessment of glucose tolerance (2.11, 95% CI 1.74 to 5.10). The random-effects pooled estimate adjusted for age and other covariates but not BMI was 1.26 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.45). The estimate with BMI adjustment was lower (1.18, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.40). Two studies assessing between-spouse associations of diabetes/prediabetes determined by glucose testing reported high concordance (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.55 to 2.37 without BMI adjustment; 2.32, 95% CI 1.87 to 3.98 with BMI adjustment). Two studies did not distinguish type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However given that around 95% of adults is type 2, this is unlikely to have influenced the results. Conclusions Our pooled estimate suggests that a spousal history of diabetes is associated with a 26% diabetes risk increase. Recognizing shared risk between spouses may improve diabetes detection and motivate couples to increase collaborative efforts to optimize eating and

  20. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D. PMID:22528676

  1. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D.

  2. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

  3. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications. PMID:25227362

  4. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    of early glycemic control. Identifying high-risk patients at a very early stage is not only desired for prevention of diabetic retinopathy - neuropathy and nephropathy similarly remain frequent in type 1 diabetes. Early risk stratification will allow for timely implementation of effective interventions and for individualized screening and diabetes care. The second and third studies of this thesis provide the longest prospective studies to date on both retinal vessel calibers and retinal fractal dimensions and their predictive value on diabetic microvascular complications. Semi-automated computer software has been developed to measure smaller changes in the retinal vessels on retinal photographs. Two of the first parameters to be reliably estimated by these programs were retinal vessel calibers and retinal vascular fractal dimensions (a quantitative measure on vascular complexity). There is very limited knowledge on their predictive value on diabetic complications thus far. In the second and third study, a consistent relation between narrower retinal arteriolar calibers, wider retinal venular calibers, lower fractal dimensions and the 16-year incidences of diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy and proliferative retinopathy was found. This has never been shown before. The results on vessel analyzes provides indications of a common pathogenic pathway for diabetic microvascular complications and therefore a possibility of universal risk estimation for development of neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25703648

  5. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    of early glycemic control. Identifying high-risk patients at a very early stage is not only desired for prevention of diabetic retinopathy - neuropathy and nephropathy similarly remain frequent in type 1 diabetes. Early risk stratification will allow for timely implementation of effective interventions and for individualized screening and diabetes care. The second and third studies of this thesis provide the longest prospective studies to date on both retinal vessel calibers and retinal fractal dimensions and their predictive value on diabetic microvascular complications. Semi-automated computer software has been developed to measure smaller changes in the retinal vessels on retinal photographs. Two of the first parameters to be reliably estimated by these programs were retinal vessel calibers and retinal vascular fractal dimensions (a quantitative measure on vascular complexity). There is very limited knowledge on their predictive value on diabetic complications thus far. In the second and third study, a consistent relation between narrower retinal arteriolar calibers, wider retinal venular calibers, lower fractal dimensions and the 16-year incidences of diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy and proliferative retinopathy was found. This has never been shown before. The results on vessel analyzes provides indications of a common pathogenic pathway for diabetic microvascular complications and therefore a possibility of universal risk estimation for development of neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy in type 1 diabetes.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk. PMID:25987904

  7. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  8. Air pollution and diabetes association: Modification by type 2 diabetes genetic risk score.

    PubMed

    Eze, Ikenna C; Imboden, Medea; Kumar, Ashish; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Stolz, Daiana; Gerbase, Margaret W; Künzli, Nino; Pons, Marco; Kronenberg, Florian; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution (AP) exposure has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Evidence on the impact of T2D genetic variants on AP susceptibility is lacking. Compared to single variants, joint genetic variants contribute substantially to disease risk. We investigated the modification of AP and diabetes association by a genetic risk score (GRS) covering 63 T2D genes in 1524 first follow-up participants of the Swiss cohort study on air pollution and lung and heart diseases in adults. Genome-wide data and covariates were available from a nested asthma case-control study design. AP was estimated as 10-year mean residential particulate matter <10μm (PM10). We computed count-GRS and weighted-GRS, and applied PM10 interaction terms in mixed logistic regressions, on odds of diabetes. Analyses were stratified by pathways of diabetes pathology and by asthma status. Diabetes prevalence was 4.6% and mean exposure to PM10 was 22μg/m(3). Odds of diabetes increased by 8% (95% confidence interval: 2, 14%) per T2D risk allele and by 35% (-8, 97%) per 10μg/m(3) exposure to PM10. We observed a positive interaction between PM10 and count-GRS on diabetes [ORinteraction=1.10 (1.01, 1.20)], associations being strongest among participants at the highest quartile of count-GRS [OR: 1.97 (1.00, 3.87)]. Stronger interactions were observed with variants of the GRS involved in insulin resistance [(ORinteraction=1.22 (1.00, 1.50)] than with variants related to beta-cell function. Interactions with count-GRS were stronger among asthma cases. We observed similar results with weighted-GRS. Five single variants near GRB14, UBE2E2, PTPRD, VPS26A and KCNQ1 showed nominally significant interactions with PM10 (P<0.05). Our results suggest that genetic risk for T2D may modify susceptibility to air pollution through alterations in insulin sensitivity. These results need confirmation in diabetes cohort consortia.

  9. Air pollution and diabetes association: Modification by type 2 diabetes genetic risk score.

    PubMed

    Eze, Ikenna C; Imboden, Medea; Kumar, Ashish; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Stolz, Daiana; Gerbase, Margaret W; Künzli, Nino; Pons, Marco; Kronenberg, Florian; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution (AP) exposure has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Evidence on the impact of T2D genetic variants on AP susceptibility is lacking. Compared to single variants, joint genetic variants contribute substantially to disease risk. We investigated the modification of AP and diabetes association by a genetic risk score (GRS) covering 63 T2D genes in 1524 first follow-up participants of the Swiss cohort study on air pollution and lung and heart diseases in adults. Genome-wide data and covariates were available from a nested asthma case-control study design. AP was estimated as 10-year mean residential particulate matter <10μm (PM10). We computed count-GRS and weighted-GRS, and applied PM10 interaction terms in mixed logistic regressions, on odds of diabetes. Analyses were stratified by pathways of diabetes pathology and by asthma status. Diabetes prevalence was 4.6% and mean exposure to PM10 was 22μg/m(3). Odds of diabetes increased by 8% (95% confidence interval: 2, 14%) per T2D risk allele and by 35% (-8, 97%) per 10μg/m(3) exposure to PM10. We observed a positive interaction between PM10 and count-GRS on diabetes [ORinteraction=1.10 (1.01, 1.20)], associations being strongest among participants at the highest quartile of count-GRS [OR: 1.97 (1.00, 3.87)]. Stronger interactions were observed with variants of the GRS involved in insulin resistance [(ORinteraction=1.22 (1.00, 1.50)] than with variants related to beta-cell function. Interactions with count-GRS were stronger among asthma cases. We observed similar results with weighted-GRS. Five single variants near GRB14, UBE2E2, PTPRD, VPS26A and KCNQ1 showed nominally significant interactions with PM10 (P<0.05). Our results suggest that genetic risk for T2D may modify susceptibility to air pollution through alterations in insulin sensitivity. These results need confirmation in diabetes cohort consortia. PMID:27281273

  10. Health benefits and risk associated with adopting a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Pilis, Wiesław; Stec, Krzysztof; Zych, Michał; Pilis, Anna

    2014-01-01

    A vegetarian diet may be adopted for various reasons that can include ecological, economic, religious, ethical and health considerations. In the latter case they arise from the desire to lose weight, in tackling obesity, improving physical fitness and/or in reducing the risk of acquiring certain diseases. It has been shown that properly applied vegetarian diet is the most effective way of reducing body mass (expressed as BMI), improving the plasma lipid profile and in decreasing the incidence of high arterial blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic syndrome and arteriosclerosis. In addition, improved insulin sensitivity together with lower rates of diabetes and cancer has been observed. Some studies have however found that a vegetarian diet may result in changes adversely affecting the body. These could include; hyperhomocysteinaemia, protein deficiency, anaemia, decreased creatinine content in muscles and menstrual disruption in women who undertake increased physical activity. Some of these changes may decrease the ability for performing activities that require physical effort. Nevertheless, on balance it can be reasonably concluded that the beneficial effects of a vegetarian diet significantly, by far, outweigh the adverse ones. It should also be noted that the term 'vegetarian diet' is not always clearly defined in the literature and it may include many dietary variations.

  11. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function.

  12. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function. PMID:27621191

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  14. The risks and benefits of human donor breast milk.

    PubMed

    Brent, Nancy

    2013-05-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Review the advantages and disadvantages of donor-banked milk over informal milk sharing.2.List disadvantages of proprietary infant formula for use as supplementation.3.Determine the primary ethical concerns when electing to use donor human milk versus propriety infant formula for supplementation. The benefits of breast-feeding, as well as the risks of some artificial formula, are well known. This growing recognition of the advantages of breast-feeding is reflected in the increased incidence of breast-feeding in recent years. However, one of the most common reasons for premature weaning is low milk supply, perceived or real, followed by nipple or breast pain. Given the increased awareness of the superiority of breast milk, however, more parents are turning to human donor milk to supplement their babies after they have been weaned.

  15. Estrogen use in postmenopausal women--costs, risks, and benefits.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, M C

    1980-08-01

    The cost effectiveness of estrogen use in postmenopausal women was analyzed with use of data from the medical and epidemiologic literature. Risks of endometrial cancer, uterine bleeding, and gallbladder disease were weighed against benefits associated with relief of menopausal symptoms and with prevention of osteoporosis and consequent fractures. Net effects on life expectancy are probably small in either direction, although they are likely to be positive in women with existing osteoporosis or prior hysterectomy. Treatment appears to be relatively cost effective in menopausal women with prior hysterectomy or osteoporosis but does not appear to be cost effective as a prophylactiv measure in asymptomatic women with intact uteri. For women with menopausal symptoms and intact uteri, the decision to prescribe estrogens for the individual patient and the cost effectiveness of estrogen use at the societal level depend critically on the subjective values assigned to symptomatic relief.

  16. Assessment of the benefits and risks for engineered virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeremy R; Tepfer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Viral diseases of cultivated crops are responsible for the worldwide loss of billions of US dollars in agricultural productivity every year. Historically, this loss has been reduced or minimized principally by the implementation of specific agricultural/phytosanitary measures, and by the introduction of naturally occurring virus-resistance genes into appropriate cultivars by plant breeding. Since the first report of virus-resistant transgenic plants (VRTPs) in 1986, a remarkable diversity of virus-resistance transgenes has been developed. Despite this, to a large part due to controversy surrounding the use of genetically modified organisms, the number of commercially available VRTPs remains small. However, since the potential risks associated with VRTPs were first formulated in the early 1990s, fundamental research on plant-virus interactions and also research specifically aimed at resolving biosafety issues have greatly circumscribed the potential impact of the risks envisaged. Yet, in spite of the advances, both in strategies for creating VRTPs and in the assessment of potential risks, it remains remarkably difficult to weigh the risks/costs and benefits of different means to manage plant viral diseases, and even to make scientifically well-founded choices of the most appropriate strategy for creating VRTPs. Many of the outstanding issues concern the lack of sufficient knowledge of the breadth and durability of the resistance of VRTPs under field conditions. VRTPs will only take their appropriate place in modern agriculture when their potential users will be able to base their choices on realistic assessments of their efficacy, durability, and safety. PMID:20965071

  17. Terrorism risks and cost-benefit analysis of aviation security.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mark G; Mueller, John

    2013-05-01

    We evaluate, for the U.S. case, the costs and benefits of three security measures designed to reduce the likelihood of a direct replication of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. To do so, we assess risk reduction, losses, and security costs in the context of the full set of security layers. The three measures evaluated are installed physical secondary barriers (IPSB) to restrict access to the hardened cockpit door during door transitions, the Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS), and the Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) Program. In the process, we examine an alternate policy measure: doubling the budget of the FFDO program to $44 million per year, installing IPSBs in all U.S. aircraft at a cost of $13.5 million per year, and reducing funding for FAMS by 75% to $300 million per year. A break-even cost-benefit analysis then finds the minimum probability of an otherwise successful attack required for the benefit of each security measures to equal its cost. We find that the IPSB is costeffective if the annual attack probability of an otherwise successful attack exceeds 0.5% or one attack every 200 years. The FFDO program is costeffective if the annual attack probability exceeds 2%. On the other hand, more than two otherwise successful attacks per year are required for FAMS to be costeffective. A policy that includes IPSBs, an increased budget for FFDOs, and a reduced budget for FAMS may be a viable policy alternative, potentially saving hundreds of millions of dollars per year with consequences for security that are, at most, negligible.

  18. Terrorism risks and cost-benefit analysis of aviation security.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mark G; Mueller, John

    2013-05-01

    We evaluate, for the U.S. case, the costs and benefits of three security measures designed to reduce the likelihood of a direct replication of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. To do so, we assess risk reduction, losses, and security costs in the context of the full set of security layers. The three measures evaluated are installed physical secondary barriers (IPSB) to restrict access to the hardened cockpit door during door transitions, the Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS), and the Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) Program. In the process, we examine an alternate policy measure: doubling the budget of the FFDO program to $44 million per year, installing IPSBs in all U.S. aircraft at a cost of $13.5 million per year, and reducing funding for FAMS by 75% to $300 million per year. A break-even cost-benefit analysis then finds the minimum probability of an otherwise successful attack required for the benefit of each security measures to equal its cost. We find that the IPSB is costeffective if the annual attack probability of an otherwise successful attack exceeds 0.5% or one attack every 200 years. The FFDO program is costeffective if the annual attack probability exceeds 2%. On the other hand, more than two otherwise successful attacks per year are required for FAMS to be costeffective. A policy that includes IPSBs, an increased budget for FFDOs, and a reduced budget for FAMS may be a viable policy alternative, potentially saving hundreds of millions of dollars per year with consequences for security that are, at most, negligible. PMID:23035984

  19. Nitroglycerin Use in Myocardial Infarction Patients: Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and its sequelae are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nitroglycerin remains a first-line treatment for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction. Nitroglycerin achieves its benefit by giving rise to nitric oxide, which causes vasodilation and increases blood flow to the myocardium. However, continuous delivery of nitroglycerin results in tolerance, limiting the use of this drug. Nitroglycerin tolerance is due, at least in part, to inactivation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), an enzyme that converts nitroglycerin to the vasodilator, nitric oxide. We have recently found that, in addition to nitroglycerin’s effect on the vasculature, sustained treatment with nitroglycerin negatively affects cardiomyocyte viability following ischemia, thus resulting in increased infarct size in a myocardial infarction model in animals. Co-administration of Alda-1, an activator of ALDH2, with nitroglycerin improves metabolism of reactive aldehyde adducts and prevents the nitroglycerin-induced increase in cardiac dysfunction following myocardial infarction. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms associated with the benefits and risks of nitroglycerin administration in myocardial infarction. (167 of 200). PMID:22040938

  20. Type 2 diabetes diminishes the benefits of dietary antioxidants: Evidence from the different free radical scavenging potential.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Xie, Yixi; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-01

    The development of food fortified with polyphenols and polyphenol-rich foods represents a novel approach for preventing or managing type 2 diabetes. Herein, taking advantage of several radical scavenging, the impact of plasma proteins in diabetes on the benefits of dietary polyphenols was investigated. It illustrated that plasma proteins masked the dietary polyphenols, thus reducing their radical scavenging potential. The plasma proteins from type 2 diabetics bind and protect (i.e., mask) the polyphenol antioxidants less effectively than the non-glycosylated ones in healthy blood do. In the blood of diabetics the less-protected (non-masked) antioxidants react with free radicals before being delivered to the tissues that need them. We should pay more attention to in vivo benefits of dietary polyphenols for type 2 diabetics.

  1. Weighing health benefit and health risk information when consuming sport-caught fish.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Barbara A; A Connelly, Nancy; Sheeshka, Judy; Patterson, Jacqueline

    2003-12-01

    Fish consumers may incur benefits and risks from eating fish. Health advisories issued by states, tribes, and other entities typically include advice about how to limit fish consumption or change other behaviors (e.g., fish cleaning or cooking) to reduce health risks from exposure to contaminants. Eating fish, however, may provide health benefits. Risk communicators and fish consumers have suggested the importance of including risk comparison information, as well as health risk-benefit comparisons in health advisory communications. To improve understanding about how anglers fishing in waters affected by health advisories may respond to such risk-risk or risk-benefit information, we surveyed Lake Ontario (NY, USA) anglers. We interviewed by telephone 4,750 anglers, 2,593 of which had fished Lake Ontario in the past 12 months and were sent a detailed mail questionnaire (1,245 responded). We posed questions varying the magnitude of health risks and health benefits to be gained by fish consumption, and varied the population affected by these risks and benefits (anglers, children, women of childbearing age, and unborn children). Respondents were influenced by health benefit and health risk information. When risks were high, most respondents would eat less fish regardless of the benefit level. When risks were low, the magnitude of change in fish consumption was related to level of benefit. Responses differed depending on the question wording order, that is, whether "risks" were posed before "benefits." For a given risk-benefit level, respondents would give different advice to women of childbearing age versus children, with more conservative advice (eat less fish) provided to women of childbearing age. Respondents appeared to be influenced more strongly by risk-risk comparisons (e.g., risks from other foods vs. risks from fish) than by risk-benefit comparisons (e.g., risks from fish vs. benefits from fish). Risk analysts and risk communicators should improve efforts to

  2. Tipping the balance: Haemoglobinopathies and the risk of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Henry J; Green, Aislinn E; Spellar, Kayleigh M; Arthur, Philip J; Phillips, Hannah G; Patel, Jeetesh V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a link between the risk of diabetes with haemoglobinopathies by examining available evidence of the effects of iron and blood glucose homeostasis from molecular to epidemiological perspectives. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed using electronic literature databases using various search terms. The International Diabetes Federation World Atlas was used to generate a list of populations with high rates of diabetes. PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were used to identify which of these populations also had a reported prevalence of haemoglobin abnormalities. RESULTS: Abnormalities in iron homeostasis leads to increases in reactive oxygen species in the blood. This promotes oxidative stress which contributes to peripheral resistance to insulin in two ways: (1) reduced insulin/insulin receptor interaction; and (2) β-cell dysfunction. Hepcidin is crucial in terms of maintaining appropriate amounts of iron in the body and is in turn affected by haemoglobinopathies. Hepcidin also has other metabolic effects in places such as the liver but so far the extent of these is not well understood. It does however directly control the levels of serum ferritin. High serum ferritin is found in obese patients and those with diabetes and a meta-analysis of the various studies shows that high serum ferritin does indeed increase diabetes risk. CONCLUSION: From an epidemiological standpoint, it is plausible that the well-documented protective effects of haemoglobinopathies with regard to malaria may have also offered other evolutionary advantages. By contributing to peripheral insulin resistance, haemoglobinopathies may have helped to sculpt the so-called “thrifty genotype”, which hypothetically is advantageous in times of famine. The prevalence data however is not extensive enough to provide concrete associations between diabetes and haemoglobinopathies - more precise studies are required. PMID:26788262

  3. Excess cardiovascular risk in diabetic women: a case for intensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Recarti, C; Sep, S J S; Stehouwer, C D A; Unger, T

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes is a common and rapidly growing disease that affects more than 380 million people worldwide and is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease with differential effects on women compared to men. While the general population of women, particularly young women, has more favourable cardiovascular risk profiles than men, this protective effect has been shown to be lost or even reversed in diabetic women. Several studies have demonstrated a significant diabetes-associated excess risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Sex-specific differences in risk factors associated with diabetes and their management may be responsible for the relative excess cardiovascular risk in women with diabetes. Diabetic women need intensive treatment in order to optimize management of cardiovascular risk factors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the excess cardiovascular risk in diabetic women in order to tailor prevention and treatment strategies.

  4. Modern obesity pharmacotherapy: weighing cardiovascular risk and benefit.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Jonathan W; Wiviott, Stephen D

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is a major correlate of cardiovascular disease. Weight loss improves cardiovascular risk factors and has the potential to improve outcomes. Two drugs, phentermine plus topiramate and lorcaserin, have recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the indication of obesity; a third, bupropion plus naltrexone, is under consideration for approval. In clinical trials, these drugs cause weight loss and improve glucose tolerance, lipid profile, and, with the exception of bupropion plus naltrexone, blood pressure. However, their effect on cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. In defining appropriate roles for these drugs in preventive cardiology, it is important to remember the checkered history of drugs for obesity. New weight-loss drugs share the serotonergic and sympathomimetic mechanisms that proved harmful in the cases of Fen-Phen and sibutramine, respectively, albeit with significant differences. Given these risks, randomized cardiovascular outcomes trials are needed to establish the safety, and potential benefit, of these drugs. This review will discuss the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity, existing efficacy and safety data for the novel weight-loss drugs, and issues in the design of postapproval clinical trials. PMID:25223901

  5. Tool Weighs Benefits, Risks of Raloxifene or Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a benefit-risk index to help guide decisions on whether postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer should take raloxifene or tamoxifen to reduce that risk.

  6. Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ranee; Maruthur, Nisa M; Edelman, David

    2015-12-01

    In the USA, compared to whites, African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by the diabetes epidemic. Traditional diabetes risk factors, such as obesity, are more common among African-Americans, but these traditional risk factors do not explain all of the disparity in diabetes risk. Recent research has identified novel environmental, lifestyle, physiologic, and genetic risk factors for diabetes, some of which appear to impact African-Americans more than whites. This manuscript reviews the recent literature to highlight some of these novel risk factors that may be contributing to the racial disparity in diabetes risk. Further study is needed of the modifiable risk factors for development of interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes in African-Americans, as well as other high-risk populations.

  7. Beverage-consumption patterns and associations with metabolic risk factors among low-income Latinos with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monica L; Lemon, Stephenie C; Olendzki, Barbara; Rosal, Milagros C

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, Latinos experience disproportionately higher rates of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications than non-Latino whites. Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is strongly associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing caloric intake, particularly from energy-dense, low-nutrient foods or beverages, can be an effective and key strategy for metabolic and weight control. However, little is known about the contribution of various types of beverages, including but not limited to SSBs, to total caloric intake among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Low-income Latinos (87.7% Puerto Rican) participating in a diabetes self-management intervention trial (N=238) provided cross-sectional, descriptive data on beverage-consumption patterns, anthropometric outcomes, and metabolic characteristics. Beverages accounted for one fifth of the total daily caloric intake. SSBs and milk beverages, respectively, contributed 9.6% of calories to overall daily caloric intake. Interventions directed at diabetes risk factors among low-income Latinos with diabetes can benefit from consideration of beverage-consumption behaviors as an important strategy to reduce caloric and sugar intake.

  8. Diabetes mellitus: an important risk factor for reactivation of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Carmen; Mangual, Michelle; Martinez, José; Rivera, Kelvin; Fernandez, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diabetes mellitus was identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis (TB) infection, and relapse after therapy. The risk of acquiring TB is described as comparable to that of HIV population. The fact that diabetics are 3× times more prone to develop pulmonary TB than nondiabetics cannot be overlooked. With DM recognized as global epidemic, and TB affecting one-third of the world population, physicians must remain vigilant. We present a 45-year-old woman born in Dominican Republic (DR), with 10-year history of T2DM treated with metformin, arrived to our Urgency Room complaining of dry cough for the past 3months. Interview unveiled unintentional 15lbs weight loss, night sweats, occasional unquantified fever, and general malaise but denied bloody sputum. She traveled to DR 2years before, with no known ill exposure. Physical examination showed a thin body habitus, otherwise well appearing woman with stable vital signs, presenting solely right middle lung field ronchi. LDH, ESR, hsCRP and Hg A1C were elevated. Imaging revealed a right middle lobe cavitation. Sputum for AFB disclosed active pulmonary TB. Our case portrays that the consideration of TB as differential diagnosis in diabetics should be exercised with the same strength, as it is undertaken during the evaluation of HIV patients with lung cavitation. Inability to recognize TB will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace. Learning points Diabetes mellitus should be considered an important risk factor for the reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. High clinical suspicious should be taken into consideration as radiological findings for pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with diabetes mellitus may be atypical, involving middle and lower lobes. Inability to recognize pulmonary tuberculosis will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace. PMID:27482384

  9. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher's exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ(2)=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ(2)=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

  10. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher’s exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ2=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ2=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. PMID:26823865

  11. Clinical imaging guidelines part 2: Risks, benefits, barriers, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Malone, James; del Rosario-Perez, Maria; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Jung, Seung Eun; Holmberg, Ola; Bettmann, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    A recent international meeting was convened by two United Nations bodies to focus on international collaboration on clinical appropriateness/referral guidelines for use in medical imaging. This paper, the second of 4 from this technical meeting, addresses barriers to the successful development/deployment of clinical imaging guidelines and means of overcoming them. It reflects the discussions of the attendees, and the issues identified are treated under 7 headings: ■ Practical Strategy for Development and Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Governance Arrangements and Concerns with Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Finance, Sustainability, Reimbursement, and Related Issues; ■ Identifying Benefits and Radiation Risks from Radiological Examinations; ■ Information Given to Patients and the Public, and Consent Issues; ■ Special Concerns Related to Pregnancy; and ■ The Research Agenda. Examples of topics identified include the observation that guideline development is a global task and there is no case for continuing it as the project of the few professional organizations that have been brave enough to make the long-term commitment required. Advocacy for guidelines should include the expectations that they will facilitate: (1) better health care delivery; (2) lower cost of that delivery; with (3) reduced radiation dose and associated health risks. Radiation protection issues should not be isolated; rather, they should be integrated with the overall health care picture. The type of dose/radiation risk information to be provided with guidelines should include the uncertainty involved and advice on application of the precautionary principle with patients. This principle may be taken as an extension of the well-established medical principle of "first do no harm." PMID:25652302

  12. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  13. ASSESSMENT OF RISK FACTORS FOR DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Edin; Arnautovic, Amira; Masic, Izet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, and represents a disease of the modern age, disease of the 21st century. Prevention of this disease is listed as imperative. Aim of this article was to evaluate questionnaires on the assessment of risk factors for Diabetes Mellitus type 2. Material and Methods: A total of 540 questionnaires handed out randomly to citizens of Canton Sarajevo of all ages, sexes and educational levels (in January 2016) were analyzed. Results: Analyzed questionnaires showed relatively low risk of getting diabetes in the next ten years in the majority of the population. These results are rather encouraging but may in some way be in confrontation with the statistics which show a rapid outburst of diabetes. Conclusion: The life-style is the main reason for such a thing to happen, and looking at these questionnaires, we might get the feeling that we really do live in a, conditionally speaking, physically active society. That, from our everyday experience is not entirely true. It would be wise to continue doing research on this topic on the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:27482159

  14. Markers for Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Relatives of Alsacian Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Remi; Pinget, Michel; Belcourt, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Background: The cytotoxic T lymphocyteassociated antigen 4 gene (CTLA-4) encode the T cell receptor involved in the control of T cell proliferation and mediates T cell apoptosis. The receptor protein is a specific T lymphocyte surface antigen that is detected on cells only after antigen presentation. Thus, CTLA-4 is directly involved in both immune and autoimmune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. There is polymorphism at position 49 in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, providing an A-G exchange. Moreover, we assessed the CTLA-4 49 (Thr/Ala) polymorphism in diabetic patients and first-degree relatives as compared to control subjects. Research design and methods: Three loci (HLA-DQB1, DQA1 and CTLA-4) were analysed in 62 type 1 diabetic patients, 72 firstdegree relatives and 84 nondiabetic control subjects by means of PCR-RFLP. Results: A significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles encoding for an amino acid different from Asp in position 57 (NA) and DQA1 alleles encoding for Arg in position 52 was observed in diabetic subjects and first-degree relatives as compared to controls. The genotype and allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in type 1 diabetic patients and firstdegree relatives differed significantly from those of controls (p< 0.001 and 0.05 respectively). CTLA-49 Ala alleles frequencies were 75.8% in type 1 diabetic patients and 68.1% in first-degree relatives in comparison to 35.7% in control subjects. The Ala/Ala genotype conferred a relative risk of 18.8 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The CTLA-4 49 Ala allele confers an increased risk of type 1 diabetes, independent of age and HLA-DQ genetic markers. PMID:11900275

  15. Air pollution as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM.

  16. Recent evidence of sustained benefit with exenatide in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2006-10-01

    Exenatide has been shown to improve glycaemic control (over 30 weeks) in subjects with Type 2 diabetes. A recent extension study has shown that, in metformin-treated subjects with Type 2 diabetes, exenatide remained beneficial at 82 weeks. For those subjects who completed the study, in addition to the 1% fall in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) at 30 weeks, there was another 0.2% fall in HbA1c by 82 weeks. The weight loss achieved was a mean of 3 kg after 30 weeks, and this increased to 5.3 kg after 82 weeks in the completer cohort. In another extension study, continued benefit with exenatide was shown in subjects treated with metformin and/or sulfonylureas. For those subjects who completed the study, in addition to the 0.9% fall in HbA(1c) at 30 weeks, there was another 0.2% fall in HbA(1c) by 82 weeks. The weight loss achieved was a mean of 1.6 kg after 30 weeks, and this increased to 2.1 kg after 82 weeks in the completer cohort. The subjects taking exenatide with metformin had a greater weight loss (5.3 kg), compared with those treated with a sulfonylurea (3.9 kg) and those taking metformin and a sulfonylurea (4.1 kg). In conclusion, extension studies have confirmed that exenatide is an exciting new and useful medicine for Type 2 diabetes.

  17. Safety and benefits of a tablet combining losartan and hydrochlorothiazide in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sakoda, Mariyo; Kurauchi-Mito, Asako; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of a tablet combining losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (L/HCTZ) in comparison with losartan alone in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension. Thirty consecutive Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension were randomly assigned to group A, receiving losartan alone for the first 3 months, then L/HCTZ for the next 3 months, or group B, receiving L/HCTZ for the first 3 months, then losartan alone for the next 3 months. Clinical and biological parameters were obtained before, and 3 and 6 months after the start of this study. The decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) during treatment with L/HCTZ were significantly greater than in treatment with losartan alone. Both treatments significantly and similarly decreased urinary albumin excretion, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and augmentation index (AI). There was no significant difference in metabolic change during both the mono- and combination pharmacotherapies. The tablet combining L/HCTZ significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BP compared with the losartan monotherapy, and offered benefits similar to losartan monotherapy for albuminuria, arterial stiffness assessed by the CAVI and AI, and metabolic effects. Thus, the L/HCTZ tablet could be a useful drug for Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension. PMID:19763132

  18. A new approach to risk assessment integrating scientific evaluation and economic assessment of costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R C

    1996-10-01

    Traditional quantitative risk assessment based on conservative generic assumptions led to an upper-bound risk value with minimum or no consideration of costs and benefits. There is a growing consensus for a new approach to risk assessment based on a combination of scientific risk assessment and economic cost-benefit analysis. Scientific evaluation would be improved to support the economic cost-benefit analysis. The objective is to demonstrate whether the benefits justify the costs. The move in the new direction is shown by Executive Order 12866 and the Office of Management and Budget implementing document, the proposed regulatory reform legislation in Congress, the draft report of the Risk Assessment and Risk Management Commission, and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 that enacted the new approach combining scientific and economic assessment of risk. This Commentary discusses these developments with particular reference to contemplated changes in scientific risk assessment to support a parallel economic risk-benefit analysis. PMID:8933625

  19. As health care technology advances: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Funk, Marjorie

    2011-07-01

    Technology permeates every dimension of critical care. Bedside technology is integral to the assessment and monitoring of patients and to the provision of treatment. It also helps with access to vital information and can enhance communication. Although it offers extraordinary benefits to patients and clinicians, technology may also create problems. Our research addresses the wise use of technology in the care of critically ill patients. It examines the appropriate and safe use of technology, its equitable distribution, and the human-machine interface. Given that some devices are more effective and safe than others, it is important to assess the appropriateness of a specific technology in a specific situation. Just because a particular device is available, is it necessary to use it in every possible situation? Do we use it just because it is there? Do we employ "heroic" measures sometimes when it would be kinder not to? Studies on the safe use of technology in patient care lead to a consideration of the risk-benefit ratio. Our research on gender and racial differences in the use of cardiac procedures in patients with acute myocardial infarction focused on the equitable distribution of technology. The results of this line of research, along with those of numerous other studies, suggest possible racism in our health care practices. The human-machine interface, or how clinicians and patients interact with health care technology, is a crucial focus of research. Technology is at the heart of critical care. It allows clinicians to perform miracles, but is also a seductive and self-perpetuating force that needs careful monitoring by those who use it.

