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Sample records for diabetes benefits risks

  1. Risks and benefits of carnitine supplementation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dambrova, M; Liepinsh, E

    2015-02-01

    L-carnitine is a very popular food supplement due to its safety profile, antioxidant-type activity and suggested effects on energy metabolism pathways. L-carnitine participates in both fatty acid transport pathways and the export of acetyl groups out of the mitochondria. However, contradictory data exist concerning the pharmacological outcomes of L-carnitine treatment in diabetes mellitus, which is a highly prevalent metabolic disease characterised by hyperglycemia and associated with severe complications, including cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia. Recently, the L-carnitine-derived metabolites, acylcarnitines and trimethylamine-N-oxide, have been associated with increased cardio-metabolic risks. This review aims to highlight the possible risks and benefits of L-carnitine supplementation.

  2. Benefits and risks for intensive glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blonde, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Overweight, obesity, pre-diabetes and diabetes have become epidemic in most of Western society. An estimated 25.8 million United States adults have diabetes and some 79 million have prediabetes and are thus at high risk for future development of diabetes. Appropriate treatment of the ABCs of diabetes [A1C, blood pressure and cholesterol (dyslipidemia)] can reduce the risk for the development and progression of diabetic complications. This paper reviews some of the research studies that support treatment goals established by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology and the American Diabetes Association. Multiple studies have demonstrated that intensive glycemic control will reduce the risk for diabetes microvascular and neuropathic disease, but none showed decreased macrovascular disease events during the initial phase of the trials, although benefit was seen in long-term follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology and the American Diabetes Association goals for glycemia informed by these studies indicate the importance of individualizing targets for patients based on factors including the duration of diabetes, presence of acute and chronic complications and life expectancy. Writing groups convened by these organizations have also developed treatment algorithms to help clinicians appropriately use both lifestyle and pharmacotherapy interventions to safely achieve glycemic targets.

  3. Risks and benefits of statin use in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R Paul

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the primary cause of mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Despite advances in the management of microvascular complications of T1D, there is a lack of similar progress in reduction of macrovascular complications. Dyslipidemia is one of the major contributory factors for macrovascular complications in T1D, but the literature suggests significant under-treatment of this risk factor in children and adolescents with diabetes. Statins have shown to be both effective and safe in young people with familial hypercholesterolemia and adults with diabetes mellitus, but the role for statins in children and adolescent with T1D remains unclear and controversial. In this review, we will summarize the risks and benefits of statin use in young people with T1D.

  4. A nursing case management program for low-income high-risk diabetic clients: a projected cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Crow, Carolyn S; Lakes, Shelley A; Carter, Melondie R

    2006-01-01

    Case management has been widely promoted as a method that can improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. This article describes a cost-benefit analysis for a proposed nursing case management program that provides care for a low-income high-risk diabetic population in a rural county. Industry trends, objectives and functions of the case management program, timeline, financial plan, and cost analysis are described. The analysis indicated a potential net savings of 149,544 dollars annually. This would be a significant cost savings for the healthcare provider and funding source.

  5. "I take what I think works for me": a qualitative study to explore patient perception of diabetes treatment benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Nair, Kalpana M; Levine, Mitchel A H; Lohfeld, Lynne H; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes is impacting more and more people each year. A key aspect of disease management is patient adherence to prescribed treatments. Treatment adherence is influenced by many factors, including the understanding of a treatment's benefits and risks. This study sought to describe the experience of benefit and risk assessment for people with type 2 diabetes when making treatment decisions. This study utilized qualitative research methods. Individual interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Both purposeful and theoretical sampling was used. A grounded theory approach was employed to facilitate data collection and analysis. The 18 study participants were on varying treatment regimens for diabetes (diet therapy, oral medications, and insulin). Many people felt that they had not received enough information about the benefits and risks of treatment at the point of decision-making and later sought this information on their own. Participants did not seem to consciously assess treatment benefits and risks when treatments were prescribed or suggested, but rather continued to make decisions after the clinical encounter by means of experimentation or experience with treatments. In general, benefits and risks were conceptualized very broadly, and some people were not able to verbally articulate their perceptions of treatment benefits and risks. Patients' assessment of treatment benefits and risks is an ongoing, often unconscious process that requires continuous interaction with the health care system. Access to information and an opportunity to discuss treatment options with health care providers are important to people with diabetes when making treatment decisions.

  6. Benefits & risks of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Asian Indians - a population with the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease & diabetes.

    PubMed

    Enas, Enas A; Kuruvila, Arun; Khanna, Pravien; Pitchumoni, C S; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2013-10-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses have demonstrated the incontrovertible benefits of statin therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the role for statins in primary prevention remained unclear. The updated 2013 Cochrane review has put to rest all lingering doubts about the overwhelming benefits of long-term statin therapy in primary prevention by conclusively demonstrating highly significant reductions in all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs). More importantly, these benefits of statin therapy are similar at all levels of CVD risk, including subjects at low (<1% per year) risk of a MACE. In addition to preventing myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death, primary prevention with statins is also highly effective in delaying and avoiding expensive CARPs such as angioplasties, stents, and bypass surgeries. There is no evidence of any serious harm or threat to life caused by statin therapy, though several adverse effects that affect the quality of life, especially diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported. Asian Indians have the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. When compared with Whites, Asian Indians have double the risk of CAD and triple the risk of DM, when adjusted for traditional risk factors for these diseases. Available evidence supports the use of statin therapy for primary prevention in Asian Indians at a younger age and with lower targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL-C), than those currently recommended for Americans and Europeans. Early and aggressive statin therapy offers the greatest potential for reducing the continuing epidemic of CAD among Indians.

  7. Benefits & risks of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Asian Indians – A population with the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease & diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Enas, Enas A.; Kuruvila, Arun; Khanna, Pravien; Pitchumoni, C.S.; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses have demonstrated the incontrovertible benefits of statin therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the role for statins in primary prevention remained unclear. The updated 2013 Cochrane review has put to rest all lingering doubts about the overwhelming benefits of long-term statin therapy in primary prevention by conclusively demonstrating highly significant reductions in all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs). More importantly, these benefits of statin therapy are similar at all levels of CVD risk, including subjects at low (<1% per year) risk of a MACE. In addition to preventing myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death, primary prevention with statins is also highly effective in delaying and avoiding expensive CARPs such as angioplasties, stents, and bypass surgeries. There is no evidence of any serious harm or threat to life caused by statin therapy, though several adverse effects that affect the quality of life, especially diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported. Asian Indians have the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. When compared with Whites, Asian Indians have double the risk of CAD and triple the risk of DM, when adjusted for traditional risk factors for these diseases. Available evidence supports the use of statin therapy for primary prevention in Asian Indians at a younger age and with lower targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL-C), than those currently recommended for Americans and Europeans. Early and aggressive statin therapy offers the greatest potential for reducing the continuing epidemic of CAD among Indians. PMID:24434254

  8. Risks, benefits, and therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couri, Carlos Eduardo Barra; de Oliveira, Maria Carolina; Simões, Belinda Pinto

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that results from the autoimmune response against pancreatic insulin producing β cells. Apart of several insulin regimens, since the decade of 80s various immunomodulatory regimens were tested aiming at blocking some steps of the autoimmune process against β cell mass and at promoting β cell preservation. In the last years, some independent research groups tried to cure type 1 diabetes with an "immunologic reset" provided by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in newly diagnosed patients, and the majority of patients became free form insulin with increasing levels of C-peptide along the time. In this review, we discuss the biology of hematopoietic stem cells and the possible advantages and disadvantages related to the high dose immunosuppression followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  9. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Risks and Benefits of Implementing Glycemic Control Guidelines in Frail Elders with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sei J.; Boscardin, W. John; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Huang, Elbert S.; Rice-Trumble, Kathy; Eng, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES To determine the hypo- and hyper-glycemic outcomes associated with implementing the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) guideline for Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)<8% in frail older patients with diabets. DESIGN/SETTING Guideline Implementation in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) PARTICIPANTS All patients in the Before (10/02–12/04, n=338), Early (1/05–6/06, n=289) and Late phases of guideline implementation (7/06–12/08, n=385) with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and at least one HbA1c measurement. INTERVENTION Clinician education in 2005 with annual monitoring of the proportion of each clinician’s patients with diabetes with HbA1c<8%. MEASUREMENTS Hypoglycemia (Blood sugar or BS<50), hyperglycemia (BS>400) and severe hypoglycemia (Emergency room or ER visit for hypoglycemia) RESULTS Before, Early and Late groups were similar in mean age, race/ethnicity, comorbidity and functional dependency. Antihyperglycemic medication use increased with more patients using metformin (28% Before versus 42% Late, p<0.001) and insulin (23% Before versus 34% Late, p<0.001), with more patients achieving the AGS glycemic target of HbA1c<8% (74% Before versus 84% Late, p<0.001). Episodes of hyperglycemia (per 100 person-years) decreased dramatically (159 Before versus 46 Late, p<0.001) and episodes of hypoglycemia were unchanged (10.1 versus 9.3, p=0.50). Episodes of severe hypoglycemia were increased in the Early period (1.1 Before versus 2.9 Early, p=0.03). CONCLUSION Implementing the AGS glycemic control guideline for frail elders led to fewer hyperglycemic episodes, but more severe hypoglycemic episodes requiring ER visits in the Early implementation period. Future glycemic control guideline implementation efforts should be coupled with close monitoring for severe hypoglycemia in the early implementation period. PMID:21480838

  11. [Low-dose aspirin in patients with diabete melitus: risks and benefits regarding macro and microvascular complications].

    PubMed

    Camargo, Eduardo G; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Weinert, Letícia S; Lavinsky, Joel; Silveiro, Sandra P

    2007-04-01

    Aspirin is recommended as cardiovascular disease prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus. Due to the increased risk of bleeding and because of the hypothesis that there could be a worsening of microvascular complications related to aspirin, there has been observed an important underutilization of the drug. However, it is now known that aspirin is not associated with a deleterious effect on diabetic retinopathy and there is evidence indicating that it also does not affect renal function with usual doses (150 mg/d). On the other hand, higher doses may prove necessary, since recent data suggest that diabetic patients present the so called "aspirin resistance". The mechanisms of this resistance are not yet fully understood, being probably related to an abnormal intrinsic platelet activity. The employment of alternative antiplatelet strategies or the administration of higher aspirin doses (150-300 mg/d) should be better evaluated regarding effective cardiovascular disease prevention in diabetes as well as the possible effects on microvascular complications.

  12. [Risk and benefit of sulfonylureas--their role in view of new treatment options for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2016-02-01

    Currently, the therapy with oral antidiabetic drugs undergoes major changes. The use of sulfonylureas is in marked decline. The major argument in favor of newer oral antidiabetic drugs is the lower risk of hypoglycemia. At the present time however, it is unclear whether DDP4 inhibitors or SGLT2 inhibitors lead to better outcomes with respect to cardiovascular events and overall mortality. Most evidence on the therapeutic use of sulfonylureas has been gained with glibenclamide and to some degree sulfonylureas and glibenclamide have become synonymous. Since sulfonylureas vary considerably in their affinity for the K(ATP) channel subtypes and in their pharmacokinetic properties, the epidemiological evidence that outcomes tend to be less favorable with glibenclamide than with glimepiride or gliclazide has gained some attention. Beyond debate is the efficacy of metformin to diminish cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetes, probably due to effects beyond the lowering of blood glucose.

  13. Estimated Cost-Effectiveness, Cost Benefit, and Risk Reduction Associated with an Endocrinologist-Pharmacist Diabetes Intense Medical Management "Tune-Up" Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jan D; Bounthavong, Mark; Arjmand, Anisa; Ha, David R; Cadiz, Christine L; Zimmerman, Andrew; Ourth, Heather; Morreale, Anthony P; Edelman, Steven V; Morello, Candis M

    2017-03-01

    In 2012 U.S. diabetes costs were estimated to be $245 billion, with $176 billion related to direct diabetes treatment and associated complications. Although a few studies have reported positive glycemic and economic benefits for diabetes patients treated under primary care physician (PCP)-pharmacist collaborative practice models, no studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of an endocrinologist-pharmacist collaborative practice model treating complex diabetes patients versus usual PCP care for similar patients. To estimate the cost-effectiveness and cost benefit of a collaborative endocrinologist-pharmacist Diabetes Intense Medical Management (DIMM) "Tune-Up" clinic for complex diabetes patients versus usual PCP care from 3 perspectives (clinic, health system, payer) and time frames. Data from a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (A1c) ≥ 8% who were referred to the DIMM clinic at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Health System were used for cost analyses against a comparator group of PCP patients meeting the same criteria. The DIMM clinic took more time with patients, compared with usual PCP visits. It provided personalized care in three 60-minute visits over 6 months, combining medication therapy management with patient-specific diabetes education, to achieve A1c treatment goals before discharge back to the PCP. Data for DIMM versus PCP patients were used to evaluate cost-effectiveness and cost benefit. Analyses included incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) at 6 months, 3-year estimated total medical costs avoided and return on investment (ROI), absolute risk reduction of complications, resultant medical costs, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over 10 years. Base case ICER results indicated that from the clinic perspective, the DIMM clinic costs $21 per additional percentage point of A1c improvement and $115-$164 per additional patient at target A1c goal level

  14. Risk/benefit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, E.A.C.; Wilson, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Reagan administration is intent on rolling back regulations it considers unwise to give new life to American industry, but regulations were instituted to protect individuals against long-term hazards. The authors believe these hazards must be assessed before a regulation is modified, suspended, or implemented. They point out the problems inherent in defining, perceiving, and estimating risk. Throughout, they combine theoretical discussions with actual case studies covering the risk associated with nuclear power plants, saccharin use, mass chest radiography, and others. They believe that risk assessment should be distinct from decision making, with the risk assessor supplying clear and objective information about hazards and the probability of damage as well as pointing out the uncertainties to policy makers. 149 references, 29 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Benefit of Blood Pressure Control in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kintscher, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The coexistence of arterial hypertension and diabetes represents a devastating partnership for cardiovascular health. Thus, blood pressure and blood glucose control are essential therapeutic goals to reduce cardiovascular risk and other diabetes-related endpoints in these patients. The major benefit of blood pressure lowering in diabetes comes from a marked reduction of cardiovascular and renal endpoints. New target blood pressure values to achieve maximum cardiovascular and renal protection will be discussed. In addition to the reduction of macrovascular endpoints, blood pressure lowering therapy in diabetic patients has also been discussed to improve microvascular diseases during diabetes, in particular microalbuminuria or diabetic retinopathy. However, current clinical trial evidence is less robust than for macrovascular disease. Clinical studies showed controversial results, and will be discussed. Finally, new data from the ADVANCE-ON study about the long-term, sustained benefit of blood pressure lowering in hypertensive, diabetic patients has been recently published, and will be evaluated in the context of previous evidence. In summary, the present article will discuss selected new topics in the field of hypertension and diabetes focusing on the benefits achieved by blood pressure lowering in these patients.

  16. Nuclear Energy: Benefits Versus Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Walter H.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the benefits as well as the risks of nuclear-power plants. Suggests that critics who dwell on the risks to the public from nuclear-power plants should compare these risks with the present hazards that would be eliminated. Bibliography. (LC)

  17. Nuclear Energy: Benefits Versus Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Walter H.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the benefits as well as the risks of nuclear-power plants. Suggests that critics who dwell on the risks to the public from nuclear-power plants should compare these risks with the present hazards that would be eliminated. Bibliography. (LC)

  18. Phytoremediation: Risk or benefit?

    SciTech Connect

    Beath, J.M.; Allen, B.J.

    1999-07-01

    The proposed use of phytoremediation at an increasing variety of contaminated sites has resulted in concerns by regulating agencies that a successful removal of constituents from contaminated sludge or soil by plants might result in the unwanted transfer of these constituents to the food chain. As part of the basis for a corrective measures study for a potential remedy, this pathway may need to be evaluated. Different constituents of concern result in different transport issues. For volatile compounds, the evolution of gases from plants as part of evapotranspiration may be an issue. This paper discusses the risks associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are frequently present at hazardous waste surface impoundments for which phytoremediation may have attractive cost advantages over conventional closure methods. Central to an analysis of potential uptake effects is an evaluation of constituent transport, exposure pathway and toxicity. Methods by which each of these can be estimated are presented. Regulatory frameworks under which these evaluations may be performed at the state level are still evolving, in fact Texas issued new proposed regulatory language pertaining to ecological risk as this paper was going to print. The attractiveness of phytoremediation in a RCRA setting is greater if a phytoremediation-based cover can be substituted for a traditional RCRA landfill cap. At the federal level some flexibility has now been provided, but it must be adopted by RCRA- delegated states to be useful. Alternatively, a demonstration that the phytoremediation-based cover somehow meets the RCRA closure design criteria for caps must be made. Work to make this kind of demonstration compelling is underway under the oversight of EPA.

  19. Aspirin for primary prevention in diabetes mellitus: from the calculation of cardiovascular risk and risk/benefit profile to personalised treatment.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by persistent thromboxane (TX)-dependent platelet activation, regardless of disease duration. Low-dose aspirin, that induces a permanent inactivation of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, thus inhibiting TXA2 biosynthesis, should be theoretically considered the drug of choice. The most up-to-date meta-analysis of aspirin prophylaxis in this setting, which includes three trials conducted in patients with diabetes and six other trials in which such patients represent a subgroup within a broader population, reported that aspirin is associated with a non-significant decrease in the risk of vascular events, although the limited amount of available data precludes a precise estimate of the effect size. An increasing body of evidence supports the concept that less-than-expected response to aspirin may underlie mechanisms related to residual platelet hyper-reactivity despite anti-platelet treatment, at least in a fraction of patients. Among the proposed mechanisms, the variable turnover rate of the drug target (platelet COX-1) appears to represent the most convincing determinant of the inter-individual variability in aspirin response. This review intends to develop the idea that the understanding of the determinants of less-than-adequate response to aspirin in certain individuals, although not changing the paradigm of the indication to low-dose aspirin prescription in primary prevention, may help identifying, in terms of easily detectable clinical or biochemical characteristics, individuals who would attain inadequate protection from aspirin, and for whom different strategies should be challenged.

  20. Postmarketing studies: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Garfield, F B; Caro, J J

    1999-01-01

    To consider the benefits and risks of large postmarketing outcomes studies, as demonstrated by studies of the statin drugs. Literature review. The risks were that the statin studies had a strong coat-tail effect. Each new study was beneficial to all statins as well as the one studied. Economic analyses based on the results of the postmarketing studies concluded that the drugs were not cost-effective. Long-term postmarketing studies were slow to be put into perspective and did not immediately influence other researchers or clinicians. During that time, the sponsoring companies shouldered opportunity costs as well as the actual costs of the studies. The risk that one drug company would use another company's results instead of investing in their own research did not materialize. The benefits were that the studies definitively showed that the drugs and the lowering of lipids were safe and efficacious. The studies also expanded the indications for the drugs, generated goodwill in the medical and research communities for the sponsors, allowed sponsors to include specific claims in their advertisements, generated follow-up studies, spawned economic analyses that sparked interest in the medical and lay press, and had a major impact on clinicians' use of the drug. The risks and benefits of postmarketing studies may depend on the company's time perspective. In the short term, the risks may outweigh the benefits. Only companies that have a longer perspective may find it beneficial to undertake large postmarketing studies.

  1. Diabetes benefit management: evolving strategies for payers.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert L

    2011-11-01

    Over the next quarter century, the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is expected to at least double. Currently, 1 in every 10 healthcare dollars is spent on diabetes management; by 2050, it has been projected that the annual costs of managing T2DM will rise to $336 billion. Without substantial, systemic changes, T2DM management costs will lead to a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system. However, the appropriate management of diabetes can reduce associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, adequate glycemic control can improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce diabetes-related complications. This article provides an overview of key concepts associated with a value-based insurance design (VBID) approach to T2DM coverage. By promoting the use of services or treatments that provide high benefits relative to cost, and by alternatively discouraging patients from utilizing services whose benefits do not justify their cost, VBID improves the quality of healthcare while simultaneously reining in spending. VBID initiatives tend to focus on chronic disease management and generally target prescription drug use. However, some programs have expanded their scope by incorporating services traditionally offered by wellness and disease management programs. The concept of VBID is growing, and it is increasingly being implemented by a diverse and growing number of public and private entities, including pharmacy benefit managers, health plans, and employers. This article provides key background on VBID strategies, with a focus on T2DM management. It also provides a road map for health plans seeking to implement VBID as part of their programs.

  2. Physical Activity, Health Benefits, and Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinos, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A plethora of epidemiologic evidence from large studies supports unequivocally an inverse, independent, and graded association between volume of physical activity, health, and cardiovascular and overall mortality. This association is evident in apparently healthy individuals, patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, regardless of body weight. Moreover, the degree of risk associated with physical inactivity is similar to, and in some cases even stronger than, the more traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The exercise-induced health benefits are in part related to favorable modulations of cardiovascular risk factors observed by increased physical activity or structured exercise programs. Although the independent contribution of the exercise components, intensity, duration, and frequency to the reduction of mortality risk is not clear, it is well accepted that an exercise volume threshold defined at caloric expenditure of approximately 1,000 Kcal per week appears to be necessary for significant reduction in mortality risk. Further reductions in risk are observed with higher volumes of energy expenditure. Physical exertion is also associated with a relatively low and transient increase in risk for cardiac events. This risk is significantly higher for older and sedentary individuals. Therefore, such individuals should consult their physician prior to engaging in exercise. “Walking is man’s best medicine”Hippocrates PMID:23198160

  3. Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chogtu, Bharti; Magazine, Rahul; Bairy, KL

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, statins, are widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases to lower serum cholesterol levels. As type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by dyslipidemia, statins have a major role in preventing the long term complications in diabetes and are recommended for diabetics with normal low density lipoprotein levels as well. In 2012, United States Food and Drug Administration released changes to statin safety label to include that statins have been found to increase glycosylated haemoglobin and fasting serum glucose levels. Many studies done on patients with cardiovascular risk factors have shown that statins have diabetogenic potential and the effect varies as per the dosage and type used. The various mechanisms for this effect have been proposed and one of them is downregulation of glucose transporters by the statins. The recommendations by the investigators are that though statins can have diabetogenic risk, they have more long term benefits which can outweigh the risk. In elderly patients and those with metabolic syndrome, as the risk of diabetes increase, the statins should be used cautiously. Other than a subset of population with risk for diabetes; statins still have long term survival benefits in most of the patients. PMID:25789118

  4. Mediterranean diet for type 2 diabetes: cardiometabolic benefits.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Giugliano, Dario

    2017-04-01

    Dietary patterns influence various cardiometabolic risk factors, including body weight, lipoprotein concentrations, and function, blood pressure, glucose-insulin homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial health. The Mediterranean diet can be described as a dietary pattern characterized by the high consumption of plant-based foods, olive oil as the main source of fat, low-to-moderate consumption of fish, dairy products and poultry, low consumption of red and processed meat, and low-to-moderate consumption of wine with meals. The American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while the results of randomized controlled trials show that Mediterranean diet reduces glycosylated hemoglobin levels by 0.30-0.47 %, and is also associated with a 28-30 % reduced risk for cardiovascular events. The mechanisms by which Mediterranean diet produces its cardiometabolic benefits in type 2 diabetes are, for the most, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative: increased consumption of high-quality foods may cool down the activation of the innate immune system, by reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing that of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This may favor the generation of an anti-inflammatory milieu, which in turn may improve insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and endothelial function at the vascular level and ultimately act as a barrier to the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and development of atherosclerosis.

  5. Benefits and risks of circumcision.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, E.; Strashin, E.

    1981-01-01

    Circumcisions are performed either prophylactically in the neonatal period or therapeutically at a later age. About 10% of males not circumcised at birth will eventually require circumcision. The present neonatal circumcision rate is about 80% in the United States and 40% in Canada. The single most important determinant of whether a newborn male will be circumcised is the attitude of the attending physician. The literature was reviewed to determine the proven benefits of circumcision and to compare these with the known risks. Circumcising the newborn facilitates penile hygiene, prevents cancer of the penis and decreases the incidence of genital herpes in later life. Whether it decreases the incidence of cancer of the cervix is still uncertain. More important, neonatal circumcision is associated with much lower morbidity and mortality and with lower costs than therapeutic circumcision. Thus, prophylactic circumcision is recommended for the male population as a whole. PMID:7037142

  6. Benefits/Risks of Sodium–Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibitor Canagliflozin in Women for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sodium–glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, such as canagliflozin, are used in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In clinical studies, canagliflozin significantly reduced A1C, bodyweight and blood pressure, and was generally well tolerated with no increased risk of hypoglycemia. Most common adverse effects observed were genital mycotic infections and urinary tract infections, and increased urination. Approximately 10% of women treated with canagliflozin experienced a genital mycotic infection compared with 3% treated with placebo; those with a prior history were at greater risk. Approximately 9% of women treated with canagliflozin reported a urinary tract infection compared with 7% treated with placebo. Most adverse events were considered mild to moderate in intensity and responded to standard therapy. Treatment with canagliflozin was effective and generally well tolerated in both women (and men) with T2DM. PMID:26928259

  7. Benefits/risks of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin in women for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Pamela

    2016-06-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, such as canagliflozin, are used in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In clinical studies, canagliflozin significantly reduced A1C, bodyweight and blood pressure, and was generally well tolerated with no increased risk of hypoglycemia. Most common adverse effects observed were genital mycotic infections and urinary tract infections, and increased urination. Approximately 10% of women treated with canagliflozin experienced a genital mycotic infection compared with 3% treated with placebo; those with a prior history were at greater risk. Approximately 9% of women treated with canagliflozin reported a urinary tract infection compared with 7% treated with placebo. Most adverse events were considered mild to moderate in intensity and responded to standard therapy. Treatment with canagliflozin was effective and generally well tolerated in both women (and men) with T2DM.

  8. Diabetes risk factors (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and type 2 diabetes typically begins in adulthood. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common due to the growing number of older Americans and an increasing trend toward obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Without proper ...

  9. Tea and its consumption: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Khizar; Iqbal, Hira; Malik, Uzma; Bilal, Uzma; Mushtaq, Sobia

    2015-01-01

    The recent convention of introducing phytochemicals to support the immune system or combat diseases is a centuries' old tradition. Nutritional support is an emerging advancement in the domain of diet-based therapies; tea and its constituents are one of the significant components of these strategies to maintain the health and reduce the risk of various malignancies. Tea is the most frequently consumed beverage worldwide, besides water. All the three most popular types of tea, green (unfermented), black (fully fermented), and oolong (semifermented), are manufactured from the leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis. Tea possesses significant antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, neuroprotective, cholesterol-lowering, and thermogenic properties. Several research investigations, epidemiological studies, and meta-analyses suggest that tea and its bioactive polyphenolic constituents have numerous beneficial effects on health, including the prevention of many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, genital warts, and obesity. Controversies regarding beneficialts and risks of tea consumption still exist but the limitless health-promoting benefits of tea outclass its few reported toxic effects. However, with significant rise in the scientific investigation of role of tea in human life, this review is intended to highlight the beneficial effects and risks associated with tea consumption.

  10. Risks and benefits of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, R E

    2008-01-01

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in cancer and is of particular clinical importance in breast and prostate cancers due to the prevalence of these diseases. Bone metastases result in considerable morbidity and complex demands on health care resources, affecting quality of life and independence over years rather than months. The bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce skeletal morbidity in multiple myeloma as well as a wide range of solid tumours affecting bone by 30–50%. Quite appropriately, these agents are increasingly used alongside anticancer treatments to prevent skeletal complications and relieve bone pain. The use of bisphosphonates in early cancer is also increasingly important to prevent the adverse effects of cancer treatments on bone health. These include ovarian suppression and the use of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer patients and androgen deprivation therapy in those with prostate cancer. Bisphosphonate strategies, similar to those used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, have suggested that bisphosphonates are a safe and effective treatment for the prevention of treatment-induced bone loss. When compared to other cancer therapies, the frequency and severity of adverse events related to bisphosphonate therapy are generally mild and infrequent; thus, the benefits of treatment with any bisphosphonate almost always outweigh the risks. However, renal dysfunction may occasionally occur and over recent years, a new entity, bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), has been described. The incidence, clinical importance and prevention strategies to minimise the impact of this problem on patients requiring bisphosphonates is discussed. PMID:18506174

  11. Benefits and Risks Associated with Landscapes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To fully reap the benefits that lawns and landscapes can provide our urban and suburban communities, these green spaces must be well-maintained. The landscaping initiative helps manage the benefits and risks associated with lawn care.

  12. Implementing Low-Cost, Community-Based Exercise Programs for Middle-Aged and Older Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: What Are the Benefits for Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk?

    PubMed

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Reis, Victor Machado; Themudo-Barata, Jose Luis

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a long-term, community-based, combined exercise program developed with low-cost exercise strategies on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants (n = 124; 63.25 ± 7.20 years old) engaged in either a 9-month supervised exercise program (n = 39; consisting of combined aerobic, resistance, agility/balance, and flexibility exercise; three sessions per week; 70 min per session) or a control group (n = 85) who maintained their usual care. Glycemic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, anthropometric profile, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease were assessed before and after the 9-month intervention. A significant time * group interaction effect (p < 0.001) was identified in the values of the glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease. A long-term, community-based, combined exercise program developed with low-cost exercise strategies was effective in inducing significant benefits on glycemic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, anthropometric profile, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical Trial Identification Number: ISRCTN09240628.

  13. Bisphosphonates for Osteoporosis: Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... o es sis : Benefits and Risks What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which your bones become ... through menopause are especially at risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is more common in women than in ...

  14. Chocolate intake and diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, James A

    2015-02-01

    In-vitro and rodent studies, and short-term human trials suggest that compounds in chocolate can enhance insulin sensitivity. Also, a recent prospective Japanese epidemiological analysis found that long-term chocolate consumption was inversely associated with diabetes risk. The objective of the present analysis was to test the epidemiological association between long-term chocolate consumption and diabetes risk in a U.S. cohort. Multivariable prospective Cox Regression analysis with time-dependent covariates was used to examine data from 7802 participants in the prospective Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Cohort. The data included 861 new diabetes cases during 98,543 person-years of follow up (mean = 13.3 years). Compared to participants who ate 1 oz of chocolate less often than monthly, those who ate it 1-4 times/month, 2-6 times/week and ≥ 1 time/day had relative risks of being diagnosed with diabetes that were lower by 13% (95% confidence interval: -2%, 25%), 34% (18%, 47%) and 18% (-10%, 38%). These relative risks applied to participants without evidence of preexisting serious chronic disease that included diabetes, heart attacks, stroke or cancer. In conclusion, the risk of diabetes decreased as the frequency of chocolate intake increased, up to 2-6 servings (1 oz) per week. Consuming ≥ 1 serving per day did not yield significantly lower relative risk. These results suggest that consuming moderate amount of chocolate may reduce the risk of diabetes. Further research is required to confirm and explore these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Benefits and risks of breastfeeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2005, the American Academy of Pediatrics extended their position concerning the superiority of human milk for feeding human infants and the reasons for encouraging breastfeeding. Yet questions have been raised whether the benefits of breastfeeding pertain to populations in the industrialized wor...

  16. Coffee and its consumption: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, M Tauseef

    2011-04-01

    Coffee is the leading worldwide beverage after water and its trade exceeds US $10 billion worldwide. Controversies regarding its benefits and risks still exist as reliable evidence is becoming available supporting its health promoting potential; however, some researchers have argued about the association of coffee consumption with cardiovascular complications and cancer insurgence. The health-promoting properties of coffee are often attributed to its rich phytochemistry, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, hydroxyhydroquinone (HHQ), etc. Many research investigations, epidemiological studies, and meta-analyses regarding coffee consumption revealed its inverse correlation with that of diabetes mellitus, various cancer lines, Parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, it ameliorates oxidative stress because of its ability to induce mRNA and protein expression, and mediates Nrf2-ARE pathway stimulation. Furthermore, caffeine and its metabolites help in proper cognitive functionality. Coffee lipid fraction containing cafestol and kahweol act as a safeguard against some malignant cells by modulating the detoxifying enzymes. On the other hand, their higher levels raise serum cholesterol, posing a possible threat to coronary health, for example, myocardial and cerebral infarction, insomnia, and cardiovascular complications. Caffeine also affects adenosine receptors and its withdrawal is accompanied with muscle fatigue and allied problems in those addicted to coffee. An array of evidence showed that pregnant women or those with postmenopausal problems should avoid excessive consumption of coffee because of its interference with oral contraceptives or postmenopausal hormones. This review article is an attempt to disseminate general information, health claims, and obviously the risk factors associated with coffee consumption to scientists, allied stakeholders, and certainly readers. © Taylor and Francis Group, LLC

  17. Mechanisms of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Loci.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Kyle J

    2017-09-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) risk loci can greatly inform on disease pathology. This review discusses current knowledge of mechanisms through which genetic variants influence T2DM risk and considerations for future studies. Over 100 T2DM risk loci to date have been identified. Candidate causal variants at risk loci map predominantly to non-coding sequence. Physiological, epigenomic and gene expression data suggest that variants at many known T2DM risk loci affect pancreatic islet regulation, although variants at other loci also affect protein function and regulatory processes in adipose, pre-adipose, liver, skeletal muscle and brain. The effects of T2DM variants on regulatory activity in these tissues appear largely, but not exclusively, due to altered transcription factor binding. Putative target genes of T2DM variants have been defined at an increasing number of loci and some, such as FTO, may entail several genes and multiple tissues. Gene networks in islets and adipocytes have been implicated in T2DM risk, although the molecular pathways of risk genes remain largely undefined. Efforts to fully define the mechanisms of T2DM risk loci are just beginning. Continued identification of risk mechanisms will benefit from combining genetic fine-mapping with detailed phenotypic association data, high-throughput epigenomics data from diabetes-relevant tissue, functional screening of candidate genes and genome editing of cellular and animal models.

  18. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  19. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  20. Benzodiazepines: risks and benefits. A reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Aitchison, Katherine; Bateson, Alan; Curran, H Valerie; Davies, Simon; Leonard, Brian; Nutt, David J; Stephens, David N; Wilson, Sue

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decade there have been further developments in our knowledge of the risks and benefits of benzodiazepines, and of the risks and benefits of alternatives to benzodiazepines. Representatives drawn from the Psychopharmacology Special Interest Group of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the British Association for Psychopharmacology together examined these developments, and have provided this joint statement with recommendations for clinical practice. The working group was mindful of widespread concerns about benzodiazepines and related anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs. The group believes that whenever benzodiazepines are prescribed, the potential for dependence or other harmful effects must be considered. However, the group also believes that the risks of dependence associated with long-term use should be balanced against the benefits that in many cases follow from the short or intermittent use of benzodiazepines and the risk of the underlying conditions for which treatment is being provided.

  1. Diabetes mellitus: influences on cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus and cancer are common conditions, and their co-diagnosis in the same individual is not infrequent. The relative risks associated with type 2 diabetes are greater than twofold for hepatic, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The relative risk is somewhat lower, at 1.2-1.5-fold for colorectal, breast, and bladder cancers. In comparison, the relative risk of lung cancer is less than 1. The evidence for other malignancies (e.g. kidney, non-Hodgkin lymphoma) is inconclusive, whereas prostatic cancer occurs less frequently in male patients with diabetes. The potential biologic links between the two diseases are incompletely understood. Evidence from observational studies suggests that some medications used to treat hyperglycemia are associated with either increased or reduced risk of cancer. Whereas anti-diabetic drugs have a minor influence on cancer risk, drugs used to treat cancer may either cause diabetes or worsen pre-existing diabetes. If hyperinsulinemia acts as a critical link between the observed increased cancer risk and type 2 diabetes, one would predict that patients with type 1 diabetes would have a different cancer risk pattern than patients with type 2 diabetes because the former patients are exposed to lower levels of exogenous administered insulin. Obtained results showed that patients with type 1 diabetes had elevated risks of cancers of the stomach, cervix, and endometrium. Type 1 diabetes is associated with a modest excess cancer risk overall and risks of specific cancers that differ from those associated with type 2 diabetes.

  2. Hybrid risk adjustment for pharmaceutical benefits.

    PubMed

    García-Goñi, Manuel; Ibern, Pere; Inoriza, José María

    2009-07-01

    This paper analyses the application of hybrid risk adjustment versus either prospective or concurrent risk adjustment formulae in the context of funding pharmaceutical benefits for the population of an integrated healthcare delivery organisation in Catalonia during years 2002 and 2003. We apply a mixed formula and find that, compared to prospective only models, a hybrid risk adjustment model increases incentives for efficiency in the provision for low risk individuals in health organisations, not only as a whole but also within each internal department, by reducing within-group variation of drug expenditures.

  3. Diabetic Nephropathy: New Risk Factors and Improvements in Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with diabetic nephropathy have a high cardiovascular risk, comparable to patients with coronary heart disease. Accordingly, identification and management of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy as well as timely diagnosis and prompt management of the condition are of paramount importance for effective treatment. A variety of risk factors promotes the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, including elevated glucose levels, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Most of these risk factors are modifiable by antidiabetic, antihypertensive, or lipid-lowering treatment and lifestyle changes. Others such as genetic factors or advanced age cannot be modified. Therefore, the rigorous management of the modifiable risk factors is essential for preventing and delaying the decline in renal function. Early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is another essential component in the management of diabetes and its complications such as nephropathy. New markers may allow earlier diagnosis of this common and serious complication, but further studies are needed to clarify their additive predictive value, and to define their cost-benefit ratio. This article reviews the most important risk factors in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy and summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis of this disease.

  4. Insulin-treated diabetes mellitus: An important, actionable risk marker after coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Hillegass, William B

    2016-01-01

    Insulin treatment for diabetes is a simple but important risk marker for doubled adjusted death and myocardial infarction rates and tripled stent thrombosis risk after coronary stenting. Insulin treatment does not predict meaningfully increased major bleeding or additional revascularization procedures after drug eluting coronary stent implantation. Third generation P2 Y12 receptor antagonists substantially lower risk of events in diabetics after stenting with insulin treated diabetics having twice the magnitude of benefit of diabetics not needing insulin.

  5. [Benefit-risk assessment of vaccination strategies].

    PubMed

    Hanslik, Thomas; Boëlle, Pierre Yves

    2007-04-01

    This article summarises the various stages of the risk/benefit assessment of vaccination strategies. Establishing the awaited effectiveness of a vaccination strategy supposes to have an epidemiologic description of the disease to be prevented. The effectiveness of the vaccine strategy will be thus expressed in numbers of cases, hospitalizations or deaths avoided. The effectiveness can be direct, expressed as the reduction of the incidence of the infectious disease in the vaccinated subjects compared to unvaccinated subjects. It can also be indirect, the unvaccinated persons being protected by the suspension in circulation of the pathogenic agent, consecutive to the implementation of the vaccination campaign. The risks of vaccination related to the adverse effects detected during the clinical trials preceding marketing are well quantified, but other risks can occur after marketing: e.g., serious and unexpected adverse effects detected by vaccinovigilance systems, or risk of increase in the age of cases if the vaccination coverage is insufficient. The medico-economic evaluation forms a part of the risks/benefit assessment, by positioning the vaccine strategy comparatively with other interventions for health. Epidemiologic and vaccinovigilance informations must be updated very regularly, which underlines the need for having an operational and reliable real time monitoring system to accompany the vaccination strategies. Lastly, in the context of uncertainty which often accompanies the risks/benefit assessments, it is important that an adapted communication towards the public and the doctors is planned.

  6. Optimizing the therapeutic benefits of exercise in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Praet, Stephan F E; van Loon, Luc J C

    2007-10-01

    Other than diet and medication, exercise is considered one of the three cornerstones of good diabetes treatment. Nevertheless, current clinical guidelines on Type 2 diabetes provide no detailed information on the modalities of effective exercise intervention in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Based on a review of currently available literature, exercise modalities are being identified to maximize the benefits of exercise intervention in the treatment of different Type 2 diabetes subpopulations. Both endurance and resistance types of exercise have equal therapeutic strength to improve metabolic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes. When applying endurance-type exercise, energy expenditure should be equivalent to approximately 1.7-2.1 MJ/exercise bout on 3 but preferably 5 days/wk. In sarcopenic or severely deconditioned patients with Type 2 diabetes, focus should lie on the implementation of resistance-type exercise to attenuate and/or reverse the decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength. Before choosing the most appropriate exercise modalities, the patient's disease stage should be well characterized, and an ECG-stress test should be considered. Based on baseline aerobic fitness, level of co-morbidities, body composition, and muscle strength, patients should be provided with an individually tailored exercise intervention program to optimize therapeutic value. A multidisciplinary individualized approach and continued exercise training under personal supervision is essential to enhance compliance and allow long-term health benefits of an exercise intervention program.

  7. Health aspects of caffeine: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, C

    This article examines the benefits and risks associated with caffeinated foods and drinks, taking an evidence-based approach to identify appropriate daily caffeine limits. Suggestions are provided on how to structure dietary advice for different patient groups including children, individuals with hypertension, renal patients, athletes and older adults.

  8. Cost-benefit analysis of diabetic eye disease.

    PubMed

    Matz, H; Falk, M; Göttinger, W; Kieselbach, G

    1996-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the main cause of blindness in adults 25-74 years of age in Western countries. At 100% diagnosability and 100% treatability, with laser photocoagulation vision can be retained in at least one eye in 73% of patients with proliferative retinopathy and in 67% of patients with diabetic maculopathy. The cost-benefit analysis draws a comparison of the costs incurred through benefits granted to a blind diabetic and those incurred through proper screening, examination and treatment to avoid blindness as much as possible. These calculations are valid for the State of Tyrol in Austria. The anticipated annual costs for blindness are thus ATS 19,000,000, of which ATS 14,600,000 could be avoided through an optimal screening, examination and therapy program. The maximum costs for examination and therapy amount to ATS 10,700,000, thus giving a minimum saving of ATS 3,900,000 in favor of preventive medicine.

  9. Technology and the issue of cost/benefit in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Cosimo; Mohn, Angelika; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disease in childhood and adolescence. Type 1 diabetes accounts for over 90% of diabetes in children. During the past decades, epidemiological studies have clearly shown a worldwide increase in the incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in many countries. The worldwide incidence of diabetes and especially the diabetes-related complications highlight the relevant economic burden of this disease. In fact, its costs affect health services, national productivity as well as individuals and families. Hospital in-patient costs for the treatment of complications are the largest single contributor to direct healthcare costs. Anyway, many of these complications and, therefore, their costs, as well as most of the indirect costs, are partially or completely preventable. In fact, intensive therapy, directed at controlling blood glucose, blood pressure and lipid levels, has been shown to be cost effective in that, although initial costs are high, longer term costs decrease as a result of delayed or prevented complications. From this point of view, technological advances have provided new therapeutic options to achieve metabolic control as close to normal as possible in children and adolescents with diabetes. In fact, the relevant technological devices that have been adopted till now, if adequately utilized, should allow patients to achieve intensive management with improved metabolic control, quality of life as well as reduced mortality and morbidity. However, new technologies are not a panacea, and the benefit they provide can be completely achieved only if adequately and especially individually determined. Furthermore, it is inevitable that new modalities of treatment for people with diabetes will be considered critically by healthcare planners and providers in the prevailing global environment of increasing costs of medical care and pressure for rational allocation of resources. Therefore, new technologically derived devices

  10. Risk perception for diabetes in Appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Ishveen; Chopra, Avijeet

    2016-04-11

    The social and economic burden of diabetes is large and growing. Diabetes is a significant public health issue in the Appalachian region; women constitute approximately 50% of those diagnosed with diabetes. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship among sociodemographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors (cognitive and affective representations) and perceived risk of diabetes in non-diabetic, non-elderly (21-50 years) Appalachian women residing in West Virginia (N = 202). Participants were recruited through social media, flyers, and a newsletter from the West Virginia University Extension. The final survey was conducted from March 2015 to June 2015. Bivariate analyses were used to examine unadjusted relations among sociodemographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors and comparative perceived risk of diabetes. In a multivariable logistic regression model, we found that younger age, higher body mass index, non-White race, greater diabetes knowledge, personal control, and moderate amounts of physical activity were significantly, positively associated with higher diabetes risk perception (p < .05). Our results indicated that diabetes knowledge, personal control, and physical activity were related to diabetes risk perception among Appalachian women. Understanding perceived diabetes-related risk may aid in the development of effective intervention strategies to reduce the burden of diabetes among Appalachian and other populations. These cross-sectional findings need further evaluation in longitudinal studies.

  11. Ivabradine: Do the Benefits Outweigh the Risks?

    PubMed

    Alshammari, Thamir M

    2017-05-01

    Ivabradine is a selective I f current inhibitor that is used to lower the heart rate (HR) of patients with angina and/or heart failure. It is approved for use in several countries, including the United Kingdom, Australia, Saudi Arabia, and the United States. The drug was studied in several clinical trials, and it exhibited beneficial effects on the approved indicators. However, there are some concerns with the safety profile of this drug, especially its effect in reducing HR and causing severe bradycardia. Therefore, the current review assessed the benefit-risk balance of ivabradine. A literature review of the major published studies that assessed the efficacy and safety of ivabradine was performed. The online VigiBase adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting system was also accessed to investigate reports associated with this drug. A full benefit-risk assessment was performed using the collected data from the above-mentioned resources. Most of the reviewed studies concluded that ivabradine exerted beneficial effects with a tolerable safety profile. Specifically, a favorable benefit-risk profile was found when ivabradine was used for patients with an HR ≥70 beats per minute. Reports revealed that the most common ADR was bradycardia, which was expected. Other safety risks or ADRs were comparable to other prescribed drugs. This review presents an up-to-date analysis of ivabradine from the latest literature and reports. These studies suggest that ivabradine exhibits an acceptable and favorable benefit-risk profile, and this drug should be considered as a viable option in patients with angina pectoris and chronic heart failure.

  12. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat.

  13. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  14. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L; Crandall, Jill P; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Hamman, Richard F; Montez, Maria G; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    The study objectives were to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopause status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. The study population included women in premenopause (n = 708), women in natural postmenopause (n = 328), and women with bilateral oophorectomy (n = 201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose-intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance, and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy use. After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of hormone therapy use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.63-2.64) or placebo arms (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.74-2.55). Among women at high risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with a decreased diabetes risk.

  15. [Air humidifier--benefit or risk?].

    PubMed

    Fidler, A H

    1989-12-01

    Indoor air pollution has become an issue of growing importance for the scientific community. A recent publication of a report of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) showed evidence that portable ultrasonic humidifiers may play a significant role as health hazards as far as indoor air pollution with heavy metal particles is concerned. Especially if the manufacturers' guidelines are not followed strictly and the device is operated with tap water, indoor particle concentrations may reach up to 50 times US outdoor standards for toxic particle concentration. This paper highlights potential risks and benefits of various types of humidifiers, both in private and hospital settings, emphasizing that risks of air humidification in certain situations might outweigh anticipated benefits. The health policy implication of these findings should lead to a more critical application of air humidification in the health care environment and in addition to that, promote better information of the customer about safe operation and useful indications of such devices.

  16. Update on tanning: More risks, fewer benefits.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Ryan E; Diehl, Joseph; Levins, Paul C

    2014-03-01

    The tanning response, classically defined as increased cutaneous pigmentation after solar ultraviolet light exposure, encompasses a variety of protective, reparative, and cosmetic issues. The tanning story is continuously evolving as basic science, clinical research, and public health studies shed light on topics involving: the physiologic mechanisms of tanning, the medical benefits of tanning, the role of sunscreens, the development of "sunless" self-tanners, the use of photocarcinogenic indoor tanning services, and the relatively recent development and promulgation of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues. High-risk tanning behaviors have become increasingly popular and the incidence of melanoma has risen more rapidly than any other cancer. This review will focus on the risks and benefits of each type of tanning, with an emphasis on issues pertinent to dermatologists who care for adolescents and young adults.

  17. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus: risks and management during and after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Thomas A; Xiang, Anny H; Page, Kathleen A

    2012-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a long-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of developing diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements complement maternal glucose monitoring in the identification of pregnancies that require such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after delivery can stratify the short-term diabetes risk in mothers. Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA(1c) testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes mellitus, usually type 2 diabetes mellitus. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning enables optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity.

  19. What Are the Benefits and Risks of Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Benefits and Risks of Pulmonary Rehabilitation? Benefits Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can' ... most of the limited lung function you have. Risks PR usually is safe. The only risks are ...

  20. Cannabis and neuropsychiatry, 1: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis is popularly believed to be a relatively benign substance. Cannabis is also considered to have potential medical benefits, and medical marijuana has been legislated in many parts of the world. However, a recent meta-analysis found that cannabinoids were associated with only modest benefits for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, small and inconsistent benefits for pain and spasticity, and inconclusive benefits for other indications such as improvement of appetite and weight, reduction in tic severity, and improvement of mood or sleep. On the flip side, cannabinoids and cannabis have acute and long-term adverse effects. In randomized controlled trials, cannabinoids increase the risk of total adverse events, serious adverse events, and dropout due to adverse events. Cannabis impairs cognition, and driving after cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of traffic accidents, including fatal accidents. Long-term cannabis use may lead to dependence, respiratory conditions, psychosis, and possibly cancer, as well. Cannabis use during pregnancy may compromise certain pregnancy outcomes such as fetal growth, and use during adolescence may compromise neurodevelopment, social adjustment, and vocational success. The composition and bioavailability of cannabis vary across preparations of the substance and routes of administration; this limits the ability to generalize the findings of studies. The findings of older research may no longer apply to current strains of cannabis that are higher in psychotogenic content. It is important for medical professionals and the lay public to understand the limitations of the efficacy data and the seriousness of the risks associated with cannabis use in medical and recreational contexts.

  1. Crowdfunding our health: Economic risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Matthew J; Mossialos, Elias

    2017-10-01

    Crowdfunding is an expanding form of alternative financing that is gaining traction in the health sector. This article presents a typology for crowdfunded health projects and a review of the main economic benefits and risks of crowdfunding in the health market. We use evidence from a literature review, complimented by expert interviews, to extend the fundamental principles and established theories of crowdfunding to a health market context. Crowdfunded health projects can be classified into four types according to the venture's purpose and funding method. These are projects covering health expenses, fundraising health initiatives, supporting health research, or financing commercial health innovation. Crowdfunding could economically benefit the health sector by expanding market participation, drawing money and awareness to neglected health issues, improving access to funding, and fostering project accountability and social engagement. However, the economic risks of health-related crowdfunding include inefficient priority setting, heightened financial risk, inconsistent regulatory policies, intellectual property rights concerns, and fraud. Theorized crowdfunding behaviours such as signalling and herding can be observed in the market for health-related crowdfunding. Broader threats of market failure stemming from adverse selection and moral hazard also apply. Many of the discussed economic benefits and risks of crowdfunding health campaigns are shared more broadly with those of crowdfunding projects in other sectors. Where crowdfunding health care appears to diverge from theory is the negative externality inefficient priority setting may have towards achieving broader public health goals. Therefore, the market for crowdfunding health care must be economically stable, as well as designed to optimally and equitably improve public health. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... for signing up! engagement en -- Have Type 2 Diabetes? - 2017-03-lwt2d-en.html Have Type 2 Diabetes? ... 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) Copyright 1995-2017. American Diabetes Association. All rights reserved. Use of this website ...

  3. Evaluating the benefits of risk prevention initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, G.

    2012-04-01

    The likelihood and adverse impacts of water-related disasters, such as floods and landslides, are increasing in many countries because of changes in climate and land-use. This presentation illustrates some preliminary results of a comprehensive demonstration of the benefits of risk prevention measures, carried out within the European FP7 KULTURisk project. The study is performed by using a variety of case studies characterised by diverse socio-economic contexts, different types of water-related hazards (floods, debris flows and landslides, storm surges) and space-time scales. In particular, the benefits of state-of-the-art prevention initiatives, such as early warning systems, non-structural options (e.g. mapping and planning), risk transfer strategies (e.g. insurance policy), and structural measures, are showed. Lastly, the importance of homogenising criteria to create hazard inventories and build memory, efficient risk communication and warning methods as well as active dialogue with and between public and private stakeholders, is highlighted.

