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Sample records for diabetes field study

  1. After the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study: implications for fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Frank M

    2008-12-22

    The Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study provides an extensive evidence base for the efficacy and tolerability of fenofibrate treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, predominantly in a primary prevention setting. The FIELD study did not show a significant effect with fenofibrate on the primary end point, coronary artery disease death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (p = 0.16). Treatment with fenofibrate did reduce all cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, the secondary end point (by 11%, p = 0.035). The primary end point was reduced by the same percentage. The modest percent reduction in the primary and secondary end points is probably a result of a number of study confounders, notably an excess of statin drop-in therapy and disproportionate treatment with other drugs for CVD prevention in the placebo arm. Estimates of relative risk reduction used by the FIELD investigators to equalize the use of statins in the fenofibrate and placebo groups suggest a true benefit of treatment on reduction of CVD events of 17%-21%. There was no excess of elevated serum liver enzymes and no cases of rhabdomyolysis in patients receiving both fenofibrate and a statin. Prevention of microvascular disease, specifically, reduction in the rate of laser treatment for retinopathy (by 30%, p = 0.0003), progression of albuminuria (p = 0.002), and nontraumatic amputations (by 38%, p = 0.011), may well be the most innovative finding of the FIELD study, especially in view of the current lack of effective preventative treatments for diabetic retinopathy and the need for additional treatments that slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy. These findings also give impetus to investigate mechanisms by which fenofibrate and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activation may protect the endothelium of small blood vessels in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:19084088

  2. International challenges without borders: a descriptive study of family physicians' educational needs in the field of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The optimal care of persons with diabetes by general practitioners and family physicians (GP/FP) is complex and requires multiple competencies. This is a fairly unrecognized key challenge in the healthcare systems. In some cases, local and national Continuous Professional Development (CPD) initiatives target these challenges; however there have been few international initiatives, possibly because challenges emerging from different studies have not been linked across national boundaries. In this context, the authors have compiled data about gaps and/or barriers inherent to GP/FP care of persons with type 2 diabetes from Austria, Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom. Methods Secondary analyzes of pre-existing studies were conducted to identify challenges in the care of patients with type 2 diabetes as faced by GPs/FPs. Two sources of data were reviewed: unpublished research data from collaborating organizations and articles from a literature search (in English and German). Articles retrieved were scanned by the research team for relevance to the study objectives and to extract existing gaps and barriers. The identified challenges were then categorized along three major axes: (1) phase of the continuum of care {from screening to management}; (2) learning domain {knowledge, skills, attitudes, behavior, context}; and (3) by country/region. Compilation and categorization were performed by qualitative researchers and discrepancies were resolved through discussion until concordance was achieved. Results and discussion Thirteen challenges faced by GPs/FPs in the care for patients with type 2 diabetes were common in at least 3 of the 4 targeted countries/regions. These issues were found across the entire continuum of care and included: pathophysiology of diabetes, diagnostic criteria, treatment targets assessment, drugs' modes of action, decision-making in therapies, treatment guidelines, insulin therapy, adherence, management of complications, lifestyle changes

  3. Rapid skin profiling with non-contact full-field optical coherence tomography: study of patients with diabetes mellitus type I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, P.; Talary, M. S.; Kolm, I.; Caduff, A.

    2009-07-01

    The application of the full-field optical coherence tomography (OCT) microscope to the characterisation of skin morphology is described. An automated procedure for analysis and interpretation of the OCT data has been developed which provides measures of the laterally averaged depth profiles of the skin reflectance. The skin at the dorsal side of the upper arm of 22 patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus has been characterised in a non-contact way. The OCT signal profile was compared with the optical histological data obtained with a commercial confocal microscope (CM). The highest correlation to the epidermal thickness (ET) obtained using CM was found for the distance from the entrance OCT peak to the first minimum of the reflection profile (R2=0.657, p<0.0001). The distance to the second OCT reflection peak was found to be less correlated to ET (R2=0.403, p=0.0009). A further analysis was undertaken to explore the relation between the subjects' demographical data and the OCT reflection profile. The distance to the second OCT peak demonstrated a correlation with a marginal statistical significance for the body-mass index (positive correlation with p=0.01) and age (negative correlation with p=0.062). At the same time the amplitude of the OCT signal, when compensated for signal attenuation with depth, is negatively correlated with age (p<0.0002). We suggest that this may be an effect of photo degradation of the dermal collagen. In the patient population studied, no relation could be determined between the measured skin morphology and the duration of diabetes or concentration of glycated haemoglobin in the blood.

  4. How public perceive diabetes: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Samereh; Mardanian, Leila; Mirzaei, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetes has a high prevalence in Iran, and its incidence is estimated to increase from 3.5 million adults in 2005 to 5.1 million by 2025. Given the high prevalence of diabetes in Iranians, it is surprising that little is known about understanding of diabetes in the general population. This study aimed to explore how people without diabetes interpreted the disease. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a qualitative content analysis, using unstructured and in-depth interviews, with the participation of 21 individuals without diabetes (13 women and 8 men), 18-61 years old, who were selected for this purpose from the cities of Isfahan and Tehran from October 2010 to May 2011. The data were analyzed using latent content analysis method. Results: The participants had different beliefs and ideas about diabetes and most of them gave a negative and black image of diabetes. Although a small number of individuals considered diabetes better than AIDS and cancer, they often took diabetes as blackness, end of romances, and a gradual death. Conclusion: However, the study sample was small. The findings show that the participants’ perspective on diabetes is negative and destructive. It seems shaping a new identity in the path of empowerment could be difficult within the social and cultural context. These findings can give an insight to health care providers to realize how important it is to find the public perception about diabetes. They are responsible to change or modify the public view on diabetes by introducing the disease with the help of prominent people and educating individuals in the society on all aspects of living with diabetes, not simply the symptoms and disabilities it brings along. PMID:23853650

  5. The context of empowerment and self-care within the field of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scambler, Sasha; Newton, Paul; Asimakopoulou, Koula

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing emphasis within the diabetes literature on the importance of empowerment as a way of encouraging people to take control of and responsibility for the successful management of their disease. Patients are actively encouraged to become active participants in their care, and there is an expectation that health-care professionals will facilitate this process. This article uses Bourdieu's concept of field, as a bounded social space in which actors conduct their lives day-to-day, to explore the context within which issues of empowerment are addressed and negotiated. The practice of empowerment within the biologically defined and biomedically 'policed' field of diabetes is explored using empirical data from a study of diabetes health-care professionals' understanding and practices around empowerment. It is concluded that rather than promoting active self-management and empowerment, the nature of the field of diabetes, and in particular its privileging of the biomedical, can mitigate against people with diabetes negotiating the field effectively and taking control of the disease and its management. PMID:24695383

  6. The context of empowerment and self-care within the field of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scambler, Sasha; Newton, Paul; Asimakopoulou, Koula

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing emphasis within the diabetes literature on the importance of empowerment as a way of encouraging people to take control of and responsibility for the successful management of their disease. Patients are actively encouraged to become active participants in their care, and there is an expectation that health-care professionals will facilitate this process. This article uses Bourdieu's concept of field, as a bounded social space in which actors conduct their lives day-to-day, to explore the context within which issues of empowerment are addressed and negotiated. The practice of empowerment within the biologically defined and biomedically 'policed' field of diabetes is explored using empirical data from a study of diabetes health-care professionals' understanding and practices around empowerment. It is concluded that rather than promoting active self-management and empowerment, the nature of the field of diabetes, and in particular its privileging of the biomedical, can mitigate against people with diabetes negotiating the field effectively and taking control of the disease and its management.

  7. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  8. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Results Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive’s. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor’s clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). Conclusion The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics. PMID:26500926

  9. Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159814.html Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link It hints ... screening tests following a diagnosis of diabetes," said study author Dr. Iliana Lega, of the University of ...

  10. Blood glucose levels and performance in a sports cAMP for adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a field study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Dylan; Hamilton, Jill K; Riddell, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Background. Acute hypo- and hyperglycemia causes cognitive and psychomotor impairment in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) that may affect sports performance. Objective. To quantify the effect of concurrent and antecedent blood glucose concentrations on sports skills and cognitive performance in youth with T1DM attending a sports camp. Design/Methods. 28 youth (ages 6-17 years) attending a sports camp carried out multiple skill-based tests (tennis, basketball, or soccer skills) with glucose monitoring over 4 days. Glucose levels at the time of testing were categorized as (a) hypoglycemic (<3.6 mM); (b) within an acceptable glycemic range (3.6-13.9 mM); or (c) hyperglycemic (>13.9 mM). Results. Overall, sports performance skill was approximately 20% lower when glucose concentrations were hypoglycemic compared to either acceptable or hyperglycemic at the time of skill testing (P < .05). During Stroop testing, "reading" and "color recognition" also degraded during hypoglycemia, while "interference" scores improved (P < .05). Nocturnal hypoglycemia was present in 66% of subjects, lasting an average of 84 minutes, but this did not affect sports skill performance the following day. Conclusions. Mild hypoglycemia markedly reduces sports skill performance and cognition in young athletes with T1DM.

  11. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) promote early wound healing and myofibroblast proliferation in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lin; Kwan, Rachel Lai-Chu; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen

    2014-04-01

    Reduced collagen deposition possibly leads to slow recovery of tensile strength in the healing process of diabetic cutaneous wounds. Myofibroblasts are transiently present during wound healing and play a key role in wound closure and collagen synthesis. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been shown to enhance the tensile strength of diabetic wounds. In this study, we examined the effect of PEMF on wound closure and the presence of myofibroblasts in Sprague-Dawley rats after diabetic induction using streptozotocin. A full-thickness square-shaped dermal wound (2 cm × 2 cm) was excised aseptically on the shaved dorsum. The rats were randomly divided into PEMF-treated (5 mT, 25 Hz, 1 h daily) and control groups. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the groups in blood glucose level and body weight. However, PEMF treatment significantly enhanced wound closure (days 10 and 14 post-wounding) and re-epithelialization (day 10 post-wounding), although these improvements were no longer observed at later stages of the wound healing process. Using immunohistochemistry against α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), we demonstrated that significantly more myofibroblasts were detected on days 7 and 10 post-wounding in the PEMF group when compared to the control group. We hypothesized that PEMF would increase the myofibroblast population, contributing to wound closure during diabetic wound healing.

  12. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    PubMed

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  13. Sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics, diabetics and normoglycemic controls: a comparative cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing prevalence of pre-diabetes is an emerging public health problem. Decrease in sweet taste sensitivity which can lead to an increase in sugar intake might be a factor driving them to overt diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics in comparison with diabetics and with normoglycemic controls. Methods Forty pre-diabetics, 40 diabetics and 34 normoglycemic controls were studied. The three groups were matched for age, sex and BMI. The division into groups was based on their glycated hemoglobin levels. The detection and recognition thresholds were determined by the multiple forced-choice method using sucrose solutions prepared in ¼ log dilutions. The intensities of perceived sensations for a series of suprathreshold concentrations of sucrose solutions prepared in ½ log dilution were determined by rating on a visual analogue scale. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS version 21. Results The mean (SD) detection thresholds of diabetic, pre-diabetic and normoglycemic groups were 0.025 (0.01), 0.018 (0.01) and 0.015 (0.01) respectively with a significant increase in diabetic group compared to normoglycemic group (p = 0.03). The mean recognition thresholds were not different among the three groups. When the intensity ratings for suprathreshold concentrations of sucrose were compared between the three groups, for all suprathreshold concentrations tested, significant differences were observed across the four concentrations (p < 0.001) and between groups in suprathreshold ratings (p < 0.05). Further analysis showed that the diabetic group had significantly lower suprathreshold ratings than the normoglycemic group (p < 0.001). Although all mean suprathreshold intensity ratings of the pre-diabetic group were between the normoglycemic and diabetic groups, the differences were not significant. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics

  14. [A comparative study of social representations of diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alessandra Madia; Fregonesi, Cristina Elena Prado Teles; Pelai, Elisa Bizetti; Mantovani, Aline Madia; Savian, Nathalia Ulices; Pagotto, Priscila

    2013-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate social representations of the terms "diabetes" and "diabetic foot" in different populations. Participants were divided into groups: diabetics (GD); non- diabetics (GN); and non-diabetic healthcare professionals (GP). Personal data were collected, and subjects answered two questions that were expected to evoke five words that came to mind when they thought of "diabetes" and then "diabetic foot". The evoked material was analyzed with the software Ensemble de Programmes Permettant l'Analyse dês Èvocations. A total of 161 subjects participated, including GD (n = 72) with a mean age of 56.12 ± 5.49 years; GN (n = 38) with a mean age of 54.29 ± 7.91 years; and GP (n = 51) with 34.95 ± 7.52 years. The term "diabetes" evoked 297 words in GD, 172 in GN, and 235 words in GP. The term "diabetic foot" evoked 180 words in GD, 90 in GN, and 236 in GP. The groups proved to be anxious for more information, thus confirming the need for awareness-raising and educational programs on diabetes, covering comprehensive issues concerning the disease. PMID:24356689

  15. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy among inpatients with diabetes: the diabetic retinopathy inpatient study (DRIPS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Jessica J; Eller, Andrew W; Willard, Lauren A; Ding, Jiaxi; Johnston, Jann M; Waxman, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient diabetic population in the USA and to determine the barriers to ophthalmic examinations and treatment among this population. Research design and methods A cross-sectional analysis of 113 inpatients with diabetes mellitus admitted to an inner city community teaching hospital in Pittsburgh. Digital fundus photographs of the posterior pole were taken of each eye after pharmacological dilation. Presence, absence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema were graded on the basis of internationally accepted criteria. An investigator-administered questionnaire and review of the medical record were used to obtain data about patient demographics, clinical characteristics and barriers to ophthalmic care. The association between these data and the presence of diabetic retinopathy was tested. Results The estimated prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population was 44% (95% CI 34% to 53%). The prevalence of previously undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy was 25% (95% CI 17% to 33%) and 19% (95% CI 11% to 26%), respectively. Renal disease was independently associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (OR, 3.86; 95% CI 1.22 to 12.27), as well as a longer duration of diabetes (OR, 1.08 per year; 95% CI 1.014 to 1.147). Diabetic retinopathy was seen in 15 of 17 patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers or osteomyelitis. Frequently reported barriers to ophthalmic examinations included lack of transportation and physical disability. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population is likely significantly higher than in the general diabetic population in the USA. These patients have barriers to care that need to be addressed to make standard of care ophthalmic examinations and treatment possible in this population. PMID:26925238

  16. Nonmydriatic ultra-wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Optomap) versus two-field fundus photography in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Liegl, Raffael; Liegl, Kristine; Ceklic, Lala; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael W; Kernt, Marcus; Neubauer, Aljoscha S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic properties of a 2-laser wavelength nonmydriatic 200° ultra-wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) versus mydriatic 2-field 45° color fundus photography (EURODIAB standard) for assessing diabetic retinopathy (DR). A total of 143 consecutive eyes of patients with different levels of DR were graded regarding DR level and macular edema based on 2-field color photographs or 1 Optomap Panoramic 200 SLO image. All SLO images were nonmydriatic and all photographs mydriatic. Grading was performed masked to patient and clinical data. Based on photography, 20 eyes had no DR, 44 had mild, 18 moderate and 42 severe nonproliferative DR, and 19 eyes had proliferative DR. Overall correlation for grading DR level compared to Optomap SLO was moderate with kappa 0.54 (p < 0.001), fair-to-moderate in macular edema grading with kappa 0.39 (p < 0.001), and substantial for grading clinically significant macular edema (kappa 0.77). The wide-field SLO offers a wider field of view and can potentially better differentiate lesions by applying the 2 laser wavelengths. However, these advantages over 2-field fundus photography need to be confirmed in further studies.