  20. Energy crops on floodplains - flood risk or benefit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolova, Zdenka; Baylis, Adam; Rose, Steve

    2010-05-01

    Land use and land management on floodplains have increasingly come into focus, particularly in relation to their impact on flooding. To date, research and modelling has explored the impact of land use changes such as floodplain afforestation, changes to management of upland moorlands or re-establishment of wet meadows on floodplains. However, no such investigation has been carried out into the impact on floodplain flows of growing energy crops. In the UK, a strong emphasis is being given to promotion of renewable energy. Farmers are encouraged to plant energy crops such as Miscanthus or Short Rotation Crops (e.g. Willow) in suitable locations, which typically exclude farmland in Flood Zone 3 (i.e. areas likely to be flooded by an event with a 100-year return period). However, there is a lack of understanding as to what impact, if any, the dense character of these crops planted on floodplains might have on flooding. This gap in knowledge currently prevents energy crops from being planted in areas where they could provide high economic and environmental benefit, and even possibly contribute to flood mitigation. At present, no guidance or policy exists to advise whether allowing farmers to establish energy crop plantations in Flood Zone 3 could alter the existing flood risk. Consequently, if energy crops could provide a coupled benefit of renewable energy source and flood mitigation, this benefit is not being utilised. To help fill in this gap in knowledge, a short term project was carried out in order to investigate, using suitable hydraulic modelling, the possible scale of impact of growing energy crops on river and floodplain flows, flood depth and overall impact on flood risk locally as well as downstream. 2D hydraulic modelling using TUFLOW was deemed to be the most appropriate approach for these investigations. The methodology included gaining an understanding of the life cycle and planting regime of Miscanthus and Willow, review of current knowledge on the

  1. Benefits of Diabetes Self-Management for Health Plan Members: A 6-Month Translation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorig, Kate; Turner, Ralph M; English, Kathleen; Laurent, Diana D; Greenberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education has been shown to be effective in controlled trials. However, few programs that meet American Association of Diabetes Educators standards have been translated into widespread practice. Objective This study examined the translation of the evidence-based Better Choices, Better Health-Diabetes program in both Internet and face-to-face versions. Methods We administered the Internet program nationally in the United States (n=1010). We conducted face-to-face workshops in Atlanta, Georgia; Indianapolis, Indiana; and St. Louis, Missouri (n=232). Self-report questionnaires collected health indicator, health behavior, and health care utilization measures. Questionnaires were administered on the Web or by mail. We determined hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from blood samples collected via mailed kits. Paired t tests determined whether changes between baseline and 6 months differed significantly from no change. Subgroup analyses determined whether participants with specific conditions benefited (high HbA1c, depression, hypoglycemia, nonadherence to medication taking, and no aerobic exercise). We calculated the percentage of participants with improvements of at least 0.4 effect size in at least one of the 5 above measures. Results Of the 1242 participants, 884 provided 6-month follow-up questionnaires. There were statistically significant improvements in 6 of 7 health indicators (including HbA1c) and in 7 of 7 behaviors. For each of the 5 conditions, there were significant improvements among those with the condition (effect sizes 0.59–1.1). A total of 662 (75.0%) of study participants improved at least 0.4 effect size in at least one criterion, and 327 (37.1%) improved in 2 or more. Conclusions The Diabetes Self-Management Program, offered in two modes, was successfully disseminated to a heterogeneous national population of members of either insured or administered health plans. Participants had small but significant benefits in multiple

  2. Unrealistic Optimism, Sex, and Risk Perception of Type 2 Diabetes Onset: Implications for Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sealey-Potts, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This study examined links among unrealistic optimism, sex, and risk perception of type 2 diabetes onset in college students. Participants included 660 college students who consented to complete a questionnaire. The results showed significant differences between students who perceived that they were at risk for type 2 diabetes onset and those who thought their peers were the ones at risk. A higher prevalence of participants thought their peers were the ones at risk for type 2 diabetes. Women were more likely than men to report a higher risk perception, indicating that their peers were at lower risk for diabetes onset. PMID:25717271

  3. CHICAGO, PERISCOPE and PROactive: CV risk modification in diabetes with pioglitazone.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, D John

    2009-12-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes and its impact on cardiovascular disease have led to confusion and speculation amongst physicians. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Study was terminated early because of a significant excess all-cause mortality in the intensively-treated group. Furthermore the ADVANCE and VADT trials did not demonstrate cardiovascular benefit with more intensive glycaemic control. Against this background, it is pertinent to re-visit and critically appraise the results of the PROactive study which examined the effects of the thiazolidinedione, pioglitazone, on cardiovascular end-points in a large, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in type 2 diabetic patients with symptomatic disease. PROactive has been rightly criticized in the choice of its composite primary end-point which included a physician-driven as opposed to a disease-driven outcome, namely peripheral vascular re-vascularization. This was primarily responsible for the primary composite end-point not being achieved; whereas there was a significant beneficial impact on the major secondary end-point of death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke. The results of PROactive have been supported by two subsequent studies examining the impact of pioglitazone on important surrogates of atherosclerosis, namely carotid intima/medial thickness (IMT) and coronary atheroma volume as delineated with intravascular ultrasound. The CHICAGO study demonstrated that IMT in type 2 diabetic patients treated with pioglitazone did not progress whereas those treated with glimepiride showed progression. In PERISCOPE atheroma volume progressed with glimepiride but did not with pioglitazone. This is exciting data pointing to the cardiovascular benefits of pioglitazone. In PROactive, CHICAGO and PERISCOPE there was a sustained effect of pioglitazone on glycaemic control and, in addition, beneficial effects in reducing triglycerides and

  4. Community-Based Diabetes Screening and Risk Assessment in Rural West Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ranjita; Fitch, Cindy; Roberts, David; Wright, Dana

    2016-01-01

    This project utilized a cross-sectional study design to assess diabetes risk among 540 individuals from 12 counties using trained extension agents and community organizations in West Virginia. Individuals were screened for diabetes using (1) the validated 7-item diabetes risk assessment survey and (2) hemoglobin A1c tests. Demographic and lifestyle behaviors were also collected. The average age, body mass index, and A1c were 51.2 ± 16.4, 31.1 ± 7.5, and 5.8 ± 0.74, respectively. The majority were females, Non-Hispanic Whites with no prior diagnosis of diabetes. Screenings showed that 61.8% of participants were at high risk for diabetes. Family history of diabetes (siblings or parents), overweight or obese status, sedentary lifestyle, and older age were commonly prevalent risk factors. Higher risk scores computed from the 7-item questions correlated positively with higher A1c (r = 0.221, P < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, higher diabetes risk was predicted by obesity, older age, family history of hypertension, and gestational diabetes. Females were 4 times at higher risk than males. The findings indicated that community-based screenings were an effective way to assess diabetes risk in rural West Virginia. Linking diabetes screenings with referrals to lifestyle programs for high risk individuals can help reduce the burden of diabetes in the state. PMID:26881242

  5. Benefit and Adherence of the Disease Management Program “Diabetes 2”: A Comparison of Turkish Immigrants and German Natives with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities. PMID:25233016

  6. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. PMID:22819925

  7. Fried, Grilled or Baked Foods? They May Affect Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fried, Grilled or Baked Foods? They May Affect Type 2 Diabetes Risk Researchers suggest steaming, poaching and stewing for ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Diets Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  8. Metformin use and lung cancer risk in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Lori C.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Achacoso, Ninah S.; Peng, Tiffany; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2015-01-01

    Methodologic biases may explain why observational studies examining metformin use in relation to lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a cohort study to further investigate this relationship, accounting for potential biases. For 47,351 patients with diabetes aged ≥40 years, who completed a health-related survey administered between 1994 and 1996, data on prescribed diabetes medications were obtained from electronic pharmacy records. Follow-up for incident lung cancer occurred from January 1, 1997, until June 30, 2012. Using Cox regression, we estimated lung cancer risk associated with new use of metformin, along with total duration, recency, and cumulative dose (all modeled as time-dependent covariates), adjusting for potential confounding factors. During 428,557 person-years of follow-up, 747 patients were diagnosed with lung cancer. No association was found with duration, dose, or recency of metformin use and overall lung cancer risk. Among never smokers, however, ever use was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.33-0.99), and risk appeared to decrease monotonically with longer use (≥5 years: HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.21-1.09). Among current smokers, corresponding risk estimates were >1.0, although not statistically significant. Consistent with this variation in effect by smoking history, longer use was suggestively associated with lower adenocarcinoma risk (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.40-1.17), but higher small cell carcinoma risk (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 0.85-3.91). In this population, we found no evidence that metformin use affects overall lung cancer risk. The observed variation in association by smoking history and histology requires further confirmation. PMID:25644512

  9. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    PubMed

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  10. Risks and benefits of commonly used herbal medicines in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott W; Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-02-15

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicines that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of the following plant species: nopal (Opuntia ficus), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chaparral (Larrea divaricata), dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), nettle or stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), linden flower (Tilia europea), and aloe (Aloe vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified. PMID:18037151

  11. Risks and benefits of commonly used herbal medicines in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott W. Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-02-15

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicines that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of the following plant species: nopal (Opuntia ficus), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chaparral (Larrea divaricata), dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), nettle or stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), linden flower (Tilia europea), and aloe (Aloe vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified.

  12. Communicating vaccine benefit and risk - lessons from the medical field.

    PubMed

    Yarwood, Joanne

    2006-10-01

    The childhood immunisation programme in England aims to achieve and maintain high vaccine coverage so that no child needlessly suffers from a vaccine preventable disease. As part of the programme, parents must have appropriate support from health professionals and have information available to them to make informed decisions about their choices. Even though immunisation is voluntary in England, coverage is generally high. It has been estimated that only 0.33% of parents do not consent to their child being included in a computerised database that schedules immunisation appointments. Parental attitudes, experiences and social grade are influential in determining whether a child receives a vaccine. Personal experience and knowledge of diseases influence parental perceptions about the seriousness of diseases and their likelihood of being affected by it. In societies where immunisation programmes have been successful, the challenge is maintaining high levels of vaccine coverage. In the absence of disease, the threat of that disease rapidly disappears and anxieties about the vaccine's safety may increase. A fall in vaccine coverage can lead to the return of disease as happened in the UK when rates of pertussis immunisation plummeted in the 1970s. Further perceived threats may also affect vaccine uptake, for example, the MMR controversy dating from 1998. The article outlines the MMR debate in the UK, the communication of risk and benefit and the management of information to the public. It will share lessons learned and examine how they might apply to the veterinary programme. PMID:16854535

  13. The affect heuristic, mortality salience, and risk: domain-specific effects of a natural disaster on risk-benefit perception.

    PubMed

    Västfjäll, Daniel; Peters, Ellen; Slovic, Paul

    2014-12-01

    We examine how affect and accessible thoughts following a major natural disaster influence everyday risk perception. A survey was conducted in the months following the 2004 south Asian Tsunami in a representative sample of the Swedish population (N = 733). Respondents rated their experienced affect as well as the perceived risk and benefits of various everyday decision domains. Affect influenced risk and benefit perception in a way that could be predicted from both the affect-congruency and affect heuristic literatures (increased risk perception and stronger risk-benefit correlations). However, in some decision domains, self-regulation goals primed by the natural disaster predicted risk and benefit ratings. Together, these results show that affect, accessible thoughts and motivational states influence perceptions of risks and benefits.

  14. A School-Based Intervention for Diabetes Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. METHODS Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a multicomponent school-based intervention (21 schools) or assessment only (control, 21 schools). A total of 4603 students participated (mean [±SD] age, 11.3±0.6 years; 54.2% Hispanic and 18.0% black; 52.7% girls). At the beginning of 6th grade and the end of 8th grade, students underwent measurements of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and fasting glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS There was a decrease in the primary outcome — the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity — in both the intervention and control schools, with no significant difference between the school groups. The intervention schools had greater reductions in the secondary outcomes of BMI z score, percentage of students with waist circumference at or above the 90th percentile, fasting insulin levels (P = 0.04 for all comparisons), and prevalence of obesity (P = 0.05). Similar findings were observed among students who were at or above the 85th percentile for BMI at baseline. Less than 3% of the students who were screened had an adverse event; the proportions were nearly equivalent in the intervention and control schools. CONCLUSIONS Our comprehensive school-based program did not result in greater decreases in the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity than those that occurred in control schools. However, the intervention did result in significantly greater reductions in various indexes of adiposity. These changes may reduce the risk of childhood-onset type 2 diabetes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00458029.) PMID:20581420

  15. Net Efficacy Adjusted for Risk (NEAR): A Simple Procedure for Measuring Risk:Benefit Balance

    PubMed Central

    Boada, José N.; Boada, Carlos; García-Sáiz, Mar; García, Marcelino; Fernández, Eduardo; Gómez, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    Background Although several mathematical models have been proposed to assess the risk:benefit of drugs in one measure, their use in practice has been rather limited. Our objective was to design a simple, easily applicable model. In this respect, measuring the proportion of patients who respond favorably to treatment without being affected by adverse drug reactions (ADR) could be a suitable endpoint. However, remarkably few published clinical trials report the data required to calculate this proportion. As an approach to the problem, we calculated the expected proportion of this type of patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Theoretically, responders without ADR may be obtained by multiplying the total number of responders by the total number of subjects that did not suffer ADR, and dividing the product by the total number of subjects studied. When two drugs are studied, the same calculation may be repeated for the second drug. Then, by constructing a 2×2 table with the expected frequencies of responders with and without ADR, and non-responders with and without ADR, the odds ratio and relative risk with their confidence intervals may be easily calculated and graphically represented on a logarithmic scale. Such measures represent “net efficacy adjusted for risk” (NEAR). We assayed the model with results extracted from several published clinical trials or meta-analyses. On comparing our results with those originally reported by the authors, marked differences were found in some cases, with ADR arising as a relevant factor to balance the clinical benefit obtained. The particular features of the adverse reaction that must be weighed against benefit is discussed in the paper. Conclusion NEAR representing overall risk-benefit may contribute to improving knowledge of drug clinical usefulness. As most published clinical trials tend to overestimate benefits and underestimate toxicity, our measure represents an effort to change this trend. PMID:18974868

  16. Human parechovirus and the risk of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, P; Koskiniemi, M; Oikarinen, S; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Hyöty, H; Tauriainen, S

    2013-09-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are RNA viruses associated mainly with mild gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in children and also cause neonatal sepsis and CNS infections. Human enteroviruses, close relatives of HPeVs, associate with the development of type 1 diabetes. In this study, the potential role of HPeV infections in promoting beta cell autoimmunity was investigated by analyzing stool samples of 54 prediabetic case and 134 healthy control children for the presence of HPeV RNA and comparing the derived infection frequencies. All 188 children were participants of the Finnish prospective Diabetes Prediction and Prevention study. Viral RNA was screened for using an HPeV-specific RT-PCR method coupled to liquid hybridization of the PCR product. The overall HPeV infection frequency did not differ between prediabetic case and control children. However, case boys had more HPeV positive samples in the 6-month period before becoming autoantibody positive, when compared to the matching time-period in controls (P < 0.01). HPeV infection at a young age does not appear to play a major role in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity. In boys, however, HPeVs showed time-dependent association with the first detection of diabetes-associated autoantibodies. Thus, in boys, HPeV infections cannot be excluded as a gender-specific risk factor which promotes the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23852688

  17. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  18. Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score: a novel tool to discriminate monogenic and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K A; Oram, R A; Flanagan, S E; De Franco, E; Colclough, K; shepherd, M; Ellard, S

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing patients with monogenic diabetes from Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is important for correct diagnosis, treatment and to select patients for gene discovery studies. We assessed whether a T1D genetic risk score (T1D-GRS) generated from T1D-associated common genetic variants provides a novel way to discriminate monogenic diabetes from T1D. The T1D-GRS was highly discriminative of proven MODY (n=805) and T1D (n=1963) (ROC-AUC=0.87). A T1D-GRS of >0.280 (>50th T1D centile) was indicative of T1D (94% specificity, 50% sensitivity). We then analyzed the T1D-GRS in 242 White-European patients with neonatal diabetes (NDM) who had been tested for all known neonatal diabetes genes. Monogenic NDM was confirmed in 90%, 59% and 8% in patients with GRS <5th T1D centile, 50-75th T1D centile and >75th T1D centile, respectively. Applying a GRS 50th T1D centile cut-off in 48 NDM patients with no known genetic cause, identified those most likely to have a novel monogenic etiology by highlighting patients with probable early-onset T1D (GRS >50th T1D centile) who were diagnosed later, had less syndromic presentation but had additional autoimmune features compared to proven monogenic NDM. The T1D-GRS is a novel tool to improve the use of biomarkers in the discrimination of monogenic diabetes from T1D. PMID:27207547

  19. Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score: A Novel Tool to Discriminate Monogenic and Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kashyap A; Oram, Richard A; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Colclough, Kevin; Shepherd, Maggie; Ellard, Sian; Weedon, Michael N; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-07-01

    Distinguishing patients with monogenic diabetes from those with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is important for correct diagnosis, treatment, and selection of patients for gene discovery studies. We assessed whether a T1D genetic risk score (T1D-GRS) generated from T1D-associated common genetic variants provides a novel way to discriminate monogenic diabetes from T1D. The T1D-GRS was highly discriminative of proven maturity-onset diabetes of young (MODY) (n = 805) and T1D (n = 1,963) (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.87). A T1D-GRS of >0.280 (>50th T1D centile) was indicative of T1D (94% specificity, 50% sensitivity). We then analyzed the T1D-GRS of 242 white European patients with neonatal diabetes (NDM) who had been tested for all known NDM genes. Monogenic NDM was confirmed in 90, 59, and 8% of patients with GRS <5th T1D centile, 50-75th T1D centile, and >75th T1D centile, respectively. Applying a GRS 50th T1D centile cutoff in 48 NDM patients with no known genetic cause identified those most likely to have a novel monogenic etiology by highlighting patients with probable early-onset T1D (GRS >50th T1D centile) who were diagnosed later and had less syndromic presentation but additional autoimmune features compared with those with proven monogenic NDM. The T1D-GRS is a novel tool to improve the use of biomarkers in the discrimination of monogenic diabetes from T1D. PMID:27207547

  20. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhi-Peng; Ma, Jing-Xue

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed between May 2011 and April 2012. A total of 1100 patients (male/female, 483/617) were included in this study. DR was defined following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) severity scale. All included patients accepted a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including retinal photographs. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS Retinopathy was present in 307 patients with a prevalence of 27.9%. In univariate logistic analysis, presence of DR was associated with longer duration of diabetes (OR, 5.70; 95%CI, 2.91-12.56), higher concentration of fasting blood glucose (OR, 12.94; 95%CI, 2.40-67.71), higher level of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c (OR, 5.50; 95%CI, 3.78-11.97) and insulin treatment (OR, 6.99; 95%CI, 1.39-35.12). The lifestyle of patients with T2DM including smoking, alcohol consumption and regular exercise seemed not associated with the development of DR. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that fasting serum glucose concentration, HbA1c level, duration of diabetes and insulin treatment are potential risk factors for DR in northern Chinese patients with T2DM, while the lifestyle of included patients seems not associated with DR. PMID:27588275

  1. [Clinical and pathophysiological features of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their risk factors for diabetic complication].

    PubMed

    Sone, Hirohito

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiological backgrounds as well as clinical phenotypes of Japanese or East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes are quite different from those in Western countries. According to results of East Asian large-scale studies such as the Japan Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS), which is a representative cohort of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, Japanese patients had a much lower body mass index and lower incidence of coronary heart disease compared with Caucasian diabetic patients. Other differences between Japanese and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes could be found in risk factors such as fruit intake on retinopathy and significance of triglycerides, or the effects of moderate alcohol drinking on cardiovascular disease. These results demonstrated a necessity of ethnic group-specific risk evaluations and care of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  2. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  3. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  4. Beyond HbA1c: Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nwanyanwu, Kristen Harris; Newman-Casey, Paula-Anne; Gardner, Thomas W; Lim, Jennifer I

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy affects 4.2 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in working-aged people. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, cost-effective interventions to decrease blindness from diabetic retinopathy will be paramount. While HbA1c and duration of disease are known risk factors, they account for only 11% of the risk of developing microvascular complications from the disease. The assessment of environmental risk factors for diabetic eye disease allows for the determination of modifiable population-level challenges that may be addressed to facilitate the end of blindness from diabetes. PMID:26973797

  5. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  6. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: economics and marketing-finance.

    PubMed

    Kalogeras, N; Odekerken-Schröder, G; Pennings, J M E; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Holm, F; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    All market participants (e.g., investors, producers, consumers) accept a certain level of risk as necessary to achieve certain benefits. There are many types of risk including price, production, financial, institutional, and individual human risks. All these risks should be effectively managed in order to derive the utmost of benefits and avoid disruption and/or catastrophic economic consequences for the food industry. The identification, analysis, determination, and understanding of the benefit-risk trade-offs of market participants in the food markets may help policy makers, financial analysts and marketers to make well-informed and effective corporate investment strategies in order to deal with highly uncertain and risky situations. In this paper, we discuss the role that benefits and risks play in the formation of the decision-making process of market-participants, who are engaged in the upstream and downstream stages of the food supply chain. In addition, we review the most common approaches (expected utility model and psychometrics) for measuring benefit-risk trade-offs in the economics and marketing-finance literature, and different factors that may affect the economic behaviour in the light of benefit-risk analyses. Building on the findings of our review, we introduce a conceptual framework to study the benefit-risk behaviour of market participants. Specifically, we suggest the decoupling of benefits and risks into the separate components of utilitarian benefits, hedonic benefits, and risk attitude and risk perception, respectively. Predicting and explaining how market participants in the food industry form their overall attitude in light of benefit-risk trade-offs may be critical for policy-makers and managers who need to understand the drivers of the economic behaviour of market participants with respect to production, marketing and consumption of food products. PMID:21871522

  7. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: economics and marketing-finance.

    PubMed

    Kalogeras, N; Odekerken-Schröder, G; Pennings, J M E; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Holm, F; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    All market participants (e.g., investors, producers, consumers) accept a certain level of risk as necessary to achieve certain benefits. There are many types of risk including price, production, financial, institutional, and individual human risks. All these risks should be effectively managed in order to derive the utmost of benefits and avoid disruption and/or catastrophic economic consequences for the food industry. The identification, analysis, determination, and understanding of the benefit-risk trade-offs of market participants in the food markets may help policy makers, financial analysts and marketers to make well-informed and effective corporate investment strategies in order to deal with highly uncertain and risky situations. In this paper, we discuss the role that benefits and risks play in the formation of the decision-making process of market-participants, who are engaged in the upstream and downstream stages of the food supply chain. In addition, we review the most common approaches (expected utility model and psychometrics) for measuring benefit-risk trade-offs in the economics and marketing-finance literature, and different factors that may affect the economic behaviour in the light of benefit-risk analyses. Building on the findings of our review, we introduce a conceptual framework to study the benefit-risk behaviour of market participants. Specifically, we suggest the decoupling of benefits and risks into the separate components of utilitarian benefits, hedonic benefits, and risk attitude and risk perception, respectively. Predicting and explaining how market participants in the food industry form their overall attitude in light of benefit-risk trade-offs may be critical for policy-makers and managers who need to understand the drivers of the economic behaviour of market participants with respect to production, marketing and consumption of food products.

  8. Do We Know Whether Researchers and Reviewers are Estimating Risk and Benefit Accurately?

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Accurate estimation of risk and benefit is integral to good clinical research planning, ethical review, and study implementation. Some commentators have argued that various actors in clinical research systems are prone to biased or arbitrary risk/benefit estimation. In this commentary, we suggest the evidence supporting such claims is very limited. Most prior work has imputed risk/benefit beliefs based on past behavior or goals, rather than directly measuring them. We describe an approach - forecast analysis - that would enable direct and effective measure of the quality of risk/benefit estimation. We then consider some objections and limitations to the forecasting approach. PMID:27197044

  9. Do We Know Whether Researchers and Reviewers are Estimating Risk and Benefit Accurately?

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Accurate estimation of risk and benefit is integral to good clinical research planning, ethical review, and study implementation. Some commentators have argued that various actors in clinical research systems are prone to biased or arbitrary risk/benefit estimation. In this commentary, we suggest the evidence supporting such claims is very limited. Most prior work has imputed risk/benefit beliefs based on past behavior or goals, rather than directly measuring them. We describe an approach - forecast analysis - that would enable direct and effective measure of the quality of risk/benefit estimation. We then consider some objections and limitations to the forecasting approach.

  10. Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and assessments of their risk factors in urban slums of Bangalore

    PubMed Central

    Dasappa, Hemavathi; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Prabhakar, Rugmani; Sarin, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and to assess the risk factors associated with diabetes and pre-diabetes in the urban slums of Bangalore. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four slums of Bangalore in the age group of 35 years and above comprising of total 2013 subjects. Risk factors like age, sex, family history, behavior, physical activity, BMI, waist hip ration, diet habits were assessed to find their association with diabetes. Results: Prevalence of diabetes was 12.33% and of pre-diabetes was 11.57%. Prevalence was more among the females compared to males. Increasing age, over weight and obesity, sedentary life style, tobacco consumption, diet habits showed statistically significant association with prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes. Conclusion: Physical activity like regular exercises both at the office and at home, fibers-rich diet, blood sugar estimation after 35 years are some of the recommendations which can control diabetes. PMID:26288781

  11. Potential ghrelin-mediated benefits and risks of hydrogen water.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2015-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) can scavenge hydroxyl radical and diminish the toxicity of peroxynitrite; hence, it has interesting potential for antioxidant protection. Recently, a number of studies have explored the utility of inhaled hydrogen gas, or of hydrogen-saturated water, administered parenterally or orally, in rodent models of pathology and in clinical trials, oftentimes with very positive outcomes. The efficacy of orally ingested hydrogen-rich water (HW) has been particularly surprising, given that only transient and rather small increments in plasma hydrogen can be achieved by this method. A recent study in mice has discovered that orally administered HW provokes increased gastric production of the orexic hormone ghrelin, and that this ghrelin mediates the favorable impact of HW on a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The possibility that most of the benefits observed with HW in experimental studies are mediated by ghrelin merits consideration. Ghrelin is well known to function as an appetite stimulant and secretagogue for growth hormone, but it influences physiological function throughout the body via interaction with the widely express GHS-R1a receptor. Rodent and, to a more limited extent, clinical studies establish that ghrelin has versatile neuroprotective and cognitive enhancing activity, favorably impacts vascular health, exerts anti-inflammatory activity useful in autoimmune disorders, and is markedly hepatoprotective. The stimulatory impact of ghrelin on GH-IGF-I activity, while potentially beneficial in sarcopenia or cachectic disorders, does raise concerns regarding the long-term impact of ghrelin up-regulation on cancer risk. The impact of ingesting HW water on ghrelin production in humans needs to be evaluated; if HW does up-regulate ghrelin in humans, it may have versatile potential for prevention and control of a number of health disorders.

  12. Potential ghrelin-mediated benefits and risks of hydrogen water.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2015-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) can scavenge hydroxyl radical and diminish the toxicity of peroxynitrite; hence, it has interesting potential for antioxidant protection. Recently, a number of studies have explored the utility of inhaled hydrogen gas, or of hydrogen-saturated water, administered parenterally or orally, in rodent models of pathology and in clinical trials, oftentimes with very positive outcomes. The efficacy of orally ingested hydrogen-rich water (HW) has been particularly surprising, given that only transient and rather small increments in plasma hydrogen can be achieved by this method. A recent study in mice has discovered that orally administered HW provokes increased gastric production of the orexic hormone ghrelin, and that this ghrelin mediates the favorable impact of HW on a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The possibility that most of the benefits observed with HW in experimental studies are mediated by ghrelin merits consideration. Ghrelin is well known to function as an appetite stimulant and secretagogue for growth hormone, but it influences physiological function throughout the body via interaction with the widely express GHS-R1a receptor. Rodent and, to a more limited extent, clinical studies establish that ghrelin has versatile neuroprotective and cognitive enhancing activity, favorably impacts vascular health, exerts anti-inflammatory activity useful in autoimmune disorders, and is markedly hepatoprotective. The stimulatory impact of ghrelin on GH-IGF-I activity, while potentially beneficial in sarcopenia or cachectic disorders, does raise concerns regarding the long-term impact of ghrelin up-regulation on cancer risk. The impact of ingesting HW water on ghrelin production in humans needs to be evaluated; if HW does up-regulate ghrelin in humans, it may have versatile potential for prevention and control of a number of health disorders. PMID:25649854

  13. Nanotechnology: Scientific challenges and societal benefits and risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romig, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    The field of nanotechnology is developing rapidly, as are its practical application in society. In this article, we give examples that demonstrate the enormous potential that exists for this new class of materials, and for devices with critical dimensions of less than 100 nm. We also identify some of the challenges that need to be faced in order to fully realize the practical benefits of nanotechnology, and discuss possible risks that may come with this new technology. In all cases, the unique advantage of nanotechnology can be traced back to nanoscale physical and chemical properties that are quite different from those encountered in more traditional microscopic (micro) or macroscopic (macro) materials and devices. Unique nanoscale properties and behaviors are already being used to increase energy efficiency, improve healthcare, and strengthen national security. However, while progress is rapid, many challenges remain. These include manufacturing at the nanoscale, integration of nanoscale materials and devices with more conventional technology, and predictive modeling that will allow nanotechnology to be engineered reliably into useful applications and products. Nanotechnology can be expected to have an increasing impact on human lives and society at large. As we strive to use nanotechnology to improve human life through better healthcare, cleaner environment, and improved national security, we must also work to detect and assess the negative impacts that nanotechnology science (or any new technology) might bring. We suggest that the conduct of should be allowed to proceed unimpeded, so that we can fully understand and appreciate the rules of nature at the nanometer scale. That said, scientific pursuits that involve self-replication in synthetic systems, encryption, defense technology, or the enhancement of human intelligence should be reviewed. The development of new technology from fundamental science and the process of deciding what new technology is to be

  14. Risks and Benefits of Late Onset Hypogonadism Treatment: An Expert Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is a syndromic condition that has a well-recognized association with sexual and reproductive failure. LOH is frequently associated with chronic conditions including cardiovascular diseases (CVD), obesity, osteoporosis, HIV infection, renal failure, and obstructive pulmonary diseases. Despite this evidence, in patients with these conditions, LOH is still only rarely investigated and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) rarely considered. In this paper, we critically reviewed the available evidence on LOH treatment focusing on possible risks and benefits. Medical therapy of LOH should be individualized depending on the etiology of the disease and the patient's expectations. The fear of prostate cancer and the risk of erythrocytosis probably represent the main limitations of TRT in aging men. However, TRT in healthy older men in near physiological doses does not appear to incur serious adverse events, although regular monitoring of prostate-specific antigen and hematocrit levels is required. Available evidence also suggests that TRT might ameliorate central obesity and glycometabolic control in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In addition, TRT has been associated with an increase in bone mineral density in men with osteoporosis, with an improvement in lean body mass in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infection or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as with peripheral oxygenation in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Despite this evidence, however, it should be recognized that the results of these trials were heterogeneous and limited by small sample sizes. Hence, further research is required regarding the long-term benefits and adverse effects of TRT in LOH. PMID:24044106

  15. Understanding public perceptions of benefits and risks of childhood vaccinations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Song, Geoboo

    2014-03-01

    In the face of a growing public health concern accompanying the reemerging threat of preventable diseases, this research seeks mainly to explain variations in the perceived benefits and risks of vaccinations among the general public in the United States. As Mary Douglas and Aaron Wildavsky's grid-group cultural theory of risk perception claims, the analytical results based upon original data from a nationwide Internet survey of 1,213 American adults conducted in 2010 suggest that individuals' cultural predispositions contribute to the formation of their perceptions pertaining to vaccine benefits and risks at both societal and individual levels, in conjunction with other factors suggested by previous risk perception literature, such as perceived prevalence of diseases, trust, knowledge level, and demographic characteristics. Those with a strong hierarch orientation tend to envision greater benefits and lesser risks and conceive of a relatively high ratio of benefit to risk when compared to other cultural types. By contrast, those with a strong fatalist tendency are inclined to emphasize risks and downplay benefits while conceiving of a low vaccination benefit-risk ratio. Situated between hierarchs and fatalists, strong egalitarians are prone to perceive greater benefits, smaller risks, and a more positive benefit-risk ratio than strong individualists.

  16. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: consumer perception.

    PubMed

    Ueland, Ø; Gunnlaugsdottir, H; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Benefit and risk perception with respect to food consumption, have been a part of human daily life from beginning of time. In today's society the food chain is long with many different types of actors and low degree of transparency. Making informed food choices where knowledge of benefits and risks is part of the decision making process are therefore complicated for consumers. Thus, to understand how consumers perceive benefits and risks of foods, their importance in relation to quality evaluations are aspects that need to be addressed. The objective of this paper is to discuss state of the art in understanding consumer perceptions of benefits and risks of foods in order to improve understanding of consumer behaviour in the food domain. Risks may be associated with both acute and long term consequences, some of which may have serious effects. Perceived risks are connected to morbidity and mortality along two dimensions relating to unknown risk, and to which extent the risk is dreaded by the consumer. Unfamiliar, uncertain, unknown, uncontrollable, and severe consequences are some factors associated with risk perception. Novel food processing techniques, for instance, score high on several of these parameters and are consequently regarded with suspicion and perceived as risky by consumers. On a daily basis, benefits of foods and food consumption are more important in most consumers' minds than risks. Benefits are often associated with food's ability to assuage hunger, and to provide pleasure through eating and socialising. In addition, two main categories of benefits that are important for acceptance of product innovations are health and environmental benefits. Benefit and risk perception of foods seem to be inversely correlated, so when something is perceived as being highly beneficial, it is correspondingly perceived as having low risk. However, slightly different paths are used in the formation of these perceptions; benefit perception is based on heuristics and

  17. Menopausal Estrogen Therapy Benefits and Risks Vary by Age, WHI Analysis Suggests

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term follow-up data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) provide new information about the potential risks and benefits of hormone therapy to treat symptoms related to menopause, including its effect on breast cancer risk,

  18. Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Risk in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Linda

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment have been associated with adipose tissue changes and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism. The proportion of HIV-infected adults over the age of 50 is also growing placing HIV-infected adults at particular risk for metabolic perturbations and cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults has been increasingly studied but whether HIV is associated with greater risk remains unclear, likely because of the interplay of host, viral and antiretroviral factors that are associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome. While the Framingham Risk Score is a well-accepted measure of 10-year cardiovascular risk in the general population, it may not accurately predict risk in the HIV setting due to HIV-related factors such as inflammation that are not accounted for. The relationship between HIV and diabetes mellitus (DM) risk has also been debated. We summarize the recent literature on metabolic syndrome, DM, and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25027062

  19. Risk and potential risk reduction in diabetes type 2 patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Häussler, Bertram; Berger, Ursula; Mast, Oliver; Thefeld, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    Avoiding serious complications such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and amputations in diabetes patients is the main interest of long-term treatment. Given the considerable prevalence of diabetes type 2 in industrialized countries this is a major public health concern as well as a burden to health care systems. The present study estimated the current risk of major complications occurring in the German diabetes type 2 population and explored the potential for further risk reduction. Risk reduction can be achieved when physiological and behavioral parameters (HbAlc, blood pressure, cholesterol level, body mass index, smoking) are set to target values recommended in guidelines. To estimate individual risk and potential risk reduction the multifactor disease model Mellibase was employed. Data were obtained from the German Health Survey of 1998, which includes a sample of 7,124 individuals representative of the German population. The survey shows a prevalence rate of 6.3% for diabetes type 2 in persons older than 35 years. The analyses reveal that the overall potential for risk reduction is moderate (e.g., the average reduction potential of the 10-year risk of stroke is 5.7%). A majority of parameter ranges found in the patient population are either already close to the recommended values (HbA1c), are not alarmingly higher than in the general population (blood pressure) or have little impact on risk reduction. In addition nonmodifiable risk factors such as duration of the illness and advanced age constrain possible improvements. However, there is a wide variation in the actual risk between individuals (e.g., the 10-year risk of stroke varies between 2.2% and 79.8%), and thus a wide variation in potential risk reduction (the risk reduction potential for stroke varies between 0% and 53.4%). Intensified treatment should therefore (a) focus on relevant subgroups of patients taking their risk reduction potential into account and (b) aim at improvement in the overall

  20. [Biomarkers and risk factors of cardiovascular system disease in diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Prystupiuk, O M

    2013-01-01

    The content of glycated hemoglobin, a biomarker of diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes correlates with risk factors for cardiovascular disease: hypertension, BMI and ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Therefore, increase in glycosylated hemoglobin should be considered a predictor of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. PRESENCE OF DIABETES RISK FACTORS IN A LARGE U.S. EIGHTH-GRADE COHORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: The study was conducted in 12 middle schools to determine the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes, and diabetes risk factors in eighth-grade students who were predominantly minority and to evaluate the feasibility of collecting physical and laboratory data in schools. RESEARCH DESIGN AND...