  4. Prediabetes: a high-risk state for diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Tabák, Adam G; Herder, Christian; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Brunner, Eric J; Kivimäki, Mika

    2012-06-16

    Prediabetes (intermediate hyperglycaemia) is a high-risk state for diabetes that is defined by glycaemic variables that are higher than normal, but lower than diabetes thresholds. 5-10% of people per year with prediabetes will progress to diabetes, with the same proportion converting back to normoglycaemia. Prevalence of prediabetes is increasing worldwide and experts have projected that more than 470 million people will have prediabetes by 2030. Prediabetes is associated with the simultaneous presence of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction-abnormalities that start before glucose changes are detectable. Observational evidence shows associations between prediabetes and early forms of nephropathy, chronic kidney disease, small fibre neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and increased risk of macrovascular disease. Multifactorial risk scores using non-invasive measures and blood-based metabolic traits, in addition to glycaemic values, could optimise estimation of diabetes risk. For prediabetic individuals, lifestyle modification is the cornerstone of diabetes prevention, with evidence of a 40-70% relative-risk reduction. Accumulating data also show potential benefits from pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Risks and Management during and after Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Thomas A.; Xiang, Anny H.; Page, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) represents glucose levels in the high end of the population distribution during pregnancy. GDM carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a longer-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements compliment maternal glucose measurements in identifying pregnancies that need such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after pregnancy can stratify the near-term diabetes risk in mothers, Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA1C testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes, usually type 2. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning allows optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity. PMID:22751341

  6. Risk Factors For Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, Yüksel; KURT, Semiha; KARAER ÜNALDI, Hatice; ERKORKMAZ, Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for distal symmetric sensory-motor polyneuropathy (DSP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Method Sixty seven patients with type 2 DM (33 males and 34 females) were included in the study. In addition to a detailed neurological examination, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was administered to all patients and their total neuropathy scores were calculated. Nerve conduction examinations were performed for all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.83±.87 years. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) value was 8.56±2.07% (normal: 3–6.5%). The total neuropathy score significantly correlated with diabetes duration, hypertension, retinopathy, and HbA1C. Conclusion This study confirms the previous reports regarding the association of neuropathy with poor glycaemic control and duration of the disease. The association of neuropathy with retinopathy and hypertension is important.

  7. Periodontitis and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gurav, Abhijit; Jadhav, Varsha

    2011-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex disease with varying degrees of systemic and oral complications. The periodontium is also a target for diabetic damage. Diabetes is a pandemic in both developed and developing countries. In recent years, a link between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus has been postulated. The oral cavity serves as a continuous source of infectious agents that could further worsen the diabetic status of the patient and serve as an important risk factor deterioration of diabetes mellitus. The present review highlights the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. The potential mechanisms involved in the deterioration of diabetic status and periodontal disease are also discussed. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. [Benefit/risk ratio of antibiotic therapy

    PubMed

    Rossi, F.; Mangrella, M.; Mazzeo, F.

    1999-01-01

    This publication evaluates critically the benefit/risk profile of several antibiotics currently at our disposal. The considered antibiotics are divided into pharmacological classes, because generally the drugs of the same class share the same adverse events. Moreover, the high therapeutic profile of the antibiotics puts them at the top of the safest drugs. Therefore the choice of an antibiotic is based above all on the evaluation of the patient and of the pathology to be treated, in terms of severity and possibility of achieving a response to treatment. An accurate anamnesis, the identification of the correct dosage and of the therapy duration minimise the potential risks of the chosen treatment. Detailed knowledge of the safety profile of these drugs is a further element in order for the antibiotic to perform at its best

  9. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: risks and benefits of ventilation].

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Garelli, Valentina; Lyazidi, Aissam; Suppan, Laurent; Savary, Dominique; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2013-12-11

    Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that govern cardiopulmonary interactions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) allows to better assess risks and benefits of ventilation. Ventilation is required to maintain gas exchange, particularly when CPR is prolonged. Nevertheless, conventional ventilation (bag mask or mechanical ventilation) may be harmful when excessive or when chest compressions are interrupted. In fact large tidal volume and/or rapid respiratory rate may adversely compromise hemodynamic effects of chest compressions. In this regard, international recommendations that give the priority to chest compressions, are meaningful. Continuous flow insufflation with oxygen that generates a moderate positive airway pressure avoids any interruption of chest compressions and prevents the risk of lung injury associated with prolonged resuscitation.

  10. Addressing immunization barriers, benefits, and risks.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Sanford R; Burns, Ilene Timko; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2003-01-01

    Immunization rates in the United States still fall short of the Healthy People 2010 goals for children and adults. To improve rates of immunization, physicians need to understand and address barriers to immunization, including fragmented health-care delivery, missed opportunities to vaccinate, and the patient's fear of adverse reactions. This article addresses these issues and suggests strategies by which rates can be improved, such as patient reminders, standing orders, and assessment of and feedback on practitioner performance. Additionally, it provides suggestions to help physicians better communicate vaccine risks and benefits to their patients, potentially affecting an individual's acceptance of those risks. It describes the appropriate use of materials such as the Vaccine Information Statements. Physicians should also be prepared to answer patients' questions about alleged or controversial vaccine adverse events.

  11. Lifestyle Interventions to Reduce Risk of Diabetes among Women with Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by more than 50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English-language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, 9 studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. PMID:25220104

  12. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceived risk of diabetes seriously underestimates actual diabetes risk: The KORA FF4 study

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Andreas; Bongaerts, Brenda; Kuss, Oliver; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Quante, Anne; Holle, Rolf; Huth, Cornelia; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christa

    2017-01-01

    Objective Early detection of diabetes and prediabetic states is beneficial for patients, but may be delayed by patients´ being overly optimistic about their own health. Therefore, we assessed how persons without known diabetes perceive their risk of having or developing diabetes, and we identified factors associated with perception of diabetes risk. Research design and methods 1,953 participants without previously known diabetes from the population-based, German KORA FF4 Study (59.1 years, 47.8% men) had an oral glucose tolerance test. They estimated their probability of having undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (UDM) on a six category scale, and assessed whether they were at risk of developing diabetes in the future. We cross-tabulated glycemic status with risk perception, and fitted robust Poisson regression models to identify determinants of diabetes risk perception. Results 74% (95% CI: 65–82) of persons with UDM believed that their probability of having undetected diabetes was low or very low. 72% (95% CI: 69–75) of persons with prediabetes believed that they were not at risk of developing diabetes. In people with prediabetes, seeing oneself at risk of diabetes was associated with self-rated poor general health (prevalence ratio (PR) = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.4–6.8), parental diabetes (PR = 2.6, 1.9–3.4), high educational level (PR = 1.9 (1.4–2.5)), lower age (PR = 0.7, 0.6–0.8, per 1 standard deviation increase), female sex (PR = 1.2, 0.9–1.5) and obesity (PR = 1.5, 1.2–2.0). Conclusions People with undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes considerably underestimate their probability of having or developing diabetes. Contrary to associations with actual diabetes risk, perceived diabetes risk was lower in men, lower educated and older persons. PMID:28141837

  14. Risk and Benefit of Drug Use During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Environmental teratogenic factors (e.g. alcohol) are preventable. We focus our analysis on human teratogenic drugs which are not used frequently during pregnancy. The previous human teratogenic studies had serious methodological problems, e.g. the first trimester concept is outdated because environmental teratogens cannot induce congenital abnormalities in the first month of gestation. In addition, teratogens usually cause specific congenital abnormalities or syndromes. Finally, the importance of chemical structures, administrative routes and reasons for treatment at the evaluation of medicinal products was not considered. On the other hand, in the so-called case-control epidemiological studies in general recall bias was not limited. These biases explain that the teratogenic risk of drugs is exaggerated, while the benefit of medicine use during pregnancy is underestimated. Thus, a better balance is needed between the risk and benefit of drug treatments during pregnancy. Of course, we have to do our best to reduce the risk of teratogenic drugs as much as possible, however, it is worth stressing the preventive effect of drugs for maternal diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus and hyperthermia) related congenital abnormalities. PMID:16007261

  15. The risks and benefits of sun exposure 2016

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, David G.; Berwick, Marianne; de Gruijl, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Public health authorities in the United States are recommending that men, women and children reduce their exposure to sunlight, based on concerns that this exposure will promote skin cancer. On the other hand, data show that increasing numbers of Americans suffer from vitamin D deficiencies and serious health problems caused by insufficient sun exposure. The body of science concerning the benefits of moderate sun exposure is growing rapidly, and is causing a different perception of sun/UV as it relates to human health. Melanoma and its relationship to sun exposure and sunburn is not adequately addressed in most of the scientific literature. Reports of favorable health outcomes related to adequate serum 25(OH)D concentration or vitamin D supplementation have been inappropriately merged, so that benefits of sun exposure other than production of vitamin D are not adequately described. This review of recent studies and their analyses consider the risks and benefits of sun exposure which indicate that insufficient sun exposure is an emerging public health problem. This review considers the studies that have shown a wide range health benefits from sun/UV exposure. These benefits include among others various types of cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer disease/dementia, myopia and macular degeneration, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The message of sun avoidance must be changed to acceptance of non-burning sun exposure sufficient to achieve serum 25(OH)D concentration of 30 ng/mL or higher in the sunny season and the general benefits of UV exposure beyond those of vitamin D. PMID:27942349

  16. How to balance cardiorenometabolic benefits and risks of statins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Oh, Pyung Chun; Sakuma, Ichiro; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2014-08-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are important for preventing adverse cardiovascular events not only in patients with a high risk of vascular disease but also in those with a low risk, by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Statin is associated with deteriorating glucose homeostasis and an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. Moreover, these off-target effects are dose-dependent; it has also been suggested that renal insult can be caused dose-dependently by statin treatment, in contrast to previous studies showing a renoprotective effect. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend the use of high-intensity statin therapy, and extend its use to more people at risk of vascular diseases. However, a European committee has expressed concerns about the potential side effects of using statins in a large fraction of the population for extended periods. This is true of Asian people, for whom the disease burden from cardiovascular disorders is not as great as among Western ethnic groups. There are still many unanswered questions on how to balance the cardiovascular benefits with the potential renometabolic risks of statins. Therefore, genetic or pharmacogenetic approaches are needed to define who is more vulnerable to developing diabetes mellitus or acute kidney injury. In particular, more information is required regarding the metabolism of statins, and their off-target or unknown actions and overall impact. These different renometabolic effects of statins should help in formulating optimal therapeutic strategies for patients for reducing overall morbidity and mortality and not just those associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeannie D; Nelson, Michele A; Schneider, Alan L

    2016-05-18

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia.

  18. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration

    PubMed Central

    Lochhead, Jeannie D.; Nelson, Michele A.; Schneider, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia. PMID:27403276

  19. Hand disinfection in hospitals - benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Günter; Löffler, Harald

    2010-12-01

    The WHO regards hand hygiene as an essential tool for the prevention of noso-comial infections. The hygienic hand disinfection has a superior antimicrobial efficacy compared to hand washing and should be performed as the treatment of choice before and after a variety of activities at the point of patient care. Washing hands should be preferred when the hands are visibly soiled. Skin irritation is quite common among healthcare workers and is mainly caused by water, soap and long lasting occlusion. Compliance with hand disinfection in clinical practice is often low. Measures to improve compliance include training, provision of hand rubs where they are needed, and the responsibility of doctors to set a good example. Improved compliance in hand hygiene and targeted use of alcohol-based hand rubs can reduce the nosocomial infection rate by up to 40 %. The benefit of hand disinfection is therefore much larger than possible risks.

  20. Cooling down inflammation in type 2 diabetes: how strong is the evidence for cardiometabolic benefit?

    PubMed

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2017-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is supposed to be an important mediator of cardiometabolic dysfunctions seen in type 2 diabetes. In this mini-review, we collected evidence (PubMed) from randomized controlled trials (through March 2016) evaluating the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs on indices of glycemic control and/or cardiovascular events in people with type 2 diabetes. Within the last 25 years, many anti-inflammatory drugs have been tested in type 2 diabetes, including hydroxychloroquine, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies (etanercept and infliximab), salsalate, interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra, canakinumab, gevokizumab, LY2189102), and CC-R2 antagonists. Despite being promising, the observed effects on HbA1c or glucose control remain rather modest in most clinical trials, especially with the new drugs. There are many trials underway with anti-inflammatory agents to see whether patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes may have clinical benefit from marked reductions in circulating inflammatory markers. Until now, a large trial with losmapimod (a p38 inhibitor) among patients with acute myocardial infarction, including one/third of diabetic patients, showed no reduction in the risk of major ischemic cardiovascular events. Further evidence is warranted in support of the concept that targeting inflammation pathways may ameliorate glycemic control and also reduce cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

  1. Prediabetes: A high-risk state for developing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tabák, Adam G.; Herder, Christian; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Brunner, Eric J.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2013-01-01

    Summary Prediabetes (or “intermediate hyperglycaemia”), based on glycaemic parameters above normal but below diabetes thresholds is a high risk state for diabetes with an annualized conversion rate of 5%–10%; with similar proportion converting back to normoglycaemia. The prevalence of prediabetes is increasing worldwide and it is projected that >470 million people will have prediabetes in 2030. Prediabetes is associated with the simultaneous presence of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, abnormalities that start before glucose changes are detectable. Observational evidence shows associations of prediabetes with early forms of nephropathy, chronic kidney disease, small fibre neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and increased risk of macrovascular disease. Multifactorial risk scores could optimize the estimation of diabetes risk using non-invasive parameters and blood-based metabolic traits in addition to glycaemic values. For prediabetic individuals, lifestyle modification is the cornerstone of diabetes prevention with evidence of a 40%–70% relative risk reduction. Accumulating data also suggests potential benefits from pharmacotherapy. PMID:22683128

  2. Joint distribution approaches to simultaneously quantifying benefit and risk.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Michele L; Watterberg, Kristi L

    2006-10-12

    The benefit-risk ratio has been proposed to measure the tradeoff between benefits and risks of two therapies for a single binary measure of efficacy and a single adverse event. The ratio is calculated from the difference in risk and difference in benefit between therapies. Small sample sizes or expected differences in benefit or risk can lead to no solution or problematic solutions for confidence intervals. Alternatively, using the joint distribution of benefit and risk, confidence regions for the differences in risk and benefit can be constructed in the benefit-risk plane. The information in the joint distribution can be summarized by choosing regions of interest in this plane. Using Bayesian methodology provides a very flexible framework for summarizing information in the joint distribution. Data from a National Institute of Child Health & Human Development trial of hydrocortisone illustrate the construction of confidence regions and regions of interest in the benefit-risk plane, where benefit is survival without supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age, and risk is gastrointestinal perforation. For the subgroup of infants exposed to chorioamnionitis the confidence interval based on the benefit-risk ratio is wide (Benefit-risk ratio: 1.52; 90% confidence interval: 0.23 to 5.25). Choosing regions of appreciable risk and acceptable risk in the benefit-risk plane confirms the uncertainty seen in the wide confidence interval for the benefit-risk ratio--there is a greater than 50% chance of falling into the region of acceptable risk--while visually allowing the uncertainty in risk and benefit to be shown separately. Applying Bayesian methodology, an incremental net health benefit analysis shows there is a 72% chance of having a positive incremental net benefit if hydrocortisone is used in place of placebo if one is willing to incur at most one gastrointestinal perforation for each additional infant that survives without supplemental oxygen. If the benefit-risk

  3. Health benefits of nuts in prevention and management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Esfahani, Amin; Truan, Jennifer; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A

    2010-01-01

    The effects of tree nuts on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), in particular blood lipids, have been investigated in a number of studies and the beneficial effects are now recognized. The beneficial effects of nuts on CHD in cohort studies have also been clearly demonstrated. However, while there is also reason to believe the unique micro- and macronutrient profiles of nuts may help to control blood glucose levels, relatively few studies have investigated their role in diabetes control and prevention. Nuts are low in available carbohydrate, have a healthy fatty acid profile, and are high in vegetable protein, fiber and magnesium. Acute feeding studies indicate that when eaten alone nuts have minimal effects on raising postprandial blood glucose levels. In addition, when nuts are consumed with carbohydrate rich foods, they blunt the postprandial glycemic response of the carbohydrate meal. Despite the success of these acute studies, only a limited number of trials have been conducted with nuts in type 2 diabetes. These studies have either been of insufficient duration to observe changes in HbA1c, as the standard measure of glycemic control, or have been underpowered. Therefore, more long-term clinical trials are required to examine the role of nuts on glycemic control in patients with prediabetes and diabetes. Overall, there are good reasons to justify further exploration of the use of nuts in the prevention of diabetes and its micro- and macrovascular complications.

  4. Benefits of healthy adipose tissue in the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C

    2014-08-15

    The major malfunction in diabetes mellitus is severe perturbation of glucose homeostasis caused by deficiency of insulin. Insulin deficiency is either absolute due to destruction or failure of pancreatic β cells, or relative due to decreased sensitivity of peripheral tissues to insulin. The primary lesion being related to insulin, treatments for diabetes focus on insulin replacement and/or increasing sensitivity to insulin. These therapies have their own limitations and complications, some of which can be life-threatening. For example, exogenous insulin administration can lead to fatal hypoglycemic episodes; islet/pancreas transplantation requires life-long immunosuppressive therapy; and anti-diabetic drugs have dangerous side effects including edema, heart failure and lactic acidosis. Thus the need remains for better safer long term treatments for diabetes. The ultimate goal in treating diabetes is to re-establish glucose homeostasis, preferably through endogenously generated hormones. Recent studies increasingly show that extra-pancreatic hormones, particularly those arising from adipose tissue, can compensate for insulin, or entirely replace the function of insulin under appropriate circumstances. Adipose tissue is a versatile endocrine organ that secretes a variety of hormones with far-reaching effects on overall metabolism. While unhealthy adipose tissue can exacerbate diabetes through limiting circulation and secreting of pro-inflammatory cytokines, healthy uninflamed adipose tissue secretes beneficial adipokines with hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory properties, which can complement and/or compensate for the function of insulin. Administration of specific adipokines is known to alleviate both type 1 and 2 diabetes, and leptin mono-therapy is reported to reverse type 1 diabetes independent of insulin. Although specific adipokines may correct diabetes, administration of individual adipokines still carries risks similar to those of insulin monotherapy. Thus a

  5. Seafood: nutritional benefits and risk aspects.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschläger, Jörg

    2012-06-01

    Seafood, such as fish, crustacean and molluscan shellfish, and echinoderms, provides in the edible part (e. g., filet, abdominal muscle) many nutritional components beneficial for the human diet like n-3 polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids (PUFAs), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), essential elements such as selenium and iodine, high potassium and low sodium concentrations, and the vitamins D, A, E, and B(12), as well as taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) among others. Its protein is highly digestible due to low connective tissue content, and cholesterol content is also low in fish. Lean fish species are extremely low in fat content (<1 %), while fatty species are extremely rich in PUFAs. However, being subject to environmental influences from its habitat, seafood also entails water-borne health risks such as organic pollutants, toxins, parasites, and heavy metals. Nevertheless, the vast majority of experimental and epidemiological studies have proven that the benefits of fish intake exceed the potential risks even for vulnerable consumer groups.

  6. Human milk pasteurization: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Deborah L; Ewaschuk, Julia B; Unger, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Recent findings substantiate that the optimal method of nourishing preterm, very low birth weight infants (VLBW, born <1500 g) is through appropriately nutrient-enriched human milk, which is frequently provided as pasteurized donor milk. The availability of donor milk for VLBW infants during initial hospitalization continues to increase with the launch of new milk banks in North America. The majority of North American neonatal ICUs now have written policies governing the provision of donor milk. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent evidence regarding the risks and benefits of pasteurization of human milk and outcomes associated with its provision to VLBW preterm infants. Studies investigating the impact of collection, storage and pasteurization on the bacteriostatic, immunologic and nutritional aspects of human milk continue to be published, generally revealing a partial, but not complete reduction in bioactivity. Risk of contamination of pasteurized donor human milk with pathogenic agents is mitigated through pasteurization. New pasteurization methods aiming to maintain the safety of pooled human milk while better preserving bioactivity are under investigation. Provision of a human milk-derived diet to preterm VLBW infants is associated with improved outcomes.

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Dede, Anastasia D; Tournis, Symeon; Dontas, Ismene; Trovas, George

    2014-12-01

    Increased fracture risk, traditionally associated with type 1 diabetes, has lately been of great concern in patients with type 2 diabetes. A variable increase in fracture risk has been reported, ranging from 20% to 3-fold, depending on skeletal site, diabetes duration and study design. Longer disease duration, the presence of diabetic complications, inadequate glycemic control, insulin use and increased risk for falls are all reported to increase fracture risk. Patients with type 2 diabetes display a unique skeletal phenotype with either normal or more frequently increased, bone mineral density and impaired structural and geometric properties. Recently, alterations in bone material properties seem to be the predominant defect leading to increased bone fragility. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products and changes in collagen cross-linking along with suppression of bone turnover seem to be significant factors impairing bone strength. FRAX score has been reported to underestimate fracture risk and lumbar spine BMD is inadequate in predicting vertebral fractures. Anti-diabetic medications, apart from thiazolidinediones, appear to be safe for the skeleton, although more data are needed. Optimal strategies to reduce skeletal fragility in type 2 diabetic patients are yet to be determined.

  8. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Niesters, Marieke; Martini, Christian; Dahan, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The anaesthetic ketamine is used to treat various chronic pain syndromes, especially those that have a neuropathic component. Low dose ketamine produces strong analgesia in neuropathic pain states, presumably by inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor although other mechanisms are possibly involved, including enhancement of descending inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects at central sites. Current data on short term infusions indicate that ketamine produces potent analgesia during administration only, while three studies on the effect of prolonged infusion (4–14 days) show long-term analgesic effects up to 3 months following infusion. The side effects of ketamine noted in clinical studies include psychedelic symptoms (hallucinations, memory defects, panic attacks), nausea/vomiting, somnolence, cardiovascular stimulation and, in a minority of patients, hepatoxicity. The recreational use of ketamine is increasing and comes with a variety of additional risks ranging from bladder and renal complications to persistent psychotypical behaviour and memory defects. Blind extrapolation of these risks to clinical patients is difficult because of the variable, high and recurrent exposure to the drug in ketamine abusers and the high frequency of abuse of other illicit substances in this population. In clinical settings, ketamine is well tolerated, especially when benzodiazepines are used to tame the psychotropic side effects. Irrespective, close monitoring of patients receiving ketamine is mandatory, particularly aimed at CNS, haemodynamic, renal and hepatic symptoms as well as abuse. Further research is required to assess whether the benefits outweigh the risks and costs. Until definite proof is obtained ketamine administration should be restricted to patients with therapy-resistant severe neuropathic pain. PMID:23432384

  9. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Niesters, Marieke; Martini, Christian; Dahan, Albert

    2014-02-01

    The anaesthetic ketamine is used to treat various chronic pain syndromes, especially those that have a neuropathic component. Low dose ketamine produces strong analgesia in neuropathic pain states, presumably by inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor although other mechanisms are possibly involved, including enhancement of descending inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects at central sites. Current data on short term infusions indicate that ketamine produces potent analgesia during administration only, while three studies on the effect of prolonged infusion (4-14 days) show long-term analgesic effects up to 3 months following infusion. The side effects of ketamine noted in clinical studies include psychedelic symptoms (hallucinations, memory defects, panic attacks), nausea/vomiting, somnolence, cardiovascular stimulation and, in a minority of patients, hepatoxicity. The recreational use of ketamine is increasing and comes with a variety of additional risks ranging from bladder and renal complications to persistent psychotypical behaviour and memory defects. Blind extrapolation of these risks to clinical patients is difficult because of the variable, high and recurrent exposure to the drug in ketamine abusers and the high frequency of abuse of other illicit substances in this population. In clinical settings, ketamine is well tolerated, especially when benzodiazepines are used to tame the psychotropic side effects. Irrespective, close monitoring of patients receiving ketamine is mandatory, particularly aimed at CNS, haemodynamic, renal and hepatic symptoms as well as abuse. Further research is required to assess whether the benefits outweigh the risks and costs. Until definite proof is obtained ketamine administration should be restricted to patients with therapy-resistant severe neuropathic pain. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Parental Longevity and Diabetes Risk in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Jill P.; Perreault, Leigh; Marcovina, Santica M.; Bray, George A.; Saudek, Christopher D.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Knowler, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Longevity clusters in families, and parental longevity may be associated with lower risk of chronic diseases in their children. It is unknown if diabetes risk is associated with parental longevity. Methods. We evaluated participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program with a parental history questionnaire at study entry. We classified them into five groups: premature death (parental death at age < 50 years), parental longevity (living to at least 80 years), and three intermediate groups (alive by age 49 but dying at age 50–59, 60–69, or 70–79). Those with alive parents and younger than 80 years were excluded. We analyzed separately effects of paternal (n = 2,165) and maternal (n = 1,739) longevity on diabetes incidence and risk after an average follow-up of 3.2 years. Results. At baseline, more diabetes risk factors (parental history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, higher body mass index, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, and corrected insulin response) were found in participants whose parents died prematurely. Diabetes incidence was 9.5 cases/100 person-years in the 229 whose fathers died prematurely. In the 618 with paternal longevity, the rate was 6.6 cases/100 person-years (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] = 0.68 [0.49–0.94]). The rates were 10.7 cases/100 person-years (n = 156) and 7.3 cases/100 person-years (n = 699, hazard ratio = 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.47–0.95]) for those with maternal premature death or longevity, respectively. Associations with demographic and diabetes risk factors had minimal influence on the reduced risk found in those with paternal (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.52–1.16) and maternal (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.41–1.01) longevity. Conclusion. Parental longevity is associated with lower diabetes incidence in adults at high risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21852284

  11. Overcoming barriers to glycemic control in African Americans with type-2 diabetes: benefits of insulin therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Merville C.

    2007-01-01

    A disproportionate number of African-American men and women are affected by obesity and diabetes. The documented rate of poor glycemic control in the African-American population may contribute to the high rate of morbidity and mortality due to diabetes observed in these patients. Since the benefits of strict glycemic control have been demonstrated in multiple large trials, the aim of treatment should be to achieve the goals set forth by the American Diabetes Association. Insulin remains an essential therapeutic agent for helping patients achieve glycemic control and preventing long-term comorbidities. However, barriers to insulin therapy exist for both the physician and patient. Strategies to counter this resistance include identifying barriers to treatment, restoring the patient's sense of control, utilizing simple regimens, and reviewing the benefits of insulin and the risk of hypoglycemia. In treating African-American patients with diabetes, providers of various racial and ethnic backgrounds may maximize treatment efficacy by attempting to understand and practice culturally competent care. PMID:17722663

  12. Risks and benefits of generic antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Alonso, Juan; Kanner, Andrés M; Herranz, José Luis; Molins, Albert; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    In most therapeutic areas, prescribing generic drugs seems to lower costs without sacrificing efficacy. The use of generic drugs for treating epilepsy may, however, be more controversial. A systematic review of the literature on generic antiepileptic drugs has been carried out based primarily on a bibliographical search in the Medline database. Published studies are usually of a descriptive nature and are sometimes based on generic drugs that were approved in times when regulatory agency requirements were not as strict as they are now. Experts claim that a change in pharmaceutical formulations could cause seizure recurrence in cases that had been successfully controlled in the past, with severe effects on patients. Meanwhile, several health organizations have provided inconsistent recommendations on the use of generic antiepileptic drugs. In order to obtain scientific evidence on the potential risks and benefits of interchanging branded and generic antiepileptic drugs, high methodological comparative studies are necessary. These studies could bring consensus about the role of generic drugs for treating epilepsy.

  13. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  14. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the Risks of Cochlear Implants? General Anesthesia Risks General anesthesia is drug-induced sleep. The drugs, such as ... differently. For most people, the risk of general anesthesia is very low. However, for some people with ...

  15. Communicating the risks, and the benefits, of nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Issues surrounding the wide spectrum of (perceived) risks and possible benefits associated with the rapid advance of modern nanotechnology are deliberated. These include the current realities of nanotechnological hazards, their impact vis-à-vis perceived nanotech-risks and perceived nanotech-benefits, and the consequent repercussions on the public and society. It is argued that both the risks and the benefits of nanoscientific advances must be properly communicated if the public is to support this emerging technology. PMID:19823594

  16. Sleep Characteristics, Mental Health, and Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Edward J.; Seelig, Amber D.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Hooper, Tomoko I.; Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Research has suggested that a higher risk of type 2 diabetes associated with sleep characteristics exists. However, studies have not thoroughly assessed the potential confounding effects of mental health conditions associated with alterations in sleep. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively assessed the association between sleep characteristics and self-reported incident diabetes among Millennium Cohort Study participants prospectively followed over a 6-year time period. Surveys are administered approximately every 3 years and collect self-reported data on demographics, height, weight, lifestyle, features of military service, sleep, clinician-diagnosed diabetes, and mental health conditions assessed by the PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire and the PTSD Checklist–Civilian Version. Statistical methods for longitudinal data were used for data analysis. RESULTS We studied 47,093 participants (mean 34.9 years of age; mean BMI 26.0 kg/m2; 25.6% female). During 6 years of follow-up, 871 incident diabetes cases occurred (annual incidence 3.6/1,000 person-years). In univariate analyses, incident diabetes was significantly more likely among participants with self-reported trouble sleeping, sleep duration <6 h, and sleep apnea. Participants reporting incident diabetes were also significantly older, of nonwhite race, of higher BMI, less likely to have been deployed, and more likely to have reported baseline symptoms of panic, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression. After adjusting for covariates, trouble sleeping (odds ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.03–1.42]) and sleep apnea (1.78 [1.39–2.28]) were significantly and independently related to incident diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Trouble sleeping and sleep apnea predict diabetes risk independent of mental health conditions and other diabetes risk factors. PMID:23835691

  17. Considering Tangible Benefit for Interdependent Donors: Extending a Risk-Benefit Framework in Donor Selection.

    PubMed

    Van Pilsum Rasmussen, S E; Henderson, M L; Kahn, J; Segev, D

    2017-10-01

    From its infancy, live donor transplantation has operated within a framework of acceptable risk to donors. Such a framework presumes that risks of living donation are experienced by the donor while all benefits are realized by the recipient, creating an inequitable distribution that demands minimization of donor risk. We suggest that this risk-tolerance framework ignores tangible benefits to the donor. A previously proposed framework more fully considers potential benefits to the donor and argues that risks and benefits must be balanced. We expand on this approach, and posit that donors sharing a household with and/or caring for a potential transplant patient may realize tangible benefits that are absent in a more distantly related donation (e.g. cousin, nondirected). We term these donors, whose well-being is closely tied to their recipient, "interdependent donors." A flexible risk-benefit model that combines risk assessment with benefits to interdependent donors will contribute to donor evaluation and selection that more accurately reflects what is at stake for donors. In so doing, a risk-benefit framework may allow some donors to accept greater risk in donation decisions. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: medicines.

    PubMed

    Luteijn, J M; White, B C; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; McCarron, P A; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Benefit-risk assessment in medicine has been a valuable tool in the regulation of medicines since the 1960s. Benefit-risk assessment takes place in multiple stages during a medicine's life-cycle and can be conducted in a variety of ways, using methods ranging from qualitative to quantitative. Each benefit-risk assessment method is subject to its own specific strengths and limitations. Despite its widespread and long-time use, benefit-risk assessment in medicine is subject to debate and suffers from a number of limitations and is currently still under development. This state of the art review paper will discuss the various aspects and approaches to benefit-risk assessment in medicine in a chronological pathway. The review will discuss all types of benefit-risk assessment a medicinal product will undergo during its lifecycle, from Phase I clinical trials to post-marketing surveillance and health technology assessment for inclusion in public formularies. The benefit-risk profile of a drug is dynamic and differs for different indications and patient groups. In the end of this review we conclude benefit-risk analysis in medicine is a developed practice that is subject to continuous improvement and modernisation. Improvement not only in methodology, but also in cooperation between organizations can improve benefit-risk assessment.

  19. Risk-benefit analysis: from a logical point of view.

    PubMed

    Spielthenner, Georg

    2012-06-01

    In this paper I am concerned with risk-benefit analysis; that is, the comparison of the risks of a situation to its related benefits. We all face such situations in our daily lives and they are very common in medicine too, where risk-benefit analysis has become an important tool for rational decision-making. This paper explores risk-benefit analysis from a logical point of view. In particular, it seeks a better understanding of the common view that decisions should be made by weighing risks against benefits and that an option should be chosen if its benefits outweigh its risks. I devote a good deal of this paper scrutinizing this popular view. Specifically, I demonstrate that this mode of reasoning is logically faulty if "risk" and "benefit" are taken in their absolute sense. But I also show that arguing in favour of an action because its benefits outweigh its risks can be valid if we refer to incremental risks and benefits.

  20. Pregnancy-Linked Diabetes Poses Risks for Mom, Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- Diabetes that develops during pregnancy -- known as gestational diabetes -- carries health risks for both the mom-to- ... 2012. Compared to other pregnant women, those with gestational diabetes were 30 percent more likely to experience preterm ...

  1. Risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Wasim; Khan, Ishtiaq Ali; Ghaffar, Salma; Al-Swailmi, Farhan Khasham; Khan, Ihsanullah

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot is one of the common complications of diabetes mellitus. Many risk factors are involved in its causation. This study was conducted to determine risk factors responsible for foot ulcer in diabetic patients. A total of 196 consecutive patients with diabetic foot were included in the study. Detailed history, clinical findings and investigations were recorded. Lesions were graded according to Wagner's classification, and appropriate medical and/or surgical treatment was carried out. Patients who did not consent to participate in the study had established gangrene of the foot, or had any medical co-morbidity especially chronic heart failure and chronic renal failure which could influence these risk factors were excluded from the study. Data were collected on a special proforma for analysis. Out of 196 patients 80.1% were male. One hundred and forty-six (74.48%) patients were in the range of 40-70) years. Right foot was more commonly involved (65.3%). 91.3% patients had diabetes of more than 5 years duration. No treatment had been received by 47.4% patients while 41.3% were on oral anti-diabetics; 11.2% patients were on insulin. All patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy was present in 51% patients, 62.8% had absent or diminished peripheral pulses, 43.4% had poorly controlled diabetes. According to the Wagner classification 30.6% patients had grade 1, 26.5% had grade 2, and 42.9% had grade 3 diabetic foot. Evidence of infection was seen in 85.7% patients: staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 43.4% patients. Osteomyelitis was present in 42.9% patients. Surgical intervention was performed in 85.7% patients. Direct relation was found between the duration of diabetes, sugar control, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease. grade of diabetic foot, evidence of osteomyelitis, intervention and the outcome of the disease. Neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, duration of diseases and undlerlying osteomylitis are the major risk factors and

  2. Brief report: Benefit finding and identity processes in type 1 diabetes: Prospective associations throughout adolescence.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, Koen; Ramsey, Meagan A; Kelly, Caitlin S; Wiebe, Deborah J; Mello, Daniel; Oris, Leen; Prikken, Sofie; Verschueren, Margaux; Berg, Cynthia A

    2016-06-01

    Identity formation constitutes a core developmental task during adolescence, but may be challenged when having a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes. The present study examined whether viewing positive benefits to one's diabetes across adolescence was related to greater identity exploration and commitment later in time. A total of 55 adolescents (10-14 years; 47% female) with type 1 diabetes participated in a six-wave study spanning 3 years (with six-month measurement intervals). Through latent growth curve modeling, Time 6 identity scores were regressed on intercept and slope terms of benefit finding through Times 1-4, simultaneously controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Identity exploration (but not commitment) at Time 6 was positively predicted by the intercept and slope of benefit finding: adolescents who find benefits in diabetes are more inclined to explore different alternatives later on in adolescence. Benefit finding may constitute a resource facilitating identity formation in adolescents with diabetes.

  3. Major Long-Term Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Type 1 Diabetes: Study Reports Near-Normal Glucose Levels Lead to Large Reductions in Kidney, Heart, ... type 1 diabetes helps them achieve near-normal glucose levels and substantially reduces the risk of developing ...

  4. Model-based benefit-risk assessment: can Archimedes help?

    PubMed

    Krishna, R

    2009-03-01

    In December 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a new draft Guidance for Industry on Diabetes Mellitus--evaluating cardiovascular risk in new antidiabetic therapies to treat Type 2 diabetes. This guidance comes at a time when recent discussions have focused on delineation of cardiovascular risk reduction for new antidiabetic drugs. Computational tools that can enable early prediction of cardiovascular risk are reviewed with specific reference to Archimedes (Kaiser Permanente), with an aim of proposing a model-based solution and enabling decisions to be made as early as possible in the drug development value chain.

  5. Cardiovascular benefits and safety profile of acarbose therapy in prediabetes and established type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hanefeld, Markolf

    2007-01-01

    Dysglycaemic disease is one of the most important health issues facing the world in the 21st century. Patients with type 2 diabetes and individuals with prediabetes are at risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications. Long-term management strategies are therefore required that are effective at controlling dysglycaemia, well tolerated and, ideally, offer additional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk-reduction benefits. The efficacy, safety and tolerability of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose have been well-established in a wide range of patient populations in both clinical and community trials. In addition, acarbose has been shown to reduce cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes and prevent hypertension and CVD in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Acarbose has a very good safety profile and, owing to its straightforward, non-systemic mode of action, avoids most adverse events. The most common side-effects of acarbose are mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal complaints that subside as treatment continues. They can be minimised through the use of an appropriate stepwise dosing regimen and careful choice of diet. Acarbose is therefore a valuable option for the management of type 2 diabetes and, as the only oral antidiabetes agent approved for the treatment of prediabetes, can help to improve clinical management across the dysglycaemic disease continuum. PMID:17697384

  6. Parental History of Diabetes, Positive Affect, and Diabetes Risk in Adults: Findings from MIDUS.

    PubMed

    Tsenkova, Vera K; Karlamangla, Arun S; Ryff, Carol D

    2016-12-01

    Family history of diabetes is one of the major risk factors for diabetes, but significant variability in this association remains unexplained, suggesting the presence of important effect modifiers. To our knowledge, no previous work has examined whether psychological factors moderate the degree to which family history of diabetes increases diabetes risk. We investigated the relationships among parental history of diabetes, affective states (positive affect, negative affect, and depressed affect), and diabetes in 978 adults from the MIDUS 2 national sample. As expected, parental history of diabetes was associated with an almost threefold increase in diabetes risk. We found a significant interaction between positive affect and parental history of diabetes on diabetes (p = .009): higher positive affect was associated with a statistically significant lower relative risk for diabetes in participants who reported having a parental history of diabetes (RR = .66 per unit increase in positive affect; 95 % CI = .47; .93), but it did not influence diabetes risk for participants who reported no parental history of diabetes (p = .34). This pattern persisted after adjusting for an extensive set of health and sociodemographic covariates and was independent of negative and depressed affect. These results suggest that psychological well-being may protect individuals at increased risk from developing diabetes. Understanding such interactions between non-modifiable risk factors and modifiable psychological resources is important for delineating biopsychosocial pathways to diabetes and informing theory-based, patient-centered interventions to prevent the development of diabetes.

  7. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: introduction.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, H; Tijhuis, M J; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Holm, F

    2012-01-01

    Risk-taking is normal in everyday life if there are associated (perceived) benefits. Benefit-Risk Analysis (BRA) compares the risk of a situation to its related benefits and addresses the acceptability of the risk. Over the past years BRA in relation to food and food ingredients has gained attention. Food, and even the same food ingredient, may confer both beneficial and adverse effects. Measures directed at food safety may lead to suboptimal or insufficient levels of ingredients from a benefit perspective. In BRA, benefits and risks of food (ingredients) are assessed in one go and may conditionally be expressed into one currency. This allows the comparison of adverse and beneficial effects to be qualitative and quantitative. A BRA should help policy-makers to make more informed and balanced benefit-risk management decisions. Not allowing food benefits to occur in order to guarantee food safety is a risk management decision much the same as accepting some risk in order to achieve more benefits. BRA in food and nutrition is making progress, but difficulties remain. The field may benefit from looking across its borders to learn from other research areas. The BEPRARIBEAN project (Best Practices for Risk-Benefit Analysis: experience from out of food into food; http://en.opasnet.org/w/Bepraribean) aims to do so, by working together with Medicines, Food Microbiology, Environmental Health, Economics & Marketing-Finance and Consumer Perception. All perspectives are reviewed and subsequently integrated to identify opportunities for further development of BRA for food and food ingredients. Interesting issues that emerge are the varying degrees of risk that are deemed acceptable within the areas and the trend towards more open and participatory BRA processes. A set of 6 'state of the art' papers covering the above areas and a paper integrating the separate (re)views are published in this volume.

  8. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah , Allison B. Goldfine Download ... initiation in at-risk patients. Can Statins Cause Diabetes Mellitus? Careful review of findings from many trials ...

  9. Diabetes and Amoebiasis: a high risk encounter.

    PubMed

    Bredin, C; Margery, J; Bordier, L; Mayaudon, H; Dupuy, O; Vergeau, B; Bauduceau, B

    2004-02-01

    Amoebiasis is the second most common parasitic disease worldwIde. It occurs mainly in developing countries. A high percentage of people in countries where it is endemic are asymptomatic carriers. It results in severe disease that can be fatal in rare cases. Diabetics are at increased risk of exposure as travel to countries where it is endemic becomes more frequent, as indicated by the present case. This patient suffered from amoebiasis that produced an amoeboma which is most rare in cases of colonic amoebiasis. The clinical picture was that of an occluding gut tumor, but it was treated only with drugs. Retrospective studies show that diabetics are at increased risk of suffering severe complications after amoebic infection. The frequency and severity of this diabetes-amoeba association requires patients to take prophylactic measures, especially when travelling in developing countries.

  10. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. A framework for risk-benefit evaluations in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Rid, Annette; Wendler, David

    2011-06-01

    Essentially all guidelines and regulations require that biomedical research studies have an acceptable risk-benefit profile. However, these documents offer little concrete guidance for implementing this requirement and determining when it is satisfied. As a result, those charged with risk-benefit evaluations currently assess the risk-benefit profile of biomedical research studies in unsystematic ways, raising concern that some research participants are not being protected from excessive risks and that some valuable studies involving acceptable risk are being rejected. The present paper aims to address this situation by delineating the first comprehensive framework, which is based on existing guidelines and regulations as well as the relevant literature, for risk-benefit evaluations in biomedical research.

  12. Cancer clinical trial participants' assessment of risk and benefit

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Connie M.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Zhou, Qiuping (Pearl); Knafl, Kathleen; Grady, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which cancer clinical trial participants assess the benefits and risks of research participation before enrollment. Methods One hundred and ten oncology research participants enrolled in cancer clinical research in a large Northeastern cancer center responded to a self-administered questionnaire on perceptions about cancer clinical trials. Results Of the participants, 51.6% reported they did not directly assess the benefits or risks. Educational level, age, employment, treatment options, insurance, and spiritual–religious beliefs were significantly associated with whether participants assessed risk and benefits. Those who felt well informed were more likely to have assessed the benefits and risks at enrollment than those who did not feel well informed (odds ratio [OR] = 3.92, p = .014); of those who did not assess the risks and benefits, 21% did not feel well informed at enrollment (p = .001). Those who agreed that the clinical trial helped pay the costs of the care had nearly three times the odds of not assessing risks and benefits compared to those who disagreed. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for understanding the role of assessing risks and benefits in the research participation decisions of patients with cancer and call for further understanding of why participants are not assessing information believed to be essential for autonomous informed decisions. PMID:26709381

  13. Importance of risk factor management in diabetic patients and reduction in Stage B heart failure.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, G; O Connell, J; O Connell, E; Tallon, E; Watson, C; Gallagher, J; Baugh, J; Patle, A; O Connell, L; Griffin, J; O'Hanlon, R; Voon, V; Ledwidge, M; O Shea, D; McDonald, K

    2015-04-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated the presence of a diabetic cardiomyopathy, increasing the risk of heart failure development in this population. Improvements in present-day risk factor control may have modified the risk of diabetes-associated cardiomyopathy. We sought to determine the contemporary impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the prevalence of cardiomyopathy in at-risk patients with and without adjustment for risk factor control. A cross-sectional study in a population at risk for heart failure. Those with diabetes were compared to those with other cardiovascular risk factors, unmatched, matched for age and gender and then matched for age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In total, 1399 patients enrolled in the St Vincent's Screening to Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) cohort were included. About 543 participants had an established history of DM. In the whole sample, Stage B heart failure (asymptomatic cardiomyopathy) was not found more frequently among the diabetic cohort compared to those without diabetes [113 (20.8%) vs. 154 (18.0%), P = 0.22], even when matched for age and gender. When controlling for these risk factors and risk factor control Stage B was found to be more prevalent in those with diabetes [88 (22.2%)] compared to those without diabetes [65 (16.4%), P = 0.048]. In this cohort of patients with established risk factors for Stage B heart failure superior risk factor management among the diabetic population appears to dilute the independent diabetic insult to left ventricular structure and function, underlining the importance and benefit of effective risk factor control in this population on cardiovascular outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. How can we improve the management of vascular risk in type 2 diabetes: insights from FIELD.

    PubMed

    Steiner, George

    2009-10-01

    Intensive multifactorial risk factor intervention, targeting blood glucose, blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, is central to therapeutic management of type 2 diabetes. This strategy reduces, but does not eliminate the risk for cardiovascular complications, and microvascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy still continue to develop or progress. Fibrates have been shown to be effective in managing mixed dyslipidemia characterized by elevated triglycerides and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), typically associated with type 2 diabetes. Data were reviewed from the largest fibrate study to date, the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study which evaluated the effect of fenofibrate treatment in 9,795 patients with type 2 diabetes (about 80% without prior cardiovascular disease or microvascular complications). Although FIELD did not show a significant benefit with fenofibrate for major coronary events (the primary outcome), there was significant reduction in total cardiovascular events (relative risk reduction [RRR] 11%, p = 0.035 vs. placebo). The clinical benefits of fenofibrate treatment were greater in patients with marked mixed dyslipidemia (elevated triglycerides >or=200 mg/dL and low plasma levels of HDL-C), features of the metabolic syndrome commonly observed in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a RRR of 27%, p = 0.005. These data are consistent with evidence from other fibrate trials showing increased treatment benefits in patients with metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes and mixed dyslipidemia. The FIELD study also provided promising data for microvascular benefits with fenofibrate, specifically on the need for laser treatment for diabetic retinopathy, progression of albuminuria, and prevention of diabetes-related lower-limb amputation. Adding fenofibrate to primary statin therapy might be a useful strategy to address residual macrovascular and microvascular risk in

  15. Ecological risk assessment benefits environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbrother, A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A.; Glicken, J.

    1994-12-31

    The ecological risk assessment process in its ideal form is an unbiased approach for assessing the probability of harm to the environment as a consequence of a given action. This information can then be combined with other societal values and biases in the management of such risks. However, as the process currently is understood, decision makers often are accused of manipulating information in order to generate decisions or achieve buy in from the public in support of a particular political agenda. A clear understanding of the nature of the risk management process can help define areas where information should be free from social or personal bias, and areas where values and judgments are critical. The authors do not propose to discuss the individual`s decision-making process, but rather to address the social process of risk communication and environmentally-related decision-making, identifying which parts of that process require bias-free, scientifically generated information about the consequences of various actions and which parts need an understanding of the social values which underlie the informed choices among those possible actions.

  16. Obesity, diabetes, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Natalia; Gao, Xiang; McCullough, Marjorie L; Jacobs, Eric J; Patel, Alpa V; Mayo, Tinisha; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether obesity and diabetes are related to risk of Parkinson's disease. We prospectively followed 147,096 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Participants provided information on anthropometric variables and medical history at baseline and on waist circumference in 1997. Incident cases of Parkinson's disease (n = 656) were confirmed by treating neurologists and medical record review. Relative risks were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and other risk factors. Neither body mass index nor waist circumference significantly predicted Parkinson's disease risk. Relative risk comparing individuals with a baseline body mass index of ≥ 30 to those with a body mass index <23 was 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.34; P trend: 0.79), and that comparing individuals with a waist circumference in the top category (≥ 40.3 inches in men and ≥ 35 inches in women) to those in the bottom category (<34.5 inches in men and <28 inches in women) was 1.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.93; P trend: 0.08). History of diabetes was not significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk (combined relative risks = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.25; P heterogeneity = 0.96). In addition, neither body mass index at age 18 nor changes in weight between age 18 and baseline were significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk. The results did not differ significantly by gender. Our results do not provide evidence for a relationship between body mass index, weight change, waist circumference, or baseline diabetes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Evaluation of risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus in medical students using Indian Diabetes Risk Score.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Pranita; Kharche, Jayshree S; Joshi, Aniruddha R

    2011-01-01

    According to World Health Organisation, type 2 diabetes mellitus [type 2 D. M] has recently escalated in all age groups and is now being identified in younger age groups. This underscores the need for mass awareness and screening programs to detect diabetes at an early stage. For this purpose we have used a simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) for prediction of diabetes in undergraduate medical students. To screen and to identify 1st MBBS students at risk for developing type 2 D. M using IDRS. 261 undergraduates (1st MBBS students) were scored using IDRS which includes age, family history of diabetes, exercise status, and waist circumference. After scoring them, we assessed random capillary blood glucose (RCBG) in students with high IDRS score. Students with RCBG ≥ 113 mg/dl are followed for definitive tests for diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes. We have assessed 261 students till now. It was observed that 5%, 55%, and 38% students in High, Moderate, and Low risk group, respectively, for developing type 2 D. M. The mean abdominal obesity in high risk students was 101.95 ± 5.76 as compared to 79.17 ± 11.08 in moderate and low risk students (P < 0.0001). 63% students were having sedentary lifestyle. Family history of diabetes in either or both parents was present in 25% students. Mean RCBG in students having score more than 50 was 97.33 ± 9.68 mg/dl. Also, two students were having RCBG > 113 mg/dl in which one student found to have prediabetic. This underscores the need for further investigations to detect diabetes at an early stage and to overcome the disease burden of diabetes in future. Prevention of obesity and promotion of physical activity have to be the future plan of action which can be suggested in the form of regular exercise and diet planning for the students as part of an integrated approach.

  18. Rapamycin treatment benefits glucose metabolism in mouse models of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reifsnyder, Peter C.; Flurkey, Kevin; Te, Austen; Harrison, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that rapamycin treatment promotes insulin resistance, implying that rapamycin could have negative effects on patients with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). New evidence, however, indicates that rapamycin treatment produces some benefits to energy metabolism, even in the context of T2D. Here, we survey 5 mouse models of T2D (KK, KK-Ay, NONcNZO10, BKS-db/db, TALLYHO) to quantify effects of rapamycin on well-recognized markers of glucose homeostasis within a wide range of T2D environments. Interestingly, dietary rapamycin treatment did not exacerbate impaired glucose or insulin tolerance, or elevate circulating lipids as T2D progressed. In fact, rapamycin increased insulin sensitivity and reduced weight gain in 3 models, and decreased hyperinsulinemia in 2 models. A key covariate of this genetically-based, differential response was pancreatic insulin content (PIC): Models with low PIC exhibited more beneficial effects than models with high PIC. However, a minimal PIC threshold may exist, below which hypoinsulinemic hyperglycemia develops, as it did in TALLYHO. Our results, along with other studies, indicate that beneficial or detrimental metabolic effects of rapamycin treatment, in a diabetic or pre-diabetic context, are driven by the interaction of rapamycin with the individual model's pancreatic physiology. PMID:27922820

  19. Moonshot Science-Risks and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-08-30

    Ever since the successful Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a "moonshot" has come to signify a bold effort to achieve a seemingly impossible task. The Obama administration recently called for a moonshot to cure cancer, an initiative that has elicited mixed responses from researchers who welcome additional funding but worry about raising expectations. We suggest that a successful moonshot requires a sufficient understanding of the basic science underlying a problem in question so that efforts can be focused on engineering a solution. Current gaps in our basic knowledge of cancer biology make the cancer moonshot a uniquely challenging endeavor. Nevertheless, history has shown that intensive research efforts have frequently yielded conceptual and technological breakthroughs with unanticipated benefits for society. We expect that this effort will be no different. Copyright © 2016 Casadevall and Fang.