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  18. A Narrative Review of Diabetes Intervention Studies to Explore Diabetes Care Opportunities for Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Ayadurai, Shamala; Hattingh, H Laetitia; Tee, Lisa B G; Md Said, Siti Norlina

    2016-01-01

    Background. We conducted a review of current diabetes intervention studies in type 2 diabetes and identified opportunities for pharmacists to deliver quality diabetes care. Methods. A search on randomised controlled trials (RCT) on diabetes management by healthcare professionals including pharmacists published between 2010 and 2015 was conducted. Results and Discussion. Diabetes management includes multifactorial intervention which includes seven factors as outlined in diabetes guidelines, namely, glycaemic, cholesterol and blood pressure control, medication, lifestyle, education, and cardiovascular risk factors. Most studies do not provide evidence that the intervention methods used included all seven factors with exception of three RCT which indicated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) reduction range of 0.5% to 1.8%. The varied HbA1C reduction suggests a lack of standardised and consistent approach to diabetes care. Furthermore, the duration of most studies was from one month to two years; therefore long term outcomes could not be established. Conclusion. Although pharmacists' contribution towards improving clinical outcomes of diabetes patients was well documented, the methods used to deliver structured, consistent evidence-based care were not clearly stipulated. Therefore, approaches to achieving long term continuity of care are uncertain. An intervention strategy that encompass all seven evidence-based factors will be useful. PMID:27247949

  19. A Narrative Review of Diabetes Intervention Studies to Explore Diabetes Care Opportunities for Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Ayadurai, Shamala; Hattingh, H. Laetitia; Tee, Lisa B. G.; Md Said, Siti Norlina

    2016-01-01

    Background. We conducted a review of current diabetes intervention studies in type 2 diabetes and identified opportunities for pharmacists to deliver quality diabetes care. Methods. A search on randomised controlled trials (RCT) on diabetes management by healthcare professionals including pharmacists published between 2010 and 2015 was conducted. Results and Discussion. Diabetes management includes multifactorial intervention which includes seven factors as outlined in diabetes guidelines, namely, glycaemic, cholesterol and blood pressure control, medication, lifestyle, education, and cardiovascular risk factors. Most studies do not provide evidence that the intervention methods used included all seven factors with exception of three RCT which indicated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) reduction range of 0.5% to 1.8%. The varied HbA1C reduction suggests a lack of standardised and consistent approach to diabetes care. Furthermore, the duration of most studies was from one month to two years; therefore long term outcomes could not be established. Conclusion. Although pharmacists' contribution towards improving clinical outcomes of diabetes patients was well documented, the methods used to deliver structured, consistent evidence-based care were not clearly stipulated. Therefore, approaches to achieving long term continuity of care are uncertain. An intervention strategy that encompass all seven evidence-based factors will be useful. PMID:27247949

  20. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved

  1. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  2. Survey of a Scottish diabetic clinic: a study of the etiology of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Munro, H N; Eaton, J C; Glen, A

    1949-01-01

    Certain features of a group of 1309 diabetics were studied. The group was considered representative of Scottish diabetics since the sex distribution of cases corresponded to the sex distribution of deaths from diabetes recorded in the official mortality statistics for Scotland. Evidence is presented which justifies the use of Scottish mortality statistics for this purpose. A study of the incidence of diabetes in 413,110 Scottish recruits (male and female) suggested that in the general population the sex distribution of persons with undiagnosed diabetes might not be the same as that of persons known to have the disease. In both sexes, the disease began most frequently after age 40; sex incidence was equal up to age 40 and thereafter, female diabetics were more common than male diabetics. The high frequency of diabetes in women of middle age was confined to married women and appeared to be related, at least in part, to previous childbearing. The age at onset and the severity of the disease in this group of women were apparently uninfluenced by marriage and childbearing. Adult diabetics were no taller than the controls (hospital visitors). In the case of women diabetics, the maximum weight was significantly greater than that of the control from age 20 onwards, and in the case of male diabetics, from age 40 onwards. In both groups, married women were heavier than single women. The mean blood pressure was significantly higher in female diabetics after age 30 than in the corresponding control group. This hypertension could not be adequately explained on the grounds of obesity; it was not related to previous childbearing. Of 923 diabetics questioned, 23.2% had a family history of diabetes. As age at onset of the disease increased, positive family histories decreased. There was no relationship between presence of a positive family history and severity of the disease. The frequency of a positive family history in obese and hypertensive patients did not differ from that of a

  3. Characteristics and outcome of type 2 diabetes in urban Aboriginal people: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Davis, T M E; McAullay, D; Davis, W A; Bruce, D G

    2007-01-01

    We analysed data from Aboriginal patients with type 2 diabetes recruited to the community-based Fremantle Diabetes Study and compared them with those from the Anglo-Celt participants. Diabetes prevalence among Aboriginal people in the Fremantle area was more than double that of Anglo-Celts and the average age at diagnosis was 14 years or younger. Glycaemic control, urinary albumin :creatinine and the proportion of smokers were all higher in the Aboriginal group and there was evidence of lower diabetes-related quality of life and high rates of disability at a young age. The Aboriginal patients died 18 years or younger than their Anglo-Celt counterparts. Specialized, culturally-sensitive and sustainable programmes are urgently needed to improve the management of diabetes in urban Aboriginal communities.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  6. Anterior Diabetic Retinopathy Studied by Ultra-widefield Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kunho; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Hyup; Cho, Ga Eun; Ahn, Jeeyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence of anterior type diabetic retinopathy (DR) using ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography and to identify the factors associated with anterior type DR incidence. Methods A retrospective case review was used in this study. Patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) underwent examination by ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography, and were classified into anterior, posterior, or diffuse DR groups. Anterior DR was defined if diabetic retinal changes were noted only at the location anterior to the imaginary circle bordered by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study seven-standard fields. Correlations between demographic data, as well as systemic and ocular factors, and the incidence of NPDR types were evaluated. Results Among the 234 eyes of 234 patients with NPDR, 25 eyes (10.7%) demonstrated anterior DR. Anterior DR was observed in 10 eyes (30.3%) of patients having mild NPDR, three eyes (4.8%) of moderate NPDR patients, and in 12 eyes (7.1%) of severe NPDR patients (p < 0.001). The incidence of anterior DR positively correlated with lower hemoglobin A1c levels and with greater high-density lipoprotein levels following multiple logistic regression analysis (p < 0.001). The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 7.03 ± 0.99% in anterior DR, 7.99 ± 1.74% in posterior DR, and 7.94 ± 1.39% in diffuse DR patients (p = 0.003). The mean high-density lipoprotein level was 51.2 ± 12.5 mg/dL in anterior, 49.7 ± 15.2 mg/dL in posterior, and 45.2 ± 13.1 mg/dL in diffuse DR patients (p = 0.010). Conclusions Diabetic retinal changes confined to an anterior location were more frequently noted in earlier stages of NPDR. The incidence of DR sparing posterior retinal involvement was related to favorable blood sugar and lipid profiles. PMID:27729754

  7. Development and Validation of a Diabetic Retinopathy Referral Algorithm Based on Single-Field Fundus Photography

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Shetty, Sharan; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Sharma, Tarun; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a simplified algorithm to identify and refer diabetic retinopathy (DR) from single-field retinal images specifically for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy for appropriate care (ii) to determine the agreement and diagnostic accuracy of the algorithm as a pilot study among optometrists versus “gold standard” (retinal specialist grading). Methods The severity of DR was scored based on colour photo using a colour coded algorithm, which included the lesions of DR and number of quadrants involved. A total of 99 participants underwent training followed by evaluation. Data of the 99 participants were analyzed. Fifty posterior pole 45 degree retinal images with all stages of DR were presented. Kappa scores (κ), areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs), sensitivity and specificity were determined, with further comparison between working optometrists and optometry students. Results Mean age of the participants was 22 years (range: 19–43 years), 87% being women. Participants correctly identified 91.5% images that required immediate referral (κ) = 0.696), 62.5% of images as requiring review after 6 months (κ = 0.462), and 51.2% of those requiring review after 1 year (κ = 0.532). The sensitivity and specificity of the optometrists were 91% and 78% for immediate referral, 62% and 84% for review after 6 months, and 51% and 95% for review after 1 year, respectively. The AUC was the highest (0.855) for immediate referral, second highest (0.824) for review after 1 year, and 0.727 for review after 6 months criteria. Optometry students performed better than the working optometrists for all grades of referral. Conclusions The diabetic retinopathy algorithm assessed in this work is a simple and a fairly accurate method for appropriate referral based on single-field 45 degree posterior pole retinal images. PMID:27661981

  8. [Polish Multicenter Study on Diabetes Epidemiology (PMSDE)--1998-2000].

    PubMed

    Szybiński, Z

    2001-09-01

    increasing a burden of patients, theirs families, society and health care system. Within PMSDE programme elaboration of the model for calculation the direct costs about of diabetes and burden in terms of years of life lost using DALY measure was performed (K. Kissimova-Skarbek). Average diabetes type 1 patients costs 7 times and type 2 over 3 times higher than average health care cost and 95% of total time lost due to disability is caused by diabetes type 2. Therefor primary and secondary prevention of diabetes typ 2 have highest priority among strategic preventive targets. The Review Conference held in Warsaw at 24-25 February 2001 in the presence of WHO Experts formulated the recommendations focused on: 1. Elaboration of high risk strategy for early diagnosis of unknown diabetes type 2 based on the 2-hours OGTT (WHO 1985) 2. Continuation of the epidemiologic study in diabetes 3. Instituting the professional post for diabetes educator on the specialized and primary health care levels. 4. Further research are recommended for evaluation of the role of fasting glycemia and hyperinsulinemia as predictors and risk factors of diabetes type 2, for development of preventive models in diabetes type 2 and for development of the economical models to asses the costs of diabetes (Recommendations).

  9. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers through Systemic Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Núñez, A. D.; Pérez-Chávez, F.; García-Sánchez, C.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañendo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    This study was designed to, investigate the healing effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on diabetic foot ulcers and test two different exposure systems aimed at reducing the ELF-EMF exposure time of patients. In the first system the ELF-EMF were applied to the arm where only 3% of the total blood volume/min circulates at any given time. In the second system the ELF-EMF were applied to the thorax where more than 100% of the total blood volume/minute circulates at any given time. Twenty-six diabetic patients, with superficial neuropathic ulcers unresponsive to medical treatment were included in this preliminary report. In the first group (17 patients), the arm was exposed two hours twice a week to a extremely low frequency electromagnetic field of 0.45-0.9 mTrms, 120 Hz generated inside a solenoid coil of 10.1 cm by 20.5 cm long. In the second group the thorax of 7 patients was exposed 25 minutes twice a week to an electromagnetic field of 0.4-0.85 mTrms, 120 Hz generated in the center of a squared quasi-Helmholtz coil 52 cm by side. One patient was assigned to a placebo configuration of each exposure system with identical appearance as the active equipment but without magnetic field. Patients with deep ulcers, infected ulcers, cancer, or auto-immune disease were excluded. These preliminary results showed that the two exposure systems accelerate the healing process of neuropathic ulcers. Complete healing of the ulcer had a median duration of 90 days in both exposure systems. Therefore thorax exposure where more blood is exposed to ELF-EMF per unit of time was able to reduce 4.8 times the patient treatment time. In those patients assigned to the placebo equipment no healing effects were observed. This study will continue with a parallel, double blind placebo controlled protocol.

  10. The Swedish childhood diabetes study. Vaccinations and infections as risk determinants for diabetes in childhood.

    PubMed

    Blom, L; Nyström, L; Dahlquist, G

    1991-03-01

    In a nationwide incident case referent study we have evaluated vaccinations, early and recent infections and the use of medicines as possible risk determinants for Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood. A total of 339 recently onset diabetic and 528 referent children, age 0-14 years, were included. Information about infections was collected from a mailed questionnaire and about vaccinations from childhood health care centres and schools. When vaccinations were considered as possible risk factors for diabetes, a significant decrease in relative risk estimated as odds ratio (OR) was noted for measles vaccination (OR = 0.69; 95% confidence limits 0.48-0.98). For vaccination against tuberculosis, smallpox, tetanus, whooping cough, rubella and mumps no significant effect on OR for diabetes was found. The odds ratios for Type 1 diabetes for children exposed to 0.1-2 or over 2 infections during the last year before diagnosis of diabetes revealed a linear increase (OR = 1.0, 1.96 and 2.55 for 0, 1-2 and over 2 infections, respectively). The trend was still significant when standardized for possible confounders such as age and sex of the children, maternal age and education and intake of antibiotics and analgetics. In conclusion, a protective effect of measles vaccination for Type 1 diabetes in childhood is indicated as well as a possible causal relationship between the onset of the disease and the total load of recent infections.

  11. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... improved with weight-loss surgery. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Treating either type 1 diabetes or type 2 ... a life-long disease and there is no cure. Tight control of blood ... diabetes complications. But these problems can occur, even in ...

  12. Management of diabetic foot ulcers: evaluation of case studies.

    PubMed

    Torkington-Stokes, Rachel; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-11

    This article explores local barriers to diabetic foot ulcer healing, and describes the use of a dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm (AQUACEL® Ag+ dressing (AQAg+)) on recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers. The authors consider four case studies that demonstrate how managing local barriers to wound healing with antimicrobial and anti-biofilm dressings in protocols of care can improve outcomes for patients.

  13. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  14. Non-diabetic renal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Study of renal - retinal relationship.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J; Gupta, T; Prakash, S; Bhushan, P; Usha; Sivasankar, M; Singh, S P

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD), is known to occur in diabetic patients. The renal and retinal relationship in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with nephropathy is not uniform. This study was carried to study the histological spectrum of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients with proteinuria and its relationship with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Total 31 (males - 26; females - 5) proteinuric type 2 diabetic patients were studied. Average age of patients was 50.7 years. Nephrotic syndrome was noted in 21 (67.7%) patients. Overall, isolated DN, NDRD and NDRD superimposed on DN (mixed lesion) were observed in 12 (38.7%), 13 (41.9%) and 6 (19.4%) cases, respectively. DR was absent in 21/31 (67.7%) cases. The spectrum of nephropathy in patients without DR included: DN in 6 (28.57%), NDRD in 12 (57.14%) and mixed lesion in 3 (14.29%). Kidney histology in patients with DR (n-10) revealed DN in 6 (60%), NDRD in 1 (10%) and mixed lesion in 3 (30%) patients. Thus, absence of DR favors NDRD but does not exclude DN because isolated DN was noted in 28.57% cases in absence of DR. Similarly biopsy proven NDRD (pure NDRD; 10% and mixed lesion; 30%) was noted in 40% of cases in presence of DR. In summary, patients with T2DM had higher incidence of NDRD. DR is less frequent (32.3%) in type 2 diabetes and is a poor predictor of type of nephropathy. Hence, renal biopsy is essential for precise diagnosis of nephropathy in patients with T2DM.