  2. Impact of Diabetes on Stroke Risk and Outcomes: Two Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Chang; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Several limitations existed in previous studies which suggested that diabetic patients have increased risk of stroke. We conducted this study to better understand the stroke risk and poststroke outcomes in patients with diabetes.From the claims data of Taiwan's National Health Insurance, we identified 24,027 adults with new-diagnosed diabetes and 96,108 adults without diabetes between 2000 and 2003 in a retrospective cohort study. Stroke events (included hemorrhage, ischemia, and other type of stroke) during the follow-up period of 2000 to 2008 were ascertained and adjusted risk of stroke associated with diabetes was calculated. A nested cohort study of 221,254 hospitalized stroke patients (included hemorrhage, ischemia, and other type of stroke) between 2000 and 2009 was conducted. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for adverse events after stroke hospitalization in patients with and without diabetes.The incidences of stroke in cohorts with and without diabetes were 10.1 and 4.5 per 1000 person-years, respectively. During the follow-up period, diabetic patients had an increased risk of stroke (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.64-1.86) than those without diabetes. Associations between diabetes and stroke risk were significant in both sexes and all age groups. Previous diabetes was associated with poststroke mortality (OR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.19-1.49), pneumonia (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.20-1.42), and urinary tract infection (OR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.55-1.77). The impact of diabetes on adverse events after stroke was investigated particularly in those with diabetes-related complications.Diabetes was associated with stroke risk, and diabetic patients had more adverse events and subsequent mortality after stroke. PMID:26717365

  3. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Cambodian Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Wong, Eunice C.; Berthold, S. Megan; Hambarsoomian, Katrin; Elliott, Marc N.; Bardenheier, Barbara H.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees, and to assess the proportion whose conditions are satisfactorily managed in comparison to the general population. Methods Self-report and laboratory/physical health assessment data obtained from a household probability sample of U.S.-residing Cambodian refugees (N = 331) in 2010-2011 were compared to a probability sample of the adult U.S. population (N = 6360) from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results Prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees greatly exceeded rates found in the age- and gender-adjusted U.S. population. Cambodian refugees with diagnosed hypertension or hyperlipidemia were less likely than their counterparts in the general U.S. population to have blood pressure and total cholesterol within recommended levels. Conclusions Increased attention should be paid to prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Cambodian refugee community. Research is needed to determine whether this pattern extends to other refugee groups. PMID:25651882

  4. Obesity paradox in amputation risk among nonelderly diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Min-Woong; Budiman-Mak, Elly; Oh, Elissa H; Park, Michael S; Stuck, Rodney M; Stone, Neil J; Pearce, William B

    2012-02-01

    The association between BMI and amputation risk is not currently well known. We used data for a cohort of diabetic patients treated in the US Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in 2003. Men aged <65 years at the end of follow-up were examined for their amputation risk and amputation-free survival during the next 5 years (2004-2008). Compared to overweight individuals (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)), the risks of amputation and treatment failure (amputation or death) were higher for patients with BMI <25 kg/m(2) and were lower for those with BMI ≥30 kg/m(2). Individuals with BMI ≥40 kg/m(2) were only half as likely to experience any (hazard ratios (HR) = 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.30-0.80) and major amputations (HR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.39-0.73) during follow-up as overweight individuals. While the amputation risk continued to decrease for higher BMI, amputation-free survival showed a slight upturn at BMI >40 kg/m(2). The association between obesity and amputation risk in our data shows a pattern consistent with "obesity paradox" observed in many health conditions. More research is needed to better understand pathophysiological mechanisms that may explain the paradoxical association between obesity and lower-extremity amputation (LEA) risk.

  5. Benefits and Risks of Antiretroviral Therapy for Perinatal HIV Prevention.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Mary G; Qin, Min; Fiscus, Susan A; Currier, Judith S; Flynn, Patricia M; Chipato, Tsungai; McIntyre, James; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Siberry, George K; Coletti, Anne S; Taha, Taha E; Klingman, Karin L; Martinson, Francis E; Owor, Maxensia; Violari, Avy; Moodley, Dhayendre; Theron, Gerhard B; Bhosale, Ramesh; Bobat, Raziya; Chi, Benjamin H; Strehlau, Renate; Mlay, Pendo; Loftis, Amy J; Browning, Renee; Fenton, Terence; Purdue, Lynette; Basar, Michael; Shapiro, David E; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2016-11-01

    Background Randomized-trial data on the risks and benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared with zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine to prevent transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV-infected pregnant women with high CD4 counts are lacking. Methods We randomly assigned HIV-infected women at 14 or more weeks of gestation with CD4 counts of at least 350 cells per cubic millimeter to zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine plus a 1-to-2-week postpartum "tail" of tenofovir and emtricitabine (zidovudine alone); zidovudine, lamivudine, and lopinavir-ritonavir (zidovudine-based ART); or tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir-ritonavir (tenofovir-based ART). The primary outcomes were HIV transmission at 1 week of age in the infant and maternal and infant safety. Results The median CD4 count was 530 cells per cubic millimeter among 3490 primarily black African HIV-infected women enrolled at a median of 26 weeks of gestation (interquartile range, 21 to 30). The rate of transmission was significantly lower with ART than with zidovudine alone (0.5% in the combined ART groups vs. 1.8%; difference, -1.3 percentage points; repeated confidence interval, -2.1 to -0.4). However, the rate of maternal grade 2 to 4 adverse events was significantly higher with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (21.1% vs. 17.3%, P=0.008), and the rate of grade 2 to 4 abnormal blood chemical values was higher with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (2.9% vs. 0.8%, P=0.03). Adverse events did not differ significantly between the ART groups (P>0.99). A birth weight of less than 2500 g was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (23.0% vs. 12.0%, P<0.001) and was more frequent with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (16.9% vs. 8.9%, P=0.004); preterm delivery before 37 weeks was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (20.5% vs. 13.1%, P<0.001). Tenofovir-based ART was associated

  6. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: food and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tijhuis, M J; de Jong, N; Pohjola, M V; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Hendriksen, M; Hoekstra, J; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; van Leeuwen, F X R; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Rompelberg, C; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Benefit-risk assessment in food and nutrition is relatively new. It weighs the beneficial and adverse effects that a food (component) may have, in order to facilitate more informed management decisions regarding public health issues. It is rooted in the recognition that good food and nutrition can improve health and that some risk may be acceptable if benefit is expected to outweigh it. This paper presents an overview of current concepts and practices in benefit-risk analysis for food and nutrition. It aims to facilitate scientists and policy makers in performing, interpreting and evaluating benefit-risk assessments. Historically, the assessments of risks and benefits have been separate processes. Risk assessment is mainly addressed by toxicology, as demanded by regulation. It traditionally assumes that a maximum safe dose can be determined from experimental studies (usually in animals) and that applying appropriate uncertainty factors then defines the 'safe' intake for human populations. There is a minor role for other research traditions in risk assessment, such as epidemiology, which quantifies associations between determinants and health effects in humans. These effects can be both adverse and beneficial. Benefit assessment is newly developing in regulatory terms, but has been the subject of research for a long time within nutrition and epidemiology. The exact scope is yet to be defined. Reductions in risk can be termed benefits, but also states rising above 'the average health' are explored as benefits. In nutrition, current interest is in 'optimal' intake; from a population perspective, but also from a more individualised perspective. In current approaches to combine benefit and risk assessment, benefit assessment mirrors the traditional risk assessment paradigm of hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Benefit-risk comparison can be qualitative and quantitative. In a quantitative comparison, benefits

  7. Risk Prediction for Early CKD in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peggy; Lee, Shun Fu; Heinze, Georg; Clase, Catherine M.; Tobe, Sheldon; Teo, Koon K.; Gerstein, Hertzel; Mann, Johannes F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Quantitative data for prediction of incidence and progression of early CKD are scarce in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, two risk prediction models were developed for incidence and progression of CKD after 5.5 years and the relative effect of predictors were ascertained. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Baseline and prospective follow-up data of two randomized clinical trials, ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) and Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN), were used as development and independent validation cohorts, respectively. Individuals aged ≥55 years with type 2 diabetes and normo- or microalbuminuria at baseline were included. Incidence or progression of CKD after 5.5 years was defined as new micro- or macroalbuminuria, doubling of creatinine, or ESRD. The competing risk of death was considered as an additional outcome state in the multinomial logistic models. Results Of the 6766 ONTARGET participants with diabetes, 1079 (15.9%) experienced incidence or progression of CKD, and 1032 (15.3%) died. The well calibrated, parsimonious laboratory prediction model incorporating only baseline albuminuria, eGFR, sex, and age exhibited an externally validated c-statistic of 0.68 and an R2 value of 10.6%. Albuminuria, modeled to depict the difference between baseline urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and the threshold for micro- or macroalbuminuria, was mostly responsible for the predictive performance. Inclusion of clinical predictors, such as glucose control, diabetes duration, number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs, previous vascular events, or vascular comorbidities, increased the externally validated c-statistic and R2 value only to 0.69 and 12.1%, respectively. Explained variation was largely driven by renal and not clinical predictors. Conclusions Albuminuria and eGFR were the most important factors to predict onset and

  8. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and progression to diabetes in patients at risk for diabetes: an ancillary analysis in the diabetes prevention program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. The research design and methods were a prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multi-center trial co...

  9. Metformin therapy associated with survival benefit in lung cancer patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoxing; Yu, Xiongjie; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianhe; Pan, Dongfeng; Wang, Xuanbin; Li, Linjun; Cai, Xiaojun; Cao, Fengjun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize the currently available evidence regarding the concerned issue by performing a comprehensive meta-analysis. Relevant publications reporting the association of metformin use with survival of lung cancer patients with diabetes were electronically searched to identify eligible studies. The meta-analysis was performed with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) as effect measures for disease-free survival(DFS) and overall survival(OS) estimates. A total of 17 individual studies from 10 publications were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the results revealed a significant association of metformin use with a better survival of lung cancer patients with diabetes(for DFS: HR = 0.65, 95%CI = 0.52-0.83; for OS: HR = 0.78, 95%CI = 0.64-0.93). The subgroup analyses showed similar association in Asian region(for DFS:HR = 0.69, 95%CI = 0.59-0.80; for OS: HR = 0.55, 95%CI = 0.46-0.67) but not in Western region. Such association was also presented in small cell lung cancer (for DFS: HR = 0.54, 95%CI = 0.38-0.77; for OS: HR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.39-0.69) and in non-small cell lung cancer(for DFS: HR = 0.70, 95%CI = 0.51-0.96; for OS: HR = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.58-0.97). Analyses stratified by treatment strategy showed a reduction in the risk of cancer-related mortality in patients receiving chemotherapy(for DFS: HR = 0.71, 95%CI = 0.64-0.83; for OS: HR = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.47-0.71) but not in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. The meta-analysis demonstrated that metformin use was significantly associated with a favorable survival outcome of lung cancer patients with diabetes. PMID:27105507

  10. Risk/Benefit Communication about Food-A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Frewer, L J; Fischer, A R H; Brennan, M; Bánáti, D; Lion, R; Meertens, R M; Rowe, G; Siegrist, M; Verbeke, W; Vereijken, C M J L

    2016-07-26

    A systematic review relevant to the following research questions was conducted (1) the extent to which different theoretical frameworks have been applied to food risk/benefit communication and (2) the impact such food risk/benefit communication interventions have had on related risk/benefit attitudes and behaviors. Fifty four papers were identified. The analysis revealed that (primarily European or US) research interest has been relatively recent. Certain food issues were of greater interest to researchers than others, perhaps reflecting the occurrence of a crisis, or policy concern. Three broad themes relevant to the development of best practice in risk (benefit) communication were identified: the characteristics of the target population; the contents of the information; and the characteristics of the information sources. Within these themes, independent and dependent variables differed considerably. Overall, acute risk (benefit) communication will require advances in communication process whereas chronic communication needs to identify audience requirements. Both citizen's risk/benefit perceptions and (if relevant) related behaviors need to be taken into account, and recommendations for behavioral change need to be concrete and actionable. The application of theoretical frameworks to the study of risk (benefit) communication was infrequent, and developing predictive models of effective risk (benefit) communication may be contingent on improved theoretical perspectives.

  11. 76 FR 77543 - Quantitative Summary of the Benefits and Risks of Prescription Drugs: A Literature Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Quantitative Summary of the Benefits and Risks of... ``Quantitative Summary of the Benefits and Risks of Prescription Drugs: A Literature Review'' (literature review... FDA is announcing the availability of a draft report entitled ``Quantitative Summary of the...

  12. A practical approach to communicating benefit-risk decisions of medicines to stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Leong, James; Walker, Stuart; Salek, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The importance of a framework for a systematic structured assessment of the benefits and risks has been established, but in addition, it is necessary that the benefit-risk decisions and the processes to derive those decisions are documented and communicated to various stakeholders for accountability. Hence there is now a need to find appropriate tools to enhance communication between regulators and other stakeholders, in a manner that would uphold transparency, consistency and standards. Methods: A retrospective, non-comparative study was conducted to determine the applicability and practicality of a summary template in documenting benefit-risk assessment and communicating benefit-risk balance and conclusions for reviewers to other stakeholders. The benefit-risk (BR) Summary Template and its User Manual was evaluated by 12 reviewers within a regulatory agency in Singapore, the Health Sciences Authority (HSA). Results: The BR Summary Template was found to be adequate in documenting benefits, risks, relevant summaries and conclusions, while the User Manual was useful in guiding the reviewer in completing the template. The BR Summary Template was also considered a useful tool for communicating benefit-risk decisions to a variety of stakeholders. Conclusions: The use of a template may be of value for the communicating benefit-risk assessment of medicines to stakeholders. PMID:26124720

  13. ADHD-associated risk taking is linked to exaggerated views of the benefits of positive outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, Rachel; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Aloni, Hamutal; Yaniv, Ilan; Pollak, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often assumed to be associated with increased engagement in risk-taking behaviors. The current study sought to understand the mental processes underlying this association using a theory-driven behavioral economics perspective. Psychological risk-return models suggest that risk and benefit are inherently subjective, and risk taking is best understood as the interplay between cognitions and motivations regarding the benefits and risks of alternatives. A sample of 244 adults was assessed for ADHD symptoms. The likelihood of engagement in a range of risky behaviors (e.g., driving without wearing a seat belt), the magnitude of perceived benefit and risk ascribed to these behaviors, and benefit and risk attitudes of each participant were extracted from the Domain Specific Risk Taking (DOSPERT) scales. ADHD symptoms were correlated with more risky behaviors and perception of greater benefits from engaging in these behaviors, but were not correlated with risk perception. Mediation analysis revealed that the association between ADHD symptoms and engagement in risk taking was mediated by perceived benefits. These findings highlight the idea that people with high level ADHD symptoms tend to engage in risky behaviors because they find such behavior particularly appealing, rather than because they seek risk per se. PMID:27725684

  14. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  15. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis. PMID:25941651

  16. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  17. Potassium intake and risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, L. A.; Yeh, H. C.; Anderson, C. A.; Daviglus, M. L.; Liu, K.; Brancati, F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Serum potassium has been found to be a significant predictor of diabetes risk, but the effect of dietary potassium on diabetes risk is not clear. We sought to determine if dietary potassium is associated with risk of incident type 2 diabetes in young adults. Methods We used data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Potassium intake was measured by (1) an average of three 24 h urinary potassium collections at the 5-year study visit, and (2) the CARDIA dietary assessment instrument at baseline. Incident type 2 diabetes cases were ascertained on the basis of use of diabetes medication and laboratory measurements. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders including intake of fruit and vegetables and other dietary factors. Results Of 1,066 participants with urinary potassium measurements, 99 (9.3%) developed diabetes over 15 years of follow-up. In multivariate models, adults in the lowest urinary potassium quintile were more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as their counterparts in the highest quintile (HR 2.45; 95% CI 1.08, 5.59). Of 4,754 participants with dietary history measurements, 373 (7.8%) developed diabetes over 20 years of follow-up. In multivariate models, African-Americans had a significantly increased risk of diabetes with lower potassium intake, which was not found in whites. Conclusions/interpretation Low dietary potassium is associated with increased risk of incident diabetes in African-Americans. Randomised clinical trials are needed to determine if potassium supplementation, from either dietary or pharmacological sources, could reduce the risk of diabetes, particularly in higher-risk populations. PMID:22322920

  18. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  19. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Emily Jane; LeRoith, Derek

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  20. Patient beliefs and behaviors about genomic risk for type 2 diabetes: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick; King, Heather A; Haga, Susanne B; Orlando, Lori A; Joy, Scott V; Trujillo, Gloria M; Scott, William Michael; Bembe, Marylou; Creighton, Dana L; Cho, Alex H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major health burden in the United States, and population trends suggest this burden will increase. High interest in, and increased availability of, testing for genetic risk of type 2 diabetes presents a new opportunity for reducing type 2 diabetes risk for many patients; however, to date, there is little evidence that genetic testing positively affects type 2 diabetes prevention. Genetic information may not fit patients' illness representations, which may reduce the chances of risk-reducing behavior changes. The present study aimed to examine illness representations in a clinical sample who are at risk for type 2 diabetes and interested in genetic testing. The authors used the Common Sense Model to analyze survey responses of 409 patients with type 2 diabetes risk factors. Patients were interested in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes risk and believed in its importance. Most patients believed that genetic factors are important to developing type 2 diabetes (67%), that diet and exercise are effective in preventing type 2 diabetes (95%), and that lifestyle changes are more effective than drugs (86%). Belief in genetic causality was not related to poorer self-reported health behaviors. These results suggest that patients' interest in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes might produce a teachable moment that clinicians can use to counsel behavior change. PMID:25844569

  1. Hyperketonemia and ketosis increase the risk of complications in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kanikarla-Marie, Preeti; Jain, Sushil K

    2016-06-01

    Diets that boost ketone production are increasingly used for treating several neurological disorders. Elevation in ketones in most cases is considered favorable, as they provide energy and are efficient in fueling the body's energy needs. Despite all the benefits from ketones, the above normal elevation in the concentration of ketones in the circulation tend to illicit various pathological complications by activating injurious pathways leading to cellular damage. Recent literature demonstrates a plausible link between elevated levels of circulating ketones and oxidative stress, linking hyperketonemia to innumerable morbid conditions. Ketone bodies are produced by the oxidation of fatty acids in the liver as a source of alternative energy that generally occurs in glucose limiting conditions. Regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis plays an important role in dictating ketone concentrations in the blood. Hyperketonemia is a condition with elevated blood levels of acetoacetate, 3-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. Several physiological and pathological triggers, such as fasting, ketogenic diet, and diabetes cause an accumulation and elevation of circulating ketones. Complications of the brain, kidney, liver, and microvasculature were found to be elevated in diabetic patients who had elevated ketones compared to those diabetics with normal ketone levels. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which hyperketonemia and ketoacidosis cause an increase in redox imbalance and thereby increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients. PMID:27036365

  2. Assessment of the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ran; Liu, Bin; Dong, Qi

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have investigated the association between Glutathione S-Transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and risk of diabetes mellitus, but the impact of GSTM1 null genotype on diabetes mellitus is unclear owing to the obvious inconsistence among those studies. This study aimed to quantify the strength of association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of diabetes mellitus. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Wangfang databases for studies relating the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of diabetes mellitus. We estimated summary odds ratio (OR) with their 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) to assess the association. Subgroup analyses were performed by type of diabetes and ethnicity. 10 case-control studies with 7, 054 subjects were included into this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of total 10 studies showed GSTM1 null genotype was associated increased risk of diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.59, 95 % CI 1.14-2.22, P = 0.007). Subgroup analyses by type of diabetes mellitus suggested GSTM1 null genotype was associated increased risk of type 2 diabetes (OR = 1.90, 95 % CI 1.37-2.64, P < 0.001), but was not associated with risk of type 1 diabetes (OR = 0.84, 95 % CI 0.66-1.07, P = 0.153). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity further identified the obvious association between GSTM1 null genotype and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The cumulative meta-analyses showed a trend of obvious association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes as information accumulated. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Thus, evidence from current meta-analysis suggests an association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Retention in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Spero M.; Jiang, Luohua; Zhang, Lijing; Beals, Janette; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the associations between participant and site characteristics and retention in a multisite cardiovascular disease risk reduction project. Design and Methods: Data were derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project, an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American Indians and Alaska Natives with diabetes. In 2006, a total of 1,072 participants from 30 participating sites completed baseline questionnaires measuring demographics and sociobehavioral factors. They also underwent a medical examination at baseline and were reassessed annually after baseline. A Provider Annual Questionnaire was administered to staff members of each grantee site at the end of each year to assess site characteristics. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate the relationships between participant and site characteristics and retention 1 year after baseline. Results: Among enrolled participants, 792 (74%) completed their first annual assessment. Participants who completed the first annual assessment tended to be older and had, at baseline, higher body mass index and higher level of physical activity. Site characteristics associated with retention included average age of staff, proportion of female staff members, and percentage of staff members having completed graduate or professional school. Implications: Understanding successful retention must reach beyond individual characteristics of participants to include features of the settings that house the interventions. PMID:21565816

  4. Statistical aspects in comparative benefit-risk assessment: challenges and opportunities for pharmaceutical statisticians.

    PubMed

    Quartey, George; Wang, Jixian

    2012-01-01

    Benefit-risk assessment is a fundamental element of drug development with the aim to strengthen decision making for the benefit of public health. Appropriate benefit-risk assessment can provide useful information for proactive intervention in health care settings, which could save lives, reduce litigation, improve patient safety and health care outcomes, and furthermore, lower overall health care costs. Recent development in this area presents challenges and opportunities to statisticians in the pharmaceutical industry. We review the development and examine statistical issues in comparative benefit-risk assessment. We argue that a structured benefit-risk assessment should be a multi-disciplinary effort involving experts in clinical science, safety assessment, decision science, health economics, epidemiology and statistics. Well planned and conducted analyses with clear consideration on benefit and risk are critical for appropriate benefit-risk assessment. Pharmaceutical statisticians should extend their knowledge to relevant areas such as pharmaco-epidemiology, decision analysis, modeling, and simulation to play an increasingly important role in comparative benefit-risk assessment.

  5. Should risk from medical imaging be assessed in the absence of benefit and vice versa?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Louis K

    2014-10-01

    Diagnostic radiology has an image problem. In its effort to develop a better understanding of benefit-risk in medical radiology, data on potential risks associated with medical imaging have been welcomed into the medical community. As such, risk perspectives and mantras from the occupational health profession have been adopted and applied to patients. These perspectives often focus on risk with only casual, incidental, or no reference to the benefits experienced by patients. These occupational health viewpoints have accumulated over decades, have overshadowed a very limited perspective about the benefits of medical X-rays, and have become an integrated part of our profession. This review argues that the medical profession should abandon perspectives on risk that are adopted from occupational health professions and focus on perspectives that realistically focus on the medical benefit-risk for patients.

  6. The health benefits of dietary fiber: beyond the usual suspects of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M.; Miller, Michael J.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is deemed to be a key component in healthy eating. DF is not a static collection of undigestible plant materials that pass untouched or unencumbered through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract; instead, DFs are a vast array of complex saccharide-based molecules that can bind potential nutrients and nutrient precursors to prevent their absorption. Some DFs are fermentable, and the GI tract catabolism leads to the generation of various bioactive materials, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), that can markedly augment the GI tract biomass and change the composition of the GI tract flora. The health benefits of DFs include the prevention and mitigation of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer. By modulating food ingestion, digestion, absorption and metabolism, DFs reduce the risk of hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia. Emerging research has begun to investigate the role of DFs in immunomodulation. If substantiated, DFs could facilitate many biologic processes, including infection prevention and the improvement of mood and memory. This review describes the accepted physiologic functions of DFs and explores their new potential immune-based actions. PMID:22401879

  7. The health benefits of dietary fiber: beyond the usual suspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M; Miller, Michael J; Freund, Gregory G

    2012-08-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is deemed to be a key component in healthy eating. DF is not a static collection of undigestible plant materials that pass untouched or unencumbered through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract; instead, DFs are a vast array of complex saccharide-based molecules that can bind potential nutrients and nutrient precursors to prevent their absorption. Some DFs are fermentable, and the GI tract catabolism leads to the generation of various bioactive materials, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), that can markedly augment the GI tract biomass and change the composition of the GI tract flora. The health benefits of DFs include the prevention and mitigation of type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer. By modulating food ingestion, digestion, absorption and metabolism, DFs reduce the risk of hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia. Emerging research has begun to investigate the role of DFs in immunomodulation. If substantiated, DFs could facilitate many biologic processes, including infection prevention and the improvement of mood and memory. This review describes the accepted physiologic functions of DFs and explores their new potential immune-based actions. PMID:22401879

  8. Outdoor Play: Does Avoiding the Risks Reduce the Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Helen; Wyver, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    Although the term "risk-taking" often has negative connotations, the reality is that the willingness to engage in some risky activities provides opportunities to learn new skills, try new behaviours and ultimately reach our potential. Challenge and risk, in particular during outdoor play, allows children to test the limits of their physical,…

  9. Metabolic Syndrome Components and Their Response to Lifestyle and Metformin Interventions are Associated with Differences in Diabetes Risk in Persons with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Florez, Hermes; Temprosa, Marinella G; Orchard, Trevor J; Mather, Kieren J; Marcovina, Santica M; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Horton, Edward; Saudek, Christopher; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier F; Ratner, Robert E; Goldberg, Ronald B

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components with diabetes risk in participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and whether intervention-related changes in MetS lead to differences in diabetes incidence. Methods We used the NCEP/ATP III revised MetS definition at baseline and intervention-related changes of its components to predict incident diabetes using Cox models in 3234 Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) participants with IGT over an average follow-up of 3.2 years. Results In an intention-to-treat analysis, the demographic-adjusted hazard ratios (95%CI) for diabetes in those with MetS (versus no MetS) at baseline were 1.7(1.3-2.3), 1.7(1.2-2.3), and 2.0(1.3-3.0) for placebo, metformin, and lifestyle groups, respectively. Higher levels of fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides at baseline were independently associated with increased risk of diabetes. Greater waist circumference (WC) was associated with higher risk in placebo and lifestyle groups, but not in the metformin group. In a multivariate model, favorable changes in WC (placebo and lifestyle) and HDLc (placebo and metformin) contributed to reduced diabetes risk. Conclusions MetS and some of its components are associated with increased diabetes incidence in persons with IGT in a manner that differed according to DPP intervention. After hyperglycemia, the most predictive factors for diabetes were baseline hypertriglyceridemia and both baseline and lifestyle-associated changes in waist circumference. Targeting these cardio-metabolic risk factors may help to assess the benefits of interventions that reduce diabetes incidence. PMID:24118860

  10. Validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for Detecting Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes among General Medical Outpatients in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Nkomazna, Oathokwa; Amone-P'Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study designed to assess the validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for detecting undiagnosed type 2 diabetes among general medical outpatients in Botswana. Participants aged ≥20 years without previously diagnosed diabetes were screened by (1) an 8-item Finnish diabetes risk assessment questionnaire and (2) Haemoglobin A1c test. Data from 291 participants were analyzed (74.2% were females). The mean age of the participants was 50.1 (SD = ±11) years, and the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 42 (14.4%) with no significant differences between the gender (20% versus 12.5%, P = 0.26). The area under curve for detecting undiagnosed diabetes was 0.63 (95% CI 0.55–0.72) for the total population, 0.65 (95% CI: 0.56–0.75) for women, and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.52–0.83) for men. The optimal cut-off point for detecting undiagnosed diabetes was 17 (sensitivity = 48% and specificity = 73%) for the total population, 17 (sensitivity = 56% and specificity = 66%) for females, and 13 (sensitivity = 53% and specificity = 77%) for males. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 20% and 89.5%, respectively. The findings indicate that the Finnish questionnaire was only modestly effective in predicting undiagnosed diabetes among outpatients in Botswana. PMID:27738638

  11. Health Benefits of Reducing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in High Risk Populations of California: Results from the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Policy Model

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Tekeshe A.; Odden, Michelle C.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Guzman, David; Lightwood, James; Wang, Y. Claire; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) has risen over the past two decades, with over 10 million Californians drinking one or more SSB per day. High SSB intake is associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and coronary heart disease (CHD). Reduction of SSB intake and the potential impact on health outcomes in California and among racial, ethnic, and low-income sub-groups has not been quantified. Methods We projected the impact of reduced SSB consumption on health outcomes among all Californians and California subpopulations from 2013 to 2022. We used the CVD Policy Model – CA, an established computer simulation of diabetes and heart disease adapted to California. We modeled a reduction in SSB intake by 10–20% as has been projected to result from proposed penny-per-ounce excise tax on SSB and modeled varying effects of this reduction on health parameters including body mass index, blood pressure, and diabetes risk. We projected avoided cases of diabetes and CHD, and associated health care cost savings in 2012 US dollars. Results Over the next decade, a 10–20% SSB consumption reduction is projected to result in a 1.8–3.4% decline in the new cases of diabetes and an additional drop of 0.5–1% in incident CHD cases and 0.5–0.9% in total myocardial infarctions. The greatest reductions are expected in African Americans, Mexican Americans, and those with limited income regardless of race and ethnicity. This reduction in SSB consumption is projected to yield $320–620 million in medical cost savings associated with diabetes cases averted and an additional savings of $14–27 million in diabetes-related CHD costs avoided. Conclusions A reduction of SSB consumption could yield substantial population health benefits and cost savings for California. In particular, racial, ethnic, and low-income subgroups of California could reap the greatest health benefits. PMID:24349119

  12. Maximize Benefits, Minimize Risk: Selecting the Right HVAC Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, James T.

    1993-01-01

    An informal survey of 20 major urban school districts found that 40% were currently operating in a "break down" maintenance mode. A majority, 57.9%, also indicated they saw considerable benefits in contracting for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) maintenance services with outside firms. Offers guidelines in selecting HVAC…

  13. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from “common soil”. The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients. PMID:25126392

  14. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  15. THE NEGLECTED SIDE OF THE COIN: QUANTITATIVE BENEFIT-RISK ANALYSES IN MEDICAL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Zanzonico, Pat B.

    2016-01-01

    While it is implicitly recognized that the benefits of diagnostic imaging far outweigh any theoretical radiogenic risks, quantitative estimates of the benefits are rarely, if ever, juxtaposed with quantitative estimates of risk. This alone - expression of benefit in purely qualitative terms versus expression of risk in quantitative, and therefore seemingly more certain, terms - may well contribute to a skewed sense of the relative benefits and risks of diagnostic imaging among healthcare providers as well as patients. The current paper, therefore, briefly compares the benefits of diagnostic imaging in several cases, based on actual mortality or morbidity data if ionizing radiation were not employed, with theoretical estimates of radiogenic cancer mortality based on the “linear no-threshold” (LNT) dose-response model. PMID:26808890

  16. The Neglected Side of the Coin: Quantitative Benefit-risk Analyses in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat B

    2016-03-01

    While it is implicitly recognized that the benefits of diagnostic imaging far outweigh any theoretical radiogenic risks, quantitative estimates of the benefits are rarely, if ever, juxtaposed with quantitative estimates of risk. This alone - expression of benefit in purely qualitative terms versus expression of risk in quantitative, and therefore seemingly more certain, terms - may well contribute to a skewed sense of the relative benefits and risks of diagnostic imaging among healthcare providers as well as patients. The current paper, therefore, briefly compares the benefits of diagnostic imaging in several cases, based on actual mortality or morbidity data if ionizing radiation were not employed, with theoretical estimates of radiogenic cancer mortality based on the "linear no-threshold" (LNT) dose-response model. PMID:26808890

  17. Type 2 Diabetes and 10-Year Risk of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment Among Older Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Mayeda, Elizabeth R.; Haan, Mary N.; Kanaya, Alka M.; Yaffe, Kristine; Neuhaus, John

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes has been linked with increased risk of dementia and cognitive impairment among older adults and with premature mortality in young and middle-aged adults. No studies have evaluated the association between diabetes and dementia among Mexican Americans, a population with a high burden of diabetes. We evaluated the association of diabetes with incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND) among older Mexican Americans while accounting for competing risk from death. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study included 1,617 participants 60–98 years of age from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging followed up to 10 years from 1998. We evaluated the association between diabetes and dementia/CIND with competing risk regression models. RESULTS Participants free of dementia/CIND at baseline (n = 1,617) were followed annually up to 10 years. There were 677 (41.9%) participants with diabetes, 159 (9.8%) incident dementia/CIND cases, and 361 (22.3%) deaths. Treated and untreated diabetes (hazard ratio 2.12 [95% CI 1.65–2.73] and 2.15 [1.58–2.95]) and dementia/CIND (2.48 [1.75–3.51]) were associated with an increased risk of death. In models adjusted for competing risk of death, those with treated and untreated diabetes had an increased risk of dementia/CIND (2.05 [1.41–2.97] and 1.55 [0.93–2.58]) compared with those without diabetes. CONCLUSIONS These findings provide evidence that the association between type 2 diabetes and dementia/CIND among Mexican Americans remains strong after accounting for competing risk of mortality. Treatments that modify risk of death among those with diabetes may change future dementia risk. PMID:23514732

  18. Environmental Enterprise Risk Management Benefits for a Government Contractor

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Guinn

    2012-05-01

    An often overlooked advantage that an Environmental Enterprise Risk Management System (ERMS) has to organizations is the added protection from the Civil False Claims Act (FCA) for activities under a government contract.