  20. Moonshot Science—Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ever since the successful Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a “moonshot” has come to signify a bold effort to achieve a seemingly impossible task. The Obama administration recently called for a moonshot to cure cancer, an initiative that has elicited mixed responses from researchers who welcome additional funding but worry about raising expectations. We suggest that a successful moonshot requires a sufficient understanding of the basic science underlying a problem in question so that efforts can be focused on engineering a solution. Current gaps in our basic knowledge of cancer biology make the cancer moonshot a uniquely challenging endeavor. Nevertheless, history has shown that intensive research efforts have frequently yielded conceptual and technological breakthroughs with unanticipated benefits for society. We expect that this effort will be no different. PMID:27578761

  1. Other Risks/Possible Benefits of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Weeth, Lisa P

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is not a cosmetic or social issue; it is an animal health issue. The metabolic effects of obesity on insulin resistance and development of hyperlipidemia and the mechanical stress excess weight places on the musculoskeletal system are well established in the literature. Additional health risks from obesity, such as fatty accumulation in the liver, intestinal bacterial dysbiosis, and changes to renal architecture, are less well understood, but have been demonstrated to occur clinically in obese animals and may lead to deleterious long-term health effects. Keeping dogs and cats lean lowers their risk for development of certain diseases and leads to a longer and better quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Major Online Diabetes Risk Calculators and Computerized Predictive Models

    PubMed Central

    Stiglic, Gregor; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2015-01-01

    Classical paper-and-pencil based risk assessment questionnaires are often accompanied by the online versions of the questionnaire to reach a wider population. This study focuses on the loss, especially in risk estimation performance, that can be inflicted by direct transformation from the paper to online versions of risk estimation calculators by ignoring the possibilities of more complex and accurate calculations that can be performed using the online calculators. We empirically compare the risk estimation performance between four major diabetes risk calculators and two, more advanced, predictive models. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999–2012 was used to evaluate the performance of detecting diabetes and pre-diabetes. American Diabetes Association risk test achieved the best predictive performance in category of classical paper-and-pencil based tests with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.699 for undiagnosed diabetes (0.662 for pre-diabetes) and 47% (47% for pre-diabetes) persons selected for screening. Our results demonstrate a significant difference in performance with additional benefits for a lower number of persons selected for screening when statistical methods are used. The best AUC overall was obtained in diabetes risk prediction using logistic regression with AUC of 0.775 (0.734) and an average 34% (48%) persons selected for screening. However, generalized boosted regression models might be a better option from the economical point of view as the number of selected persons for screening of 30% (47%) lies significantly lower for diabetes risk assessment in comparison to logistic regression (p < 0.001), with a significantly higher AUC (p < 0.001) of 0.774 (0.740) for the pre-diabetes group. Our results demonstrate a serious lack of predictive performance in four major online diabetes risk calculators. Therefore, one should take great care and consider optimizing the online versions of questionnaires that were

  3. Aspirin use and risk of type 2 diabetes in apparently healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Hayashino, Yasuaki; Hennekens, Charles H.; Kurth, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data on aspirin use and the risk of diabetes are limited. The Physician’s Health Study has accumulated 22 years of follow-up data, including 5 years of randomized data, from 22,071 apparently healthy men. Methods and results At baseline and in yearly follow-up questionnaires, participants self-reported a history of diabetes, aspirin use and various lifestyle factors. To evaluate the association between aspirin use and risk of subsequent diabetes, we used a Cox-proportional hazards model with time-varying regression coefficients. During the 22 follow-up years, 1719 cases of diabetes were reported. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of developing diabetes was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77–0.97) for those who self-selected any aspirin. During the 5 years of randomized treatment, 318 cases of diabetes were observed, with an HR of 0.91 (95%CI, 0.73–1.14) for those randomized to aspirin. Conclusions Our data suggest a small but not significant decrease in the risk of diabetes during 5 years of randomized comparison of 325 mg of aspirin every other day. This trend was continued during 22 years of follow-up, indicating that self-selection of any use of aspirin is associated with a significant, approximately 14% decrease in the risk of diabetes. Decreased risk of type 2 diabetes may be added to the list of the clinical benefits of aspirin. PMID:19233341

  4. Think It Through: Managing the Benefits and Risks of Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... It Through: Managing the Benefits and Risks of Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... or thoughts that you may have. Know Your Medicines--Prescription and Over-the-Counter the brand and ...

  5. Testosterone Therapy May Have Benefits, but Risks Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163696.html Testosterone Therapy May Have Benefits, But Risks Too While ... 21, 2017 TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment can boost bone density and reduce anemia ...

  6. What Are the Possible Benefits and Risks of Clinical Trials?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsors Why Are They Important How Do They Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites What Are the ...

  7. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  8. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  9. Epigenetic Changes in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Samuel T; Plutzky, Jorge; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications remain the leading causes of morbidity and premature mortality in patients with diabetes. Studies in humans and preclinical models demonstrate lasting gene expression changes in the vasculopathies initiated by previous exposure to high glucose concentrations and the associated overproduction of reactive oxygen species. The molecular signatures of chromatin architectures that sensitize the genome to these and other cardiometabolic risk factors of the diabetic milieu are increasingly implicated in the biologic memory underlying cardiovascular complications and now widely considered as promising therapeutic targets. Atherosclerosis is a complex heterocellular disease where the contributing cell types possess distinct epigenomes shaping diverse gene expression. While the extent that pathological chromatin changes can be manipulated in human cardiovascular disease remains to be established, the clinical applicability of epigenetic interventions will be greatly advanced by a deeper understanding of the cell type-specific roles played by writers, erasers, and readers of chromatin modifications in the diabetic vasculature. This review details a current perspective of epigenetic mechanisms of macrovascular disease in diabetes, and highlights recent key descriptions of chromatinized changes associated with persistent gene expression in endothelial, smooth muscle, and circulating immune cells relevant to atherosclerosis. Furthermore we discuss the challenges associated with pharmacological targeting of epigenetic networks to correct abnormal or deregulated gene expression as a strategy to alleviate the clinical burden of diabetic cardiovascular disease. PMID:27230637

  10. Noncontraceptive use of oral combined hormonal contraceptives in polycystic ovary syndrome-risks versus benefits.

    PubMed

    Dokras, Anuja

    2016-12-01

    The use of steroid sex hormones for noncontraceptive benefits has been endorsed by several medical societies. In women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), hormonal contraceptives are first-line therapy for concurrent treatment of menstrual irregularity, acne, and hirsutism. The association of PCOS with obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia frequently brings up the debate regarding risks versus benefits of hormonal contraceptives in this population. In women with PCOS, the lack of large-scale studies evaluating the risks with varying doses of ethinyl estradiol, types of progestins, and presence of confounding factors such as obesity, smoking, and other cardiometabolic comorbidities is a significant limitation in these deliberations. Although it is important to assess the absolute risk for major morbidities including cardiovascular events, currently, there are a paucity of long-term data for these outcomes in PCOS. Most of the current studies do not suggest an increase in risk of prediabetes/diabetes, clinically significant dyslipidemia, inflammatory changes, or depressive/anxiety symptoms with oral contraceptive pill use. Screening of women with PCOS for cardiometabolic and psychiatric comorbidities is routinely recommended. This information should be used by health care providers to individualize the choice of hormonal contraceptive treatment, adequately counsel patients regarding risks and benefits, and formulate an appropriate follow-up plan.

  11. Weighing the risks and benefits of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Glickman, L T

    1999-01-01

    The following summarizes this author's current thoughts regarding veterinary vaccines and their safety: 1. Every licensed animal vaccine is probably effective, but also produces some adverse effects. 2. Prelicensing studies of vaccines are not specifically designed to detect adverse vaccine reactions. 3. An improved system of national postmarketing surveillance is required to identify most adverse vaccine reactions that occur at low and moderate frequency. 4. Even a good postmarketing surveillance system is unlikely, however, to detect delayed adverse vaccine reactions, and the longer the delay the less likely they will be associated with vaccination. 5. Analytic epidemiologic (field) studies are the best way to link vaccination with delayed adverse reactions, but these are often hindered by incomplete vaccination histories in medical records in veterinary practice and by a lack of veterinarians in industry trained in epidemiologic methods. 6. Each licensed veterinary vaccine should be subjected to a quantitative risk assessment, and these should be updated on a regular basis as new information becomes available. 7. Risk assessment should be used to identify gaps in information regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, and appropriate epidemiologic studies conducted to fill these gaps that contribute to the uncertainty in risk estimates. 8. Risk assessment is an analytical process that is firmly based on scientific considerations, but it also requires judgments to be made when the available information is incomplete. These judgments inevitably draw on both scientific and policy considerations. 9. Representatives from industry, government, veterinary medicine, and the animal-owning public should be involved in risk management, that is, deciding between policy options. The controversy regarding vaccine risks is intensifying to the point that some animal owners have stopped vaccinating their animals. They offer as justification the belief that current vaccines

  12. Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan; Marquardt, Allison; Kravitz, Ben; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2009-10-01

    Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors into the stratosphere has been suggested as a means of geoengineering to cool the planet and reduce global warming. The decision to implement such a scheme would require a comparison of its benefits, dangers, and costs to those of other responses to global warming, including doing nothing. Here we evaluate those factors for stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols. Using existing U.S. military fighter and tanker planes, the annual costs of injecting aerosol precursors into the lower stratosphere would be several billion dollars. Using artillery or balloons to loft the gas would be much more expensive. We do not have enough information to evaluate more exotic techniques, such as pumping the gas up through a hose attached to a tower or balloon system. Anthropogenic stratospheric aerosol injection would cool the planet, stop the melting of sea ice and land-based glaciers, slow sea level rise, and increase the terrestrial carbon sink, but produce regional drought, ozone depletion, less sunlight for solar power, and make skies less blue. Furthermore it would hamper Earth-based optical astronomy, do nothing to stop ocean acidification, and present many ethical and moral issues. Further work is needed to quantify many of these factors to allow informed decision-making.

  13. BRAFO tiered approach for Benefit-Risk Assessment of Foods.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Jeljer; Hart, Andy; Boobis, Alan; Claupein, Erika; Cockburn, Andrew; Hunt, Alistair; Knudsen, Ib; Richardson, David; Schilter, Benoît; Schütte, Katrin; Torgerson, Paul R; Verhagen, Hans; Watzl, Bernhard; Chiodini, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    BRAFO stands for Benefit-Risk Analysis for Foods. This European Commission funded project aims at developing a framework that allows quantitative comparison of human health risks and benefits of foods and food compounds based on a common scale of measurement. A methodology group brought together methodologies from several disciplines relevant to the evaluation of risks and benefits in food. This group reviewed and assembled the methodologies available. They produced this guidance document that describes a tiered ('stepwise') approach for performing a risk and benefit assessment of foods. This process starts with pre-assessment and problem formulation to set the scope of the assessment. This includes defining two scenarios, the reference and an alternative that are compared in the assessment. The approach consists of four tiers. In many cases, a lower tier assessment in which risks and benefits are qualitatively evaluated may be sufficient to show a clear difference between the health impacts of the two scenarios. In other cases, increasingly sophisticated methods to integrate risks and benefits quantitatively are used at higher tiers to assess the net health impact.

  14. Evidence-based case report: acute diabetic complication risks of Ramadan fasting in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, William J; Handjaja, C T; Salama, N; Anasy, N; Ardianto, M F; Kusumadewi, D

    2013-07-01

    to investigate causal relationship between Ramadan fasting and acute diabetic complications in adult controlled type 2 diabetics. a Pubmed's Clinical Queries and Embase search was conducted and resulted in 2 useful articles: 1 systematic review and 1 cohort study to be critically appraised. the incidence of acute diabetic complications is higher during Ramadan, with the relative risk for adult type 2 diabetics who fast during Ramadan is 1.36 and number needed to harm 50. Ramadan fasting was related with acute diabetic complications in adult controlled type 2 diabetics, but the risk was only slightly higher. It is acceptable for type 2 diabetics to fast during Ramadan.

  15. Planned home birth: benefits, risks, and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Ruth; Ackerson, Kelly; Kane Low, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While the number of women in developed countries who plan a home birth is low, the number has increased over the past decade in the US, and there is evidence that more women would choose this option if it were readily available. Rates of planned home birth range from 0.1% in Sweden to 20% in the Netherlands, where home birth has always been an integrated part of the maternity system. Benefits of planned home birth include lower rates of maternal morbidity, such as postpartum hemorrhage, and perineal lacerations, and lower rates of interventions such as episiotomy, instrumental vaginal birth, and cesarean birth. Women who have a planned home birth have high rates of satisfaction related to home being a more comfortable environment and feeling more in control of the experience. While maternal outcomes related to planned birth at home have been consistently positive within the literature, reported neonatal outcomes during planned home birth are more variable. While the majority of investigations of planned home birth compared with hospital birth have found no difference in intrapartum fetal deaths, neonatal deaths, low Apgar scores, or admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, there have been reports in the US, as well as a meta-analysis, that indicated more adverse neonatal outcomes associated with home birth. There are multiple challenges associated with research designs focused on planned home birth, in part because conducting randomized controlled trials is not feasible. This report will review current research studies published between 2004 and 2014 related to maternal and neonatal outcomes of planned home birth, and discuss strengths, limitations, and opportunities regarding planned home birth. PMID:25914559

  16. Methods for risk-benefit and cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, G; Ambrosch, F

    1979-01-01

    The basic aim of vaccination is to prevent more severe complications of the respective disease than might be caused by the vaccine itself. Following this idea formulae were developed for calculation of the risk ratio Q and the risk difference D. The following parameters are considered in this formulae: risk of the disease (R), risk of vaccination (r), protection rate (p) and duration of protection (t). Besides, for calculations with partially vaccinated populations the immunization rate "I" has to be considered. A vaccination is beneficial if Q greater than 1.0 and D greater than 0. If vaccinations have proved to be valuable from the medical point of view, additional cost-benefit calculations may be of great importance for socio-economic considerations. Consequently, the above mentioned formulae were modified for calculation of the benefit cost ratio (Qc) and the benefit cost difference (Dc) for monovalent as well as for bivalent vaccines.

  17. Updated risk factors should be used to predict development of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Mary Angelyn; Hyland, Kristen A; Chacra, Antonio R; Deedwania, Prakash; Fulcher, Gregory R; Holman, Rury R; Jenssen, Trond; Levitt, Naomi S; McMurray, John J V; Boutati, Eleni; Thomas, Laine; Sun, Jie-Lena; Haffner, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Predicting incident diabetes could inform treatment strategies for diabetes prevention, but the incremental benefit of recalculating risk using updated risk factors is unknown. We used baseline and 1-year data from the Nateglinide and Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) Trial to compare diabetes risk prediction using historical or updated clinical information. Among non-diabetic participants reaching 1year of follow-up in NAVIGATOR, we compared the performance of the published baseline diabetes risk model with a "landmark" model incorporating risk factors updated at the 1-year time point. The C-statistic was used to compare model discrimination and reclassification analyses to demonstrate the relative accuracy of diabetes prediction. A total of 7527 participants remained non-diabetic at 1year, and 2375 developed diabetes during a median of 4years of follow-up. The C-statistic for the landmark model was higher (0.73 [95% CI 0.72-0.74]) than for the baseline model (0.67 [95% CI 0.66-0.68]). The landmark model improved classification to modest (<20%), moderate (20%-40%), and high (>40%) 4-year risk, with a net reclassification index of 0.14 (95% CI 0.10-0.16) and an integrated discrimination index of 0.01 (95% CI 0.003-0.013). Using historical clinical values to calculate diabetes risk reduces the accuracy of prediction. Diabetes risk calculations should be routinely updated to inform discussions about diabetes prevention at both the patient and population health levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercise in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: what are the benefits and how does it work?

    PubMed

    Duclos, Martine; Virally, Marie-Laure; Dejager, Sylvie

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we examine the results from meta-analyses of studies that have focused on the effects of supervised exercise in patients with established type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exercise has been clearly demonstrated to have benefits on blood glucose control (average reduction of glycated hemoglobin, 0.6%) and cardiovascular risk factors. These benefits are observed independently of any change in body mass index and fat mass, and are also seen in older populations. Multiple mechanisms are involved, and the improved insulin-sensitizing effect of exercise training is not restricted to muscle but extends to hepatic and adipose tissue. However, while the benefits of exercise in type 2 diabetes management are undisputable, it is not as easy to draw correlations between clinical benefit and the amount of physical activity included in daily life. Recent studies have shown encouraging results with moderate increases in physical activity, which are feasible for most patients and are sufficient to induce sustained positive changes for 2 years. Thus, the benefits of structured and supervised exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes have been consistently demonstrated. Currently, the primary challenge is to determine how long-term increased physical activity can be durably implemented in a patient's daily life.

  19. Use of pioglitazone in the treatment of diabetes: effect on cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Zou, Cong; Hu, Honglin

    2013-01-01

    Pioglitazone and other thiazolidinediones (TZDs) initially showed great promise as unique receptor-mediated oral therapy for type 2 diabetes, but a host of serious side effects, primarily cardiovascular, have limited their utility. It is crucial at this point to perform a risk- benefit analysis to determine what role pioglitazone should play in our current treatment of type 2 diabetes and where the future of this class of drugs is headed. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the present literature. Clinical data currently available indicate that pioglitazone is an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment option for use in patients with type 2 diabetes. Pioglitazone can still reduce adverse cardiovascular risk.

  20. Perceptions of the risks and benefits of fish consumption: Individual choices to reduce risk and increase health benefits

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption often focus on awareness of and adherence to advisories, how much fish people eat, and contaminant levels in those fish. This paper examines knowledge and accuracy of risks and benefits of fish consumption among fishers and other recreationists in the New York Bight, indicative of whether they could make sound dietary decisions. While most respondents knew about health risks (70%) and benefits (94%) of consuming fish, far fewer could name specific risks and benefits. Less than 25% of respondents mentioned mercury and less than 15% mentioned that pregnant women and children were at risk. Far fewer people mentioned polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Nearly 70% said it was healthy to eat fish, and 45% were aware that fish were rich in healthful oils. Despite the lack of details about what specific risks and benefits of fish, well over a third did not feel they needed more information. Other respondents had basic questions, but did not pose specific questions about the fish they caught or ate that would have clarified their individual risk-balancing decisions. Knowledge of which fish were high in contaminants did not match the mercury or PCB levels in those fish. There was a disconnect between the information base about specific risks and benefits of fish consumption, levels of mercury and PCBs in fish, and the respondent’s desire for more information. These data indicate that respondents did not have enough accurate information about contaminants in fish to make informed risk-balancing decisions. PMID:19193369

  1. Sterilization of women: benefits vs risks.

    PubMed

    Rioux, J E

    Voluntary sterilization is the birth control method most widely practiced throughout the world. The last ten years have witnessed great improvements in techniques and perfection of innovations, explaining the important role that it now plays in the regulation of fertility. Different methods are examined and it is concluded that hysterectomy is the best, if medically indicated; conventional laparotomy is not justified unless required by concomitant intraabdominal pathology; minilaparotomy is mostly suitable postpartum; colpotomy is better left to specialists; laparoscopy is ideal for nonpregnant patients; culdoscopy is a relic of the past; and hysteroscopy, although still experimental, may be the way of the future. The advantages of voluntary sterilization lie in its remarkable and immediate efficiency, freedom from ongoing motivation, the convenience of a one-time operation, the absence of side effects and the reduction of total costs. Its disadvantages are the complexity of any surgical intervention for a woman, its indisputable finality, its uncertain legality and the risks inherent in any operation. Hysterectomy and tubal ligation are practically never fatal, so this argument does not influence the choice of either method. However, incidence of morbidity is higher following hysterectomies, which must therefore be justified. The balance is clearly in favor of voluntary sterilization for the woman who is convinced that the size of her family is complete.

  2. Risk-benefit perception: The research challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, E.

    1987-01-01

    Factors predisposing to perception of repositories as risky include the nuclear track record of secrecy and ineptitude, the overconfidence of some pro-nukes and the premature commercialization of an immature technology. Then, in parallel, we have the AEC-DOE track record including a bureaucratic approach involving premature policy decisions and continual changes in nuclear waste policy as demanded by Congress. The confusion of nuclear power with nuclear weapons is encouraged by those whose goal is to get rid of nuclear power. Media coverge feeds on controversy and a crisis, is a major factor in public perception of N-power and repositories as risky. Beyond their actual physical effects, there is the signal value of accidents such as Browns Ferry, Chernobyl, the Hanford tank leaks, Challenger, and TMI. These accidents have signaled that either the managers and operators don't understand the technology well enough to manage it, or worse yet, that the technology itself may not be manageable. With wodefully inadequate science and technology eduation, US citizens are unprepared to make decisions about management and uses of technology or to conduct their own risk evaluations. All of the above is occurring against the backdrop of the widespread and pervasive decline of trust in government and institutions in the past 25 years. And finally, there is Murphy's Law - everyone has some personal knowledge that whatever can go wrong will go wrong some day. In this social context, the tilt is toward perception of repositories as risky.

  3. Health benefits and risks of plant proteins.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicova-Kudlackova, M; Babinska, K; Valachovicova, M

    2005-01-01

    Plant proteins have a reduced content of essential amino acids in comparison to animal proteins. A significant reduction of limiting amino acids (methionine, lysine, tryptophan) means lower protein synthesis. In subjects with predominant or exclusive consumption of plant food a higher incidence of hypoproteinemia due to significant reduction of methionine and lysine intakes was observed. On the other hand, lower intake of these amino acids provides a preventive effect against cardiovascular disease via cholesterol regulation by an inhibited hepatic phospholipid metabolism. Vegetarians have a significantly higher intake of non-essential amino acids arginine and pyruvigenic amino acids glycine, alanine, serine. When plant protein is high in non-essential amino acids, down-regulation of insulin and up-regulation of glucagon is a logical consequence. The action of glucagon in the liver is mediated by stimulation of adenyl cyclase that raises cyclic-AMP (adenosine-3,5-monophosphate) concentrations. Cyclic-AMP down-regulates the synthesis of a number of enzymes required for de novo lipogenesis and cholesterol synthesis, up-regulates key gluconeogenic enzymes and the LDL receptors and decreases the IGF-1 activity (insulin-like growth factor). Cyclic-AMP thus provides a reduction of atherosclerosis risk factors as well as a retardation of cancer development. A sufficient consumption of plant proteins has the protective effects against chronic degenerative diseases (Tab. 2, Ref. 26).

  4. Walking vs running for hypertension, cholesterol, & diabetes risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Background To test whether equivalent energy expenditure by moderate-intensity (e.g., walking) and vigorous-intensity exercise (e.g., running) provides equivalent health benefits. Methods and Results We used the National Runners’ (n=33,060) and Walkers’ (n=15,945) Health Study cohorts to examine the effect of differences in exercise mode and thereby exercise intensity on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. Baseline expenditure (METhr/d) was compared to self-reported, physician-diagnosed incident hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and CHD during 6.2 years follow-up. Running significantly decreased the risks for incident hypertension by 4.2% (P<10-7), hypercholesterolemia by 4.3% (P<10-14), diabetes by 12.1% (P<10-5), and CHD by 4.5% per METh/d run (P=0.05). The corresponding reductions for walking were 7.2% (P<10-6), 7.0% (P<10-8), 12.3% (P<10-4), and 9.3% (P=0.01). Relative to <1.8 METh/d, the risk reductions for 1.8 to 3.6, 3.6 to 5.4, 5.4 to 7.2, and ≥ 7.2 METh/d were: 1) 10.1%, 17.7%, 25.1% and 34.9% from running and 14.0%, 23.8%, 21.8% and 38.3% from walking for hypercholesterolemia; 2) 19.7%, 19.4%, 26.8% and 39.8% from running and 14.7%, 19.1%, 23.6% and 13.3% from walking for hypertension; 3) 43.5%, 44.1%, 47.7% and 68.2% from running and 34.1%, 44.2%, and 23.6% from walking for diabetes (too few cases for diabetes for walking >5.4 METh/d). The risk reductions were not significantly greater for running than walking for diabetes (P=0.94) or CHD (P=0.26), and only marginally greater for walking than running for hypertension (P=0.06) and hypercholesterolemia (P=0.04). Conclusion Equivalent energy expenditures by moderate (walking) and vigorous (running) exercise produced similar risk reductions for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and CHD, but there is limited statistical power to evaluate CHD conclusively. PMID:23559628

  5. Benefit and risk of organic ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, G J; Schaefer, H

    2001-06-01

    marketing, new UV filters undergo stringent human testing to confirm their efficacy as well as the absence of irritation, sensitization, photoirritation, and photosensitization potential in man. UV filters not only protect against acute skin injury, such as sunburn, but also against long-term and chronic skin damage, including cellular DNA damage, photoinduced immune suppression, and, by extension, skin cancer. The protection provided by modern sunscreens against UV-induced skin cancer was shown in animal photocarcinogenicity studies and confirmed by numerous in vitro, animal, and human investigations: UV filters protect the p53 tumor suppressor gene from damage and prevent UV-induced immune suppression. Recent studies suggest that sunscreens protect against precursor lesions of skin cancer, such as actinic keratoses. Additional benefits of ultraviolet filters include prevention of photodermatoses, such as polymorphic light eruption, and, possibly, photoaging. Modern sunscreens are safe for children and adults. Percutaneous penetration and irritation rates of topically applied substances in children and adults are similar. The principal protective measure is to keep children out of the sun and/or to cover them with protective clothes; however, sunscreens are a safe and effective and often the only feasible defense of children against UV radiation. In conclusion, sunscreens are safe protective devices that undergo stringent safety and efficacy evaluation.

  6. Exercise and Cardiac Complications: Do the Benefits Outweigh the Risks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Barry A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    In a roundtable discussion, a panel of experts address how physicians can identify active patients for whom exercise poses the risk of serious heart complications, how useful stress tests are, what exercise intensity is best, and what physicians can tell patients about the risks of exercise versus its benefits. (SM)

  7. Diabetes Risk May Be Higher for HIV-Positive Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... people to live longer with HIV, which may increase their risk for other chronic health issues, such as diabetes. The study was published online Jan. 30 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care . " ...

  8. Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163195.html Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression: Study It ... 23, 2017 MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes and a previous bout of depression can increase ...

  9. Metabolic factors and genetic risk mediate familial type 2 diabetes risk in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Sridharan; Porneala, Bianca; McKeown, Nicola; Fox, Caroline S.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes mellitus in parents is a strong determinant of diabetes risk in their offspring. We hypothesise that offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes is mediated by metabolic risk factors. Methods We studied initially non-diabetic participants of the Framingham Offspring Study. Metabolic risk was estimated using beta cell corrected insulin response (CIR), HOMA-IR or a count of metabolic syndrome components (metabolic syndrome score [MSS]). Dietary risk and physical activity were estimated using questionnaire responses. Genetic risk score (GRS) was estimated as the count of 62 type 2 diabetes risk alleles. The outcome of incident diabetes in offspring was examined across levels of parental diabetes exposure, accounting for sibling correlation and adjusting for age, sex and putative mediators. The proportion mediated was estimated by comparing regression coefficients for parental diabetes with (βadj) and without (βunadj) adjustments for CIR, HOMA-IR, MSS and GRS (percentage mediated = 1 – βadj / βunadj). Results Metabolic factors mediated 11% of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.96. GRS mediated 9% of risk, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.99. Conclusions/interpretation Metabolic risk factors partially mediated offspring type 2 diabetes risk conferred by parental diabetes to a similar magnitude as genetic risk. However, a substantial proportion of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes remains unexplained by metabolic factors, genetic risk, diet and physical activity, suggesting that important familial influences on diabetes risk remain undiscovered. PMID:25619168

  10. External insulin pump treatment in the day-to-day management of diabetes: benefits and future prospectives.

    PubMed

    Hanaire, H

    2011-12-01

    The aim of diabetes treatment is to achieve tight glucose control to avoid the development of chronic diabetes complications while reducing the frequency of hypoglycaemic episodes. The main clinical indications of pump therapy in type 1 diabetes are persistently elevated HbA(1c) in spite of the best attempts of intensified insulin therapy with multiple daily injections (MDI) and/or frequent, disabling or severe hypoglycaemia. Several trials have demonstrated the superiority of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) over MDI, and highlighted the benefits of using short-acting insulin analogues. However, new MDI regimens with long-acting insulin analogues challenge insulin pump therapy in some indications, thus indicating the need for precise selection of those patients who will benefit the most from CSII. In type 2 diabetes, pump therapy may be an invaluable tool in selected patients characterized by chronic elevation of HbA(1c), obesity and high insulin requirements. In addition, in any case, specific education, training and ongoing evaluation of the benefit/risk ratio of the treatment are mandatory. Furthermore, there is continuing progress in the development of pump and catheter features, and insulin kinetics can still be improved. These technical advances are part of the work in progress towards developing closed-loop systems.

  11. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of the Asymptomatic Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Budoff, Matthew J.; Raggi, Paolo; Beller, George A.; Berman, Daniel S.; Druz, Regina S.; Malik, Shaista; Rigolin, Vera H.; Weigold, Wm. Guy; Soman, Prem

    2017-01-01

    Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is well established; diabetes is associated with at least a 2-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease. Approximately two-thirds of deaths among persons with diabetes are related to cardiovascular disease. Previously, diabetes was regarded as a “coronary risk equivalent,” implying a high 10-year cardiovascular risk for every diabetes patient. Following the original study by Haffner et al., multiple studies from different cohorts provided varying conclusions on the validity of the concept of coronary risk equivalency in patients with diabetes. New guidelines have started to acknowledge the heterogeneity in risk and include different treatment recommendations for diabetic patients without other risk factors who are considered to be at lower risk. Furthermore, guidelines have suggested that further risk stratification in patients with diabetes is warranted before universal treatment. The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology systematically reviewed all modalities commonly used for risk stratification in persons with diabetes mellitus and summarized the data and recommendations. This document reviews the evidence regarding the use of noninvasive testing to stratify asymptomatic patients with diabetes with regard to coronary heart disease risk and develops an algorithm for screening based on available data. PMID:26846937

  12. Values, perceived risks and benefits, and acceptability of nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Judith I M; Steg, Linda; Poortinga, Wouter

    2013-02-01

    We examined how personal values and perceptions of risks and benefits are associated with the acceptability of nuclear energy (NE). A theoretical model is tested in which beliefs about the risks and benefits of NE mediate the relationship between values and acceptability. The results showed that egoistic values are positively related to the perceived benefits and acceptability of NE. In contrast, altruistic and biospheric values were positively related to the perceived risks of NE. Although it has been argued that NE may help to combat climate change through lower CO(2) emissions, these environmental benefits were not acknowledged by people with strong biospheric values. Furthermore, results confirmed that the more risks respondents perceived, the less they were inclined to accept NE. In contrast, the more a person believed that NE has beneficial consequences, the more acceptable NE was. Finally, as expected, perceived risks and benefits were found to partly mediate the relationship between personal values and acceptability. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  13. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  14. Childhood type 2 diabetes: Risks and complications

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Gao, Min; Gao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    The universal endocrine pathological state affecting young individuals and adults is type 2 diabetes mellitus, which has seen a significant increase in the last 30 years, particularly in children. Genetic and evnironmental factors are the causative agents for this pathological state in children. This rapid and wide spread of the disease can be controlled by enforcing amendments in environmental factors such as diet, physical activities and obesity. In young infants breastfeeding may be a key modulator of the disease. Associated disorders co-observed in the patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus include renal failure, heart problems and circulatory dysfunctionalities, such as cardiac failure and vision disability. These associated disorders become more pronounced in young patients when they reach puberty. To overcome the lethal outcomes of the disease, early screening of the disease is crucial. The present review focused on the latest updates in the field, as well as plausible risks and complications of this pathological state. PMID:27703500

  15. Early nutrition and later diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Knip, Mikael; Akerblom, Hans K

    2005-01-01

    Early feeding may modify the risk of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life. The information generated so far is, however, controversial. When evaluating studies on the impact of early feeding on risk of later diabetes, the data have to be assessed critically and possible confounding factors have to be considered. The study design may induce biases and there are considerable differences in early feeding practices across various countries and cultures. Accordingly it may not be possible to generalise observations based on one population. Long breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding in particular, and supplementation with vitamin D in infancy have been reported to confer partial protection against beta-cell autoimmunity and TID. In contrast, early exposure to cow's milk proteins and cereals and heavy weight in infancy have been implicated as risk factors for T1D. Long breastfeeding has also been observed to protect against T2D in aboriginal populations. Poor fetal nutrition resulting in low birth weight has been identified as a factor contributing to later insulin resistance and T2D. Recent data indicate that current overweight and obesity are stronger determinants of insulin resistance than birth weight among preschool children. High-nutrient diet and rapid growth in early infancy have been reported to adversely programme the principal components of the metabolic syndrome including insulin resistance and T2D. It is an important scientific and public-health objective to define protective and predisposing effects of early nutrition on the development of diabetes, since early feeding can potentially be modified to minimise the risk of later chronic diseases.

  16. The benefits and risks of testosterone replacement therapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Nazem; Alkaade, Saad; Morley, John E

    2009-01-01

    Increased longevity and population aging will increase the number of men with late onset hypogonadism. It is a common condition, but often underdiagnosed and undertreated. The indication of testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT) treatment requires the presence of low testosterone level, and symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Although controversy remains regarding indications for testosterone supplementation in aging men due to lack of large-scale, long-term studies assessing the benefits and risks of testosterone-replacement therapy in men, reports indicate that TRT may produce a wide range of benefits for men with hypogonadism that include improvement in libido and sexual function, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, mood, erythropoiesis, cognition, quality of life and cardiovascular disease. Perhaps the most controversial area is the issue of risk, especially possible stimulation of prostate cancer by testosterone, even though no evidence to support this risk exists. Other possible risks include worsening symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, liver toxicity, hyperviscosity, erythrocytosis, worsening untreated sleep apnea or severe heart failure. Despite this controversy, testosterone supplementation in the United States has increased substantially over the past several years. The physician should discuss with the patient the potential benefits and risks of TRT. The purpose of this review is to discuss what is known and not known regarding the benefits and risks of TRT. PMID:19707253

  17. Health benefits and possible risks of broccoli - an overview.

    PubMed

    Latté, Klaus Peter; Appel, Klaus-Erich; Lampen, Alfonso

    2011-12-01

    Chemopreventive effects of broccoli, a highly valued vegetable, have been known for a long time. Several studies have demonstrated that broccoli might be beneficial by reducing the risk for the development of certain forms of cancer. These effects are generally attributed to glucosinolate-derived degradation products like isothiocyanates and indoles which are formed by the hydrolytic action of plant myrosinase and/or glucosidases deriving from the human microbial flora. However, recent in vitro and experimental animal studies indicate that broccoli, its extracts and the glucosinolate-derived degradation products might also have undesirable effects, especially genotoxic activities. However, the relevance of the genotoxic activities to human health is not known yet. This paper gives an overview on genotoxic, anti-genotoxic/chemopreventive, nutritive and antinutritive properties of broccoli, its ingredients and their degradation products. A qualitative comparison of the benefit and risk of broccoli consumption benefit-risk assessment shows that the benefit from intake in modest quantities and in processed form outweighs potential risks. For other preparations (fortified broccoli-based dietary supplements, diets with extraordinary high daily intake, consumption as a raw vegetable) further studies both for potential risks and beneficial effects are needed in order to assess the benefit and risk in the future.

  18. Risk factor control is key in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gareth; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged duration of diabetes, poor glycaemic control and hypertension are major risk factors for both diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Optimising blood sugar control together with excellent control of blood pressure can reduce the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy should be considered in any patient with diabetes when persistent albuminuria develops. Microalbuminuria is the earliest clinically detectable indicator of diabetic nephropathy risk. The majority of patients with diabetic nephropathy are appropriately diagnosed based on elevated urinary albumin excretion and/or reduced 0032-6518 renal function. Patients with type 2 diabetes should have annual urinary ACR measurements from the time of diabetes diagnosis while those with type 1 diabetes should commence five years after diagnosis. Blood pressure lowering to 130/80mmHg and reduction of proteinuria to <1 g/day retards progression of diabetic nephropathy and reduces the number of cardiovascular events. Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are effective in reducing proteinuria, managing hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk. Unless there are clear contraindications or intolerance all patients with diabetic nephropathy should be prescribed an ACEI or ARB. Stopping an ACEI or ARB during intercurrent illness or times of volume depletion is critically important. Patients with diabetic nephropathy should have at least yearly measurements of blood pressure, renal function and urinary ACR.

  19. Benefit-Risk Analysis for Decision-Making: An Approach.

    PubMed

    Raju, G K; Gurumurthi, K; Domike, R

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of benefit and risk is an important aspect of decision-making throughout the drug lifecycle. In this work, the use of a benefit-risk analysis approach to support decision-making was explored. The proposed approach builds on the qualitative US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approach to include a more explicit analysis based on international standards and guidance that enables aggregation and comparison of benefit and risk on a common basis and a lifecycle focus. The approach is demonstrated on six decisions over the lifecycle (e.g., accelerated approval, withdrawal, and traditional approval) using two case studies: natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS) and bedaquiline for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB).

  20. The Benefits of Risk Factor Prevention in Americans Aged 51 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuhui; Girosi, Federico; Michaud, Pierre-Carl; Olshansky, S. Jay; Cutler, David; Rowe, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the potential health and economic benefits of reducing common risk factors in older Americans. Methods. A dynamic simulation model tracked a national cohort of persons 51 and 52 years of age to project their health and medical spending in prevention scenarios for diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and smoking. Results. The gain in life span from successful treatment of a person aged 51 or 52 years for obesity would be 0.85 years; for hypertension, 2.05 years; and for diabetes, 3.17 years. A 51- or 52-year-old person who quit smoking would gain 3.44 years. Despite living longer, those successfully treated for obesity, hypertension, or diabetes would have lower lifetime medical spending, exclusive of prevention costs. Smoking cessation would lead to increased lifetime spending. We used traditional valuations for a life-year to calculate that successful treatments would be worth, per capita, $198 018 (diabetes), $137 964 (hypertension), $118 946 (smoking), and $51 750 (obesity). Conclusions. Effective prevention could substantially improve the health of older Americans, and—despite increases in longevity—such benefits could be achieved with little or no additional lifetime medical spending. PMID:19762651

  1. Standard-dose statin therapy provides incremental clinical benefits in normocholesterolemic diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sunao; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Hisao; Kitagawa, Akira; Matsui, Kunihiko; Shimomura, Hideki; Kimura, Kazuo; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Sakaino, Naritsugu

    2010-04-01

    Randomized trials have established statins as an agent for prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to assess the hypothesis that standard-dose statin therapy has a beneficial effect in normocholesterolemic diabetic patients with CHD. A prospective, randomized, open, blinded-endpoint trial was conducted from 2002 to 2004 at 55 hospitals in Japan to evaluate the effect of statins on subsequent cardiovascular events. A total number of 1,016 CHD patients (301 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus [DM] and 715 non-DM patients) with serum total cholesterol levels of 180-240 mg/dl were randomly divided into non-statin and statin treatments. Clinical parameters were comparable between DM and non-DM groups. Serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels were equally decreased after statin treatment in the 2 groups. Statin treatment improved prognosis in both the DM and non-DM groups; however, the number needed to treat (NNT) and relative risk reduction (RRR) were remarkable especially in the DM group (NNT=8, RRR=67%) compared with the non-DM group (NNT=30, RRR=24%). Standard-dose statin therapy provides incremental clinical benefits in DM patients with normal cholesterol levels compared with non-DM patients. The data suggest that DM patients may enjoy the pleiotropic effects of statins, independent of the LDL-cholesterol lowering effects of these agents.

  2. Public Health Service report on fluoride benefits and risks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-14

    This report, Public Health Service Report on Fluoride Benefits and Risks is a summary of the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of Review of Fluoride Benefits and Risks: Report of the Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Fluoride of the Committee to Coordinate Environmental Health and Related Programs, published in February 1991. The full report was prepared by an ad hoc subcommittee of the United States Public Health Service's Committee to Coordinate Environmental Health and Related Programs (CCEHRP) at the request of the Assistant Secretary for Health. The full report can be obtained from the Public Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Risks and benefits of parent/child bed sharing.

    PubMed

    Sobralske, Mary C; Gruber, Megan E

    2009-09-01

    To recognize the concerns for and against parent/child bed-sharing (co-sleeping) practices. Review of the literature and the clinical experiences of the authors. The decision to bed share ultimately lies with the parent, but it is the responsibility of the nurse practitioner (NP) to discuss risks and benefits of parent preferences and to help families make a safe decision regarding the sleeping arrangement for their child. If NPs know the benefits and risks regarding co-sleeping and bed sharing, they can better promote safe and culturally congruent family centered care.

  4. Safety impact--the risk/benefits of functional foods.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Gérard

    2009-12-01

    It is amazing to see how much the approach of the food risk analysis evolved in the recent years. For half a century and the birth of the risk assessment methodology in the food domain, only no appreciable health risk was considered acceptable by the manager. This is the vocabulary used in the case of a voluntary, deliberated human action, as the use of food additives (definition of ADI). In the case of risks not resulting from such an action, as that of the presence of contaminants, the risk assessor allocates provisional tolerable daily, weekly or monthly intake that are the basis for regulation. This vocabulary is in agreement with the objective which consists in approaching closer possible of the zero risk which is the wish of a majority of the consumers. Some years ago, the risk managers insisted to obtain from the assessors as often as possible a quantitative risk evaluation. More recently even, the managers would like to decide on the basis of a balance of risk and benefit acceptable for management purposes. Finally, they hope that general principles and tools will be available for conducting a quantitative risk-benefit analysis for foods and food ingredients. What is possible in the case of functional foods (FF)? Based on the definition of FF proposed in the programme FUFOSE, one has to distinguish between different situations in order to assess the risk: that of a micro-, that of a macro-component or that of a whole food. These situations have been clearly described in the document resulting from FOSIE. The standardized methodology relevant to assess micro-components is not well adapted to the assessment of whole food. Concepts of substantial equivalence and of history of safe use could be useful tools in this case. However, quantitative risk assessment remains a very difficult exercise. If a process for the assessment of health benefit of FF has been proposed as an outcome of the PASSCLAIM action, the quantification of this benefit needs adequate tools

  5. Benefits of modest weight loss on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lau, David C W; Teoh, Hwee

    2013-04-01

    The epidemic of overweight and obesity is a major driver of the growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus globally. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases exponentially as body mass index rises above 25 kg/m(2). Obesity currently costs the Canadian economy approximately $7.1 billion annually whereas per capita health care cost for individuals with diabetes are 3 to 4 times that for persons without the disease. Each kilogram of weight lost through health behaviour changes in people with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a relative diabetes risk reduction of 16%. As 80% to 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and adiposity worsens the metabolic and physiologic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes, weight loss is recommended as the cornerstone management measure. A modest weight loss of 5% to 10% is an achievable and realistic goal for preventing type 2 diabetes in susceptible individuals and improving glycemic and metabolic control in people with type 2 diabetes. When health behaviour modification fails to achieve glycemic and metabolic goal targets, priority should be given to antihyperglycemic agents that are associated with weight loss or weight neutrality. Every pound of body fat loss matters and every kilogram counts in the management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Risks and benefits of consumption of Great Lakes fish.

    PubMed

    Turyk, Mary E; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Bowerman, William; Boysen, Eric; Clark, Milton; Diamond, Miriam; Mergler, Donna; Pantazopoulos, Peter; Schantz, Susan; Carpenter, David O

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial effects of fish consumption on early cognitive development and cardiovascular health have been attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids in fish and fish oils, but toxic chemicals in fish may adversely affect these health outcomes. Risk-benefit assessments of fish consumption have frequently focused on methylmercury and omega-3 fatty acids, not persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, and none have evaluated Great Lakes fish consumption. The risks and benefits of fish consumption have been established primarily for marine fish. Here, we examine whether sufficient data are available to evaluate the risks and benefits of eating freshwater fish from the Great Lakes. We used a scoping review to integrate information from multiple state, provincial, and federal agency sources regarding the contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and fish consumers, consumption rates and fish consumption advisories, and health effects of contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids. Great Lakes fish contain persistent contaminants--many of which have documented adverse health effects--that accumulate in humans consuming them. In contrast, data are sparse on omega-3 fatty acids in the fish and their consumers. Moreover, few studies have documented the social and cultural benefits of Great Lakes fish consumption, particularly for subsistence fishers and native communities. At this time, federal and state/provincial governments provide fish consumption advisories based solely on risk. Our knowledge of Great Lakes fish has critical gaps, particularly regarding the benefits of consumption. A risk-benefit analysis requires more information than is currently available on the concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and their absorption by fish eaters in addition to more information on the social, cultural, and health consequences of changes in the amount of fish consumed.

  7. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lars J.; Leirgul, Elisabeth; Boyd, Heather A.; Priest, James; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Quertermous, Thomas; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Background— Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. Methods and Results— In a national cohort study, we identified 2 025 727 persons born from 1978 to 2011; among them were 7296 (0.36%) persons exposed to maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus. Pregestational diabetes mellitus was identified by using the National Patient Register and individual-level information on all prescriptions filled in Danish pharmacies. Persons with CHD (n=16 325) were assigned to embryologically related cardiac phenotypes. The CHD prevalence in the offspring of mothers with pregestational diabetes mellitus was 318 per 10 000 live births (n=232) in comparison with a baseline risk of 80 per 10 000; the adjusted relative risk for CHD was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 3.51–4.53). The association was not modified by year of birth, maternal age at diabetes onset, or diabetes duration, and CHD risks associated with type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (insulin-independent) diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly. Persons born to women with previous acute diabetes complications had a higher CHD risk than those exposed to maternal diabetes mellitus without complications (relative risk, 7.62; 95% confidence interval, 5.23–10.6, and relative risk, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.91–4.13, respectively; P=0.0004). All specific CHD phenotypes were associated with maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus (relative risk range, 2.74–13.8). Conclusions— The profoundly increased CHD risk conferred by maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus neither changed over time nor differed by diabetes subtype. The association with acute pregestational diabetes complications was particularly strong, suggesting a role for glucose in the causal pathway. PMID:27166384

  8. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  9. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  10. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  11. Diabetes awareness and diabetes risk reduction behaviors among attendance of primary healthcare centers.

    PubMed

    Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A; Al-Jaradeen, Najah

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess level of awareness about diabetes and the level of adoption of diabetes risk behaviors among adult attending primary healthcare centers. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using a self-administrated questionnaire. In addition to demographic information, the questionnaire contained questions on diabetes awareness related to diabetes definition, symptoms, risk factors, complications and management of diabetes as well as questions on diabetes risk reduction behaviors and sources of information on diabetes. The data was analyzed with independent t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and ANOVA test. A total of 541 participants aged ≥ 18 years were recruited. The mean score of diabetes awareness was 27.5/40 [SD=5.7]. The participants performed best in symptoms section with a mean score of 6.3/8 [SD=1.6], and worst in the risk factors section with a mean score of 3.6/6 (SD=1.4). With respect to diabetes risk reduction behaviors the results showed that the highest mean score was for fat reduction 2.0/4 [SD=0.8]; and the lowest mean score was for weight control or losing 1.7/4 [SD=0.8]. The current study demonstrated that substantial numbers of adult Jordanian lack the sufficient awareness about diabetes to prevent and cope with the increasing prevalence of diabetes in Jordan. Also, it demonstrated that adoption of diabetes risk reduction behaviors was suboptimal. Raising public awareness of diabetes and diabetes risk reduction behaviors through population-based programs and mass media should be planned and implemented. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing cardiovascular risks versus clinical benefits of atypical antipsychotic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Herbert Y; Davidson, Michael; Glassman, Alexander H; Vieweg, W Victor R

    2002-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drugs are a major advance in the treatment of psychosis in spite of concerns about metabolic and cardiovascular side effects that affect morbidity and mortality. Concerns about weight gain, hypoglycemia, diabetes, and increases in lipids as well as sudden death due to torsades de pointes and other cardiovascular events can temper enthusiasm about the atypical antipsychotics. The challenge for the clinician is to weigh the benefits and risks for each drug for each patient and develop a treatment plan with the individual patient in mind. This article discusses both risks and benefits of antipsychotic treatment and presents a treatment algorithm to aid the clinician in choosing medications for the psychotic patient.

  13. Promise assessment: A corollary to risk assessment for characterizing benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Sholtis, J.A. Jr. )

    1993-01-10

    Decisions involving the use of hazardous technologies are often made based on risk-benefit considerations. This is the case for U.S. space mission use of nuclear power and propulsion systems, where launch decisions are made within the office of the President. A great deal of time and effort is spent characterizing the risk for each nuclear-powered space mission. However, this is not so for benefits, even though they are no less important. To correct this situation, a new technical term--promise--is defined, and a new methodology--promise assessment--is proposed. This paper introduces and advances this concept, addresses its future application, as a tool, can be developed sufficiently and applied to methodically identify and characterized benefits. Further, it can introduce a degree of balance when judgments concerning the use of hazardous technologies are involved.

  14. Birthright Denied: The Risks and Benefits of Breast-feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stephanie G.; Highland, Joseph H.

    This document compares the benefits and risks of breastfeeding in light of recent evidence that mothers' milk contains high levels of chemical contaminants. Information is presented on the occurrence and toxicity of agricultural and industrial chemicals found in breast milk and on the lead, industrial chemicals, nitrates, and bacterial…

  15. Evaluating risks and benefits of wildland fire at landscape scales

    Treesearch

    Carol Miller; Peter B. Landres; Paul B. Alaback

    2000-01-01

    Fire suppression has resulted in severe management challenges, especially in the wildland-urban interface zone. Fire managers seek to reduce fuels and risks in the interface zone, while striving to return the natural role of fire to wildland ecosystems. Managers must balance the benefits of wildland fire on ecosystem health against the values that need to be protected...

  16. Birthright Denied: The Risks and Benefits of Breast-feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stephanie G.; Highland, Joseph H.

    This document compares the benefits and risks of breastfeeding in light of recent evidence that mothers' milk contains high levels of chemical contaminants. Information is presented on the occurrence and toxicity of agricultural and industrial chemicals found in breast milk and on the lead, industrial chemicals, nitrates, and bacterial…

  17. Occupational chemical exposure and diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Leso, Veruscka; Capitanelli, Ilaria; Lops, Erika Alessandra; Ricciardi, Walter; Iavicoli, Ivo

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases that may originate from an interaction between genetic and lifestyle risk factors. However, the possible role of occupational chemical exposures in the disease development and progression remains unclear. Therefore, this review aimed to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the relationship between occupational exposure to specific chemical substances or industrial activities and DM morbidity and mortality outcomes. Although some positive findings may support the diabetogenic role of certain pesticides and dioxins in different workplaces, the variable conditions of exposure, the lack of quantitative environmental or biological monitoring data and the different outcomes evaluated do not allow defining a specific exposure-disease causality. Therefore, further epidemiological studies will be necessary to adequately assess modes of action for different substances, dose-response relationships as well as individual susceptibility factors potentially affecting the exposure-disease continuum. Overall, this appears important to adequately assess, communicate and manage risks in occupational chemical exposure settings with the aim to protect workers and build healthier job conditions for diabetic employees.

  18. Risk assessment for invasive species produces net bioeconomic benefits

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Reuben P.; Lodge, David M.; Finnoff, David C.

    2007-01-01

    International commerce in live organisms presents a policy challenge for trade globalization; sales of live organisms create wealth, but some nonindigenous species cause harm. To reduce damage, some countries have implemented species screening to limit the introduction of damaging species. Adoption of new risk assessment (RA) technologies has been slowed, however, by concerns that RA accuracy remains insufficient to produce positive net economic benefits. This concern arises because only a small proportion of all introduced species escape, spread, and cause harm (i.e., become invasive), so a RA will exclude many noninvasive species (which provide a net economic benefit) for every invasive species correctly identified. Here, we develop a simple cost:benefit bioeconomic framework to quantify the net benefits from applying species prescreening. Because invasive species are rarely eradicated, and their damages must therefore be borne for long periods, we have projected the value of RA over a suitable range of policy time horizons (10–500 years). We apply the model to the Australian plant quarantine program and show that this RA program produces positive net economic benefits over the range of reasonable assumptions. Because we use low estimates of the financial damage caused by invasive species and high estimates of the value of species in the ornamental trade, our results underestimate the net benefit of the Australian plant quarantine program. In addition, because plants have relatively low rates of invasion, applying screening protocols to animals would likely demonstrate even greater benefits. PMID:17190819

  19. Management of diabetic foot lesions in hospital: costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    Benotmane, A; Mohammedi, F; Ayad, F; Kadi, K; Medjbeur, S; Azzouz, A

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the direct and indirect costs associated with diabetic-related foot lesions in patients hospitalized in a department of Endocrinology and Diabetology (36 beds). Direct costs included costs associated with hospital stay, laboratory testing, medical and surgical treatment. Lesions were classified in 3 groups (I, II, III) according to their importance (Wagner classification). Among 1,779 admissions for diabetes, 163 (i.e., 9.16%) were related to a foot lesion. The stay in hospital for these lesions reached 7,247 days over a 5-year period, with an average stay duration of 45 days per lesion. Mean length of hospital stay varied according to the importance of the lesion: 26.87 days, 48.25 days, 57.12 days for group I, II and III, respectively. The total cost amounted to 914,534.39 US dollars and the mean cost 5,610.64 US dollars. Mean cost was 3,326.76, 5,712.24, 7,399.74 US dollars for group I, II and III, respectively. Nearly 80% of the financial costs were due to hospital stay. Primary healing occurred in 59.09% of the patients (n=78); 17.4% (n=23) of the patients required major amputation, 14.4% (n=19) minor amputation. Death rate reached 9.1% (n=12). An increase in length of stay and costs with importance of the lesion was identified. The strategy of care of the diabetic lesions should be based upon the prevention of ulcer formation: it seems actually the best mean (the least expensive) in a developing country where financial resources are very limited. This prevention should be made through regular patient education, appropriately fitted shoes, and regular careful examination by a General Practitioner or a Diabetologist.