  15. Non-diabetic renal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Study of renal - retinal relationship

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, J.; Gupta, T.; Prakash, S.; Bhushan, P.; Usha; Sivasankar, M.; Singh, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD), is known to occur in diabetic patients. The renal and retinal relationship in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with nephropathy is not uniform. This study was carried to study the histological spectrum of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients with proteinuria and its relationship with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Total 31 (males - 26; females - 5) proteinuric type 2 diabetic patients were studied. Average age of patients was 50.7 years. Nephrotic syndrome was noted in 21 (67.7%) patients. Overall, isolated DN, NDRD and NDRD superimposed on DN (mixed lesion) were observed in 12 (38.7%), 13 (41.9%) and 6 (19.4%) cases, respectively. DR was absent in 21/31 (67.7%) cases. The spectrum of nephropathy in patients without DR included: DN in 6 (28.57%), NDRD in 12 (57.14%) and mixed lesion in 3 (14.29%). Kidney histology in patients with DR (n-10) revealed DN in 6 (60%), NDRD in 1 (10%) and mixed lesion in 3 (30%) patients. Thus, absence of DR favors NDRD but does not exclude DN because isolated DN was noted in 28.57% cases in absence of DR. Similarly biopsy proven NDRD (pure NDRD; 10% and mixed lesion; 30%) was noted in 40% of cases in presence of DR. In summary, patients with T2DM had higher incidence of NDRD. DR is less frequent (32.3%) in type 2 diabetes and is a poor predictor of type of nephropathy. Hence, renal biopsy is essential for precise diagnosis of nephropathy in patients with T2DM. PMID:26199473

  16. Observational study of subclinical diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, N M; Miller, K M; Beck, R W; Bressler, S B; Glassman, A R; Kitchens, J W; Melia, M; Schlossman, D K

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of progression of eyes with subclinical diabetic macular edema (DME) to clinically apparent DME or DME necessitating treatment during a 2-year period. Methods In all, 43 eyes from 39 study participants with subclinical DME, defined as absence of foveal center edema as determined with slit lamp biomicroscopy but a center point thickness (CPT) between 225 and 299 μm on time domain (Stratus, Carl Zeiss Meditec) optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan, were enrolled from 891 eyes of 582 subjects screened. Eyes were evaluated annually for up to 2 years for the primary outcome, which was an increase in OCT CPT of at least 50 μm from baseline and a CPT of at least 300 μm, or treatment for DME (performed at the discretion of the investigator). Results The cumulative probability of meeting an increase in OCT CPT of at least 50 μm from baseline and a CPT of at least 300 μm, or treatment for DME was 27% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14%, 38%) by 1 year and 38% (95% CI: 23%, 50%) by 2 years. Conclusions Although subclinical DME may be uncommon, this study suggests that between approximately one-quarter and one-half of eyes with subclinical DME will progress to more definite thickening or be judged to need treatment for DME within 2 years after its identification. PMID:22441027

  17. Correlates of Dietary Intake in Youth with Diabetes: Results from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortsov, Andrey; Liese, Angela D.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B., Jr.; Hamman, Richard F.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Maahs, David M.; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M.; Thomas, Joan; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore demographic, socioeconomic, diabetes-related, and behavioral correlates of dietary intake of dairy, fruit, vegetables, sweetened soda, fiber, calcium, and saturated fat in youth with diabetes. Methods: Cross-sectional study of youth 10-22 years old with type 1 (T1DM, n = 2,176) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n = 365). Association…

  18. Prevalence of Diabetes in U.S. Youth in 2009: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, David J.; Talton, Jennifer; Dabelea, Dana; Divers, Jasmin; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Lawrence, Jean M.; Liese, Angela D.; Linder, Barbara; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Pihoker, Catherine; Saydah, Sharon H.; Standiford, Debra A.; Hamman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of diabetes in U.S. youth aged <20 years in 2009 and to estimate the total number of youth with diabetes in the U.S. by age, race/ethnicity, and diabetes type. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To address one of its primary aims, the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study identified youth aged <20 years on 31 December 2009 with physician-diagnosed diabetes in selected areas of Colorado, Ohio, South Carolina, and Washington, among health plan members of Kaiser Permanente Southern California and among American Indians living on reservations in Arizona and New Mexico. Diabetes was classified as type 1, type 2, or other. Race/ethnicity was by self-report. RESULTS From a population of 3,458,974 youth aged <20 years, 7,695 youth with diabetes were identified (2.22/1,000): 6,668 with type 1 diabetes (1.93/1,000), 837 with type 2 diabetes (0.24/1,000), and 190 (0.05/1,000) with other diabetes types. Prevalence increased with age, was slightly higher in females than males, and was most prevalent in non-Hispanic White and least prevalent in Asian/Pacific Islanders, with Native American and black youth having the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes. An estimated 191,986 U.S. youth aged <20 years have diabetes; 166,984 type 1 diabetes, 20,262 type 2 diabetes, and 4,740 other types. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes, one of the leading chronic diseases in childhood, affects >190,000 (1 of 433) youth aged <20 years in the U.S., with racial and ethnic disparities seen in diabetes prevalence, overall and by diabetes type. PMID:24041677

  19. Wide-Field Megahertz OCT Imaging of Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reznicek, Lukas; Kolb, Jan P.; Klein, Thomas; Mohler, Kathrin J.; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Kernt, Marcus; Märtz, Josef; Neubauer, Aljoscha S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of wide-field Megahertz (MHz) OCT imaging in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods. A consecutive series of 15 eyes of 15 patients with diagnosed diabetic retinopathy were included. All patients underwent Megahertz OCT imaging, a close clinical examination, slit lamp biomicroscopy, and funduscopic evaluation. To acquire densely sampled, wide-field volumetric datasets, an ophthalmic 1050 nm OCT prototype system based on a Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source with 1.68 MHz A-scan rate was employed. Results. We were able to obtain OCT volume scans from all included 15 patients. Acquisition time was 1.8 seconds. Obtained volume datasets consisted of 2088 × 1044 A-scans of 60° of view. Thus, reconstructed en face images had a resolution of 34.8 pixels per degree in x-axis and 17.4 pixels per degree. Due to the densely sampled OCT volume dataset, postprocessed customized cross-sectional B-frames through pathologic changes such as an individual microaneurysm or a retinal neovascularization could be imaged. Conclusions. Wide-field Megahertz OCT is feasible to successfully image patients with diabetic retinopathy at high scanning rates and a wide angle of view, providing information in all three axes. The Megahertz OCT is a useful tool to screen diabetic patients for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26273665

  20. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications. PMID:25227362

  1. Comparative and Mixture Effect of Cynodon Dactylon, ElectroMagnetic Field and Insulin on Diabetic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nafisi, Saeid; Nezhady, Mohammad Ali Mohammad; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Objective: New investigations are in progress to find some alternative treatments for diabetes mellitus. Herbs are some of the interesting medications in this regard. Cynodon dactylon (C.d) is a potential plant to be considered as a new medication. On the other hand, the effect of the Electromagnetic Field (EMF) on bio organisms is becoming clearer. In this study, the effect of C.d, EMF and insulin have been investigated on the diabetic mouse. Material and Methods: Diabetes was induced by a combination of ketamine (60 mg/Kg) and xylazine (10 mg/Kg) which induces a sustained hyperglycemia. Mice were divided into 12 groups: 1) control, 2) normal saline, 3 and 4) 50mg/Kg C.d, 5 and 6) 100 mg/Kg C.d, 7) insulin, 8) insulin and C.d, 9) EMF (110 KHz, 700±20 mG), 10) insulin and EMF, 11) EMF plus C.d and 12) insulin plus C.d and EMF. Blood glucose level was measured after 5 and 60 minutes in C.d administrated groups, and 5 minutes in the other groups by a glucometer set. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and different means were compared by Tukey and Bonferroni tests (p<0.05). Results: According to results, both dosages of C.d had significant lowering effect on blood glucose level. The first dose was more effective than the second, and its impact was just like insulin. The 6th, 9th and 10th groups were significant, also. However, they did not show a higher effect than insulin or C.d. The application of EMF had a significant effect compared to the second group, but it did not reduce the glucose level to the normal range. The effect of the 8th group was very impressive and the mean glucose levels in this group were lower than the control group. Conclusion: Considering the data, C.d is a good alternative medication for diabetes mellitus. PMID:25207031

  2. Evaluating diabetes health policies using natural experiments: the natural experiments for translation in diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Ronald T; Kenrik Duru, O; Albu, Jeanine B; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Soumerai, Stephen B; Wharam, James F; Ali, Mohammed K; Mangione, Carol M; Gregg, Edward W

    2015-06-01

    The high prevalence and costs of type 2 diabetes makes it a rapidly evolving focus of policy action. Health systems, employers, community organizations, and public agencies have increasingly looked to translate the benefits of promising research interventions into innovative policies intended to prevent or control diabetes. Though guided by research, these health policies provide no guarantee of effectiveness and may have opportunity costs or unintended consequences. Natural experiments use pragmatic and available data sources to compare specific policies to other policy alternatives or predictions of what would likely have happened in the absence of any intervention. The Natural Experiments for Translation in Diabetes (NEXT-D) Study is a network of academic, community, industry, and policy partners, collaborating to advance the methods and practice of natural experimental research, with a shared aim of identifying and prioritizing the best policies to prevent and control diabetes. This manuscript describes the NEXT-D Study group's multi-sector natural experiments in areas of diabetes prevention or control as case examples to illustrate the selection, design, analysis, and challenges inherent to natural experimental study approaches to inform development or evaluation of health policies.

  3. Gestational diabetes insipidus: a morphological study of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, F; Buccoliero, A M; Garbini, F; Gheri, C F; Moncini, D; Poggi, G; Saladino, V; Rossi Degl'Innocenti, D; Gheri, R G; Taddei, G L

    2009-12-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) refers to the state of excessive water intake and hypotonic polyuria. Those cases manifesting in pregnancy and referred to as GDI may persist thereafter or may be a transient latent form that resolves after delivery. Microscopic examination of affected subjects has not been previously reported. In the literature, there are various case reports and case series on diabetes insipidus in pregnancy. In this study, we present a case that had transient diabetes insipidus during pregnancy in which the placenta was examined.

  4. Reduced pulmonary function and its associations in type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Davis, T M; Knuiman, M; Kendall, P; Vu, H; Davis, W A

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether diabetes is associated with reduced lung function, we studied 421 Anglo-Celt/European subjects, representing 20.5% of all patients with type 2 diabetes identified in an urban Australian catchment area of 120097 people. In addition to collection of detailed demographic and diabetes-specific data, spirometry was performed and forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), vital capacity (VC) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measured. When expressed as a percentage of those predicted (%pred) for age, sex and height, the means of all spirometric measures were reduced by > or =9.5%. After controlling for smoking, age and gender in a linear regression model, HbA(1c) was not associated with any measure of lung function (P>0.13) but diabetes duration was significantly associated with FEV1(%pred) and PEF(%pred) (P< or =0.04) and had borderline associations with FVC(%pred) and VC(%pred) (P< or =0.064). In separate analyses controlling for smoking alone, age, body mass index (BMI), coronary heart disease (CHD) and retinopathy were independently and inversely associated with FVC(%pred), FEV1(%pred) and VC(%pred) (P<0.05). In sub-group analyses, these three spirometric measures were associated with BMI, CHD and diabetes duration in males, and age and BMI in females. Pulmonary function is reduced in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes duration seems a more important influence than glycaemic control, but obesity and vascular disease may also contribute.

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy in Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study of Women with Pregestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Aoife M.; McVicker, Lyle; Heerey, Adrienne; Carmody, Louise; Harney, Fiona; Dunne, Fidelma P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate screening and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes attending five antenatal centres along the Irish Atlantic seaboard. An adequate frequency of screening was defined as at least two retinal evaluations in separate trimesters. Progression was defined as at least one stage of deterioration of diabetic retinopathy and/or development of diabetic macular edema on at least one eye. Women with pregestational diabetes who delivered after 22 gestational weeks (n = 307) were included. In total, 185 (60.3%) had an adequate number of retinal examinations. Attendance at prepregnancy care was associated with receiving adequate screening (odds ratio 6.23; CI 3.39–11.46 (P < 0.001)). Among those who received adequate evaluations (n = 185), 48 (25.9%) had retinopathy progression. Increasing booking systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03, CI 1.01–1.06, P = 0.02) and greater drop in HbA1c between first and third trimesters of pregnancy (OR 2.05, CI 1.09–3.87, P = 0.03) significantly increased the odds of progression. A significant proportion of women continue to demonstrate retinopathy progression during pregnancy. This study highlights the role of prepregnancy care and the importance of close monitoring during pregnancy and identifies those patients at the highest risk for retinopathy progression. PMID:25945354

  6. Incidence, morbidity, mortality, and prevalence of diabetes in Denmark, 2000–2011: results from the Diabetes Impact Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Green, Anders; Sortsø, Camilla; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Emneus, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose As part of the Danish Diabetes Impact Study 2013, we present trends in the incidence, morbidity, mortality, and prevalence of diabetes in Denmark for the period 2000 through 2011. Patients and methods The Danish National Diabetes Register was established in 2006 and is assumed to cover all patients with diabetes, alive as of the end of 1996, and all subsequent new cases. The present study is based on the content of the register as of July 3, 2013 (n=497,232 patients). Using the personal identification code assigned to all Danish inhabitants, all available supplementary information from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish Civil Registration Service was used to define the date of diagnosis of diabetes and the first date of experiencing complications (grouped according to impact and severity). Results During the period of 2000 to 2011, the incidence rate of diabetes increased approximately 5% annually. During the same period, decreasing trends were observed for both the rates of progression in complications and of the complication-specific mortality. During the same period, the prevalence of diabetes doubled. Conclusion The increasing prevalence of diabetes in Denmark is driven by increasing incidence combined with decreasing morbidity and mortality in the population of patients with diabetes. These mechanisms will be explored further as part of the Diabetes Impact Study 2013, together with investigations into the socioeconomic and health economic aspects of diabetes. PMID:26604822

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  8. Studies on proteolytic activities in heart muscle of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, B; Metzinger, H; Reinauer, H

    1982-06-01

    Induction of diabetes mellitus in rats following injection of streptozotocin caused reduction in rate of gain of heart weight, of protein and of DNA content in the first two weeks. During the same time interval the overall activity of acid proteinases (cathepsin D), of alkaline proteinases and of proteinase inhibitors was measured in heart muscle homogenates. No statistically significant differences were detected compared with the proteinase activities in control rats. In contrast, total aminopeptidase activity in diabetic hearts was consistently lower than in control hearts. Earlier studies on rat skeletal muscles have shown that induction of diabetes mellitus is followed by a substantial increase of alkaline proteinase as well as aminopeptidase activities. These findings are contrasted by present data obtained with heart muscle of diabetic rats, suggesting that this tissue responds differently to insulin deficiency.