  19. Perceived risk and benefit of nuclear waste repositories: four opinion clusters.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Roman; Moser, Corinne; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius

    2013-06-01

    Local public resistance can block the site-selection process, construction, and operation of nuclear waste repositories. Social science has established that the perception of risks and benefits, trust in authorities, and opinion on nuclear energy play important roles in acceptance. In particular, risk and benefit evaluations seem critical for opinion formation. However, risks and benefits have rarely been studied independently and, most often, the focus has been on the two most salient groups of proponents and opponents. The aim of this exploratory study is to examine the often-neglected majority of people holding ambivalent or indifferent opinions. We used cluster analysis to examine the sample (N = 500, mailed survey in German-speaking Switzerland) in terms of patterns of risk and benefit perception. We reveal four significantly different and plausible clusters: one cluster with high-benefit ratings in favor of a repository and one cluster with high-risk ratings opposing it; a third cluster shows ambivalence, with high ratings on both risk and benefit scales and moderate opposition, whereas a fourth cluster seems indifferent, rating risks and benefits only moderately compared to the ambivalent cluster. We conclude that a closer look at the often neglected but considerable number of people with ambivalent or indifferent opinions is necessary. Although the extreme factions of the public will most probably not change their opinion, we do not yet know how the opinion of the ambivalent and indifferent clusters might develop over time.

  20. A Qualitative Study of Acculturation and Diabetes Risk among Urban, Immigrant Latinas: Implications for Diabetes Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Shuman, Sara J.; Barrios, Dulce M.; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how acculturation influences diabetes risk among urban, immigrant Latinas (Hispanic women). Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 26 urban, immigrant Latinas who were at high clinical risk for developing diabetes. The focus group sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The authors independently analyzed transcripts using an inductive method of open coding, and themes were established by consensus among authors. Results All of the participants were foreign-born and had low levels of acculturation. During the acculturation process, they noted changes in their lifestyle behaviors and the family context in which those behaviors are shaped. They reported that since living in the U.S., their improved economic circumstances led to increased consumption of less healthy foods and beverages and a more sedentary lifestyle. They also described changing family roles and responsibilities, including working outside the home, which constrained healthy food choices. However, they perceived that their position of influence within the family offered opportunities to help family members prevent diabetes. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes in Latinas should address their acculturation experiences, which impact family functioning and health behaviors related to diabetes risk. For example, given the perceived link between Latinas’ improved economic circumstances and their diabetes risk, prevention programs should incorporate strategies to help Latinas avoid adopting less healthy lifestyle behaviors that become affordable during the acculturation process. PMID:24872386

  1. Tool Weighs Benefits, Risks of Raloxifene or Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a benefit-risk index to help guide decisions on whether postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer should take raloxifene or tamoxifen to reduce that risk. |

  2. Risk factors of type 2 diabetes in population of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ankit; Sharma, Swarkar; Dhar, Manoj K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-09-01

    We sought to identify risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Jammu and Kashmir populations, India. A total of 424 diabetic and 226 non-diabetic subjects from Jammu, and 161 diabetic and 100 non-diabetic subjects from Kashmir were screened for various parameters including fasting blood glucose level, 2 hour glucose level, urea, creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C), uric acid, systolic and diastolic blood pressure level. We found that subjects aged 40-49 years had the highest rate of diabetes, with family income playing not much of a role. Kashmiri migrants or populations with rapid cultural, environmental, social or lifestyle change along with reduced physical activity, obesity and unhealthy lifestyle (smoking and alcohol consumption) were found to have higher rates of diabetes. High blood glucose, triglycerides and low HDL-C levels were found to be contributing to disease outcome. High blood pressure also contributed to a higher risk of developing T2D. Our study supports earlier reports confirming the contribution of comfortable life style, Western dietary habits and rapid life style change along with many other factors to the prevalence of diabetes. This may contribute to the epidemic proportion of diabetes in Jammu and Kashmir. Early diagnosis and routine screening for undiagnosed diabetes in obese subjects and subjects with parental diabetes history is expected to decrease the burden of chronic diabetic complications worldwide.

  3. Endocrine stress responses and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azaz; Madhu, S V; Sharma, S B; Desai, N G

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried to ascertain whether stress responses are associated with abnormalities in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and pancreatic beta cell function and risk of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Salivary cortisol, a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and salivary α-amylase, a marker of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) were compared in 125 subjects of newly detected diabetes mellitus (NDDM) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects who were diagnosed on the basis of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Assessment of stress in them was done through stress scales - presumptive stressful life events scale (PSLES), perceived stress scale (PSS) and sense of coherence (SOC) and correlated with these and other stress response markers. Significantly higher 10 pm salivary cortisol and post dexamethasone salivary cortisol were found in NDDM subjects as compared to NGT. 10 pm salivary cortisol correlated significantly with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h plasma glucose (2h PG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) while post dex salivary cortisol correlated with 2h PG, HbA1c and salivary α-amylase with 2h PG. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (OR: 1.840), SOC (OR: 0.688) and 10 pm salivary cortisol (OR: 1.427) were the strongest predictors of NDDM. The results of the present study indicate that NDDM subjects display significantly higher chronic stress and stress responses when compared to subjects with NGT. Chronic stress and endocrine stress responses are significantly associated with glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26303379

  4. Endocrine stress responses and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azaz; Madhu, S V; Sharma, S B; Desai, N G

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried to ascertain whether stress responses are associated with abnormalities in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and pancreatic beta cell function and risk of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Salivary cortisol, a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and salivary α-amylase, a marker of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) were compared in 125 subjects of newly detected diabetes mellitus (NDDM) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects who were diagnosed on the basis of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Assessment of stress in them was done through stress scales - presumptive stressful life events scale (PSLES), perceived stress scale (PSS) and sense of coherence (SOC) and correlated with these and other stress response markers. Significantly higher 10 pm salivary cortisol and post dexamethasone salivary cortisol were found in NDDM subjects as compared to NGT. 10 pm salivary cortisol correlated significantly with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h plasma glucose (2h PG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) while post dex salivary cortisol correlated with 2h PG, HbA1c and salivary α-amylase with 2h PG. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (OR: 1.840), SOC (OR: 0.688) and 10 pm salivary cortisol (OR: 1.427) were the strongest predictors of NDDM. The results of the present study indicate that NDDM subjects display significantly higher chronic stress and stress responses when compared to subjects with NGT. Chronic stress and endocrine stress responses are significantly associated with glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus.

  5. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Increase the Risks of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to examine whether poor glycemic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors, can predict diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients aged ≥30 years with type 2 DM, enrolled in the National Diabetes Care Management Program, and free of DPN (n = 37,375) in the period 2002 to 2004 were included and followed up until 2011. The related factors were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. For an average follow-up of 7.00 years, 8379 cases of DPN were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 32.04/1000 person-years. After multivariate adjustment, patients with HbA1c levels 7 to 8%, 8 to 9%, 9 to 10%, and ≥10% exhibited higher risk of DPN (adjusted HR: 1.11 [1.04–1.20], 1.30 [1.21–1.40], 1.32 [1.22–1.43], and 1.62 [1.51–1.74], respectively) compared with patients with HbA1c level 6 to 7%. There was a significant linear trend in DPN incidence with increasing HbA1c (P < 0.001) and significant HRs of DPN for patients with HbA1c level ≥7%, blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg, triglycerides (TG) ≥150 mg/dL, high density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) <40 mg/dL in males and <50 mg/dL in females, low density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥100 mg/dL, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Patients with type 2 DM and HbA1c ≥7.0% exhibit increased risk of DPN, demonstrating a linear relationship. The incidence of DPN is also associated with poor glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, hyper-triglyceridemia, low HDL-C, high LDL-C, and decreased eGFR. PMID:26496307

  6. What are the benefits and risks of using return on investment to defend public health programs?

    PubMed

    Brousselle, Astrid; Benmarhnia, Tarik; Benhadj, Lynda

    2016-06-01

    Return on investment (ROI) is an economic measure used to indicate how much economic benefit is derived from a program in relation to its costs. Interest in the use of ROI in public health has grown substantially over recent years. Given its potential influence on resource allocation, it is crucial to understand the benefits and the risks of using ROI to defend public health programs. In this paper, we explore those benefits and risks. We present two recent examples of ROI use in public health in the United States and Canada and conclude with a series of proposals to minimize the risks associated with using ROI to defend public health interventions.

  7. Trans-Palmitoleic Acid, Metabolic Risk Factors, and New-Onset Diabetes in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Cao, Haiming; King, Irena B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Song, Xiaoling; Siscovick, David S.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2011-01-01

    independent of estimated dairy consumption or other fatty acid dairy biomarkers. Protective associations with metabolic risk factors were confirmed in the validation cohort. Limitations Measurement error; residual confounding. Conclusions Circulating trans-palmitoleate is associated with lower insulin resistance, atherogenic dyslipidemia, and incident diabetes. Our findings may explain previously observed metabolic benefits of dairy consumption and support need for detailed further experimental and clinical investigation. Primary Funding Source National Institutes of Health. PMID:21173413

  8. Maternal Family History of Diabetes Is Associated With a Reduced Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, David G.; Van Minnen, Kylie; Davis, Wendy A.; Mudhar, Jaspreet; Perret, Michael; Subawickrama, Dayani P.; Venkitachalam, Stephanie; Ravine, David; Davis, Timothy M.E.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether parental family history of diabetes influences cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 1,294 type 2 diabetic patients (mean age 64.1 years, 51.2% female) recruited to a community-based cohort study from 1993 to 1996 and followed until mid-2006. A data linkage system assessed all-cause and cardiac mortality, incident myocardial infarction, and stroke. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the influence of maternal or paternal family history on these outcomes. RESULTS A maternal family history of diabetes was reported by 20.4% of the cohort, 8.3% reported paternal family history, and 2.0% reported both parents affected. Maternal and paternal family history was associated with earlier age of diabetes onset, and maternal family history was associated with worse glycemic control. For all patients, maternal family history was significantly associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality and cardiac mortality. When analyzed by sex, maternal family history had no effect on male patients, whereas female patients with diabetic mothers had significantly reduced hazard ratios for death from all causes (0.63 [95% CI 0.41–0.96]; P = 0.033), for death from cardiac causes (0.32 [0.14–0.72]; P = 0.006), and for first myocardial infarction (0.45 [0.26–0.76]; P = 0.003). Paternal family history status was not associated with these outcomes. CONCLUSIONS A maternal family history of diabetes confers relative protection against cardiovascular disease in female patients but not in male patients with type 2 diabetes. Paternal family history is associated with risks equivalent to those without a family history of diabetes. Some of the clinical heterogeneity of type 2 diabetes is related to maternal transmission effects with differential impact on male and female patients. PMID:20368412

  9. Rare neonatal diabetes insipidus and associated late risks: Case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most cases of neonatal central diabetes insipidus are caused by an injury, which often results in other handicaps in the patient. The infant’s prognosis will be determined by his or her own early age and disability as well as by the physician’s skill. However, the rarity of this condition prevents the acquisition of personal experience dealing with it. Case Presentation A neonatal hemorrhagic stroke, caused by an aortic coarctation, caused right lower limb paresis, swallowing disability, and central diabetes insipidus in a term infant. The scant oral intake, as a consequence of his disability, caused progressive undernutrition which closed a vicious circle, delaying his development and his ability to overcome the swallowing handicap. On the other hand, nasal desmopressin absorption was blocked by several common colds, resulting in brain bleeding because of severe dehydration. This even greater brain damage hampered the improvement of swallowing, closing a second harmful circle. Moreover, a devastating central myelinolysis with quadriplegia, caused by an uncontrolled intravenous infusion, consummated a pernicious sequence, possibly unreported. Conclusions The child’s overall development advanced rapidly when his nutrition was improved by gastrostomy: This was a key effect of nutrition on his highly sensitive neurodevelopment. Besides, this case shows potential risks related to intranasal desmopressin treatment in young children. PMID:22639945

  10. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. Methods: In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. Results: The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2–4.1). Conclusions: There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity. PMID:26605019

  11. Risk Factors for and Barriers to Control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi Population

    PubMed Central

    Alneami, Yahya Mari; Coleman, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is dramatically increasing in urban areas within Saudi Arabia. Hence, Type-2 Diabetes has now become the most common public health problem. Understanding the major risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes may lead to strategies to prevent, control, and reduce in the burden of disease cases. Objective: To describe risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Methods: The literature search was conducted on risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia using the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar (2007-2015). The literature search yielded 80 articles, of which 70 articles were included in this review after excluding non-relevant articles. Results: The literature review revealed that obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, and aging are the major risk factors for Type-2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Further, the review allocated a complex set of barriers including, lack of education, social support, and healthy environment. These barriers may hinder Saudis with Type-2 Diabetes from controlling their disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is high among the Saudi population and represents a major public health problem. Effective research programs are needed to address the modifiable risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi population. PMID:27157156

  12. The association of hypertension and diabetes: prevalence, cardiovascular risk and protection by blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Mancia, G

    2005-04-01

    Diabetes and hypertension frequently coexist, and their combination provides additive increases in the risk of life-threatening cardiovascular events. Recent guidelines agree on the need for early, aggressive reduction of blood pressure, with a goal of <130/80 mmHg, in patients with diabetes. The mechanism that underpins the increased sensitivity of diabetic subjects to hypertension is not known, but may involve impaired autoregulation or attenuated nocturnal decrease of blood pressure. All classes of antihypertensive agents are effective in reducing blood pressure in diabetic subjects, and all show evidence of a concomitant reduction in cardiovascular risk. Although there is some evidence that agents that interrupt the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) provide greater protective effects, the data are not conclusive. However, most diabetic subjects will require combination therapy to reach goal blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs can also significantly influence the probability that otherwise healthy individuals will develop metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. While diuretics and betablockers have a prodiabetic effect, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers may prevent diabetes more effectively than the metabolically neutral calcium channel blockers. Given that diabetes is an important cardiovascular risk factor, there is the potential for reductions in risk due to reduced blood pressure to be offset by an increased risk due to the development of diabetes. Such concerns should be considered in the selection of antihypertensive therapy. PMID:15868115

  13. Do Variants Associated with Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Reciprocally Affect Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lang; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility. Methods Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan) were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Using the PanScan datasets, we tested for association of 38 variants within 37 genomic regions known to be susceptibility factors for type 2 diabetes. We further examined whether type 2 diabetes variants predispose to pancreatic cancer risk stratified by diabetes status. Correspondingly, we examined the association of fourteen pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants within eight genomic regions in the GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes dataset. Results Four plausible associations of diabetes variants and pancreatic cancer risk were detected at a significance threshold of p = 0.05, and one pancreatic cancer susceptibility variant was associated with diabetes risk at threshold of p = 0.05, but none remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Currently identified GWAS susceptibility variants are unlikely to explain the potential shared genetic etiology between Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer. PMID:25658847

  14. Risks and benefits of weight loss in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Alpert, Martin A; Ventura, Hector O

    2015-01-01

    Obesity adversely affects many cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and increases the risk of most CVD, including heart failure (HF). HF is markedly increased in the setting of obesity. However, obese patients with HF have a better prognosis than lean patients with HF, which has been termed the obesity paradox. Therefore, the role of weight loss, which generally improves ventricular structure, systolic and diastolic ventricular function, and New York Heart Association functional class in HF, remains controversial. This article discusses the pros and cons of weight loss and differentiates purposeful (healthy) from nonpurposeful (unhealthy) weight loss.

  15. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  16. Accelerating bleaching in vitiligo: balancing benefits versus risks.

    PubMed

    Seneschal, Julien; Boniface, Katia; Ezzedine, Khaled; Taieb, Alain

    2014-12-01

    While the goal of available treatment in vitiligo is to regain pigmentation, some patients affected by extensive and treatment-resistant vitiligo, with a major social and emotional impact, may benefit from depigmentation therapy. However, results from such therapy may not always be satisfactory. So to achieve better, faster and complete bleaching, Webb et al. propose a synergistic approach that combines topical application of bleaching phenols which targets melanocytes and initiate local inflammation with immune adjuvants so as to obtain an enhanced immune response against remaining melanocytes. This strategy could be reliable, but should be evaluated cautiously in future studies, in terms of potential side effects and induction of undesired autoimmunity.

  17. Psychopharmacology in Medical Practice—The Benefits and the Risks

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Robert L.; Shore, James H.

    1981-01-01

    Psychopharmacology has become a major approach to treatment in primary medical care. However, combined psychiatric and medical illness can give rise to some challenging diagnostic problems. Furthermore, drug treatment of patients with such illnesses can involve important drug-disease interactions and drug-drug interactions. One should keep in mind the issues that arise when an emotionally troubled patient would benefit from a psychotropic drug but a concurrent medical illness complicates this treatment. An awareness of both the medical and psychiatric issues involved may make successful treatment possible. PMID:7269559

  18. Ethnic disparities in the association of body mass index with the risk of hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Robert J; Chou, Christina; Sinha, Sidhartha R; Kamal, Ahmad; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2014-06-01

    Despite having lower body mass index (BMI) compared to other ethnic groups, Asians continue to develop significant metabolic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. To evaluate the disparate association of BMI and risk of hypertension and diabetes in Asians. We retrospectively studied 150,753 adults from the 1985-2011 California Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Trends in prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes were stratified by ethnicity. Multivariate logistic regression models evaluated the incremental effect of one unit BMI increase on risk of hypertension and diabetes and the disparate risks of hypertension and diabetes at different BMI thresholds. Asians had the lowest BMI among all groups. However, the impact of increasing BMI on risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly greater in Asians. For each one unit increase in BMI, Asians were significantly more likely to have hypertension (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18) compared to non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Similar trends were seen for diabetes (Asians: OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18). The risk of hypertension in Asians with BMI ≥ 22 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 27 and blacks with BMI ≥ 28. The risk of diabetes in Asians with BMI ≥ 28 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 30. Despite lower overall BMI compared to other groups, weight gain in Asians is associated with significantly higher risks of hypertension and diabetes. Compared to other ethnic groups, similar risks of hypertension and diabetes are seen in Asians at much lower BMI.

  19. Balancing the gastrointestinal benefits and risks of nonselective NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used classes of medications to treat pain and inflammation. However, gastrointestinal complications associated with NSAIDs are prevalent, largely due to the frequent use of these agents. Adverse events associated with NSAIDs include minor side effects, such as dyspepsia, as well as serious complications, such as bleeding and perforation. Although the probability that any given individual user of an NSAID will suffer a serious gastrointestinal complication is fairly low, widespread patient exposure can translate into a major national health burden. The increasing use of aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular events and the availability of select over-the-counter NSAIDs represent additional challenges to clinicians in their efforts to make the most appropriate therapeutic decisions while minimizing the potential gastrointestinal risks associated with the use of these agents. Side effects such as dyspepsia do not provide adequate warning of gastrointestinal complications, because most complications occur without the presence of antecedent symptoms. Therefore, accurate risk assessment and the management of controllable risk factors are crucial to the safe administration of NSAIDs. This review focuses on the gastrointestinal effects of aspirin, acetaminophen, and other nonselective NSAIDs, and discusses those factors that are associated with increased risk for adverse gastrointestinal events in certain individuals. PMID:16168079

  20. Risks and benefits of bariatric surgery: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Brethauer, Stacy A; Chand, Bipan; Schauer, Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Patients typically lose more than 50% of their excess weight after bariatric surgery. Obesity-related diseases markedly improve, reducing cardiovascular risk and improving life expectancy. Obese patients lose more weight with bariatric surgery than with medical weight-loss treatment.

  1. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child.

  2. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child. PMID:25885278

  3. Integrated genomic and BMI analysis for type 2 diabetes risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lebrón-Aldea, Dayanara; Dhurandhar, Emily J.; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Klimentidis, Yann C.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Vazquez, Ana I.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease arising from the development of insulin absence or resistance within the body, and a complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors. The incidence of T2D has increased throughout the last few decades, together with the occurrence of the obesity epidemic. The consideration of variants identified by Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) into risk assessment models for T2D could aid in the identification of at-risk patients who could benefit from preventive medicine. In this study, we build several risk assessment models, evaluated with two different classification approaches (Logistic Regression and Neural Networks), to measure the effect of including genetic information in the prediction of T2D. We used data from to the Original and the Offspring cohorts of the Framingham Heart Study, which provides phenotypic and genetic information for 5245 subjects (4306 controls and 939 cases). Models were built by using several covariates: gender, exposure time, cohort, body mass index (BMI), and 65 SNPs associated to T2D. We fitted Logistic Regressions and Bayesian Regularized Neural Networks and then assessed their predictive ability by using a ten-fold cross validation. We found that the inclusion of genetic information into the risk assessment models increased the predictive ability by 2%, when compared to the baseline model. Furthermore, the models that included BMI at the onset of diabetes as a possible effector, gave an improvement of 6% in the area under the curve derived from the ROC analysis. The highest AUC achieved (0.75) belonged to the model that included BMI, and a genetic score based on the 65 established T2D-associated SNPs. Finally, the inclusion of SNPs and BMI raised predictive ability in all models as expected; however, results from the AUC in Neural Networks and Logistic Regression did not differ significantly in their prediction accuracy. PMID:25852736

  4. Interactions Between Race/Ethnicity and Anthropometry in Risk of Incident Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lutsey, Pamela L.; Pereira, Mark A.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Kandula, Namratha R.; Jacobs, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how adiposity influences racial/ethnic differences in diabetes incidence by exploring whether relations between anthropometric measures and incident diabetes vary by race/ethnicity. Data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis initiated in 2000 (n = 5,446 US men and women aged 45–84 years) were analyzed by using proportional hazards and Poisson regression. The diabetes incidence rate was 2/100 person-years (n = 479 cases). Interactions were present between race and anthropometry (P-interaction(race × body mass index) = 0.002). The slope of incident diabetes per anthropometric unit was greatest for Chinese, less for whites and Hispanics, and still less for blacks. For small waist, risk of incident diabetes was <1/100 person-years for all racial/ethnic groups. At intermediate waist levels, Chinese had the highest and whites the lowest rates of incident diabetes. At the respective 95th percentiles of waist circumference, risk of incident diabetes per 100 person-years was 3.9 for Chinese (104 cm), 3.5 for whites (121 cm), 5.0 for blacks (125 cm), and 5.3 for Hispanics (121 cm). Adiposity influenced relative diabetes occurrence across racial/ethnic groups, in that Chinese had a steeper diabetes risk per unit of adiposity. However, the generally low level of adiposity in Chinese led to a relatively low diabetes occurrence. PMID:20570825

  5. A Bayesian approach to probabilistic sensitivity analysis in structured benefit-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Waddingham, Ed; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Nixon, Richard; Ashby, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative decision models such as multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) can be used in benefit-risk assessment to formalize trade-offs between benefits and risks, providing transparency to the assessment process. There is however no well-established method for propagating uncertainty of treatment effects data through such models to provide a sense of the variability of the benefit-risk balance. Here, we present a Bayesian statistical method that directly models the outcomes observed in randomized placebo-controlled trials and uses this to infer indirect comparisons between competing active treatments. The resulting treatment effects estimates are suitable for use within the MCDA setting, and it is possible to derive the distribution of the overall benefit-risk balance through Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The method is illustrated using a case study of natalizumab for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

  6. What You Should Know about Hormone Therapy Health Risks and Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... HAT Y OU S HOULD K NOW A BOUT Hormone Therapy Health Risks and Benefits V aginal dryness ... Women _ s Health Ini- tiative in 1993 to study hormone effects. Researchers were expecting to find that hormones ...

  7. Oseltamivir for influenza infection in children: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a common disease affecting many children each year. In a number of cases, particularly in children <2 years old and in those with severe chronic underlying disease, influenza can be complicated by lower respiratory tract infections, acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, febrile seizures, dehydration or encephalopathy. Oseltamivir is the influenza virus drug that is most commonly studied in children for both the treatment and prevention of influenza. To avoid the risk that children with mild influenza or patients suffering from different viral infections receive oseltamivir, oseltamivir treatment should be recommended only in severe influenza cases, especially if confirmed by reliable laboratory tests. However, therapy must be initiated considering the risk of complications and the presence of severe clinical manifestations at age- and weight-appropriate doses. Because the vaccine remains the best option for preventing influenza and its complications, prophylaxis using oseltamivir should only be considered in select patients. PMID:26616633

  8. Quantitative analysis of the benefits and risks of consuming farmed and wild salmon.

    PubMed

    Foran, Jeffery A; Good, David H; Carpenter, David O; Hamilton, M Coreen; Knuth, Barbara A; Schwager, Steven J

    2005-11-01

    Contaminants in farmed Atlantic and wild Pacific salmon raise important questions about the competing health benefits and risks of fish consumption. A benefit-risk analysis was conducted to compare quantitatively the cancer and noncancer risks of exposure to organic contaminants in salmon with the (n-3) fatty acid-associated health benefits of salmon consumption. Recommended levels of (n-3) fatty acid intake, as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may be achieved by consuming farmed or wild salmon while maintaining an acceptable level of noncarcinogenic risk. However, the recommended level of EPA+DHA intake cannot be achieved solely from farmed or wild salmon while maintaining an acceptable level of carcinogenic risk. Although the benefit-risk ratio for carcinogens and noncarcinogens is significantly greater for wild Pacific salmon than for farmed Atlantic salmon as a group, the ratio for some subgroups of farmed salmon is on par with the ratio for wild salmon. This analysis suggests that risk of exposure to contaminants in farmed and wild salmon is partially offset by the fatty acid-associated health benefits. However, young children, women of child-bearing age, pregnant women, and nursing mothers not at significant risk for sudden cardiac death associated with CHD but concerned with health impairments such as reduction in IQ and other cognitive and behavioral effects, can minimize contaminant exposure by choosing the least contaminated wild salmon or by selecting other sources of (n-3) fatty acids.

  9. Non-invasive method to analyse the risk of developing diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rebeca N; Ferreira, Ana C B H; Ferreira, Danton D; Barbosa, Bruno H G

    2014-10-01

    Foot complications (diabetic foot) are among the most serious and costly complications of diabetes mellitus. Amputation of all or part of a lower extremity is usually preceded by a foot ulcer. To prevent diabetic foot, an automatic non-invasive method to identify patients with diabetes who have a high risk of developing diabetic foot is proposed. To design the proposed method, information concerning social scope and self-care of 153 diabetic patients was presented to the K-means clustering algorithm, which divided the data into two groups: high risk and low risk of developing diabetic foot. In the operational stage, the Euclidian distance from the information vector to the centroids of each group of risk is used as criterion for classification. Both real and simulated data were used to evaluate the method in which promising results were achieved with accuracy of 0.97 ± 0.06 for simulated data and 0.68 ± 0.16 considering the classification of specialists as the gold standard for real data. The method requires a simple computational processing and can be useful for basic health units to triage diabetic patients helping the health-care team to reduce the number of cases of diabetic foot. PMID:26609394

  10. Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults.

    PubMed

    Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Kamineni, Aruna; Cauley, Jane A; Robbins, John A; Fried, Linda F; Siscovick, David S; Harris, Tamara B; Newman, Anne B

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N = 5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years) were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG) ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years) were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9-20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1-12.9) and BMI ≥25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.7-11.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6-7.7), but similar for BMI ≥30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01-1.78). PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92-1.57)) and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04-1.10)) modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87-1.57)). Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions. PMID:21837239

  11. Non-invasive method to analyse the risk of developing diabetic foot

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rebeca N.; Ferreira, Ana C.B.H.; Barbosa, Bruno H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Foot complications (diabetic foot) are among the most serious and costly complications of diabetes mellitus. Amputation of all or part of a lower extremity is usually preceded by a foot ulcer. To prevent diabetic foot, an automatic non-invasive method to identify patients with diabetes who have a high risk of developing diabetic foot is proposed. To design the proposed method, information concerning social scope and self-care of 153 diabetic patients was presented to the K-means clustering algorithm, which divided the data into two groups: high risk and low risk of developing diabetic foot. In the operational stage, the Euclidian distance from the information vector to the centroids of each group of risk is used as criterion for classification. Both real and simulated data were used to evaluate the method in which promising results were achieved with accuracy of 0.97 ± 0.06 for simulated data and 0.68 ± 0.16 considering the classification of specialists as the gold standard for real data. The method requires a simple computational processing and can be useful for basic health units to triage diabetic patients helping the health-care team to reduce the number of cases of diabetic foot. PMID:26609394

  12. [Benefits and risks of urologic laparoscopic surgery in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L; Novák, K; Závada, J; Bízová, S; Stolz, J; Sedlácek, J; Dvorácek, J; Vraný, M

    2003-12-01

    The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of the laparoscopic operations, the number of which steadily rises in urology. The laparoscopic surgery is considered to be a benefit regarding the short postoperative hospital stay, painless postoperative course, and virtually non-existing postoperative paralytic ileus. As disadvantage are deemed the long learning curve for the operating personal, and high economical costs, which could be cut down only if short off-work period in productive population is included. In the paper, the pathophysiological guidelines are outlined and emphasized during the laparoscopic operation, which the surgical and anesthesiological teams have to have in mind. On the own cohort of patients, the numbers and types of operations are described, which have been done at our department.

  13. Diabetes mellitus: Possible risk and promoting factors of cholangiocarcinoma: Association of diabetes mellitus and cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saengboonmee, Charupong; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2015-06-01

    The highest incidence of Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a malignancy of bile duct epithelia, is in the Northeast of Thailand. The liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, is the known risk factor for CCA development in this region. Approximately 1% of O. viverrini infected individuals develop CCA. There could be other factors that influence the cholangiocarcinogenesis particularly in the O. viverrini infected individuals. The global epidemiological studies of risk factors for CCA in non-O. viverrini related patients indicated diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor of CCA. The molecular studies in many cancers indicated that high levels of glucose, insulin and an obese condition directly and indirectly enhanced growth of cancers. For O. viverrini associated CCA, there is limited information related to DM and CCA development. High mortality rates of CCA and DM, however, were reported in the same geographical areas of northeastern Thailand. Whether DM is a factor that enhances CCA development in O. viverrini infected individuals or promotes CCA progression are discussed in a perspective of epidemiological and molecular studies. PMID:25910864

  14. Novel Metabolic Markers for the Risk of Diabetes Development in American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Hyun, Noorie; Zeng, Donglin; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T.; Yu, Tianwei; Jones, Dean; He, Jiang; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify novel metabolic markers for diabetes development in American Indians. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using an untargeted high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we conducted metabolomics analysis of study participants who developed incident diabetes (n = 133) and those who did not (n = 298) from 2,117 normoglycemic American Indians followed for an average of 5.5 years in the Strong Heart Family Study. Relative abundances of metabolites were quantified in baseline fasting plasma of all 431 participants. Prospective association of each metabolite with risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) was examined using logistic regression adjusting for established diabetes risk factors. RESULTS Seven metabolites (five known and two unknown) significantly predict the risk of T2D. Notably, one metabolite matching 2-hydroxybiphenyl was significantly associated with an increased risk of diabetes, whereas four metabolites matching PC (22:6/20:4), (3S)-7-hydroxy-2′,3′,4′,5′,8-pentamethoxyisoflavan, or tetrapeptides were significantly associated with decreased risk of diabetes. A multimarker score comprising all seven metabolites significantly improved risk prediction beyond established diabetes risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS The findings suggest that these newly detected metabolites may represent novel prognostic markers of T2D in American Indians, a group suffering from a disproportionately high rate of T2D. PMID:25468946

  15. Does early intensive multifactorial therapy reduce modelled cardiovascular risk in individuals with screen-detected diabetes? Results from the ADDITION-Europe cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Black, J A; Sharp, S J; Wareham, N J; Sandbæk, A; Rutten, G E H M; Lauritzen, T; Khunti, K; Davies, M J; Borch-Johnsen, K; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2014-01-01

    Aims Little is known about the long-term effects of intensive multifactorial treatment early in the diabetes disease trajectory. In the absence of long-term data on hard outcomes, we described change in 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk in the 5 years following diagnosis, and quantified the impact of intensive treatment on 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at 5 years. Methods In a pragmatic, cluster-randomized, parallel-group trial in Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK, 3057 people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes were randomized by general practice to receive (1) routine care of diabetes according to national guidelines (1379 patients) or (2) intensive multifactorial target-driven management (1678 patients). Ten-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was calculated at baseline and 5 years using the UK Prospective Diabetes Study Risk Engine (version 3β). Results Among 2101 individuals with complete data at follow up (73.4%), 10-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was 27.3% (sd 13.9) at baseline and 21.3% (sd 13.8) at 5-year follow-up (intensive treatment group difference –6.9, sd 9.0; routine care group difference –5.0, sd 12.2). Modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk was lower in the intensive treatment group compared with the routine care group at 5 years, after adjustment for baseline cardiovascular disease risk and clustering (–2.0; 95% CI –3.1 to –0.9). Conclusions Despite increasing age and diabetes duration, there was a decline in modelled cardiovascular disease risk in the 5 years following diagnosis. Compared with routine care, 10-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was lower in the intensive treatment group at 5 years. Our results suggest that patients benefit from intensive treatment early in the diabetes disease trajectory, where the rate of cardiovascular disease risk progression may be slowed. PMID:24533664

  16. Metabolic effects of mulberry leaves: exploring potential benefits in type 2 diabetes and hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Hunyadi, A; Liktor-Busa, E; Márki, A; Martins, A; Jedlinszki, N; Hsieh, T J; Báthori, M; Hohmann, J; Zupkó, I

    2013-01-01

    The leaves of Morus alba L. have a long history in Traditional Chinese Medicine and also became valued by the ethnopharmacology of many other cultures. The worldwide known antidiabetic use of the drug has been suggested to arise from a complex combination effect of various constituents. Moreover, the drug is also a potential antihyperuricemic agent. Considering that type 2 diabetes and hyperuricemia are vice-versa in each other's important risk factors, the use of mulberry originated phytotherapeutics might provide an excellent option for the prevention and/or treatment of both conditions. Here we report a series of relevant in vitro and in vivo studies on the bioactivity of an extract of mulberry leaves and its fractions obtained by a stepwise gradient on silica gel. In vivo antihyperglycemic and antihyperuricemic activity, plasma antioxidant status, as well as in vitro glucose consumption by adipocytes in the presence or absence of insulin, xanthine oxidase inhibition, free radical scavenging activity, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation were tested. Known bioactive constituents of M. alba (chlorogenic acid, rutin, isoquercitrin, and loliolide) were identified and quantified from the HPLC-DAD fingerprint chromatograms. Iminosugar contents were investigated by MS/MS, 1-deoxynojirimycin was quantified, and amounts of 2-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-1-deoxynojirimicin and fagomine were additionally estimated.