  20. Risk Related to Pre–Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Mellitus in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Søren L.; Preiss, David; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Squire, Iain; Cardoso, José Silva; Merkely, Bela; Martinez, Felipe; Starling, Randall C.; Desai, Akshay S.; Lefkowitz, Martin P.; Rizkala, Adel R.; Rouleau, Jean L.; Shi, Victor C.; Solomon, Scott D.; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R.; Packer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    Background— The prevalence of pre–diabetes mellitus and its consequences in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction are not known. We investigated these in the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial. Methods and Results— We examined clinical outcomes in 8399 patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction according to history of diabetes mellitus and glycemic status (baseline hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]: <6.0% [<42 mmol/mol], 6.0%–6.4% [42–47 mmol/mol; pre–diabetes mellitus], and ≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol; diabetes mellitus]), in Cox regression models adjusted for known predictors of poor outcome. Patients with a history of diabetes mellitus (n=2907 [35%]) had a higher risk of the primary composite outcome of heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular mortality compared with those without a history of diabetes mellitus: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 1.52; P<0.001. HbA1c measurement showed that an additional 1106 (13% of total) patients had undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and 2103 (25%) had pre–diabetes mellitus. The hazard ratio for patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (HbA1c, >6.5%) and known diabetes mellitus compared with those with HbA1c<6.0% was 1.39 (1.17–1.64); P<0.001 and 1.64 (1.43–1.87); P<0.001, respectively. Patients with pre–diabetes mellitus were also at higher risk (hazard ratio, 1.27 [1.10–1.47]; P<0.001) compared with those with HbA1c<6.0%. The benefit of LCZ696 (sacubitril/valsartan) compared with enalapril was consistent across the range of HbA1c in the trial. Conclusions— In patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, dysglycemia is common and pre–diabetes mellitus is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes (compared with patients with no diabetes mellitus and HbA1c <6.0%). LCZ696 was beneficial compared with enalapril

  1. Diabetes Mellitus is Associated With Higher Risk of Developing Decompensated Cirrhosis in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Powderly, William G; Presti, Rachel M

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association of diabetes with risk of decompensated cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Direct-acting antivirals are highly effective in treating CHC but very expensive. CHC patients at high risk of progression to symptomatic liver disease may benefit most from early treatment. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the 2006 to 2013 Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database including inpatient, outpatient, and pharmacy claims from private insurers. CHC and cirrhosis were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes; baseline diabetes was identified by diagnosis codes or antidiabetic medications. CHC patients were followed to identify decompensated cirrhosis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the risk of decompensated cirrhosis by baseline cirrhosis. There were 75,805 CHC patients with median 1.9 years follow-up. A total of 10,317 (13.6%) of the CHC population had diabetes. The rates of decompensated cirrhosis per 1000 person-years were: 185.5 for persons with baseline cirrhosis and diabetes, 119.8 for persons with cirrhosis and no diabetes, 35.3 for persons with no cirrhosis and diabetes, and 17.1 for persons with no cirrhosis and no diabetes. Diabetes was associated with increased risk of decompensated cirrhosis in persons with baseline cirrhosis (adjusted hazard ratio=1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-1.6) and in persons without baseline cirrhosis (adjusted hazard ratio=1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-2.1). In a privately insured US population with CHC, the adjusted risk of decompensated cirrhosis was higher in diabetic compared with nondiabetic patients. Diabetes status should be included in prioritization of antiviral treatment.

  2. Balance of risks and benefits in preparation for earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Bolt, B A

    1991-01-11

    Widespread proposals to benefit from lessons of the 17 October 1989 (Loma Prieta) earthquake dramatize the difficulties associated with reducing seismic risk. There are three main problems. First, the understanding of earthquake generation is far from complete. For example, the unanticipated source style of this earthquake raises vital questions; claims of predicting its occurrence are weak, and, for practical reasons, the detailed pattern of damaging strong ground shaking was not predicted. Second, although their interactions are not well understood, competing social forces continue to prevent the optimum growth and application of knowledge for earthquake hazard mitigation. Third, the recent use of the probabilities of seismic risk has had mixed results. Because of indecision between minimizing loss of life and maximizing broader benefits, general agreement on acceptable earthquake risk remains confused.

  3. Balance of risks and benefits in preparation for earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, B.A. )

    1991-01-11

    Widespread proposals to benefit form lessons of the 17 October 1989 (Loma Prieta) earthquake dramatize the difficulties associated with reducing seismic risk. There are three main problems. First, the understanding of earthquake generation is far form complete. For example, the unanticipated source style of this earthquake raises vital questions; claims of predicting its occurrence are weak, and, for practical reasons, the detailed pattern of damaging strong ground shaking was not predicted. Second, although their interactions are not well understood, competing social forces continue to prevent the optimum growth and application of knowledge for earthquake hazard mitigation. Third, the recent use of the probabilities of seismic risk has had mixed results. Because of indecision between minimizing loss of life and maximizing broader benefits, general agreement on acceptable earthquake risk remains confused.

  4. Biotechnology risks and benefits: Science instructor perspectives and practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Grant Ean

    Developing scientifically literate students who understand the socially contextualized nature of science and technology is a national focus of science education reform. Understanding teachers' views on this topic is of equal importance. This document focuses on the topic of risks and benefits posed by science and technology as an important topic for which the socially contextualized nature of science and technology readily emerges. Following introduction of a theoretical model and a review of the literature, two research studies are described that examined teachers' perceptions of the risks posed by biotechnology and the role of risk topics in an undergraduate science course. The first research study examines four groups of science educators; pre-service science teachers, in-service science teachers, science graduate teaching assistants, and science professors (n = 91). The participants completed a survey and card sort task to determine their perceptions of the risks of biotechnology. The results show that teacher perceptions were shaped by the risk severity, regulation processes, public acceptance, fear, reciprocal benefits, and whether the applications would impact humans or the environment. Factors determining risk perception included personal worldviews, trust in communicating institutions, and personal experiences with biotechnology. The different types of science teachers were compared and contrasted in light of these factors and the implications of instructor perceptions on science pedagogy are discussed. The second research manuscript describes a case study in which six biology graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) were observed teaching as lesson on the potential risks and benefits of biotechnology. The data sources included classroom observations and semi-structured interviews. Qualitative analysis reveals that GTAs framed the instruction of risk in one of three ways: analytical, focus on perspectives and biases, and promotion of individual reflection

  5. The role of risk and cost benefit in program budgeting

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C.J.; Alchowiak, J.

    1995-12-31

    The primary Environmental Management (EM) program mission is protecting human health and the environment. EM is currently facing a decreasing budget while still having to deal with competing requirements and risks to workers, public, and environment. There has been no consistent framework for considering in an integrated fashion the multiple types of risks and hazards present in the nuclear weapons complex. Therefore, to allocate resources during the budget process, EM is using risk, long term costs, mortgage reduction, compliance issues, and stakeholders concerns to prioritize the funding of activities. Risk and cost-benefit analysis are valuable tools to help make decisions to reduce risks to health, safety, and the environment in a sensible and cost-effective manner. Principles for priority setting using risk analysis are to seek to compare risks by grouping them into broad categories of concern (e.g., high, medium, and low); to set priorities in managing risks to account for relevant management and social considerations; to inform priorities by as broad a range of views as possible, ideally with consensus; and, to try to coordinate risk reduction efforts among programs. The Draft Risk Report to Congress, Risks and the Risk Debate: Searching for Common Ground {open_quote}The First Step,{close_quote} provides the first link between budget, compliance requirements, and risk reduction/pollution prevention activities. The process used for the report provides an initial framework to capture the spectrum of risks associated with environmental management activities and to link these risks in a qualitative fashion to compliance and the budget.

  6. Unconjugated bilirubin mediates heme oxygenase-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Limei; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhang, Yang; Han, Quan-Bin; Ho, Hing-Man; Wang, Nanping; Wong, Siu Ling; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Jun; Ng, Chi-Fai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts vasoprotective effects. Such benefit in diabetic vasculopathy, however, remains unclear. We hypothesize that bilirubin mediates HO-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetes. Diabetic db/db mice were treated with hemin (HO-1 inducer) for 2 weeks, and aortas were isolated for functional and molecular assays. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured in cultured endothelial cells. Hemin treatment augmented endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) and elevated Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in db/db mouse aortas, which were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnMP or HO-1 silencing virus. Hemin treatment increased serum bilirubin, and ex vivo bilirubin treatment improved relaxations in diabetic mouse aortas, which was reversed by the Akt inhibitor. Biliverdin reductase silencing virus attenuated the effect of hemin. Chronic bilirubin treatment improved EDRs in db/db mouse aortas. Hemin and bilirubin reversed high glucose-induced reductions in Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. The effect of hemin but not bilirubin was inhibited by biliverdin reductase silencing virus. Furthermore, bilirubin augmented EDRs in renal arteries from diabetic patients. In summary, HO-1-induced restoration of endothelial function in diabetic mice is most likely mediated by bilirubin, which preserves NO bioavailability through the Akt/eNOS/NO cascade, suggesting bilirubin as a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of diabetic vasculopathy.

  7. Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163536.html Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Study ... Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of air pollution may increase some Hispanic children's risk of type ...

  8. Community Gardens as Environmental Health Interventions: Benefits Versus Potential Risks.

    PubMed

    Al-Delaimy, W K; Webb, M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to summarize current findings on community gardens relevant to three specific areas of interest as follows: (1) health benefits, (2) garden interventions in developing versus developed countries, and (3) the concerns and risks of community gardening. Community gardens are a reemerging phenomenon in many low- and high-income urban neighborhoods to address the common risk factors of modern lifestyle. Community gardens are not limited to developed countries. They also exist in developing low-income countries but usually serve a different purpose of food security. Despite their benefits, community gardens can become a source of environmental toxicants from the soil of mostly empty lands that might have been contaminated by toxicants in the past. Therefore, caution should be taken about gardening practices and the types of foods to be grown on such soil if there was evidence of contamination. We present community gardens as additional solutions to the epidemic of chronic diseases in low-income urban communities and how it can have a positive physical, mental and social impact among participants. On balance, the benefits of engaging in community gardens are likely to outweigh the potential risk that can be remedied. Quantitative population studies are needed to provide evidence of the benefits and health impacts versus potential harms from community gardens.

  9. Risks and Benefits of Consumption of Great Lakes Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Satyendra P.; Bowerman, William; Boysen, Eric; Clark, Milton; Diamond, Miriam; Mergler, Donna; Pantazopoulos, Peter; Schantz, Susan; Carpenter, David O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Beneficial effects of fish consumption on early cognitive development and cardiovascular health have been attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids in fish and fish oils, but toxic chemicals in fish may adversely affect these health outcomes. Risk–benefit assessments of fish consumption have frequently focused on methylmercury and omega-3 fatty acids, not persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, and none have evaluated Great Lakes fish consumption. Objectives: The risks and benefits of fish consumption have been established primarily for marine fish. Here, we examine whether sufficient data are available to evaluate the risks and benefits of eating freshwater fish from the Great Lakes. Methods: We used a scoping review to integrate information from multiple state, provincial, and federal agency sources regarding the contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and fish consumers, consumption rates and fish consumption advisories, and health effects of contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids. Data synthesis: Great Lakes fish contain persistent contaminants—many of which have documented adverse health effects —that accumulate in humans consuming them. In contrast, data are sparse on omega-3 fatty acids in the fish and their consumers. Moreover, few studies have documented the social and cultural benefits of Great Lakes fish consumption, particularly for subsistence fishers and native communities. At this time, federal and state/provincial governments provide fish consumption advisories based solely on risk. Conclusions: Our knowledge of Great Lakes fish has critical gaps, particularly regarding the benefits of consumption. A risk–benefit analysis requires more information than is currently available on the concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and their absorption by fish eaters in addition to more information on the social, cultural, and health consequences of changes in the amount of fish consumed. PMID

  10. A school-based intervention for diabetes risk reduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program, addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race, or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a mu...

  11. Benefits and risks of folic acid to the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E

    2002-01-01

    During three decades of neurological practice I have witnessed a remarkable change in attitudes to the benefits and risks of folic acid therapy in nervous system disorders. In the 1960s all that was known and taught was that folic acid was harmful to the nervous system, especially in precipitating or exacerbating the neurological complications of vitamin B12 deficiency. So deeply held was this view that the possibility of neuropsychological benefits from this vitamin was initially viewed with considerable scepticism.1 PMID:11971038

  12. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Christophe; Lamblin, Nicolas; Mc Fadden, Eugène P; Van Belle, Eric; Millaire, Alain; de Groote, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM) with heart failure (HF) The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients. PMID:12556246

  13. Brief Report: Parent's Health Literacy among High-Risk Adolescents with Insulin Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the health literacy of parents of high-risk adolescents with insulin dependent diabetes and to examine the relation of parent's health literacy with treatment adherence. Methods Participants were 93 adolescents in poor metabolic control diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes and their primary caregivers. Results All parents had adequate health literacy as defined by the S-TOFHLA. Better parent reading comprehension scores were significantly related to family structure, race, and treatment regimen. Reading comprehension in turn significantly predicted adherence for adolescents on an intensive insulin regimen but not for those on conventional regimens. Conclusions Parents with low health literacy may struggle to help their children adhere to the increasingly complex diabetes regimens being used at present. Such families may benefit from more intensive diabetes education or different approaches to teaching diabetes management skills. PMID:19755494

  14. Aspirin for Primary Cardiovascular Risk Prevention and Beyond in Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Capodanno, Davide; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-11-15

    Daily administration of low-dose aspirin has proved to be beneficial in preventing recurrent cardiovascular events. However, the role of aspirin for primary prevention in patients with no overt cardiovascular disease is more controversial. In fact, in lower risk patients, the modest benefit in reducing serious vascular events can be offset by the increased risk of bleeding, including intracranial and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with a substantially increased risk of both first and recurrent atherothrombotic events, which makes aspirin therapy of potential value in these subjects. Moving from general aspects of aspirin pharmacology and specific issues in diabetes mellitus, this article reviews the literature on the topic of aspirin for primary prevention in general, and in subjects with diabetes mellitus in particular, to culminate with arguments pro and con and a practical risk-based algorithm for aspirin initiation in daily practice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Reducing Diabetes Risk in American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janice L.; Allen, Peg; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Qualls, Clifford; Whyte, Ayn N.; Wolfe, Venita K.; Herman, Carla J.

    2008-01-01

    Background American Indians experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. The impact of low-intensity interventions on diabetes risk among young American Indian women is unknown. Design Randomized controlled trial Setting/Participants Community-based; participants were 200 young urban American Indian women who were block-randomized on fasting blood glucose (FBG) into intervention and control groups. Inclusion criteria included self-reported identity, aged 18–40 years, not pregnant, willingness to stay in urban area for 2 years, and not having type 2 diabetes. Measures were taken at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data were gathered 2002–2006 and analyzed 2006–2007. Intervention Five discussion group sessions (one meeting per month for five months) were held focusing on healthful eating, physical activity, goal-setting, and social support.. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes included dietary fat and vegetable consumption and self-reported physical activity. Secondary outcomes included cardiorespiratory fitness, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, lipid profiles, percent body fat, BMI, intake of fruit, total sugar and sweetened beverages, FBG, and television viewing. Results Mean vegetable and fruit intake increased significantly more in the intervention group than in the control group over time (group by visit interaction, p=0.02 and p=0.002, respectively). Both groups had significant increases in percent body fat and decreases in waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, blood cholesterol, LDL, television viewing, and total intakes of energy, saturated fat, sugar, and sweetened beverages. Conclusions A culturally influenced, low-intensity lifestyle intervention can improve self-reported intakes of vegetables and fruit over 18 months in young, urban American Indian women. PMID:18312806

  16. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Bell, K.; Bernow, S.; Duckworth, M.; Spinney P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents preliminary results of a study to evaluate the risk-reduction benefits of wind power for a case study utility system using decision analysis techniques. The costs and risks of two alternative decisions-whether to build a 400 MW gas-fired combined cycle plant or a 1600 MW wind plant in 2003-were compared through computer simulations as fuel prices, environmental regulatory costs, wind and conventional power plant availability, and load growth were allowed to vary. Three different market scenarios were examined: traditional regulation, a short-term power pool, and fixed-price contracts of varying duration. The study concludes that, from the perspective of ratepayers, wind energy provides a net levelized risk-reduction benefit of $3.4 to $7.8/MWh under traditional regulation, and less in the other scenarios. From the perspective of the utility plant owners, wind provides a significant risk benefit in the unregulated market scenarios but none in a regulated market. The methodology and findings should help inform utility resource planning and industry restructuring efforts. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Patients' perceptions of benefits and risks of complete denture therapy.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Bárbara Barbério; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of benefits and risks concerning complete denture therapy. A secondary objective was to assess the influence of clinical and sociodemographic variables on patients' perceptions. The sample was composed of 104 volunteers who presented themselves for complete denture treatment at a dental school. The average age of the volunteers was 69.2 years (±) 9.3. Patient opinions concerning the benefits of complete denture therapy were recorded using a previously reported questionnaire. The answers were evaluated in three domains: (1) benefits (positive perceptions); (2) risks (negative perceptions); and (3) consequences of no treatment. The average time of use of the previous dentures was 20 years (SD ±12.9). Risk factors (negative perceptions) received lower scores by the patients, while the consequences of no treatment received higher scores. No association was found among evaluations of the previous dentures and educational level, marital status, and gender; however, patients' evaluation about their previous dentures was significantly different depending on age (p = 0.001) and previous dentures' time of use (p = 0.038). Patients presented a positive perception of complete denture therapy, and the risk factors (negative perceptions) received the lowest scores. Patient perception regarding complete denture therapy was not influenced by educational level, evaluation of the previous dentures, or marital status. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Children's understanding of the risks and benefits associated with research.

    PubMed

    Burke, T M; Abramovitch, R; Zlotkin, S

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the current study was to maximise the amount of information children and adolescents understand about the risks and benefits associated with participation in a biomedical research study. Participants were presented with one of six hypothetical research protocols describing how to fix a fractured thigh using either a "standard" cast or "new" pins procedure. Risks and benefits associated with each of the treatment options were manipulated so that for each one of the six protocols there was either a correct or ambiguous choice. Two hundred and fifty one children, ages 6-15 (53% boys), and 237 adults (30% men) were interviewed while waiting for a clinic appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children. Using standardised procedures and questionnaires, it was determined that most participants, regardless of age group, were able to understand the basic purpose and procedures involved in the research, and most were able to choose the "correct" operation. The younger children, however, showed an overall preference for a cast operation, whereas the older participants were more likely to choose the pins. By creating age appropriate modules of information, children as young as six years can understand potentially difficult and complex concepts such as the risks and benefits associated with participation in biomedical research. It appears, however, that different criteria were used for treatment preference, regardless of associated risks; older participants tended to opt for mobility (the pins procedure) whereas younger participants stayed with the more familiar cast operation.

  19. Oral contraceptives in women with migraine: balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Allais, G; De Lorenzo, C; Mana, O; Benedetto, C

    2004-10-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but can also be associated with some risks, mainly a potential thrombotic risk. OCs may condition the course of headache and sometimes start it, but their influence on the clinical evolution of migraine is not easily assessable. The last Classification of Headache Disorders of the International Headache Society clearly identifies an "exogenous hormone-induced headache" that could be triggered by intake of OCs. Old high-dose OCs could effectively worsen headache in a significant proportion of patients, but the newest formulations influence headache course to a lesser extent. In any case, while an increase in migraine frequency or intensity do not oblige the cessation of OCs, experiencing a migraine aura for the first time, or even a clear worsening of a preexistent aura suggest discontinuation of OCs. Even if both migraine and OCs intake are associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, migraine per se is not a contraindication for OCs use; however, patients suffering from migraine with aura generally show a greater thrombotic risk than women with migraine without aura. Other risk factors (patient's age, tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing OCs in migraine patients. Furthermore, all OCs, even those with low oestrogen content, are a major risk for venous thrombosis, particularly in women with hereditary thrombophilia. A thorough laboratory control of the genetics of prothrombotic factors and coagulative parameters should precede any decision of OCs prescription in migraine patients.

  20. Beta-glucans in the treatment of diabetes and associated cardiovascular risks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by high blood glucose level with typical manifestations of thirst, polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss. It is caused by defects in insulin-mediated signal pathways, resulting in decreased glucose transportation from blood into muscle and fat cells. The major risk is vascular injury leading to heart disease, which is accelerated by increased lipid levels and hypertension. Management of diabetes includes: control of blood glucose level and lipids; and reduction of hypertension. Dietary intake of beta-glucans has been shown to reduce all these risk factors to benefit the treatment of diabetes and associated complications. In addition, beta-glucans also promote wound healing and alleviate ischemic heart injury. However, the mechanisms behind the effect of beta-glucans on diabetes and associated complications need to be further studied using pure beta-glucan. PMID:19337540

  1. Human biomonitoring to optimize fish consumption advice: reducing uncertainty when evaluating benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Scott M; Lynn, Tracey V; Verbrugge, Lori A; Middaugh, John P

    2005-03-01

    National fish consumption advisories that are based solely on assessment of risk of exposure to contaminants without consideration of consumption benefits result in overly restrictive advice that discourages eating fish even in areas where such advice is unwarranted. In fact, generic fish advisories may have adverse public health consequences because of decreased fish consumption and substitution of foods that are less healthy. Public health is on the threshold of a new era for determining actual exposures to environmental contaminants, owing to technological advances in analytical chemistry. It is now possible to target fish consumption advice to specific at-risk populations by evaluating individual contaminant exposures and health risk factors. Because of the current epidemic of nutritionally linked disease, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, general recommendations for limiting fish consumption are ill conceived and potentially dangerous.

  2. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Post-partum Risk and Follow up.

    PubMed

    Poola-Kella, Silpa; Steinman, Rachel A; Mesmar, Bayan; Malek, Rana

    2017-09-11

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we will discuss postpartum cardiovascular and diabetes risk in women with a history of GDM and different ways to improve postpartum screening. This review involves a comprehensive literature review on gestational diabetes and post-partum risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus as well as post-partum screening methods. Cardiovascular risk post-partum is potentiated by increased inflammatory markers leading to worsening atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events downstream. Decreased insulin sensitivity and β cell compensation, recurrent GDM, maternal factors such as pre and post-partum weight gain and lactation may contribute to T2DM risk. Postpartum glucose testing is essential in screening women as hyperglycemia in pregnancy has long term effects on both cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk on the mother. Long and short term improvement to post-partum glucose testing is essential to decreasing cardiometabolic and diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Increased cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes in Dallas County.

    PubMed

    Das, Sandeep R; Vaeth, Patrice A C; Stanek, Harold G; de Lemos, James A; Dobbins, Robert L; McGuire, Darren K

    2006-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem in the United States. We assess the prevalence of diabetes in Dallas County, quantify the association between diabetes and subclinical cardiovascular disease, and assess the use of evidence-based cardiovascular disease risk-modifying therapies. This study uses data from 3392 participants aged 30 to 65 years from the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based, multiethnic sample of residents living in Dallas County, Texas. Three primary outcomes were examined: (1) diabetes prevalence, (2) adjusted odds ratios for detectable coronary calcium stratified by diabetes diagnosis status, and (3) rates of use of evidence-based cardiovascular disease risk-modifying therapies among subjects with diabetes stratified by diabetes diagnosis status. The estimated prevalence of diabetes in Dallas County was 7.8%, with >40% of diabetic patients undiagnosed before participation in the Dallas Heart Study. Both previously diagnosed and previously undiagnosed diabetes were independently associated with the presence of coronary artery calcium (diagnosed: OR 3.55, 95% CI 1.56-8.05) (undiagnosed: OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.39-6.39). The rates of use of aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins were suboptimal, and blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets were rarely met, especially among subjects with previously undiagnosed diabetes. Diabetes is prevalent and is associated with subclinical cardiovascular disease; this association is present even at the time of diagnosis. Despite the cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes, evidence-based risk-modifying therapies continue to be underused, and therapeutic targets remain unmet, especially among people unaware of their diabetes diagnosis.

  4. Know your diabetes risk project: Student pharmacists educating adults about diabetes risk in a community pharmacy setting.

    PubMed

    Letassy, Nancy; Dennis, Vincent; Lyons, Timothy J; Harrison, Don; Burton, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Alice

    To determine the feasibility of educating adults about their risk of prediabetes/diabetes in a community pharmacy, to determine the common risk factors for prediabetes/diabetes in adults visiting a community pharmacy, and to assess any association between risk factors and age. Cross sectional. Oklahoma community pharmacies between April 1 and December 31, 2008. 1,852 patients aged 18 to 80 years. Student pharmacists invited adults to complete a survey to assess their risk for diabetes/prediabetes. Students reviewed participants' risk and educated them on lifestyle changes to lower diabetes risk. Patient risk factors, pharmacy identifier, and pharmacy type (independent, chain, or clinic pharmacy) and location (rural, suburban, or city). Diabetes risk assessment and education of 1,852 adults was performed by 110 student pharmacists in 52 community pharmacies located in 27 cities across 13 (of 77) Oklahoma counties. Obesity/overweight was the most common risk factor (57%), with positive family history, hypertension, elevated cholesterol, member of high-risk ethnic group, and sedentary lifestyle being reported by at least 20% of participants. The number of risk factors increased with age, with a significant increase occurring in participants older than 40 years of age. This project demonstrated that it is feasible to perform diabetes risk assessment and to provide education on lowering that risk through community pharmacies.

  5. Structural role of perceived benefits and barriers to self-care in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohebi, Siamak; Azadbakht, Leila; Feizi, Avat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Kargar, Mehdi

    2013-07-31

    In diseases and disorders such as diabetes, treatment and disease management depends mostly on patient's performance. So, self-care is very important in these patients and they can affect their own welfare, functional capabilities, and disease processes by achieving self-care skills. Nowadays, we know that self care follows individual, psychological and social factors which its recognition can assist health care providing systems to carry out educational programs. This study aimed to investigate the role of perceived benefits and barriers in doing self-care behaviors among diabetic patients. This study is a narrative review and articles with sectional, cohort, and interventional, clinical trial, qualitative and narrative designs were chosen using databases and academic search engines such as PubMed, SCOPUS, ProQuest, Elsevier and key words like self-care diabetes, perceived benefits and barriers. Persian articles were also selected using databases like IRANMEDEX, MEDLIB, as well as searching the articles in sites of domestic scientific magazines. Reviewed articles' findings show the average situation of perceived benefits and barriers in diabetic patients regarding self-care. Qualified blood sugar (glucose) control, weight control, happiness feeling and expenses reduction are the most important perceived benefits. The most significant perceived barriers in self-care consist of lack of family support, shame feeling, forgetfulness and not being able to ignore foods' flavor. Perceived benefits and barriers, as central constructs in some patterns and theories of behavior change, were related to self-care, so that it was directly related to perceived benefits and reversely related to perceived barriers. Therefore, these two constructs can be considered as strategies for promoting self-care behaviors in diabetic patients.

  6. Cultural cognition of the risks and benefits of nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, Dan M.; Braman, Donald; Slovic, Paul; Gastil, John; Cohen, Geoffrey

    2009-02-01

    How is public opinion towards nanotechnology likely to evolve? The `familiarity hypothesis' holds that support for nanotechnology will likely grow as awareness of it expands. The basis of this conjecture is opinion polling, which finds that few members of the public claim to know much about nanotechnology, but that those who say they do are substantially more likely to believe its benefits outweigh its risks. Some researchers, however, have avoided endorsing the familiarity hypothesis, stressing that cognitive heuristics and biases could create anxiety as the public learns more about this novel science. We conducted an experimental study aimed at determining how members of the public would react to balanced information about nanotechnology risks and benefits. Finding no support for the familiarity hypothesis, the study instead yielded strong evidence that public attitudes are likely to be shaped by psychological dynamics associated with cultural cognition.

  7. The combined oral contraceptive pill -- recent developments, risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Monica V

    2014-08-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill as an effective, coitally-independent method of contraception was a public health milestone of the last century. Over time, combined oral contraception (COC) formulations and pill-taking regimens have evolved with improved safety and tolerability while maintaining contraceptive efficacy. In addition to protection against pregnancy, use of combined oral contraception confers a number of significant non-contraceptive benefits to users. COC use is also associated with well-studied risks. Common side effects are generally self-limiting and improve with increasing duration of use while serious adverse events, including venous thromboembolism, are rare among healthy COC users. Contraceptive decision-making should include consideration of both the risks and benefits of a given method versus the real consequences of unintended pregnancy.

  8. Assisted Death: The Risks and Benefits of Tribunal Approval.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Should every request for physician-assisted death require approval from some kind of independent tribunal? The benefits include consistent interpretation of statutory or judge-created guidelines from hospital to hospital, accurate reporting of assisted deaths, a process that protects vulnerable patients and health practitioners, and assurance to the public that the process has sufficient safeguards. On the other hand, such a process might cause delays for persons suffering intolerably. Accessibility might be a problem, and there is the risk that the patient's personal health information becomes fodder for media sensationalism. The author weighs these risks and benefits and concludes that a tribunal approval process is a transparent system capable of helping the law clearly gel in a way that provides guidelines, encourages trust in the healthcare process generally and the assisted death process specifically. I

  9. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Future Cardiovascular Risk: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Burlina, S.; Dalfrà, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus is increasing in parallel with the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity around the world. Current evidence strongly suggests that women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Given the growing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, it is important to identify appropriate reliable markers of cardiovascular disease and specific treatment strategies capable of containing obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome in order to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in the women affected. PMID:27956897

  10. Association between diabetes, diabetes treatment and risk of developing endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Beresford, S; Chen, C; Chlebowski, R; Garcia, L; Kuller, L; Regier, M; Wactawski-Wende, J; Margolis, K L

    2014-09-23

    A growing body of evidence suggests that diabetes is a risk factor for endometrial cancer incidence. However, most of these studies used case-control study designs and did not adjust for obesity, an established risk factor for endometrial cancer. In addition, few epidemiological studies have examined the association between diabetes treatment and endometrial cancer risk. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships among diabetes, diabetes treatment and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). A total of 88 107 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years who were free of cancer and had no hysterectomy at baseline were followed until date of endometrial cancer diagnosis, death, hysterectomy or loss to follow-up, whichever came first. Endometrial cancers were confirmed by central medical record and pathology report review. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence interval (CI)) for diagnosis of diabetes and metformin treatment as risk factors for endometrial cancer. Over a mean of 11 years of follow-up, 1241 endometrial cancers developed. In the primary analysis that focused on prevalent diabetes at enrolment, compared with women without diabetes, women with self-reported diabetes, and the subset of women with treated diabetes, had significantly higher risk of endometrial cancer without adjusting for BMI (HR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.13-1.85 for diabetes, HR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07 for treated diabetes). However after adjusting for BMI, the associations between diabetes, diabetes treatment, diabetes duration and the risk of endometrial cancer became non-significant. Elevated risk was noted when considering combining diabetes diagnosed at baseline and during follow-up as time-dependent exposure (HR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.08-1.59) even after adjusting for BMI. No significant association was observed between metformin use and endometrial cancer

  11. [Risk/benefit counseling in surgical practice: How? Why?].

    PubMed

    Gignon, M; Manaouil, C; Jardé, O

    2007-01-01

    A thorough discussion of the risks and benefits of proposed surgery is a legal obligation stemming from the code of the health service. A multidisciplinary discussion assembling all involved services best serves to balance the risks of a procedure against the hoped for benefit. A written précis should document this discussion in the patient's chart, both as a part of the patient record and also to refer to in case of eventual medico-legal dispute. While a personal oral discussion should take place with the patient, it should be fully documented. A copy of this informed consent can be sent to referring colleagues or to the patient. This document, by summarizing the elements of the risk/benefit discussion is a supplementary means to assure that the information was given and understood. The primary physician can refer back to it in ongoing discussions with his patient to be sure that the patient has full understanding and has opportunity to have his questions answered. This may require a supplementary office visit. If the referring physician cannot answer these questions, he may need to refer back to the surgeon.

  12. Metformin is associated with survival benefit in pancreatic cancer patients with diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping-Ting; Li, Bo; Liu, Fu-Rao; Zhang, Mei-Chao; Wang, Qian; Li, Yan-Yan; Xu, Ci; Liu, Yuan-Hua; Yao, Yuan; Li, Dong

    2017-04-11

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease with a poor prognosis while metformin has been associated with a decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. Although the benefit of metformin was observed for pancreatic cancer prevention, it is not clear whether it can also affect the survival of pancreatic cancer patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of metformin on the survival of pancreatic cancer patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Two independent authors searched PubMed and Web of science up to 08/07/2016. We assessed studies for eligibility, extracted data, and examined their quality, with the primary outcome as overall survival. We used published hazard ratio (HR) available or estimated based on other survival data. We pooled the data and used a random-effect model to combine direct comparisons from included articles. We also investigated treatment effects by different countries, quality and the time of metformin initiation. We found that there was a relative survival benefit associated with metformin treatment compared with non-metformin treatment in both overall survival (OS) ([HR] 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 - 0.96). These associations were also observed in subgroups of Asian countries and high quality articles. Our results support the notion that metformin maybe the best anti-diabetic medicine of choice in patients with pancreatic cancer and concurrent type 2 diabetes mellitus. The perspectives of enhancing survival of pancreatic cancer patients with diabetes mellitus by the use of metformin deserve more attention in future research and clinical practice.

  13. Risky Business: Risk Behaviors in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaser, Sarah S.; Yates, Heather; Dumser, Susan; Whittemore, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to review risk behaviors and their health consequences in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The existing literature on common risk behaviors in adolescents is examined, with a focus on illicit drug use, alcohol use, smoking, unprotected sexual activity, and disordered eating behaviors. Conclusions A review of the literature highlights the lack of studies of risk behaviors in this population. Much of what is known comes from studies with adolescents in the general population or from studies of adults with type 1 diabetes. Known risk and protective factors for risk behaviors and health outcomes are noted. Based on these findings, suggestions are provided for diabetes educators and health care providers to assess for and prevent risk behaviors in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Directions for future research in this population are indicated, including the need to develop and test standardized prevention programs. PMID:22002971

  14. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Native Hawaiians

    PubMed Central

    Aluli, N. Emmett; Jones, Kristina L.; Reyes, Phillip W.; Brady, S. Kalani; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is an increasing health problem among Native Hawaiians. Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death among Native Hawaiians. In this article, the prevalence of diabetes is reported and associations with CVD risk factors are examined. Design and Methods Cross-section of 862 Native Hawaiians, ages 19–88. Physical exam included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, glucose and lipid measures, and personal interview. Results Age-adjusted prevalences of diabetes (25.1% in men vs. 22.6% in women) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (47.8% vs. 39.3%) increased with age and were higher in men. Fasting glucose was higher in diabetic men than women (209 mg/dL vs. 179, p = .0117). BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were higher in diabetic participants (all p < .01), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower (p < .005). Conclusions Diabetes prevalence in Native Hawaiians is high. The high proportion with IFG and the increase in CVD risk factors with diabetes suggest that community-based programs are needed to focus on diabetes and diabetes-related CVD. PMID:19653416

  15. Phytanic acid consumption and human health, risks, benefits and future trends: A review.

    PubMed

    Roca-Saavedra, P; Mariño-Lorenzo, P; Miranda, J M; Porto-Arias, J J; Lamas, A; Vazquez, B I; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A

    2017-04-15

    Phytanic acid is a methyl-branched fatty acid present in the human diet, derived from the enzymatic degradation of phytol and subsequently oxidized by the rumenal microbiota and certain marine organisms. Consequently, phytanic acid is carried into the human body by means of food ingestion, mostly via red meat, dairy products and fatty marine foods. This fatty acid accumulates in people with some peroxisomal disorders and is traditionally related to neurological damage. However, some benefits derived from phytanic acid intake have also been described, such as the prevention of metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. The aim of this work was to conduct an overview of the literature on the phytanic acid content of foods, management of the phytanic content during food production and biochemical mechanisms of phytanic acid metabolism, as well as to assess the evidence for the health benefits and risks of phytanic acid consumption in human health.

  16. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... is more common among American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders. Women who have had diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) or have given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds are also more ...

  17. Diabetes and Risk of Hospitalized Fall Injury Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Rebecca K.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Resnick, Helaine E.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Cauley, Jane A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Cummings, Steven R.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether older adults with diabetes are at increased risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The longitudinal Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study included 3,075 adults aged 70–79 years at baseline. Hospitalizations that included ICD-9-Clinical Modification codes for a fall and an injury were identified. The effect of diabetes with and without insulin use on the rate of first fall-related injury hospitalization was assessed using proportional hazards models. RESULTS At baseline, 719 participants had diabetes, and 117 of them were using insulin. Of the 293 participants who were hospitalized for a fall-related injury, 71 had diabetes, and 16 were using insulin. Diabetes was associated with a higher rate of injurious fall requiring hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 1.48 [95% CI 1.12–1.95]) in models adjusted for age, race, sex, BMI, and education. In those participants using insulin, compared with participants without diabetes, the HR was 3.00 (1.78–5.07). Additional adjustment for potential intermediaries, such as fainting in the past year, standing balance score, cystatin C level, and number of prescription medications, accounted for some of the increased risk associated with diabetes (1.41 [1.05–1.88]) and insulin-treated diabetes (2.24 [1.24–4.03]). Among participants with diabetes, a history of falling, poor standing balance score, and A1C level ≥8% were risk factors for an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS Older adults with diabetes, in particular those using insulin, are at greater risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, poor glycemic control may increase the risk of an injurious fall. PMID:24130352

  18. Preliminary risk benefit assessment for nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Denning, R. S.; Friedlander, A. L.; Priest, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the recent work of the authors on the evaluation of health risk benefits of space disposal of nuclear waste. The paper describes a risk model approach that has been developed to estimate the non-recoverable, cumulative, expected radionuclide release to the earth's biosphere for different options of nuclear waste disposal in space. Risk estimates for the disposal of nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository and the short- and long-term risk estimates for space disposal were developed. The results showed that the preliminary estimates of space disposal risks are low, even with the estimated uncertainty bounds. If calculated release risks for mined geologic repositories remain as low as given by the U.S. DOE, and U.S. EPA requirements continue to be met, then no additional space disposal study effort in the U.S. is warranted at this time. If risks perceived by the public are significant in the acceptance of mined geologic repositories, then consideration of space disposal as a complement to the mined geologic repository is warranted.

  19. Preliminary risk benefit assessment for nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Denning, R. S.; Friedlander, A. L.; Priest, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the recent work of the authors on the evaluation of health risk benefits of space disposal of nuclear waste. The paper describes a risk model approach that has been developed to estimate the non-recoverable, cumulative, expected radionuclide release to the earth's biosphere for different options of nuclear waste disposal in space. Risk estimates for the disposal of nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository and the short- and long-term risk estimates for space disposal were developed. The results showed that the preliminary estimates of space disposal risks are low, even with the estimated uncertainty bounds. If calculated release risks for mined geologic repositories remain as low as given by the U.S. DOE, and U.S. EPA requirements continue to be met, then no additional space disposal study effort in the U.S. is warranted at this time. If risks perceived by the public are significant in the acceptance of mined geologic repositories, then consideration of space disposal as a complement to the mined geologic repository is warranted.

  20. Levothyroxine treatment of mild subclinical hypothyroidism: a review of potential risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Zeeshan; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4). SCH is further classified into a milder condition with TSH levels between 4.0 and 10.0 milli-international units (mIU)/l (mild-SCH) and a severe form with TSH >10.0 mIU/l (severe-SCH). SCH is a common problem (prevalence is greater in women than men), which increases further with increasing age and TSH levels. Even though the risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism is higher in patients with severe-SCH, the risk is also significant in patients having mild-SCH; it has been suggested that every twofold rise in serum TSH would increase the risk from 1 to 4%, which further increases to 38% if thyroid antibodies are positive. Current data have shown increased cardiovascular risk in patients with mild-SCH and have demonstrated some benefits of levothyroxine treatment in reducing these events. However, evidence on the association of mild-SCH and musculoskeletal system, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and goitre is conflicting. Similarly, the discussion regarding the exact upper limit of normal for serum TSH remains controversial. The data have also shown increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in patient with mild-SCH, with some benefits of thyroxine treatment. The recent available guidelines related to management of patients with serum TSH <10 mIU/l have suggested decisions should be made taking into account the age of the patient, associated risk factors and comorbid conditions. This chronicle review assesses current evidence regarding the risks associated and the recommendations related to benefits of levothyroxine treatment in patients having mild-SCH. PMID:26885359

  1. SMA statement the benefits and risks of exercise during pregnancy. Sport Medicine Australia.

    PubMed

    2002-03-01

    There are numerous benefits to pregnant women of remaining active during pregnancy. These include improved weight control and maintenance of fitness. There may also be benefits in terms of reduced risk of development of gestational diabetes meilitus and improved psychological functioning. Moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to be safe in pregnancy, with a number of studies now indicating that for trained athletes it may be possible to exercise at a higher level than is currently recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Studies of resistance training, incorporating moderate weights and avoiding maximal isometnc contractions, have shown no adverse outcomes. There may be benefits of increased strength and flexibility. The risk of neural tube defects due to exercise-induced hyperthermia that is suggested by animal studies is less likely in women, because of more effective mechanisms of heat dissipation in humans. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that participation in moderate intensity exercise throughout pregnancy may enhance birth weight, while more severe or frequent exercise, maintained for longer into the pregnancy: may result in lighter babies. There have been no reports of foetal injury or death in relation to trauma or contact during sporting activities. Despite this, a risk of severe blunt trauma is present in some sporting situations as pregnancy progresses. Exercise and lactation are compatible in the post-partum period, providing adequate calories are consumed. Considerations of pelvic floor function and type of delivery are relevant in planning a return to certain types of exercise at this time.

  2. Physical activity benefits and risks on the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald

    2011-12-01

    This review evaluates the current understanding of the benefits and risks of physical activity and exercise on the gastrointestinal system. A significant portion of endurance athletes are affected by gastrointestinal symptoms, but most symptoms are transient and do not have long-term consequences. Conversely, physical activity may have a protective effect on the gastrointestinal system. There is convincing evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer. The evidence is less convincing for gastric and pancreatic cancers, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cholelithiasis, diverticular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and constipation. Physical activity may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and inflammatory bowel disease, although this has not been proven unequivocally. This article provides a critical review of the evidence-based literature concerning exercise and physical activity effects on the gastrointestinal system and provides physicians with a better understanding of the evidence behind exercise prescriptions for patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Well-designed prospective randomized trials evaluating the risks and benefits of exercise and physical activity on gastrointestinal disorders are recommended for future research.

  3. [Risk perception and communication: from diabetes to cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gianinazzi, F; Bodenmann, P; Izzo, F; Voeffray Favre, A C; Rossi, I; Ruiz, J

    2010-06-09

    Evidence-based medicine has enabled to approach disease in a more rational and scientific way. Clinical research has identified behaviours and risk factors that could cause disease often "silent" at the beginning, such as diabetes. Despite the clear impact of these evidences on public health, it seems that the individual risk perception level remains weak. To mention as well, the health professionals very often have a different views, which makes it difficult to communicate the risk with patients. In this article we describe the principles of risk perception, the diabetes related risk perception concerning cardiovascular complications, and suggest some practical strategies and tools which could improve risk communication in the everyday practice.

  4. Sedentary behavior, gestational diabetes mellitus, and type 2 diabetes risk: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven T; Lynch, Brigid; Vallance, Jeff; Davenport, Margie H; Gardiner, Paul A; Butalia, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A substantial number of pregnancies are complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and up to 70 % of women with GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Given the extensive body of research suggesting physical activity reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, facilitating physical activity, and reducing sedentary time may be effective approaches to promote the health of women with a previous GDM diagnosis. Here, we discuss physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior, in the context of GDM and the potential for type 2 diabetes risk reduction.

  5. Putting the diabetes risk due to statins in perspective: a re-evaluation using the complementary outcome.

    PubMed

    Furuya-Kanamori, L; Stone, J C; Doi, S A R

    2014-07-01

    Statins are used extensively to treat dyslipidemia and have been associated with significant clinical benefit that increases with dose. However, recent studies have associated statins with an excess risk of developing diabetes mellitus, which may offset the clinical benefit to patients. Adverse events related to intensive-dose statin therapy were revisited in light of recent data regarding the use of relative risks. A meta-analysis was replicated with the event of interest redefined as the complementary outcome (no-onset of diabetes). Five randomised controlled trials that compared the risk of intense-dose with moderate-dose of statin therapy for the onset of diabetes with a follow-up greater than 12 months were included in the analysis. A reduction in the risk for no-onset of diabetes was found when intensive-dose statin therapy was compared with moderate-dose statin therapy, revealing a relative risk of 0.9908 (95%CI: 0.9849-0.99679). Over two years, one more patient was harmed by diabetes onset for every 237 patients exposed to intensive-dose statin therapy (95%CI: 123-3847) compared with standard dose statin therapy. Statins are associated with only a very small increase in risk of diabetes mellitus. Previous research selected the outcomes with the lower baseline risks and therefore the actual risk associated with statins has been largely over-estimated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolite Profiles and the Risk of Developing Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Thomas J.; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P.; McCabe, Elizabeth; Lewis, Gregory D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Jacques, Paul F.; Fernandez, Céline; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Carr, Stephen A.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Florez, Jose C.; Souza, Amanda; Melander, Olle; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies allow the high-throughput profiling of metabolic status from a blood specimen (metabolomics). We investigated whether metabolite profiles could predict the development of diabetes. Among 2,422 normoglycemic individuals followed for 12 years, 201 developed diabetes. Amino acids, amines, and other polar metabolites were profiled in baseline specimens using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cases and controls were matched for age, body mass index and fasting glucose. Five branched-chain and aromatic amino acids had highly-significant associations with future diabetes: isoleucine, leucine, valine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. A combination of three amino acids predicted future diabetes (>5-fold higher risk for individuals in top quartile). The results were replicated in an independent, prospective cohort. These findings underscore the potential importance of amino acid metabolism early in the pathogenesis of diabetes, and suggest that amino acid profiles could aid in diabetes risk assessment. PMID:21423183

  7. A Risk Assessment Model for Type 2 Diabetes in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Senlin; Han, Longfei; Zeng, Ping; Chen, Feng; Pan, Limin; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Tiemei

    2014-01-01

    Aims To develop a risk assessment model for persons at risk from type 2 diabetes in Chinese. Materials and Methods The model was generated from the cross-sectional data of 16246 persons aged from 20 years old and over. C4.5 algorithm and multivariate logistic regression were used for variable selection. Relative risk value combined with expert decision constructed a comprehensive risk assessment for evaluating the individual risk category. The validity of the model was tested by cross validation and a survey performed six years later with some participants. Results Nine variables were selected as risk variables. A mathematical model was established to calculate the average probability of diabetes in each cluster's group divided by sex and age. A series of criteria combined with relative RR value (2.2) and level of risk variables stratified individuals into four risk groups (non, low, medium and high risk). The overall accuracy reached 90.99% evaluated by cross-validation inside the model population. The incidence of diabetes for each risk group increased from 1.5 (non-risk group) to 28.2(high-risk group) per one thousand persons per year with six years follow-up. Discussion The model could determine the individual risk for type 2 diabetes by four risk degrees. This model could be used as a technique tool not only to support screening persons at different risk, but also to evaluate the result of the intervention. PMID:25101994

  8. The 24-month metabolic benefits of the healthy living partnerships to prevent diabetes: A community-based translational study.

    PubMed

    Pedley, Carolyn F; Case, L Douglas; Blackwell, Caroline S; Katula, Jeffrey A; Vitolins, Mara Z

    2017-09-23

    Large-scale clinical trials and translational studies have demonstrated that weight loss achieved through diet and physical activity reduced the development of diabetes in overweight individuals with prediabetes. These interventions also reduced the occurrence of metabolic syndrome and risk factors linked to other chronic conditions including obesity-driven cancers and cardiovascular disease. The Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) was a clinical trial in which participants were randomized to receive a community-based lifestyle intervention translated from the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) or an enhanced usual care condition. The objective of this study is to compare the 12 and 24 month prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the two treatment arms of HELP PD. The intervention involved a group-based, behavioral weight-loss program led by community health workers monitored by personnel from a local diabetes education program. The enhanced usual care condition included dietary counseling and written materials. HELP PD included 301 overweight or obese participants (BMI 25-39.9kg/m(2)) with elevated fasting glucose levels (95-125mg/dl). At 12 and 24 months of follow-up there were significant improvements in individual components of the metabolic syndrome: fasting blood glucose, waist circumference, HDL, triglycerides and blood pressure and the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in the intervention group compared to the usual care group. This study demonstrates that a community diabetes prevention program in participants with prediabetes results in metabolic benefits and a reduction in the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in the intervention group compared to the enhanced usual care group. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Putting the benefits and risks of aerobic exercise in perspective.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Barry A; Billecke, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Although considerable epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that structured exercise, increased lifestyle activity, or both are cardioprotective, the absolute and relative risk of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal complications appear to increase transiently during vigorous physical activity. The estimated relative risk of exercise-related cardiac events ranges from 2.1 to 56 and is highest among habitually sedentary individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease who were performing unaccustomed vigorous physical exertion. Moreover, an estimated 7 million Americans receive medical attention for sports and recreation-related injuries each year. These risks, and their modulators, should be considered when endorsing strenuous leisure time or exercise interventions. If the current mantra "exercise is medicine" is embraced, underdosing and overdosing are possible. Thus, exercise may have a typical dose-response curve with a plateau in benefit or even adverse effects, in some individuals, at more extreme levels.

  10. The Comparison of Matching Methods Using Different Measures of Balance: Benefits and Risks Exemplified within a Study to Evaluate the Effects of German Disease Management Programs on Long-Term Outcomes of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Birgit; Pöhlmann, Boris; Krohn, Robert; Adams, John L; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Erler, Antje

    2016-10-01

    To present a case study on how to compare various matching methods applying different measures of balance and to point out some pitfalls involved in relying on such measures. Administrative claims data from a German statutory health insurance fund covering the years 2004-2008. We applied three different covariance balance diagnostics to a choice of 12 different matching methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of the German disease management program for type 2 diabetes (DMPDM2). We further compared the effect estimates resulting from applying these different matching techniques in the evaluation of the DMPDM2. The choice of balance measure leads to different results on the performance of the applied matching methods. Exact matching methods performed well across all measures of balance, but resulted in the exclusion of many observations, leading to a change of the baseline characteristics of the study sample and also the effect estimate of the DMPDM2. All PS-based methods showed similar effect estimates. Applying a higher matching ratio and using a larger variable set generally resulted in better balance. Using a generalized boosted instead of a logistic regression model showed slightly better performance for balance diagnostics taking into account imbalances at higher moments. Best practice should include the application of several matching methods and thorough balance diagnostics. Applying matching techniques can provide a useful preprocessing step to reveal areas of the data that lack common support. The use of different balance diagnostics can be helpful for the interpretation of different effect estimates found with different matching methods. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Combined hormonal contraceptives: prescribing patterns, compliance, and benefits versus risks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives [combined oral contraceptives (COCs)] have been available for over 50 years and the impact of this invention may not be overestimated. Today over 100 million women are current users and in Western Europe and the United States approximately 80% of women of fertile ages can be considered as ever-users. Over the years several drawbacks have been identified and media alarms on risks are frequently presented, resulting in suboptimal compliance and low compliance and continuation rates. Poor compliance and discontinuation is a big problem and is not generally identified by prescribers. During ideal use COCs offer very good protection against unwanted pregnancies, however there is a big problem with compliance and continuation and thus the ‘real-life’ efficacy is much lower. Reasons for poor compliance include side effects and fear of side effects and it is crucial that the prescriber gives the individual woman thorough and balanced information on the benefits and risks. Most well known is the increased risk of venous thromboembolism, but also an elevated risk of arterial thrombosis and several types of cancer has been reported. The risk estimates are low but according to the large number of users a substantial number of extra cases will occur. However, use of COCs also offers several additional health benefits with significant impact on morbidity and quality of life. COC use is associated with a substantial decrease in the risk of ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer and colorectal cancer. Moreover, COCs are a major option of treatment for women suffering from heavy menstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhea as well as hirsutism and acne vulgaris. The net effect of the additional health effects of COC- use may very well be positive, i.e. a slight increase in life expectancy. PMID:25360241

  12. Genetically Driven Hyperglycemia Increases Risk of Coronary Artery Disease Separately From Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Merino, Jordi; Leong, Aaron; Posner, Daniel C; Porneala, Bianca; Masana, Lluís; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C

    2017-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that genetically raised hyperglycemia increases coronary artery disease (CAD) risk separately from the risk conferred by type 2 diabetes as a whole. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis using summary-level statistics from the largest published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) (n = 133,010 participants free of diabetes) and CAD (n = 63,746 case subjects and 130,681 control subjects) of predominantly European ancestry. FG-increasing variants associated with type 2 diabetes from the largest GWAS for type 2 diabetes were excluded. Variants with pleiotropic effects on other CAD risk factors (blood lipids, blood pressure, and obesity) were excluded using summary-level data from the largest published GWAS. Data from the Framingham Heart Study were used to validate the MR instrument and to build an FG genetic risk score (GRS). In an instrumental variable analysis comprising 12 FG-raising variants, a 1 mmol/L increase in FG revealed an effect-size estimate of 1.43 CAD odds (95% CI 1.14-1.79). The association was preserved after excluding variants for heterogeneity and pleiotropic effects on other CAD risk factors (odds ratio [OR] 1.33 [95% CI 1.02-1.73]). The 12 FG-increasing variants did not significantly increase type 2 diabetes risk (OR 1.05 [95% CI 0.91-1.23]), and its prevalence was constant across FG GRS quintiles (P = 0.72). Our data support that genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia raises the odds of CAD separately from type 2 diabetes and other CAD risk factors. These findings suggest that modulating glycemia may provide cardiovascular benefit. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Risk factors for retinopathy in diabetes mellitus in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shriwas, S R; Rahman Isa, A B; Reddy, S C; Mohammad, M; Mohammad, W B; Mazlan, M

    1996-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to determine the risk factors for diabetic retinopathy which is a major cause of visual impairment and blindness. One hundred and forty patients of diabetes mellitus were studied to determine the prevalence and types of retinopathy, and its relation to various risk factors. Nearly half (48.6%) of the patients suffered from retinopathy. The significant associated risk factors were long duration of diabetes, proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine level. However, there was no significant association between the prevalence of retinopathy and high levels of serum cholesterol, C-peptide levels, associated hypertension, and glycaemic control of diabetes mellitus. An effective screening programme for detection of retinopathy in the patients of diabetes as a regular practice is encouraged.