  9. Vaccination of patients with diabetes mellitus--a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mad'ar, Rastislav; Benesová, Dagmar; Brandejská, Dana; Cermáková, Miriam; Dvorková, Alena; Gazárková, Olga; Jakubalová, Silvana; Kochová, Ilona; Lastovicková, Jana; Nebáznivá, Dagmar; Orolinová, Marta; Polomis, Karel; Rehka, Václav; Sattranová, Ludmila; Schejbalová, Miriam; Slámová, Alena; Skalleová, Deanna; Sevcíková, Hana; Tkadlecová, Hana; Tmejová, Marta; Trmal, Josef; Turková, Dagmar

    2011-06-01

    402 subjects with diabetes mellitus have been vaccinated of the total of 34,000 vaccinees immunized during the study period of 9 and half months. Altogether 229 diabetic patients (56.97%) have been vaccinated'against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and 74 (18.4%) against viral hepatitis (41 types A+B, 30 type A, 3 type B). The average age in four most commonly administered vaccines (FSME IMMUN 0.5 ML, Twinrix Adult, Typhim Vi, and Havrix 1440) was 65, 52, 56, and 54 years, respectively. Live attenuated vaccines have been given to 6 patients with diabetes (1.49%)--- 5 travellers to endemic countries received the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril (1 female, 4 male) and one male patient varicella vaccine Varilrix. Among the least common vaccines in diabetic patients were those against invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal infections. Not a single unexpected side effect has been observed following the vaccination procedure in any diabetic patient. Based on the results of this retrospective study we can conclude that vaccination in diabetic patients is free of any ri-k- provided that there are no other contraindications, e.g. allergy to vaccine components or severe acute febrile illness. In the case of unstable glycaemia and significantly impaired immune system due to diabetes mellitus, vaccination with live attenuated vaccines should be carefully considered and measured against the risks of exposure to each and every specific infectious agent. There is no reason to be afraid of vaccination in diabetic patients provided that general contraindications are respected. On the contrary, this risk group can benefit from vaccination more remarkably since it may have some life-saving potential.

  10. Vejle Diabetes Biobank – a resource for studies of the etiologies of diabetes and its comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Eva Rabing Brix; Nielsen, Aneta Aleksandra; Christensen, Henry; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Christensen, Cramer Kjeldahl; Brandslund, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Aims Carefully designed and established biobanks are considered one of the most essential resources to foster biomedical research as they provide cost-effective and rapid access to a vast variety of biological materials and related anthropometrics allowing for testing of various biomarkers as well as numerous original and pertinent bioclinical hypotheses related to human disease etiology and prognosis. The objective of the present study was to present the baseline data, design, and methods used for the establishment of the Vejle Diabetes Biobank. Further aims included assessment of the prevalence of diabetes and quality of diabetes treatment in a specified Danish region. Methods The Vejle Diabetes Biobank was established from 2007 to 2010 as a regional Biobank containing blood, DNA, and urine samples from patients with diabetes and a gender- and age-matched control population aged 25–75 years. Anthropometrics were obtained by physical examination, questionnaires, and interviews at the time of inclusion into the Biobank. The cohort was linked to the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Registry, and the Danish National Prescription Registry. Results In total, 4,255 nondiabetic individuals and 3,320 patients with diabetes were included. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients had a higher body mass index (30 kg/m2) than type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (25 and 26 kg/m2 in women and men, respectively) and control subjects (25 and 27 kg/m2 in women and men, respectively). Fasting levels of plasma triglycerides and blood pressure were higher in T2D patients (1.5 mmol/L and 148/85 mmHg, respectively) compared with T1D patients (0.9 mmol/L and 139/81 mmHg, respectively), whereas glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol were lower in T2D patients (51 mmol/mol, 1.2 mmol/L, 2.2 mmol/L, and 4.2 mmol/L, respectively) compared with findings in T1D patients (61 mmol/mol, 1.6 mmol/L, 2.3 mmol

  11. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

  12. Streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in rodents as a model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic β cell glucotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and the corresponding glucotoxicity are the main pathogenic mechanisms of diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animal models are useful platforms for the understanding of β cell glucotoxicity in diabetes. As diabetes induced by a single STZ injection is often referred to as type 1 diabetes that is caused by STZ’s partial destruction of pancreas, one question often being asked is whether the STZ type 1 diabetes animal model is a good model for studying the mitochondrial mechanisms of β cell glucotoxicity. In this mini review, we provide evidence garnered from the literature that the STZ type 1 diabetes is indeed a suitable model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic β cell glucotoxicity. Evidence presented includes: 1) continued β cell derangement is due to chronic hyperglycemia after STZ is completely eliminated out of the body; 2) STZ diabetes can be reversed by insulin treatment, which indicates that β cell responds to treatment and shows ability to regenerate; and 3) STZ diabetes can be ameliorated or alleviated by administration of phytochemicals. In addition, mechanisms of STZ action and fundamental gaps in understanding mitochondrial mechanisms of β cell dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:25897251

  13. The changing face of diabetes in youth: lessons learned from studies of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Tamara S; Arslanian, Silva A

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of youth type 2 diabetes (T2D), linked with obesity and declining physical activity in high-risk populations, is increasing. Recent multicenter studies have led to a number of advances in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of this disease. As in adult T2D, youth T2D is associated with insulin resistance, together with progressive deterioration in β cell function and relative insulin deficiency in the absence of diabetes-related immune markers. In contrast to adult T2D, the decline in β cell function in youth T2D is three- to fourfold faster, and therapeutic failure rates are significantly higher in youth than in adults. Whether the more aggressive nature of youth T2D is driven by genetic heterogeneity or physiology/metabolic maladaptation is yet unknown. Besides metformin, the lack of approved pharmacotherapeutic agents for youth T2D that target the pathophysiological mechanisms is a major barrier to optimal diabetes management. There is a significant need for effective therapeutic options, in addition to increased prevention, to halt the projected fourfold increase in youth T2D by 2050 and the consequences of heightened diabetes-related morbidity and mortality at younger ages. PMID:26448515

  14. The interactive effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia on all-cause mortality: The Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Davis, Wendy Angela; Starkstein, Sergio E; Bruce, David G; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-01-01

    In a study of the effects of type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia on mortality in 1296 community-based diabetic patients followed for a mean±SD 12.9±6.1years and in 5159 matched non-diabetic residents, 0.4% of each group had schizophrenia. Patients with both conditions had a six-fold adjusted increased risk of death. PMID:26387807

  15. Genetic Studies on Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Focusing on Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Soo Heon

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disorder with a worldwide prevalence of 8.3% and is the leading cause of visual loss, end-stage renal disease and amputation. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified genetic risk factors for diabetic microvascular complications of retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. We summarized the recent findings of GWASs on diabetic microvascular complications and highlighted the challenges and our opinion on future directives. Five GWASs were conducted on diabetic retinopathy, nine on nephropathy, and one on neuropathic pain. The majority of recent GWASs were underpowered and heterogeneous in terms of study design, inclusion criteria and phenotype definition. Therefore, few reached the genome-wide significance threshold and the findings were inconsistent across the studies. Recent GWASs provided novel information on genetic risk factors and the possible pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular complications. However, further collaborative efforts to standardize phenotype definition and increase sample size are necessary for successful genetic studies on diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:26194074

  16. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  17. Clinical Impact of the Temporal Relationship between Depression and Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, David G.; Davis, Wendy A.; Cetrullo, Violetta; Starkstein, Sergio E.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical features of type 2 diabetes may differ depending on whether first depression episode precedes or follows the diagnosis of diabetes. Methods Type 2 patients from the observational community-based Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II underwent assessment of lifetime depression using the Brief Lifetime Depression Scale (developed and validated for this study) supplemented by information on current depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, 9-item version) and use of antidepressants. Patients were categorized as never depressed (Group 1), having had depression before diabetes diagnosis (Group 2), diagnosed with depression and diabetes within 2 years of each other (Group 3) and having depression after diabetes diagnosis (Group 4). Results Of 1391 patients, 20.8% were assigned to Group 2, 6.0% to Group 3 and 14.5% to Group 4. In Group 2, depression occurred a median 15.6 years before diabetes onset at age 37.2±14.7 years. These patients had similar clinical characteristics to never depressed patients except for reduced self-care behaviours and having more symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. In Group 4, depression occurred a median 9.9 years after diabetes onset at age 59.8±13.0 years. These patients had long duration diabetes, poor glycaemic control, more intensive management and more diabetic complications. Group 4 patients had more current depression than Group 2 but were less likely to be receiving antidepressants. Conclusions/Interpretation The clinical features of depression and type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous depending on their temporal relationship. There may be corresponding differences in the pathogenesis of depression in diabetes that have implications for diagnosis and management. PMID:24324682

  18. Meta-analysis of three diabetes population studies: association of inactive ALDH2 genotype with maternal inheritance of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Murata, C; Taniyama, M; Kuriyama, S; Muramatsu, T; Atsumi, Y; Matsuoka, K; Suzuki, Y

    2004-12-01

    To date, there have been three population studies that examined the association of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotype with inheritance of diabetes. Here, we summarize the results by meta-analysis. The study 1 consisted of 212 type 2 diabetics who did not have renal failure. The study 2 consisted of 73 type 2 diabetics who had renal failure. The study 3 consisted of 230 type 1 diabetics. In total, 515 subjects were examined for the association of ALDH2 genotype with inheritance of diabetes. Out of 515 subjects, 307 (60%) had active ALDH2 (ALDH2*1/ALDH2*1) and 208 (40%) had inactive ALDH2 (175 had ALDH2*1/ALDH2*2 and 33 had ALDH2*2/ALDH2*2). As for family history, 25 subjects (8.1%) in the active ALDH2 group had a diabetic mother, compared with 43 (20.6%) in the inactive ALDH2 group. Twenty-nine subjects (9.4%) in the active ALDH2 group had a diabetic father, compared with 14 (6.7%) in the inactive ALDH2 group. The percentage of diabetic mother was higher in the inactive ALDH2 group, the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). We hence speculate that diabetic patients with inactive ALDH2 genotype may have underlying background of mitochondria etiology, thereby showing maternal trait of diabetes inheritance. In conclusion, meta-analysis using three diabetes population studies strongly confirmed the association between ALDH2 inactivity and maternal inheritance.

  19. Studying Cat (Felis catus) Diabetes: Beware of the Acromegalic Imposter

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Stijn J. M.; Forcada, Yaiza; Mantis, Panagiotis; Lamb, Christopher R.; Harrington, Norelene; Fowkes, Rob; Korbonits, Márta; Smith, Ken; Church, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring diabetes mellitus (DM) is common in domestic cats (Felis catus). It has been proposed as a model for human Type 2 DM given many shared features. Small case studies demonstrate feline DM also occurs as a result of insulin resistance due to a somatotrophinoma. The current study estimates the prevalence of hypersomatotropism or acromegaly in the largest cohort of diabetic cats to date, evaluates clinical presentation and ease of recognition. Diabetic cats were screened for hypersomatotropism using serum total insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; radioimmunoassay), followed by further evaluation of a subset of cases with suggestive IGF-1 (>1000 ng/ml) through pituitary imaging and/ or histopathology. Clinicians indicated pre-test suspicion for hypersomatotropism. In total 1221 diabetic cats were screened; 319 (26.1%) demonstrated a serum IGF-1>1000 ng/ml (95% confidence interval: 23.6–28.6%). Of these cats a subset of 63 (20%) underwent pituitary imaging and 56/63 (89%) had a pituitary tumour on computed tomography; an additional three on magnetic resonance imaging and one on necropsy. These data suggest a positive predictive value of serum IGF-1 for hypersomatotropism of 95% (95% confidence interval: 90–100%), thus suggesting the overall hypersomatotropism prevalence among UK diabetic cats to be 24.8% (95% confidence interval: 21.2–28.6%). Only 24% of clinicians indicated a strong pre-test suspicion; most hypersomatotropism cats did not display typical phenotypical acromegaly signs. The current data suggest hypersomatotropism screening should be considered when studying diabetic cats and opportunities exist for comparative acromegaly research, especially in light of the many detected communalities with the human disease. PMID:26023776

  20. Atorvastatin prevents type 2 diabetes mellitus--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Sri Venkata; Aslam, Mohammad; Galav, Vikas; Bhattacharya, Swapan Kumar; Jafri, Aiman Abbas

    2014-04-01

    Recent reports of increased diabetes risk have raised concerns regarding the use of statins. The present study was therefore planned to clarify whether atorvastatin can prevent diabetes development in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eight week old male Wistar rats were randomized into three groups (n = 12 each group). Group A was given standard chow diet, while group B and group C were offered high sucrose diet. In addition to high sucrose diet, group C was given atorvastatin (20mg/kg/day) from beginning of study till 26th week. After 26 weeks, a low dose of streptozotocin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to all 3 groups and further followed for 4 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests were done at week 4, 26 and week 30. Development of impaired glucose tolerance at week 26 (16.66% vs 100%, P = <0.001) and diabetes at week 30 (16.66% vs 81.81%, P = 0.002) was significantly lower in rats pretreated with atorvastatin along with high sucrose diet viz group C compared to group B rats who received high sucrose diet only respectively. Also, metabolic indices like body weight, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose area under the curve (Gl-AUC) were significantly lower in group C compared to group B (P = <0.05) while insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was also lower in group C (P = 0.05). This study clearly demonstrates for the first time in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus that atorvastatin prevents development of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Ramadan and diabetes - knowledge, attitude and practices of general practitioners; a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Muhammad Yakoob; Hashmi, Bella Z.; Ulhaque, Muhammad Saif

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Fasting during Ramadan is obligatory for all Muslims across the world. Through literature review, it has been found out that there are various articles published for the awareness of patients and general population regarding safe fasting during Ramadan. But very few studies highlight the Ramadan specific knowledge of general practitioners engaged in providing care to people with diabetes. This study aims to describe the practice, knowledge and attitude of general practitioners regarding treatment and dietary modifications for people with diabetes during Ramadan across Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken among a sample of 274 general practitioners. Data was collected by means of a questionnaire that consisted of 25 questions that were structured according to three categories i-e. Ramadan specific knowledge, diet and physical activity and treatment modification related knowledge and practices of GPs. Results: Out of the total population of GPs surveyed, 70% responded correctly to the questions while 30% responded incorrectly. 1/4th of GPs incorrectly responded to questions regarding basic concepts of diabetes and Ramadan. 1/3rd of GPs responded incorrectly regarding questions on diet. Almost 40% of the GPs responded incorrectly to the questions regarding drug dosage adjustment in people with diabetes during Ramadan. However, more than 80% responded in agreement regarding alteration in medication timings. Conclusion: Almost one third of the studied populations of general practitioners across Pakistan lack the knowledge of basic principles that are important to be employed in the management of diabetes during Ramadan. Hence there is need to promote educational programmes and CMEs to improve the knowledge of our GPs that should be reflected by their sound clinical practices in the field of diabetes. PMID:27648026

  2. Effects of Sulbutiamine on Diabetic Polyneuropathy: An Open Randomised Controlled Study in Type 2 Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Kiew, K.K.; Wan Mohamad, W.B.; Ridzuan, A.; Mafauzy, M.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty patients with diabetic polyneuropathy were recruited from the diabetic clinic in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from 1996 to 1998. They were randomly assigned either sulbutiamine (Arcalion®) (15 patients) or no treatment (control group; 15 patients). Glycaemic control was assessed by blood glucose and HbA1. Severity of neuropathy was assessed by symptom and sign score, and electrophysiological parameters (nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potential) at entry to the study and after 6 weeks. There were improvements in the electrophysiological parameters in the treatment group when compared to the controls with significant improvement in the median nerve conduction velocity (p<0.001), median compound muscle action potential (p<0.001), peroneal nerve conduction velocity (p<0.001), and peroneal compound muscle action potential (p<0.001). No significant improvement in symptom and sign scores were noted between the groups but a significant improvement compared to base line was noted for the sulbutiamine treated group. (p< 0.05). The glycaemic control in both groups was not significantly different at base line and was stable throughout the study. Sulbutiamine objectively improved peripheral nerve function in diabetic polyneuropathy although the symptom score did not improve, possibly due to the short duration of the study. PMID:22969314