  17. Risk of skin cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hui-Wen; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Lam, Hing-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence suggests that certain types of cancers are more common in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to investigate the risk of skin cancer in patients with DM in Taiwan. In this retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, the risk of developing overall skin cancer, including nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma, was compared by Poisson regression analysis and Cox regression analysis between the DM and non-DM cohorts. The DM cohort with newly diagnosed DM (n = 41,898) and a non-DM cohort were one-to-one matched by age, sex, index date, and comorbidities (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity). Compared with non-DM cohort statistically, for the people with DM aged ≥60 years, the incidence rates of overall skin cancer and NMSC were significantly higher (overall: DM/non-DM: number [n] = 99/76, incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.44, P = 0.02; NMSC: DM/non-DM: n = 94/66, IRR = 1.57, P = 0.005). By Cox regression analysis, the risk of developing overall skin cancer or NMSC was significantly higher after adjusting for sex, comorbidities, and overall diseases with immunosuppression status (overall: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.46, P = 0.01; NMSC: AHR = 1.6, P = 0.003). Other significant risk factors were older males for skin cancer (overall: AHR = 1.68, P = 0.001; NMSC: AHR = 1.59, P = 0.004; melanoma: AHR = 3.25, P = 0.04), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for NMSC (AHR = 1.44, P = 0.04), and coronary artery disease for melanoma (AHR = 4.22, P = 0.01). The risk of developing melanoma was lower in the DM cohort than in the non-DM cohort, but without significance (AHR = 0.56, P = 0.28; DM/non-DM: n = 5/10). The incidence rate and risk of developing overall skin cancer, including NMSC, was significantly higher in older adults with DM. Other significant risk factors for older

  18. Augmentation with antidepressants in schizophrenia treatment: benefit or risk

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ye-Meng; Zhang, Ming-Dao

    2015-01-01

    We focused on the application of antidepressants in schizophrenia treatment in this review. Augmentation of antidepressants with antipsychotics is a common clinical practice to treat resistant symptoms in schizophrenia, including depressive symptoms, negative symptoms, comorbid obsessive–compulsive symptoms, and other psychotic manifestations. However, recent systematic review of the clinical effects of antidepressants is lacking. In this review, we have selected and summarized current literature on the use of antidepressants in patients with schizophrenia; the patterns of use and effectiveness, as well as risks and drug–drug interactions of this clinical practice are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the treatment of depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:25834445

  19. Benefits and Risks of Fosaprepitant in Patients Receiving Emetogenic Regimens.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Wendy; Kinsley, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Fosaprepitant dimeglumine (Emend IV®) is an IV antiemetic that may be beneficial to patients receiving highly emetogenic regimens. Aprepitant (Emend®) is an oral medication that is administered for three consecutive days, whereas fosaprepitant is a single-dose IV medication that is administered on the day of chemotherapy for 20-30 minutes (depending on the IV access type). Fosaprepitant may be useful, yet it can also present a risk for hypersensitivity reactions and phlebitis. Oncology nurses must be aware of the signs and symptoms of these potential adverse events to properly care for their patients. 
. PMID:27668376

  20. [Benefits and limitations of risk assessment for criminal recidivism].

    PubMed

    Moulin, V; Gasser, J

    2012-09-19

    The legislatives evolutions imply an important recourse to the psychiatric expertise in order to evaluate the potential dangerousness of a subject. However, in spite of the development of techniques and tools for this evaluation, the dangerousness assessment of a subject is in practice extremely complex and discussed in the scientific literature. The evolution of the concept of dangerousness to the risk assessment involved a technicisation of this evaluation which should not make forget the limits of these tools and the need for restoring the subject, the meaning and the clinic in this evaluation.

  1. The Loss of Myocardial Benefit following Ischemic Preconditioning Is Associated with Dysregulation of Iron Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Berenshtein, Eduard; Eliashar, Ron; Chevion, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Whether the diabetic heart benefits from ischemic preconditioning (IPC), similar to the non-diabetic heart, is a subject of controversy. We recently proposed new roles for iron and ferritin in IPC-protection in Type 1-like streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat heart. Here, we investigated iron homeostasis in Cohen diabetic sensitive rat (CDs) that develop hyperglycemia when fed on a high-sucrose/low-copper diet (HSD), but maintain normoglycemia on regular-diet (RD). Control Cohen-resistant rats (CDr) maintain normoglycemia on either diet. The IPC procedure improved the post-ischemic recovery of normoglycemic hearts (CDr-RD, CDr-HSD and CDs-RD). CDs-HSD hearts failed to show IPC-associated protection. The recovery of these CDs-HSD hearts following I/R (without prior IPC) was better than their RD controls. During IPC ferritin levels increased in normoglycemic hearts, and its level was maintained nearly constant during the subsequent prolonged ischemia, but decayed to its baseline level during the reperfusion phase. In CDs-HSD hearts the baseline levels of ferritin and ferritin-saturation with iron were notably higher than in the controls, and remained unchanged during the entire experiment. This unique and abnormal pattern of post-ischemic recovery of CDs-HSD hearts is associated with marked changes in myocardial iron homeostasis, and suggests that iron and iron-proteins play a causative role/s in the etiology of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27458721

  2. The Loss of Myocardial Benefit following Ischemic Preconditioning Is Associated with Dysregulation of Iron Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinokur, Vladimir; Weksler-Zangen, Sarah; Berenshtein, Eduard; Eliashar, Ron; Chevion, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Whether the diabetic heart benefits from ischemic preconditioning (IPC), similar to the non-diabetic heart, is a subject of controversy. We recently proposed new roles for iron and ferritin in IPC-protection in Type 1-like streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat heart. Here, we investigated iron homeostasis in Cohen diabetic sensitive rat (CDs) that develop hyperglycemia when fed on a high-sucrose/low-copper diet (HSD), but maintain normoglycemia on regular-diet (RD). Control Cohen-resistant rats (CDr) maintain normoglycemia on either diet. The IPC procedure improved the post-ischemic recovery of normoglycemic hearts (CDr-RD, CDr-HSD and CDs-RD). CDs-HSD hearts failed to show IPC-associated protection. The recovery of these CDs-HSD hearts following I/R (without prior IPC) was better than their RD controls. During IPC ferritin levels increased in normoglycemic hearts, and its level was maintained nearly constant during the subsequent prolonged ischemia, but decayed to its baseline level during the reperfusion phase. In CDs-HSD hearts the baseline levels of ferritin and ferritin-saturation with iron were notably higher than in the controls, and remained unchanged during the entire experiment. This unique and abnormal pattern of post-ischemic recovery of CDs-HSD hearts is associated with marked changes in myocardial iron homeostasis, and suggests that iron and iron-proteins play a causative role/s in the etiology of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27458721

  3. Improving diabetes care and outcomes: the secondary benefits of a public health-managed care research collaboration.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Solberg, Leif; Clark, Cynthia; Reger, Laurel; Pearson, Teresa; Bishop, Don; Roberts, Martha; Sniegowski, Russ; O'Connor, Patrick

    2003-11-01

    The project improving Diabetes Care through Empowerment, Active Collaboration and Leadership (IDEAL) is a collaborative translational research project of the Minnesota Diabetes Program (MDP) at the Minnesota Department of Health and HealthPartners (HP), a large managed care organization. The research was designed to test a quality improvement model to improve diabetes care delivery and outcomes in primary care clinics, but the collaboration was structured from the beginning to maximize potential secondary effects. The MDP and HP participated jointly in every aspect of the project. Personnel from other health care systems and academic and quality improvement organizations also participated in IDEAL. Secondary effects included heightened priority for diabetes care improvement at HP and within its medical group, along with an increased emphasis on a population approach for both of these organizations. Simultaneously, the MDP developed a better understanding of the issues and potential for improving care in primary care clinics, medical groups, and managed care organizations. These benefits resulted in further collaboration between the MDP, HP, and other managed care, health care, and quality improvement organizations in Minnesota. Thus, Project IDEAL has been a successful collaboration of public health and managed care whose contribution to improved diabetes care in Minnesota health systems extends far beyond the original scope of the project.

  4. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension.

  5. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension. PMID:21222313

  6. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Megan L.; Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Lister, Natalie B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  7. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Lister, Natalie B

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  8. Exploring Diabetes Beliefs in At-Risk Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della, Lindsay J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies and describes perceptions of susceptibility and severity of diabetes; cultural beliefs, barriers, and knowledge about diabetes; and social stigma associated with diabetes in an Eastern Appalachian Kentucky population. Methods: A 55-item intercept survey was administered in 2 large retail outlets in Eastern Kentucky.…

  9. Lactate and Risk of Incident Diabetes in a Case-Cohort of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Shantha, Ghanshyam Palamaner Subash; Chu, Audrey Y.; Miller, Edgar R.; Guallar, Eliseo; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Pankow, James S.; Young, J. Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxidative capacity is decreased in type 2 diabetes. Whether decreased oxidative capacity is a cause or consequence of diabetes is unknown. Our purpose is to evaluate whether lactate, a marker of oxidative capacity, is associated with incident diabetes. Methods and Findings We conducted a case-cohort study in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study at year 9 of follow-up. We evaluated lactate’s association with diabetes risk factors at baseline and estimated the hazard ratio for incident diabetes by quartiles of plasma lactate in 544 incident diabetic cases and 533 non-cases. Plasma lactate showed a graded positive relationship with fasting glucose and insulin (P<0.001). The relative hazard for incident diabetes increased across lactate quartiles (P-trend ≤0.001). Following adjustment for demographic factors, medical history, physical activity, adiposity, and serum lipids, the hazard ratio in the highest quartile was 2.05 times the hazard in the lowest quartile (95% CI: 1.28, 3.28). After including fasting glucose and insulin the association became non-significant. Conclusions Lactate, an indicator of oxidative capacity, predicts incident diabetes independent of many other risk factors and is strongly related to markers of insulin resistance. Future studies should evaluate the temporal relationship between elevated lactate and impaired fasting glucose and insulin resistance. PMID:23383072

  10. BVDV vaccination in North America: risks versus benefits.

    PubMed

    Griebel, Philip J

    2015-06-01

    The control and prevention of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections has provided substantial challenges. Viral genetic variation, persistent infections, and viral tropism for immune cells have complicated disease control strategies. Vaccination has, however, provided an effective tool to prevent acute systemic infections and increase reproductive efficiency through fetal protection. There has been substantial controversy about the safety and efficacy of BVDV vaccines, especially when comparing killed versus modified-live viral (MLV) vaccines. Furthermore, numerous vaccination protocols have been proposed to protect the fetus and ensure maternal antibody transfer to the calf. These issues have been further complicated by reports of immune suppression during natural infections and following vaccination. While killed BVDV vaccines provide the greatest safety, their limited immunogenicity makes multiple vaccinations necessary. In contrast, MLV BVDV vaccines induce a broader range of immune responses with a longer duration of immunity, but require strategic vaccination to minimize potential risks. Vaccination strategies for breeding females and young calves, in the face of maternal antibody, are discussed. With intranasal vaccination of young calves it is possible to avoid maternal antibody interference and induce immune memory that persists for 6-8 months. Thus, with an integrated vaccination protocol for both breeding cows and calves it is possible to maximize disease protection while minimizing vaccine risks.

  11. Perceptions of Smoking-Related Risks and Benefits as Predictors of Adolescent Smoking Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Anna V.; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Cornell, Jodi L.; Ramos, Malena E.; Biehl, Michael; Kropp, Rhonda Y.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The predictive value of perceptions of smoking-related risks and benefits with regard to adolescent smoking initiation has not been adequately established. We used prospective, longitudinal data to directly test whether smoking-related perceptions predict smoking initiation among adolescents. Methods. We administered surveys assessing perceptions of smoking-related risks and benefits to 395 high school students, beginning at the start of their ninth-grade year. We conducted follow-up assessments every 6 months until the end of 10th grade, obtaining 4 waves of data. Results. Adolescents who held the lowest perceptions of long-term smoking-related risks were 3.64 times more likely to start smoking than were adolescents who held the highest perceptions of risk. Adolescents who held the lowest perceptions of short-term smoking-related risks were 2.68 times more likely to initiate. Adolescents who held the highest perceptions of smoking-related benefits were 3.31 times more likely to initiate. Conclusions. Findings from this study provide one of the first sets of empirical evidence to show that smoking initiation is directly related to smoking-related perceptions of risks and benefits. Thus, efforts to reduce adolescent smoking should continue to communicate the health risks of smoking and counteract perceptions of benefits associated with smoking. PMID:19106420

  12. Physiological and behavioral risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural India

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Anamitra; Mazumdar, Sumit; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Rai, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The dynamics of physiological and behavioral risk factors of diabetes in rural India is poorly understood. Using data from a health and demographic surveillance site of Birbhum district in West Bengal, India, this study aims to assess the risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods A total of 7674 individuals aged ≥18 years participated in a cross-sectional study. Venous plasma glucose method was used for measuring and reporting glucose concentrations in blood, categorized as individuals with diabetes, pre-diabetes or impaired, and normoglycemic. Aside from a set of physiological and behavioral risk factors, a range of socioeconomic confounders of diabetes was computed. Bivariate analysis with χ2 test, and multivariate ordered logit regression methods were deployed to attain the study's objective. Results Overall 2.95% and 3.34% of study participants were diagnosed as individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes or impaired, respectively. Compared to the poorest, the richest have higher probability (β: 0.730; 95% CI 0.378 to 1.083) of being diagnosed with diabetes. As compared to people with normal body mass index, overweight/obese people are more prone to being diagnosed with diabetes (β: 0.388; 95% CI 0.147 to 0.628). With a decreasing level of physical activity, people are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes. Conclusions To curb the level of diabetes, this study recommends a culturally sensitive, focused intervention for the adoption of physical activity with more traditional dietary practices, to control the level of overweight/obesity. Attention should be paid to relatively older patients with diabetes or adults with pre-diabetes. PMID:27547420

  13. Coping Skills Training in a Telephone Health Coaching Program for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Vanessa; Jaser, Sarah S.; Lindemann, Evie; Galasso, Pamela; Beale, Alison; Holl, Marita G.; Grey, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this paper is to describe components of a health coaching intervention based on coping skills training delivered via telephone. This intervention was provided to urban adolescents at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reinforcing a school-based curriculum designed to promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent T2DM. Method Health coaching via telephone was provided to at-risk, urban youth enrolled in a study of an intervention to reduce risk for T2DM. Vignettes are used to describe the use of several coping skills in this high risk youth population. Results A variety of vignettes illustrate how telephone health coaching reinforced lifestyle changes in students by incorporating coping skills training. Discussion Given the benefits and the challenges of the telephone health coaching intervention, several suggestions for others who plan to use a similar method are described. PMID:21514490

  14. Incidence and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in African Americans with diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Ayokanmi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Desvorieux, Moise; Pankow, James S.; Taylor, Herman

    2002-01-01

    To determine the incidence rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its association with conventional and less well-established risk factors in African Americans with diabetes, we studied 741 African Americans aged 45 to 64 years with diabetes, in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Risk factors were measured from 1987 to 1989, and incident CVD (n = 143 coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke events) was ascertained through 1998. The crude incidence rate (per 1000 person-years) of CVD was 22.5 (11.9 for CHD and 12.0 for stroke). After multivariate adjustments, total cholesterol, prevalent hypertension and current smoking were significantly and positively associated with incident CVD among these African Americans with diabetes. Among the non-conventional risk factors, serum creatinine, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and white blood cell count were positively and serum albumin negatively and independently associated with CVD incidence. Adjusted relative risks for highest versus lowest tertiles of these risk factors ranged from 1.77 to 2.13. This study confirms that the major risk factors (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and smoking) are important determinants of CVD in African Americans with diabetes. In addition, several blood markers of hemostasis or inflammatory response and elevated serum creatinine also proved to be CVD risk factors in African Americans with diabetes. PMID:12510702

  15. A comparative approach to using the diabetes prevention program to reduce diabetes risk in a worksite setting.

    PubMed

    Dallam, George M; Foust, Carol P

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly increasing rate of non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) among both market economy and developing countries is a worldwide health phenomenon. The number of diabetics worldwide has been projected to increase from 135 million in 1995 to 300 million in 2025. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effectiveness of three different approaches to the implementation of the Diabetes Prevention Program, a standardized diabetes prevention curriculum, in various worksite organizations within a single community. The methods of implementation selected included an intensive one-on-one counseling approach, a support group meeting approach, and a passive transfer of information approach. The intervention was successful in creating significant mean improvements overall in the participants who completed the 26-week program as follows: (a) reduction in overall mean body weight and mean body mass index, (b) reduction in overall average mean arterial blood pressure, (c) reduction in overall mean diabetes risk score, and (d) increase in overall mean physical activity level. Although the largest proportion of these changes occurred in the one-on-one intervention group, significant changes in some factors were found in all groups. This illustrates the utility of an on-site and incentive-driven approach to diabetes risk factor modification in the workplace.

  16. Dietary nitrate and nitrite: Benefits, risks, and evolving perceptions.

    PubMed

    Bedale, Wendy; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Milkowski, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Consumers have an illogical relationship with nitrite (and its precursor, nitrate) in food. Despite a long history of use, nitrite was nearly banned from use in foods in the 1970s due to health concerns related to the potential for carcinogenic nitrosamine formation. Changes in meat processing methods reduced those potential risks, and nitrite continued to be used in foods. Since then, two opposing movements continue to shape how consumers view dietary nitrate and nitrite. The discovery of the profound physiological importance of nitric oxide led to the realization that dietary nitrate contributes significantly to the nitrogen reservoir for nitric oxide formation. Numerous clinical studies have also demonstrated beneficial effects from dietary nitrate consumption, especially in vascular and metabolic health. However, the latest wave of consumer sentiment against food additives, the clean-label movement, has renewed consumer fear and avoidance of preservatives, including nitrite. Education is necessary but may not be sufficient to resolve this disconnect in consumer perception. PMID:26994928

  17. Bariatric surgery risks, benefits, and care of the morbidly obese.

    PubMed

    Owens, Tracy Martinez

    2006-06-01

    The American Society for Bariatric Surgery defines morbid obesity as a lifelong, progressive, life-threatening, genetically-related, costly, multi-factorial disease of excess fat storage with multiple comorbidities. Obesity satisfies the definition of morbid obesity when it reaches the point of significant risk for obesity-related comorbidities. These significant comorbidities often result in either significant physical disability or even death. Obesity results from excessive accumulation of fat that exceeds the body skeletal and physical standards. Morbid obesity is defined as being at least 100 lb heavier than ideal body weight, or a body mass index (BMI) of 40. BMI is calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared. This article focuses on the causes, treatment, and perioperative nursing care of patients who are morbidly obese.

  18. Risk of Hand Syndromes in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Yi; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Wang, Liang-Yi; Kuo, Ken N.; Jou, I-Ming; Hou, Wen-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the overall and cause-specific incidences of diabetic hand syndromes (DHS) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) by using age and sex stratifications. The DM and control cohorts comprised 606,152 patients with DM and 609,970 age- and sex-matched subjects, respectively, who were followed up from 2000 to 2008. We estimated the incidence densities (IDs) of overall and cause-specific DHS, namely carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), stenosing flexor tenosynovitis (SFT), limited joint mobility (LJM), and Dupuytren disease (DD), and calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) of DHS in relation to DM by using a Cox proportional hazards model with adjustment for potential confounders. Over a 9-year period, 51,207 patients with DM (8.45%) and 39,153 matched controls (6.42%) sought ambulatory care visits for various DHS, with an ID of 117.7 and 80.7 per 10,000 person-years, respectively. The highest cause-specific ID was observed for CTS, followed by SFT, LJM, and DD, regardless of the diabetic status. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with DM had a significantly high HR of overall DHS (1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.48–1.53). Men and women aged <35 years had the highest HR (2.64, 95% CI = 2.15–3.24 and 2.99, 95% CI = 2.55–3.50, respectively). Cause-specific analyses revealed that DM was more strongly associated with SFT (HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.86–1.95) and DD (HR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.39–2.39) than with CTS (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.28–1.34) and LJM (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13–1.35). Men and younger patients with DM have the highest risk of DHS. Certain hand syndromes, such as SFT and DD, were more strongly associated with DM than with other syndromes and require the attention of clinicians. PMID:26469895

  19. Addressing Benefits, Risks and Consent in Next Generation Sequencing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Meller, R

    2016-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome and technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to a revolution with respect to DNA sequencing and its potential to diagnose genetic disorders. However, requests for open access to genomic data must be balanced against the guiding principles of the Common Rule for human subject research. Unfortunately, the risks to patients involved in genomic studies are still evolving and as such may not be clear to learned and well-intentioned scientists. Central to this issue are the strategies that enable human participants in such studies to remain anonymous, or de-identified. The wealth of genomic data on the Internet in genomic data repositories and other databases has enabled de-identified data to be broken and research subjects to be identified. The security of de-identification neglects the fact that DNA itself is an identifying element. Therefore, it is questionable whether data security standards can ever truly protect the identity of a patient, under the current conditions or in the future. As Big Data methodologies advance, additional sources of data may enable the re-identification of patients enrolled in next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies. As such, it is time to re-evaluate the risks of sharing genomic data and establish new guidelines for good practices. In this commentary, I address the challenges facing federally funded investigators who need to strike a balance between compliance with federal (US) rules for human subjects and the recent requirement for open access/sharing of data from National Institute for Health (NIH)-funded studies involving human subjects. PMID:27375922

  20. Outcomes of Combined Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management Strategies in Type 2 Diabetes: The ACCORD Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Karen L.; O’Connor, Patrick J.; Morgan, Timothy M.; Buse, John B.; Cohen, Robert M.; Cushman, William C.; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Evans, Gregory W.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Grimm, Richard H.; Lipkin, Edward W.; Narayan, K.M.Venkat; Riddle, Matthew C.; Sood, Ajay; Goff, David C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare effects of combinations of standard and intensive treatment of glycemia and either blood pressure (BP) or lipids in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS ACCORD enrolled 10,251 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40–79 years at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Participants were randomly assigned to hemoglobin A1c goals of <6.0% (<42 mmol/mol; intensive glycemia) or 7.0–7.9% (53–63 mmol/mol; standard glycemia) and then randomized a second time to either 1) systolic BP goals of <120 mmHg (intensive BP) or <140 mmHg (standard BP) or 2) simvastatin plus fenofibrate (intensive lipid) or simvastatin plus placebo (standard lipid). Proportional hazards models were used to assess combinations of treatment assignments on the composite primary (deaths due to CVD, nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI], and nonfatal stroke) and secondary outcomes. RESULTS In the BP trial, risk of the primary outcome was lower in the groups intensively treated for glycemia (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67; 95% CI 0.50–0.91), BP (HR 0.74; 95% CI 0.55–1.00), or both (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.52–0.96) compared with combined standard BP and glycemia treatment. For secondary outcomes, MI was significantly reduced by intensive glycemia treatment and stroke by intensive BP treatment; most other HRs were neutral or favored intensive treatment groups. In the lipid trial, the general pattern of results showed no evidence of benefit of intensive regimens (whether single or combined) compared with combined standard lipid and glycemia treatment. The mortality HR was 1.33 (95% CI 1.02–1.74) in the standard lipid/intensive glycemia group compared with the standard lipid/standard glycemia group. CONCLUSIONS In the ACCORD BP trial, compared with combined standard treatment, intensive BP or intensive glycemia treatment alone improved major CVD outcomes, without additional benefit from combining the two. In the ACCORD lipid

  1. Balancing benefits and risks in patients receiving incretin-based therapies: focus on cardiovascular and pancreatic side effects.

    PubMed

    Haluzík, Martin; Mráz, Miloš; Svačina, Štěpán

    2014-12-01

    Incretin-based therapies either increase endogenous levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 by prolonging its half-life (DPP-4 inhibitors) or directly stimulate its receptor (glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues; GLP-1 RA). They are currently widely used for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus owing to good antidiabetic efficacy, low risk of hypoglycemia, and relatively few other side effects. They also offer potential additional benefits such as weight neutrality or weight loss, positive effects on blood pressure and lipid levels, and potential cardio- and neuroprotectivity. Some experimental and clinical studies have raised concerns with respect to potential cardiovascular and pancreatic side effects of these therapies such as increased risk of heart failure with DPP-4 inhibitors as well as acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer with both classes. The available data are at present not robust enough to enable firm conclusions regarding these potential associations. Nevertheless, some recent data suggest a possibility of slightly increased risk of acute pancreatitis with GLP-1 RAs while they do not indicate increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials will shed more light on the possible cardioprotective effects of incretin-based therapies as well as on the possible interconnection of DPP-4 inhibitors and heart failure.

  2. Risks and benefits of removal of impacted third molars. A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mercier, P; Precious, D

    1992-02-01

    A critical review of the literature about risks and benefits of the removal of impacted 3rd molar teeth is presented in 4 categories: risk of non-intervention, risk of intervention, benefit of non-intervention and benefit of intervention. There are well-defined criteria for removal of impacted 3rd molar teeth. Absolute indications and contra-indications for the removal of asymptomatic 3rd molar teeth cannot be established because no long-term studies exist which validate the benefit to the patient either of early removal or of deliberate retention of these teeth. The prudent course of action for the clinician to follow is based on rational clinical decision-making using traditional methods of evaluation to effect the optimal outcome, keeping the interests of the individual patient above all else. PMID:1569360

  3. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the "foot at risk" to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-04-10

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities.

  4. Effects of Physical Activity on Diabetes Management and Lowering Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Connie L.; Soros, Arlette; Sothern, Melinda S.; Vargas, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is a proven form of diabetes management and is considered a cornerstone in the prevention of diabetes. In children with diabetes, physical activity may improve insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Aerobic-based physical activity lasting 40-60 minutes daily for a minimum of four months is shown to enhance…

  5. Cost benefit and risk assessment for selected tank waste process testing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, K.A.

    1995-05-22

    The US Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program to safely manage wastes currently stored in underground tank at the Hanford Site. A TWRS testing and development strategy was recently developed to define long-range TWRS testing plans. The testing and development strategy considered four alternatives. The primary variable in the alternatives is the level of pilot-scale testing involving actual waste. This study evaluates the cost benefit and risks associated with the four alternatives. Four types of risk were evaluated: programmatic schedule risk, process mishap risk, worker risk, and public health risk. The structure of this report is as follows: Section 1 introduces the report subject; Section 2 describes the test strategy alternative evaluation; Section 3 describes the approach used in this study to assess risk and cost benefit; Section 4 describes the assessment methodologies for costs and risks; Section 5 describes the bases and assumptions used to estimate the costs and risks; Section 6 presents the detailed costs and risks; and Section 7 describes the results of the cost benefit analysis and presents conclusions.

  6. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for gastrointestinal cancers among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Juhua; Chlebowski, Rowan; Liu, Simin; McGlynn, Katherine A; Parekh, Niyati; White, Donna L; Margolis, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    Background While diabetes has been linked to several cancers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, findings have been mixed for sites other than colorectal and liver cancer. We used the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) data and conducted a comprehensive assessment of associations between diabetes and GI malignancy (esophagus, stomach, liver, biliary, pancreas, colon and rectal). Methods 145,765 postmenopausal women ages 50-79 enrolled in the WHI were followed for a mean 10.3 years. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between GI cancers and diagnosed diabetes, including its duration and treatment. Results Diabetes at enrollment was associated with increased risk for liver (HR = 3.00 95% CI 1.68-5.36), pancreatic (HR=1.64 95% CI: 1.16-2.33), colon (HR=1.37 95% CI: 1.13-1.65) and rectal (HR=1.90, 95%CI: 1.24-2.90) cancer. Diabetes severity, assessed by duration or need for pharmacotherapy, appeared to have stronger links to risk of liver, pancreatic and rectal cancer, but not colon cancer. There was no statistically significant association of diabetes with biliary, esophageal and stomach cancers. Conclusion Type 2 diabetes is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancers of the liver, pancreas, colon and rectum in postmenopausal women. Diabetes severity may further increase risk of pancreatic, liver and rectal cancer. Impact This study confirmed that diabetes increases risk of cancers of the liver, pancreas, colon and rectum. The suggestion that diabetes severity further increases these cancer risks requires future studies. PMID:22622863

  7. Health benefits of 'grow your own' food in urban areas: implications for contaminated land risk assessment and risk management?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Compelling evidence of major health benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and outdoor interaction with 'greenspace' have emerged in the past decade - all of which combine to give major potential health benefits from 'grow-your-own' (GYO) in urban areas. However, neither current risk assessment models nor risk management strategies for GYO in allotments and gardens give any consideration to these health benefits, despite their potential often to more than fully compensate the risks. Although urban environments are more contaminated by heavy metals, arsenic, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins than most rural agricultural areas, evidence is lacking for adverse health outcomes of GYO in UK urban areas. Rarely do pollutants in GYO food exceed statutory limits set for commercial food, and few people obtain the majority of their food from GYO. In the UK, soil contamination thresholds triggering closure or remediation of allotment and garden sites are based on precautionary principles, generating 'scares' that may negatively impact public health disproportionately to the actual health risks of exposure to toxins through own-grown food. By contrast, the health benefits of GYO are a direct counterpoint to the escalating public health crisis of 'obesity and sloth' caused by eating an excess of saturated fats, inadequate consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables combined with a lack of exercise. These are now amongst the most important preventable causes of illness and death. The health and wider societal benefits of 'grow-your-own' thus reveal a major limitation in current risk assessment methodologies which, in only considering risks, are unable to predict whether GYO on particular sites will, overall, have positive, negative, or no net effects on human health. This highlights a more general need for a new generation of risk assessment tools that also predict overall consequences for health to more effectively guide risk management in our

  8. Nutrients and Chemical Pollutants in Fish and Shellfish. Balancing Health Benefits and Risks of Regular Fish Consumption.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns and lifestyle factors are clearly associated with at least five of the ten leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease, certain types of cancer, stroke, non-insulin insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis. Concerning specifically fish and seafood consumption, its beneficial health effects in humans are clearly supported by an important number of studies performed in the last 30 years. These studies have repeatedly linked fish consumption, especially those species whose contents in omega-3 fatty acids are high, with healthier hearts in the aging population. The nutritional benefits of fish and seafood are also due to the content of high-quality protein, vitamins, as well as other essential nutrients. However, a number of studies, particularly investigations performed in recent years, have shown that the unavoidable presence of environmental contaminants in fish and shellfish can also mean a certain risk for the health of some consumers. While prestigious international associations as the American Heart Association have recommended eating fish at least two times (two servings a week), based on our own experimental results, as well as in results from other laboratories, we cannot be in total agreement with that recommendation. Although a regular consumption of most fish and shellfish species should not mean adverse health effects for the consumers, the specific fish and shellfish species consumed, the frequency of consumption, as well as the meal size, are essential issues for adequately balancing the health benefits and risks of regular fish consumption.

  9. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics.

  10. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics.

  11. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics. PMID:25825221

  12. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics. PMID:26031458

  13. Prevalence of Pre-Diabetes and Its Associated Risk Factors in Rural Areas of Ningbo, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Hongbo; Yuan, Yanyan; Wang, Fuyan; Xi, Yang; Wen, Li Ming; Shen, Peng; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and explore its associated risk factors in rural areas of Ningbo, China. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 4583 adult residents in rural areas of Ningbo, China between March and May 2013. The survey used a multi-stage, stratified, cluster sampling method. Data collected included demographics and medical history, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood lipid, and plasma glucose. After at least 10 h of overnight fasting, participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to identify pre-diabetes. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associated risk factors for pre-diabetes, and to estimate the effect of interaction between the factors. Results: There were 1307 survey participants having pre-diabetes (28.52%) and the age-standardized prevalence was 30.53%. Multivariate logistic regression results showed that overweight/obesity, hypertension, and higher triglycerides were the risk factors for developing pre-diabetes. There were positive interactions between overweight/obesity and triglycerides, and also between hypertension and triglycerides on the multiplicative scale, suggesting that they synergistically influenced the development of pre-diabetes. Conclusions: The rural areas in Ningbo had a high prevalence of pre-diabetes. Overweight and obesity, hypertension, and elevated triglycerides were the major risk factors. There is a need of early intervention for preventing pre-diabetes. PMID:27517947

  14. Natural Products for the Prevention and Alleviation of Risk Factors for Diabetes: Chromium and Cinnamon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are widespread for the alleviation and prevention of the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We have shown that glucose, insulin, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels are all improved in people with type 2 diabetes following chromium supplementation in a double-b...