  14. Economic benefits of treating high-risk hypertension with angiotensin II receptor antagonists (blockers).

    PubMed

    Coca, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the leading risk factors for cardiovascular disease and represents a major health and economic burden. Most patients with high- or very high-risk hypertension have multiple cardiovascular risk factors with or without accompanying subclinical organ damage or established cardiovascular or renal disease. Patients with severe hypertension or with moderate hypertension and one to two additional risk factors have absolute 10-year risks of cardiovascular disease of 21-30% and 15-20%, respectively. Current European treatment guidelines recommend that antihypertensive therapy be initiated rapidly and aggressively in patients with high-risk hypertension. Most patients require two or more antihypertensive agents to achieve the strict blood pressure target of <130/80 mmHg. This article reviews the existing cost-effectiveness data on the use of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (blockers) [ARBs] in patients with high-risk hypertension. Aggressive ARB treatment of patients in the early (microalbuminuric) stages of diabetic nephropathy has a significant renoprotective effect, delaying the onset of overt (proteinuric) nephropathy. By slowing the progression of these patients to end-stage renal disease, substantial cost savings can be made. There is a paucity of cost-effectiveness data regarding the use of fixed-dose ARB plus thiazide diuretic combination therapies. Longitudinal cost-benefit studies of this attractive and efficacious first-line treatment option are needed.

  15. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Accessory child safety harnesses: do the risks outweigh the benefits?

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie; Wainohu, Derek; Aquilina, Peter; Suratno, Basuki; Kelly, Paul; Bilston, Lynne E

    2010-01-01

    Accessory child safety harnesses are available in some countries as alternative restraints for young children or as an accessory restraint used with booster seats. Their use, in Australia at least, is becoming more common. There have been concerns that the risk of misuse of these restraints outweighs any potential benefit this system might have over a retractable lap-shoulder belt system used with a booster seat. However to date there is no evidence to confirm or deny this. This study used laboratory simulated frontal crash tests to examine the performance of accessory child safety harness systems compared to the lap-shoulder belt when used alone and when used with two common designs of Australian booster seat. The performance of the child safety harness system when misused was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the correctly used child safety harness system performed no better than the lap-shoulder system, and in fact allows for a greater risk of submarining. Furthermore, one common form of child safety harness misuse, where the harness is over-tightened causing the lap belt to be positioned high over the abdomen, allowed extremely undesirable dummy motion. This involved gross submarining and direct contact between the harness system and the dummy's neck. These findings suggest that the risks associated with accessory child safety harness systems most likely outweigh any potential benefits, in frontal impacts at least.

  17. The social benefits of private infectious disease-risk mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Perrings, Charles; Kinzig, Ann; Levin, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Does society benefit from private measures to mitigate infectious disease risks? Since mitigation reduces both peak prevalence and the number of people who fall ill, the answer might appear to be yes. But mitigation also prolongs epidemics and therefore the time susceptible people engage in activities to avoid infection. These avoidance activities come at a cost—in lost production or consumption, for example. Whether private mitigation yields net social benefits depends on the social weight given to the costs of illness and illness avoidance, now and into the future. We show that, for a large class of infectious diseases, private risk mitigation is socially beneficial. However, in cases where society discounts the future at either very low or very high rates relative to private individuals, or where it places a low weight on the private cost of illness, the social cost of illness under proportionate mixing (doing nothing) may be lower than the social cost of illness under preferential mixing (avoiding infectious individuals). That is, under some circumstances, society would prefer shorter, more intense epidemics without avoidance costs over longer, less intense epidemics with avoidance costs. A sobering (although not surprising) implication of this is that poorer societies should be expected to promote less private disease-risk mitigation than richer societies. PMID:26858777

  18. The social benefits of private infectious disease-risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Morin, Benjamin R; Perrings, Charles; Kinzig, Ann; Levin, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Does society benefit from private measures to mitigate infectious disease risks? Since mitigation reduces both peak prevalence and the number of people who fall ill, the answer might appear to be yes. But mitigation also prolongs epidemics and therefore the time susceptible people engage in activities to avoid infection. These avoidance activities come at a cost-in lost production or consumption, for example. Whether private mitigation yields net social benefits depends on the social weight given to the costs of illness and illness avoidance, now and into the future. We show that, for a large class of infectious diseases, private risk mitigation is socially beneficial. However, in cases where society discounts the future at either very low or very high rates relative to private individuals, or where it places a low weight on the private cost of illness, the social cost of illness under proportionate mixing (doing nothing) may be lower than the social cost of illness under preferential mixing (avoiding infectious individuals). That is, under some circumstances, society would prefer shorter, more intense epidemics without avoidance costs over longer, less intense epidemics with avoidance costs. A sobering (although not surprising) implication of this is that poorer societies should be expected to promote less private disease-risk mitigation than richer societies.

  19. Benefits and risks of shared services in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kennewell, Suzanne; Baker, Laura

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of staff in a large, public health service involved in transitioning support services to a shared services model. It aims to understand their perceptions of the benefits and risks arising from this change. Design/methodology/approach - Thematic analysis of qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with both service provider and customer agency staff was used to identify, analyze and report patterns of benefits and risks within data. Findings - Staff expressed the need for relevant subject-matter-experts to work within customer agencies to facilitate effective communication between the customer agency and shared services provider, reflecting observations found in out-sourcing literature. Research limitations/implications - Results point to significant challenges continuing to occur for shared services in healthcare. Risks identified suggest a more intimate relationship between clinical and support services than previously discussed. Originality/value - Previous discussion of the shared services model has not considered the skills, knowledge and ability required by staff in the customer agency. This research indicates that in the absence of such consideration, the concepts of the shared services model are weakened.

  20. Gist and verbatim communication concerning medication risks/benefits.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Susan J; DeVellis, Robert F; Chewning, Betty; Sleath, Betsy L; Reyna, Valerie F

    2016-06-01

    To describe the information about medication risks/benefits that rheumatologists provide during patient office visits, the gist that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) extract from the information provided, and the relationship between communication and medication satisfaction. Data from 169 RA patients were analyzed. Each participant had up to three visits audiotaped. Four RA patients coded the audiotapes using a Gist Coding Scheme and research assistants coded the audiotapes using a Verbatim Coding Scheme. When extracting gist from the information discussed during visits, patient coders distinguished between discussion concerning the possibility of medication side effects versus expression of significant safety concerns. Among patients in the best health, nearly 80% reported being totally satisfied with their medications when the physician communicated the gist that the medication was effective, compared to approximately 50% when this gist was not communicated. Study findings underscore the multidimensional nature of medication risk communication and the importance of communication concerning medication effectiveness/need. Health care providers should ensure that patients understand that medication self-management practices can minimize potential risks. Communicating simple gist messages may increase patient satisfaction, especially messages about benefits for well-managed patients. Optimal communication also requires shared understanding of desired therapeutic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetes and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samy L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Luna, Maria; Werner, Sherry A

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives: There is evidence that the incidence of solid tumors is markedly increased in patients with diabetes mellitus. In the current study, we investigate the association between diabetes and renal cancer. Patients and Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis of 473 patients who underwent nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was performed. Diabetic RCC patients were screened for age, gender, ethnicity, HgA1C, glucose levels and renal function. Results: Of the 473 cases with RCC, we identified 120 patients (25.4%) with a history of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes in RCC patients was higher in female than male subjects and in Hispanic compared to White and Other ethnic backgrounds. At diagnosis, the majority of diabetic RCC patients were 50-59 years of age. In diabetic RCC cases, clear cell type histology (92.0%), nuclear grade 2 (56.1%) and tumor size range from 1-5 cm (65.7%) were the most common in each category. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that diabetic RCC patients have a predominance of localized, small clear cell RCC. In addition, females with a history of RCC have a higher frequency of diabetes compared to males. This is the first report of clinical and histopathological features of RCC associated with diabetes. PMID:22232697

  2. Presence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma in Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Brian J; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a growing international public health issue with a near quadrupling in its worldwide prevalence since 1980. Though it has many known microvascular complications, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating for affected individuals. In addition, there is increasing evidence to suggest that diabetic patients have a greater risk for glaucoma as well. Though the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not completely understood, both diabetes and glaucoma appear to share some common risk factors and pathophysiologic similarities with studies also reporting that the presence of diabetes and elevated fasting glucose levels are associated with elevated intraocular pressure-the primary risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While no study has completely addressed the possibility of detection bias, most recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetic populations are likely enriched with glaucoma patients. As the association between diabetes and glaucoma becomes better defined, routine evaluation for glaucoma in diabetic patients, particularly in the telemedicine setting, may become a reasonable consideration to reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients.

  3. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  4. Presence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Brian J.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a growing international public health issue with a near quadrupling in its worldwide prevalence since 1980. Though it has many known microvascular complications, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating for affected individuals. In addition, there is increasing evidence to suggest that diabetic patients have a greater risk for glaucoma as well. Though the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not completely understood, both diabetes and glaucoma appear to share some common risk factors and pathophysiologic similarities with studies also reporting that the presence of diabetes and elevated fasting glucose levels are associated with elevated intraocular pressure – the primary risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While no study has completely addressed the possibility of detection bias, most recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetic populations are likely enriched with glaucoma patients. As the association between diabetes and glaucoma becomes better-defined, routine evaluation for glaucoma in diabetic patients, particularly in the telemedicine setting, may become a reasonable consideration to reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients. PMID:27766584

  5. Risk assessment in diabetes management: how do general practitioners estimate risks due to diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Häussler, Bertram; Fischer, Gisela C; Meyer, Sibylle; Sturm, Diethard

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the ability of general practitioners (GPs) in Germany to estimate the risk of patients with diabetes developing complications. Methods An interview study using a structured questionnaire to estimate risks of four case vignettes having diabetes‐specific complications within the next 10 years, risk reduction and life expectancy potential. A representative random sample of 584 GPs has been drawn, of which 150 could be interviewed. We compared GPs' estimates among each other (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cohen's (multirater‐) κ) and with risks for long‐term complications generated by the multifactor disease model “Mellibase”, which is a knowledge‐based support system for medical decision management. Results The risk estimates by GPs varied widely (ICC 0.21 95% CI (0.13 to 0.36)). The average level of potential risk reduction was between 47% and 70%. Compared with Mellibase values, on average, the GPs overestimated the risk threefold. Mean estimates of potential prolongation of life expectancy were close to 10 years for each patient, whereas the Mellibase calculations ranged from 3 to 10 years. Conclusions Overestimation could lead to unnecessary care and waste of resources. PMID:17545348

  6. 7 CFR 2.71 - Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit... Chief Economist § 2.71 Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis. (a) Delegations..., Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis: (1) Responsible for assessing the risks to...

  7. 7 CFR 2.71 - Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit... Chief Economist § 2.71 Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis. (a) Delegations..., Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis: (1) Responsible for assessing the risks to...

  8. 7 CFR 2.71 - Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit... Chief Economist § 2.71 Director, Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis. (a) Delegations..., Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis: (1) Responsible for assessing the risks to...

  9. The impact of diabetes and associated cardiometabolic risk factors on members: strategies for optimizing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Ahmann, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    In the past decade, the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome has increased exponentially. Estimated national spending on direct costs related to these conditions exceeds $90 billion for overweight and obesity, $90 billion for diabetes, and $250 billion for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Spending on prescription drugs that are used to modify cardiometabolic risk (CMR) is both a major component of all spending on prescription drugs and a leading cause of the increase in such spending. Also, spending on antihyperglycemic agents is projected to become the largest single component of all spending on prescription drugs in the near future. As the use of antihyperglycemic agents continues to increase, there is a growing need to evaluate the relative and comparative cost-effectiveness of these products. As new antihyperglycemic agents appear, physicians and health plans may begin differentiating products in this category not only on the basis of their use in achieving glycemic control, but also in the context of their effect on global CMR factor modification. To describe the effect of overall CMR on clinical outcomes and costs in patients with diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a clustering of risk factors that identify those at increased risk of CVD and diabetes. Although the exact definition and clinical use of the term "metabolic syndrome" are debated, the clinical community is united in identifying its individual risk factors as important contributors to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Two of the most important points of consensus are that diabetes significantly increases the risk of CVD and that the CVD risk associated with metabolic syndrome is greater than the sum of its measured risk factors. Therefore, it is increasingly recognized that the risk of CVD is greater in patients with diabetes and other CMR factors than in those with diabetes alone. Diabetes treatment goals extend beyond glycemic control to include other risk factor

  10. Do the Health Benefits of Cycling Outweigh the Risks?

    PubMed Central

    de Hartog, Jeroen Johan; Boogaard, Hanna; Nijland, Hans; Hoek, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Background Although from a societal point of view a modal shift from car to bicycle may have beneficial health effects due to decreased air pollution emissions, decreased greenhouse gas emissions, and increased levels of physical activity, shifts in individual adverse health effects such as higher exposure to air pollution and risk of a traffic accident may prevail. Objective We describe whether the health benefits from the increased physical activity of a modal shift for urban commutes outweigh the health risks. Data sources and extraction We have summarized the literature for air pollution, traffic accidents, and physical activity using systematic reviews supplemented with recent key studies. Data synthesis We quantified the impact on all-cause mortality when 500,000 people would make a transition from car to bicycle for short trips on a daily basis in the Netherlands. We have expressed mortality impacts in life-years gained or lost, using life table calculations. For individuals who shift from car to bicycle, we estimated that beneficial effects of increased physical activity are substantially larger (3–14 months gained) than the potential mortality effect of increased inhaled air pollution doses (0.8–40 days lost) and the increase in traffic accidents (5–9 days lost). Societal benefits are even larger because of a modest reduction in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions and traffic accidents. Conclusions On average, the estimated health benefits of cycling were substantially larger than the risks relative to car driving for individuals shifting their mode of transport. PMID:20587380

  11. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Kowalski, Jonathan W; Bek, Toke; Chen, Shih-Jen; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Fletcher, Astrid; Grauslund, Jakob; Haffner, Steven; Hamman, Richard F; Ikram, M Kamran; Kayama, Takamasa; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Krishnaiah, Sannapaneni; Mayurasakorn, Korapat; O'Hare, Joseph P; Orchard, Trevor J; Porta, Massimo; Rema, Mohan; Roy, Monique S; Sharma, Tarun; Shaw, Jonathan; Taylor, Hugh; Tielsch, James M; Varma, Rohit; Wang, Jie Jin; Wang, Ningli; West, Sheila; Xu, Liang; Yasuda, Miho; Zhang, Xinzhi; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-03-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes. A pooled analysis using individual participant data from population-based studies around the world was performed. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify all population-based studies in general populations or individuals with diabetes who had ascertained DR from retinal photographs. Studies provided data for DR end points, including any DR, proliferative DR, diabetic macular edema, and VTDR, and also major systemic risk factors. Pooled prevalence estimates were directly age-standardized to the 2010 World Diabetes Population aged 20-79 years. A total of 35 studies (1980-2008) provided data from 22,896 individuals with diabetes. The overall prevalence was 34.6% (95% CI 34.5-34.8) for any DR, 6.96% (6.87-7.04) for proliferative DR, 6.81% (6.74-6.89) for diabetic macular edema, and 10.2% (10.1-10.3) for VTDR. All DR prevalence end points increased with diabetes duration, hemoglobin A(1c), and blood pressure levels and were higher in people with type 1 compared with type 2 diabetes. There are approximately 93 million people with DR, 17 million with proliferative DR, 21 million with diabetic macular edema, and 28 million with VTDR worldwide. Longer diabetes duration and poorer glycemic and blood pressure control are strongly associated with DR. These data highlight the substantial worldwide public health burden of DR and the importance of modifiable risk factors in its occurrence. This study is limited by data pooled from studies at different time points, with different methodologies and population characteristics.

  12. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, I; Cadier, E; Beulens, J W J; van der A, D L; Spijkerman, A M W; van der Schouw, Y T

    2015-04-01

    Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes associate with reduced type 2 diabetes risk. Data from 37,846 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition- Netherlands study were analyzed. Dietary intakes of β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein & zeaxanthin and the sum of these carotenoids were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Incident type 2 diabetes was mainly self-reported, and verified against general practitioner information. Mean ±SD total carotenoid intake was 10 ± 4 mg/day. During a mean ±SD follow-up of 10 ± 2 years, 915 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained. After adjustment for age, sex, diabetes risk factors, dietary intake, waist circumference and BMI, higher β-carotene intakes associated inversely with diabetes risk [Hazard Ratio quartile 4 versus quartile 1 (HR(Q4)): 0.78 (95%CI:0.64,0.95), P-linear trend 0.01]. For α-carotene, a borderline significant reduced risk was observed, with a HR(Q4) of 0.85 (95%CI:0.70,1.03), and P-linear trend 0.05. β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein & zeaxanthin, and the sum of all carotenoids did not associate with diabetes risk. This study shows that diets high in β-carotene and α-carotene are associated with reduced type 2 diabetes in generally healthy men and women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coronary risk prediction for those with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    2006-02-01

    Coronary risk prediction 'engines' are now in common use, and their worth is well proven. There remains the question of how to deal with a prior diagnosis of diabetes. An individual participant meta-analysis of 33 cohort studies involving 364 566 subjects. Fatal coronary hazard ratios for age, smoking, systolic blood pressure and cholesterol, were computed from Cox models, comparing those with and without diabetes. Three risk prediction equations were compared: a 'stepped model', which included the risk factors and diabetes status; an 'interaction model', which included interactions between diabetes and the risk factors; and a 'fixed model', which fixed the 10-year rate of coronary death amongst those with diabetes to be 7%. These were compared through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics. The hazard ratio for age was greater for those without diabetes than those with, for men (P=0.005) and women (P=0.02); for men only, systolic blood pressure showed a similar differential (P=0.011). Nevertheless, AUCs were only 0.001 different for the stepped and interaction models for each sex. The AUC for the fixed model was lower and, unlike the other two, showed significant lack of fit for both sexes (P<0.001). There is no justification for developing separate risk prediction models for those with and without diabetes, nor for assuming that everyone with diabetes should be considered as being at a common high level of risk. Diabetes status might, instead, be used as a risk variable in an overall population equation.

  14. Operational Benefits and Risk Reduction of Marine Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, L. H. J.; Glansdorp, C. C.

    1998-09-01

    Safety is a crucial issue in densely sailed waterways. Traffic guidance systems (VTS) have proven to be valuable in this respect. The effectiveness of current systems and the benefits for improvements in navigation are addressed in this paper. Relevant incidents are analysed with a risk assessment tool (Accident Sequence Precursor method) developed for complex system analyses. The method is capable of drawing conclusions on a high level: strategic and tactic events and the human errors associated with the navigator's task cycle. Changes in current VTS systems will not likely improve safety records in dense areas. Improvements might best be achieved by reducing or eliminating the human factor in incident sequences.

  15. Benefits of flu vaccination for persons with diabetes mellitus: A review.

    PubMed

    Goeijenbier, M; van Sloten, T T; Slobbe, L; Mathieu, C; van Genderen, P; Beyer, Walter E P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2017-09-12

    Diabetes mellitus imposes a significant and increasing burden on society, with major consequences for human health, welfare and the economy worldwide. Persons with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing severe complications after influenza virus infection and guidelines advise vaccination. The present evidence for influenza vaccine effectiveness in persons with diabetes mellitus is mainly based on observational studies with clinical endpoints like hospitalization and death, indicating a beneficial reduction of morbidity and mortality. Further supportive evidence comes from serological studies, in which persons with diabetes mellitus usually develop similar antibody levels after vaccination as healthy people. Observational studies may be prone to selection bias, and serological studies may not completely mirror vaccine effectiveness in the field. Although more controlled trials in persons with diabetes mellitus with laboratory-confirmed, influenza-specific outcomes would be desirable to better estimate the effect of vaccination, the currently available data justify routine influenza vaccination in persons with diabetes mellitus. As in this risk group, the use of influenza vaccine is far below target worldwide, efforts should be made to increase vaccination coverage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Too Much Screen Time May Raise Kids' Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... reducing type 2 diabetes risk factors, in both boys and girls and in different ethnic groups from an early ... Excessive screen time was far more common among boys than girls. Children of African or Caribbean descent were also ...

  17. Development and validation of a Diabetes Risk Score for screening undiagnosed diabetes in Sri Lanka (SLDRISK).

    PubMed

    Katulanda, P; Hill, N R; Stratton, I; Sheriff, R; De Silva, S D N; Matthews, D R

    2016-07-25

    Screening for undiagnosed diabetes is not widely undertaken due to the high costs and invasiveness of blood sampling. Simple non-invasive tools to identify high risk individuals can facilitate screening. The main objectives of this study are to develop and validate a risk score for screening undiagnosed diabetes among Sri Lankan adults and to compare its performance with the Cambridge Risk Score (CRS), the Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) and three other Asian risk scores. Data were available from a representative sample of 4276 adults without diagnosed diabetes. In a jack-knife approach two thirds of the sample was used for the development of the risk score and the remainder for the validation. Age, waist circumference, BMI, hypertension, balanitis or vulvitis, family history of diabetes, gestational diabetes, physical activity and osmotic symptoms were significantly associated with undiagnosed diabetes (age most to osmotic symptoms least). Individual scores were generated for these factors using the beta coefficient values obtained in multiple logistic regression. A cut-off value of sum = 31 was determined by ROC curve analysis. The area under the ROC curve of the risk score for prevalent diabetes was 0.78 (CI 0.73-0.82). In the sample 36.3 % were above the cut-off of 31. A risk score above 31 gave a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 77.9, 65.6, 9.4 and 98.3 % respectively. For Sri Lankans the AUC for the CRS and IDRS were 0.72 and 0.66 repectively. This simple non-invasive screening tool can identify 80 % of undiagnosed diabetes by selecting 40 % of Sri Lankan adults for confirmatory blood investigations.

  18. Cognitive function and the risk for diabetes among young men.

    PubMed

    Twig, Gilad; Gluzman, Israel; Tirosh, Amir; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Yaniv, Gal; Afek, Arnon; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Karasik, Avraham; Gordon, Barak; Fruchter, Eyal; Lubin, Gadi; Rudich, Assaf; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for an accelerated rate of cognitive decline and dementia. However, the relationship between cognitive function and the subsequent development of diabetes is unclear. We conducted a historical-prospective cohort study merging data collected at premilitary recruitment assessment with information collected at the Staff Periodic Examination Center of the Israeli Army Medical Corps. Included were men aged 25 years or older without a history of diabetes at the beginning of follow-up with available data regarding their general intelligence score (GIS), a comprehensive measure of cognitive function, at age 17 years. Among 35,500 men followed for a median of 5.5 years, 770 new cases of diabetes were diagnosed. After adjustment for age, participants in the lowest GIS category had a 2.6-fold greater risk for developing diabetes compared with those in the highest GIS category. In multivariable analysis adjusted for age, BMI, fasting plasma glucose, sociogenetic variables, and lifestyle risk factors, those in the lowest GIS category had a twofold greater risk for incident diabetes when compared with the highest GIS category (hazard ratio 2.1 [95% CI 1.5-3.1]; P < 0.001). Additionally, participants in the lowest GIS category developed diabetes at a mean age of 39.5 ± 4.7 years and those in the highest GIS group at a mean age of 41.5 ± 5.1 years (P for comparison 0.042). This study demonstrates that in addition to a potential causal link between diabetes and enhanced cognitive decline, lower cognitive function at late adolescence is independently associated with an elevated risk for future diabetes. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Genetic risk profiling for prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mihaescu, Raluca; Meigs, James; Sijbrands, Eric; Janssens, A. Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a common disease caused by a complex interplay between many genetic and environmental factors. Candidate gene studies and recent collaborative genome-wide association efforts revealed at least 38 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased risk of T2D. Genetic testing of multiple SNPs is considered a potentially useful tool for early detection of individuals at high diabetes risk leading to improved targeting of preventive interventions. PMID:21278902

  20. Early benefits of mitigation in risk of regional climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter; Lowe, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Large differences in climate outcomes are projected by the end of this century depending on whether greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase or are reduced sufficiently to limit total warming to below 2 °C (ref. ). However, it is generally thought that benefits of mitigation are hidden by internal climate variability until later in the century. Here we show that if the likelihood of extremely hot seasons is considered, the benefits of mitigation emerge more quickly than previously thought. It takes less than 20 years of emissions reductions in many regions for the likelihood of extreme seasonal warmth to reduce by more than half following initiation of mitigation. Additionally we show that the latest possible date at which the probability of extreme seasonal temperatures will be halved through emissions reductions consistent with the 2 °C target is in the 2040s. Exposure to climate risk is therefore reduced markedly and rapidly with substantial reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, demonstrating that the early mitigation needed to limit eventual warming below potentially dangerous levels benefits societies in the nearer term not just in the longer-term future.

  1. Assessing the risk of gestational diabetes in twin gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, C. E.; Scarpelli, S.; LaRosa, D.; Divon, M. Y.

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that twin gestation is a risk factor for gestational diabetes. In a retrospective analysis, the incidence of gestational diabetes in twin and singleton pregnancies was determined in groups matched for maternal age, weight, and parity. One-hour oral glucose challenge tests (50 g) were used to screen 9185 pregnant women. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed when abnormal screens (> or = 130 mg/dL) were followed by two or more abnormal values on a 3-hour (100 g) glucose tolerance test using National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) criteria. A twin gestation was identified in 1.5% (138/9185) of the pregnancies. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed in 5.8% (8/138) and 5.4% (439/9047) of the twin and singleton pregnancies, respectively. The incidence of gestational diabetes is similar for singleton and twin gestations. PMID:7473851

  2. Diabetes Mellitus, Arterial Wall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structural background for cardiovascular events. The present paper provides a critical overview of the clinical evidence linking diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities to cardiovascular risk, debates the pathophysiologic mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may affect the arterial wall, and discusses the associations between vascular biomarkers, metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events. PMID:26861377

  3. Do the health benefits of cycling outweigh the risks?

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jeroen Johan de; Boogaard, Hanna; Nijland, Hans; Hoek, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Although from a societal point of view a modal shift from car to bicycle may have beneficial health effects due to decreased air pollution emissions and increased levels of physical activity, shifts in individual adverse health effects such as higher exposure to air pollution and risk of a traffic accident may prevail. We have summarized the literature for air pollution, traffic accidents, and physical activity using systematic reviews supplemented with recent key studies. We quantified the impact on all-cause mortality when 500,000 people would make a transition from car to bicycle for short trips on a daily basis in the Netherlands. We estimate that beneficial effects of increased physical activity are substantially larger (3-14 months gained) than the potential mortality effect of increased inhaled air pollution doses (0.8-40 days lost) and the increase in traffic accidents (5-9 days lost). Societal benefits are even larger because of a modest reduction in air pollution and traffic accidents. On average, the estimated health benefits of cycling were substantially larger than the risks relative to car driving for individuals shifting their mode of transport.

  4. Pesticide testing on human subjects: weighing benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Portier, Christopher

    2005-07-01

    In the debate surrounding testing pesticides on human subjects, two distinct positions have emerged. The first position holds that pesticide experiments on human subjects should be allowed, but only under stringent scientific and ethical standards. The second position asserts that these experiments should never be allowed. In this article, we evaluate what we consider to be the strongest argument for the second position--namely, that the benefits of the experiments are not significant enough to justify the risks posed to healthy subjects. We challenge this argument by examining the benefits and risks of testing pesticides on human subjects. We argue that a study that intentionally exposes humans subjects to pesticides should be permitted if a) the knowledge gained from the study is expected to promote human health; b) the knowledge cannot be reasonably obtained by other means; c) the study is not expected to cause serious or irreversible harm to the subjects; and d) appropriate safeguards are in place to minimize harm to the subjects.

  5. Pesticide Testing on Human Subjects: Weighing Benefits and Risks

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Portier, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    In the debate surrounding testing pesticides on human subjects, two distinct positions have emerged. The first position holds that pesticide experiments on human subjects should be allowed, but only under stringent scientific and ethical standards. The second position asserts that these experiments should never be allowed. In this article, we evaluate what we consider to be the strongest argument for the second position—namely, that the benefits of the experiments are not significant enough to justify the risks posed to healthy subjects. We challenge this argument by examining the benefits and risks of testing pesticides on human subjects. We argue that a study that intentionally exposes humans subjects to pesticides should be permitted if a) the knowledge gained from the study is expected to promote human health; b) the knowledge cannot be reasonably obtained by other means; c) the study is not expected to cause serious or irreversible harm to the subjects; and d) appropriate safeguards are in place to minimize harm to the subjects. PMID:16002367

  6. Selenium Health Benefit Values: Updated Criteria for Mercury Risk Assessments.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Nicholas V C; Ralston, Carla R; Raymond, Laura J

    2016-06-01

    Selenium (Se)-dependent enzymes (selenoenzymes) protect brain tissues against oxidative damage and perform other vital functions, but their synthesis requires a steady supply of Se. High methylmercury (CH3Hg) exposures can severely diminish Se transport across the placenta and irreversibly inhibit fetal brain selenoenzymes. However, supplemental dietary Se preserves their activities and thus prevents pathological consequences. The modified Se health benefit value (HBVSe) is a risk assessment criterion based on the molar concentrations of CH3Hg and Se present in a fish or seafood. It was developed to reflect the contrasting effects of maternal CH3Hg and Se intakes on fetal brain selenoenzyme activities. However, the original equation was prone to divide-by-zero-type errors whereby the calculated values increased exponentially in samples with low CH3Hg contents. The equation was refined to provide an improved index to better reflect the risks of CH3Hg exposures and the benefits provided by dietary Se. The HBVSe provides a biochemically based perspective that confirms and supports the FDA/EPA advice for pregnant and breast-feeding women regarding seafoods that should be avoided vs. those that are beneficial to consume. Since Se can be highly variable between watersheds, further evaluation of freshwater fish is needed to identify locations where fish with negative HBVSe may arise and be consumed by vulnerable subpopulation groups.

  7. Improving Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Henry L.; Lloyd, Suzanne M.; Ford, Ian; Meredith, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and symptomatic coronary artery disease are also likely to be hypertensive and, overall, are at very high cardiovascular (CV) risk. This paper reports the findings of a posthoc analysis of the 1113 patients with diabetes mellitus in the ACTION trial: ACTION itself showed that outcomes in patients with stable angina and hypertension were significantly improved when a long-acting calcium channel blocking drug (nifedipine GITS) was added to their treatment regimens. This further analysis of the ACTION database in those patients with diabetes has identified a number of practical therapeutic issues which are still relevant because of potential outcome benefits, particularly in relation to BP control. For example, despite background CV treatment and, specifically, despite the widespread use of ACE Inhibitor drugs, the addition of nifedipine GITS was associated with significant benefits: improvement in BP control by an average of 6/3 mmHg and significant improvements in outcome. In summary, this retrospective analysis has identified that the addition of nifedipine GITS resulted in improved BP control and significant outcome benefits in patients with diabetes who were at high CV risk. There is evidence to suggest that these findings are of direct relevance to current therapeutic practice. PMID:21274458

  8. Disaster risk reduction in developing countries: costs, benefits and institutions.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Charles

    2012-10-01

    Some 60,000 people worldwide die annually in natural disasters, mostly due to the collapse of buildings in earthquakes, and primarily in the developing world. This is despite the fact that engineering solutions exist that can eliminate almost completely the risk of such deaths. Why is this? The solutions are expensive and technically demanding, so their cost-benefit ratio often is unfavourable as compared to other interventions. Nonetheless, there are various public disaster risk reduction interventions that are highly cost-effective. That such interventions frequently remain unimplemented or ineffectively executed points to a role for issues of political economy. Building regulations in developing countries appear to have limited impact in many cases, perhaps because of inadequate capacity and corruption. Public construction often is of low quality, perhaps for similar reasons. This suggests the need for approaches that emphasise simple and limited disaster risk regulation covering only the most at-risk structures-and that, preferably, non-experts can monitor-as well as numerous transparency and oversight mechanisms for public construction projects.

  9. Red meat consumption: an overview of the risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Alison J; McSorley, Emeir M; Cuskelly, Geraldine J; Moss, Bruce W; Wallace, Julie M W; Bonham, Maxine P; Fearon, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    Red meat is long established as an important dietary source of protein and essential nutrients including iron, zinc and vitamin B12, yet recent reports that its consumption may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colon cancer have led to a negative perception of the role of red meat in health. The aim of this paper is to review existing literature for both the risks and benefits of red meat consumption, focusing on case-control and prospective studies. Despite many studies reporting an association between red meat and the risk of CVD and colon cancer, several methodological limitations and inconsistencies were identified which may impact on the validity of their findings. Overall, there is no strong evidence to support the recent conclusion from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) report that red meat has a convincing role to play in colon cancer. A substantial amount of evidence supports the role of lean red meat as a positive moderator of lipid profiles with recent studies identifying it as a dietary source of the anti-inflammatory long chain (LC) n-3 PUFAs and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). In conclusion, moderate consumption of lean red meat as part of a balanced diet is unlikely to increase risk for CVD or colon cancer, but may positively influence nutrient intakes and fatty acid profiles, thereby impacting positively on long-term health.

  10. Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... level is: High 1 Average 0 Low Your health care provider: Will test you as soon as you know you are ... their lifetime. If you had gestational diabetes, your health care provider will test you for diabetes 6 weeks after you give ...

  11. Terrorism risks and cost-benefit analysis of aviation security.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mark G; Mueller, John

    2013-05-01

    We evaluate, for the U.S. case, the costs and benefits of three security measures designed to reduce the likelihood of a direct replication of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. To do so, we assess risk reduction, losses, and security costs in the context of the full set of security layers. The three measures evaluated are installed physical secondary barriers (IPSB) to restrict access to the hardened cockpit door during door transitions, the Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS), and the Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) Program. In the process, we examine an alternate policy measure: doubling the budget of the FFDO program to $44 million per year, installing IPSBs in all U.S. aircraft at a cost of $13.5 million per year, and reducing funding for FAMS by 75% to $300 million per year. A break-even cost-benefit analysis then finds the minimum probability of an otherwise successful attack required for the benefit of each security measures to equal its cost. We find that the IPSB is costeffective if the annual attack probability of an otherwise successful attack exceeds 0.5% or one attack every 200 years. The FFDO program is costeffective if the annual attack probability exceeds 2%. On the other hand, more than two otherwise successful attacks per year are required for FAMS to be costeffective. A policy that includes IPSBs, an increased budget for FFDOs, and a reduced budget for FAMS may be a viable policy alternative, potentially saving hundreds of millions of dollars per year with consequences for security that are, at most, negligible. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Bell, K.; Spinney, P.

    1997-05-01

    The question of uncertainty and risk in electric utility resource planning has received considerable attention in recent years. During the 1980s, many utilities suffered financial losses because of unexpectedly high plant construction costs and low growth in electricity demand. In addition, the introduction of competition to the electric industry is creating new risks for power companies. No longer will utilities be able to count on regulatory protections and a base of captive consumers to provide a stable market and adequate return on their investments. Alternative risk management strategies will have to be considered instead. One approach to managing risk is for a utility company to invest in diverse power sources such as wind power plants. Since wind plants consume no fuel, can be built in relatively small increments with short construction lead times, and generate no pollutants, it is often said that they offer significant protection from risks associated with conventional fossil-fuel power plants. So far there have been few efforts to quantify these benefits, however. The study compares the costs and risks of two competing resource options, a gas-fired combined cycle plant and a wind plant, both utility-owned, through decision analysis. The case study utility is Texas Utilities Electric, a very large investor-owned company serving an area with substantial, high-quality wind resources. The authors chose a specific moment in the future - the year 2003 - when the utility currently plans to build a large fossil-fueled power plant, and examined the implications for the utility`s expected revenues, costs, and profits if a wind plant were to be built instead.

  13. Role of coffee in modulation of diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Natella, Fausta; Scaccini, Cristina

    2012-04-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. This association does not depend on race, gender, geographic distribution of the study populations, or the type of coffee consumed (i.e., caffeinated or decaffeinated). This review discusses the strength of this relationship, examines the possibility that the pattern of coffee consumption could influence the association, and evaluates the possible relationship between coffee consumption and other risk factors associated with diabetes. Particular attention is paid to the identification, on the basis of the scientific evidence, of the possible mechanisms by which coffee components might affect diabetes development, especially in light of the paradoxical effect of caffeine on glucose metabolism. In addition to the role of coffee in reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the possible role of coffee in the course of the illness is explored. Finally, the possibility that coffee can also affect the risk of other forms of diabetes (e.g., type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes) is examined.

  14. Modifiable Lifestyle Risk Factors and Incident Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Joshua J; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Effoe, Valery S; Okhomina, Victoria; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Hsueh, Willa A; Golden, Sherita H

    2017-08-14

    The associations of modifiable lifestyle risk factors with incident diabetes are not well investigated in African Americans (AAs). This study investigated the association of modifiable lifestyle risk factors (exercise, diet, smoking, TV watching, and sleep-disordered breathing burden) with incident diabetes among AAs. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors were characterized among 3,252 AAs in the Jackson Heart Study who were free of diabetes at baseline (2000-2004) using baseline questionnaires and combined into risk factor categories: poor (0-3 points), average (4-7 points), and optimal (8-11 points). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or glycosylated hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%) were estimated using Poisson regression modeling adjusting for age, sex, education, occupation, systolic blood pressure, and BMI. Outcomes were collected 2005-2012 and data analyzed in 2016. Over 7.6 years, there were 560 incident diabetes cases (mean age=53.3 years, 64% female). An average or optimal compared to poor risk factor categorization was associated with a 21% (IRR=0.79, 95% CI=0.62, 0.99) and 31% (IRR=0.69, 95% CI=0.48, 1.01) lower risk of diabetes. Among participants with BMI <30, IRRs for average or optimal compared to poor categorization were 0.60 (95% CI=0.40, 0.91) and 0.53 (95% CI=0.29, 0.97) versus 0.90 (95% CI=0.67, 1.21) and 0.83 (95% CI=0.51, 1.34) among participants with BMI ≥30. A combination of modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with a lower risk of diabetes among AAs, particularly among those without obesity. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Eschwège, E; Tchobroutsky, G; Guyot-Argenton, C; Aubry, J P; Dérot, N

    1975-01-01

    The present study, concerning 145 insulin-dependent diabetics showed positive relationships between the severity of retinal disease on the one hand, and body weight, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol level on the other. These relationships remain significant when the duration of the clinical diabetes and the age of the patient are taken into account. Two interpretations are suggested. They are not incompatible. In diabetic subjects, either the increase in blood pressure and serum cholesterol level causes an aggravation of diabetic retinopathy or there exists a common factor at the origin of retinal lesions and of an increase in risk of cardiovascular disease through atherosclerosis.

  16. Diabetes, glucose tolerance, and the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Eranti, Antti; Kerola, Tuomas; Aro, Aapo L; Tikkanen, Jani T; Rissanen, Harri A; Anttonen, Olli; Junttila, M Juhani; Knekt, Paul; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2016-02-24

    Diabetes predisposes to sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, it is uncertain whether greater proportion of cardiac deaths are sudden among diabetes patients than other subjects. It is also unclear whether the risk of SCD is pronounced already early in the course of the disease. The relationship of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and SCD is scarcely documented. A general population cohort of 10594 middle-aged subjects (mean age 44 years, 52.6 % male, follow-up duration 35-41 years) was divided into diabetes patients (n = 82), subjects with IGT (n = 3806, plasma glucose ≥9.58 mmol/l in one-hour glucose tolerance test), and controls (n = 6706). Diabetes patients had an increased risk of SCD after adjustment confounders (hazard ratio 2.62, 95 % confidence interval 1.46-4.70, p = 0.001) but risk for non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased and the proportion of SCD of cardiac deaths was not increased. The SCD risk persisted after exclusion of subjects with baseline cardiac disease or non-fatal cardiac events during the follow-up. Subjects with IGT were at increased risk for SCD (univariate hazard ratio 1.51; 95 % confidence interval 1.31-1.74; p < 0.001) and also for non-sudden cardiac deaths and non-fatal cardiac events but adjustments for other risk factors attenuated these effects. Diabetes was associated with increased risk of SCD but also the risk of non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased. The proportion of cardiac deaths being sudden in subjects with diabetes was not increased. The higher SCD risk in diabetes patients was independent of known cardiac disease at baseline or occurrence of non-fatal cardiac event during the follow-up.

  17. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies. PMID:27022098

  18. Change in predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: who benefits?

    PubMed

    Donadelli, Simara P; Salgado, Wilson; Marchini, Julio S; Schmidt, Andre; Amato, Cristiana A F; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Dos Santos, Jose Ernesto; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2011-05-01

    The risk of developing cardiovascular disease is higher in obese than in non-obese individuals. Surgery for obesity is effective in reducing weight and resolution of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Our aim was to assess the estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk of obese patients before and after treatment of obesity with a gastric bypass. Weight, body mass index systolic and diastolic blood pressure, lipid profile, glycemia, and history of cardiovascular disease were obtained for obese patients before and 2 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Ten-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Framingham score. Forty-two patients were included in the study. We observed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of 10-year cardiovascular risk mainly associated with weight reduction and improvement of comorbidities associated with obesity. The benefits were greater among patients who already presented known risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension. Superobese patients benefited as early as 2 years after surgery, when weight loss was greater. Weight loss secondary to surgery was sustained after 2 years and promoted improvement of comorbidities, with an important reduction of 10-year cardiovascular risk especially among patients with previous risk factors.

  19. Risk-benefit of consuming Lake Erie fish.

    PubMed

    Neff, Margaret R; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Ni, Felicity J; Carpenter, David O; Drouillard, Ken; Fisk, Aaron T; Arts, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Consumption of fish is promoted as a healthy way to obtain essential fatty acids (EFA) in the diet, yet the risk of ingesting harmful contaminants remains a concern. A recent study concluded that the risk-benefit of consuming fish from the North American Laurentian Great Lakes, which sustain important commercial and recreational fisheries, is currently unclear. We report the fatty acid (FA) content in skin-off fillets of fifteen fish species from Lake Erie and assess whether recommended dietary requirements for two EFA (EPA and DHA) can be met by safely consuming Lake Erie fishes, as an example of a risk-benefit analysis. A total of 146 samples were analyzed for FA and contaminant content. A simulated fish consumption advisory (maximum recommended number of meals per month, up to 32) was calculated for each sample, and used to calculate the maximum amount of EPA+DHA that would be consumed if the consumption advisory was followed. All fifteen species had nutritionally desirable PUFA:SAFA (>0.4) and n-3:n-6 (>1). Large, fatty species had the highest EPA+DHA content, but had the most restrictive consumption advisories due to high PCB concentrations. To minimize contaminant exposure while maximizing EPA+DHA intake, consumers should consider small lake whitefish and lake trout, small panfish species, and/or walleye. However, very few species had an EPA+DHA content sufficient to safely meet the highest dietary guidelines while following advisories. Consumption of certain Lake Erie fish, an important recreational and commercial fishery, within the limits of our simulated fish consumption advisories, can be a good supplemental source of beneficial n-3 long chain PUFA. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vaccine safety evaluation: Practical aspects in assessing benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, Alberta; Bonanni, Paolo; Garçon, Nathalie; Stanberry, Lawrence R; El-Hodhod, Mostafa; Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda

    2016-12-20

    Vaccines are different from most medicines in that they are administered to large and mostly healthy populations including infants and children, so there is a low tolerance for potential risks or side-effects. In addition, the long-term benefits of immunisation in reducing or eliminating infectious diseases may induce complacency due to the absence of cases. However, as demonstrated in recent measles outbreaks in Europe and United States, reappearance of the disease occurs as soon as vaccine coverage falls. Unfounded vaccine scares such as those associating the combined measles-mumps-rubella vaccine with autism, and whole-cell pertussis vaccines with encephalopathy, can also have massive impacts, resulting in reduced vaccine uptake and disease resurgence. The safety assessment of vaccines is exhaustive and continuous; beginning with non-clinical evaluation of their individual components in terms of purity, stability and sterility, continuing throughout the clinical development phase and entire duration of use of the vaccine; including post-approval. The breadth and depth of safety assessments conducted at multiple levels by a range of independent organizations increases confidence in the rigour with which any potential risks or side-effects are investigated and managed. Industry, regulatory agencies, academia, the medical community and the general public all play a role in monitoring vaccine safety. Within these stakeholder groups, the healthcare professional and vaccine provider have key roles in the prevention, identification, investigation and management of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI). Guidelines and algorithms aid in determining whether AEFI may have been caused by the vaccine, or whether it is coincidental to it. Healthcare providers are encouraged to rigorously investigate AEFIs and to report them via local reporting processes. The ultimate objective for all parties is to ensure vaccines have a favourable benefit-risk profile. Copyright

  1. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Wierzba, Waldemar; Sliwczynski, Andrzej; Pinkas, Jaroslaw; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2017-09-01

    The publication is a polemical response to reports that present data that diabetes reduces the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The study analyzed all cases of developing AAA in patients with and without diabetes in 2012 in Poland. Data for the analysis were obtained with a unique and complete resources of the National Health Fund (NFZ) and population data from the Central Statistical Office (GUS). In Poland during 2012 2,227,453 patients with diabetes were treated, 975,364 males and 1,252,089 females. The incidence of AAA without rupture in patients without diabetes calculated per 100,000 of the non-diabetes general population was 25.0 +/- 9.0 in males and 5.6 +/- 2.3 in females. The incidence of ruptured AAA in the general population without diabetes was 3.6 +/- 0.9 in males, and 0.6 +/- 0.3 in females calculated per 100,000 of inhabitants without diabetes. The incidence of AAA without rupture in patients with diabetes was 184.897 +/- 70.653 in males and 35.364 +/- 24.925 in females calculated per 100,000 of patients diagnosed with diabetes. The incidence of ruptured AAA in patients with diabetes was 21.090 +/- 6.050 in males and 5.170 +/- 3.053 in females calculated per 100,000 of patients diagnosed with diabetes. The incidence rate for ruptured AAA in 2012 in Poland is statistically higher both in females and males in the population with diabetes. The incidence rate for AAA without rupture in 2012 in Poland is statistically higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes.

  2. Diabetes Risk Factors, Diabetes Risk Algorithms, and the Prediction of Future Frailty: The Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Kim; Kivimäki, Mika; Hamer, Mark; Shipley, Martin J.; Akbaraly, Tasnime N.; Tabak, Adam; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether established diabetes risk factors and diabetes risk algorithms are associated with future frailty. Design Prospective cohort study. Risk algorithms at baseline (1997–1999) were the Framingham Offspring, Cambridge, and Finnish diabetes risk scores. Setting Civil service departments in London, United Kingdom. Participants There were 2707 participants (72% men) aged 45 to 69 years at baseline assessment and free of diabetes. Measurements Risk factors (age, sex, family history of diabetes, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, antihypertensive and corticosteroid treatments, history of high blood glucose, smoking status, physical activity, consumption of fruits and vegetables, fasting glucose, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides) were used to construct the risk algorithms. Frailty, assessed during a resurvey in 2007–2009, was denoted by the presence of 3 or more of the following indicators: self-reported exhaustion, low physical activity, slow walking speed, low grip strength, and weight loss; “prefrailty” was defined as having 2 or fewer of these indicators. Results After a mean follow-up of 10.5 years, 2.8% of the sample was classified as frail and 37.5% as prefrail. Increased age, being female, stopping smoking, low physical activity, and not having a daily consumption of fruits and vegetables were each associated with frailty or prefrailty. The Cambridge and Finnish diabetes risk scores were associated with frailty/prefrailty with odds ratios per 1 SD increase (disadvantage) in score of 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.27) and 1.27 (1.17–1.37), respectively. Conclusion Selected diabetes risk factors and risk scores are associated with subsequent frailty. Risk scores may have utility for frailty prediction in clinical practice. PMID:24103860

  3. Modified lipoproteins as biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José Luis; Pérez, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Prevention of high incidence of cardiovascular disease in diabetes is one of the challenges of endocrinology. Validation of new biomarkers that may contribute to a better assessment of cardiovascular risk and help implement treatment strategies is one of the promising approaches in research on prevention and reduction of cardiovascular risk. Modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key element in development of atherosclerotic lesions. Several pathophysiological characteristics of diabetes are crucial for the LDL of these patients to have higher modification rates as compared to the healthy population. Diabetic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidative stress synergistically promote the occurrence of lipoperoxidation, glycosylation and glycoxidation processes, which will generate modified lipoproteins that stimulate development of atherosclerosis. This article reviews the role of different types of modified LDL in development of atherosclerosis in diabetes, as well as the possibility of using its quantification in cardiovascular risk prediction. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of the diabetic patient: focus on cardiovascular and renal risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Kevin C; Bakris, George L

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus increases the risk for hypertension and associated cardiovascular diseases, including coronary, cerebrovascular, renal and peripheral vascular disease. The risk for developing cardiovascular disease is increased when both diabetes and hypertension co-exist; in fact, over 11 million Americans have both diabetes and hypertension. These numbers will continue to climb, internationally, since the leading associated risk for diabetes development, obesity, has reached epidemic proportions, globally. Moreover, the frequent association of diabetes with dyslipidemia, as well as coagulation, endothelial, and metabolic abnormalities also aggravates the underlying vascular disease process in patients who possess these comorbid conditions. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are overactivated in both hypertension and diabetes. Drugs that inhibit this system, such as ACE inhibitors and more recently angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs), have proven beneficial effects on the micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes, especially the kidney. The BRILLIANT study showed that lisinopril reduces microalbuminuria better than CCB therapy. Numerous other long-term studies confirm this association with ACE inhibitors including the HOPE trial. Furthermore, the European Controlled trial of Lisinopril in Insulin-dependent Diabetes (EUCLID) study, showed that lisinopril slowed the progression of renal disease, even in individuals with mild albuminuria. In fact, there are now five appropriately powered randomized placebo-controlled trials to show that both ACE inhibitors and ARBs slow progression of diabetic nephropathy in people with type 2 diabetes. These effects were shown to be better than conventional blood pressure lowering therapy, including dihydropyridine CCBs. In patients with microalbuminuria, ACE inhibitors and ARBs reduce the progression of microalbuminuria to proteinuria and provide a risk reduction of between

  5. Different type 2 diabetes risk assessments predict dissimilar numbers at 'high risk': a retrospective analysis of diabetes risk-assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Gray, Benjamin J; Bracken, Richard M; Turner, Daniel; Morgan, Kerry; Thomas, Michael; Williams, Sally P; Williams, Meurig; Rice, Sam; Stephens, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-01

    Use of a validated risk-assessment tool to identify individuals at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes is currently recommended. It is under-reported, however, whether a different risk tool alters the predicted risk of an individual. This study explored any differences between commonly used validated risk-assessment tools for type 2 diabetes. Cross-sectional analysis of individuals who participated in a workplace-based risk assessment in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. Retrospective analysis of 676 individuals (389 females and 287 males) who participated in a workplace-based diabetes risk-assessment initiative. Ten-year risk of type 2 diabetes was predicted using the validated QDiabetes(®), Leicester Risk Assessment (LRA), FINDRISC, and Cambridge Risk Score (CRS) algorithms. Differences between the risk-assessment tools were apparent following retrospective analysis of individuals. CRS categorised the highest proportion (13.6%) of individuals at 'high risk' followed by FINDRISC (6.6%), QDiabetes (6.1%), and, finally, the LRA was the most conservative risk tool (3.1%). Following further analysis by sex, over one-quarter of males were categorised at high risk using CRS (25.4%), whereas a greater percentage of females were categorised as high risk using FINDRISC (7.8%). The adoption of a different valid risk-assessment tool can alter the predicted risk of an individual and caution should be used to identify those individuals who really are at high risk of type 2 diabetes. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  6. Antidepressant medicine use and risk of developing diabetes during the diabetes prevention program and diabetes prevention program outcomes study.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Richard R; Ma, Yong; Peyrot, Mark; Marrero, David G; Price, David W; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Knowler, William C

    2010-12-01

    To assess the association between antidepressant medicine use and risk of developing diabetes during the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). DPP/DPPOS participants were assessed for diabetes every 6 months and for antidepressant use every 3 months in DPP and every 6 months in DPPOS for a median 10.0-year follow-up. Controlled for factors associated with diabetes risk, continuous antidepressant use compared with no use was associated with diabetes risk in the placebo (adjusted hazard ratio 2.34 [95% CI 1.32-4.15]) and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45-4.22]) arms, but not in the metformin arm (0.55 [0.25-1.19]). Continuous antidepressant use was significantly associated with diabetes risk in the placebo and lifestyle arms. Measured confounders and mediators did not account for this association, which could represent a drug effect or reflect differences not assessed in this study between antidepressant users and nonusers.