  3. Effects of sulbutiamine on diabetic polyneuropathy: an open randomised controlled study in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Kiew, K K; Wan Mohamad, W B; Ridzuan, A; Mafauzy, M

    2002-01-01

    Thirty patients with diabetic polyneuropathy were recruited from the diabetic clinic in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from 1996 to 1998. They were randomly assigned either sulbutiamine (Arcalion(®)) (15 patients) or no treatment (control group; 15 patients). Glycaemic control was assessed by blood glucose and HbA1. Severity of neuropathy was assessed by symptom and sign score, and electrophysiological parameters (nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potential) at entry to the study and after 6 weeks. There were improvements in the electrophysiological parameters in the treatment group when compared to the controls with significant improvement in the median nerve conduction velocity (p<0.001), median compound muscle action potential (p<0.001), peroneal nerve conduction velocity (p<0.001), and peroneal compound muscle action potential (p<0.001). No significant improvement in symptom and sign scores were noted between the groups but a significant improvement compared to base line was noted for the sulbutiamine treated group. (p< 0.05). The glycaemic control in both groups was not significantly different at base line and was stable throughout the study. Sulbutiamine objectively improved peripheral nerve function in diabetic polyneuropathy although the symptom score did not improve, possibly due to the short duration of the study. PMID:22969314

  4. The Diabetes Visual Function Supplement Study (DiVFuSS)

    PubMed Central

    Chous, A Paul; Richer, Stuart P; Gerson, Jeffry D; Kowluru, Renu A

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is known to affect visual function before onset of retinopathy (diabetic retinopathy (DR)). Protection of visual function may signal disruption of mechanisms underlying DR. Methods This was a 6-month randomised, controlled clinical trial of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes with no retinopathy or mild to moderate non-proliferative retinopathy assigned to twice daily consumption of placebo or a novel, multi-component formula containing xanthophyll pigments, antioxidants and selected botanical extracts. Measurement of contrast sensitivity, macular pigment optical density, colour discrimination, 5-2 macular threshold perimetry, Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms, foveal and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, glycohaemoglobin (HbA1c), serum lipids, 25-OH-vitamin D, tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-a) and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) were taken at baseline and 6 months. Outcomes were assessed by differences between and within groups at baseline and at study conclusion using meand ± SDs and t tests (p<0.05) for continuous variables. Results There were no significant intergroup differences at baseline. At 6 months, subjects on active supplement compared with placebo had significantly better visual function on all measures (p values ranging from 0.008 to <0.0001), significant improvements in most serum lipids (p values ranging from 0.01 to 0.0004), hsCRP (p=0.01) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (Fisher's exact test, p=0.0024) No significant changes in retinal thickness, HbA1c, total cholesterol or TNF-α were found between the groups. Conclusions This study provides strong evidence of clinically meaningful improvements in visual function, hsCRP and peripheral neuropathy in patients with diabetes, both with and without retinopathy, and without affecting glycaemic control. Trial registration number www.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01646047 PMID:26089210

  5. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  6. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  7. Eye Study Underscores the Long-Lasting Benefits of Controlling Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monday, June 13, 2016 Eye study underscores the long-lasting benefits of controlling diabetes NIH-funded study ... received intensive glycemic therapy in the 10-year-long Diabetes Control and Complications Trial on average had ...

  8. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  9. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (p<0.05). We obtained significant relation between HbA1c elevation and native positivity between toes (p<0.05). Fungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (p<0.05). Moreover, native positivity in patients with diabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (p<0.05). Conclusion: Fungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers. PMID:27648034

  10. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (p<0.05). We obtained significant relation between HbA1c elevation and native positivity between toes (p<0.05). Fungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (p<0.05). Moreover, native positivity in patients with diabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (p<0.05). Conclusion: Fungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers.

  11. Effects of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) on the liver of diabetic rats: a morphological and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bolkent, S; Yanardag, R; Ozsoy-Sacan, O; Karabulut-Bulan, O

    2004-12-01

    Parsley is used by diabetics in Turkey to reduce blood glucose. The present study aims to investigate both the morphological and biochemical effects of parsley on liver tissue. Rat hepatocytes were examined by light and electron microscopy. Degenerative changes were observed in the hepatocytes of diabetic rats. These degenerative changes were significantly reduced or absent in the hepatocytes of diabetic rats treated with parsley. Blood glucose levels, alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase were observed to be raised in diabetic rats. Diabetic rats treated with parsley demonstrated significantly lower levels of blood glucose, alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase. The present study suggests that parsley demonstrates a significant hepatoprotective effect in diabetic rats.

  12. Meanings of Health for Iranian Diabetic Patients: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Moridi, Golrokh; Valiee, Sina; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Nasab, Golnaz Esmaeil; Khaledi, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health is an exclusive and subjective phenomenon, and one of the most important situations with regard to perception of health, arises when patients suffer from a chronic disease. This study was conducted within the qualitative research framework and aimed to explore the meanings of health as perceived by a group of Iranian diabetic patients. Methods A descriptive qualitative analysis design was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants among diabetic patients, who were admitted to the diabetes care centre of Tohid Hospital of the Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran during a ten-month period in 2014. Interviews were transcribed and analysed through conventional content analysis. Results Based on the findings of the study, three major health-related themes emerged: 1) the syndrome of the healthy body and the happy heart (physical well-being vivacity, satisfaction, and calmness of the mind), 2) life without compulsory limitations (lack of dietary limitations, No activity limitations, lack of social limitations), and 3) exalted spirituality (satisfying self and others, trusting God, remembering God). Conclusion Health care providers should consider the meaning of health in special groups, chiefly in patients with chronic diseases. It facilitates the development of appropriate programmes to improve desirable health levels among diabetic patients. PMID:27790342

  13. Detection of retinal lesions in diabetic retinopathy: comparative evaluation of 7-field digital color photography versus red-free photography.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Sharma, Reetika; Vashist, Nagender; Vohra, Rajpal; Garg, Satpal

    2015-10-01

    Red-free light allows better detection of vascular lesions as this wavelength is absorbed by hemoglobin; however, the current gold standard for the detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy remains 7-field color fundus photography. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of 7-field fundus photography using red-free light to detect retinopathy lesions with corresponding images captured using standard 7-field color photography. Non-stereoscopic standard 7-field 30° digital color fundus photography and 7-field 30° digital red-free fundus photography were performed in 200 eyes of 103 patients with various grades of diabetic retinopathy ranging from mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The color images (n = 1,400) were studied with corresponding red-free images (n = 1,400) by one retina consultant (PV) and two senior residents training in retina. The various retinal lesions [microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, soft exudates, intra-retinal microvascular anomalies (IRMA), neovascularization of the retina elsewhere (NVE), and neovascularization of the disc (NVD)] detected by all three observers in each of the photographs were noted followed by determination of agreement scores using κ values (range 0-1). Kappa coefficient was categorized as poor (≤0), slight (0.01-0.20), fair (0.2 -0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), substantial (0.61-0.80), and almost perfect (0.81-1). The number of lesions detected by red-free images alone was higher for all observers and all abnormalities except hard exudates. Detection of IRMA was especially higher for all observers with red-free images. Between image pairs, there was substantial agreement for detection of hard exudates (average κ = 0.62, range 0.60-0.65) and moderate agreement for detection of hemorrhages (average κ = 0.52, range 0.45-0.58), soft exudates (average κ = 0.51, range 0.42-0.61), NVE (average κ = 0.47, range 0.39-0.53), and NVD

  14. Assessment of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Nonmydriatic Ultra-Widefield Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (Optomap) Compared With ETDRS 7-Field Stereo Photography

    PubMed Central

    Kernt, Marcus; Hadi, Indrawati; Pinter, Florian; Seidensticker, Florian; Hirneiss, Christoph; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael W.; Neubauer, Aljoscha S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the diagnostic properties of a nonmydriatic 200° ultra-widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) versus mydriatic Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) 7-field photography for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A consecutive series of 212 eyes of 141 patients with different levels of DR were examined. Grading of DR and clinically significant macular edema (CSME) from mydriatic ETDRS 7-field stereo photography was compared with grading obtained by Optomap Panoramic 200 SLO images. All SLO scans were performed through an undilated pupil, and no additional clinical information was used for evaluation of all images by the two independent, masked, expert graders. RESULTS Twenty-two eyes from ETDRS 7-field photography and 12 eyes from Optomap were not gradable by at least one grader because of poor image quality. A total of 144 eyes were analyzed regarding DR level and 155 eyes regarding CSME. For ETDRS 7-field photography, 22 eyes (18 for grader 2) had no or mild DR (ETDRS levels ≤ 20) and 117 eyes (111 for grader 2) had no CSME. A highly substantial agreement between both Optomap DR and CSME grading and ETDRS 7-field photography existed with κ = 0.79 for DR and 0.73 for CSME for grader 1, and κ = 0.77 (DR) and 0.77 (CSME) for grader 2. CONCLUSIONS Determination of CSME and grading of DR level from Optomap Panoramic 200 nonmydriatic images show a positive correlation with mydriatic ETDRS 7-field stereo photography. Both techniques are of sufficient quality to assess DR and CSME. Optomap Panoramic 200 images cover a larger retinal area and therefore may offer additional diagnostic properties. PMID:22912430

  15. Is social support universally adaptive in diabetes? A correlational study in an Arabic-speaking population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between diabetes self-care, diabetes-specific emotional distress, and social support and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1C levels: HbA1c) among a sample of Lebanese adults with type 2 diabetes. A descriptive correlational design was adapted with descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regressions for analyses. A convenience sample of 140 adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes was recruited from 2 diabetes clinics in Greater Beirut. Participants were asked to complete 4 questionnaires in Arabic. Significant associations (P < .05) were found between following a general diet for more than 3.5 days per week and higher social support and HbA1c levels of 7% or more. Social support was positively associated with HbA1c levels such that participants with uncontrolled glycemic levels, as evidenced by higher values for HbA1c, received more support from their social network.

  16. A cohort study of diabetic patients and diabetic foot ulceration patients in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yufeng; Wang, Xuemei; Xia, Lei; Fu, Xiaobing; Xu, Zhangrong; Ran, Xingwu; Yan, Li; Li, Qiu; Mo, Zhaohui; Yan, Zhaoli; Ji, Qiuhe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    To determine the annual incidence and clinically relevant risk factors for foot ulceration in a large cohort study of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients and diabetes mellitus (DM) patients in China. To investigate a cohort of 1,333 patients comprising 452 DFU patients and 881 DM patients, who underwent foot screening, physical examination, and laboratory tests in eight hospitals. The patients were assessed at baseline in terms of their demographic information, medical and social history, peripheral neuropathy disease (PND) screening, periphery artery disease (PAD) screening, assessment of nutritional status, and diabetic control. One year later, the patients were followed up to determine the incidence of new foot ulcers, amputation, and mortality. By univariate analysis, statistically significant differences were found in age, location, gender, living alone (yes/no), occupation, smoking, hypertension, PND, PAD, nephropathy, retinopathy, cataracts, duration of diabetes, Glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose level, postprandial blood glucose level, insulin level, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, cholesterol, triglyeride, high density lipoprotein (HDL), serum albumin, white blood cell, and body mass index. A binary logistic regression model was used to examine which of these risk factors were independent risk factors for foot ulceration. A total of 687 (51.5%) of the 1,333 patients were followed up for an average of 12 months; there were 458 DM patients and 229 DFU patients. A total of 46 patients died during the follow-up period; 13 were DM patients, and 33 were DFU patients. Of the 641 patients, 445 (69.4%) patients were DM patients, and 196 (30.6%) were DFU patients. At follow-up, 36/445 DM patients (8.1%), and 62/196 DFU patients (31.6%), developed new ulcers; 10/196 DFU patients underwent an amputation. The annual incidence of ulceration for DM patients and amputation for DFU patients were 8.1 and 5.1%, respectively. The annual mortality of

  17. Sugar intake is associated with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Molly M.; Frederiksen, Brittni; Seifert, Jennifer A.; Kroehl, Miranda; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Dietary sugar intake may increase insulin production, stress the beta cells and increase the risk for islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes. Methods Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA (autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein [IA2] twice or more in succession) and progression to type 1 diabetes. Information on intake of fructose, sucrose, total sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, beverages with non-nutritive sweetener and juice was collected prospectively throughout childhood via food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). We examined diet records for 1,893 children (mean age at last follow-up 10.2 years); 142 developed IA and 42 progressed to type 1 diabetes. HLA genotype was dichotomised as high risk (HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302) or not. All Cox regression models were adjusted for total energy, FFQ type, type 1 diabetes family history, HLA genotype and ethnicity. Results In children with IA, progression to type 1 diabetes was significantly associated with intake of total sugars (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07–2.85). Progression to type 1 diabetes was also associated with increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in those with the high-risk HLA genotype (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25–2.71), but not in children without it (interaction p value = 0.02). No sugar variables were associated with IA risk. Conclusions/interpretation Sugar intake may exacerbate the later stage of type 1 diabetes development; sugar-sweetened beverages may be especially detrimental to children with the highest genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes. PMID:26048237

  18. The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study: Rationale, Findings, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Hamman, Richard F.; Dabelea, Dana; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Lawrence; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Lawrence, Jean M.; Linder, Barbara; Marcovina, Santica M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Pihoker, Catherine; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; Saydah, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth (SEARCH) study was initiated in 2000, with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and support from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to address major knowledge gaps in the understanding of childhood diabetes. SEARCH is being conducted at five sites across the U.S. and represents the largest, most diverse study of diabetes among U.S. youth. An active registry of youth diagnosed with diabetes at age <20 years allows the assessment of prevalence (in 2001 and 2009), annual incidence (since 2002), and trends by age, race/ethnicity, sex, and diabetes type. Prevalence increased significantly from 2001 to 2009 for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in most age, sex, and race/ethnic groups. SEARCH has also established a longitudinal cohort to assess the natural history and risk factors for acute and chronic diabetes-related complications as well as the quality of care and quality of life of persons with diabetes from diagnosis into young adulthood. Many youth with diabetes, particularly those from low-resourced racial/ethnic minority populations, are not meeting recommended guidelines for diabetes care. Markers of micro- and macrovascular complications are evident in youth with either diabetes type, highlighting the seriousness of diabetes in this contemporary cohort. This review summarizes the study methods, describes key registry and cohort findings and their clinical and public health implications, and discusses future directions. PMID:25414389

  19. Candidate gene association study for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiufen; Deng, Yu; Gu, Hong; Ren, Xuetao; Li, Na; Lim, Apiradee; Snellingen, Torkel; Liu, Xipu; Wang, Ningli