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population

    PubMed Central

    Abi Khalil, Charbel; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Robay, Amal; Ramstetter, Monica D.; Al-Azwani, Iman K.; Malek, Joel A.; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Nabet Al-Marri, Ajayeb; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Al-Shakaki, Alya; Chidiac, Omar; Gharbiah, Maey; Bener, Abdulbari; Stadler, Dora; Hackett, Neil R.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians. Methods All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124) and controls (n = 590) were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1), Persian/South Asian (Q2) and African (Q3)]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%), the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR) for T2D SNPs in Qatari’s is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations. Results Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565), both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565) was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations. Conclusions With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting

  16. A new proposal for benefit-less-risk analysis in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chuang-Stein, C

    1994-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to discount the observed benefit of a treatment by the observed risk in order to facilitate the benefit-less-risk comparison of treatments in a clinical trial. The discounting, applied to each individual in a trial, utilizes a method proposed by Chuang-Stein and co-authors to consolidate the safety data collected in the trial. The collating of the safety information allows one to estimate quantitatively the risk experienced by each individual, and therefore enables the construction of a risk-adjusted benefit measure for the same individual. We discuss the rationale for the adjusting method and examine its impact on the inference. When the discounting process reflects an individual's choice, the results should be interpreted at the individual level. An example is given to illustrate the approach. PMID:7908619

  17. [Benefits of large healthcare databases for drug risk research].

    PubMed

    Garbe, Edeltraut; Pigeot, Iris

    2015-08-01

    Large electronic healthcare databases have become an important worldwide data resource for drug safety research after approval. Signal generation methods and drug safety studies based on these data facilitate the prospective monitoring of drug safety after approval, as has been recently required by EU law and the German Medicines Act. Despite its large size, a single healthcare database may include insufficient patients for the study of a very small number of drug-exposed patients or the investigation of very rare drug risks. For that reason, in the United States, efforts have been made to work on models that provide the linkage of data from different electronic healthcare databases for monitoring the safety of medicines after authorization in (i) the Sentinel Initiative and (ii) the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP). In July 2014, the pilot project Mini-Sentinel included a total of 178 million people from 18 different US databases. The merging of the data is based on a distributed data network with a common data model. In the European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance (ENCEPP) there has been no comparable merging of data from different databases; however, first experiences have been gained in various EU drug safety projects. In Germany, the data of the statutory health insurance providers constitute the most important resource for establishing a large healthcare database. Their use for this purpose has so far been severely restricted by the Code of Social Law (Section 75, Book 10). Therefore, a reform of this section is absolutely necessary. PMID:26092163

  18. Extreme Conditioning Programs: Potential Benefits and Potential Risks.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    and minimize the risk of overuse injuries.

  19. Extreme Conditioning Programs: Potential Benefits and Potential Risks.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    and minimize the risk of overuse injuries. PMID:26360365

  20. The impact of high-risk drivers and benefits of limiting their driving degree of freedom.

    PubMed

    Habtemichael, Filmon G; de Picado-Santos, Luis

    2013-11-01

    The perception of drivers regarding risk-taking behaviour is widely varied. High-risk drivers are the segment of drivers who are disproportionately represented in the majority of crashes. This study examines the typologies of drivers in risk-taking behaviour, the common high-risk driving errors (speeding, close following, abrupt lane-changing and impaired driving), their safety consequences and the technological (ITS) devices for their detection and correction. Limiting the driving degree of freedom of high-risk drivers is proposed and its benefits on safety as well as traffic operations are quantified using VISSIM microscopic traffic simulation at various proportions of high-risk drivers; namely, 4%, 8% and 12%. Assessment of the safety benefits was carried out by using the technique of simulated vehicle conflicts which was validated against historic crashes, and reduction in travel time was used to quantify the operational benefits. The findings imply that limiting the freedom of high-risk drivers resulted in a reduction of crashes by 12%, 21% and 27% in congested traffic conditions; 9%, 13% and 18% in lightly congested traffic conditions as well as 9%, 10% and 17% in non-congested traffic conditions for high-risk drivers in proportions of 4%, 8% and 12% respectively. Moreover, the surrogate safety measures indicated that there was a reduction in crash severity levels. The operational benefits amounted to savings of nearly 1% in travel time for all the proportions of high-risk drivers considered. The study concluded that limiting the freedom of high-risk drivers has safety and operational benefits; though there could be social, legal and institutional concerns for its practical implementation.

  1. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Ibrahim, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk. PMID:26989695

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and pregnancy: A review of maternal, fetal and neonatal risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Marchocki, Zbigniew; Russell, Noirin E

    2013-01-01

    Depression is common in women of childbearing age. Whereas non-pharmacological interventions are recommended as first line interventions, pharmacological treatment may be required. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed antidepressants in pregnancy. Ideally, discussion of the risks and benefits of SSRI use in pregnancy should occur prior to pregnancy. The potential risks of psychotropic medications need to be balanced against the risks associated with untreated psychiatric conditions and the discontinuation of necessary medications.

  3. Immunization against poliomyelitis: risk/benefit/cost in a changing context.

    PubMed

    Salk, J

    1979-01-01

    Benefit/risk factors in immunization against poliomyelitis are examined from the viewpoint of the relative risk and efficacy of killed and live poliovirus vaccines in the currently changing contexts of poliomyelitis prevalence in developed and developing countries. Risk factors include virus of vaccine origin gaining access to the CNS, and failure of the vaccine to immunize. Data are presented to illustrate the degree to which the respective risks occur in developed and developing countries. The ultimate elimination of risk by eradication of wild and vaccine virus from the population is discussed.

  4. HbA1c Alone Is a Poor Indicator of Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Subjects with Pre-Diabetes but Is Suitable for Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Seán R.; Perry, Ivan J.; Phillips, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement is recommended as an alternative to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for the diagnosis of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. However, evidence suggests discordance between HbA1c and FPG. In this study we examine a range of metabolic risk features, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute-phase response proteins, coagulation factors and white blood cell counts to determine which assay more accurately identifies individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 2,047 men and women aged 46-73 years. Binary and multinomial logistic regression were employed to examine risk feature associations with pre-diabetes [either HbA1c levels 5.7-6.4% (39-46 mmol/mol) or impaired FPG levels 5.6-6.9 mmol/l] and type 2 diabetes [either HbA1c levels >6.5% (>48 mmol/mol) or FPG levels >7.0 mmol/l]. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate the ability of HbA1c to discriminate pre-diabetes and diabetes defined by FPG. Results Stronger associations with diabetes-related phenotypes were observed in pre-diabetic subjects diagnosed by FPG compared to those detected by HbA1c. Individuals with type 2 diabetes exhibited cardiometabolic profiles that were broadly similar according to diagnosis by either assay. Pre-diabetic participants classified by both assays displayed a more pro-inflammatory, pro-atherogenic, hypertensive and insulin resistant profile. Odds ratios of having three or more metabolic syndrome features were also noticeably increased (OR: 4.0, 95% CI: 2.8-5.8) when compared to subjects diagnosed by either HbA1c (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2-1.8) or FPG (OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.7-5.1) separately. Conclusions In middle-aged Caucasian-Europeans, HbA1c alone is a poor indicator of cardiometabolic risk but is suitable for diagnosing diabetes. Combined use of HbA1c and FPG may be of additional benefit for detecting individuals at highest odds of

  5. Lifestyle risk factors for atherosclerosis in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Franziska K; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Ogden, Lorraine G; Kinney, Greg L; Rewers, Marian

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the amount of self-reported physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use in a large sample of adults with type 1 diabetes and non-diabetic subjects. A second aim is to test the hypothesis that these lifestyle risk factors are associated cross-sectionally with coronary artery calcification. In 2000-2002, the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study applied validated questionnaires for smoking, alcohol and physical activity to 582 type 1 diabetes subjects and 724 non-diabetic subjects. More type 1 diabetes subjects reported current smoking than non-diabetic subjects (12.3% versus 8.6%, p=0.027). Overall, reported physical activity did not differ by diabetes status (p=0.79). More type 1 diabetes subjects reported never having consumed alcohol (10% versus 4%, p<0.0001) and those who drank consumed less alcohol (p=0.0015) than non-diabetic subjects. Physical activity and smoking were significantly associated with the presence of coronary artery calcification (adjusted OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.8-0.996, p=0.045, and OR=1.7, CI: 1.1-2.6, p=0.03, respectively). Type 1 diabetes was independently associated with increased odds of coronary artery calcification (OR=3.5, 95% CI: 2.5-5.0, p<0.0001). Differences exist in lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with type 1 diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects in the CACTI study. PMID:20368221

  6. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    hydrates. Methane gas leaking into the marine environment is rapidly oxidized by microbes such that only a very small fraction of the methane emitted at the seabed escapes into the atmosphere. Slope failure is a more serious thread. It may lead to a complete destruction of seabed infrastructures for gas production and transport, significant gas emissions, and damage to local benthic ecosystems. New regulations should be developed at the national and international level to address and minimize the specific environmental risks associated with the future commercial exploitation of marine gas hydrates.

  7. Glycemic management in diabetes and the associated cardiovascular risk: are we helping or hurting our patients?

    PubMed

    Koshizaka, Masaya; Green, Jennifer B; Alexander, John H

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes, which is a metabolic disorder with multiple comorbidities, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Although it was once assumed that controlling plasma glucose levels would reduce diabetes-related morbidity and mortality, recent trials have demonstrated that this is not consistently the case. Data from large, well-designed trials suggest that intensive glycemic therapy may be useful in preventing cardiovascular events if initiated early in the disease course, but may be harmful or not useful if applied to high-risk patients with a longer history of diabetes. Furthermore, the cardiovascular safety of existing individual antihyperglycemic agents remains largely unknown. We review the relationship between glycemic control targets and cardiovascular outcomes, as well as the current understanding of the cardiovascular effects of existing glucose-lowering therapies. This information has affected recommendations for diabetes care in Japan and the United States differently, and supports a more comprehensive and prospective approach to cardiovascular safety assessments of diabetes therapies in the future. Results from ongoing cardiovascular outcomes trials of diabetes medications may help to define optimal glucose-lowering strategies for patients at high risk of cardiovascular complications. Until then, glycemic control targets and the medications used to achieve them should be individualized according to each patient's age, duration of diabetes, risk of hypoglycemia, risk of cardiovascular complications, and life expectancy.

  8. Nutritional fats and the risk of type 2 diabetes and cancer.

    PubMed

    Stoeckli, R; Keller, U

    2004-12-30

    Dietary factors are important predictors for the risk of diabetes type 2. Increased consumption of fibre-rich foods, fruits and vegetables as well as limited amounts of total and saturated fats are essential elements in the prevention of diabetes type 2. The association between these dietary factors and the appearance of diabetes was not only present in cohort studies but were also major elements in the dietary part of the two large diabetes prevention trials (Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, Diabetes Prevention Program). There is also strong evidence for a relation between obesity and total fat intake and the incidence of certain types of cancers. There is a significant correlation between total fat intake and the risk of cancer; however, it is much weaker than that of the effect of red meat. Recommendations to decrease red meat intake, particularly processed meat, may decrease the risk of colorectal and prostate cancer and may have beneficial effects on breast cancer as well, although this evidence is less compelling. Overall, recommendations focused on controlling or reducing body weight by regular physical activity and avoidance of excessive energy intake from all sources, particularly from fat and saturated fats, by increasing consumption of fibre-rich carbohydrates, vegetables and fruits are effective in decreasing the risk for type 2 diabetes by more than 50% in high-risk individuals. Similar dietary patterns are likely to diminish the manifestation of certain forms of cancers. These conclusions are in agreement with current recommendations for cancer prevention as propagated by the American Cancer Society.

  9. Intentional Exposure Studies of Environmental Agents on Human Subjects: Assessing Benefits and Risks

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I assess the benefits and risks of studies that intentionally expose research subjects to environmental agents. I describe these types of studies, identify their benefits and risks, compare these studies to other research methods that can be used to investigate the relationship between environmental exposures and disease, and discuss some issues related to research design and risk minimization. I argue that the benefits of intentional environmental exposure studies outweigh the risks when 1) the knowledge gained is likely to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental exposure and disease; 2) this knowledge cannot be obtained by other methods; 3) the experiments are well-designed; 4) the subjects will receive some benefits, such as medical evaluations; 5) risks are minimized; and 6) the risks to human subjects are less than the those encountered in a typical Phase I drug study. Only in rare circumstances, i.e. when an intentional environmental exposure study is needed to implement an important environmental or public health intervention or regulation, may such studies expose research subjects to risks as high as those encountered in a typical Phase I drug trail. PMID:17847606

  10. Validation of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes screening in the Slovenian working population.

    PubMed

    Štiglic, Gregor; Fijačko, Nino; Stožer, Andraž; Sheikh, Aziz; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2016-10-01

    We performed a cross-sectional population-based study on 632 participants, aged 20-65, who were screened using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire. Optimal results for men were achieved at FINDRISC⩾7 (100.0% sensitivity and 0.78 AUC) and for women at FINDRISC⩾13 (60.0% sensitivity and 0.78 AUC).

  11. Risk factors for ulceration and amputation in diabetic foot: study in a cohort of 496 patients.

    PubMed

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz; Nery, Marcia; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Treatment strategies for foot at risk and diabetic foot are mainly preventive. Studies describing demographic data, clinical and impacting factors continue to be, however, scarce. Our objective was to determine the epidemiological presentation of diabetic foot and understand whether there were easily assessable variables capable of predicting the development of diabetic foot. This was a retrospective study of 496 patients with established foot at risk or diabetic foot, who were evaluated based on age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, foot at risk classification, and the presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation. The presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation was recorded in 45.9, 25.3, and 12.9 % of patients, respectively. As for diabetic foot classification, the great majority of our cohort had diabetic neuropathy (92.9 %). Approximately 30 % had neuro-ischemic disease and only 7.1 % had ischemic disease alone. Sixty-two percent of patients presented neuropathy with no signs of arteriopathy. Foot classification was as a significant predictor for the presence of ulcer (p = 0.009; OR = 3.2; 95 % CI = 1.18-7.3). Only male gender was a significant predictor for ulceration (p < 0.001). Predictors of amputation were male gender (p < 0.001; OR = 3.44 95 % CI = 1.81-6.56) and neuro-ischemic diabetic foot (p < 0.049; OR = 4.6; 95 % CI = 1.01-20.9). The predictors for diabetic foot were male gender and the presence of neuropathy. The combination of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease adds significantly to the risk for amputation among patients with the diabetic foot syndrome. Men, presenting combined risk factors, should be a group receiving special attention and in the foot clinic, due to their potentially worse evolution.

  12. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Magnússon, S H; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Loveren, H van; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Over the past years benefit-risk analysis (BRA) in relation to foods and food ingredients has gained much attention; in Europe and worldwide. BRA relating to food microbiology is however a relatively new field of research. Microbiological risk assessment is well defined but assessment of microbial benefits and the weighing of benefits and risk has not been systematically addressed. In this paper the state of the art in benefit-risk analysis in food microbiology is presented, with a brief overview of microbiological food safety practices. The quality and safety of foods is commonly best preserved by delaying the growth of spoilage bacteria and contamination by bacterial pathogens. However, microorganisms in food can be both harmful and beneficial. Many microorganisms are integral to various food production processes e.g. the production of beer, wine and various dairy products. Moreover, the use of some microorganisms in the production of fermented foods are often claimed to have beneficial effects on food nutrition and consumer health. Furthermore, food safety interventions leading to reduced public exposure to foodborne pathogens can be regarded as benefits. The BRA approach integrates an independent assessment of both risks and benefits and weighs the two using a common currency. Recently, a number of initiatives have been launched in the field of food and nutrition to address the formulation of the benefit-risk assessment approach. BRA has recently been advocated by EFSA for the public health management of food and food ingredients; as beneficial and adverse chemicals can often be found within the same foods and even the same ingredients. These recent developments in the scoping of BRA could be very relevant for food microbiological issues. BRA could become a valuable methodology to support evaluations and decision making regarding microbiological food safety and public health, supplementing other presently available policy making and administrative tools for

  13. KCNJ11: Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Mohamed, Zahurin; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Haghvirdizadeh, Pantea; Haerian, Monir Sadat; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major worldwide health problem and its prevalence has been rapidly increasing in the last century. It is caused by defects in insulin secretion or insulin action or both, leading to hyperglycemia. Of the various types of DM, type 2 occurs most frequently. Multiple genes and their interactions are involved in the insulin secretion pathway. Insulin secretion is mediated through the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in pancreatic beta cells. This channel is a heteromeric protein, composed of four inward-rectifier potassium ion channel (Kir6.2) tetramers, which form the pore of the KATP channel, as well as sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits surrounding the pore. Kir6.2 is encoded by the potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11) gene, a member of the potassium channel genes. Numerous studies have reported the involvement of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the KCNJ11 gene and their interactions in the susceptibility to DM. This review discusses the current evidence for the contribution of common KCNJ11 genetic variants to the development of DM. Future studies should concentrate on understanding the exact role played by these risk variants in the development of DM. PMID:26448950

  14. STAT4: a risk factor for type 1 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Zervou, Maria I; Mamoulakis, Dimitrios; Panierakis, Charalampos; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Goulielmos, George N

    2008-10-01

    Genes and mechanisms involved in autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 5% of human population, remain still obscure but there is accumulating evidence that common genetic factors might predispose to multiple autoimmune disorders. STAT4, a transcription factor transmitting signals induced by several key cytokines, has recently been identified as a genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's disease (SD), thus indicating that multiple autoimmune diseases may share common biochemical pathways that lead to immune deregulation. Here we demonstrate for the first time, in a genetically homogeneous population, the association of the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphism, which has been shown to be associated with these autoimmune diseases, with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The susceptibility is associated with a significant increase of the frequency of the T allele (p = 0.0012, two-tailed chi(2), OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.29-2.91) in this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We also present an indication for association with Wegener's granulomatosis. These findings suggest that this variant form of STAT4 may have a putative key role in the development of a variety of autoimmune diseases, probably because of signaling defects that it causes in the IL-12 pathway. PMID:18703106

  15. Waist circumference threshold values for type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2009-07-01

    Adult gains in body weight, excess adiposity, and intra-abdominal fat have each been associated with risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), forming the basis for preventive medicine guidelines and actuarial predictions using practical indices of weight (e.g., body mass index [BMI]) and waist circumference (WC). As obesity-related disease spreads beyond affluent western countries, application of WC thresholds to other populations has highlighted issues of their generalizability. For example, U.S. national health goals based on BMI < 25 kg/m(2) and WC < 89 cm (women) and <102 cm (men) differ considerably with a recent law in Japan mandating intervention for older adults with WC exceeding 90 cm (women) and 85 cm (men). The U.S. military has also faced issues of generalizability of WC-based adiposity standards that are fair and achievable. Data from many studies indicate that WC is a reliable biomarker for T2DM risk, suggesting that, for adult men and women, action thresholds should be more stringent than current U.S. guidelines, and it would not be harmful to set worldwide targets somewhere below 90 cm for men and women, regardless of weight status. Medical technology has provided many great insights into disease, including modern imaging technologies that have differentiated fat depots that have the greatest influence on T2DM, but ultimately, an inexpensive measuring tape provides the most useful and cost-effective preventive measure for T2DM today. At some point in the future, a Star Trek-like abdominal body fat "tricorder" noninvasive assessment of tissue composition may provide an advantage over abdominal girth.

  16. [The benefits of L-carnitine therapy in essential arterial hypertension with diabetes mellitus type II].

    PubMed

    Digiesi, V; Palchetti, R; Cantini, F

    1989-03-01

    Carnitine is a natural substance essential for the mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids and therefore regulates the energy metabolism of the cells. Tissue carnitine levels are altered under diabetes mellitus or hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of L-carnitine therapy in essential hypertension with diabetes mellitus type II. A clinical trial was performed in two homogeneous groups with essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II. L-carnitine was given orally, 2 g twice daily, for 45 weeks. In the group of patients treated with L-carnitine in comparison with control group cardiac arrhythmias, chiefly extrasystoles, some disorders of A-V conduction and some electrocardiographic signs of ischaemia stopped or diminished and symptoms, chiefly asthenia, significantly improved. No side effects were observed during the treatment. These results show that treatment with L-carnitine is useful and well tolerated in patients with essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II.

  17. Measuring Property Management Risk and Loss: Step One Toward Managing Property on a Foundation of Risk, Cost, and Benefit

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Curtis

    1999-05-17

    This is a period of ever-tightening defense budgets and continuing pressure on the public sector to be more commercial-like, Property policies, practices, and regulations are increasingly being challenged and changed. In these times, we must be leaders in understanding and defining the value of our profession from a commercial standpoint so that we can provide the right services to our customers and explain and defend the value of those services. To do so, we must step outside current property management practices, regulations, and oversight. We must learn to think and speak in the language of those who fund us--a financial language of risk, cost, and benefit. Regardless of regulation and oversight, our bosses are demanding that we demonstrate (financially) the benefits of current practice, or else. This article is intended to be the beginning of an effort to understand and define our profession in terms of risk, cost, and benefit so that we can meet these new challenges. The first step in this effort must be defining and measuring risk, cost, and benefit. Our costs, although sometimes difficult to capture, are easy to understand: they are almost exclusively the effort, both within and without the property management organization, involved in managing property. Unfortunately, property risks and benefits are not so simple or so well understood. Generally, risks and benefits are identified and measured through physical inventory results: potential and actual shortages. This paper will explore the weaknesses in the current understanding and use of shortage information as the yardstick for property management risks and performance. It will define a new framework for understanding the purpose and value of property management. And finally, it will set a course for a new method of measuring and valuing physical inventoty shortages. This new method will yield accurate and useful measures of property management risk and benefit. Once risk and benefit are accurately

  18. Stem cell compartmentalization in diabetes and high cardiovascular risk reveals the role of DPP-4 in diabetic stem cell mobilopathy.

    PubMed

    Fadini, Gian Paolo; Albiero, Mattia; Seeger, Florian; Poncina, Nicol; Menegazzo, Lisa; Angelini, Annalisa; Castellani, Chiara; Thiene, Gaetano; Agostini, Carlo; Cappellari, Roberta; Boscaro, Elisa; Zeiher, Andreas; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Avogaro, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) derived stem and progenitor cells contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis and are affected by cardiovascular risk factors. We devised a clinical data-driven approach to test candidate stem cell mobilizing mechanisms in pre-clinical models. We found that PB and BM CD34+ cell counts were directly correlated, and that most circulating CD34+ cells were viable, non-proliferating and derived from the BM. Thus, we analyzed PB and BM CD34+ cell levels as a two-compartment model in 72 patients with or without cardiovascular disease. Self-organizing maps showed that disturbed compartmentalization of CD34+ cells was associated with aging and cardiovascular risk factors especially diabetes. High activity of DPP-4, a regulator of the mobilizing chemokine SDF-1α, was associated with altered stem cell compartmentalization. For validation of these findings, we assessed the role of DPP-4 in the BM mobilization response of diabetic rats. Diabetes differentially affected DPP-4 activity in PB and BM and impaired stem/progenitor cell mobilization after ischemia or G-CSF administration. DPP-4 activity in the BM was required for the mobilizing effect of G-CSF, while in PB it blunted ischemia-induced mobilization. Indeed, DPP-4 deficiency restored ischemia (but not G-CSF)-induced stem cell mobilization and improved vascular recovery in diabetic animals. In conclusion, the analysis of stem cell compartmentalization in humans led us to discover mechanisms of BM unresponsiveness in diabetes determined by tissue-specific DPP-4 dysregulation.

  19. "It is not possible for me to have diabetes"-community perceptions on diabetes and its risk factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Pujilestari, Cahya Utamie; Ng, Nawi; Hakimi, Mohammad; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-06-12

    Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as 'sugar' or 'sweet-pee' disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture's concepts of diseases and risk factors.

  20. The Potential Benefits and Adverse Effects of Phytic Acid Supplement in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Omoruyi, F. O.; Budiaman, A.; Eng, Y.; Olumese, F. E.; Hoesel, J. L.; Ejilemele, A.; Okorodudu, A. O.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of phytic acid supplement on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetic rats were fed rodent chow with or without phytic acid supplementation for thirty days. Blood and organ samples were collected for assays. The average food intake was the highest and the body weight gain was the lowest in the group fed phytic acid supplement compared to the diabetic and normal control groups. There was a downward trend in intestinal amylase activity in the group fed phytic acid supplement compared to the other groups. The spike in random blood glucose was the lowest in the same group. We noted reduced serum triglycerides and increased total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels in the group fed phytic acid supplement. Serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amino transferase activities were significantly (P < 0.05) increased by phytic acid supplementation. Systemic IL-1β level was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in the diabetic control and supplement treated groups. The liver lipogenic enzyme activities were not significantly altered among the groups. These results suggest that phytic acid supplementation may be beneficial in the management of diabetes mellitus. The observed adverse effect on the liver may be due to the combined effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and phytic acid supplementation. PMID:24454345

  1. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This ... as 10 pounds or more at term. Gestational diabetes In the NHSII 1989 baseline questionnaire and subsequent ...

  2. Multiple Metabolic Genetic Risk Scores and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Three Racial/Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Wineinger, Nathan E.; Vazquez, Ana I.; de los Campos, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Context/Rationale: Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified many single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with various metabolic and cardiovascular traits, offering us the opportunity to learn about and capitalize on the links between cardiometabolic traits and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Design: In multiple datasets comprising over 30 000 individuals and 3 ethnic/racial groups, we calculated 17 genetic risk scores (GRSs) for glycemic, anthropometric, lipid, hemodynamic, and other traits, based on the results of recent trait-specific meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies, and examined associations with T2D risk. Using a training-testing procedure, we evaluated whether additional GRSs could contribute to risk prediction. Results: In European Americans, we find that GRSs for T2D, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and body mass index are associated with T2D risk. In African Americans, GRSs for T2D, fasting insulin, and waist-to-hip ratio are associated with T2D. In Hispanic Americans, GRSs for T2D and body mass index are associated with T2D. We observed a trend among European Americans suggesting that genetic risk for hyperlipidemia is inversely associated with T2D risk. The use of additional GRSs resulted in only small changes in prediction accuracy in multiple independent validation datasets. Conclusions: The analysis of multiple GRSs can shed light on T2D etiology and how it varies across ethnic/racial groups. Our findings using multiple GRSs are consistent with what is known about the differences in T2D pathogenesis across racial/ethnic groups. However, further work is needed to understand the putative inverse correlation of genetic risk for hyperlipidemia and T2D risk and to develop ethnic-specific GRSs. PMID:24905067

  3. Common variants in WFS1 confer risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Manjinder S; Weedon, Michael N; Fawcett, Katherine A; Wasson, Jon; Debenham, Sally L; Daly, Allan; Lango, Hana; Frayling, Timothy M; Neumann, Rosalind J; Sherva, Richard; Blech, Ilana; Pharoah, Paul D; Palmer, Colin N A; Kimber, Charlotte; Tavendale, Roger; Morris, Andrew D; McCarthy, Mark I; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham; Glaser, Benjamin; Permutt, M Alan; Hattersley, Andrew T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês

    2009-01-01

    We studied genes involved in pancreatic β cell function and survival, identifying associations between SNPs in WFS1 and diabetes risk in UK populations that we replicated in an Ashkenazi population and in additional UK studies. In a pooled analysis comprising 9,533 cases and 11,389 controls, SNPs in WFS1 were strongly associated with diabetes risk. Rare mutations in WFS1 cause Wolfram syndrome; using a gene-centric approach, we show that variation in WFS1 also predisposes to common type 2 diabetes. PMID:17603484

  4. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis in countries with high tuberculosis burdens: individual risks and social determinants

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Jeon, Christie Y; Cohen, Ted; Murray, Megan B

    2011-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence supports the role of type 2 diabetes as an individual-level risk factor for tuberculosis (TB), though evidence from developing countries with the highest TB burdens is lacking. In developing countries, TB is most common among the poor, in whom diabetes may be less common. We assessed the relationship between individual-level risk, social determinants and population health in these settings. Methods We performed individual-level analyses using the World Health Survey (n = 124 607; 46 countries). We estimated the relationship between TB and diabetes, adjusting for gender, age, body mass index, education, housing quality, crowding and health insurance. We also performed a longitudinal country-level analysis using data on per-capita gross domestic product and TB prevalence and incidence and diabetes prevalence for 1990–95 and 2003–04 (163 countries) to estimate the relationship between increasing diabetes prevalence and TB, identifying countries at risk for disease interactions. Results In lower income countries, individuals with diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to have TB [univariable odds ratio (OR): 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.84–3.10; multivariable OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.37–2.39]. Increases in TB prevalence and incidence over time were more likely to occur when diabetes prevalence also increased (OR: 4.7; 95% CI: 1.0–22.5; OR: 8.6; 95% CI: 1.9–40.4). Large populations, prevalent TB and projected increases in diabetes make countries like India, Peru and the Russia Federation areas of particular concern. Conclusions Given the association between diabetes and TB and projected increases in diabetes worldwide, multi-disease health policies should be considered. PMID:21252210

  5. Applicability of the Existing CVD Risk Assessment Tools to Type II Diabetics in Oman: A Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Rawahi, Abdulhakeem; Lee, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Patients with type II diabetes (T2DM) have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and it is considered to be a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in these patients. Many traditional risk factors such as age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, glycemic control, diabetes duration, renal dysfunction, obesity, and smoking have been studied and identified as independent factors for CVD. Quantifying the risk of CVD among diabetics using the common risk factors in order to plan the treatment and preventive measures is important in the management of these patients as recommended by many clinical guidelines. Therefore, several risk assessment tools have been developed in different parts of the world for this purpose. These include the tools that have been developed for general populations and considered T2DM as a risk factor, and the tools that have been developed for T2DM populations specifically. However, due to the differences in sociodemographic factors and lifestyle patterns, as well as the differences in the distribution of various CVD risk factors in different diabetic populations, the external applicability of these tools on different populations is questionable. This review aims to address the applicability of the existing CVD risk models to the Omani diabetic population.

  6. Diabetes Risk by Length of Residence among Somali Women in Oslo Area

    PubMed Central

    Gele, Abdi A.; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Kumar, Bernadette; Torheim, Liv Elin

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes represents a major health problem worldwide, with immigrants strongly contributing to the increase in diabetes in many countries. Norway is not immune to the process, and immigrants in the country are experiencing an increase in the prevalence of diabetes after arrival. However, the dynamics of these transitions in relation to the duration of residence in the new environment in Norway are not clearly understood. From this background, a cross-sectional quantitative study using a respondent-driven sampling method was conducted among 302 Somali women living in Oslo area. The results show that 41% of the study participants will be at risk for developing diabetes in the coming 10 years, which coincides with 85% of the study participants being abdominally obese. Significant associations were found between years of stay in Norway and the risk for diabetes with those who lived in Norway >10 years, having twofold higher odds of being at risk for developing diabetes compared to those who lived in Norway ≤5 years (OR: 2.16, CI: 1.08–4.32). Understanding the mechanisms through which exposure to the Norwegian environment leads to higher obesity and diabetes risk may aid in prevention efforts for the rapidly growing African immigrant population. PMID:27314048

  7. Quantification of diabetes comorbidity risks across life using nation-wide big claims data.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Chmiel, Anna; Schiller-Frühwirth, Irmgard; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Despite substantial progress in the study of diabetes, important questions remain about its comorbidities and clinical heterogeneity. To explore these issues, we develop a framework allowing for the first time to quantify nation-wide risks and their age- and sex-dependence for each diabetic comorbidity, and whether the association may be consequential or causal, in a sample of almost two million patients. This study is equivalent to nearly 40,000 single clinical measurements. We confirm the highly controversial relation of increased risk for Parkinson's disease in diabetics, using a 10 times larger cohort than previous studies on this relation. Detection of type 1 diabetes leads detection of depressions, whereas there is a strong comorbidity relation between type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia, suggesting similar pathogenic or medication-related mechanisms. We find significant sex differences in the progression of, for instance, sleep disorders and congestive heart failure in diabetic patients. Hypertension is a highly sex-sensitive comorbidity with females being at lower risk during fertile age, but at higher risk otherwise. These results may be useful to improve screening practices in the general population. Clinical management of diabetes must address age- and sex-dependence of multiple comorbid conditions. PMID:25855969

  8. Passive smoke exposure and risk of diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kan; Liu, Dan; Wang, Chuan; Ren, Men; Yang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that passive smoke exposure is related to the development of diabetes. However, data on this issue are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of the association between passive smoking and the risk of diabetes. We searched the Medline and Embase databases up to October 2013 to identify prospective cohort studies related to passive smoke exposure and incident diabetes. Summary effect estimates with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were derived using a fixed or random effects model, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Six prospective studies that span three continents involving 154,406 participants (ages 18-74) with 7,116 new diabetes cases were included in the meta-analysis. On the basis of the Newcastle Ottawa Scale system, five studies were identified as relatively high-quality. In our primary analysis, compared to never smokers without passive smoke exposure, never smokers reporting passive smoke exposure was associated with increased risk of diabetes (pooled relative risk 1.21, 95 % CI 1.07-1.38). Such association persisted in the dose-response analysis. No indications of significant heterogeneity and publication bias were detected. Estimates of total effects were generally consistent in the sensitivity and subgroup analyses. Findings of the present meta-analysis suggest that passive smoke exposure is independently associated with the risk of diabetes. The conclusion may have a far-reaching significance for public health in countries of high smoking intensity and high incident diabetes.