  7. Pioglitazone has a dubious bladder cancer risk but an undoubted cardiovascular benefit.

    PubMed

    Ryder, R E J

    2015-03-01

    On 8 April 2014, a US jury ordered Takeda and Eli Lilly to pay $9 bn in punitive damages after finding that they had concealed the cancer risks associated with pioglitazone. By contrast, on 28 August 2014, the long-awaited outcome of the 10-year Kaiser Permanente Northern California study was announced. That study was specifically designed to investigate whether patients exposed to pioglitazone were at an increased risk of bladder cancer and found no association; thus, at last, the controversial issue has been resolved. A review, in retrospect, of the story of the proposed link between pioglitazone and bladder cancer reveals flaws at every stage. In 2012, a BMJ editorial, in keeping with some other contemporary reports, stated 'it can confidently be assumed that pioglitazone increases the risk of bladder cancer'. Examination of the information which led to such a statement shows that: 1) the pre-clinical findings of bladder cancer in male rats is not indicative of human risk; 2) there is no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone in randomized controlled trials, once cases that could not plausibly be related to treatment are removed; and 3) the observational studies that have suggested a link have over-extrapolated from the data: pioglitazone-treated patients had more risk factors for bladder cancer than those not treated with pioglitazone. Meanwhile careful study of randomized controlled trials shows evidence of cardiovascular benefit from pioglitazone in Type 2 diabetes, a condition which results, more than anything, in premature cardiovascular death and morbidity.

  8. Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rewers, Marian; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen considerably in the past 30 years due to changes in the environment that have been only partially identified. In this Series paper, we critically discuss candidate triggers of islet autoimmunity and factors thought to promote progression from autoimmunity to overt type 1 diabetes. We revisit previously proposed hypotheses to explain the growth in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in light of current data. Finally, we suggest a unified model in which immune tolerance to β cells can be broken by several environmental exposures that induce generation of hybrid peptides acting as neoautoantigens. PMID:27302273

  9. Thyroid Cancer Risk Is Not Increased in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated thyroid cancer risk with regards to diabetes status and diabetes duration, and with the use of anti-diabetic drugs including sulfonylurea, metformin, insulin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, by using a population-based reimbursement database in Taiwan. Methods A random sample of 1,000,000 subjects covered by the National Health Insurance was recruited. After excluding patients with type 1 diabetes, 999730 subjects (495673 men and 504057 women) were recruited into the analyses. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for independent variables including age, sex, diabetes status/duration, anti-diabetic drugs, other medications, comorbidities, living regions, occupation and examinations that might potentially lead to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in various models. Results The diabetic patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving potential detection examinations (6.38% vs. 5.83%, P<0.0001). After multivariable-adjustment, the OR (95% CI) for diabetes status was 0.816 (0.652–1.021); and for diabetes duration <1 year, 1–3 years, 3–5 years and ≥5 years vs. non-diabetes was 0.071 (0.010–0.507), 0.450 (0.250–0.813), 0.374 (0.203–0.689) and 1.159 (0.914–1.470), respectively. Among the anti-diabetic agents, only sulfonylurea was significantly associated with thyroid cancer, OR (95% CI): 1.882 (1.202–2.947). The OR (95% CI) for insulin, metformin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone was 1.701 (0.860–3.364), 0.696 (0.419–1.155), 0.581 (0.202–1.674), 0.522 (0.069–3.926) and 0.669 (0.230–1.948), respectively. Furthermore, patients with benign thyroid disease or other cancer, living in Kao-Ping/Eastern regions, or receiving potential detection examinations might have a significantly higher risk; and male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, vascular complications or use of statin, aspirin or non

  10. Cochrane reviews on the benefits/risks of fluoride toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Wong, M C M; Clarkson, J; Glenny, A-M; Lo, E C M; Marinho, V C C; Tsang, B W K; Walsh, T; Worthington, H V

    2011-05-01

    This concise review presents two Cochrane Reviews undertaken to determine: (1) the relative effectiveness of fluoride toothpastes of different concentrations in preventing dental caries in children and adolescents; and (2) the relationship between the use of topical fluorides in young children and their risk of developing dental fluorosis. To determine the relative effectiveness of fluoride toothpastes of different concentrations, we undertook a network meta-analysis utilizing both direct and indirect comparisons from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The review examining fluorosis included evidence from experimental and observational studies. The findings of the reviews confirm the benefits of using fluoride toothpaste, when compared with placebo, in preventing caries in children and adolescents, but only significantly for fluoride concentrations of 1000 ppm and above. The relative caries-preventive effects of fluoride toothpastes of different concentrations increase with higher fluoride concentration. However, there is weak, unreliable evidence that starting the use of fluoride toothpaste in children under 12 months of age may be associated with an increased risk of fluorosis. The decision of what fluoride levels to use for children under 6 years should be balanced between the risk of developing dental caries and that of mild fluorosis.

  11. Diabetes mellitus and cancer risk: review of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Kentaro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and cancer are diseases of epidemic proportions across the globe. These diseases are influenced by many factors, both genetic and environmental. A possible association between diabetes and cancer risk has long been speculated. Increased incidence of several cancers has been observed in diabetes patients, notably pancreatic, hepatic, colorectal, breast, urinary tract, and endometrial cancers. In contrast, a decreased incidence of prostate cancer is observed in diabetes patients, implying a protective effect. Precise knowledge of the complex associations and interactions between these two conditions is of great importance for their prevention and treatment. Multiple potential mechanisms have been proposed, but they have tended to be site-specific. Possible common mechanisms for a biological link between diabetes and cancer include hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and inflammation. Today, 366 million people live with diabetes globally, and this figure is expected to increase. Thus, if diabetes is associated with even a small increase in cancer risk, this may have important consequences at the population level. The aim of this review is to summarize recent epidemiological evidence of an association between diabetes and total cancer and specific sites of cancer, and to consider causal associations between these diseases. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Diabetes and coronary heart disease risk in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B D; Haffner, S M; Hazuda, H P; Patterson, J K; Stern, M P

    1992-01-01

    Mexican Americans have a high prevalence of diabetes relative to non-Hispanic whites, but paradoxically experience a lower prevalence of myocardial infarction and lower cardiovascular mortality (at least in men). To determine whether Mexican Americans might be more resistant to the atherogenic effects of diabetes than non-Hispanic whites, we examined the associations between diabetes and myocardial infarction and selected coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in these two ethnic groups. The study population consisted of 5149 Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites who were 25 to 64 years old and recruited from the San Antonio Heart Study, a population-based study of cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes conducted between 1979 and 1988. Diabetic men were more than twice as likely to have an electrocardiography (ECG)-documented myocardial infarction than were nondiabetic men, while diabetic women were more than three times as likely to have a myocardial infarction than were nondiabetic women. In both sexes the association between myocardial infarction and diabetes was nearly identical between the two ethnic groups. In both ethnic groups diabetes was also more strongly associated with conventional CHD risk factors (e.g., triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol) in women than in men. Furthermore, these associations were at least as strong, if not stronger, in Mexican Americans as in non-Hispanic whites. Thus, these data provide no evidence to suggest that Mexican Americans are resistant to the lipid-altering effects of diabetes. We conclude that the protective effect against CHD conferred by Mexican American ethnicity may be obscured in part by the high prevalence of diabetes in this ethnic group.

  13. [Relevance of diabetes in high cardiovascular risk hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Segura, Julián; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Fernández, Sandra; Ruilope, Luis M

    2013-10-05

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of target organ damage (TOD) and established cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a cohort of nondiabetic hypertensive patients with 3 or more cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) against a group of hypertensives with type 2 diabetes. We included 4,725 hypertensive patients, 62% male, mean age 64 (SD 12) years, with type 2 diabetes mellitus, independently of the number of associated CVRF (N=2,608), or non-diabetics, in which case we required the presence of 3 CVRF (N=2,117). The prevalence of established CVD (clinical interview) and TOD (left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiogram, microalbuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate) were estimated. Hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes had an older age and more marked obesity. Furthermore, these patients showed a higher prevalence of micro- and macroalbuminuria, renal failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries and CVD compared with nondiabetic hypertensive patients with 3 or more CVRF. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of TOD or established CVD were associated independently with the presence of diabetes. Hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes have a higher prevalence of LOD and CVD compared to nondiabetic hypertensive patients with 3 or more CVRF. Although both situations are included in the high cardiovascular risk stratum, it would be expected an increased incidence of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive diabetic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Cats.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, M; Egenvall, A; Fall, T; Hansson-Hamlin, H; Röcklinsberg, H; Holst, B S

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes in cats resembles type 2 diabetes in people. The etiology is not fully understood, but both genetic and environmental factors are believed to contribute. To assess the associations of environmental risk factors with diabetes in cats. Cats with a diagnosis of diabetes (n = 396) insured by a Swedish insurance company during years 2009-2013, and a control group (n = 1,670) matched on birth year. A web-based questionnaire was used in a case-control study. An invitation to participate was sent to owners of 1,369 diabetic cats and 5,363 control cats. The survey contained questions related to the cat's breed, age, sex, neutering status, body condition, housing, access to the outdoors, activity level, diet, eating behavior, feeding routine, general health, stressful events, other pets in the household, medications, and vaccination status. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Response rate was 35% for the diabetic group and 32% for the control group. Indoor confinement, being a greedy eater, and being overweight were associated with an increased risk of diabetes. In cats assessed by owners as being normal weight, there was an association between eating predominantly dry food and an increased risk of diabetes (Odds ratio 3.8; 95% confidence intervals 1.3-11.2). Dry food is commonly fed to cats worldwide. The association found between dry food and an increased risk of diabetes in cats assessed as normal weight by owners warrants further attention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Benefit-risk assessment in a post-market setting: a case study integrating real-life experience into benefit-risk methodology.

    PubMed

    Hallgreen, Christine E; van den Ham, Hendrika A; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Ashworth, Simon; Hermann, Richard; Hobbiger, Steve; Luciani, Davide; Micaleff, Alain; Thomson, Andrew; Wang, Nan; van Staa, Tjeerd P; Downey, Gerald; Hirsch, Ian; Hockley, Kimberley; Juhaeri, Juhaeri; Metcalf, Marilyn; Mwangi, Jeremiah; Nixon, Richard; Peters, Ruth; Stoeckert, Isabelle; Waddingham, Ed; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Ashby, Deborah; Wise, Lesley

    2014-09-01

    Difficulties may be encountered when undertaking a benefit-risk assessment for an older product with well-established use but with a benefit-risk balance that may have changed over time. This case study investigates this specific situation by applying a formal benefit-risk framework to assess the benefit-risk balance of warfarin for primary prevention of patients with atrial fibrillation. We used the qualitative framework BRAT as the starting point of the benefit-risk analysis, bringing together the relevant available evidence. We explored the use of a quantitative method (stochastic multi-criteria acceptability analysis) to demonstrate how uncertainties and preferences on multiple criteria can be integrated into a single measure to reduce cognitive burden and increase transparency in decision making. Our benefit-risk model found that warfarin is favourable compared with placebo for the primary prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. This favourable benefit-risk balance is fairly robust to differences in preferences. The probability of a favourable benefit-risk for warfarin against placebo is high (0.99) in our model despite the high uncertainty of randomised clinical trial data. In this case study, we identified major challenges related to the identification of relevant benefit-risk criteria and taking into account the diversity and quality of evidence available to inform the benefit-risk assessment. The main challenges in applying formal methods for medical benefit-risk assessment for a marketed drug are related to outcome definitions and data availability. Data exist from many different sources (both randomised clinical trials and observational studies), and the variability in the studies is large. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Can modeling of health outcomes facilitate regulatory decision making? The benefit-risk tradeoff for rosiglitazone in 1999 vs. 2007.

    PubMed

    Cross, J T; Veenstra, D L; Gardner, J S; Garrison, L P

    2011-03-01

    Rosiglitazone was initially approved for type 2 diabetes monotherapy. We tested health-outcomes modeling as an aid to regulatory decision making by quantifying the incremental net benefit (INB) value of rosiglitazone (relative to a comparator), both at the time of first approval (1999) and at the FDA advisory committee review (2007). Using 1999 data, rosiglitazone was projected to provide an additional 0.639 years of life (0.373 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs)) relative to placebo but a loss of 0.312 years (0.173 QALYs) relative to glyburide, with uncertainty in reduction of hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) level having the greatest impact on the benefit-risk profile. By 2007, rosiglitazone was projected to provide an additional 0.222 years (0.091 QALYs) vs. glyburide and 0.026 years vs. metformin (0.009 QALYs). Modeling suggested that the use of rosiglitazone as monotherapy was not initially warranted, given the uncertainty with regard to benefit. Despite similar net benefit (NB) as metformin shown in postmarketing data, residual cardiovascular (CV) concerns did not support the use of rosiglitazone as first-line therapy. We adapted a mathematical diabetes model to estimate NB and uncertainty of diabetes monotherapy.

  17. The risks and benefits of human donor breast milk.

    PubMed

    Brent, Nancy

    2013-05-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Review the advantages and disadvantages of donor-banked milk over informal milk sharing.2.List disadvantages of proprietary infant formula for use as supplementation.3.Determine the primary ethical concerns when electing to use donor human milk versus propriety infant formula for supplementation. The benefits of breast-feeding, as well as the risks of some artificial formula, are well known. This growing recognition of the advantages of breast-feeding is reflected in the increased incidence of breast-feeding in recent years. However, one of the most common reasons for premature weaning is low milk supply, perceived or real, followed by nipple or breast pain. Given the increased awareness of the superiority of breast milk, however, more parents are turning to human donor milk to supplement their babies after they have been weaned. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Strength training for children and adolescents: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Davide; Zaccagni, Luciana

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity has proved to be an effective means of preventing several diseases and improving general health. In most cases, though, light to moderate efforts are suggested, for both youngsters and adults. Common sense advices call for late inception of intense, strength training-related activities, like weight lifting and plyometrics, which are usually postponed at the end of the growth age, even among sport practitioners. However, such advices seem to have a mainly anecdotal nature. The purpose of this review is to evaluate risks and benefits of early inception of strength training, at adolescence or even earlier and to verify whether concerns can be grounded scientifically. Current literature does not seem to have any particular aversion against the practice of strength training by children and adolescents, provided that some safety rules are followed, like medical clearance, proper instruction from a qualified professional and progressive overload. At the same time, several studies provide consistent findings supporting the benefits of repeated, intense physical efforts in young subjects. Improved motor skills and body composition, in terms of increased fat free mass, reduced fat mass and enhanced bone health, have been extensively documented, especially if sport practice began early, when the subjects were pubescent. It can be therefore concluded that strength training is a relatively safe and healthy practice for children and adolescents.

  19. Nitroglycerin Use in Myocardial Infarction Patients: Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and its sequelae are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nitroglycerin remains a first-line treatment for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction. Nitroglycerin achieves its benefit by giving rise to nitric oxide, which causes vasodilation and increases blood flow to the myocardium. However, continuous delivery of nitroglycerin results in tolerance, limiting the use of this drug. Nitroglycerin tolerance is due, at least in part, to inactivation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), an enzyme that converts nitroglycerin to the vasodilator, nitric oxide. We have recently found that, in addition to nitroglycerin’s effect on the vasculature, sustained treatment with nitroglycerin negatively affects cardiomyocyte viability following ischemia, thus resulting in increased infarct size in a myocardial infarction model in animals. Co-administration of Alda-1, an activator of ALDH2, with nitroglycerin improves metabolism of reactive aldehyde adducts and prevents the nitroglycerin-induced increase in cardiac dysfunction following myocardial infarction. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms associated with the benefits and risks of nitroglycerin administration in myocardial infarction. (167 of 200). PMID:22040938

  20. Assessment of the benefits and risks for engineered virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeremy R; Tepfer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Viral diseases of cultivated crops are responsible for the worldwide loss of billions of US dollars in agricultural productivity every year. Historically, this loss has been reduced or minimized principally by the implementation of specific agricultural/phytosanitary measures, and by the introduction of naturally occurring virus-resistance genes into appropriate cultivars by plant breeding. Since the first report of virus-resistant transgenic plants (VRTPs) in 1986, a remarkable diversity of virus-resistance transgenes has been developed. Despite this, to a large part due to controversy surrounding the use of genetically modified organisms, the number of commercially available VRTPs remains small. However, since the potential risks associated with VRTPs were first formulated in the early 1990s, fundamental research on plant-virus interactions and also research specifically aimed at resolving biosafety issues have greatly circumscribed the potential impact of the risks envisaged. Yet, in spite of the advances, both in strategies for creating VRTPs and in the assessment of potential risks, it remains remarkably difficult to weigh the risks/costs and benefits of different means to manage plant viral diseases, and even to make scientifically well-founded choices of the most appropriate strategy for creating VRTPs. Many of the outstanding issues concern the lack of sufficient knowledge of the breadth and durability of the resistance of VRTPs under field conditions. VRTPs will only take their appropriate place in modern agriculture when their potential users will be able to base their choices on realistic assessments of their efficacy, durability, and safety. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Italian risk factor-based screening for gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrado, F; Pintaudi, B; Di Vieste, G; Interdonato, M L; Magliarditi, M; Santamaria, A; D'Anna, R; Di Benedetto, A

    2014-09-01

    There is a debate about whether universal or risk factors-based screening is most appropriate for gestational diabetes diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to compare in our population the universal screening test recommended by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) panel and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) versus the selective screening proposed by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines (NICE) but modified by the Italian National Institute of Health. From May 2010 to October 2011 all consecutive pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes according to the IADPSG's panel criteria, while all the risk factors for each patient were registered. Of the 1015 pregnant women included in the study, 113 (11%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes and 26 (23%) of them would not have been identified by the selective screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health. However, all the risk factors considered by the selective screening revealed a good predictive role except for maternal age ≥ 35 years (OR: 0.98). In the group without the risk factors considered, it was reported the predictive role for gestational diabetes of prepregnancy BMI and nulliparity. The selective risk factors-based screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health has detected 77% of gestational diabetes cases in our population, sparing the oral glucose tolerance test for more than 40% of pregnant women at the same time. More information on the clinical impact of this choice could be obtained by a strict analysis of treatment, perinatal outcome and follow-up of an adequate sample size of "missed" gestational diabetes.

  2. Effect of low-dose aspirin on primary prevention of cardiovascular events in Japanese diabetic patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sadanori; Morimoto, Takeshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Sakuma, Mio; Soejima, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Waki, Masako; Doi, Naofumi; Horii, Manabu; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Somekawa, Satoshi; Soeda, Tsunenari; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Benefit of low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in diabetes remains controversial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) recommend aspirin for high-risk diabetic patients: older patients with additional cardiovascular risk factors. We evaluated aspirin's benefit in Japanese diabetic patients stratified by cardiovascular risk. In the JPAD trial, we enrolled 2,539 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and no history of cardiovascular disease. We randomly assigned them to aspirin (81-100 mg daily) or no aspirin groups. The median follow-up period was 4.4 years. We stratified the patients into high-risk or low-risk groups, according to the US recommendation: age (older; younger) and coexisting cardiovascular risk factors. The risk factors included smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, family history of coronary artery disease, and proteinuria. Most of the patients were classified into the high-risk group, consisting of older patients with risk factors (n=1,804). The incidence of cardiovascular events was higher in this group, but aspirin did not reduce cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [HR], 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58-1.17). In the low-risk group, consisting of older patients without risk factors and younger patients (n=728), aspirin did not reduce cardiovascular events (HR, 0.55; 95% CI: 0.23-1.21). These results were unchanged after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Low-dose aspirin is not beneficial in Japanese diabetic patients at high risk.

  3. Health benefits and risk associated with adopting a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Pilis, Wiesław; Stec, Krzysztof; Zych, Michał; Pilis, Anna

    2014-01-01

    A vegetarian diet may be adopted for various reasons that can include ecological, economic, religious, ethical and health considerations. In the latter case they arise from the desire to lose weight, in tackling obesity, improving physical fitness and/or in reducing the risk of acquiring certain diseases. It has been shown that properly applied vegetarian diet is the most effective way of reducing body mass (expressed as BMI), improving the plasma lipid profile and in decreasing the incidence of high arterial blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic syndrome and arteriosclerosis. In addition, improved insulin sensitivity together with lower rates of diabetes and cancer has been observed. Some studies have however found that a vegetarian diet may result in changes adversely affecting the body. These could include; hyperhomocysteinaemia, protein deficiency, anaemia, decreased creatinine content in muscles and menstrual disruption in women who undertake increased physical activity. Some of these changes may decrease the ability for performing activities that require physical effort. Nevertheless, on balance it can be reasonably concluded that the beneficial effects of a vegetarian diet significantly, by far, outweigh the adverse ones. It should also be noted that the term 'vegetarian diet' is not always clearly defined in the literature and it may include many dietary variations.

  4. Effect of mediterranean diet in diabetes control and cardiovascular risk modification: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Dana; Al-Badri, Marwa R; Azar, Sami T

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been a worldwide significant increase in the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus with both increase in morbidity and mortality. Controlling diabetes through life style modifications, including diet and exercise has always been the cornerstone in diabetes management. Increasing evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet could be of benefit in diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity as well as atherosclerosis, cancer, pulmonary diseases, and cognition disorders As a matter of fact, a number of studies addressed the relationship between Mediterranean diet and diabetes control. The result of these studies was conflicting. Some were able to elicit a protective role, while others showed no added benefit. As a result; we decided to conduct a systematic review to have a better understanding of the relationship between adherence to Mediterranean diet and diabetes control. A systematic review was conducted on the effect of Mediterranean diet in diabetes control and cardiovascular risk modification as well as the possible mechanism through which this diet might exhibit its beneficial role. We did a comprehensive search of multiple electronic databases such as Medline, Google Scholars, PubMed, and the Cochrane central register data until May 2014. We included cross-sectional, prospective, and controlled clinical trials that looked at the associations between Mediterranean diet and indices of diabetes control such HbA1c, fasting glucose, and homeostasis model assessment, in addition to cardiovascular and peripheral vascular outcomes. Most of the studies showed favorable effects of Mediterranean diet on glycemic control and CVD, although a certain degree of controversy remains regarding some issues, such as obesity. Important methodological differences and limitations in the studies make it difficult to compare results, thus further longer term studies are needed to evaluate the long

  5. Diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and a history of polycystic ovary syndrome: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bond, R; Pace, R; Rahme, E; Dasgupta, K

    2017-08-07

    To investigate whether polycystic ovary syndrome further increases postpartum diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and to explore relationships between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes in women who do not develop gestational diabetes. This retrospective cohort study (Quebec Physician Services Claims; Hospitalization Discharge Databases; Birth and Death registries) included 34 686 women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy (live birth), matched 1:1 to women without gestational diabetes by age group, year of delivery and health region. Diagnostic codes were used to define polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Cox regression models were used to examine associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Polycystic ovary syndrome was present in 1.5% of women with gestational diabetes and 1.2% of women without gestational diabetes. There were more younger mothers and mothers who were not of white European ancestry among those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Those with polycystic ovary syndrome more often had a comorbidity and a lower proportion had a previous pregnancy. Polycystic ovary syndrome was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.27, 1.82) among women with gestational diabetes. No conclusive associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes were identified (hazard ratio 0.94; 95% CI 0.39, 2.27) in women without gestational diabetes. In women with gestational diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome confers additional risk for incident diabetes postpartum. In women without gestational diabetes, an association between PCOS and incident diabetes was not observed. Given the already elevated risk of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes, a history of both polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational diabetes signal a critical need for diabetes surveillance and prevention. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  6. Predicting Risk of Type 2 Diabetes by Using Data on Easy-to-Measure Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, David M.; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Statistical models for assessing risk of type 2 diabetes are usually additive with linear terms that use non-nationally representative data. The objective of this study was to use nationally representative data on diabetes risk factors and spline regression models to determine the ability of models with nonlinear and interaction terms to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods We used 4 waves of data (2005–2006 to 2011–2012) on adults aged 20 or older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5,471) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to build risk models in 2015. MARS allowed for interactions among 17 noninvasively measured risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Results A key risk factor for type 2 diabetes was increasing age, especially for those older than 69, followed by a family history of diabetes, with diminished risk among individuals younger than 45. Above age 69, other risk factors superseded age, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The additive MARS model with nonlinear terms had an area under curve (AUC) receiver operating characteristic of 0.847, whereas the 2-way interaction MARS model had an AUC of 0.851, a slight improvement. Both models had an 87% accuracy in classifying diabetes status. Conclusion Statistical models of type 2 diabetes risk should allow for nonlinear associations; incorporation of interaction terms into the MARS model improved its performance slightly. Robust statistical manipulation of risk factors commonly measured noninvasively in clinical settings might provide useful estimates of type 2 diabetes risk. PMID:28278129

  7. Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Retention in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manson, Spero M.; Jiang, Luohua; Zhang, Lijing; Beals, Janette; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the associations between participant and site characteristics and retention in a multisite cardiovascular disease risk reduction project. Design and Methods: Data were derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project, an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American…

  8. Diabetes Drug Gets FDA Warning Due to Amputation Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Diabetes Drug Gets FDA Warning Due to Amputation Risk Canagliflozin tied to a doubling of amputations of legs, feet, agency says To use the ... to increase the risk of leg and foot amputations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. The ...

  9. Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Retention in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manson, Spero M.; Jiang, Luohua; Zhang, Lijing; Beals, Janette; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the associations between participant and site characteristics and retention in a multisite cardiovascular disease risk reduction project. Design and Methods: Data were derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project, an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American…

  10. Benefits of standardized diabetes and hypertension screening forms at community screening events.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garth N; Kim, Soo; James, Barbara; Reynolds, Gladys; Buggs, Georgia; Hunter, Mildred; Davis, Willie; Welsh, Valerie; Bourne, Khandi; Payne, Kermit; Primas, Marion E; Burwell, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to (a) assess hypertension and diabetes screening data collection practices and guidelines and (b) develop and test standardized screening forms for use at minority community- and faith-based screening events. Project Phase I involved resource assessment and the development of a set of screening forms and guidelines containing a core data set for both hypertension and diabetes. These were then tested during Phase II at predetermined community based screening events throughout the United States. Community- and faith-based health screening programs are important in reaching and informing individuals in selected communities about their health and health risks. This study demonstrated the development of a standard tool that was effective in conducting African American community-based screening programs for hypertension and diabetes by community-based organizations. These activities are effective to obtain standardized information on individuals within the communities served.

  11. Potential Effect of Opium Consumption on Controlling Diabetes and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Najmeh; Gozashti, Mohamad Hossain; Najafipour, Hamid; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Marefati, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to this belief that opium may have beneficial effects on diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors, the present study aimed to assess the potential and possible effects of opium consumption on diabetes control and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. Methods This study enrolled 374 diabetic subjects from diabetes care centers in Kerman, Iran, including opium user group (n = 179) and a non-opium user group (n = 195). The data were collected through a questionnaire completed by interviewing, physical examination and laboratory assessment. Findings Opium did not show any statistically significant effect on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and diastolic blood pressure. However, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and prevalence of high SBP were significantly higher in opium user group (P < 0.050). In addition, lower serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and frequency of lower HDL was significantly higher in opium user group (P < 0.001). Conclusion According to this study, opium does not seem to have beneficial effects on diabetes control or cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, it would not be advisable to consume opium as an anti-diabetes or cardioprotective agent. PMID:25140211

  12. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Progression to Diabetes in Patients at Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pittas, Anastassios G.; Nelson, Jason; Mitri, Joanna; Hillmann, William; Garganta, Cheryl; Nathan, David M.; Hu, Frank B.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multicenter trial comparing different strategies for prevention of diabetes in patients with prediabetes. We assessed the association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, measured repeatedly during follow-up, and incident diabetes in the combined placebo (n = 1,022) and intensive lifestyle (n = 1,017) randomized arms of the DPP. Variables measured at multiple study time points (25-hydroxyvitamin D, BMI, and physical activity) entered the analyses as time-varying “lagged” covariates, as the mean of the previous and current visits at which diabetes status was assessed. RESULTS After multivariate adjustment, including for the DPP intervention, participants in the highest tertile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (median concentration, 30.1 ng/mL) had a hazard ratio of 0.72 (95% CI 0.56–0.90) for developing diabetes compared with participants in the lowest tertile (median concentration, 12.8 ng/mL). The association was in the same direction in placebo (0.70; 0.52–0.94) versus lifestyle arm (0.80; 0.54–1.17). CONCLUSIONS Higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, assessed repeatedly, was associated with lower risk of incident diabetes in high-risk patients, after adjusting for lifestyle interventions (dietary changes, increased physical activity, and weight loss) known to decrease diabetes risk. Because of the observational nature of the study, the potential association between vitamin D and diabetes needs to be confirmed in intervention studies. PMID:22323410

  13. Adolescents' Perceptions of Health Risks, Social Risks, and Benefits Differ Across Tobacco Products.

    PubMed

    Roditis, Maria; Delucchi, Kevin; Cash, David; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie

    2016-05-01

    This study assesses perceptions of overall harm, short-term health and social risks, long-term health risks, and benefits associated with various tobacco products including conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, chew, and hookah. This study also assesses whether and how perceptions differ by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and previous experience with tobacco. A total of 722 high school students completed an online survey, answering questions about their use and perceptions of a variety of tobacco products. Differences in perceptions across products were assessed using a generalized estimation equation with an exchangeable correlation structure. Adolescents rated the various tobacco products as conferring significantly different levels of risks and benefits. Generally, adolescents rated cigarettes as most risky, followed by cigars and chew, with hookah and e-cigarettes rated as least risky. Adolescents rated hookah followed by cigarettes and e-cigarettes as most likely to make them look cool or fit in and cigars and chew as least likely to confer these benefits. There were interaction effects by age and use, with older adolescents and those with tobacco experience holding lower perceptions of risk. There were no significant interaction effects by race/ethnicity or gender. Given the significant differences in adolescents' perceptions of risks and benefits of using different tobacco products and research showing the predictive relationship between perceptions and behavior, there is a need for comprehensive messaging that discusses risks of all tobacco products, particularly hookah and e-cigarettes. There is also a need to address perceived benefits of tobacco products, especially hookah and e-cigarettes. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Diabetes and amoebiasis: a high-risk combination].

    PubMed

    Bredin, C; Margery, J; Bordier, L; Mayaudon, H; Dupuis, O; Vergeau, B; Bauduceau, B

    2004-01-01

    Amoebiasis is the second most common parasitic disease in the world. It occurs mainly in developing countries. Many people in endemic countries are asymptomatic carriers. It results in severe disease that can be fatal in rare cases. The case described in this report illustrates the growing risk of exposure to amoebiasis for diabetic patients as travel to endemic countries becomes more and more frequent. In the patient described here amoebiasis led to amoeboma, a rare complication of the colonic presentation. Despite a clinical disease syndrome mimicking that of an occluding gut tumor, the patient was treated medically with drugs alone. Retrospective studies show that diabetics are at higher risk for severe complications after amoebic infection. Because of the high incidence and severity of concurrent diabetes and amoeba, prophylactic measures are necessary for diabetic patients traveling in developing countries.

  15. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  16. Modifying Risk Factors: Strategies That Work Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 29.1 million Americans are currently diagnosed with diabetes, and this number is expected to increase to 48.3 million Americans by 2050. Correspondingly, the present burden of diabetes among patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty is significant and rising. Diabetes as a chronic condition is a well-established risk factor for complication after total joint arthroplasty. A growing body of evidence also indicates that hyperglycemia in the perioperative period, and not the diagnosis of diabetes alone, is similarly associated with increased complication risk. As a result, a coordinated approach to preoperative screening and optimization, combined with judicious perioperative glycemic control, may present an opportunity to improve outcomes, reduce complications, and avoid complication-related costs for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

  17. Modern obesity pharmacotherapy: weighing cardiovascular risk and benefit.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Jonathan W; Wiviott, Stephen D

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is a major correlate of cardiovascular disease. Weight loss improves cardiovascular risk factors and has the potential to improve outcomes. Two drugs, phentermine plus topiramate and lorcaserin, have recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the indication of obesity; a third, bupropion plus naltrexone, is under consideration for approval. In clinical trials, these drugs cause weight loss and improve glucose tolerance, lipid profile, and, with the exception of bupropion plus naltrexone, blood pressure. However, their effect on cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. In defining appropriate roles for these drugs in preventive cardiology, it is important to remember the checkered history of drugs for obesity. New weight-loss drugs share the serotonergic and sympathomimetic mechanisms that proved harmful in the cases of Fen-Phen and sibutramine, respectively, albeit with significant differences. Given these risks, randomized cardiovascular outcomes trials are needed to establish the safety, and potential benefit, of these drugs. This review will discuss the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity, existing efficacy and safety data for the novel weight-loss drugs, and issues in the design of postapproval clinical trials.

  18. Benefits and risks of diversification for individual fishers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sean C; Ward, Eric J; Shelton, Andrew O; Adkison, Milo D; Beaudreau, Anne H; Brenner, Richard E; Haynie, Alan C; Shriver, Jennifer C; Watson, Jordan T; Williams, Benjamin C

    2017-09-18

    Individuals relying on natural resource extraction for their livelihood face high income variability driven by a mix of environmental, biological, management, and economic factors. Key to managing these industries is identifying how regulatory actions and individual behavior affect income variability, financial risk, and, by extension, the economic stability and the sustainable use of natural resources. In commercial fisheries, communities and vessels fishing a greater diversity of species have less revenue variability than those fishing fewer species. However, it is unclear whether these benefits extend to the actions of individual fishers and how year-to-year changes in diversification affect revenue and revenue variability. Here, we evaluate two axes by which fishers in Alaska can diversify fishing activities. We show that, despite increasing specialization over the last 30 years, fishing a set of permits with higher species diversity reduces individual revenue variability, and fishing an additional permit is associated with higher revenue and lower variability. However, increasing species diversity within the constraints of existing permits has a fishery-dependent effect on revenue and is usually (87% probability) associated with increased revenue uncertainty the following year. Our results demonstrate that the most effective option for individuals to decrease revenue variability is to participate in additional or more diverse fisheries. However, this option is expensive, often limited by regulations such as catch share programs, and consequently unavailable to many individuals. With increasing climatic variability, it will be particularly important that individuals relying on natural resources for their livelihood have effective strategies to reduce financial risk.

  19. Early Benefits of Mitigation in Risk of Regional Climate Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter; Lowe, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Large differences in climate outcomes are projected over the coming century depending on whether greenhouse gas emissions continue on a business as usual path or are substantially reduced following an aggressive mitigation strategy. However, it has previously been claimed that it will take many decades for there to be any significant difference between paths of aggressive mitigation and business as usual with the emergence of differences only seen towards the middle of the century. Here we show that important differences in our exposure to risk of climate extremes in many land regions emerges much more quickly. Without substantial mitigation, in many regions of the world, extreme (one in 20-year) seasonal, regional near surface air temperatures are found to have become more than twice as likely within only 15 years (i.e. by 2030). Therefore our exposure to climate risk is reduced substantially and rapidly with aggressive mitigation. This demonstrates that the benefits of mitigation are realised rapidly and it is not necessary to wait until the middle of the century as has previously been claimed.

  20. HDL cholesterol and risk of diabetic nephropathy in patient with type 1 diabetes: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhi, Yunqing; Li, Chengqian; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Lifang; Wang, Yangang; Che, Kui

    2016-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of HDL on risk of diabetic nephropathy in T1DM patients. Ten papers containing (7698) participants were included in this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis suggest that the risk of diabetic nephropathy was decreased with HDL in type 1 diabetes.

  1. Weighing health benefit and health risk information when consuming sport-caught fish.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Barbara A; A Connelly, Nancy; Sheeshka, Judy; Patterson, Jacqueline

    2003-12-01

    Fish consumers may incur benefits and risks from eating fish. Health advisories issued by states, tribes, and other entities typically include advice about how to limit fish consumption or change other behaviors (e.g., fish cleaning or cooking) to reduce health risks from exposure to contaminants. Eating fish, however, may provide health benefits. Risk communicators and fish consumers have suggested the importance of including risk comparison information, as well as health risk-benefit comparisons in health advisory communications. To improve understanding about how anglers fishing in waters affected by health advisories may respond to such risk-risk or risk-benefit information, we surveyed Lake Ontario (NY, USA) anglers. We interviewed by telephone 4,750 anglers, 2,593 of which had fished Lake Ontario in the past 12 months and were sent a detailed mail questionnaire (1,245 responded). We posed questions varying the magnitude of health risks and health benefits to be gained by fish consumption, and varied the population affected by these risks and benefits (anglers, children, women of childbearing age, and unborn children). Respondents were influenced by health benefit and health risk information. When risks were high, most respondents would eat less fish regardless of the benefit level. When risks were low, the magnitude of change in fish consumption was related to level of benefit. Responses differed depending on the question wording order, that is, whether "risks" were posed before "benefits." For a given risk-benefit level, respondents would give different advice to women of childbearing age versus children, with more conservative advice (eat less fish) provided to women of childbearing age. Respondents appeared to be influenced more strongly by risk-risk comparisons (e.g., risks from other foods vs. risks from fish) than by risk-benefit comparisons (e.g., risks from fish vs. benefits from fish). Risk analysts and risk communicators should improve efforts to

  2. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  3. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  4. Clinical imaging guidelines part 2: Risks, benefits, barriers, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Malone, James; del Rosario-Perez, Maria; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Jung, Seung Eun; Holmberg, Ola; Bettmann, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    A recent international meeting was convened by two United Nations bodies to focus on international collaboration on clinical appropriateness/referral guidelines for use in medical imaging. This paper, the second of 4 from this technical meeting, addresses barriers to the successful development/deployment of clinical imaging guidelines and means of overcoming them. It reflects the discussions of the attendees, and the issues identified are treated under 7 headings: ■ Practical Strategy for Development and Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Governance Arrangements and Concerns with Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Finance, Sustainability, Reimbursement, and Related Issues; ■ Identifying Benefits and Radiation Risks from Radiological Examinations; ■ Information Given to Patients and the Public, and Consent Issues; ■ Special Concerns Related to Pregnancy; and ■ The Research Agenda. Examples of topics identified include the observation that guideline development is a global task and there is no case for continuing it as the project of the few professional organizations that have been brave enough to make the long-term commitment required. Advocacy for guidelines should include the expectations that they will facilitate: (1) better health care delivery; (2) lower cost of that delivery; with (3) reduced radiation dose and associated health risks. Radiation protection issues should not be isolated; rather, they should be integrated with the overall health care picture. The type of dose/radiation risk information to be provided with guidelines should include the uncertainty involved and advice on application of the precautionary principle with patients. This principle may be taken as an extension of the well-established medical principle of "first do no harm."

  5. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Araújo, Raquel Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes). The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... they become pregnant are less likely to develop gestational diabetes mellitus, a type of diabetes that occurs only ...

  7. Prevalence of risk factors for diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Fatma; El-Sadig, Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Background Foot complications are common in diabetic patients and are considered one of the most expensive diabetes (DM) complications to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for foot complications among diabetic patients in Al-Ain district, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of DM complications in Al-Ain district, UAE. A sample of 513 diabetic patients with a mean age of 53 years (SD: ± 13) were randomly selected during 2003/2004. All completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent medical assessment including foot examination and assessment of presence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Results Forty nine percent of the study populations were diagnosed to have DM without presenting with symptoms of diabetes and 35% had hypertension. The majority (86%) had type 2 DM. Of the total sample, 39% (95% CI: 35.1-43.7%) had PN and 12% (95% CI: 8.8–14.4%) had PVD. There were no cases of amputation and only one case had previous history of lower extremity ulceration. Significant risk factors for PN and PVD were: male gender, poor level of education, UAE nationality, increased duration of diabetes, type 2 DM, presence of hypertension and microalbuminuria (MA). Conclusion Despite the low prevalence of foot ulceration and amputation among the study population, nevertheless, a substantial proportion had potential risk factors for foot complications. PMID:17927826

  8. Tool Weighs Benefits, Risks of Raloxifene or Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a benefit-risk index to help guide decisions on whether postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer should take raloxifene or tamoxifen to reduce that risk.

  9. The traditions and risks of fasting for lipid profiles in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aldasouqi, Saleh; Grunberger, George

    2014-11-01

    Fasting overnight has been traditionally recommended by clinicians when ordering laboratory tests for lipid profiles for the purposes of health screening or monitoring of the effects of lipid-lowering medications. Patients with diabetes are tested for lipid profiles at least annually. This deeply rooted tradition of fasting for lipid testing has recently been challenged. Several studies have shown little benefit obtained by testing lipids in fasting compared with postprandial states. Furthermore, recent studies have shown the importance of postprandial lipid spikes in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. At the same time, recent reports have alerted the medical community to the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes on antidiabetic medications (particularly insulin and sulfonylureas) who are asked to fast for lab tests. This article reviews the literature on these emerging issues in lipid testing in patients with diabetes, and offers recommendations for lipid testing in these patients in view of these emerging discussions.

  10. As health care technology advances: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Funk, Marjorie

    2011-07-01

    Technology permeates every dimension of critical care. Bedside technology is integral to the assessment and monitoring of patients and to the provision of treatment. It also helps with access to vital information and can enhance communication. Although it offers extraordinary benefits to patients and clinicians, technology may also create problems. Our research addresses the wise use of technology in the care of critically ill patients. It examines the appropriate and safe use of technology, its equitable distribution, and the human-machine interface. Given that some devices are more effective and safe than others, it is important to assess the appropriateness of a specific technology in a specific situation. Just because a particular device is available, is it necessary to use it in every possible situation? Do we use it just because it is there? Do we employ "heroic" measures sometimes when it would be kinder not to? Studies on the safe use of technology in patient care lead to a consideration of the risk-benefit ratio. Our research on gender and racial differences in the use of cardiac procedures in patients with acute myocardial infarction focused on the equitable distribution of technology. The results of this line of research, along with those of numerous other studies, suggest possible racism in our health care practices. The human-machine interface, or how clinicians and patients interact with health care technology, is a crucial focus of research. Technology is at the heart of critical care. It allows clinicians to perform miracles, but is also a seductive and self-perpetuating force that needs careful monitoring by those who use it.

  11. Energy crops on floodplains - flood risk or benefit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolova, Zdenka; Baylis, Adam; Rose, Steve

    2010-05-01

    Land use and land management on floodplains have increasingly come into focus, particularly in relation to their impact on flooding. To date, research and modelling has explored the impact of land use changes such as floodplain afforestation, changes to management of upland moorlands or re-establishment of wet meadows on floodplains. However, no such investigation has been carried out into the impact on floodplain flows of growing energy crops. In the UK, a strong emphasis is being given to promotion of renewable energy. Farmers are encouraged to plant energy crops such as Miscanthus or Short Rotation Crops (e.g. Willow) in suitable locations, which typically exclude farmland in Flood Zone 3 (i.e. areas likely to be flooded by an event with a 100-year return period). However, there is a lack of understanding as to what impact, if any, the dense character of these crops planted on floodplains might have on flooding. This gap in knowledge currently prevents energy crops from being planted in areas where they could provide high economic and environmental benefit, and even possibly contribute to flood mitigation. At present, no guidance or policy exists to advise whether allowing farmers to establish energy crop plantations in Flood Zone 3 could alter the existing flood risk. Consequently, if energy crops could provide a coupled benefit of renewable energy source and flood mitigation, this benefit is not being utilised. To help fill in this gap in knowledge, a short term project was carried out in order to investigate, using suitable hydraulic modelling, the possible scale of impact of growing energy crops on river and floodplain flows, flood depth and overall impact on flood risk locally as well as downstream. 2D hydraulic modelling using TUFLOW was deemed to be the most appropriate approach for these investigations. The methodology included gaining an understanding of the life cycle and planting regime of Miscanthus and Willow, review of current knowledge on the

  12. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes: a mendelian randomisation study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amand F; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V; Patel, Riyaz S; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik; Hovingh, G Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew; Panayiotou, Andrie G; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Pająk, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S; McCarty, Catherine A; Kirchner, H Lester; Larson, Eric B; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; O'Donnell, Martin; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P; Smith, Daniel J; Meade, Tom; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Baranova, Ekaterina V; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L; Grobbee, Diederick E; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothée; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I; Reiner, Alex P; Lange, Leslie A; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Keating, Brendan J; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D; Sattar, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, which in no way offsets their substantial benefits. We sought to investigate the associations of LDL cholesterol-lowering PCSK9 variants with type 2 diabetes and related biomarkers to gauge the likely effects of PCSK9 inhibitors on diabetes risk. In this mendelian randomisation study, we used data from cohort studies, randomised controlled trials, case control studies, and genetic consortia to estimate associations of PCSK9 genetic variants with LDL cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, fasting insulin, bodyweight, waist-to-hip ratio, BMI, and risk of type 2 diabetes, using a standardised analysis plan, meta-analyses, and weighted gene-centric scores. Data were available for more than 550 000 individuals and 51 623 cases of type 2 diabetes. Combined analyses of four independent PCSK9 variants (rs11583680, rs11591147, rs2479409, and rs11206510) scaled to 1 mmol/L lower LDL cholesterol showed associations with increased fasting glucose (0·09 mmol/L, 95% CI 0·02 to 0·15), bodyweight (1·03 kg, 0·24 to 1·82), waist-to-hip ratio (0·006, 0·003 to 0·010), and an odds ratio for type diabetes of 1·29 (1·11 to 1·50). Based on the collected data, we did not identify associations with HbA1c (0·03%, -0·01 to 0·08), fasting insulin (0·00%, -0·06 to 0·07), and BMI (0·11 kg/m(2), -0·09 to 0·30). PCSK9 variants associated with lower LDL cholesterol were also associated with circulating higher fasting glucose concentration, bodyweight, and waist-to-hip ratio, and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. In trials of PCSK9 inhibitor drugs, investigators should carefully assess these safety outcomes and quantify the risks and benefits of PCSK9 inhibitor treatment, as was

  13. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  14. Risk Assessment Tools for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Buijsse, Brian; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Griffin, Simon J.; Schulze, Matthias B.

    2011-01-01

    Trials have demonstrated the preventability of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications or drugs in people with impaired glucose tolerance. However, alternative ways of identifying people at risk of developing diabetes are required. Multivariate risk scores have been developed for this purpose. This article examines the evidence for performance of diabetes risk scores in adults by 1) systematically reviewing the literature on available scores and 2) their validation in external populations; and 3) exploring methodological issues surrounding the development, validation, and comparison of risk scores. Risk scores show overall good discriminatory ability in populations for whom they were developed. However, discriminatory performance is more heterogeneous and generally weaker in external populations, which suggests that risk scores may need to be validated within the population in which they are intended to be used. Whether risk scores enable accurate estimation of absolute risk remains unknown; thus, care is needed when using scores to communicate absolute diabetes risk to individuals. Several risk scores predict diabetes risk based on routine noninvasive measures or on data from questionnaires. Biochemical measures, in particular fasting plasma glucose, can improve prediction of such models. On the other hand, usefulness of genetic profiling currently appears limited. PMID:21622851

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Oral Diabetic Medications, Insulin Therapy, and Overall Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Azar, Sami T.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide. Diabetes is an important chronic health problem associated with insulin resistance, increased insulin level, changes in growth hormones and factors, and activation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, leading to an increased breast cancer risk. This paper looked at the epidemiologic studies of the association between type 2 diabetes and risk of breast cancer and its effect on overall cancer-specific survival. The combined evidence overall supported a modest association between type 2 diabetes and the risk of breast cancer, which was found to be more prevalent among postmenopausal women. Effect of oral diabetics and insulin therapy on breast cancer risk was also evaluated. It was found that metformin and thiazolidinones tended to have a protective role. Metformin therapy trials for its use as an adjuvant for breast cancer treatment are still ongoing. Sulfonylurea and insulin therapy were found to be mildly associated with increased overall cancers. No evidence or studies evaluated the association of DPPIV inhibitors and GLP 1 agonists with breast cancer risk because of their recent introduction into the management of diabetes. PMID:23401790

  16. Survey of diabetes risk assessment tools: concepts, structure and performance.

    PubMed

    Thoopputra, Thitaporn; Newby, David; Schneider, Jennifer; Li, Shu Chuen

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to review the effectiveness and limitations of existing diabetes risk screening tools to assess the need for further developing of such tools. An electronic search of the EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane library supplemented by a manual search was performed from 1995-2010. The search retrieved a total of 2168 articles reporting diabetes risk assessment tools which, after culling, produced 41 tools developed in 22 countries, with the majority (n = 26) developed in North America and Europe. All are short questionnaires of 2-16 questions incorporating common variables including age, gender, waist circumference, BMI, family history of diabetes, history of hypertension or antihypertensive medications. While scoring format and cut-offs point are diverse between questionnaires, overall accuracy value range of 40-97%, 24-86% and 62-87% were reported for sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic curve respectively. In summary, there is a trend of increasing availability of diabetes prediction tools with the existing risk assessment tools being generally a short questionnaire aiming for ease of use in clinical practice. The overall performance of existing tools showed moderate to high accuracy in their predictive performance. However, further detailed comparison of existing questionnaires is needed to evaluate whether they can serve adequately as diabetes risk assessment tool in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Alcohol consumption and diabetes risk in the Diabetes Prevention Program1234

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Sarit; Howard, Andrea A; Perreault, Leigh; Bray, George A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Brown-Friday, Janet; Whittington, Tracy; Foo, Sandra; Ma, Yong; Edelstein, Sharon L

    2009-01-01

    Background: Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population, but little is known about the effects in individuals at high risk of diabetes. Objectives: The objectives were to determine associations between alcohol consumption and diabetes risk factors and whether alcohol consumption was a predictor of incident diabetes in individuals enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Design: DPP participants (n = 3175) had impaired glucose tolerance (2-h glucose: 7.8–11.1 mmol/L), elevated fasting glucose (5.3–7.0 mmol/L), and a body mass index (in kg/m2) ≥24. Participants were randomly assigned to placebo, metformin, or lifestyle modification and were followed for a mean of 3.2 y. Alcohol intake was assessed at baseline and year 1 by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Diabetes was diagnosed by annual oral-glucose-tolerance testing and semiannual fasting plasma glucose measurement. Results: Participants who reported higher alcohol consumption tended to be male, older, white, and less obese and to have a higher calorie intake and a higher HDL-cholesterol concentration. Higher alcohol consumption was associated with lower insulin secretion at any level of insulin sensitivity. We found lower incidence rates of diabetes with higher alcohol consumption in the metformin (P < 0.01 for trend) and lifestyle modification (P = 0.02 for trend) groups, which remained significant after adjustment for multiple baseline covariates. No similar association was observed in the placebo group. Conclusions: Despite overall low rates of alcohol consumption, there was a reduced risk of incident diabetes in those who reported modest daily alcohol intake and were assigned to metformin or lifestyle modification. Moderate daily alcohol intake is associated with lower insulin secretion—an effect that warrants further investigation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00038727. PMID

  18. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    PubMed

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Patients' Experience of therapeutic footwear whilst living at risk of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    PubMed

    Paton, Joanne S; Roberts, Anne; Bruce, Graham K; Marsden, Jonathan

    2014-02-22

    Previous work has found that people with diabetes do not wear their therapeutic footwear as directed, but the thinking behind this behaviour is unclear. Adherence to therapeutic footwear advice must improve in order to reduce foot ulceration and amputation risk in people with diabetes and neuropathy. Therefore this study aimed to explore the psychological influences and personal experiences behind the daily footwear selection of individuals with diabetes and neuropathy. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used to explore the understanding and experience of therapeutic footwear use in people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration. This study benefited from the purposive selection of a small sample of four people and used in-depth semi structured interviews because it facilitated the deep and detailed examination of personal thoughts and feelings behind footwear selection. Four overlapping themes that interact to regulate footwear choice emerged from the analyses: a) Self-perception dilemma; resolving the balance of risk experienced by people with diabetes and neuropathy day to day, between choosing to wear footwear to look and feel normal and choosing footwear to protect their feet from foot ulceration; b) Reflective adaption; The modification and individualisation of a set of values about footwear usage created in the minds of people with diabetes and neuropathy; c) Adherence response; The realignment of footwear choice with personal values, to reinforce the decision not to change behaviour or bring about increased footwear adherence, with or without appearance management; d) Reality appraisal; A here and now appraisal of the personal benefit of footwear choice on emotional and physical wellbeing, with additional consideration to the preservation of therapeutic footwear. For some people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration, the decision whether or not to wear therapeutic footwear is driven by the

  20. Patients’ Experience of therapeutic footwear whilst living at risk of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous work has found that people with diabetes do not wear their therapeutic footwear as directed, but the thinking behind this behaviour is unclear. Adherence to therapeutic footwear advice must improve in order to reduce foot ulceration and amputation risk in people with diabetes and neuropathy. Therefore this study aimed to explore the psychological influences and personal experiences behind the daily footwear selection of individuals with diabetes and neuropathy. Methods An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used to explore the understanding and experience of therapeutic footwear use in people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration. This study benefited from the purposive selection of a small sample of four people and used in-depth semi structured interviews because it facilitated the deep and detailed examination of personal thoughts and feelings behind footwear selection. Findings Four overlapping themes that interact to regulate footwear choice emerged from the analyses: a) Self-perception dilemma; resolving the balance of risk experienced by people with diabetes and neuropathy day to day, between choosing to wear footwear to look and feel normal and choosing footwear to protect their feet from foot ulceration; b) Reflective adaption; The modification and individualisation of a set of values about footwear usage created in the minds of people with diabetes and neuropathy; c) Adherence response; The realignment of footwear choice with personal values, to reinforce the decision not to change behaviour or bring about increased footwear adherence, with or without appearance management; d) Reality appraisal; A here and now appraisal of the personal benefit of footwear choice on emotional and physical wellbeing, with additional consideration to the preservation of therapeutic footwear. Conclusion For some people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration, the decision whether or not to wear

  1. Maternal overweight and obesity and risk of pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Persson, Martina; Cnattingius, Sven; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Johansson, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Overweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia in women without diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of maternal overweight and obesity on the risk of pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In a population-based cohort study including singleton births in Sweden, we estimated the risk of pre-eclampsia among women with type 1 diabetes (n = 7062) and type 2 diabetes (n = 886), and investigated whether maternal overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m(2)) modified the risk. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate crude and adjusted ORs with 95% CIs, using women without diabetes as the reference group (n = 1,509,525). Compared with women without diabetes, the adjusted ORs for pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were 5.74 (95% CI 5.31, 6.20) and 2.11 (95% CI 1.65, 2.70), respectively. The corresponding risks of pre-eclampsia combined with preterm birth were even higher. Risks of pre-eclampsia increased with maternal overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m(2)), foremost in women without diabetes, to a lesser extent in women with type 1 diabetes but not in women with type 2 diabetes. Maternal overweight and obesity increased risks of pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes but not in women with type 2 diabetes. Even so, considering associations between maternal BMI and overall maternal and offspring risk, all women (with and without diabetes) should aim for a normal weight before pregnancy.