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether variants in a set of eight candidate genes are associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) in a cohort of Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Case-control study. Patients with T2DM were recruited from the Desheng community in urban Beijing and assigned into a DR group or diabetic without retinopathy (DWR) group, based on the duration of diabetes and grading of fundus images. Twenty-six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within eight candidate genes, including PPARγ, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), erythropoietin, aldose reductase, protein kinase C-β, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, were analyzed using the MassARRAY genotyping system. Results A total of 500 patients with T2DM (216 with DR and 284 with DWR) were enrolled in the study. Significant associations of DR were noted with genotypes of four SNPs—rs699947 (p<0.001), rs833061 (p=0.001), rs13207351 (p<0.001), and rs2146323 (p=0.006)—in the VEGF gene and one variant, rs2071559, in the KDR gene (p=0.034). After adjustment for covariates, significant association of DR remained with the homozygous genotype of the minor allele for the SNPs rs699947 (odds ratio [OR] = 3.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12–11.19), rs833061 (OR = 3.72, 95% CI: 1.17–11.85), rs13207351 (OR = 3.76, 95% CI: 1.21–11.71), and rs2146323 (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.46–5.37) in the VEGF gene as well as the SNP rs2071559 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.08–2.41) in the KDR gene. However, only rs699947 and rs13207351 in the VEGF gene remained statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. No associations were found in other genes tested. Conclusions These data expanded previous observations on the association of DR with variants in the VEGF gene in Chinese patients with T2DM. Moreover, a possible association between DR and KDR polymorphisms is suggested. PMID:24623964

  20. Correlates of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in US South Asians: Findings from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti D.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Kandula, Namratha R.; Srivastava, Shweta; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of sociodemographic, lifestyle and cultural factors in pre-diabetes and diabetes in South Asian immigrants to the United States (US), a population at high risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a community-based cohort of 899 South Asians without known cardiovascular disease from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. Glycemic status was determined by fasting glucose, 2-hour post-challenge glucose and use of diabetes medication. We used multinomial logistic regression models to estimate the independent associations of sociodemographic, lifestyle and cultural factors with pre-diabetes and diabetes, adjusting for confounders identified using directed acyclic graphs. Results Approximately 33% of participants had pre-diabetes and 25% had diabetes. In multivariate analyses, an independent correlate of pre-diabetes was low exercise. Additional covariates associated with diabetes included: lower family income, less education, high chronic psychological burden score, and greater time spent watching television, and fasting monthly or annually was inversely associated with diabetes prevalence. Conclusions We found several modifiable risk factors associated with pre-diabetes and diabetes that may help guide diabetes prevention interventions for South Asian immigrants to the US. PMID:25459085

  1. Depression in Patients with Type II Diabetes: Case study at Diabetic Outpatient Clinic, in Samut Prakan

    PubMed Central

    Thongsai, Soontareeporn; Watanabenjasopa, Suntaree; Youjaiyen, Malinee

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive research studied the depression level of patients with diabetes type II at diabetic clinics in Samut Prakarn, and, identified the causes of severe depression in patients with type 2. There were 209 participants enrolled in the study. The samples were selected by opportunistic sampling technique. The data were collected from May 2013 to July 2013, using the CES-D questionnaire, with Cronbach’s coefficient alpha 0.82 and guidelines for interviews. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Research Results: 1. 66 percent of participants had a depression score at a low level. 2. The CES-D showed that, 44 percent were unhappy and 38 percent did not feel that their life was enjoyable. 29 percent felt no hope for the future, 5.6 percent were easily upset and 8.3 percent suffered from insomnia and severe depression. 3. Half of the participants mentioned that troubled family relationships was a main cause of their depression, 42.9 percents felt worrying about their illness, 35.3 percent blamed over work and almost 15 percent identified loss of love as the cause of depression. PMID:24373272

  2. EDF field operation computerization study

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, L.; Pirus, D.

    2006-07-01

    The main control room has been the subject of extensive research and actions into improved operations assistance. On the other hand, few studies concern the need for field operation improvements, which have few assistance resources adapted to working requirements. Why? Past studies have shown the inability of technology to assume job constraints (insufficient screen readability, excessive equipment weight, prohibitive response times). Nevertheless, today new technologies can be adapted to field operations, and they justify further study. Real needs exist: local operations are often complex and are led in difficult environments where conditions prevent the use of paper-based documents. The issue is a significant risk of error which might impact plant reliability. The cumbersome nature of paper procedures, the working environment and the operational feed-back of experience led us to concentrate on the field operation to identify how it may be improved by the use of these new technologies. Such equipment would allow a better traceability and quality of actions. Possibility of communications with other plant personnel and information sharing may be also immediately available for all. This paper presents a study which intends to collect assistance requirements through an analysis of working practices and organizations with local personnel. Our aim is to identify which of those might benefit from IT support. This collection was obtained through interviews and observations. These two methods helped us to define potential needs, constraints and consequences for work organization. This paper presents the study results and findings, identifies professions which may benefit from the use of wearable computers and describes how the reliability and efficiency of human actions would be improved. Finally we identify design requirements and criteria to be used for writing the technical specifications for a test prototype. (authors)

  3. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes. Methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of randomly selected African American (n = 220), Native American (n = 181), and white (n = 297) Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes in 2 rural counties in central North Carolina. Participants were asked about utilization of a primary care doctor and of specialists (nutritionist, diabetes specialist, eye doctor, bladder specialist, kidney specialist, heart specialist, foot specialist) in the past year. Findings Virtually all respondents (99.0%) reported having a primary care doctor and seeing that doctor in the past year. About 42% reported seeing a doctor for diabetes-related care. On average, participants reported seeing 2 specialists in the past year, and 54% reported seeing >1 specialist. Few reported seeing a diabetes specialist (5.7%), nutritionist (10.9%), or kidney specialist (17.5%). African Americans were more likely than others to report seeing a foot specialist (P<.01), while men were more likely than women to have seen a bladder specialist (P =.02), kidney specialist (P =.001), and heart specialist (P =.004), after adjusting for potential confounders. Predictors of the number of specialists seen include gender, education, poverty status, diabetes medication use, and self-rated health. Conclusions These data indicate low utilization of specialty diabetes care providers across ethnic groups and reflect the importance of primary care providers in diabetes care in rural areas. PMID:16092292

  4. Performance of the First Combined Smartwatch and Smartphone Diabetes Diary Application Study

    PubMed Central

    Årsand, Eirik; Muzny, Miroslav; Bradway, Meghan; Muzik, Jan; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wearable computing has long been described as the solution to many health challenges. However, the use of this technology as a diabetes patient self-management tool has not been fully explored. A promising platform for this use is the smartwatch—a wrist-worn device that not only tells time but also provides internet connection and ability to communicate information to and from a mobile phone. Method: Over 9 months, the design of a diabetes diary application for a smartwatch was completed using agile development methods. The system, including a two-way communication between the applications on the smartwatch and mobile phone, was tested with 6 people with type 1 diabetes. A small number of participants was deliberately chosen due to ensure an efficient use of resources on a novel system. Results: The designed smartwatch system displays the time, day, date, and remaining battery time. It also allows for the entry of carbohydrates, insulin, and blood glucose (BG), with the option to view previously recorded data. Users were able to record specific physical activities, program reminders, and automatically record and transfer data, including step counts, to the mobile phone version of the diabetes diary. The smartwatch system can also be used as a stand-alone tool. Users reported usefulness, responded positively toward its functionalities, and also provided specific suggestions for further development. Suggestions were implemented after the feasibility study. Conclusions: The presented system and study demonstrate that smartwatches have opened up new possibilities within the diabetes self-management field by providing easier ways of monitoring BG, insulin injections, physical activity and dietary information directly from the wrist. PMID:25591859

  5. A case study of a patient with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; Gharibi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    The patient, in this report, is a 52 years old male driver who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) five years ago without diabetic retinopathy at the baseline. The patient was being monitored for two intervals. It was at the second interval which he was diagnosed with proliferative retinopathy; in fact, the progression rate of retinopathy from its first sign, which occurred at the middle of the first and second interval, to the point at which the patient lost his vision from the left eye occurred within a year. In this work, we introduce a new factor ignored through all the previously conducted studies, namely, type of profession. This factor which contributes to occupational stress plays an important role in the progression of proliferative retinopathy. We speculate that this factor can accelerate the progression of this disease dramatically, even when the other risk factors are not present. PMID:26907970

  6. Improvements in the life expectancy of type 1 diabetes: the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study cohort.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel G; Secrest, Aaron M; Sharma, Ravi K; Songer, Thomas J; Orchard, Trevor J

    2012-11-01

    Survival in type 1 diabetes has improved, but the impact on life expectancy in the U.S. type 1 diabetes population is not well established. Our objective was to estimate the life expectancy of the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) study cohort and quantify improvements by comparing two subcohorts based on year of diabetes diagnosis (1950-1964 [n = 390] vs. 1965-1980 [n = 543]). The EDC study is a prospective cohort study of 933 participants with childhood-onset (aged <17 years) type 1 diabetes diagnosed at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh from 1950 to 1980. Mortality ascertainment was censored 31 December 2009. Abridged cohort life tables were constructed to calculate life expectancy. Death occurred in 237 (60.8%) of the 1950-1964 subcohort compared with 88 (16.2%) of the 1965-1980 subcohort. The life expectancy at birth for those diagnosed 1965-1980 was ~15 years greater than participants diagnosed 1950-1964 (68.8 [95% CI 64.7-72.8] vs. 53.4 [50.8-56.0] years, respectively) (P < 0.0001); this difference persisted regardless of sex or pubertal status at diagnosis. This improvement in life expectancy emphasizes the need for insurance companies to update analysis of the life expectancy of those with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes because weighting of insurance premiums is based on outdated estimates.

  7. Healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns are related to pre-diabetes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Fariba; Siassi, Fereydoun; Koohdani, Fariba; Mahaki, Behzad; Qorbani, Mostafa; Yavari, Parvaneh; Shaibu, Osman Mohammed; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2016-09-01

    Pre-diabetes increases the risk of diabetes and CVD. Several studies have investigated the relationship between food intake and pre-diabetes morbidity, but the dietary patterns of pre-diabetes subjects were not taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between dietary patterns and pre-diabetes. In this regard, 150 pre-diabetic subjects and 150 healthy controls, who attended the diabetes screening centre in Shahreza, Iran, were matched for age group and sex. The weight, height, waist circumference, physical activity, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and blood glucose levels of all participants were measured. Dietary information was collected using a semi-quantitative FFQ. Using factor analysis, two dietary patterns were identified: the vegetables, fruits and legumes (VFL) dietary pattern and the sweet, solid fat, meat and mayonnaise (SSMM) dietary pattern. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between pre-diabetes and dietary patterns. After adjusting for age, education, physical activity, BMI and energy intake, the VFL dietary pattern was found to be negatively associated with lower pre-diabetes (OR 0·16; 95 % CI 0·10, 0·26). Furthermore, the SSMM dietary pattern was positively associated with pre-diabetes (OR 5·45; 95 % CI 3·22, 9·23). In conclusion, the VFL dietary pattern is inversely related to pre-diabetes, whereas the SSMM dietary pattern is associated with increased risk of pre-diabetes. PMID:27451983

  8. Retinol binding protein 4 and incident diabetes – the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC Study)

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Vivian C.; Pereira, Mark; Pankow, James S.; Ballantyne, Christie; Couper, David; Heiss, Gerardo; Duncan, Bruce B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been described as a link between impaired glucose uptake in adipocytes and systemic insulin sensitivity. Objective To determine whether RBP4 fasting levels predict the development of type 2 diabetes. Methods Using a case-cohort design, we followed 543 middle-aged individuals who developed diabetes and 537 who did not over ~9 years within the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Weighted Cox proportional hazards analyses permitted statistical inference of the RBP4 – incident diabetes associations to the entire cohort. Results Women in the highest tertile of RBP4 presented greater risk of developing diabetes (HR=1.74; 95%CI 1.03–2.94) in analyses adjusted for age, ethnicity, study center, parental history of diabetes, hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, nonesterified fatty acids, adiponectin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL-C. When additionally adjusted for fasting insulin, this association’s significance became borderline (HR=1.68; 95%CI 1.00–2.82). No association between RBP4 levels and incident diabetes was found in men. Conclusion These findings suggest that RBP4 levels may be directly involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in women. PMID:24142010

  9. Association of Mediterranean diet and cardiorespiratory fitness with the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Bantle, Anne E; Chow, Lisa S; Steffen, Lyn M; Wang, Qi; Hughes, John; Durant, Nefertiti H; Ingram, Katherine H; Reis, Jared P; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To better understand the association between a modified Mediterranean diet pattern in young adulthood, cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, and the odds of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age. Research design and methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who did not have pre-diabetes or diabetes at baseline (year 0 (Y0), ages 18–30) and who had data available at the Y0 and year 25 (Y25) visits were included in this analysis (n=3358). Polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the association between baseline dietary intake and fitness data and odds of pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age (Y25, ages 43–55). Results At the Y25 visit, 1319 participants (39%) had pre-diabetes and 393 (12%) had diabetes. Higher baseline fitness was associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes at Y25. After adjustment for covariates, each SD increment in treadmill duration (181 s) was associated with lower odds for pre-diabetes (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95, p=0.005) and for diabetes (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.85, p=0.0002) when compared to normal glycemia. A modified Mediterranean diet pattern was not associated with either pre-diabetes or diabetes. No interaction between cardiorespiratory fitness and dietary intake was observed, but baseline fitness remained independently associated with incident pre-diabetes and diabetes following adjustment for diet. Conclusions Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, but not a modified Mediterranean diet pattern, is associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes in middle age. Trial registration number NCT00005130.