  9. Quantification of Diabetes Comorbidity Risks across Life Using Nation-Wide Big Claims Data

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Chmiel, Anna; Schiller-Frühwirth, Irmgard; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in the study of diabetes, important questions remain about its comorbidities and clinical heterogeneity. To explore these issues, we develop a framework allowing for the first time to quantify nation-wide risks and their age- and sex-dependence for each diabetic comorbidity, and whether the association may be consequential or causal, in a sample of almost two million patients. This study is equivalent to nearly 40,000 single clinical measurements. We confirm the highly controversial relation of increased risk for Parkinson’s disease in diabetics, using a 10 times larger cohort than previous studies on this relation. Detection of type 1 diabetes leads detection of depressions, whereas there is a strong comorbidity relation between type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia, suggesting similar pathogenic or medication-related mechanisms. We find significant sex differences in the progression of, for instance, sleep disorders and congestive heart failure in diabetic patients. Hypertension is a highly sex-sensitive comorbidity with females being at lower risk during fertile age, but at higher risk otherwise. These results may be useful to improve screening practices in the general population. Clinical management of diabetes must address age- and sex-dependence of multiple comorbid conditions. PMID:25855969

  10. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of the Asymptomatic Diabetic Patient: The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Budoff, Matthew J; Raggi, Paolo; Beller, George A; Berman, Daniel S; Druz, Regina S; Malik, Shaista; Rigolin, Vera H; Weigold, Wm Guy; Soman, Prem

    2016-02-01

    Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is well established; diabetes is associated with at least a 2-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease. Approximately two-thirds of deaths among persons with diabetes are related to cardiovascular disease. Previously, diabetes was regarded as a "coronary risk equivalent," implying a high 10-year cardiovascular risk for every diabetes patient. Following the original study by Haffner et al., multiple studies from different cohorts provided varying conclusions on the validity of the concept of coronary risk equivalency in patients with diabetes. New guidelines have started to acknowledge the heterogeneity in risk and include different treatment recommendations for diabetic patients without other risk factors who are considered to be at lower risk. Furthermore, guidelines have suggested that further risk stratification in patients with diabetes is warranted before universal treatment. The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology systematically reviewed all modalities commonly used for risk stratification in persons with diabetes mellitus and summarized the data and recommendations. This document reviews the evidence regarding the use of noninvasive testing to stratify asymptomatic patients with diabetes with regard to coronary heart disease risk and develops an algorithm for screening based on available data. PMID:26846937

  11. A prospective study of moderate alcohol drinking and risk of diabetes in women.

    PubMed

    Stampfer, M J; Colditz, G A; Willett, W C; Manson, J E; Arky, R A; Hennekens, C H; Speizer, F E

    1988-09-01

    Several investigators have observed an association between alcohol consumption and elevated glucose levels, raising the possibility that alcohol may increase the risk of diabetes. This hypothesis was evaluated prospectively among 85,051 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study who were 34 to 59 years of age in 1980 and had no history of cancer, coronary heart disease, or diabetes. At baseline, participants completed an independently validated dietary questionnaire which included information on the consumption of beer, wine, and liquor. Incident cases of non-insulin-dependent diabetes were reported on follow-up questionnaires sent in 1982 and 1984 (98% response to at least one follow-up); 526 cases were confirmed by a supplementary questionnaire regarding symptoms, laboratory values, and treatment. The risk of diabetes decreased monotonically with increasing alcohol consumption (chi trend = -9.4, p less than 0.0001). Compared with nondrinkers, women consuming 5-14.9 g of alcohol per day (about 4-10 drinks per week) had an age-adjusted relative risk of diabetes of 0.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3-0.6); for 15 g or more per day, the relative risk was 0.3 (95% CI 0.2-0.4). However, a strong inverse association between alcohol drinking and body weight explained much of the apparent protective effect of alcohol. After simultaneous adjustment for Quetelet index (weight (kg)/height (m)2), family history of diabetes, total caloric intake, and age, the relative risk of diabetes for consumers of 5-14.9 g per day was 0.8 (95% CI 0.6-1.2), and for women who drank 15+ g per day, the relative risk was 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-0.9). These data provide no support for the hypothesis that moderate alcohol intake increases the risk of non-insulin-dependent diabetes. PMID:3414660

  12. Quantifying benefit-risk preferences for medical interventions: an overview of a growing empirical literature.

    PubMed

    Brett Hauber, A; Fairchild, Angelyn O; Reed Johnson, F

    2013-08-01

    Decisions regarding the development, regulation, sale, and utilization of pharmaceutical and medical interventions require an evaluation of the balance between benefits and risks. Such evaluations are subject to two fundamental challenges-measuring the clinical effectiveness and harms associated with the treatment, and determining the relative importance of these different types of outcomes. In some ways, determining the willingness to accept treatment-related risks in exchange for treatment benefits is the greater challenge because it involves the individual subjective judgments of many decision makers, and these decision makers may draw different conclusions about the optimal balance between benefits and risks. In response to increasing demand for benefit-risk evaluations, researchers have applied a variety of existing welfare-theoretic preference methods for quantifying the tradeoffs decision makers are willing to accept among expected clinical benefits and risks. The methods used to elicit benefit-risk preferences have evolved from different theoretical backgrounds. To provide some structure to the literature that accommodates the range of approaches, we begin by describing a welfare-theoretic conceptual framework underlying the measurement of benefit-risk preferences in pharmaceutical and medical treatment decisions. We then review the major benefit-risk preference-elicitation methods in the empirical literature and provide a brief overview of the studies using each of these methods. The benefit-risk preference methods described in this overview fall into two broad categories: direct-elicitation methods and conjoint analysis. Rating scales (6 studies), threshold techniques (9 studies), and standard gamble (2 studies) are examples of direct elicitation methods. Conjoint analysis studies are categorized by the question format used in the study, including ranking (1 study), graded pairs (1 study), and discrete choice (21 studies). The number of studies reviewed

  13. Risk factors of diabetic foot Charcot arthropathy: a case-control study at a Malaysian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Aishah Ahmad; Chung, Tze Yang; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine the risk factors of diabetic Charcot arthropathy of the foot among diabetic patients with and without foot problems. METHODS This was a case-control study involving diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Foot Care and Wound Management Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from June 2010 to June 2011. Data on sociodemographic profiles, foot factors and diabetes characteristics was collected and analysed. RESULTS A total of 48 diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the foot were identified. Data from these 48 patients was compared with those of 52 diabetic patients without foot problems. Up to 83.3% of patients with diabetic Charcot arthropathy presented with unilateral Charcot foot, most commonly located at the midfoot (45.8%). Patients with a history of foot problems, including foot ulcer, amputation, surgery or a combination of problems, had the highest (26-time) likelihood of developing Charcot arthropathy (odds ratio 26.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4–109.6). Other significant risk factors included age below 60 years, more than ten years’ duration of diabetes mellitus and the presence of nephropathy. CONCLUSION A history of prior diabetic foot problems is the greatest risk factor for developing diabetic Charcot arthropathy, compared with other risk factors such as diabetes characteristics and sociodemographic profiles. Preventive management of diabetic foot problems in the primary care setting and multidisciplinary care are of paramount importance, especially among chronic diabetic patients. PMID:27075668

  14. Importance of Weight Loss Maintenance and Risk Prediction in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes: Analysis of European Diabetes Prevention Study RCT

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Linda; White, Martin; Lindström, Jaana; den Boer, Annemieke Th.; Blaak, Ellen; Eriksson, Johan G.; Feskens, Edith; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Walker, Mark; Mathers, John C.; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. T2D prevention by lifestyle intervention is effective. Pragmatic scalable interventions are needed, with evidence to efficiently target and monitor such interventions. We report pooled analyses of data from three European trial cohorts: to analyse T2D incidence, sustained weight loss and utility of risk predictors. Methods We analysed data on 749 adults with impaired glucose tolerance (278 men and 471 women, mean age 56 years, mean BMI 31 kgm−2) recruited between 1993 and 2003, and randomised to intensive lifestyle intervention (I) or lifestyle advice control (C). The intervention aimed to increase physical activity, modify diet, and promote weight loss≥5%. Using Cox-regression survival analysis, we assessed T2D incidence and the impact on T2D incidence of sustained weight loss, and of baseline cut-point values of FINDRISC score, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and HbA1c. Results Mean follow-up duration was 3.1 years. T2D was diagnosed in 139 participants (I = 45/379, C = 94/370). Cumulative T2D incidence was 57% lower in the intervention compared with the control group (HR 0.42 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.60) P<0.001). Participants with ≥5% weight loss at one year had 65% lower T2D incidence (HR 0.35 (95% CI 0.22 to 0.56) P<0.001); maintaining ≥5% weight loss for two and three years further reduced T2D incidence. Recommended cut-points to identify those at high risk for T2D would have identified different proportions of European Diabetes Prevention Study (EDIPS) participants with similar hazard-ratios for intervention effect. Conclusions Pooled analysis of EDIPS trial data reinforces evidence for T2D prevention by lifestyle intervention. Analysis showed the preventive effect of ≥5% weight loss, especially if maintained long term, which has utility for intervention monitoring. Analysis of proposed cut-points demonstrates difficulties in balancing risk and benefit, to efficiently target

  15. Cluster Randomized Trial Assessing the Effect on Diabetes Control of Personalized Diabetes Complication Risk Assessment during Ophthalmology Exams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance Optimization of glycemic control is critical to reduce diabetes related complications, but long-term success is challenging. Although vision loss is among the greatest fears of individuals with diabetes, comprehensive personalized diabetes education and risk assessments are not consistently employed in ophthalmology settings. Objective To determine whether point-of-care measurement of HbA1c and personalized diabetes complication risk assessments performed during retinal ophthalmology visits improve glycemic control as assessed by HA1c. Design/Setting Ophthalmologist office based clinical trial where investigators from 42 sites were randomly assigned to provide either study-prescribed augmented diabetes assessment and education, or usual care. Participants Adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes enrolled into two cohorts: “more frequent” than annual follow-up (502 control and 488 intervention participants) and “annual” follow-up (368 and 388 participants). Intervention(s) Point-of-care measurement of HbA1c, blood pressure, and retinopathy severity; individualized estimate of retinopathy progression risk derived from the visit findings; structured comparison and review of past and current clinical findings; and structured education with immediate assessment and feedback regarding participant understanding. Intervention was performed at enrollment and routine ophthalmic follow-up visits scheduled at least 12 weeks apart. Main Outcome Measure(s) Mean change in HbA1c from baseline to 1 year. Secondary outcomes included body mass index, blood pressure, and diabetes self-management practices and attitudes surveys. Results In the “more frequent” cohort, mean (SD) change in HbA1c at 1 year was −0.1% (1.5%) in the control group and −0.3% (1.4%) in the intervention group (adjusted mean difference −0.09%, 95% confidence interval −0.29% to +0.12%, P=0.35). In the “annual” cohort, mean (SD) change in HBA1c was 0.0% (1.1%) and −0.1% (1

  16. The presence of family history and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in rural children.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Lammon, Carol Ann Barnett

    2007-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated casual blood glucose, elevated total cholesterol, and the presence of acanthosis nigricans) for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural children with or without a family history of diabetes during annual school health fairs. Of the children screened, 40% (673) presented with two or more of the identified risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of multiple risk factors in participants reporting a positive family history of diabetes mellitus versus those with no family history was not statistically significant. Based on the study results, factors other than family history may be more predictive for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural school children.

  17. [Benefits and risks of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Cordido, Fernando

    2014-10-21

    Adult growth hormone (GH) deficiency is a well-recognized clinical syndrome with adverse health consequences. Many of these may improve after replacement therapy with recombinant GH. This treatment induces an increase in lean body mass and a decrease in fat mass. In long-term studies, bone mineral density increases and muscle strength improves. Health-related quality of life tends to increase after treatment with GH. Lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk also improve with therapy. Nevertheless, GH replacement therapy is not without risk. According to some studies, GH increases blood glucose, body mass index and waist circumference and may promote long-term development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Risk of neoplasia does not appear to be increased in adults treated with GH, but there are some high-risk subgroups. Methodological shortcomings and difficulties inherent to long-term studies prevent definitive conclusions about the relationship between GH and survival. Therefore, research in this field should remain active.

  18. EQ-5D visual analog scale and utility index values in individuals with diabetes and at risk for diabetes: Findings from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD)

    PubMed Central

    Grandy, Susan; Fox, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    Background The EQ-5D was used to compare burden experienced by respondents with diabetes and those at risk for diabetes. Methods A survey including the EQ-5D was mailed to individuals with self-reported diabetes, as well as those without diabetes but with the following risk factors (RFs): (1) abdominal obesity, (2) body mass index ≥ 28 kg/m2, (3) dyslipidemia, (4) hypertension, and (5) cardiovascular disease. Non-diabetes respondents were combined into 0–2 RFs and 3–5 RFs. Mean EQ-5D scores were compared across groups using analysis of variance. Multivariable linear regression modeling identified factors affecting respondents' EQ-5D scores. Results Complete responses were available from >75% of each cohort. Mean EQ-5D index scores were significantly lower for respondents with type 2 diabetes and 3–5 RFs (0.778 and 0.792, respectively) than for those with 0–2 RFs (0.870, p < 0.001 for each); score for respondents with type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower than for those with 3–5 RFs (p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen for visual analog scale (VAS). For both VAS and index scores, after adjusting for other characteristics, respondents reported decreasing EQ-5D scores as status moved from low to high risk (-6.49 for VAS score and -0.045 for index score) to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (-9.75 for VAS score and -0.054 for index score; p < 0.001 vs. 0–2 RFs for all). Conclusion High-risk and type 2 diabetes groups had similar EQ-5D scores, and both were substantially lower than in low-risk respondents. PMID:18304340

  19. Costs and benefits of river flood risk management at the global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P.

    2015-12-01

    Floods cause billions of dollars of economic damage each year, and this is expected to increase in the future due to socioeconomic development and climate change‎. To limit these losses, and to protect people and their livelihoods from flooding, adaptation in flood risk management systems is required that takes into account both current and future risk. Whilst several global scale flood risk models have now been developed to assess both current and future river flood risk, to date none of these include currently installed or future flood risk management measures, nor their costs and benefits. In this contribution, a new modelling framework is presented for assessing both the costs and benefits of flood risk management at the global scale, which employs a cascade of models to provide first-cut estimates of the costs and benefits of adaptation by means of hazard reduction through the construction of dikes. The modeling framework is first used to assess what protection standards would be required in the future per state, in order to keep future flood risk constant at today's levels, and the costs and benefits associated with such a strategy. In a second analysis, flood risk protection standards are calculated per state that optimize the net present value of adaptation. The potential usefulness and limitations of the results for practical applications are discussed, as well as key avenues for future developments. In particular, recent research has shown flood risk itself to be non-stationary, being influenced by oscillations in climate variability caused by phenomenon such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The results of the research will be discussed within the context of climate-driven ENSO variability.

  20. Reliability and validity of the Persian (Farsi) version of the Risk Perception Survey-Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Soltanipour, S; Heidarzadeh, A; Jafarinezhad, A

    2014-04-03

    Knowledge of patients' risk perceptions is essential for the management of chronic diseases. This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of a Persian (Farsi) language translation of the Risk Perception Survey-Diabetes Mellitus. After forward-backward translation the RPS-DM was randomly administered to 106 adult patients with diabetes who were enrolled in a teaching referral clinic in the north of the Islamic Republic of Iran (Rasht). Internal consistency and exploratory factor analysis were applied. The minimum value for internal consistency was 0.50 for risk knowledge and the highest value was 0.88 on the optimistic bias subscale. Principal component analysis showed that the items of the composite risk score matched with the same items in the English language version, except for question numbers 16, 24 and 25. The Persian version of RPS-DM is the first standardized tool for measuring risk perception and knowledge about diabetes complications in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  1. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young adults with arterial hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Gomes, Emiliana Bezerra; dos Santos, Jênifa Cavalcante

    2010-12-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in young adults assisted in six Family Health Units (UBASF), of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. This is a descriptive and documental study, based on the records of the Care Program to Arterial Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus (HIPERDIA). The sample was composed of 60 records, including hypertensive, diabetics and patients with the two diagnoses. The results showed prevalence of young female adults (78%). Regarding the risk factors, arterial hypertension (n=45), family history (n=33), overweight (n=33) and sedentary lifestyle (n=27) stood out. Regarding the cardiovascular risk stratification, most presented Medium additional risk for cardiovascular disease. We concluded that the individualized evaluation of risk factors supports an action addressed for possible events, being necessary investments in prevention and also in training and maintenance of the HIPERDIA system.

  2. The potential of novel biomarkers to improve risk prediction of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Herder, Christian; Kowall, Bernd; Tabak, Adam G; Rathmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes can be reduced substantially by implementing preventive measures in high-risk individuals, but this requires prior knowledge of disease risk in the individual. Various diabetes risk models have been designed, and these have all included a similar combination of factors, such as age, sex, obesity, hypertension, lifestyle factors, family history of diabetes and metabolic traits. The accuracy of prediction models is often assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) as a measure of discrimination, but AROCs should be complemented by measures of calibration and reclassification to estimate the incremental value of novel biomarkers. This review discusses the potential of novel biomarkers to improve model accuracy. The range of molecules that serve as potential predictors of type 2 diabetes includes genetic variants, RNA transcripts, peptides and proteins, lipids and small metabolites. Some of these biomarkers lead to a statistically significant increase of model accuracy, but their incremental value currently seems too small for routine clinical use. However, only a fraction of potentially relevant biomarkers have been assessed with regard to their predictive value. Moreover, serial measurements of biomarkers may help determine individual risk. In conclusion, current risk models provide valuable tools of risk estimation, but perform suboptimally in the prediction of individual diabetes risk. Novel biomarkers still fail to have a clinically applicable impact. However, more efficient use of biomarker data and technological advances in their measurement in clinical settings may allow the development of more accurate predictive models in the future.

  3. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  4. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  5. Labeling of nanotechnology consumer products can influence risk and benefit perceptions.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Keller, Carmen

    2011-11-01

    Currently, there is no mandatory labeling for products containing synthetic nanoparticles. The public as well as other stakeholders have positive views about mandatory labeling. However, little is known how such a label influences the risk and benefit perception of a product. Consumers may infer that a label is a signal that there are risks associated with this technology. Data were collected in a survey experiment (N= 1,382). Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions. The control group received a picture of a sunscreen container without a label. One experimental group received a picture of a sunscreen container with a label. The other groups received, in addition to the sunscreen container with a label, some risk or benefit information. Results suggest that labeling of products may reduce consumers' benefit perception and increase risk perception. Labeling nanotechnology consumer products may change the public perception of the products. Respondents may have relied on the affect heuristic for assessing the risks and benefits of the sunscreen.

  6. A semi-quantitative approach to GMO risk-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Morris, E Jane

    2011-10-01

    In many countries there are increasing calls for the benefits of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to be considered as well as the risks, and for a risk-benefit analysis to form an integral part of GMO regulatory frameworks. This trend represents a shift away from the strict emphasis on risks, which is encapsulated in the Precautionary Principle that forms the basis for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, and which is reflected in the national legislation of many countries. The introduction of risk-benefit analysis of GMOs would be facilitated if clear methodologies were available to support the analysis. Up to now, methodologies for risk-benefit analysis that would be applicable to the introduction of GMOs have not been well defined. This paper describes a relatively simple semi-quantitative methodology that could be easily applied as a decision support tool, giving particular consideration to the needs of regulators in developing countries where there are limited resources and experience. The application of the methodology is demonstrated using the release of an insect resistant maize variety in South Africa as a case study. The applicability of the method in the South African regulatory system is also discussed, as an example of what might be involved in introducing changes into an existing regulatory process.

  7. A semi-quantitative approach to GMO risk-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Morris, E Jane

    2011-10-01

    In many countries there are increasing calls for the benefits of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to be considered as well as the risks, and for a risk-benefit analysis to form an integral part of GMO regulatory frameworks. This trend represents a shift away from the strict emphasis on risks, which is encapsulated in the Precautionary Principle that forms the basis for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, and which is reflected in the national legislation of many countries. The introduction of risk-benefit analysis of GMOs would be facilitated if clear methodologies were available to support the analysis. Up to now, methodologies for risk-benefit analysis that would be applicable to the introduction of GMOs have not been well defined. This paper describes a relatively simple semi-quantitative methodology that could be easily applied as a decision support tool, giving particular consideration to the needs of regulators in developing countries where there are limited resources and experience. The application of the methodology is demonstrated using the release of an insect resistant maize variety in South Africa as a case study. The applicability of the method in the South African regulatory system is also discussed, as an example of what might be involved in introducing changes into an existing regulatory process. PMID:21197601

  8. Impact of Depression and Diabetes on Risk of Dementia In a National Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Katon, Wayne; Pedersen, Henrik Sondergaard; Ribe, Anette Riisgaard; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Davydow, Dimitry; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Importance Although depression and type 2 diabetes may independently increase dementia risk, no studies have examined whether the risk of dementia among people with both is higher than the sum of each individually. Objective To examine risk of all-cause dementia among persons with depression, diabetes or both compared to those with neither. Design A population-based cohort study of 2,454,532 adults, including 477,133 (19.4%) with depression, 223,174 (9.1%) with diabetes and 95,691 (3.9%) with both. Setting Denmark Participants All dementia-free Danish citizens ≥50 years old between January 1, 2007 through 2013. Main outcome measure Dementia was ascertained by physician diagnosis from the Danish National Patient Register, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register (DPCR), and/or prescription of a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine from the Danish National Prescription Registry (DNPR). Depression was ascertained by psychiatrist diagnosis from the DPCR or antidepressant prescription from the DNPR. Diabetes was identified using the Danish National Diabetes Register. The risk of all-cause dementia associated with diabetes, depression or both was estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models that adjusted for potential confounding factors such as demographics and potential intermediates such as medical comorbidity. Results During 13,834,645 million person-years of follow-up, 59,663 (2.4%) developed dementia of whom 6,466 (10.8%) had diabetes, 15,729 (26.4%) had depression and 4,022 (6.7%) had both. The adjusted hazard ratio of developing all-cause dementia was 1.83 (95% confidence interval: 1.80, 1.87) for persons with depression, 1.20 (95% CI: 1.17, 1.23) for persons with diabetes, and 2.17 (95% CI: 2.10, 2.24) for those with both as compared to those with neither. The excess risk of all-cause dementia observed for individuals with comorbid depression and diabetes surpassed the summed risk associated with the two individually, especially for younger

  9. Prospective study of self-reported diabetes and risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Wen; Freedman, Neal D.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Abnet, Christian C.

    2011-01-01

    Background While gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA) incidence rates in the US have decreased, the rates of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC) have increased. Obesity increases the risks of GCA and EADC, and the associations may be partially mediated by insulin resistance. A few case-control studies have shown an association between diabetes and an increased risk of EADC. Methods We prospectively examined the association between diabetes and upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancers in a cohort of 469,448 people in the US, ages 50-71 at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for diabetes and UGI cancers, controlling for multiple potential confounders, including body mass index (BMI). Results We observed no association of self-reported diabetes with risk of EADC, HR (95%CI) = 0.98 (0.73-1.31), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), HR (95%CI) = 1.02 (0.60-1.74), or GNCA, HR (95%CI) = 0.98 (0.70-1.37). However, diabetes was significantly associated with an increased risk of GCA, HR (95%CI) = 1.89 (1.43-2.50). The significant association between diabetes and risk of GCA remained after adjustment for BMI, HR (95%CI) = 1.70 (1.28-2.26) and did not differ by BMI strata (pinteraction =0.83). The significant association was unchanged when restricting to only overweight subjects (BMI 25 - ≤30), HR (95%CI) = 1.83 (1.18-2.85). Conclusions We found a significant association between self-reported diabetes and increased risk of GCA. Impact Our results suggest that the metabolic and hormonal changes related to diabetes may play a role in the etiology of GCA independently from BMI. PMID:21415356

  10. Increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Janson, Juliette; Laedtke, Thomas; Parisi, Joseph E; O'Brien, Peter; Petersen, Ronald C; Butler, Peter C

    2004-02-01

    Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes are characterized by increased prevalence with aging, a genetic predisposition, and comparable pathological features in the islet and brain (amyloid derived from amyloid beta protein in the brain in Alzheimer disease and islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes). Evidence is growing to link precursors of amyloid deposition in the brain and pancreas with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Given these similarities, we questioned whether there may be a common underlying mechanism predisposing to islet and cerebral amyloid. To address this, we first examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in a community-based controlled study, the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer Disease Patient Registry (ADPR), which follows patients with Alzheimer disease versus control subjects without Alzheimer disease. In addition to this clinical study, we performed a pathological study of autopsy cases from this same community to determine whether there is an increased prevalence of islet amyloid in patients with Alzheimer disease and increased prevalence of cerebral amyloid in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients who were enrolled in the ADPR (Alzheimer disease n = 100, non-Alzheimer disease control subjects n = 138) were classified according to fasting glucose concentration (FPG) as nondiabetic (FPG <110 mg/dl), impaired fasting glucose (IFG, FPG 110-125 mg/dl), and type 2 diabetes (FPG >126 mg/dl). The mean slope of FPG over 10 years in each case was also compared between Alzheimer disease and non-Alzheimer disease control subjects. Pancreas and brain were examined from autopsy specimens obtained from 105 humans (first, 28 cases of Alzheimer disease disease vs. 21 non-Alzheimer disease control subjects and, second, 35 subjects with type 2 diabetes vs. 21 non-type 2 diabetes control subjects) for the presence of islet and brain amyloid. Both type 2 diabetes (35% vs. 18%; P < 0

  11. Rational Risk-Benefit Decision-Making in the Setting of Military Mefloquine Policy.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L

    2015-01-01

    Mefloquine is an antimalarial drug that has been commonly used in military settings since its development by the US military in the late 1980s. Owing to the drug's neuropsychiatric contraindications and its high rate of inducing neuropsychiatric symptoms, which are contraindications to the drug's continued use, the routine prescribing of mefloquine in military settings may be problematic. Due to these considerations and to recent concerns of chronic and potentially permanent psychiatric and neurological sequelae arising from drug toxicity, military prescribing of mefloquine has recently decreased. In settings where mefloquine remains available, policies governing prescribing should reflect risk-benefit decision-making informed by the drug's perceived benefits and by consideration both of the risks identified in the drug's labeling and of specific military risks associated with its use. In this review, these risks are identified and recommendations are made for the rational prescribing of the drug in light of current evidence.

  12. Rational Risk-Benefit Decision-Making in the Setting of Military Mefloquine Policy

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Remington L.

    2015-01-01

    Mefloquine is an antimalarial drug that has been commonly used in military settings since its development by the US military in the late 1980s. Owing to the drug's neuropsychiatric contraindications and its high rate of inducing neuropsychiatric symptoms, which are contraindications to the drug's continued use, the routine prescribing of mefloquine in military settings may be problematic. Due to these considerations and to recent concerns of chronic and potentially permanent psychiatric and neurological sequelae arising from drug toxicity, military prescribing of mefloquine has recently decreased. In settings where mefloquine remains available, policies governing prescribing should reflect risk-benefit decision-making informed by the drug's perceived benefits and by consideration both of the risks identified in the drug's labeling and of specific military risks associated with its use. In this review, these risks are identified and recommendations are made for the rational prescribing of the drug in light of current evidence. PMID:26579231

  13. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  14. Depression in romanian patients with type 2 diabetes: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, ANDREIA S.; IANCU, SILVIA S.; DUMA, LIVIA; MURESEANU, CAMELIA; BABAN, ADRIANA S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Co-existing major depression was found to have a negative impact on the diabetes outcome and the quality of life. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Romanian diabetes patients and to identify the risk factors associated with depression. Methods A total of 144 type 2 diabetes patients were included in the study. Five models of presumed predictors were used to assess the risk factors for depressive symptoms, using hierarchical regression analysis. Together with demographics, disease, lifestyle predictors, previous depressive symptoms and diabetes distress were taken into account. Results In our sample the prevalence of depression was 12.6%. Main risk factors for depressive symptoms were previous depressive symptoms which were associated with depression in both Model 4 (β=0.297, p=0.013) and Model 5 (β=0.239, p=0.017) and diabetes distress in Model 5 (β=0.540, p≤0.001). Employment (β =−0.276, p=0.029) and increased number of diabetes complications (β=0.236, p=0.017) became significant when diabetes distress was added to the analysis. Conclusions The overall prevalence of depressive symptoms was found to be in range with the prevalence identified in the literature. Previous depression and diabetes distress were both independently associated with depression, confirming the bidirectional relationship between depression and diabetes distress. Due to the consequences for daily living, screening for diabetes distress and depression should be done in primary care units both by physicians and trained nurses. PMID:27547056

  15. Is serum retinol binding protein-4: A predictor for diabetes in genetically high risk population?

    PubMed Central

    Bose, K. Subhash Chandra; Gupta, Shachin K.; Singh, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Retinol binding protein-4 (BP-4) a new adipocytokine, specifically binds to retinol, through experimental studies, reported its link between obesity and insulin resistance (IR). But till date no studies are available on influence of genetic predisposition of diabetes on RBP-4 expression. Hence, we aimed to study the influence of genetic predisposition of diabetes on the serum RBP-4 and its role in development of IR and diabetes in genetically high risk population. Materials and Methods: Healthy non diabetic individuals (age 18 to 22) were grouped into Group I: Control (n = 81), whose parents are non diabetic, non hypertensive and does not have any family history of coronary heart diseases. Group II: (n = 157) with one of their parents diabetic and Group III: (n = 47) with both parents diabetic. In all the participants, we estimated fasting serum RBP-4, insulin and glucose. Homeostasis model for assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and homeostasis model for assessment-beta cell dysfunction (HOMA-B) were calculated from fasting serum insulin and glucose levels. Results: In this study, we observed significantly higher RBP-4 levels 12.71 ± 2.3 in Group-II and 13.25 ± 2 in Group-III, respectively when compared to Group-I 11.4 ± 1.8 (P < 0.01). RBP-4 showed a significantly strong positive correlation with plasma insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR in genetically high risk population (group II and III) P < 0.01. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong positive association of RBP-4 with parental diabetes even after adjusting for BMI, age and sex (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.089-1.40). Conclusion: Higher serum RBP-4 and its positive correlation with Insulin, glucose, and HOMA-IR in healthy non diabetic participants of genetically high risk population, indicating its role as predictor for the onset of diabetes in coming future. PMID:23833574

  16. Association of Mediterranean diet and cardiorespiratory fitness with the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Bantle, Anne E; Chow, Lisa S; Steffen, Lyn M; Wang, Qi; Hughes, John; Durant, Nefertiti H; Ingram, Katherine H; Reis, Jared P; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To better understand the association between a modified Mediterranean diet pattern in young adulthood, cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, and the odds of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age. Research design and methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who did not have pre-diabetes or diabetes at baseline (year 0 (Y0), ages 18–30) and who had data available at the Y0 and year 25 (Y25) visits were included in this analysis (n=3358). Polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the association between baseline dietary intake and fitness data and odds of pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age (Y25, ages 43–55). Results At the Y25 visit, 1319 participants (39%) had pre-diabetes and 393 (12%) had diabetes. Higher baseline fitness was associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes at Y25. After adjustment for covariates, each SD increment in treadmill duration (181 s) was associated with lower odds for pre-diabetes (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95, p=0.005) and for diabetes (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.85, p=0.0002) when compared to normal glycemia. A modified Mediterranean diet pattern was not associated with either pre-diabetes or diabetes. No interaction between cardiorespiratory fitness and dietary intake was observed, but baseline fitness remained independently associated with incident pre-diabetes and diabetes following adjustment for diet. Conclusions Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, but not a modified Mediterranean diet pattern, is associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes in middle age. Trial registration number NCT00005130.