  2. Type 2 diabetes diminishes the benefits of dietary antioxidants: Evidence from the different free radical scavenging potential.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Xie, Yixi; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-01

    The development of food fortified with polyphenols and polyphenol-rich foods represents a novel approach for preventing or managing type 2 diabetes. Herein, taking advantage of several radical scavenging, the impact of plasma proteins in diabetes on the benefits of dietary polyphenols was investigated. It illustrated that plasma proteins masked the dietary polyphenols, thus reducing their radical scavenging potential. The plasma proteins from type 2 diabetics bind and protect (i.e., mask) the polyphenol antioxidants less effectively than the non-glycosylated ones in healthy blood do. In the blood of diabetics the less-protected (non-masked) antioxidants react with free radicals before being delivered to the tissues that need them. We should pay more attention to in vivo benefits of dietary polyphenols for type 2 diabetics.

  3. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course.

    PubMed

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø; Jensen, Lasse; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S

    2017-05-31

    Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity had any impact on the knowledge, skills, and career of health care professionals contrasting participants from developing countries versus developed countries. 52.006 participants signed up and 29.469 participants were active in one of the three sessions (2014-2015) of Diabetes - a Global Challenge. Using an online based questionnaire (nine sections) software (Survey Monkey), email invitations were send out using a Coursera based database to the 29.469 course participants. Responses were analyzed and stratified, according to the United Nations stratification method, by developing and developed countries. 1.303 (4.4%) of the 29.469 completed the questionnaire. 845 of the 1303 were defined as health care professionals, including medical doctors (34%), researchers (15%), nurses (11%) and medical students (8%). Over 80% of the health care participants report educational benefits, improved knowledge about the prevention and treatment therapies of diabetes and furthermore improved professional life and practice. Over 40% reported that their professional network expanded after course participation. Study participants who did not complete all modules of the course reported similar impact as the ones that completed the entire course(P = 0.9). Participants from developing countries gained more impact on their clinical practice (94%) compared to health care professionals from

  4. Nut and peanut butter consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui; Manson, JoAnn E; Stampfer, Meir J; Liu, Simin; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B

    2002-11-27

    Nuts are high in unsaturated (polyunsaturated and monounsaturated) fat and other nutrients that may improve glucose and insulin homeostasis. To examine prospectively the relationship between nut consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes. Prospective cohort study of 83 818 women from 11 states in the Nurses' Health Study. The women were aged 34 to 59 years, had no history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer, completed a validated dietary questionnaire at baseline in 1980, and were followed up for 16 years. Incident cases of type 2 diabetes. We documented 3206 new cases of type 2 diabetes. Nut consumption was inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), family history of diabetes, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, and total energy intake. The multivariate relative risks (RRs) across categories of nut consumption (never/almost never, or =5 times/week) for a 28-g (1 oz) serving size were 1.0, 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85-1.00), 0.84 (0.95% CI, 0.76-0.93), and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.60-0.89) (P for trend <.001). Further adjustment for intakes of dietary fats, cereal fiber, and other dietary factors did not appreciably change the results. The inverse association persisted within strata defined by levels of BMI, smoking, alcohol use, and other diabetes risk factors. Consumption of peanut butter was also inversely associated with type 2 diabetes. The multivariate RR was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.68-0.91; P for trend <.001) in women consuming peanut butter 5 times or more a week (equivalent to > or =140 g [5 oz] of peanuts/week) compared with those who never/almost never ate peanut butter. Our findings suggest potential benefits of higher nut and peanut butter consumption in lowering risk of type 2 diabetes in women. To avoid increasing caloric intake, regular nut consumption can be recommended as a replacement for consumption of refined grain products or red or processed

  5. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  6. How to Decide on Modeling Details: Risk and Benefit Assessment.

    PubMed

    Özilgen, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical models based on thermodynamic, kinetic, heat, and mass transfer analysis are central to this chapter. Microbial growth, death, enzyme inactivation models, and the modeling of material properties, including those pertinent to conduction and convection heating, mass transfer, such as diffusion and convective mass transfer, and thermodynamic properties, such as specific heat, enthalpy, and Gibbs free energy of formation and specific chemical exergy are also needed in this task. The origins, simplifying assumptions, and uses of model equations are discussed in this chapter, together with their benefits. The simplified forms of these models are sometimes referred to as "laws," such as "the first law of thermodynamics" or "Fick's second law." Starting to modeling a study with such "laws" without considering the conditions under which they are valid runs the risk of ending up with erronous conclusions. On the other hand, models started with fundamental concepts and simplified with appropriate considerations may offer explanations for the phenomena which may not be obtained just with measurements or unprocessed experimental data. The discussion presented here is strengthened with case studies and references to the literature.

  7. Risks and benefits of commonly used herbal medicines in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott W. Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-02-15

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicines that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of the following plant species: nopal (Opuntia ficus), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chaparral (Larrea divaricata), dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), nettle or stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), linden flower (Tilia europea), and aloe (Aloe vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified.

  8. Brown bear habituation to people - Safety, risks, and benefits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrero, Stephen; Smith, Tom; DeBruyn, Terry D.; Gunther, Kerry; Matt, Colleen A.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, brown bear (Ursus arctos) viewing has increased in coastal Alaska and British Columbia, as well as in interior areas such as Yellowstone National Park. Viewing is most often being done under conditions that offer acceptable safety to both people and bears. We analyze and comment on the underlying processes that lead brown bears to tolerate people at close range. Although habituation is an important process influencing the distance at which bears tolerate people, other variables also modify levels of bear-to-human tolerance. Because bears may react internally with energetic costs before showing an overt reaction to humans, we propose a new term, the Overt Reaction Distance, to emphasize that what we observe is the external reaction of a bear. In this paper we conceptually analyze bear viewing in terms of benefits and risks to people and bears. We conclude that managers and policy-makers must develop site-specific plans that identify the extent to which bear-to-human habituation and tolerance will be permitted. The proposed management needs scientific underpinning. It is our belief that bear viewing, where appropriate, may promote conservation of bear populations, habitats, and ecosystems as it instills respect and concern in those who participate.

  9. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    PubMed

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  10. Hijamat in traditional Persian medicine: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Nimrouzi, Majid; Mahbodi, Ali; Jaladat, Amir-Mohammad; Sadeghfard, Abbas; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2014-04-01

    Traditional Persian medicine is based on humoral medical concepts. In the case of abundant blood in the body, tabi'at (body nature) deals with this imbalance by elimination of the morbid substances via some controlling mechanisms. If tabi'at could not react properly, the physician should prescribe an intervention to let the extra blood out. This can be done through phlebotomy, wet cupping, and the use of leech or scarification of the ears. Cupping with scarification may eliminate the morbid substance through the scarified skin, and cupping without scarification evacuates the morbid materials from the compromised organs. Wet cupping in health state is meant to be applied for preventing the blood humor dominance in susceptible individuals. In disease condition, wet cupping is defined as a treatment in which the patients confront the abundance of blood. Wet cupping may have harmful complications in extremely thin or obese patients. Wet cupping should be postponed in patients compromised by diseases especially in the thick phlegm abundance. In Asia, Iranian people, because of religious beliefs, are very interested in cupping therapy. Many unsupervised cupping procedures are performed in Iran, whereas benefits and risks of these procedures are undetermined by providers and clients. In this study, the most important indications and contraindications of wet cupping have been reviewed based on the traditional Persian medicine resources.

  11. Genetically modified organisms: do the benefits outweigh the risks?

    PubMed

    Hug, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to analyze the implications of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as well as international and European position regarding such organisms. Review of international and European legal requirements and ethical guidelines and relevant publications, found and accessed with the help of PubMed and Lund University Library databases. The article discusses the main application areas of GMOs, the expansion of using GMOs in the world as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the implications of their usage. It further provides an overview of the suggested ways to tackle or avoid the GMO-related risks. The international and European positions regarding the application of GMOs are discussed and European Directives, Regulations, and ethical guidelines are overviewed. The article further presents the public attitudes towards GMOs in Europe as well as overviews surveys conducted at the national level. Suggested steps to tackle the challenge of developing and managing biotechnology for the benefit of public health and the environment are presented.

  12. Risks and benefits of commonly used herbal medicines in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott W; Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-02-15

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicines that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of the following plant species: nopal (Opuntia ficus), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chaparral (Larrea divaricata), dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), nettle or stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), linden flower (Tilia europea), and aloe (Aloe vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified.

  13. Consumption of freshwater fish in Kahnawake: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Chan, H M; Trifonopoulos, M; Ing, A; Receveur, O; Johnson, E

    1999-02-01

    Kahnawake is a Mohawk community located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal. A comprehensive study was conducted in 1996-1997 to address the local concern regarding health risks of contaminant exposure associated with freshwater fish consumption. Forty-two participants, including most of the identified active fishermen (n=33), were interviewed. Walleye, perch, bullhead, and smallmouth bass were the species most consumed. Average daily intake of locally caught fish was 23 g/day. Nutrient and contaminant levels of locally collected fish were analyzed. Fish were good sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids (particularly omega-3 fatty acids), calcium, zinc, and iron. Levels of cadmium, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other chlorinated pesticides were at least 10 times lower than the guideline levels. Mercury levels of some predatory fish exceeded the guideline of 0.5 microgram/g. Average daily intakes of all contaminants were below the guideline levels by a factor of 10 except for mercury. Average mercury intake rate was about one-third that of the guideline level (200 micrograms/week). Contrary to residents' perception, Kahnawake fish were not particularly contaminated. In view of the nutritional as well as cultural benefits, fishing and fish consumption may be promoted. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. Consumption of freshwater fish in Kahnawake: Risks and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.M.; Trifonopoulos, M.; Ing, A.; Receveur, O.; Johnson, E.

    1999-02-01

    Kahnawake is a Mohawk community located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal. A comprehensive study was conducted in 1996--1997 to address the local concern regarding health risks of contaminant exposure associated with freshwater fish consumption. Forty-two participants, including most of the identified active fishermen were interviewed. Walleye, perch, bullhead, and smallmouth bass were the species most consumed. Average daily intake of locally caught fish was 23 g/day. Nutrient and contaminant levels of locally collected fish were analyzed. Fish were good sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, calcium, zinc, and iron. Levels of cadmium, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other chlorinated pesticides were at least 10 times lower than the guideline levels. Mercury levels of some predatory fish exceeded the guideline of 0.5 {micro}g/g. Average daily intakes of all contaminants were below the guideline levels by a factor of 10 except for mercury. Average mercury intake rate was about one-third that of the guideline level. Contrary to residents` perception, Kahnawake fish were not particularly contaminated. In view of the nutritional as well as cultural benefits, fishing and fish consumption may be promoted.

  15. The impact of web-based diabetes risk calculators on information processing and risk perceptions.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher; Padman, Rema; Downs, Julie

    2008-11-06

    As consumer demand for online health information grows, many organizations are providing personalized and interactive health risk communication tools. In response, there is a need to better understand how effective these features are in influencing user attention, information processing and risk perceptions. This study randomly assigned 100 middle-aged and elderly adult users to one of three versions of an experimental type 2 diabetes "risk calculator" in order to determine if personalized risk estimates and interactive risk feedback impact usage behavior and beliefs about future diabetes onset. Results suggest that personalization and interactive features did not lead to increases in user attention or systematic information processing. The experiment provided only modest evidence that personalization was related to increased accuracy in absolute diabetes risk perceptions. Future studies are warranted to more precisely explain the descriptive and normative implications when laypersons use web-based risk communication tools.

  16. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  17. Risk perception and unrecognized type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Janine; Lawson, Margaret L; Gaboury, Isabelle; Keely, Erin

    2009-09-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) following the index pregnancy, however, little is known of women's perception of this risk. The objectives were to (1) determine women's perception of risk of future development of T2DM following a GDM pregnancy and (2) describe the prevalence of undetected dysglycaemia in a Canadian population. The study was designed as a 9-11 year follow-up study of women previously enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of tight versus minimal intervention for GDM. Women's perception of future risk of diabetes was determined by questionnaire. Fasting lipid profile, height and weight were performed on all participants. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on all women without prior history of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The study was conducted at Ottawa Hospital General Campus and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, in Ottawa, Canada. Eighty-nine of 299 (30%) of the original cohort were recruited. Eighty-eight women completed the questionnaire and 77 women without known diabetes underwent two hour glucose tolerance testing. Twenty-three (30%) felt their risk was no different than other women or did not know, 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a little and 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a lot. Only 52% (40/77) had normal glucose tolerance. Of all, 25/88 (28%) patients had diabetes (11 previously diagnosed and 14 diagnosed within the study). Of those newly diagnosed with DM2, four (29%) were diagnosed by fasting glucose, six (42%) by two hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) alone and four (29%) by both. Twenty-four of the women (27%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Of those with IGT, 12 (57%) had a fasting food glucose < 5.6 mmol/L. In the high-risk perception group with newly diagnosed diabetes, two were overweight, seven were obese, four had a family history of DM2, and all had a waist circumference >88 cm. In conclusion the perception

  18. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2012-07-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients.

  19. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2014-01-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients. PMID:22527174

  20. Osteoarthritis-related difficulty walking and risk for diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Hawker, G A; Croxford, R; Bierman, A S; Harvey, P; Ravi, B; Kendzerska, T; Stanaitis, I; King, L K; Lipscombe, L

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of Osteoarthritis (OA)-related difficulty walking on risk for diabetes complications in persons with diabetes and OA. A population cohort aged 55+ years with symptomatic hip and knee OA was recruited 1996-98 and followed through provincial administrative data to 2015 (n = 2,225). In those with confirmed OA (examination and radiographs) and self-reported diabetes at baseline (n = 359), multivariate Cox regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between baseline difficulty walking (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) difficulty walking score; use of walking aid) and time to first diabetes-specific complication (hospitalization for hypo- or hyperglycemia, infection, amputation, retinopathy, or initiation of chronic renal dialysis) and cardiovascular (CV) events. Participants' mean baseline age was 71.4 years; 66.9% were female, 77.7% had hypertension, 54.0% had pre-existing CV disease, 42.9% were obese and 15.3% were smokers. Median HAQ difficulty walking score was 2/3 indicating moderate to severe walking disability; 54.9% used a walking aid. Over a median 6.1 years, 184 (51.3%) experienced one or more diabetes-specific complications; 191 (53.2%) experienced a CV event over a median 5.7 years. Greater baseline difficulty walking was associated with shorter time to the first diabetes-specific complication (adjusted HR per unit increase in HAQ walking 1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47, P = 0.02) and CV event (adjusted HR for those using a walking aid 1.35, 95% CI 1.00-1.83, P = 0.04). In a population cohort with OA and diabetes, OA-related difficulty walking was a significant - and potentially modifiable - risk factor for diabetes complications. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Communication about the risks and benefits of phase I pediatric oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Rebecca A; Zyzanski, Stephen; Baker, Justin N; Drotar, Dennis; Kodish, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Phase 1 pediatric oncology trials offer only a small chance of direct benefit and may have significant risks and an impact on quality of life. To date, research has not examined discussions of risks and benefits during informed consent conferences for phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. The objective of the current study was to examine clinician and family communication about risks, benefits, and quality of life during informed consent conferences for phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Participants included clinician investigators, parents, and children recruited from 6 sites conducting phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Eighty-five informed consent conferences were observed and audiotaped. Trained coders assessed discussions of risks, benefits, and quality of life. Types of risks discussed were coded (e.g., unanticipated risks, digestive system risks, and death). Types of benefits were categorized as therapeutic (e.g., discussion of how participation may or may not directly benefit child), psychological, bridge to future trial, and altruism. Risks and benefits were discussed in 95% and 88% of informed consent conferences, respectively. Therapeutic benefit was the most frequently discussed benefit. The impact of trial participation on quality of life was discussed in the majority (88%) of informed consent conferences. Therapeutic benefit, risks, and quality of life were frequently discussed. The range of information discussed during informed consent conferences suggests the need for considering a staged process of informed consent for phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Benefits and Safety of Long-Term Fenofibrate Therapy in People With Type 2 Diabetes and Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Ru-Dee; Keech, Anthony C.; Drury, Paul L.; Donoghoe, Mark W.; Hedley, John; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Davis, Timothy M.E.; Lehto, Seppo; Celermajer, David; Simes, R. John; Rajamani, Kushwin; Stanton, Kim

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic patients with moderate renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2) are at particular cardiovascular risk. Fenofibrate’s safety in these patients is an issue because it may elevate plasma creatinine. Furthermore, guidelines regarding fenofibrate dosing in renal impairment vary internationally. We investigated fenofibrate’s effects on cardiovascular and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) events, according to eGFR, in the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Type 2 diabetic patients (aged 50–75 years) with eGFR ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m2 were randomly allocated to a fixed dose of fenofibrate (200 mg daily) (n = 4,895) or placebo (n = 4,900) for 5 years. Baseline renal function (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation) was grouped by eGFR (30–59, 60–89, and ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2). The prespecified outcome was total cardiovascular events (composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary/carotid revascularization). Serious adverse events and instances of ESRD (plasma creatinine >400 μmol/L, dialysis, renal transplant, or renal death) were recorded. Analysis was by intention to treat. RESULTS Overall, fenofibrate reduced total cardiovascular events, compared with placebo (hazard ratio 0.89 [95% CI 0.80–0.99]; P = 0.035). This benefit was not statistically different across eGFR groupings (P = 0.2 for interaction) (eGFR 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2: 0.68 [0.47–0.97], P = 0.035; eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2: 0.85 [0.70–1.02], P = 0.08). ESRD rates were similar between treatment arms, without adverse safety signals of fenofibrate use in renal impairment. CONCLUSIONS Patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment benefit from long-term fenofibrate, without excess drug-related safety concerns compared with those with no or mild renal impairment. Fenofibrate treatment should not be contraindicated in moderate

  3. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    PubMed

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income <236 euros (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.8), and a glycosylated hemoglobin ≥ 7.0% (OR 2.8; 95%CI: 1.5-5.0). It is necessary that all DM patients seen in a family medicine clinic have a yearly screening for the early detection of diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Age at Menarche and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Cathy E.; Ong, Ken K.; Scott, Robert A.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Brand, Judith S.; Wark, Petra A.; Amiano, Pilar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Franks, Paul W.; Grioni, Sara; Halkjaer, Jytte; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Mattiello, Amalia; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rinaldi, Sabina; Rolandsson, Olov; Romieu, Isabelle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sánchez, María-José; Spijkerman, Annemieke M.W.; Tjonneland, Anne; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Younger age at menarche, a marker of pubertal timing in girls, is associated with higher risk of later type 2 diabetes. We aimed to confirm this association and to examine whether it is explained by adiposity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study consists of 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals from 26 research centers across eight European countries. We tested the association between age at menarche and incident type 2 diabetes using Prentice-weighted Cox regression in 15,168 women (n = 5,995 cases). Models were adjusted in a sequential manner for potential confounding and mediating factors, including adult BMI. RESULTS Mean menarcheal age ranged from 12.6 to 13.6 years across InterAct countries. Each year later menarche was associated with 0.32 kg/m2 lower adult BMI. Women in the earliest menarche quintile (8–11 years, n = 2,418) had 70% higher incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with those in the middle quintile (13 years, n = 3,634), adjusting for age at recruitment, research center, and a range of lifestyle and reproductive factors (hazard ratio [HR], 1.70; 95% CI, 1.49–1.94; P < 0.001). Adjustment for BMI partially attenuated this association (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.18–1.71; P < 0.001). Later menarche beyond the median age was not protective against type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Women with history of early menarche have higher risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. Less than half of this association appears to be mediated by higher adult BMI, suggesting that early pubertal development also may directly increase type 2 diabetes risk. PMID:24159179

  5. Plantar Pressure as a Risk Assessment Tool for Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Egyptian Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fawzy, Olfat A; Arafa, Asmaa I; El Wakeel, Mervat A; Abdul Kareem, Shaimaa H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diabetic foot ulceration is a preventable long-term complication of diabetes. In the present study, peak plantar pressures (PPP) and other characteristics were assessed in a group of 100 Egyptian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers. The aim was to study the relationship between plantar pressure (PP) and neuropathy with or without ulceration and trying to clarify the utility of pedobarography as an ulceration risk assessment tool in patients with diabetes. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients having diabetes were selected. All patients had a comprehensive foot evaluation, including assessment for neuropathy using modified neuropathy disability score (MNDS), for peripheral vascular disease using ankle brachial index, and for dynamic foot pressures using the MAT system (Tekscan). The studied patients were grouped into: (1) diabetic control group (DC), which included 37 patients who had diabetes without neuropathy or ulceration and MNDS ≤2; (2) diabetic neuropathy group (DN), which included 33 patients who had diabetes with neuropathy and MNDS >2, without current or a history of ulceration; and (3) diabetic ulcer group (DU), which included 30 patients who had diabetes and current ulceration, seven of those patients also gave a history of ulceration. RESULTS PP parameters were significantly different between the studied groups, namely, forefoot peak plantar pressure (FFPPP), rearfoot peak plantar pressure (RFPPP), forefoot/rearfoot ratio (F/R), forefoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG) rearfoot peak pressure gradient (RFPPG), and forefoot peak pressure gradient/rearfoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG/RFPPG) (P < 0.05). FFPPP and F/R were significantly higher in the DU group compared to the DN and DC groups (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between DN and DC. FFPPG was significantly higher in the DU and DN groups compared to the DC group (P < 0.05). RFPPP and FFPPG/RFPPG were significantly higher in the DU and DN

  6. Net Efficacy Adjusted for Risk (NEAR): A Simple Procedure for Measuring Risk:Benefit Balance

    PubMed Central

    Boada, José N.; Boada, Carlos; García-Sáiz, Mar; García, Marcelino; Fernández, Eduardo; Gómez, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    Background Although several mathematical models have been proposed to assess the risk:benefit of drugs in one measure, their use in practice has been rather limited. Our objective was to design a simple, easily applicable model. In this respect, measuring the proportion of patients who respond favorably to treatment without being affected by adverse drug reactions (ADR) could be a suitable endpoint. However, remarkably few published clinical trials report the data required to calculate this proportion. As an approach to the problem, we calculated the expected proportion of this type of patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Theoretically, responders without ADR may be obtained by multiplying the total number of responders by the total number of subjects that did not suffer ADR, and dividing the product by the total number of subjects studied. When two drugs are studied, the same calculation may be repeated for the second drug. Then, by constructing a 2×2 table with the expected frequencies of responders with and without ADR, and non-responders with and without ADR, the odds ratio and relative risk with their confidence intervals may be easily calculated and graphically represented on a logarithmic scale. Such measures represent “net efficacy adjusted for risk” (NEAR). We assayed the model with results extracted from several published clinical trials or meta-analyses. On comparing our results with those originally reported by the authors, marked differences were found in some cases, with ADR arising as a relevant factor to balance the clinical benefit obtained. The particular features of the adverse reaction that must be weighed against benefit is discussed in the paper. Conclusion NEAR representing overall risk-benefit may contribute to improving knowledge of drug clinical usefulness. As most published clinical trials tend to overestimate benefits and underestimate toxicity, our measure represents an effort to change this trend. PMID:18974868

  7. Safety and benefits of a tablet combining losartan and hydrochlorothiazide in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sakoda, Mariyo; Kurauchi-Mito, Asako; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of a tablet combining losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (L/HCTZ) in comparison with losartan alone in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension. Thirty consecutive Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension were randomly assigned to group A, receiving losartan alone for the first 3 months, then L/HCTZ for the next 3 months, or group B, receiving L/HCTZ for the first 3 months, then losartan alone for the next 3 months. Clinical and biological parameters were obtained before, and 3 and 6 months after the start of this study. The decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) during treatment with L/HCTZ were significantly greater than in treatment with losartan alone. Both treatments significantly and similarly decreased urinary albumin excretion, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and augmentation index (AI). There was no significant difference in metabolic change during both the mono- and combination pharmacotherapies. The tablet combining L/HCTZ significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BP compared with the losartan monotherapy, and offered benefits similar to losartan monotherapy for albuminuria, arterial stiffness assessed by the CAVI and AI, and metabolic effects. Thus, the L/HCTZ tablet could be a useful drug for Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension.

  8. Diabetes among Ethiopian Immigrants to Israel: Exploring the Effects of Migration and Ethnicity on Diabetes Risk.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Anat; Giveon, Shmuel; Wulffhart, Liat; Oberman, Bernice; Freedman, Laurence; Ziv, Arnona; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence among ethnic minorities and immigrants often differs from the majority indigenous population. We compared diabetes prevalence, incidence and risk among Ethiopian and non-Ethiopian Jews. Within these main groups, we controlled for the effect of migration on diabetes risk by comparing the subgroups of Ethiopian and former Soviet Union (FSU) immigrants, and compared both with Israeli-born non-Ethiopian Jews. The study cohort included adult Ethiopian (n = 8,398) and age-matched non-Ethiopian Jews (n = 15,977) and subgroups: Ethiopian immigrants (n = 7,994), FSU immigrants (n = 1,541) and Israeli-born non-Ethiopian Jews (n = 10,828). Diabetes prevalence, annual incidence, and hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for sex and metabolic syndrome (MetS)-components, were determined in three age groups (<50yrs, 50-59yrs, and ≥60yrs). Comparisons of body mass index (BMI) at diabetes incidence were made. Younger (<50yrs) Ethiopians had higher prevalence rates, 3.6% (95%CI: 3.1-4.1) and annual incidence, 0.9% (95%CI: 0.8-1.0) than non-Ethiopians, 2.7% (95%CI: 2.3-3.0) and 0.5% (95%CI: 0.4-0.6), respectively. These differences were particularly pronounced among Ethiopian women. Diabetes risk among Ethiopians was higher and adjustment for MetS-components was important only for BMI, which further increased hazard ratio (HR) estimates associated with Ethiopian ethnicity from 1.81 (95% CI:1.50-2.17) to 2.31 (95% CI:1.91-2.79). The same differences were seen when comparing Ethiopian to FSU immigrants. BMI before incident diabetes was lower among younger Ethiopian immigrants than younger FSU immigrants and Israeli-born. Ethiopian ethnicity is associated with increased diabetes risk, which is age and BMI dependent. Young Ethiopians<50yrs, particularly women, had the greatest increase in risk. Lower BMI cut-offs should be defined to reflect diabetes risk among Ethiopians.

  9. Benefits of Diabetes Self-Management for Health Plan Members: A 6-Month Translation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorig, Kate; Turner, Ralph M; English, Kathleen; Laurent, Diana D; Greenberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education has been shown to be effective in controlled trials. However, few programs that meet American Association of Diabetes Educators standards have been translated into widespread practice. Objective This study examined the translation of the evidence-based Better Choices, Better Health-Diabetes program in both Internet and face-to-face versions. Methods We administered the Internet program nationally in the United States (n=1010). We conducted face-to-face workshops in Atlanta, Georgia; Indianapolis, Indiana; and St. Louis, Missouri (n=232). Self-report questionnaires collected health indicator, health behavior, and health care utilization measures. Questionnaires were administered on the Web or by mail. We determined hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from blood samples collected via mailed kits. Paired t tests determined whether changes between baseline and 6 months differed significantly from no change. Subgroup analyses determined whether participants with specific conditions benefited (high HbA1c, depression, hypoglycemia, nonadherence to medication taking, and no aerobic exercise). We calculated the percentage of participants with improvements of at least 0.4 effect size in at least one of the 5 above measures. Results Of the 1242 participants, 884 provided 6-month follow-up questionnaires. There were statistically significant improvements in 6 of 7 health indicators (including HbA1c) and in 7 of 7 behaviors. For each of the 5 conditions, there were significant improvements among those with the condition (effect sizes 0.59–1.1). A total of 662 (75.0%) of study participants improved at least 0.4 effect size in at least one criterion, and 327 (37.1%) improved in 2 or more. Conclusions The Diabetes Self-Management Program, offered in two modes, was successfully disseminated to a heterogeneous national population of members of either insured or administered health plans. Participants had small but significant benefits in multiple

  10. Fears, Feelings, and Facts: Interactively Communicating Benefits and Risks of Medical Radiation With Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Balter, Rochelle; Williamson, Matthew J.; St. Germain, Jean

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE As public awareness of medical radiation exposure increases, there has been heightened awareness among patients and physicians of the importance of holistic benefit-and-risk discussions in shared medical decision making. CONCLUSION We examine the rationale for informed consent and risk communication, draw on the literature on the psychology of radiation risk communication to increase understanding, examine methods commonly used to communicate radiation risk, and suggest strategies for improving communication about medical radiation benefits and risk. PMID:21427321

  11. Bienestar: a diabetes risk-factor prevention program.

    PubMed

    Trevino, R P; Pugh, J A; Hernandez, A E; Menchaca, V D; Ramirez, R R; Mendoza, M

    1998-02-01

    The Bienester Health Program, a diabetes risk-factor prevention pilot program, targeted fourth grade Mexican American children. The primary goals are to decrease the two established risk factors for diabetes--overweight and dietary fats. Since the health program is based on Social Cognitive Theory, on social systems structure, and on culturally relevant material, it considers the child's social systems on both its health program and process evaluation. Learning activities were developed for four social systems that potentially influence children's health behaviors (parent, classroom, school cafeteria, and after-school care). Preliminary results show that the Bienestar Health Program significantly decreased dietary fat, increased fruit and vegetable servings, and increased diabetes health knowledge.

  12. Importance of cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is commonly accompanied by other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, CVD is the most common cause of death in people with T2DM. It is therefore of critical importance to minimize the risk of macrovascular complications by carefully managing modifiable CVD risk factors in patients with T2DM. Therapeutic strategies should include lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and prothrombotic factors. This article discusses the impact of modifying these CVD risk factors in the context of T2DM; the clinical evidence is summarized, and current guidelines are also discussed. The cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, and reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure are well established. For aspirin therapy, any cardiovascular benefits must be balanced against the associated bleeding risk, with current evidence supporting this strategy only in certain patients who are at increased CVD risk. Although overweight, obesity, and hyperglycemia are clearly associated with increased cardiovascular risk, the effect of their modification on this risk is less well defined by available clinical trial evidence. However, for glucose-lowering drugs, further evidence is expected from several ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials. Taken together, the evidence highlights the value of early intervention and targeting multiple risk factors with both lifestyle and pharmacological strategies to give the best chance of reducing macrovascular complications in the long term. PMID:24920930

  13. Nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert P

    2016-12-01

    If we are to gain a full and complete understanding of mechanisms of cardiovascular risk factors in adolescent type 1 diabetes mechanistic risk markers must be developed that predict risk accurately and which can be used as endpoints for short or intermediate term intervention studies aimed at reducing risk. A variety of biochemical and vascular markers have potential to meet these requirements. Biochemical markers include markers of inflammation, oxidation, and endothelial damage. Vascular markers include static and dynamic measures of arterial function. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes demonstrate alterations in many of these markers. For many of the biochemical markers precise cut-off points with high sensitivity and specificity are not available and many of the vascular measures require specific equipment and are operator dependent.

  14. Iron supplementation in early childhood: health benefits and risks123

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Lora L; Tielsch, James M; Black, Maureen M; Black, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of iron deficiency among infants and young children living in developing countries is high. Because of its chemical properties—namely, its oxidative potential—iron functions in several biological systems that are crucial to human health. Iron, which is not easily eliminated from the body, can also cause harm through oxidative stress, interference with the absorption or metabolism of other nutrients, and suppression of critical enzymatic activities. We reviewed 26 randomized controlled trials of preventive, oral iron supplementation in young children (aged 0–59 mo) living in developing countries to ascertain the associated health benefits and risks. The outcomes investigated were anemia, development, growth, morbidity, and mortality. Initial hemoglobin concentrations and iron status were considered as effect modifiers, although few studies included such subgroup analyses. Among iron-deficient or anemic children, hemoglobin concentrations were improved with iron supplementation. Reductions in cognitive and motor development deficits were observed in iron-deficient or anemic children, particularly with longer-duration, lower-dose regimens. With iron supplementation, weight gains were adversely affected in iron-replete children; the effects on height were inconclusive. Most studies found no effect on morbidity, although few had sample sizes or study designs that were adequate for drawing conclusions. In a malaria-endemic population of Zanzibar, significant increases in serious adverse events were associated with iron supplementation, whereas, in Nepal, no effects on mortality in young children were found. More research is needed in populations affected by HIV and tuberculosis. Iron supplementation in preventive programs may need to be targeted through identification of iron-deficient children. PMID:17158406

  15. Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Fan, Yingli; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hou, Wenshang; Tang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify and quantify the potential dose–response association between the intake of fruit and vegetables and risk of type 2 diabetes. Design Meta-analysis and systematic review of prospective cohort studies. Data source Studies published before February 2014 identified through electronic searches using PubMed and Embase. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Prospective cohort studies with relative risks and 95% CIs for type 2 diabetes according to the intake of fruit, vegetables, or fruit and vegetables. Results A total of 10 articles including 13 comparisons with 24 013 cases of type 2 diabetes and 434 342 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Evidence of curve linear associations was seen between fruit and green leafy vegetables consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes (p=0.059 and p=0.036 for non-linearity, respectively). The summary relative risk of type 2 diabetes for an increase of 1 serving fruit consumed/day was 0.93 (95% CI 0.88 to 0.99) without heterogeneity among studies (p=0.477, I2=0%). For vegetables, the combined relative risk of type 2 diabetes for an increase of 1 serving consumed/day was 0.90 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.01) with moderate heterogeneity among studies (p=0.002, I2=66.5%). For green leafy vegetables, the summary relative risk of type 2 diabetes for an increase of 0.2 serving consumed/day was 0.87 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.93) without heterogeneity among studies (p=0.496, I2=0%). The combined estimates showed no significant benefits of increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables combined. Conclusions Higher fruit or green leafy vegetables intake is associated with a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25377009

  16. Diabetes mellitus is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jonathan D; Rockman, Caron B; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Guo, Yu; Zhong, Hua; Weintraub, Howard S; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Adelman, Mark A; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is associated with significantly increased risk of peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is classified as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent, but it is unknown whether diabetes is a CHD risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease. The objective was to evaluate the odds of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or carotid artery stenosis (CAS) among participants with diabetes, CHD, or both, compared with participants without diabetes or CHD, in a nationwide vascular screening database. We hypothesized that diabetes and CHD would confer similar odds of PAD and CAS.

  17. The Impact of Hepatitis B Vaccination Status on the Risk of Diabetes, Implicating Diabetes Risk Reduction by Successful Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Feng, Wei; Samoa, Raynald; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chiu, Ken C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The liver plays a key role in fuel metabolism. It is well established that liver disease is associated with an increased risk for diabetes mellitus. Hepatitis C virus infection has been known to increase the risk of diabetes. However, much less is known about the role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in diabetes. We examined the association of diabetes based on the vaccination status for HBV. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we included adult subjects (≥20 y/o) with HBV serology available from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010. Diabetes was defined as established diabetes or fasting plasma glucose concentration ≥7.0 mmol/L, 2-hour plasma glucose concentration ≥11.1 mmol/L, or HbA1c ≥ 47.5 mmol/mol (6.5%). Vaccination was based on the reported history and immunization was determined by HBV serology. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated with consideration of the following covariates: age, gender, BMI, ethnic/racial group, current smoker, current alcohol consumption, family history of diabetes, poverty index, and education. Results This study included 15,316 subjects. Among them, 2,320 subjects was immunized based the HBV serology. Among 4,063 subjects who received HBV vaccination, successful vaccination was only noted in 39% of subjects. The HBV vaccination was not associated with diabetes (OR: 1.08, 95%CI: 0.96–1.23). Serology evidence of HBV immunization was associated with a reduced OR of diabetes (0.75, 95%CI: 0.62–0.90). Successful HBV vaccination was also associated with a reduced OR of diabetes (0.67, 95%CI: 0.52–0.84). Conclusions Although our study shows the association of HBV vaccination with the reduced odds of diabetes by 33%, a prospective study is warranted to confirm and examine the impact of HBV vaccination in prevention of diabetes. PMID:26509504

  18. Expanding role of the Madras Diabetes Research Foundation - Indian Diabetes Risk Score in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Viswanathan; Anbalagan, Viknesh Prabu

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Diabetes Risk Score was initially developed by the Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF-IDRS) to help detect undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the community. Soon it was found that the MDRF-IDRS could also help to predict incident diabetes, metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease (CAD), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as well as sleep disorders in the community. It helps to differentiate T2DM from non-T2DM. Finally, it also helps to identify those with CAD, peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy among those with T2DM. Thus, the MDRF-IDRS is a simple, virtually 'no cost' tool which is useful in several clinical and epidemiological settings.

  19. Comparison of frequency of obesity in high risk non diabetic young individuals with low risk non diabetic young individuals.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mumtaz Ali; Kumar, Raj; Ghori, Raft Ahmed; Shaikh, Dur-e-Yakta

    2011-06-01

    To assess the body mass index and waist circumferences of high risk non diabetic young individuals and compare them with low risk non diabetic young individuals. A cross sectional, case control comparative study was conducted in the department of medicine, LUMHS from January 2008 to March 2009. Five hundred individuals 20-40 years of age were selected and divided into two groups i.e. Group A: high risk (250 individuals) and Group B: low risk (250 individuals) on the basis of same age and gender. Group A included those who had positive family history of type 2 DM in 1st degree relatives while group B had no family history of type 2 DM in 1st degree relatives. The blood pressure, BMI and Waist Circumference was measured and Fasting Blood Sugar was estimated in each individual. In each group 125 (50%) were males and 125 (50%) were females. In group A 58% and in group B 28.8% individuals represented raised BMI whereas 42% in group A and 36% in group B individuals showed an increased waist circumference. Mean fasting blood glucose was significantly higher in Group A than in Group B (P = 0.001). Impaired Fasting Glucose is strongly associated with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Presence of obesity specially in high risk non-diabetic young individuals emphasize the need for routine health screening for early institution of preventive measures.

  20. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  1. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  2. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  3. Gender aspects in type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Naveed

    2013-08-01

    Men are well known to have a higher risk than women for cardiovascular disease. In recent years, however, studies show adult men also have higher risk for type 2 diabetes, an observation which has important clinical implications, particularly in the public health arena. This chapter explores the relevant data underlying this observation, examines potential mechanisms including life course changes in insulin resistance and role of adiposity, and discusses relevant clinical implications and solutions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Opportunistic Risk Screening for Type 2 Diabetes: Exploring of Application of Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool in Community Pharmacy in Australia and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thoopputra, Thitaporn; Pongmesa, Tipaporn; Newby, David Andrew; Schneider, Jennifer; Li, Shu Chuen

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of providing diabetes risk assessment at community pharmacy level in Australia and Thailand from organizational aspects. The intervention study was conducted in eight community pharmacies in New South Wales, Australia, and six community pharmacies in Central Thailand. Diabetes risk assessment tools were applied to determine the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. An open-ended question was asked to solicit the willingness-to-pay value for the service. A semistructured interview was conducted with participating pharmacists to solicit the perceived facilitators and barriers in providing the service. There were a total of 132 and 185 participants, with the ratio of participants in the three risk categories of low, intermediate, and high being 1:4:11 and 2:1:1.5 for Australia and Thailand, respectively. More Thai participants were willing to pay for the service (72.4% vs. 18.9%; P = 0.0001). Pharmacists from both countries agreed that providing risk assessment would increase health awareness and assist in dampening the burden of disease. A major barrier is time and staff shortage. Support from the government and collaboration among health care providers were major facilitators from Thai pharmacists' perspective, whereas remuneration was a major facilitator from Australian pharmacists' perspective. Pharmacists in both countries agreed that this intervention would contribute to produce positive health benefits. Differences in advantages and barriers as well as in the proportion of consumers willing to pay for the service demonstrated that it is essential for pharmacists (particularly in developing countries) to be aware of the pitfalls of copying practice initiatives in developed countries without any consideration of the local health care environment. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: economics and marketing-finance.

    PubMed

    Kalogeras, N; Odekerken-Schröder, G; Pennings, J M E; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Holm, F; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    All market participants (e.g., investors, producers, consumers) accept a certain level of risk as necessary to achieve certain benefits. There are many types of risk including price, production, financial, institutional, and individual human risks. All these risks should be effectively managed in order to derive the utmost of benefits and avoid disruption and/or catastrophic economic consequences for the food industry. The identification, analysis, determination, and understanding of the benefit-risk trade-offs of market participants in the food markets may help policy makers, financial analysts and marketers to make well-informed and effective corporate investment strategies in order to deal with highly uncertain and risky situations. In this paper, we discuss the role that benefits and risks play in the formation of the decision-making process of market-participants, who are engaged in the upstream and downstream stages of the food supply chain. In addition, we review the most common approaches (expected utility model and psychometrics) for measuring benefit-risk trade-offs in the economics and marketing-finance literature, and different factors that may affect the economic behaviour in the light of benefit-risk analyses. Building on the findings of our review, we introduce a conceptual framework to study the benefit-risk behaviour of market participants. Specifically, we suggest the decoupling of benefits and risks into the separate components of utilitarian benefits, hedonic benefits, and risk attitude and risk perception, respectively. Predicting and explaining how market participants in the food industry form their overall attitude in light of benefit-risk trade-offs may be critical for policy-makers and managers who need to understand the drivers of the economic behaviour of market participants with respect to production, marketing and consumption of food products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing multiple competing interventions in the absence of randomized trials using clinical risk-benefit analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the use of risk-benefit analysis for comparing multiple competing interventions in the absence of randomized trials, we applied this approach to the evaluation of five anticoagulants to prevent thrombosis in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Methods Using a cost-effectiveness approach from a clinical perspective (i.e. risk benefit analysis) we compared thromboprophylaxis with warfarin, low molecular weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, fondaparinux or ximelagatran in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, with sub-analyses according to surgery type. Proportions and variances of events defining risk (major bleeding) and benefit (thrombosis averted) were obtained through a meta-analysis and used to define beta distributions. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted and used to calculate incremental risks, benefits, and risk-benefit ratios. Finally, net clinical benefit was calculated for all replications across a range of risk-benefit acceptability thresholds, with a reference range obtained by estimating the case fatality rate - ratio of thrombosis to bleeding. Results The analysis showed that compared to placebo ximelagatran was superior to other options but final results were influenced by type of surgery, since ximelagatran was superior in total knee replacement but not in total hip replacement. Conclusions Using simulation and economic techniques we demonstrate a method that allows comparing multiple competing interventions in the absence of randomized trials with multiple arms by determining the option with the best risk-benefit profile. It can be helpful in clinical decision making since it incorporates risk, benefit, and personal risk acceptance. PMID:22233221

  7. Do We Know Whether Researchers and Reviewers are Estimating Risk and Benefit Accurately?

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Accurate estimation of risk and benefit is integral to good clinical research planning, ethical review, and study implementation. Some commentators have argued that various actors in clinical research systems are prone to biased or arbitrary risk/benefit estimation. In this commentary, we suggest the evidence supporting such claims is very limited. Most prior work has imputed risk/benefit beliefs based on past behavior or goals, rather than directly measuring them. We describe an approach - forecast analysis - that would enable direct and effective measure of the quality of risk/benefit estimation. We then consider some objections and limitations to the forecasting approach.

  8. Perceptions of health risks and benefits associated with fish consumption among Russian consumers.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Heleen; Fischer, Arnout R H; Honkanen, Pirjo; Frewer, Lynn J

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge about differences in consumer perceptions of health risks and benefits related to fish consumption is important for the development of targeted health interventions associated with dietary choice. The purpose of this study is to identify individual differences in Russian consumers according to their perceptions of health risks and benefits associated with fish consumption. By application of a cluster analysis on perceptions of personal risks and benefits associated with the consumption of fish, four groups of Russian consumers were classified as: very positive; positive; moderately positive; and 'high risk-high benefit' about the healthiness of fish consumption. Differences in perceptions of personal risks and benefits across consumers were related to self-reported fish consumption, optimism about personal risks and benefits, and optimism about personal knowledge about risks and benefits. Implications for the development of targeted health interventions to influence perceptions of risks and benefits associated with fish consumption, and ultimately fish consumption, are discussed. It is concluded that optimism regarding perceptions and knowledge of health risks, and health benefits should be taken into account when developing interventions aimed at consumer health.

  9. Gestational diabetes: risks, management, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is commonly defined as glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. Diagnostic criteria for GDM have changed over the decades, and several definitions are currently used; recent recommendations may increase the prevalence of GDM to as high as one of five pregnancies. Perinatal complications associated with GDM include hypertensive disorders, preterm delivery, shoulder dystocia, stillbirths, clinical neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and cesarean deliveries. Postpartum complications include obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in the offspring and diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the mothers. Management strategies increasingly emphasize optimal management of fetal growth and weight. Monitoring of glucose, fetal stress, and fetal weight through ultrasound combined with maternal weight management, medical nutritional therapy, physical activity, and pharmacotherapy can decrease comorbidities associated with GDM. Consensus is lacking on ideal glucose targets, degree of caloric restriction and content, algorithms for pharmacotherapy, and in particular, the use of oral medications and insulin analogs in lieu of human insulin. Postpartum glucose screening and initiation of healthy lifestyle behaviors, including exercise, adequate fruit and vegetable intake, breastfeeding, and contraception, are encouraged to decrease rates of future glucose intolerance in mothers and offspring. PMID:21151681

  10. Quantifying the benefits of achieving or maintaining long-term low risk profile for cardiovascular disease: The Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Smit, Henriëtte A; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Daviglus, Martha L; Verschuren, W M Monique

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating the relation between risk profiles and cardiovascular disease have measured risk at baseline only. We investigated maintenance and changes of risk profiles over time and their potential impact on incident cardiovascular disease. Population-based cohort study. Risk factors were measured at baseline (1987-1991) among 5574 cardiovascular disease-free adults aged 20-59 years. They were classified into four risk categories according to smoking status, presence of diabetes and widely accepted cut-off values for blood pressure, total cholesterol/HDL-ratio and body mass index. Categories were subdivided (maintenance, deterioration, improvement) based on risk factor levels at six and 11 years of follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for cardiovascular disease incidence 5-10 years following the risk-change period were fitted using Cox proportional hazards models. Only 12% of participants were low risk at baseline, and only 7% maintained it. Participants who maintained a low risk profile over 11 years had seven times lower risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 0.14, 95% CI: 0.05-0.41) than participants with long-term high risk profile, whereas those low risk at baseline whose profile deteriorated had three times lower risk (HR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.18-0.71). Our results suggest that, within each baseline risk profile group, compared with a stable profile, improving profiles may be associated with up to two-fold lower HRs, and deteriorating profiles with about two-fold higher HRs. Our study, using long-term risk profiles, demonstrates the full benefits of low risk profile. These findings underscore the importance of achieving and maintaining low risk from young adulthood onwards. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  11. Causal beliefs and perceptions of risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, The Netherlands, 2007.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Liesbeth; Henneman, Lidewij; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline; Marteau, Theresa; Timmermans, Danielle

    2011-11-01

    Understanding people's perceptions of disease risk and how these perceptions compare with actual risk models may improve the effectiveness of risk communication. This study examined perceived disease risk and causal beliefs for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the relationship between self-reported risk factors and perceived disease risk, and the influence of causal beliefs on perceived disease risk in people at increased risk. The sample (n = 255) consisted of people who were at increased risk for diabetes and CVD (aged 57-79 y). Participants completed a postal questionnaire assessing risk factors, perceived risk, and causal beliefs for diabetes and CVD. We used regression analyses to examine the relationship between risk factors and perceived disease risk and to explore how causal beliefs affect the relationship between risk factors and perceived disease risk. Associations between risk factors and perceived diabetes and CVD risks were weak. Perceived risk, causal beliefs, and explained variance of risk factors on perceived risk were lower for diabetes than for CVD. Stronger beliefs concerning 1) overweight as a cause of diabetes and 2) smoking as a cause of CVD strengthened the association between these risk factors and perceived disease risk. Although participants seemed to have some understanding of disease causation, they only partially translated their risk factors into accurate perceptions of risk. To improve understanding of risk information, health professionals may need to educate patients on how personal risk factors can contribute to the development of diabetes and CVD.

  12. Diabetes mellitus as a novel risk factor for gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Herrigel, Dana J; Moss, Rebecca A

    2014-10-01

    Evidence of an emerging etiologic link between diabetes mellitus and several gastrointestinal malignancies is presented. Although a correlation between pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus has long been suspected, the potential role diabetes mellitus plays in the pathogenicity of both hepatocellular carcinoma and colon cancer is becoming increasingly well defined. Further supporting the prospect of etiologic linkage, the association of diabetes mellitus with colon cancer is consistently demonstrated to be independent of obesity. An increasing incidence of diabetes and obesity in the United States has led to a recent surge in incidence of hepatocellular cancer on the background of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and this disease is expected to commensurately grow in incidence. Widespread recognition of this emerging risk factor may lead to a change in screening practices. Although the mechanisms underlying the correlation are still under investigation, the role of insulin, the insulin-like growth factor-I, and related binding and signaling pathways as regulators of cell growth and cell proliferation are implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. The potential role of metformin and other medications for diabetes mellitus in the chemoprevention, carcinogenesis, and treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies is also presented.