  10. Association of Mediterranean diet and cardiorespiratory fitness with the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Bantle, Anne E; Chow, Lisa S; Steffen, Lyn M; Wang, Qi; Hughes, John; Durant, Nefertiti H; Ingram, Katherine H; Reis, Jared P; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To better understand the association between a modified Mediterranean diet pattern in young adulthood, cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, and the odds of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age. Research design and methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who did not have pre-diabetes or diabetes at baseline (year 0 (Y0), ages 18–30) and who had data available at the Y0 and year 25 (Y25) visits were included in this analysis (n=3358). Polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the association between baseline dietary intake and fitness data and odds of pre-diabetes or diabetes by middle age (Y25, ages 43–55). Results At the Y25 visit, 1319 participants (39%) had pre-diabetes and 393 (12%) had diabetes. Higher baseline fitness was associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes at Y25. After adjustment for covariates, each SD increment in treadmill duration (181 s) was associated with lower odds for pre-diabetes (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95, p=0.005) and for diabetes (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.85, p=0.0002) when compared to normal glycemia. A modified Mediterranean diet pattern was not associated with either pre-diabetes or diabetes. No interaction between cardiorespiratory fitness and dietary intake was observed, but baseline fitness remained independently associated with incident pre-diabetes and diabetes following adjustment for diet. Conclusions Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in young adulthood, but not a modified Mediterranean diet pattern, is associated with lower odds of pre-diabetes and of diabetes in middle age. Trial registration number NCT00005130. PMID:27648287

  11. Impact of Diabetes on Stroke Risk and Outcomes: Two Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Chang; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Several limitations existed in previous studies which suggested that diabetic patients have increased risk of stroke. We conducted this study to better understand the stroke risk and poststroke outcomes in patients with diabetes.From the claims data of Taiwan's National Health Insurance, we identified 24,027 adults with new-diagnosed diabetes and 96,108 adults without diabetes between 2000 and 2003 in a retrospective cohort study. Stroke events (included hemorrhage, ischemia, and other type of stroke) during the follow-up period of 2000 to 2008 were ascertained and adjusted risk of stroke associated with diabetes was calculated. A nested cohort study of 221,254 hospitalized stroke patients (included hemorrhage, ischemia, and other type of stroke) between 2000 and 2009 was conducted. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for adverse events after stroke hospitalization in patients with and without diabetes.The incidences of stroke in cohorts with and without diabetes were 10.1 and 4.5 per 1000 person-years, respectively. During the follow-up period, diabetic patients had an increased risk of stroke (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.64-1.86) than those without diabetes. Associations between diabetes and stroke risk were significant in both sexes and all age groups. Previous diabetes was associated with poststroke mortality (OR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.19-1.49), pneumonia (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.20-1.42), and urinary tract infection (OR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.55-1.77). The impact of diabetes on adverse events after stroke was investigated particularly in those with diabetes-related complications.Diabetes was associated with stroke risk, and diabetic patients had more adverse events and subsequent mortality after stroke. PMID:26717365

  12. Dietary intake of lutein and diabetic retinopathy in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Sahli, Michelle W.; Mares, Julie A.; Meyers, Kristin J.; Klein, Ronald; Brady, William E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Donahue, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that dietary intake of lutein is inversely associated with prevalence of diabetic retinopathy due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its location within the retina. Methods We used logistic regression to examine the association between prevalent DR and energy-adjusted lutein intake [by quartile (Q)] using data collected from 1,430 ARIC study participants with diabetes (n=994 White and n=508 Black). DR was assessed using a 45-degree nonmydriatic retinal photograph from one randomly chosen eye taken at visit 3 (1993–95). Dietary lutein intake was estimated using a 66-item food frequency questionnaire at visit 1(1987–89). Results The median estimated daily lutein intake was 1,370 μg/1000 kcals and the prevalence of DR was ~21%. We found a crude association between lutein and DR [OR (95% CI) for Q4 (high intake) vs. Q1 (low intake) =2.11 (1.45–3.09); p for trend<0.0001] which was attenuated after adjustment for race, duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, field center and energy intake [1.41 (0.87–2.28); p for trend=0.01]. In analyses limited to persons with a short duration of diabetes (<6 years), the association no longer persisted [0.94 (0.31–2.16); p for trend=0.72] as compared to the association in those with a longer duration of diabetes (≥6 year) [1.58 (0.91–2.75); p for trend=0.01]. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that the odds of higher lutein intake were greater among those with DR than those without DR. However, after adjusting for confounders, intake of lutein was not associated with DR. PMID:26949989

  13. Validating self-report of diabetes use by participants in the 45 and up study: a record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence studies usually depend on self-report of disease status in survey data or administrative data collections and may over- or under-estimate disease prevalence. The establishment of a linked data collection provided an opportunity to explore the accuracy and completeness of capture of information about diabetes in survey and administrative data collections. Methods Baseline questionnaire data at recruitment to the 45 and Up Study was obtained for 266,848 adults aged 45 years and over sampled from New South Wales, Australia in 2006–2009, and linked to administrative data about hospitalisation from the Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) for 2000–2009, claims for medical services (MBS) and pharmaceuticals (PBS) from Medicare Australia data for 2004–2009. Diabetes status was determined from response to a question ‘Has a doctor EVER told you that you have diabetes’ (n = 23,981) and augmented by examination of free text fields about diagnosis (n = 119) or use of insulin (n = 58). These data were used to identify the sub-group with type 1 diabetes. We explored the agreement between self-report of diabetes, identification of diabetes diagnostic codes in APDC data, claims for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in MBS data, and claims for dispensed medication (oral hyperglycaemic agents and insulin) in PBS data. Results Most participants with diabetes were identified in APDC data if admitted to hospital (79.3%), in MBS data with at least one claim for HbA1c testing (84.7%; 73.4% if 2 tests claimed) or in PBS data through claim for diabetes medication (71.4%). Using these alternate data collections as an imperfect ‘gold standard’ we calculated sensitivities of 83.7% for APDC, 63.9% (80.5% for two tests) for MBS, and 96.6% for PBS data and specificities of 97.7%, 98.4% and 97.1% respectively. The lower sensitivity for HbA1c may reflect the use of this test to screen for diabetes suggesting that it is less useful in identifying

  14. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy: a consensus statement of the diabetic neuropathy study group of the EASD (Neurodiab).

    PubMed

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A; Dobrowsky, R; Feldman, E L; Fernyhough, P; Jakobsen, J; Malik, R A; Mizisin, A P; Oates, P J; Obrosova, I G; Pop-Busui, R; Russell, J W; Sima, A A; Stevens, M J; Schmidt, R E; Tesfaye, S; Veves, A; Vinik, A I; Wright, D E; Yagihashi, S; Yorek, M A; Ziegler, D; Zochodne, D W

    2014-06-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current understanding of each area, gold standards (if applicable) for assessments of function, improvements of existing techniques, and utility of known and exploratory biomarkers. The research opportunities in each area were outlined, providing a possible roadmap for future studies. The meeting concluded with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions.

  15. Social and economic impact of diabetics in Bangladesh: protocol for a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects both individuals and their families and has an impact on economic and social development of a country. Information on the availability, cost, and quality of medical care for diabetes is mostly not available for many low- and middle-income countries including Bangladesh. Complications from diabetes, which can be devastating, could largely be prevented by wider use of several inexpensive generic medicines, simple tests and monitoring and can be a cost saving intervention. This study will provide an in-depth and comprehensive picture of social and economic impacts of diabetes in Bangladesh and propose clear recommendations for improving prevention and management of diabetes. The objectives of the study are: 1) To study the association between diabetes and other health problems and its social impacts 2) To estimate the economic impact of diabetes including total direct and indirect costs 3) To measure the impact of diabetes on quality of life among diabetes patients in Bangladesh 4) To study the impact of diabetes on the health care system Methods This is a case–control study comparing cases with type 2 diabetes to controls without diabetes matched on age, sex and place of residence. 564 cases and 564 controls will be selected from the outpatient department of a tertiary hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data on socioeconomic status, health utility index, direct and indirect costs for diabetes, medication adherence, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, diet, physical activity, mental state examination, weight, height, hip and waist circumference, blood pressure, pulse, medication history, laboratory data and physical examination will be conducted. Outcome measures: The primary outcome measures will be association between diabetes and other health problems, cost of diabetes, impact of diabetes on quality of life and secondary outcome measures are impact of diabetes on healthcare systems in Bangladesh. Discussion This study will provide an

  16. Review of the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS) family of studies: a comprehensively examined sample for genetic and epidemiological studies of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Donald W; Cox, Amanda J; Freedman, Barry I; Hugenschimdt, Christina E; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Herrington, David; Agarwal, Subhashish; Register, Thomas C; Maldjian, Joseph A; Ng, Maggie C-Y; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Langefeld, Carl D; Williamson, Jeff D; Carr, J Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The Diabetes Heart Study (DHS) is a genetic and epidemiological study of 1,443 European American and African American participants from 564 families with multiple cases of type 2 diabetes. Initially, participants were comprehensively examined for measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) including computed tomography measurement of vascular calcified plaque, ultrasound imaging of carotid artery wall thickness, and electrocardiographic intervals. Subsequent studies have investigated the relationship between bone mineral density and vascular calcification, measures of adiposity, and biomarkers. Ongoing studies are carrying out an extensive evaluation of cerebrovascular disease using magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive assessment. A second, parallel study, the African American DHS, has expanded the sample of African Americans to investigate marked racial differences in subclinical CVD between European Americans and African Americans. Studies in development will evaluate the impact of social stress during the lifecourse on CVD risk, and the prevalence of gastroparesis in this diabetes enriched sample. In addition, the ongoing high mortality rate in DHS participants provides novel insights into the increased risks for type 2 diabetes affected individuals. A comprehensive genetic analysis of the sample is underway using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. Data from this GWAS survey will complement prior family-based linkage data in the analysis of genetic contributors to the wide range of traits in the sample. To our knowledge the DHS family of studies has created the most comprehensively examined sample of individuals with type 2 diabetes yet available, and represents a unique resource for the study people with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide a collective overview of the major results from the DHS family of studies, and relate them to the larger body of biomedical investigations of diabetes and its complications. PMID

  17. Clinical Profile of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Prospective Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Pankaj; Kaur, Maneet

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic ketoacidosis, a well-known and major acute metabolic complication classically occurs in young patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it may occur in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus too. Objective Aim of this study was to look into the clinical profile, precipitating factors and clinical outcome in the patients presenting with Diabetic ketoacidosis in the Emergency of a Tertiary care hospital. Design The study was a prospective study conducted over a period of two years in Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods Clinical profile of 60 diabetic patients admitted in the Emergency with the diagnosis of Diabetic ketoacidosis were analysed. Results Out of 60 patients, 12 were of Type 1 and 48 were Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Mean duration of diabetes was 8.65 years. Only 14 (23.3%) patients were taking regular treatment for Diabetes Mellitus whereas 32 (53.33%) patients were on irregular treatment and eight (13.33%) were not on any treatment at all. Among 12 Type 1 Diabetic patients, six patients were freshly diagnosed to be diabetic when they presented with Diabetic ketoacidosis complication. Nausea and vomiting (63.33%) were the most common symptoms of these patients. Infections (73.33%) were the most common precipitating factor for Diabetic ketoacidosis. Mean fluid requirement on first day of therapy was 3.51 liters. Mortality of 10% was seen. Conclusion Diabetic ketoacidosis is a fatal acute metabolic complication of Diabetes Mellitus with heterogeneous clinical presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid morbidity & mortality. PMID:26266145

  18. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  19. Diabetes Knowledge Translation Status in Developing Countries: A Mixed Method Study Among Diabetes Researchers in Case of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Valinejadi, Ali; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite considerable investment in research, the existing research evidence is frequently not implemented and/or leads to useless or detrimental care in healthcare. The knowledge-practice gap proposed as one of the main causes of not achieving the treatment goals in diabetes. Iran also is facing a difference between the production and utilization of the knowledge of diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the status of diabetes knowledge translation (KT) in Iran. Methods: This was a survey that executed in 2015 by concurrent mixed methods approach in a descriptive, cross-sectional method. The research population was 65 diabetes researchers from 14 diabetes research centers throughout Iran. The research was carried out via the self-assessment tool for research institutes (SATORI), a valid and reliable tool. Focus group discussions were used to complete this tool. The data were analyzed using quantitative (descriptive method by Excel software) and qualitative approaches (thematic analysis) based on SATORI-extracted seven themes. Results: The mean of scores “the question of research,” “knowledge production,” “knowledge transfer,” “promoting the use of evidence,” and all aspects altogether were 2.48, 2.80, 2.18, 2.06, and 2.39, respectively. The themes “research quality and timeliness” and “promoting and evaluating the use of evidence” received the lowest (1.91) and highest mean scores (2.94), respectively. Except for the theme “interaction with research users” with a relatively mediocre scores (2.63), the other areas had scores below the mean. Conclusions: The overall status of diabetes KT in Iran was lower than the ideal situation. There are many challenges that require great interventions at the organizational or macro level. To reinforce diabetes KT in Iran, it should hold a more leading and centralized function in the strategies of the country's diabetes research system. PMID:26955462

  20. A Qualitative Study of Acculturation and Diabetes Risk among Urban, Immigrant Latinas: Implications for Diabetes Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Shuman, Sara J.; Barrios, Dulce M.; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how acculturation influences diabetes risk among urban, immigrant Latinas (Hispanic women). Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 26 urban, immigrant Latinas who were at high clinical risk for developing diabetes. The focus group sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The authors independently analyzed transcripts using an inductive method of open coding, and themes were established by consensus among authors. Results All of the participants were foreign-born and had low levels of acculturation. During the acculturation process, they noted changes in their lifestyle behaviors and the family context in which those behaviors are shaped. They reported that since living in the U.S., their improved economic circumstances led to increased consumption of less healthy foods and beverages and a more sedentary lifestyle. They also described changing family roles and responsibilities, including working outside the home, which constrained healthy food choices. However, they perceived that their position of influence within the family offered opportunities to help family members prevent diabetes. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes in Latinas should address their acculturation experiences, which impact family functioning and health behaviors related to diabetes risk. For example, given the perceived link between Latinas’ improved economic circumstances and their diabetes risk, prevention programs should incorporate strategies to help Latinas avoid adopting less healthy lifestyle behaviors that become affordable during the acculturation process. PMID:24872386

  1. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes.

  2. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes. PMID:22707396

  3. Quantitative Estimation of Temperature Variations in Plantar Angiosomes: A Study Case for Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Morales-Hernandez, L. A.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J. J.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Ramirez-Cortes, J. M.; Morales-Caporal, R.

    2014-01-01

    Thermography is a useful tool since it provides information that may help in the diagnostic of several diseases in a noninvasive and fast way. Particularly, thermography has been applied in the study of the diabetic foot. However, most of these studies report only qualitative information making it difficult to measure significant parameters such as temperature variations. These variations are important in the analysis of the diabetic foot since they could bring knowledge, for instance, regarding ulceration risks. The early detection of ulceration risks is considered an important research topic in the medicine field, as its objective is to avoid major complications that might lead to a limb amputation. The absence of symptoms in the early phase of the ulceration is conceived as the main disadvantage to provide an opportune diagnostic in subjects with neuropathy. Since the relation between temperature and ulceration risks is well established in the literature, a methodology that obtains quantitative temperature differences in the plantar area of the diabetic foot to detect ulceration risks is proposed in this work. Such methodology is based on the angiosome concept and image processing. PMID:24688595

  4. Association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and vascular complications of diabetes mellitus: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mika H; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Majamaa, Kari

    2015-07-01

    We investigated whether mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplogroups and maternal family history of diabetes mellitus were associated with vascular diabetes mellitus complications in a population-based cohort of 299 Finnish diabetes mellitus patients with disease onset in young adult age. We found that haplogroup U was more prevalent among patients with no vascular diabetes mellitus complications than among those with at least one complication (p = 0.038). Haplogroup U was also more prevalent among the patients who reported maternal family history of diabetes mellitus than among those who did not (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, haplogroup U was more prevalent among patients with maternal family history of diabetes mellitus but no vascular diabetes mellitus complications than among those with at least one vascular diabetes mellitus complication but no maternal family history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.0003 for difference). These findings suggest that different mtDNA-related factors may influence the risk of diabetes mellitus per se and the risk of vascular diabetes mellitus complications. Further studies are, however, warranted to replicate and elaborate on these results.