  17. Association of Mediterranean diet and cardiorespiratory fitness with the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Bantle, Anne E; Chow, Lisa S; Steffen, Lyn M; Wang, Qi; Hughes, John; Durant, Nefertiti H; Ingram, Katherine H; Reis, Jared P; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To better understand the association between a modified Mediterranean diet pattern in young adulthood, cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, and the odds of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age. Research design and methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who did not have pre-diabetes or diabetes at baseline (year 0 (Y0), ages 18–30) and who had data available at the Y0 and year 25 (Y25) visits were included in this analysis (n=3358). Polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the association between baseline dietary intake and fitness data and odds of pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age (Y25, ages 43–55). Results At the Y25 visit, 1319 participants (39%) had pre-diabetes and 393 (12%) had diabetes. Higher baseline fitness was associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes at Y25. After adjustment for covariates, each SD increment in treadmill duration (181 s) was associated with lower odds for pre-diabetes (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95, p=0.005) and for diabetes (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.85, p=0.0002) when compared to normal glycemia. A modified Mediterranean diet pattern was not associated with either pre-diabetes or diabetes. No interaction between cardiorespiratory fitness and dietary intake was observed, but baseline fitness remained independently associated with incident pre-diabetes and diabetes following adjustment for diet. Conclusions Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, but not a modified Mediterranean diet pattern, is associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes in middle age. Trial registration number NCT00005130. PMID:27648287

  18. Ten-year Diabetes Risk Forecast in the Capital of Jordan: Arab Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire Perspective-A Strobe-Complaint Article.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Alghwiri, Alia A; Awad, Hamzeh; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in Jordan has been increasing. The early diagnosis of diabetes is vital to slow its progression. The Arab Risk (ARABRISK) screening tool is a self-administered questionnaire used to determine people who are at high risk for developing diabetes. This study aimed to identify people at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes by using the ARABRISK in the capital of Jordan.A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of people in the capital of Jordan. The ARABRISK screening tool was administered to identify the participants' risk for developing diabetes. In addition to descriptive statistics, percentages of the ARABRISK categories were represented, and an independent samples t test was used to explore the differences between men and women. A total of 513 participants with a mean age of 51.94 (SD = 10.33) were recruited; 64.9% of the participants were men (n = 333).The total ARABRISK score ranged from 0 to 25 with a mean score of 12.30 (SD = 4.76). Using the independent samples t test, women (mean = 13.25, SE = 0.10) had significantly higher ARABRISK total scores than men did (mean = 12.95, SE = 0.09), t(141) = -2.23, P = 0.03 in the "moderate risk" category. All of the items in the ARABRISK questionnaire were found to be good predictors of the ARABRISK total scores. Among them, age, body mass index (BMI), and high blood glucose (HBG) were the best predictors as indicated by the standardized regression coefficient (β). Older age, obesity, elevated weight circumference, absence of daily physical activity, daily consumption of fruits/vegetables, presence of high blood pressure (HBP), and HBG were significantly associated with increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores. Neither a history of gestational diabetes nor a positive family history was associated with an increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores.By identifying risk factors in these participants, interventions and lifestyle

  19. Ten-year Diabetes Risk Forecast in the Capital of Jordan: Arab Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire Perspective-A Strobe-Complaint Article.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Alghwiri, Alia A; Awad, Hamzeh; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in Jordan has been increasing. The early diagnosis of diabetes is vital to slow its progression. The Arab Risk (ARABRISK) screening tool is a self-administered questionnaire used to determine people who are at high risk for developing diabetes. This study aimed to identify people at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes by using the ARABRISK in the capital of Jordan.A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of people in the capital of Jordan. The ARABRISK screening tool was administered to identify the participants' risk for developing diabetes. In addition to descriptive statistics, percentages of the ARABRISK categories were represented, and an independent samples t test was used to explore the differences between men and women. A total of 513 participants with a mean age of 51.94 (SD = 10.33) were recruited; 64.9% of the participants were men (n = 333).The total ARABRISK score ranged from 0 to 25 with a mean score of 12.30 (SD = 4.76). Using the independent samples t test, women (mean = 13.25, SE = 0.10) had significantly higher ARABRISK total scores than men did (mean = 12.95, SE = 0.09), t(141) = -2.23, P = 0.03 in the "moderate risk" category. All of the items in the ARABRISK questionnaire were found to be good predictors of the ARABRISK total scores. Among them, age, body mass index (BMI), and high blood glucose (HBG) were the best predictors as indicated by the standardized regression coefficient (β). Older age, obesity, elevated weight circumference, absence of daily physical activity, daily consumption of fruits/vegetables, presence of high blood pressure (HBP), and HBG were significantly associated with increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores. Neither a history of gestational diabetes nor a positive family history was associated with an increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores.By identifying risk factors in these participants, interventions and lifestyle

  20. Menopausal Estrogen Therapy Benefits and Risks Vary by Age, WHI Analysis Suggests | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term follow-up data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) provide important new information about the potential risks and benefits of hormone therapy to treat symptoms or conditions related to menopause, including its effect on breast cancer risk. The results were published April 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. |

  1. Risk and benefit perceptions of mobile phone and base station technology in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    van Kleef, Ellen; Fischer, Arnout R H; Khan, Moin; Frewer, Lynn J

    2010-06-01

    Research in developed countries showed that many citizens perceive that radio signals transmitted by mobile phones and base stations represent potential health risks. Less research has been conducted in developing countries focused on citizen perceptions of risks and benefits, despite the recent and rapid introduction of mobile communication technologies. This study aims to identify factors that are influential in determining the tradeoffs that Bangladeshi citizens make between risks and benefits in terms of mobile phone technology acceptance and health concerns associated with the technology. Bangladesh was selected as representative of many developing countries inasmuch as terrestrial telephone infrastructure is insubstantial, and mobile phone use has expanded rapidly over the last decade, even among the poor. Issues of importance were identified in a small-scale qualitative study among Bangladeshi citizens (n = 13), followed by a survey within a sample of Bangladeshi citizens (n = 500). The results demonstrate that, in general, the perceived benefits of mobile phone technology outweigh the risks. The perceived benefits are primarily related to the social and personal advantages of mobile phone use, including the ability to receive emergency news about floods, cyclones, and other natural disasters. Base stations were seen as a symbol of societal advance. The results furthermore suggest that overall risk perceptions are relatively low, in particular health risks, and are primarily driven by perceptions that related to crime and social inconvenience. Perceived health risks are relatively small. These findings show that risk communication and management may be particularly effective when contextual factors of the society where the system is implemented are taken into consideration.

  2. Ethnic differences in control of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes attending an Inner London diabetes clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, T A; Lasker, S S; Mahfuz, R

    2006-01-01

    Background South Asians have higher risk of diabetic complications compared with white Europeans. The aim of this study was to compare management of cardiovascular risk factors between Bangladeshis and white Europeans. Methods A retrospective survey of all diabetic patients attending an Inner London hospital diabetic clinic over one year was undertaken. Data were obtained from the hospital diabetes database: presence of macrovascular (myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, transient ischaemic attack, cardiac intervention) and microvascular disease (neuropathy, retinopathy, and nephropathy), glycated haemoglobin, blood pressure, lipids, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) were all determined. Results A total of 1162 white European and 912 Bangladeshi patients with full data available were included in the analyses. The groups were equivalent in age, sex, duration of diabetes. Compared with white Europeans, Bangladeshis had more macrovascular disease (19.5% v 11.9% p<0.01), sight threatening retinopathy (7.2% v 3.8%, p<0.01), and nephropathy (15.3% v 9.1%, p<0.01). In addition, Bangladeshis had significantly more male smokers (28.1% v 22.1%, p<0.01), poorer glycaemic control (mean HbA1c 8.6% v 8.1%, p = 0.039), greater proportion with uncontrolled hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol >5.0 mmol/l, 31.6% v 26% p = 0.05), and poorer control of blood pressure (proportion with BP >140/80 mm Hg, 43.2% v 32.1%, p<0.01). Conclusions South Asians with type 2 diabetes have poorer glycaemic, blood pressure, and lipid control than white Europeans. The reasons for this are probably multifactorial. PMID:16517804

  3. Insulin-like growth factor axis and risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

    PubMed

    Rajpathak, Swapnil N; He, Meian; Sun, Qi; Kaplan, Robert C; Muzumdar, Radhika; Rohan, Thomas E; Gunter, Marc J; Pollak, Michael; Kim, Mimi; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Beasley, Jeannette; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Hu, Frank B; Strickler, Howard D

    2012-09-01

    IGF-I shares structural homology and in vitro metabolic activity with insulin. Laboratory models suggest that IGF-I and its binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 have potentially beneficial effects on diabetes risk, whereas IGFBP-3 may have adverse effects. We therefore conducted a prospective nested case-control investigation of incident diabetes (n = 742 case subjects matched 1:1 to control subjects) and its associations with IGF-axis protein levels in the Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of middle-aged women. The median time to diabetes was 9 years. Statistical analyses were adjusted for multiple risk factors, including insulin and C-reactive protein. Diabetes risk was fivefold lower among women with baseline IGFBP-2 levels in the top versus bottom quintile (odds ratio [OR](q5-q1) = 0.17 [95% CI 0.08-0.35]; P trend < 0.0001) and was also negatively associated with IGFBP-1 levels (OR(q5-q1) = 0.37 [0.18-0.73]; P trend = 0.0009). IGFBP-3 was positively associated with diabetes (OR(q5-q1) = 2.05 [1.20-3.51]; P trend = 0.002). Diabetes was not associated with total IGF-I levels, but free IGF-I and diabetes had a significant association that varied (P interaction = 0.003) by insulin levels above the median (OR(q5-q1) = 0.48 [0.26-0.90]; P trend = 0.0001) versus below the median (OR(q5-q1) = 2.52 [1.05-6.06]; P trend < 0.05). Thus, this prospective study found strong associations of incident diabetes with baseline levels of three IGFBPs and free IGF-I, consistent with hypotheses that the IGF axis might influence diabetes risk.

  4. Health benefits and potential risks related to consumption of fish or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Kirpal S

    2003-12-01

    The nutritional benefits of fish consumption relate to the utilization of proteins of high biological value, as well as certain minerals and vitamins that fish provide. Fish or fish oil contains omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that appear to play several useful roles for human health. Conversely, some carcinogenic contaminants are also stored in the adipose tissue of fish. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential health benefits and risks related to the consumption of fish or fish oil. Health benefits related to the consumption of fish or omega-3 PUFAs were obtained by an extensive literature search. Potential health risks related to carcinogenic contaminants (e.g., dioxin, PCB, etc.) in fish were estimated using the U.S. EPA-approved cancer risk assessment guidelines. Potential health risk estimates were evaluated by comparing them with the acceptable excess risk level of 10(-6)-10(-4). Scientific data indicate that the consumption of fish or fish oil containing omega-3 PUFAs reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, decreases mild hypertension, and prevents certain cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. Risk estimates in humans for carcinogenic environmental contaminants in fish ranged from an excess risk level of 3x10(-6)-9x10(-4). These risk estimates appeared to meet the acceptable excess risk level criteria. Therefore, consumption of fish in accordance with the State of Michigan Fish Advisory Guidelines is safe and should be encouraged. The top 11 fish species [e.g., sardines, mackerel, herring (Atlantic and Pacific), lake trout, salmon (Chinook, Atlantic, and Sockeye), anchovy (European), sablefish, and bluefish] provide an adequate amount of omega-3 PUFAs (2.7-7.5g/meal) and appear to meet the nutritional recommendation of the American Heart Association.

  5. Are the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Associated With Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Daisy; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; He, Ka; Jacobs, David R.; Shikany, James M.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the prospective association between accordance with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and subsequent diabetes incidence and changes in cardiometabolic risk factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The sample consisted of 4,381 black and white young adults examined repeatedly from 1985 to 2005. We used the 2005 Diet Quality Index (DQI) to rate participants’ diets based on meeting key dietary recommendations conveyed by the 2005 DGA. RESULTS Overall, we found no association between DQI score and diabetes risk using Cox models adjusted for potential confounders. Higher DQI scores were associated with favorable changes in HDL cholesterol and blood pressure overall (P for trend <0.05), but with increased insulin resistance among blacks (P for trend <0.01). CONCLUSIONS Our findings highlight the need for evaluation of the DGA’s effectiveness, particularly among ethnic minority populations. Clinicians should be aware that following the DGA might not lower diabetes risk. PMID:21478463

  6. Levels of albuminuria and risk of developing macroalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes: historical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Shoma; Fujita, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Akifumi; Hayashi, Akinori; Ichikawa, Raishi; Kamata, Yuji; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Takano, Koji; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Although increased urinary albumin excretion may increase the risk of adverse renal outcomes in patients with diabetes, it remains unclear whether microalbuminuria is associated with a higher incidence of macroalbuminuria in the absence of non-diabetic kidney events that frequently develop during the long-term course of type 2 diabetes. This historical cohort study included patients with type 2 diabetes, spot urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) <300 mg/gCr and normal serum creatinine concentrations treated between August 1988 and April 2015. Patients with any evidence suggesting non-diabetic kidney diseases at baseline were excluded. Over a median follow-up of 50 months, 70 of the 1760 included patients developed macroalbuminuria. Twenty-one of these patients were diagnosed with non-diabetic renal events. The five-year cumulative incidence of macroalbuminuria in patients with ACRs of 0–7.5 mg/gCr, 7.5–30 mg/gCr, 30–150 mg/gCr, and 150–300 mg/gCr were 0%, 0.53%, 3.5%, and 36.0%, respectively, with significant differences between each pair of ACR categories. In type 2 diabetes, higher urinary ACR, even within a level of normoalbuminuria, was associated with a greater incidence of macroalbuminuria when non-diabetic renal events were excluded. These results conflict with findings suggesting that microalbuminuria is a poor indicator for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27210499

  7. A national approach to diabetes foot risk stratification and foot care.

    PubMed

    Leese, G P; Stang, D; Pearson, D W

    2011-08-01

    The Scottish Diabetes Foot Action Group (SDG) has developed and introduced a national strategy plan for diabetic foot care across Scotland. This has involved the implementation of an evidence-based national foot screening and risk stratification programme that has already covered 61% of the population in just the first two years. Nationally agreed patient information foot leaflets and professional education material have been introduced, and a consensus for antibiotic use in the diabetic foot has been published. Information on multidisciplinary specialist foot services has been collected, indicating that 58% of Health Board areas have consultants with dedicated sessions in their job plan to a foot clinic, and 42% had integrated orthotic involvement. The SDG aims to increase these figures. Work has been undertaken to support local podiatry networks and improve communication between the specialist centre and the community. At a national level the SDG is working with Foot in Diabetes UK (FDUK) to recognize key podiatry skills by developing core competencies and a competency framework for the diabetes podiatrist and diabetes orthotist. The annual Scottish Diabetes Survey indicates some improvement in amputation rates with prevalence decreasing from 0.8% to 0.5%, and improved recording of foot ulceration at a national level. This national strategy has helped highlight the importance and difficulties facing diabetes foot care and should help to continue to improve the quality of care of people with diabetes who have foot-related problems.

  8. Validation of a Multimarker Model for Assessing Risk of Type 2 Diabetes from a Five-Year Prospective Study of 6784 Danish People (Inter99)

    PubMed Central

    Urdea, Mickey; Kolberg, Janice; Wilber, Judith; Gerwien, Robert; Moler, Edward; Rowe, Michael; Jorgensen, Paul; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Jørgensen, Torben; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Background Improved identification of subjects at high risk for development of type 2 diabetes would allow preventive interventions to be targeted toward individuals most likely to benefit. In previous research, predictive biomarkers were identified and used to develop multivariate models to assess an individual's risk of developing diabetes. Here we describe the training and validation of the PreDx™ Diabetes Risk Score (DRS) model in a clinical laboratory setting using baseline serum samples from subjects in the Inter99 cohort, a population-based primary prevention study of cardiovascular disease. Methods Among 6784 subjects free of diabetes at baseline, 215 subjects progressed to diabetes (converters) during five years of follow-up. A nested case-control study was performed using serum samples from 202 converters and 597 randomly selected nonconverters. Samples were randomly assigned to equally sized training and validation sets. Seven biomarkers were measured using assays developed for use in a clinical reference laboratory. Results The PreDx DRS model performed better on the training set (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.837) than fasting plasma glucose alone (AUC = 0.779). When applied to the sequestered validation set, the PreDx DRS showed the same performance (AUC = 0.838), thus validating the model. This model had a better AUC than any other single measure from a fasting sample. Moreover, the model provided further risk stratification among high-risk subpopulations with impaired fasting glucose or metabolic syndrome. Conclusions The PreDx DRS provides the absolute risk of diabetes conversion in five years for subjects identified to be “at risk” using the clinical factors. PMID:20144324

  9. [Children with Multiple Risk Factor Exposition Benefit from the German "Strengthening Families Program"].

    PubMed

    Bröning, Sonja; Sack, Peter-Michael; Thomsen, Monika; Thomasius, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Children with Multiple Risk Factor Exposition Benefit from the German "Strengthening Families Program" The German adaptation of the substance use-preventive family-based Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (SFP, Iowa version) was evaluated in a longitudinal two-year follow-up trial. Participants were N = 292 children with a mean age of twelve years at baseline, and N = 292 parents. We employed a multi-centric, randomized-controlled, two-armed (SFP vs. minimal control condition) study design. Following a "risk moderation hypothesis", we assumed that children with an elevated risk-exposition R(+) would benefit more than children with a low risk-exposition R(-) irrespective of the preventive intervention, and that R(+) under SFP would benefit more than R(+) under the minimal control condition. "Risk-exposition" was measured in correspondence with the Communities That Care Youth Survey-questionnaire. A total of 28 % of children were classified with an elevated risk level. Children's reports confirmed our hypothesis: R(+) report a total of eleven improvements, four of these being significantly more distinct than in the other groups (Anxiety-Depressivity, Punitive Parenting of mother, Punitive Parenting of father, Unbalanced family functioning). In three measures an improvement appears solely in R(+) under SFP (Satisfaction with family functioning, School Attachment and Peer Relationship Quality, Quality of Life). Parents' reports showed a similar tendency, but were less pronounced. PMID:27595812

  10. Diabetic Foot and Risk: How to Prevent Losing Your Leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... Midfoot Ailments of the Heel Ailments of the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot ... Procedures Treatments of the Ankle Treatments of the Big Toe Treatments of the Heel Treatments of the ...

  11. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  12. Diabetes and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lu, Shelly C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Marchand, Loic Le; Henderson, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes is an emerging risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but prospective data from different ethnic populations are scarce. We examined the association between diabetes and HCC in 168679 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos and whites in the Multiethnic Cohort. Methods During a 15.7-year follow up period, 470 incident HCC cases were identified. Risk factor data were obtained from the baseline questionnaire. Cox regressions were used to calculate hazard rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for HCC associated with self-reported diabetes. The population attributable risk percent associated with diabetes was also calculated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The RRs for developing HCC (vs whites) were 2.73 (95% CI = 2.00 to 3.72) for Latinos, 2.48 (95% CI = 1.59 to 3.87) for Hawaiians, 2.16 (95% CI = 1.52 to 3.07) for African Americans, and 2.05 (95% CI = 1.50 to 2.81) for Japanese. Diabetes was associated with HCC across ethnic groups (RRLatinos = 3.36 [95% CI = 2.41 to 4.70], RRHawaiians = 2.50 [95% CI = 1.11 to 5.64], RRJapanese = 2.34 [95% CI = 1.60 to 3.41], RRwhites = 2.15 [95% CI = 0.95 to 4.90], and RRAfrican Americans = 2.02 [95% CI = 1.17 to 3.48]). We estimated that 27% of HCC cases in Latinos, 18% in Hawaiians, 13% in African Americans, 12% in Japanese, and 6% in whites were attributed to diabetes. Conclusions Latinos were at the highest risk of developing HCC, followed by Native Hawaiians, African Americans, Japanese and whites. Diabetes is a risk factor for HCC in all ethnic groups, and eliminating diabetes could potentially reduce HCC incidence in all ethnic groups, with the largest potential for reduction in Latinos. PMID:25326644

  13. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration. PMID:27302713

  14. Decision making for animal health and welfare: integrating risk-benefit analysis with prospect theory.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Helena; Lagerkvist, Carl Johan

    2014-06-01

    This study integrated risk-benefit analysis with prospect theory with the overall objective of identifying the type of management behavior represented by farmers' choices of mastitis control options (MCOs). Two exploratory factor analyses, based on 163 and 175 Swedish farmers, respectively, highlighted attitudes to MCOs related to: (1) grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent spread of existing infection and (2) working in a precautionary way to prevent mastitis occurring. This was interpreted as being based on (1) reactive management behavior on detection of udder-health problems in individual cows and (2) proactive management behavior to prevent mastitis developing. Farmers' assessments of these MCOs were found to be based on asymmetrical evaluations of risks and benefits, suggesting that farmers' management behavior depends on their individual reference point. In particular, attitudes to MCOs related to grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent the spread of mastitis once infected cows were detected were stronger in the risk domain than in the benefit domain, in accordance with loss aversion. In contrast, attitudes to MCOs related to working in a precautionary way to prevent cows from becoming infected in the first place were stronger in the benefit domain than in the risk domain, in accordance with reverse loss aversion. These findings are of practical importance for farmers and agribusiness and in public health protection work to reduce the current extensive use of antibiotics in dairy herds. PMID:24372180

  15. Decision Making for Animal Health and Welfare: Integrating Risk-Benefit Analysis with Prospect Theory

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Helena; Lagerkvist, Carl Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study integrated risk-benefit analysis with prospect theory with the overall objective of identifying the type of management behavior represented by farmers’ choices of mastitis control options (MCOs). Two exploratory factor analyses, based on 163 and 175 Swedish farmers, respectively, highlighted attitudes to MCOs related to: (1) grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent spread of existing infection and (2) working in a precautionary way to prevent mastitis occurring. This was interpreted as being based on (1) reactive management behavior on detection of udder-health problems in individual cows and (2) proactive management behavior to prevent mastitis developing. Farmers’ assessments of these MCOs were found to be based on asymmetrical evaluations of risks and benefits, suggesting that farmers’ management behavior depends on their individual reference point. In particular, attitudes to MCOs related to grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent the spread of mastitis once infected cows were detected were stronger in the risk domain than in the benefit domain, in accordance with loss aversion. In contrast, attitudes to MCOs related to working in a precautionary way to prevent cows from becoming infected in the first place were stronger in the benefit domain than in the risk domain, in accordance with reverse loss aversion. These findings are of practical importance for farmers and agribusiness and in public health protection work to reduce the current extensive use of antibiotics in dairy herds. PMID:24372180

  16. Detectable Risks in Studies of the Fetal Benefits of Maternal Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheon, Jennifer A.; Fell, Deshayne B.; Jackson, Michael L.; Kramer, Michael S.; Ortiz, Justin R.; Savitz, David A.; Platt, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal influenza vaccination prevents influenza illness in both mothers and newborns. Results from some recent studies have suggested that influenza vaccination might also prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth. However, it is challenging to conduct epidemiologic studies to evaluate the benefits to the fetus of maternal influenza vaccination because the causal benefit of vaccination is likely only experienced by the small fraction of the cohort in whom influenza illness is prevented by vaccination. The plausibility of detecting true differences in risks between groups under such conditions is rarely discussed. We aimed to inform the interpretation of studies in which the fetal benefits of maternal influenza vaccination are evaluated by estimating detectable risk ratios and necessary sample sizes for different study scenarios. Estimates of rates of influenza illness, vaccine effectiveness, vaccine uptake, and preterm birth and of the association of influenza illness with preterm birth were identified from the published literature. We calculated detectable risk ratios for preterm birth in vaccinated versus unvaccinated women and the associated sample size requirements. Our results demonstrated that under most scenarios, plausible differences between groups will be extremely challenging to detect (risk ratios for preterm birth of 0.9 to 1.0) and will require sample sizes infeasible for prospective epidemiologic research. This suggests that the large fetal benefits from influenza vaccination observed in epidemiologic studies are unlikely to be causal. PMID:27365363

  17. Decision making for animal health and welfare: integrating risk-benefit analysis with prospect theory.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Helena; Lagerkvist, Carl Johan

    2014-06-01

    This study integrated risk-benefit analysis with prospect theory with the overall objective of identifying the type of management behavior represented by farmers' choices of mastitis control options (MCOs). Two exploratory factor analyses, based on 163 and 175 Swedish farmers, respectively, highlighted attitudes to MCOs related to: (1) grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent spread of existing infection and (2) working in a precautionary way to prevent mastitis occurring. This was interpreted as being based on (1) reactive management behavior on detection of udder-health problems in individual cows and (2) proactive management behavior to prevent mastitis developing. Farmers' assessments of these MCOs were found to be based on asymmetrical evaluations of risks and benefits, suggesting that farmers' management behavior depends on their individual reference point. In particular, attitudes to MCOs related to grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent the spread of mastitis once infected cows were detected were stronger in the risk domain than in the benefit domain, in accordance with loss aversion. In contrast, attitudes to MCOs related to working in a precautionary way to prevent cows from becoming infected in the first place were stronger in the benefit domain than in the risk domain, in accordance with reverse loss aversion. These findings are of practical importance for farmers and agribusiness and in public health protection work to reduce the current extensive use of antibiotics in dairy herds.

  18. Need for Physician Education on the Benefits and Risks of Male Circumcision in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbery, Baevin; Zhu, Julia; Gust, Deborah A.; Chen, Robert T.; Kretsinger, Katrina; Kilmarx, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Physicians may be called upon to counsel male patients or parents of newborn males regarding their decision to circumcise their newborn sons. The purpose of the present study was to describe physicians who do not understand the benefits and risks associated with male circumcision well enough to counsel parents of newborn male infants and adult…

  19. Prophylactic surgery prior to extended-duration space flight: Is the benefit worth the risk?

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Williams, David R.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Polk, J.D.; Vanderploeg, James M.; Talamini, Mark A.; Campbell, Mark R.; Broderick, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the potential benefits and defined risks associated with prophylactic surgical procedures for astronauts before extended-duration space flight. This includes, but is not limited to, appendectomy and cholecystesctomy. Furthermore, discussion of treatment during space flight, potential impact of an acute illness on a defined mission and the ethical issues surrounding this concept are debated in detail. PMID:22564516

  20. 7 CFR 2.71 - Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis. 2.71 Section 2.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENT Delegations of Authority by...

  1. 7 CFR 2.71 - Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis. 2.71 Section 2.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENT Delegations of Authority by...

  2. Vaccine Risk/Benefit Communication: Effect of an Educational Package for Public Health Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Terry C.; Fredrickson, Doren D.; Kennen, Estela M.; Humiston, Sharon G.; Arnold, Connie L.; Quinlin, Mackey S.; Bocchini, Joseph A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an in-service for public health nurses (PHNs) and accompanying educational materials could improve vaccine risk/benefit communication. The content and timing of vaccine communication were recorded during 246 pre-and 217 post-intervention visits in two public health immunization clinics.…

  3. The Risks and Benefits of Snow Sports for People with Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasuti, Gabriella; Temple, Viviene A.

    2010-01-01

    Snow sports are popular pastimes with therapeutic potential. The aim of this review is to evaluate the risk of injury and evidence of benefits of alpine skiing (including sit-skiing), Nordic skiing, and snowboarding for people with disabilities. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria from 357 citations. Research in this area is still in its…

  4. Redefining Risk and Benefit: Understanding the Decision to Undergo Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rendle, Katharine A S; Halley, Meghan C; May, Suepattra G; Frosch, Dominick L

    2015-09-01

    Rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among unilateral breast cancer patients are rapidly increasing; however, there are little data documenting the decision-making process of patients with no known BRCA mutations, who elect this more aggressive treatment. We conducted semistructured interviews with nine newly diagnosed patients who elected CPM over other surgical options. Using grounded theory, we analyzed interview data to identify influential decision-making factors by prevalence and intensity across participants. Decision-making factors included subjective evaluations of risk and benefit, avoidance of future breast cancer surveillance and accompanying worry, and desire to maintain (or improve) breast appearance. Based solely on survival benefit, the decision to undergo CPM might be viewed as unnecessary or even misguided. However, our findings show the importance of psychosocial factors in patients' assessments of risk and benefit, and support the need for additional patient-provider communication regarding these factors. PMID:25371380

  5. Eliciting benefit-risk preferences and probability-weighted utility using choice-format conjoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Houtven, George; Johnson, F Reed; Kilambi, Vikram; Hauber, A Brett

    2011-01-01

    This study applies conjoint analysis to estimate health-related benefit-risk tradeoffs in a non-expected-utility framework. We demonstrate how this method can be used to test for and estimate nonlinear weighting of adverse-event probabilities and we explore the implications of nonlinear weighting on maximum acceptable risk (MAR) measures of risk tolerance. We obtained preference data from 570 Crohn's disease patients using a web-enabled conjoint survey. Respondents were presented with choice tasks involving treatment options that involve different efficacy benefits and different mortality risks for 3 possible side effects. Using conditional logit maximum likelihood estimation, we estimate preference parameters using 3 models that allow for nonlinear preference weighting of risks--a categorical model, a simple-weighting model, and a rank dependent utility (RDU) model. For the second 2 models we specify and jointly estimate 1- and 2-parameter probability weighting functions. Although the 2-parameter functions are more flexible, estimation of the 1-parameter functions generally performed better. Despite well-known conceptual limitations, the simple-weighting model allows us to estimate weighting function parameters that vary across 3 risk types, and we find some evidence of statistically significant differences across risks. The parameter estimates from RDU model with the single-parameter weighting function provide the most robust estimates of MAR. For an improvement in Crohn's symptom severity from moderate and mild, we estimate maximum 10-year mortality risk tolerances ranging from 2.6% to 7.1%. Our results provide further the evidence that quantitative benefit-risk analysis used to evaluate medical interventions should account explicitly for the nonlinear probability weighting of preferences.

  6. Coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients – risk factors for sternal wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kristina; Brandt, Michael; Fraund-Cremer, Sandra; Cremer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of sternal wound infections (SWI) after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) as reported worldwide is low. However, it is associated with significant increase of postoperative mortality and treatment costs. The major risk factors discussed are diabetes mellitus and bilateral IMA harvesting of the internal mammary artery. This study analyses data of 590 patients receiving CABG concerning the risk factors for SWI. Sternal wound infections occur significantly more often in diabetic patients, one crucial and significant additional risk factor is obesity. PMID:27547690

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, S; Balakumar, S; Arasaratnam, V

    2015-09-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District. Multistage stratified cluster sampling technique was employed to select 544 participants. An interviewer administrated questionnaire was used. Anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measurements were recorded and biochemical parameters were analysed. Response rate was 95.3%. Of them, 224 (43.8%) were male. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 16.4% (95% CI: 13.3- 19.9); in males 19.6% (95% CI: 14.6-25.4) and in females 13.9% (95% CI: 10.1-18.5). Of the diabetics, 27.4% were previously undiagnosed. In the final multivariable model, participants with family history of diabetes were 3.5 times (p<0.001) more likely and those with high waist hip ratio were 2 times (p=0.009) more likely to develop diabetes mellitus. PMID:26520866

  8. Epidemiology: work-related stress and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric J; Kivimäki, Mika

    2013-08-01

    A new cohort study links work-related stress to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in women, but the findings are less clear in men. Randomized controlled studies are now needed to determine whether management of stress could be used to reduce the risk of developing T2DM.

  9. Noninvasive Screening for Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Young, Rural, Caucasian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon; Sheffer, Sarah; Long Roth, Sara; Bennett, Paul A.; Lloyd, Les

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying students who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Few studies have screened Caucasian students, and none have targeted rural, low-income, elementary children. The five noninvasive risk factors used for this study were family history, high body mass index (BMI) for age/sex,…

  10. A risk-based approach to cost-benefit analysis of software safety activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fortier, S.C.; Michael, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    Assumptions about the economics of making a system safe are usually not explicitly stated in industrial and software models of safety-critical systems. These assumptions span a wide spectrum of economic tradeoffs with respect to resources expended to make a system safe. The missing component in these models that is necessary for capturing the effect of economic tradeoffs is risk. A qualitative risk-based software safety model is proposed that combines features of industrial and software systems safety models. The risk-based model provides decision makers with a basis for performing cost-benefit analyses of software safety-related activities.

  11. A risk-based approach to cost-benefit analysis of software safety activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fortier, S.C. ); Michael, J.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Assumptions about the economics of making a system safe are usually not explicitly stated in industrial and software models of safety-critical systems. These assumptions span a wide spectrum of economic tradeoffs with respect to resources expended to make a system safe. The missing component in these models that is necessary for capturing the effect of economic tradeoffs is risk. A qualitative risk-based software safety model is proposed that combines features of industrial and software systems safety models. The risk-based model provides decision makers with a basis for performing cost-benefit analyses of software safety-related activities.

  12. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  13. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  14. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies.

  15. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D.; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  16. Genetic predisposition, Western dietary pattern, and the risk of type 2 diabetes in men123

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lu; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Zhang, Cuilin; van Dam, Rob M; Hu, Frank B

    2009-01-01

    Background: A widely held hypothesis is that interactions between genetic predisposition and Western-type lifestyle contribute to the epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). No study has tested this hypothesis. Objective: The objective was to assess whether established genetic variants, mainly from genomewide association studies, modify dietary patterns in predicting diabetes risk. Design: We determined 10 polymorphisms in a prospective, nested, case-control study of 1196 diabetic and 1337 nondiabetic men. A genetic risk score (GRS) was generated by using an allele counting method. Baseline dietary intakes were collected by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. We used factor analysis to derive Western and “Prudent” dietary patterns from 40 food groups. Results: A significant interaction (P = 0.02) was observed between the GRS and Western dietary pattern. The multivariable odds ratios (ORs) of T2D across increasing quartiles for the Western dietary pattern were 1.00, 1.23 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.73), 1.49 (1.06,2.09), and 2.06 (1.48, 2.88) among men with a high GRS (≥12 risk alleles; P for trend = 0.01). The Western dietary pattern was not associated with diabetes risk among those with a lower GRS. In addition, we found that intakes of processed meat, red meat, and heme iron, which characterized the Western dietary pattern, showed significant interactions with GRS in relation to diabetes risk (P for interaction = 0.029, 0.02, and 0.0004, respectively). The diet-diabetes associations were more evident among men with a high GRS (≥12) than in those with a low GRS. Conclusion: Genetic predisposition may synergistically interact with a Western dietary pattern in determining diabetes risk in men. PMID:19279076

  17. A priori-defined Diet Quality Indexes and Risk of Type 2 diabetes: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Simone; Harmon, Brook E.; Boushey, Carol J.; Morimoto, Yukiko; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kröger, Janine; Schulze, Matthias B.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Aim Dietary patterns have been associated with type 2 diabetes incidence, but little is known about the impact of ethnicity on this relation. This study evaluated the association of four a priori dietary quality indexes and type 2 diabetes risk among whites, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians in the Hawaii component of the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). Methods After excluding participants with prevalent diabetes and missing values, the analysis included 89,185 participants (11,217 cases). Dietary intake was assessed at baseline with a quantitative food frequency questionnaire designed for use in the relevant ethnic populations. Sex- and ethnicity-specific hazard ratios were calculated for the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), the alternative HEI-2010 (AHEI-2010), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH). Results We observed significant inverse associations between higher scores of the DASH index and type 2 diabetes risk in white men and women, as well as in Japanese American women and Native Hawaiian men with respective risk reductions of 37, 31, 19 and 21% (highest compared to lowest index category). A higher adherence to the AHEI-2010 and aMED diet was related to a 13–28% lower type 2 diabetes risk in white participants but not in other ethnic groups. No significant associations with type 2 diabetes risk were observed for the HEI-2010 index. Conclusions The small ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes risk associated with scores of a priori-defined dietary patterns may be due to different consumption patterns of food components and the fact that the original indexes were not based on Asians and Pacific Islanders. PMID:25319012

  18. [Coffee drinking and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Optimistic scientific data].

    PubMed

    Wierzejska, R