  13. Results of a diabetic retinopathy screening. Risk markers analysis.

    PubMed

    Ancochea, G; Martín Sánchez, M D

    2016-01-01

    To identify risk markers for retinopathy in patients from our geographic area, and to compare them with those published in other studies. To design a screening interval strategy, taking into account these results, and compare it with intervals suggested in published studies. Cross-sectional observational study on 383 diabetic patients with no previous retinopathy diagnosis, who were screened for diabetic retinopathy. An analysis was made on the possible association between patient factors and presence of retinopathy. A greater probability for finding retinopathy in diabetic patients was associated to insulin treatment in our study, with a statistical significance level of 95%. In patients with less than 10year onset of their diabetes, only mild retinopathy without macular oedema was found. Insulin treatment and time of onset of diabetes should be taken into account when designing efficient screening strategies for diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical Care Expenditures for Individuals with Prediabetes: The Potential Cost Savings in Reducing the Risk of Developing Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tamkeen; Tsipas, Stavros; Wozniak, Gregory

    2017-02-13

    The United States has 86 million adults with prediabetes. Individuals with prediabetes can prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications such as participation in the National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), thereby mitigating the medical and economic burdens associated with diabetes. A cohort analysis of a commercially insured population was conducted using individual-level claims data from Truven Health MarketScan(®) Lab Database to identify adults with prediabetes, track whether they develop diabetes, and compare medical expenditures for those who are newly diagnosed with diabetes to those who are not. This study then illustrates how reducing the risk of developing diabetes by participation in an evidence-based lifestyle change program could yield both positive net savings on medical care expenditures and return on investment (ROI). Annual expenditures are found to be nearly one third higher for those who develop diabetes in subsequent years relative to those who do not transition from prediabetes to diabetes, with an average difference of $2671 per year. At that cost differential, the 3-year ROI for a National DPP is estimated to be as high as 42%. The results show the importance and economic benefits of participation in lifestyle intervention programs to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

  15. Risk of Bladder Cancer Among Diabetic Patients Treated With Pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James D.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Peng, Tiffany; Hedderson, Monique; Bilker, Warren B.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Vaughn, David J.; Nessel, Lisa; Selby, Joseph; Strom, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Some preclinical in vivo studies and limited human data suggest a possible increased risk of bladder cancer with pioglitazone therapy. This is an interim report of an ongoing cohort study examining the association between pioglitazone therapy and the risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study includes 193,099 patients in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California diabetes registry who were ≥40 years of age between 1997 and 2002. Those with prior bladder cancer were excluded. Ever use of each diabetes medication (defined as two or more prescriptions within 6 months) was treated as a time-dependent variable. Cox regression–generated hazard ratios (HRs) compared pioglitazone use with nonpioglitazone use adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetes medications, A1C, heart failure, household income, renal function, other bladder conditions, and smoking. RESULTS The group treated with pioglitazone comprised 30,173 patients. There were 90 cases of bladder cancer among pioglitazone users and 791 cases of bladder cancer among nonpioglitazone users. Overall, ever use of pioglitazone was not associated with risk of bladder cancer (HR 1.2 [95% CI 0.9–1.5]), with similar results in men and women (test for interaction P = 0.8). However, in the a priori category of >24 months of therapy, there was an increased risk (1.4 [1.03–2.0]). Ninety-five percent of cancers diagnosed among pioglitazone users were detected at early stage. CONCLUSIONS In this cohort of patients with diabetes, short-term use of pioglitazone was not associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer, but use for more than 2 years was weakly associated with increased risk. PMID:21447663

  16. Understanding public perceptions of benefits and risks of childhood vaccinations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Song, Geoboo

    2014-03-01

    In the face of a growing public health concern accompanying the reemerging threat of preventable diseases, this research seeks mainly to explain variations in the perceived benefits and risks of vaccinations among the general public in the United States. As Mary Douglas and Aaron Wildavsky's grid-group cultural theory of risk perception claims, the analytical results based upon original data from a nationwide Internet survey of 1,213 American adults conducted in 2010 suggest that individuals' cultural predispositions contribute to the formation of their perceptions pertaining to vaccine benefits and risks at both societal and individual levels, in conjunction with other factors suggested by previous risk perception literature, such as perceived prevalence of diseases, trust, knowledge level, and demographic characteristics. Those with a strong hierarch orientation tend to envision greater benefits and lesser risks and conceive of a relatively high ratio of benefit to risk when compared to other cultural types. By contrast, those with a strong fatalist tendency are inclined to emphasize risks and downplay benefits while conceiving of a low vaccination benefit-risk ratio. Situated between hierarchs and fatalists, strong egalitarians are prone to perceive greater benefits, smaller risks, and a more positive benefit-risk ratio than strong individualists.

  17. Sex of the baby and future maternal risk of Type 2 diabetes in women who had gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Retnakaran, R; Shah, B R

    2016-07-01

    Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus have a chronic defect in the secretion of insulin by the pancreatic β cells that underlies both their diagnostic hyperglycaemia in pregnancy and their elevated lifetime risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the future. It has recently emerged that carrying a male fetus is associated with poorer maternal β-cell function and an increased risk of gestational diabetes, whereas the development of gestational diabetes when carrying a girl (as compared with a boy) predicts a comparatively higher risk of early progression to Type 2 diabetes before any subsequent pregnancy. In this context, we sought to determine the impact of fetal sex on the long-term risk of Type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes. Using population-based administrative databases, we identified all women in Ontario, Canada, with a singleton live-birth first pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes between April 2000 and March 2010 (n = 23 363). We compared the risk of subsequent Type 2 diabetes after pregnancy in those who carried a girl (n = 11 229) vs. those who carried a boy (n = 12 134). Over median 5.5 years follow-up, 5483 women (23.5%) were diagnosed with diabetes. Compared with those who carried a boy, women who had a girl had an elevated risk of subsequently developing diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12). Among women with gestational diabetes, those who are carrying a girl have a slightly higher overall future risk of Type 2 diabetes. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  18. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: consumer perception.

    PubMed

    Ueland, Ø; Gunnlaugsdottir, H; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Pohjola, M V; Tijhuis, M J; Tuomisto, J T; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Benefit and risk perception with respect to food consumption, have been a part of human daily life from beginning of time. In today's society the food chain is long with many different types of actors and low degree of transparency. Making informed food choices where knowledge of benefits and risks is part of the decision making process are therefore complicated for consumers. Thus, to understand how consumers perceive benefits and risks of foods, their importance in relation to quality evaluations are aspects that need to be addressed. The objective of this paper is to discuss state of the art in understanding consumer perceptions of benefits and risks of foods in order to improve understanding of consumer behaviour in the food domain. Risks may be associated with both acute and long term consequences, some of which may have serious effects. Perceived risks are connected to morbidity and mortality along two dimensions relating to unknown risk, and to which extent the risk is dreaded by the consumer. Unfamiliar, uncertain, unknown, uncontrollable, and severe consequences are some factors associated with risk perception. Novel food processing techniques, for instance, score high on several of these parameters and are consequently regarded with suspicion and perceived as risky by consumers. On a daily basis, benefits of foods and food consumption are more important in most consumers' minds than risks. Benefits are often associated with food's ability to assuage hunger, and to provide pleasure through eating and socialising. In addition, two main categories of benefits that are important for acceptance of product innovations are health and environmental benefits. Benefit and risk perception of foods seem to be inversely correlated, so when something is perceived as being highly beneficial, it is correspondingly perceived as having low risk. However, slightly different paths are used in the formation of these perceptions; benefit perception is based on heuristics and

  19. Benefit and Adherence of the Disease Management Program “Diabetes 2”: A Comparison of Turkish Immigrants and German Natives with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities. PMID:25233016

  20. Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial: design and methods.

    PubMed

    Buse, John B; Bigger, J Thomas; Byington, Robert P; Cooper, Lawton S; Cushman, William C; Friedewald, William T; Genuth, Saul; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Ginsberg, Henry N; Goff, David C; Grimm, Richard H; Margolis, Karen L; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Sullivan, Mark D

    2007-06-18

    of good glycemic control will reduce the rate of CVD events compared with a strategy that targets a systolic blood pressure of <140 mm Hg. The primary outcome measure for all 3 research questions is the first occurrence of a major CVD event, specifically nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or cardiovascular death. Upon the expected completion of participant follow-up in 2009, the ACCORD trial should document for the first time the benefits and risks of intensive glucose control, intensive blood pressure control, and the combination of fibrate and statin drugs in managing blood lipids in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer.

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D.

  3. Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol level as a screening tool for diabetes mellitus in a community-based population at high risk of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Yuan, Yuexing; Zhang, Yanli; Lei, Chenghao; Zhou, Yi; He, Jiajia; Sun, Zilin

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetes yields significant clinical benefits; however, currently available diagnostic tools for community-based population are limited. This study aimed to assess the value of serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) for the diagnosis and screening of diabetes mellitus in a community-based population at high risk of diabetes. In this diagnostic test, 1170 participants underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Venous blood samples were collected for fasting blood glucose (FBG), 2-h postprandial blood glucose (PBG), and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements. Serum 1,5-AG levels were detected by the GlycoMark assay, and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to assess their diagnostic value for diabetes. A total of 298 adults were diagnosed with diabetes, indicating a prevalence of 25.47%. Partial Pearson correlation analysis adjusted for age and body mass index showed that serum 1,5-AG level was negatively correlated with FBG, PBG, and HbA1c (all P < 0.01). Areas under the curves (AUCs) for serum 1,5-AG, FBG, PBG, and HbA1c in identifying diabetes were 0.920, 0.874, 0.933, and 0.887, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the optimal cutoff value of serum 1,5-AG for diagnosing diabetes was 11.18 μg/ml, which yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and a specificity of 82.3%, respectively. Comparisons between 1,5-AG and HbA1c showed that both the AUC and sensitivity of 1,5-AG were higher than those of HbA1c (both P < 0.01). Serum 1,5-AG is a simple and effective marker with high sensitivity and specificity for identifying diabetes in populations at high risk of diabetes.

  4. Risks and Benefits of Late Onset Hypogonadism Treatment: An Expert Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is a syndromic condition that has a well-recognized association with sexual and reproductive failure. LOH is frequently associated with chronic conditions including cardiovascular diseases (CVD), obesity, osteoporosis, HIV infection, renal failure, and obstructive pulmonary diseases. Despite this evidence, in patients with these conditions, LOH is still only rarely investigated and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) rarely considered. In this paper, we critically reviewed the available evidence on LOH treatment focusing on possible risks and benefits. Medical therapy of LOH should be individualized depending on the etiology of the disease and the patient's expectations. The fear of prostate cancer and the risk of erythrocytosis probably represent the main limitations of TRT in aging men. However, TRT in healthy older men in near physiological doses does not appear to incur serious adverse events, although regular monitoring of prostate-specific antigen and hematocrit levels is required. Available evidence also suggests that TRT might ameliorate central obesity and glycometabolic control in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In addition, TRT has been associated with an increase in bone mineral density in men with osteoporosis, with an improvement in lean body mass in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infection or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as with peripheral oxygenation in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Despite this evidence, however, it should be recognized that the results of these trials were heterogeneous and limited by small sample sizes. Hence, further research is required regarding the long-term benefits and adverse effects of TRT in LOH. PMID:24044106

  5. Menopausal Estrogen Therapy Benefits and Risks Vary by Age, WHI Analysis Suggests

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term follow-up data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) provide new information about the potential risks and benefits of hormone therapy to treat symptoms related to menopause, including its effect on breast cancer risk,

  6. Testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency: are the benefits and cardiovascular risks real or imagined?

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2016-09-01

    In the adult male, testosterone (T) deficiency (TD) also known as male hypogonadism, is a well-established medical condition, which has been recognized for more than a century. T therapy in men with TD was introduced as early as 1940s and was reported to improve overall health with no concomitant serious adverse effects. A wealth of recent studies demonstrated that T therapy in men with TD is associated with increased lean body mass, reduced fat mass and waist circumference, improvement in glycemic control, and reduced obesity. T therapy is also associated with improvements in lipid profiles, amelioration of metabolic syndrome (Met S) components, reduced inflammatory biomarkers, reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and improvements in sexual function. More importantly, T therapy is associated with amelioration of diabetes and reduced mortality. However, few studies, marred with serious methodological and analytical flaws reported between 2010 and 2014, suggested that T therapy is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. As summarized in this review, a thorough and critical analysis of these studies showed that the risks purported are unsubstantiated and such studies lacked credible scientific and clinical evidence. Moreover, recent observational, registry studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses, all revealed no increase in CV risks in men receiving T therapy. In this review, the benefits of T therapy in adult men with TD and the lack of credible evidence suggesting that T therapy is linked to increased CV risks are discussed. It should be noted that the literature is replete with studies demonstrating beneficial effects of T therapy on CV and overall health.

  7. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    of early glycemic control. Identifying high-risk patients at a very early stage is not only desired for prevention of diabetic retinopathy - neuropathy and nephropathy similarly remain frequent in type 1 diabetes. Early risk stratification will allow for timely implementation of effective interventions and for individualized screening and diabetes care. The second and third studies of this thesis provide the longest prospective studies to date on both retinal vessel calibers and retinal fractal dimensions and their predictive value on diabetic microvascular complications. Semi-automated computer software has been developed to measure smaller changes in the retinal vessels on retinal photographs. Two of the first parameters to be reliably estimated by these programs were retinal vessel calibers and retinal vascular fractal dimensions (a quantitative measure on vascular complexity). There is very limited knowledge on their predictive value on diabetic complications thus far. In the second and third study, a consistent relation between narrower retinal arteriolar calibers, wider retinal venular calibers, lower fractal dimensions and the 16-year incidences of diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy and proliferative retinopathy was found. This has never been shown before. The results on vessel analyzes provides indications of a common pathogenic pathway for diabetic microvascular complications and therefore a possibility of universal risk estimation for development of neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. An Approach for Quantitatively Balancing Methylmercury Risk and Omega-3 Benefit in Fish Consumption Advisories

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Leo R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nearly all fish consumption advisories for methylmercury (MeHg) are based only on risk. There is a need to also address benefits, especially those from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), in neurodevelopmental function and cardiovascular health. However, because MeHg and PUFA generally act on these same end points, disentangling risk and benefit is challenging. Objectives: We propose an approach for balancing risk and benefit that is based on the use of statistically dissociated measures of risk and benefit. Discussion: Because of mutual coexposure of MeHg and PUFAs in population-based studies and their opposite effect on many of the same end points, MeHg risk and PUFA benefit are tightly linked statistically, which results in mutual (negative) confounding. Thus, neither MeHg risk nor PUFA benefit can be accurately quantified without taking the other into account. A statistical approach that generates unconfounded risk and benefit coefficients for each end point can permit their subsequent recombination to describe the overall risk–benefit profile of each species of fish or fish diet. However, it appears that some end points may be adversely affected by MeHg without experiencing counterbalancing benefit from PUFAs. Such end points may drive consumption advisories and may preclude balancing of risk and benefit on the basis of other end points. Conclusions: Our thinking about fish consumption advisories now recognizes the need to balance risk and benefit. However, although statistical analysis of the appropriate data can eliminate mutual confounding, care is required to address the most sensitive end points that may be sensitive to risk and not benefit. PMID:21543281

  9. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk.

  10. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  11. [Incidence and clinical risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Vigo, P; Álvarez-Silvares, E; Alves-Pérez M T; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered a variant of diabetes mellitus as they share a common pathophysiological basis: insulin resistance in target and insufficient secretion of it by pancreatic p-cell bodies. Pregnancy is a unique physiological situation provides an opportunity to identify future risk of diabetes mellitus. To determine the long-term incidence of diabetes mellitus in women who have previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and identifying clinical risk factors for developing the same. nested case-control cohort study. 671 patients between 1996 and 2009 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes were selected. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was estimated and 2 subgroups were formed: Group A or cases: women who develop diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Group B or control: random sample of 71 women with a history of gestational diabetes in the follow-up period remained normoglycemic. Both groups were studied up to 18 years postpartum. By studying Kaplan Meier survival of the influence of different gestational variables it was obtained in the later development of diabetes mellitus with time parameter and COX models for categorical variables were applied. Significant variables were studied by multivariate Cox analysis. In all analyzes the Hazard ratio was calculated with confidence intervals at 95%. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10.3% in patients with a history of gestational diabetes. They were identified as risk factors in the index pregnancy to later development of diabetes mellitus: greater than 35 and younger than 27 years maternal age, BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor metabolic control and more than a complicated pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Clinical factors have been identified in the pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes that determine a higher probability of progression to diabetes mellitus in the medium and long term.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  13. Benefits and Risks of Antiretroviral Therapy for Perinatal HIV Prevention.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Mary G; Qin, Min; Fiscus, Susan A; Currier, Judith S; Flynn, Patricia M; Chipato, Tsungai; McIntyre, James; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Siberry, George K; Coletti, Anne S; Taha, Taha E; Klingman, Karin L; Martinson, Francis E; Owor, Maxensia; Violari, Avy; Moodley, Dhayendre; Theron, Gerhard B; Bhosale, Ramesh; Bobat, Raziya; Chi, Benjamin H; Strehlau, Renate; Mlay, Pendo; Loftis, Amy J; Browning, Renee; Fenton, Terence; Purdue, Lynette; Basar, Michael; Shapiro, David E; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2016-11-03

    Background Randomized-trial data on the risks and benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared with zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine to prevent transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV-infected pregnant women with high CD4 counts are lacking. Methods We randomly assigned HIV-infected women at 14 or more weeks of gestation with CD4 counts of at least 350 cells per cubic millimeter to zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine plus a 1-to-2-week postpartum "tail" of tenofovir and emtricitabine (zidovudine alone); zidovudine, lamivudine, and lopinavir-ritonavir (zidovudine-based ART); or tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir-ritonavir (tenofovir-based ART). The primary outcomes were HIV transmission at 1 week of age in the infant and maternal and infant safety. Results The median CD4 count was 530 cells per cubic millimeter among 3490 primarily black African HIV-infected women enrolled at a median of 26 weeks of gestation (interquartile range, 21 to 30). The rate of transmission was significantly lower with ART than with zidovudine alone (0.5% in the combined ART groups vs. 1.8%; difference, -1.3 percentage points; repeated confidence interval, -2.1 to -0.4). However, the rate of maternal grade 2 to 4 adverse events was significantly higher with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (21.1% vs. 17.3%, P=0.008), and the rate of grade 2 to 4 abnormal blood chemical values was higher with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (2.9% vs. 0.8%, P=0.03). Adverse events did not differ significantly between the ART groups (P>0.99). A birth weight of less than 2500 g was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (23.0% vs. 12.0%, P<0.001) and was more frequent with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (16.9% vs. 8.9%, P=0.004); preterm delivery before 37 weeks was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (20.5% vs. 13.1%, P<0.001). Tenofovir-based ART was associated

  14. Benefits and Risks of Antiretroviral Therapy for Perinatal HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, M.G.; Qin, M.; Fiscus, S.A.; Currier, J.S.; Flynn, P.M.; Chipato, T.; McIntyre, J.; Gnanashanmugam, D.; Siberry, G.K.; Coletti, A.S.; Taha, T.E.; Klingman, K.L.; Martinson, F.E.; Owor, M.; Violari, A.; Moodley, D.; Theron, G.B.; Bhosale, R.; Bobat, R.; Chi, B.H.; Strehlau, R.; Mlay, P.; Loftis, A.J.; Browning, R.; Fenton, T.; Purdue, L.; Basar, M.; Shapiro, D.E.; Mofenson, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Randomized-trial data on the risks and benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared with zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine to prevent transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV-infected pregnant women with high CD4 counts are lacking. METHODS We randomly assigned HIV-infected women at 14 or more weeks of gestation with CD4 counts of at least 350 cells per cubic millimeter to zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine plus a 1-to-2-week postpartum “tail” of tenofovir and emtricitabine (zidovudine alone); zidovudine, lamivudine, and lopinavir–ritonavir (zidovudine-based ART); or tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir–ritonavir (tenofovir-based ART). The primary outcomes were HIV transmission at 1 week of age in the infant and maternal and infant safety. RESULTS The median CD4 count was 530 cells per cubic millimeter among 3490 primarily black African HIV-infected women enrolled at a median of 26 weeks of gestation (interquartile range, 21 to 30). The rate of transmission was significantly lower with ART than with zidovudine alone (0.5% in the combined ART groups vs. 1.8%; difference, −1.3 percentage points; repeated confidence interval, −2.1 to −0.4). However, the rate of maternal grade 2 to 4 adverse events was significantly higher with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (21.1% vs. 17.3%, P=0.008), and the rate of grade 2 to 4 abnormal blood chemical values was higher with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (2.9% vs. 0.8%, P=0.03). Adverse events did not differ significantly between the ART groups (P>0.99). A birth weight of less than 2500 g was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (23.0% vs. 12.0%, P<0.001) and was more frequent with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (16.9% vs. 8.9%, P=0.004); preterm delivery before 37 weeks was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (20.5% vs. 13.1%, P<0.001). Tenofovir-based ART was

  15. Psychometric properties of the German version of the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised: additional benefit of disease-specific screening in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Saßmann, H; Albrecht, C; Busse-Widmann, P; Hevelke, L K; Kranz, J; Markowitz, J T; Marshall, L F; Meurs, S; de Soye, I H; Lange, K

    2015-12-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the German version of the abbreviated 16-item Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised in a sample of young people with Type 1 diabetes. A total of 246 young people, aged 11-19 years, with Type 1 diabetes from six pediatric diabetes centres in Germany were assessed using the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised. In addition, they underwent screening with two generic tools as well as the WHO five-question well-being index. A clinician's report was also obtained. The Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised was found to have good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.84). The Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised scores significantly correlated with those provided by the non-specific screening tools (r = 0.37, P ≤ 0.000 and r = 0.50, P ≤ 0.000 for boys and r = 0.62, P ≤ 0.000 and r = 0.79, P ≤ 0.000 for girls), indicating convergent validity. The mean (sd) total of the scores was 12.0 (9.6). Criterion validity was confirmed against HbA1c value, BMI standard deviation score and expert (clinician) report. Of the boys included in the study, 11 scored higher than the threshold score on the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised, of whom only three (27%) were classified as 'suspected to have a disordered eating behaviour' by their clinicians. The Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised delivered more specific information than generic screening instruments and identified more young people with eating disorders than did clinician report, especially regarding the detection of boys at risk. The results of this study support the utility of the German version of the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised to identify eating disorders in young people with Type 1 diabetes at an early stage. (German Clinical Trials Registry no.: DRKS00004699). © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  16. Insulin therapy, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk factors in young Latin Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Santa, Larissa; Salinas, Karin; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Raskin, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease, but this risk has not been well documented in young patients, especially of Latin American descent. Also, the potential CV benefits of insulin therapy have not been evaluated in young patients with type 2 diabetes. The objectives of this study were to determine any gender-related difference in the presence of CV risk factors in young Latin Americans with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and the effect of intensive insulin therapy on these CV risk factors. Fifty-seven Latin American patients with type 2 diabetes between the ages 18 and 45 years were evaluated at baseline. All women were premenopausal and had regular menstrual periods. The mean body mass index (BMI) was > 30 kg/m2 in both genders. Percent body fat, percent hemoglobin A1c, and lipoprotein profiles were similar between genders. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated and similar between genders (p = .4). Leukocyte adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular adhesion molecule 1, E-selectin) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 were elevated, whereas adiponectin levels were below normal in both gender groups. Urinary albumin excretion was similar between genders and did not show any relationship with any of the variables. In women, there was a direct relationship between waist circumference and high-sensitivity CRP levels (rho = .53, p = .01). No other significant relationships were observed. Eighteen Latin American patients with type 2 diabetes completed up to 104 weeks of post-intervention with insulin monotherapy. In these patients, glycemic, lipoprotein, and anthropometric measurements were obtained every 12 weeks. Highly sensitive CRP, leukocyte adhesion molecules, and urinary albumin excretion, among other tests, were obtained every 52 weeks. At 52 and 104 weeks, body weight, BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat increased in a parallel and significant manner

  17. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications.

  18. [Risk-benefit evaluation of medicinal products. An element of Health Technology Assessment].

    PubMed

    Hart, D

    2005-02-01

    This paper aims to further develop and specify the method and the process of risk-benefit evaluation for determining the safety of medicinal products in national and European pharmaceutical law. The term "safety" (Unbedenklichkeit=the relationship between efficacy and harmfulness) is one of the central categories of national and European pharmaceutical law. The guaranteeing of the safety of pharmaceuticals is not a static but a dynamic and process oriented objective. It aims to preserve what has been approved on the one hand, and to increase the standard of safety by innovation on the other. A medicinal product is only found to be safe if the result of the risk-benefit evaluation is a positive risk-benefit balance. Safety must be guaranteed permanently through the entire lifecycle of the medicinal product. One must differentiate between absolute safety, which is related to the individual product, and relative safety, which is related to already available medicinal products of the same indication. The process of risk-benefit evaluation is determined by the indication of the medicinal product. The different types of medicinal products or their different mechanisms of action require different risk-benefit evaluations. The established, estimated and evaluated benefit has to be compared with the established, estimated and evaluated risks of the medicinal product. The comparative risk-benefit evaluation requires a procedural optimisation of benefits as well as minimisation of risks and a reciprocal optimisation of both requirements. If the comparison of the benefits and risks of the product results in a negative risk-benefit balance, the product is rated absolutely unsafe. The product is relatively unsafe if its standard of safety is lower than that of already available pharmaceuticals of the same indication and the existing safety gap (increased benefit or lesser risks) is deemed considerable. Differences in benefit and/or differences in risk between the medicinal

  19. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: food and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tijhuis, M J; de Jong, N; Pohjola, M V; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Hendriksen, M; Hoekstra, J; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; van Leeuwen, F X R; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Rompelberg, C; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Benefit-risk assessment in food and nutrition is relatively new. It weighs the beneficial and adverse effects that a food (component) may have, in order to facilitate more informed management decisions regarding public health issues. It is rooted in the recognition that good food and nutrition can improve health and that some risk may be acceptable if benefit is expected to outweigh it. This paper presents an overview of current concepts and practices in benefit-risk analysis for food and nutrition. It aims to facilitate scientists and policy makers in performing, interpreting and evaluating benefit-risk assessments. Historically, the assessments of risks and benefits have been separate processes. Risk assessment is mainly addressed by toxicology, as demanded by regulation. It traditionally assumes that a maximum safe dose can be determined from experimental studies (usually in animals) and that applying appropriate uncertainty factors then defines the 'safe' intake for human populations. There is a minor role for other research traditions in risk assessment, such as epidemiology, which quantifies associations between determinants and health effects in humans. These effects can be both adverse and beneficial. Benefit assessment is newly developing in regulatory terms, but has been the subject of research for a long time within nutrition and epidemiology. The exact scope is yet to be defined. Reductions in risk can be termed benefits, but also states rising above 'the average health' are explored as benefits. In nutrition, current interest is in 'optimal' intake; from a population perspective, but also from a more individualised perspective. In current approaches to combine benefit and risk assessment, benefit assessment mirrors the traditional risk assessment paradigm of hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Benefit-risk comparison can be qualitative and quantitative. In a quantitative comparison, benefits

  20. Testosterone and modifiable risk factors associated with diabetes in men.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Lange, Kylie; Martin, Sean; Haren, Matthew T; Taylor, Anne; O'Loughlin, Peter D; Marshall, Villis; Wittert, Gary A

    2011-03-01

    The role of endogenous testosterone in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus remains vague. We investigated whether associations between endogenous testosterone and diabetes prevalence in men could be partially explained by modifiable risk factors. A random population-based cross-sectional study of 1195 men aged 35-80 years living in the north-west regions of Adelaide, Australia. Data collections occurred between 2002 and 2005, and response rate was 45.1%. Diabetes (non-specific) was classified by either: (1) self-report for doctor diagnosis of diabetes; (2) prescription medication for diabetes; (3) fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7 mmol/L; or (4) glycosylated haemoglobin ≥ 6.2%. Logistic regressions were used to estimate odds ratios (OR [with 95% confidence intervals]) for diabetes, with stepwise adjustments for demographic, lifestyle, and clinical factors. Diabetes prevalence was positively associated with age groups 45-54 years (2.8 [1.4, 5.8]), 55-64 years (3.9 [1.9, 8.3]) and ≥ 65 years (4.0 [1.8, 8.9]), lowest income group (1.8 [1.0, 3.4]), ex-smoker (1.8 [1.2, 2.9]), lowest (3.2 [1.9, 5.5]) and middle (1.9 [1.1, 3.4]) alcohol tertiles, cardiovascular disease (1.9 [1.2, 2.8]), metabolic syndrome (4.0 [2.6, 6.1]), and lowest plasma total testosterone tertile (1.8 [1.1, 3.0]), but negatively associated with middle (0.5 [0.3, 0.8]) and highest (0.4 [0.3, 0.7]) sugar intake tertiles, arthritis (0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), and elevated LDL cholesterol (0.5 [0.3, 0.8]); ORs showed an inverted 'U' shape for middle and highest voiding lower urinary tract symptoms tertiles. Body composition, muscle strength, and cardio-metabolic factors partially explained the association between low plasma total testosterone and diabetes. Plasma total testosterone was inversely and independently associated with diabetes prevalence, that might have been partially explained by several modifiable risk factors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utilizing a Diabetes Risk Test and A1c Point-of-Care Instrument to Identify Increased Risk for Diabetes In an Educational Dental Hygiene Setting.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Lori J; Rainchuso, Lori; Rothman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate the number of patients at increased risk for type 2 diabetes development using a validated survey; and to assess the rate of compliance for A1c screening in an educational dental hygiene setting. This was a descriptive study using a purposive sample of patients in an academic dental hygiene clinic, who were 18 years or older, not diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey, patients determined to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes were offered the opportunity for further assessment by having their A1c tested using a point of care instrument. Patients demonstrating an increased risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, with either the survey or the point of care instrument, were referred to their primary physician for further evaluation. A total 179 of the 422 solicited patients agreed to participate in the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey. According to the survey guidelines, 77 participants were considered increased risk for type 2 diabetes for an at-risk prevalence of 48% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 40 to 56%). The at-risk participants were then asked to have an A1c test of which 45 agreed (compliance rate 58%, 95% CI: 47 to 70%). Using American Diabetes Association A1c parameters, 60.98% (n=25) indicated a prediabetes (5.7 to 6.4%) range, and 4.88% (n=2) indicated a diabetes (≥6.5%) range. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey in any dental setting could provide patients with invaluable health information, and potentially improve overall health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  2. Tipping the balance: Haemoglobinopathies and the risk of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Henry J; Green, Aislinn E; Spellar, Kayleigh M; Arthur, Philip J; Phillips, Hannah G; Patel, Jeetesh V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a link between the risk of diabetes with haemoglobinopathies by examining available evidence of the effects of iron and blood glucose homeostasis from molecular to epidemiological perspectives. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed using electronic literature databases using various search terms. The International Diabetes Federation World Atlas was used to generate a list of populations with high rates of diabetes. PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were used to identify which of these populations also had a reported prevalence of haemoglobin abnormalities. RESULTS: Abnormalities in iron homeostasis leads to increases in reactive oxygen species in the blood. This promotes oxidative stress which contributes to peripheral resistance to insulin in two ways: (1) reduced insulin/insulin receptor interaction; and (2) β-cell dysfunction. Hepcidin is crucial in terms of maintaining appropriate amounts of iron in the body and is in turn affected by haemoglobinopathies. Hepcidin also has other metabolic effects in places such as the liver but so far the extent of these is not well understood. It does however directly control the levels of serum ferritin. High serum ferritin is found in obese patients and those with diabetes and a meta-analysis of the various studies shows that high serum ferritin does indeed increase diabetes risk. CONCLUSION: From an epidemiological standpoint, it is plausible that the well-documented protective effects of haemoglobinopathies with regard to malaria may have also offered other evolutionary advantages. By contributing to peripheral insulin resistance, haemoglobinopathies may have helped to sculpt the so-called “thrifty genotype”, which hypothetically is advantageous in times of famine. The prevalence data however is not extensive enough to provide concrete associations between diabetes and haemoglobinopathies - more precise studies are required. PMID:26788262

  3. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  4. High diabetes risk among asylum seekers in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Goosen, S; Middelkoop, B; Stronks, K; Agyemang, C; Kunst, A E

    2014-12-01

    To map the prevalence and incidence of recorded diabetes among asylum seekers according to demographic factors and length of stay in the host country. We used a nationwide database from the Community Health Services for Asylum Seekers. The study population included all asylum seekers aged 20-79 years who arrived in the Netherlands between 2000 and 2008. Case allocation was based on International Classification of Primary Care codes. A general practice registry was used to obtain reference data. Standardized prevalence and incidence ratios were calculated and their association with length of stay was explored with Cox regression. The study included 59 380 asylum seekers among whom there were 1227 recorded cases of diabetes. The prevalence of recorded diabetes was higher among asylum seekers compared with the reference population for both men (standardized prevalence ratio=1.85, 95% CI 1.71-1.91) and women (standardized prevalence ratio=2.26, 95% CI 2.08-2.45). The highest standardized prevalence ratios were found for asylum seekers from Somalia, Sudan and Sri Lanka. The standardized prevalence ratio was higher in asylum seekers aged ≥ 30 years. Incidence rates were higher compared with the reference population for all length-of-stay intervals. Asylum seekers from the majority of countries of origin were at higher risk of diabetes compared with the general population in the Netherlands. Asylum seekers from Somalia were particularly at risk. This emerging public health issue requires attention from policy-makers and care providers. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  5. Diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation: characteristics, outcome, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Vesco, L; Busson, M; Bedrossian, J; Bitker, M O; Hiesse, C; Lang, P

    1996-05-27

    The incidence and risk factors of posttransplant diabetes mellitus were evaluated in 1325 consecutive renal transplant recipients. Thirty-three (2.5%) patients developed diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy. Onset occurred a mean of 5.7 +/- 1.5 months following transplantation. The patients were compared with 33 paired-control kidney recipients. The patients were significantly older than the controls (46.8 +/- 1.9 vs. 40.6 +/- 2.1 years) (P<0.05), and chronic renal failure was more often related to interstitial nephritis (P<0.05). A family history of diabetes mellitus, the body mass index, ethnic origin, HLA phenotype, and the total doses of steroids and cyclosporine were similar in the two groups. The number of patients with at least one rejection episode was significantly higher among the diabetic patients (21 versus 9) but the number of episodes was similar. Diabetes occurred a mean of 1.1 +/- 0.3 months following rejection treatment. Intravenous pulsed prednisolone was always used for anti-rejection therapy. Insulin was withdrawn in 16 cases after a mean of 4 +/- 1 months, independently of steroid dosage reductions. Actuarial patient and graft survival rates were not significantly different, although 6-year outcome tended to be better in the controls (86% versus 93% for patient survival and 67% versus 93% for graft survival). This study suggests that pulsed steroid therapy might be the critical factor in the onset of posttransplant diabetes and that the risk is increased in older patients with chronic interstitial nephrititis.

  6. 77 FR 43601 - Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch Solutions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch Solutions; Public... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch... FDA-approved hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions. The public workshop has been planned in partnership...

  7. 76 FR 77543 - Quantitative Summary of the Benefits and Risks of Prescription Drugs: A Literature Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Quantitative Summary of the Benefits and Risks of... ``Quantitative Summary of the Benefits and Risks of Prescription Drugs: A Literature Review'' (literature review... FDA is announcing the availability of a draft report entitled ``Quantitative Summary of the...

  8. Risk/Benefit Communication about Food-A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Frewer, L J; Fischer, A R H; Brennan, M; Bánáti, D; Lion, R; Meertens, R M; Rowe, G; Siegrist, M; Verbeke, W; Vereijken, C M J L

    2016-07-26

    A systematic review relevant to the following research questions was conducted (1) the extent to which different theoretical frameworks have been applied to food risk/benefit communication and (2) the impact such food risk/benefit communication interventions have had on related risk/benefit attitudes and behaviors. Fifty four papers were identified. The analysis revealed that (primarily European or US) research interest has been relatively recent. Certain food issues were of greater interest to researchers than others, perhaps reflecting the occurrence of a crisis, or policy concern. Three broad themes relevant to the development of best practice in risk (benefit) communication were identified: the characteristics of the target population; the contents of the information; and the characteristics of the information sources. Within these themes, independent and dependent variables differed considerably. Overall, acute risk (benefit) communication will require advances in communication process whereas chronic communication needs to identify audience requirements. Both citizen's risk/benefit perceptions and (if relevant) related behaviors need to be taken into account, and recommendations for behavioral change need to be concrete and actionable. The application of theoretical frameworks to the study of risk (benefit) communication was infrequent, and developing predictive models of effective risk (benefit) communication may be contingent on improved theoretical perspectives.

  9. Impacts of antibiotic use in agriculture: what are the benefits and risks?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic drugs provide clear benefits for food animal health and welfare, while simultaneously providing clear risks due to enrichment of resistant microorganisms. There is no consensus, however, on how to evaluate benefits and risks of antibiotic use in agriculture, or the impact on public health...

  10. Immunoglobulin E and Mast Cell Proteases Are Potential Risk Factors of Human Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Xu-Hui; Jin, Kui-Li; Ye, Guo-fen; Qian, Li; Li, Bo; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mast-cell activation and inflammation are important in obesity and diabetes. Plasma levels of mast cell proteases and the mast cell activator immunoglobulin E (IgE) may serve as novel inflammatory markers that associate with the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results A total of 340 subjects 55 to 75 years of age were grouped according to the American Diabetes Association 2003 criteria of normal glucose tolerance, pre-diabetes, and diabetes mellitus. The Kruskal-Wallis test demonstrated significant differences in plasma IgE levels (P = 0.008) among groups with different glucose tolerance status. Linear regression analysis revealed significant correlations between plasma levels of chymase (P = 0.030) or IgE (P = 0.022) and diabetes mellitus. Ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that IgE was a significant risk factor of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR]: 1.674, P = 0.034). After adjustment for common diabetes risk factors, including age, sex, hypertension, body-mass index, cholesterol, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and mast cell chymase and tryptase, IgE remained a significant risk factor (OR: 1.866, P = 0.015). Two-variable ordinal logistic analysis indicated that interactions between hs-CRP and IgE, or between IgE and chymase, increased further the risks of developing pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus before (OR: 2.204, P = 0.044; OR: 2.479, P = 0.033) and after (OR: 2.251, P = 0.040; OR: 2.594, P = 0.026) adjustment for common diabetes risk factors. Conclusions Both IgE and chymase associate with diabetes status. While IgE and hs-CRP are individual risk factors of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus, interactions of IgE with hs-CRP or with chymase further increased the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus. PMID:22194960

  11. ADHD-associated risk taking is linked to exaggerated views of the benefits of positive outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, Rachel; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Aloni, Hamutal; Yaniv, Ilan; Pollak, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often assumed to be associated with increased engagement in risk-taking behaviors. The current study sought to understand the mental processes underlying this association using a theory-driven behavioral economics perspective. Psychological risk-return models suggest that risk and benefit are inherently subjective, and risk taking is best understood as the interplay between cognitions and motivations regarding the benefits and risks of alternatives. A sample of 244 adults was assessed for ADHD symptoms. The likelihood of engagement in a range of risky behaviors (e.g., driving without wearing a seat belt), the magnitude of perceived benefit and risk ascribed to these behaviors, and benefit and risk attitudes of each participant were extracted from the Domain Specific Risk Taking (DOSPERT) scales. ADHD symptoms were correlated with more risky behaviors and perception of greater benefits from engaging in these behaviors, but were not correlated with risk perception. Mediation analysis revealed that the association between ADHD symptoms and engagement in risk taking was mediated by perceived benefits. These findings highlight the idea that people with high level ADHD symptoms tend to engage in risky behaviors because they find such behavior particularly appealing, rather than because they seek risk per se. PMID:27725684

  12. Three methods for integration of environmental risk into the benefit-risk assessment of veterinary medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jennifer L; Porsch, Lucas; Vidaurre, Rodrigo; Backhaus, Thomas; Sinclair, Chris; Jones, Glyn; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2017-12-15

    Veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) require, as part of the European Union (EU) authorization process, consideration of both risks and benefits. Uses of VMPs have multiple risks (e.g., risks to the animal being treated, to the person administering the VMP) including risks to the environment. Environmental risks are not directly comparable to therapeutic benefits; there is no standardized approach to compare both environmental risks and therapeutic benefits. We have developed three methods for communicating and comparing therapeutic benefits and environmental risks for the benefit-risk assessment that supports the EU authorization process. Two of these methods support independent product evaluation (i.e., a summative classification and a visual scoring matrix classification); the other supports a comparative evaluation between alternative products (i.e., a comparative classification). The methods and the challenges to implementing a benefit-risk assessment including environmental risk are presented herein; how these concepts would work in current policy is discussed. Adaptability to scientific and policy development is considered. This work is an initial step in the development of a standardized methodology for integrated decision-making for VMPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Exercise training in congestive heart failure: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Keteyian, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    After decades of concern about the safety and effectiveness of exercise training in patients with heart failure (HF) due to reduced ejection fraction, initial research demonstrated the feasibility and physiologic benefits associated with such an intervention. Subsequent controlled studies confirmed these results and suggested improved clinical outcomes as well. This review summarizes the findings from single-site and multisite trials and meta-analyses that addressed the effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and clinical outcomes. Conclusions from these studies indicate that exercise is safe, improves health status and exercise capacity, attenuates much of the abnormal physiology that develops with HF, and yields a modest reduction in clinical events. Future research needs to identify which patient subgroups might benefit the most, the optimal exercise dose needed to lessen disease-related symptoms and maximize clinical benefit, and the effects of exercise training in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction.

  14. Anticoagulation in the older adult: optimizing benefit and reducing risk.

    PubMed

    Ko, Darae; Hylek, Elaine M

    2014-09-01

    The risk for both arterial and venous thrombosis increases with age. Despite the increasing burden of strokes related to atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) among older adults, the use of anticoagulant therapy is limited in this population due to the parallel increase in risk of serious hemorrhage. Understanding the risks and their underlying mechanisms would help to mitigate adverse events and improve persistence with these life-saving therapies. The objectives of this review are to: (1) elucidate the age-related physiologic changes that render this high risk subgroup susceptible to hemorrhage, (2) identify mutable risk factors and hazards contributing to an increased bleeding risk in older individuals, and (3) discuss interventions to optimize anticoagulation therapy in this population.

  15. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher's exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ(2)=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ(2)=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

  16. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher’s exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ2=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ2=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. PMID:26823865

  17. Motivational interviewing for modifying diabetes risk: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Colin J; Middlebrooke, Andrew; O'Loughlin, Lucy; Holland, Sandra; Piper, Jane; Steele, Anna; Gale, Tracy; Hammerton, Fenella; Daly, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Around 10–15% of adults aged over 40 years have pre-diabetes, which carries a high risk of progression to type 2 diabetes. Intensive lifestyle intervention reduces progression by as much as 58%. However, the cost and personnel requirements of these interventions are major obstacles to delivery in NHS primary care. Aim To assess the effectiveness of a low-cost intervention, delivered in primary care by non-NHS staff, to reduce the risk of diabetes through weight loss and physical activity. Design of study Pragmatic single-blind randomised controlled trial with researchers and statistician blinded to group allocation. Setting UK primary care. Method One-hundred and forty-one participants with a body mass index of 28 kg/m2 or more, but without diabetes or heart disease, received either information leaflets or individual behavioural counselling using motivational interviewing techniques. The intervention was delivered by five counsellors recruited from the local community. The primary outcomes were the proportions of participants meeting predefined targets for weight loss (5%) and moderate physical activity (150 minutes/week) after 6 months. Results Using intention-to-treat analysis, more people in the intervention group achieved the weight-loss target (24% versus 7% for controls; odds ratio [OR] = 3.96; 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 1.4 to 11.4; number needed to treat [NNT] = 6.1 (95% Cl = 4 to 21). The proportion achieving the physical activity target did not increase significantly (38% versus 28% for controls; OR = 1.6; 95% Cl = 0.7 to 3.8). Conclusion Short-term weight loss, at a level which, if sustained, is clinically meaningful for reducing diabetes risk, is achievable in primary care, without excessive use of NHS monetary or personnel resources. PMID:18682011

  18. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  19. Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ranee; Maruthur, Nisa M; Edelman, David

    2015-12-01

    In the USA, compared to whites, African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by the diabetes epidemic. Traditional diabetes risk factors, such as obesity, are more common among African-Americans, but these traditional risk factors do not explain all of the disparity in diabetes risk. Recent research has identified novel environmental, lifestyle, physiologic, and genetic risk factors for diabetes, some of which appear to impact African-Americans more than whites. This manuscript reviews the recent literature to highlight some of these novel risk factors that may be contributing to the racial disparity in diabetes risk. Further study is needed of the modifiable risk factors for development of interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes in African-Americans, as well as other high-risk populations.

  20. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals.

  1. Environmental Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Development.

    PubMed

    Antonela, Boljat; Ivana, Gunjača; Ivan, Konstantinović; Nikolina, Vidan; Vesna, Boraska Perica; Marina, Pehlić; Veselin, Škrabić; Tatijana, Zemunik

    2017-09-01

    Background Although environmental factors induce development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in genetically susceptible individuals, many of those factors have been uncovered. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze associations of T1DM with a wide range of environmental factors. Material and Methods A case-control study was conducted on 249 diabetic and 255 healthy individuals from the Dalmatian region of South Croatia. Data regarding risk factors during pregnancy and early life period of the child were evaluated. Results History of antihypertensive intake (p=0.04) and frequency of stressful life events during pregnancy (p=0.01) were associated with higher risk of T1DM, while hypertension was associated with lower risk of T1DM (p=0.01). Maternal age<25 years at delivery was associated with a higher risk of T1DM (p=0.01).Diabetic patients had a positive family history of T1DM or T2DM (p=0.002) more frequently than controls, while history of infectious diseases was inversely associated with the risk of T1DM (p=0.03). A higher risk of T1DM was significantly associated with earlier introduction of cow's milk (p=0.001), higher number of meals consumed per day (p=0.02), higher frequency of carbohydrate (p=0.001) and meat (p=0.01) consumption and stressful life events during childhood (p=0.02) while earlier introduction of fruit was associated with a lower risk of T1DM (p=0.03) Conclusion This case-control study confirmed associations of a large number of environmental factors with development of T1DM with emphasis on the association of mother's antihypertensive intake during pregnancy, which extends our knowledge about environmental factors related with development of T1DM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Maximize Benefits, Minimize Risk: Selecting the Right HVAC Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, James T.

    1993-01-01

    An informal survey of 20 major urban school districts found that 40% were currently operating in a "break down" maintenance mode. A majority, 57.9%, also indicated they saw considerable benefits in contracting for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) maintenance services with outside firms. Offers guidelines in selecting…

  3. Maximize Benefits, Minimize Risk: Selecting the Right HVAC Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, James T.

    1993-01-01

    An informal survey of 20 major urban school districts found that 40% were currently operating in a "break down" maintenance mode. A majority, 57.9%, also indicated they saw considerable benefits in contracting for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) maintenance services with outside firms. Offers guidelines in selecting…

  4. Outdoor Play: Does Avoiding the Risks Reduce the Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Helen; Wyver, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    Although the term "risk-taking" often has negative connotations, the reality is that the willingness to engage in some risky activities provides opportunities to learn new skills, try new behaviours and ultimately reach our potential. Challenge and risk, in particular during outdoor play, allows children to test the limits of their…

  5. Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM. PMID:25628401

  6. Diabetes in Utah among adults: interaction between diabetes and other risk factors for microvascular and macrovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, M C; Smith, K R

    1988-01-01

    From a telephone survey of the health status of a random sample of the general population of Utah, we identified 255 people with adult onset diabetes. We compared them to 622 non-diabetic controls, matched for age, sex, and urban/rural country of residence. We examined diabetes as a risk factor for heart diseases, stroke, and blindness and its interaction with other known risk factors. Diabetes interacted with smoking history so as to increase the risk of stroke, heart disease, and blindness. Diabetes also interacted with hypertension in their effect on the prevalence of blindness and, to a small extent, heart disease. Among the diabetics, duration of diabetes was associated with macrovascular and microvascular complications developing after the diagnosis of diabetes. Those with longer duration of disease showed an increase in risk for microvascular (kidney disease, blindness) and macrovascular (heart disease, stroke, amputations) complications. Although the estimates were imprecise, the effect of duration on macrovascular complications was greater among diabetics with a history of hypertension; the effect on microvascular complications was greater among smokers. The findings are compared to previous studies and the utility of diabetes prevalence data is discussed. PMID:3407819

  7. [Influence of diabetes on mechanics efficiency of pregnant women's feet end risk of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Głebocka, Anna Katarzyna; Zarzycki, Wiesław; Knaś, Małgorzata

    2014-05-01

    A foot is a complicated osteoarticular system. The complex structure and variability predispose it to the formation of foot deformity. The cause deformities of the feet are weakened muscle tissue and ligaments, systemic diseases: obesity, musculoskeletal defects, neurological diseases, rheumatism, diabetes, pregnancy, improper shoes or socks. They interfere with the function of the foot and are reflected in the distribution of support points. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of diabetes on pregnancy and the mechanics of the foot and the risk of developing diabetic foot. The study took part in healthy and diseased women with type 1 diabetes in pregnancy. Evaluation of static foot was performed using podoscope, made up of mirrors, lights and camera. The camera described the distribution of the pressure on the glass plate, which the person being investigated was standing on. It recorded the reflection of feet and transmit them to a computer. Description the results consisted of defining relevant indicators. The evaluation was performed using the dynamic pressure Parotec system, the measuring cylinder placed inside the patient's shoe provided with sensors recording the foot pressure distribution on the ground while standing and walking. The data were stored on a memory card loaded into the computer, where the analysis took place. It has been calculated the average values of pressures exerted on the various zones of the foot. It was found that the increase in body weight resulting from the advancement of women pregnancy increases the load exerted on the foot. Forces are growing in subsequent trimesters of pregnancy reaching a maximum at the end of the third trimester. The longitudinal and transverse arches of the foot are reducing. After the birth, the pressure exerted on each area of the foot decreases, arches of the foot are getting back to starting position. Number of foot deformities is higher in women with type 1 diabetes. It grow the risk of

  8. Markers for Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Relatives of Alsacian Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Remi; Pinget, Michel; Belcourt, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Background: The cytotoxic T lymphocyteassociated antigen 4 gene (CTLA-4) encode the T cell receptor involved in the control of T cell proliferation and mediates T cell apoptosis. The receptor protein is a specific T lymphocyte surface antigen that is detected on cells only after antigen presentation. Thus, CTLA-4 is directly involved in both immune and autoimmune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. There is polymorphism at position 49 in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, providing an A-G exchange. Moreover, we assessed the CTLA-4 49 (Thr/Ala) polymorphism in diabetic patients and first-degree relatives as compared to control subjects. Research design and methods: Three loci (HLA-DQB1, DQA1 and CTLA-4) were analysed in 62 type 1 diabetic patients, 72 firstdegree relatives and 84 nondiabetic control subjects by means of PCR-RFLP. Results: A significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles encoding for an amino acid different from Asp in position 57 (NA) and DQA1 alleles encoding for Arg in position 52 was observed in diabetic subjects and first-degree relatives as compared to controls. The genotype and allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in type 1 diabetic patients and firstdegree relatives differed significantly from those of controls (p< 0.001 and 0.05 respectively). CTLA-49 Ala alleles frequencies were 75.8% in type 1 diabetic patients and 68.1% in first-degree relatives in comparison to 35.7% in control subjects. The Ala/Ala genotype conferred a relative risk of 18.8 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The CTLA-4 49 Ala allele confers an increased risk of type 1 diabetes, independent of age and HLA-DQ genetic markers. PMID:11900275

  9. The Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men Is Synergistically Affected by Parental History of Diabetes and Overweight

    PubMed Central

    Wikner, Cecilia; Gigante, Bruna; Hellénius, Mai-Lis; de Faire, Ulf; Leander, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between genetic- and lifestyle factors may be of specific importance for the development of type 2 diabetes. Only a few earlier studies have evaluated interaction effects for the combination of family history of diabetes and presence of risk factors related to lifestyle. We explored whether 60-year-old men and women from Stockholm with a parental history of diabetes are more susceptible than their counterparts without a parental history of diabetes to the negative influence from physical inactivity, overweight or smoking regarding risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The study comprised 4232 participants of which 205 men and 113 women had diabetes (the vast majority type 2 diabetes considering the age of study participants) and 224 men and 115 women had prediabetes (fasting glucose 6.1–6.9 mmol/l). Prevalence odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Biologic interaction was analyzed using a Synergy index (S) score. The crude OR for type 2 diabetes associated with a parental history of diabetes was 2.4 (95% CI 1.7–3.5) in men and 1.4 (95% CI 0.9–2.3) in women. Adjustments for overweight, physical inactivity and current smoking had minimal effects on the association observed in men whereas in women it attenuated results. In men, but not in women, a significant interaction effect that synergistically increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was observed for the combination of BMI>30 and a parental history of diabetes, S 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.1). No signs of interactions were noted for a parental history of diabetes combined with physical inactivity and smoking, respectively. In conclusion, obesity in combination with presence of a parental history of diabetes may be particularly hazardous in men as these two factors were observed to synergistically increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in men. PMID:23630613

  10. The risk of type 2 diabetes in men is synergistically affected by parental history of diabetes and overweight.

    PubMed

    Wikner, Cecilia; Gigante, Bruna; Hellénius, Mai-Lis; de Faire, Ulf; Leander, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between genetic- and lifestyle factors may be of specific importance for the development of type 2 diabetes. Only a few earlier studies have evaluated interaction effects for the c