  5. The impact of diabetes mellitus on breast cancer outcomes: a single center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Yerrabothala, Swaroopa; Shaaban, Hamid; Capo, Gerardo; Maroules, Michael; Debari, Vincent A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been implicated to affect the prognostic outcomes of patients with various types of cancer. This study explores the impact of diabetes mellitus on the survival outcomes of patients with all stages of breast cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of 255 patients with all stages of breast cancer. Survival outcomes were compared for diabetic and non-diabetic patients. A greater percent of patients in the non-diabetic group (54.1%) presented with early-stage (stage 0 and 1) cancer than diabetics for which 41.2% presented with stage 0 or 1 breast cancer; however this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.068). Overall, we observed a significant difference in survival between the diabetics and non-diabetic subjects (p = 0.001). Even after adjustment for all covariates and after stratification for Body Mass Index (BMI), diabetics were found to have a poorer prognosis in terms of survival time. In patients with breast cancer, diabetes mellitus is an independent predictor of lower overall survival rates, even after adjusting for other comorbidities. Primary caregivers and oncologists alike should aggressively screen breast cancer patients for diabetes mellitus and vice versa. PMID:23832821

  6. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  7. Prevalence of Undiagnosed Diabetes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: an OGTT Study.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Arturi, Franco; Hribal, Marta Letizia; D'Antona, Lucia; Bruno, Caterina; Tripepi, Giovanni; Naty, Saverio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Olivieri, Ignazio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by an excess of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, estimated to be at least 50% greater when compared to the general population. Although the widespread diffusion of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) awareness, there is still a significant proportion of patients with T2DM that remain undiagnosed. Aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in RA patients. For the present study, 100 consecutive nondiabetic RA patients were recruited. Age- and sex-matched subjects with noninflammatory diseases (osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia) were used as controls. After overnight fasting, blood samples were obtained for laboratory evaluation including serum glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies (ACPA). A standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose was performed and blood samples were collected at time 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, for measurement of plasma glucose concentrations. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (9/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.49), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (19/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.17), and concomitant IFG/IGT (5/100 vs 9/100, P = 0.27) was similar between groups, whereas the prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in RA patients (10/100 vs 2/100, P = 0.02). In a logistic regression analysis, increasing age (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.028-1.245, P = 0.01) and disease duration (OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.210-2.995, P = 0.005) were both associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as prediabetes (i.e. IFG and/or IGT) or T2DM. A ROC curve was built to evaluate the predictivity of disease duration on the

  8. Association between Serum Cystatin C and Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Deng, Wuquan; Zhang, Yuping; Zheng, Yanling; Zhou, Lina; Boey, Johnson; Armstrong, David G.; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    Serum cystatin C (CysC) has been identified as a possible potential biomarker in a variety of diabetic complications, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease. We aimed to examine the association between CysC and diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). 411 patients with T2D were enrolled in this cross-sectional study at a university hospital. Clinical manifestations and biochemical parameters were compared between DFU group and non-DFU group. The association between serum CysC and DFU was explored by binary logistic regression analysis. The cut point of CysC for DFU was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy (DN), and DFU dramatically increased with CysC (P < 0.01) in CysC quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the significant risk factors for DFU were serum CysC, coronary artery disease, hypertension, insulin use, the differences between supine and sitting TcPO2, and hypertension. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut point of CysC for DFU was 0.735 mg/L. Serum CysC levels correlated with DFU and severity of tissue loss. Our study results indicated that serum CysC was associated with a high prevalence of DFU in Chinese T2D subjects.

  9. The effect of acute ethanol consumption on the human retinal circulation: a study in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Dhasmana, D; Herbert, L; Patel, V; Chen, H C; Jones, M; Kohner, E M

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol consumption on retinal haemodynamics and retinal vascular autoregulation to oxygen in the human retinal circulation were studied in 10 diabetic (mean age +/- SD: 38.2 +/- 11.1) and 16 non-diabetic (mean age +/- SD: 32.4 +/- 8.8) subjects. Subjects drank 0.5 g of ethanol, as vodka, per kg of body weight, diluted in sugar-free orange juice. Retinal blood flow was determined using laser Doppler velocimetry and computerised image analysis. The effect of ethanol on oxygen reactivity, as a measure of autoregulation, was also determined after 60% oxygen inhalation. All subjects demonstrated a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure (control group 3.3%, p = 0.04, diabetic subjects 5.7%, p = 0.05), after ethanol intake. Ethanol caused no significant change in retinal blood flow. Oxygen reactivity was found to be 38.3% (22.4-47.7, median and interquartile range) in the non-diabetic subjects at baseline, and 30.7% (10.8-42.1) after ethanol ingestion. In diabetic subjects, the oxygen reactivity was 33.2% (19.8-46.8) at baseline and 24.5% (21.1-32.1) after ethanol. In this study ethanol did not significantly affect retinal blood flow or impair autoregulation. These results suggest that the retinal circulation may be able to autoregulate despite the presence of ethanol, in contrast to other vascular beds where ethanol changes flow. PMID:7819729

  10. Association between Serum Cystatin C and Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Deng, Wuquan; Zhang, Yuping; Zheng, Yanling; Zhou, Lina; Boey, Johnson; Armstrong, David G.; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    Serum cystatin C (CysC) has been identified as a possible potential biomarker in a variety of diabetic complications, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease. We aimed to examine the association between CysC and diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). 411 patients with T2D were enrolled in this cross-sectional study at a university hospital. Clinical manifestations and biochemical parameters were compared between DFU group and non-DFU group. The association between serum CysC and DFU was explored by binary logistic regression analysis. The cut point of CysC for DFU was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy (DN), and DFU dramatically increased with CysC (P < 0.01) in CysC quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the significant risk factors for DFU were serum CysC, coronary artery disease, hypertension, insulin use, the differences between supine and sitting TcPO2, and hypertension. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut point of CysC for DFU was 0.735 mg/L. Serum CysC levels correlated with DFU and severity of tissue loss. Our study results indicated that serum CysC was associated with a high prevalence of DFU in Chinese T2D subjects. PMID:27668262

  11. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  12. Diabetic patients' willingness to use tele-technology to manage their disease – A descriptive study.

    PubMed Central

    Saddik, Basema; Al-Dulaijan, Norah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern worldwide. TeleHealth technology may be an effective tool for empowering patients in the self-management of diabetes mellitus. However despite the great impact of diabetes on healthcare in Saudi Arabia, no research has investigated diabetic patients' willingness to use this technology. This study investigates diabetic patients' willingness to use tele-technology as a tool to monitor their disease. Methods: Data were collected from diabetic patients attending the diabetes education clinic at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs (MNGHA) in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia over a three month period. A survey was developed which measured patients' willingness to use tele-technology in the self-management of their diabetes as well as their perceived expectations from the technology. Results: The study found that the majority of patients were willing to use tele-technology to self- monitor their diabetes. However, a minority (11.3%) indicated willingness to use the system daily and only half indicated preference to use it once a week (53.8%). Patients who were younger, had higher education levels, were employed, had internet access and had Type II diabetes were significantly more likely to report willingness to use the technology. Conclusions: Diabetic patients could be ready to play a more active role in their care if given the opportunity. Results from this study could serve as a baseline for future studies to develop targeted interventions by trialing tele-technology on a sample of the diabetic population. Patients with diabetes need to be in charge of their own care in order to improve health outcomes across the country. PMID:26284148

  13. Pilot study using mobile health to coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Irena; Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors.

  14. Pilot Study Using Mobile Health to Coordinate the Diabetic Patient, Diabetologist, and Ophthalmologist

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L.; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Methods: Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Results: Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. Conclusions: This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors. PMID:24876413

  15. Pilot study using mobile health to coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Irena; Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors. PMID:24876413

  16. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-08-10

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  17. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  18. Thyroid dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Demitrost, Laloo; Ranabir, Salam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a growing problem in our country and we have observed that many patients are associated with thyroid dysfunction later in their life. However, the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in these patients has not been investigated. Aims and Objectives: To find the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in type 2 DM in Manipur, India. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, data of 202 Type 2 DM patients who attended the diabetic clinic of the Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal from January 2011 to July 2012, and whose thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level was investigated were included. The inclusion criteria are known cases of type 2 DM. Exclusion criteria are patients with previous history of hypothyroidism and those on drugs affecting the thyroid profile. Results: Out the 202 type 2 DM patients for the study of which 61 are males and 141 are females, 139 (68.8%) are euthyroid, 33 (16.3%) have subclinical hypothyroidism (10 males and 23 females), 23 (11.4%) have hypothyroidism (6 males and 17 females), 4 (2%) have subclinical hyperthyroidism and 3 (1.5%) are hyperthyroidism cases. Maximum cases were of hypothyroidism (subclinical and clinical) seen in the age group of 45-64 years. Patients with BMI > 25 were at increased risk of having hypothyroidism (P < 0.016). Conclusion: Prevalence of hypothyroidism is quite high in type 2 DM patients above 45 years and more so if their BMI is over 25. PMID:23565418

  19. Pilot Study of Exercise Therapy on Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Min; D’Silva, Linda; Martin, Katherine; Sharma, Neena; Pasnoor, Mamatha; LeMaster, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Objective Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes. While the beneficial effect of exercise on diabetes is well established, its effect specifically on painful DPN has not been thoroughly explored. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the effect of aerobic exercise on pain in people with DPN. Methods Fourteen sedentary individuals (mean age 57±5.11 years) with painful DPN were enrolled in a 16-week, supervised aerobic exercise program. The Brief Pain Inventory-Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (BPI-DPN) was used to assess pain intensity (worst, least, average, now) and pain interference with daily life (activity, mood, walk, normal work, relationship, sleep, enjoyment of life) pre- and post -intervention. Body mass index (BMI), maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and blood pressure were also measured pre-and post-intervention as secondary outcomes of interest. Results Significant reductions in pain interference were observed with walking (4.93±3.03 pre to 3.29±2.89 post, p=0.016), normal work (5.39±3.32 pre to 3.79±3.04 post, p=0.032), relationship with others (3.96±3.53 pre to 1.29±1.27 post, p=0.006), sleep (5.11±3.04 pre to 3.5±3.03 post, p=0.02), and the overall pain interference (4.65±2.70 pre to 2.97±2.22 post, p=0.013) following the intervention; however, there was no change in pain intensity. VO2max increased significantly post-intervention (16.02±3.84ml/kg/min pre to 17.18±4.19ml/kg/min, p=0.028), while BMI, HbA1c, and blood pressure remained unchanged. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that perceived pain interference may be reduced following an aerobic exercise intervention among people with painful DPN, without a change in pain intensity. Further validation by a RCT is needed. PMID:25800666

  20. Barriers to care for Cambodian patients with diabetes: results from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Renfrew, Megan R; Taing, Elizabeth; Cohen, Marya J; Betancourt, Joseph R; Pasinski, Roger; Green, Alexander R

    2013-05-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in diabetes care have been well documented. While root causes have been explored for some minority groups, less is known about smaller immigrant populations such as Cambodians. In this study, we sought to explore the potential barriers to care for Cambodian patients with diabetes. We conducted five focus groups with three study groups: health care providers, bilingual Khmer frontline staff, and Cambodian patients with diabetes. Focus groups findings revealed that certain cultural beliefs, low health literacy, and language barriers strongly affect Cambodian patients' understanding of diabetes and self-management, as well as clinicians' ability to care effectively for Cambodian patients with diabetes. Our study supports previous literature and also adds several new insights not previously described. We recommend education for health care providers on patient-centered, cross-cultural care with an emphasis on the needs of Cambodians as well as culturally appropriate diabetes education for patients.

  1. Estimation of Salivary and Serum Biomarkers in Diabetic and Non Diabetic Patients - A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ladgotra, Amit; Raj, Seetharamaiah Sunder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blood is the gold standard body fluid for diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) but saliva offers an alternative to serum as a biological fluid for diagnostic purposes because it contains serum constituents. Aim The study was conducted to estimate and compare serum and salivary glucose, amylase, proteins, calcium and phosphorus levels in DM and healthy subjects and to evaluate whether saliva can be used as a diagnostic fluid in DM patients. Materials and Methods Study consisted of 120 subjects from OPD of Surendera Dental College, Sriganganagar, Rajasthan, India. The study groups were divided into Group I-60 DM patients (Type I & II) and Group II-60 healthy subjects. The saliva and serum samples were collected from each subject and levels of different biochemical parameters were estimated. Results Mean serum level of glucose (211.50 ± 43.82), amylase (79.86 ± 16.23), total proteins (6.65 ± 0.84), calcium (7.17 ± 0.91) and phosphorus (3.68±0.65) as observed in Group I while in Group II, glucose (88.81±11.29), amylase (77.67±14.88), total proteins (6.35±0.76), calcium (7.52±0.97) and phosphorus (3.96 ± 0.91) were noted. Mean salivary level of glucose (14.10±6.99), amylase (1671.42±569.86), total proteins (1.33±1.11), calcium (10.06±2.76) and phosphorus (13.75±4.45) as observed in Group I while in Group II, glucose (5.87± 2.42), amylase (1397.59 ±415.97), total proteins (1.36±0.81), calcium (7.73±2.78) and phosphorus (8.39 ± 1.95) were noted. On comparing values in saliva and serum, among two groups, an insignificant difference (p>0.005) was found between few of them. Conclusion Values regarding blood and salivary biochemical parameters were distinctly different between two groups suggesting salivary parameters can be used as a diagnostic alternative to blood parameters for diabetes mellitus. PMID:27504412

  2. Cow's milk consumption, disease-associated autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes mellitus: a follow-up study in siblings of diabetic children. Childhood Diabetes in Finland Study Group.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S M; Hyppönen, E; Läärä, E; Vähäsalo, P; Kulmala, P; Savola, K; Räsänen, L; Aro, A; Knip, M; Akerblom, H K

    1998-09-01

    Evidence from case-control studies for the diabetogenicity of introduction of cow's milk-based formulas at early age in infancy is inconclusive. We followed siblings of children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM) to investigate a possible relationship between cow's milk consumption during infancy or later in childhood and the emergence of diabetes-associated autoantibodies and progression to clinical Type 1 DM. A cohort of 725 initially unaffected 0 to 25-year-old siblings of 801 index children with Type 1 DM diagnosed in 1986-1989 participated in the study (82% of those invited). The siblings were observed for Type 1 DM associated autoantibodies at intervals of 3-12 months for 4 years, starting from the diagnosis of Type 1 DM in the index child. The follow-up for Type 1 DM started at the same time and ended on 31 October 1995. The combined prevalence of Type 1 DM associated autoantibodies (islet cell antibodies (ICA), insulin autoantibodies (IAA), GAD autoantibodies (GADA), and/or antibodies to the insulinoma associated cDNA2 protein (IA-2A)) was 13.6% (95/697) at the beginning of the study. Of the initially seronegative siblings, 7.5% (45/602) converted to antibody positivity during 4 years, and of all siblings 4.6% (33/725) developed Type 1 DM during the total follow-up time. The age at introduction of supplementary milk feeding was not significantly related to seroconversion to positivity for Type 1 DM associated autoantibodies or to the development of Type 1 DM in the siblings. When adjusted for age, sex, infant feeding patterns, and maternal age and education, high milk consumption in childhood (> or =3 glasses daily) was associated with more frequent emergence of Type 1 DM-associated autoantibodies than low consumption (<3 glasses daily) (adjusted odds ratio 3.97, 95% confidence interval 1.3-11.7, p = 0.01). There was a non-significant association between high milk consumption and progression to clinical Type 1 DM (adjusted hazard ratio 2.75, 95

  3. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. PMID:26446360

  4. Clinical study on erectile dysfunction in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and its management with Ficus relegiosa Linn.

    PubMed

    Virani, Nilesh V; Chandola, H M; Vyas, S N; Jadeja, D B

    2010-07-01

    Healthy sexual functioning plays an essential role in maintaining the harmony and happiness in marital life. It provides a media to express love, which is the base for all sorts of creative activities. The absence of this function hampers the marital relationship, leading to frustration and, sometimes, ending in divorce, and causes inadequacy in performing the routine duties. In this study, 53 patients having diabetes mellitus were surveyed to find out the incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED). Considering the high prevalence of the disease and the need to look for alternative medicine, a clinical trial on 44 patients of ED was carried out. These patients were divided into two main groups: diabetic and non-diabetic, and were further divided into two subgroups as trial group and placebo group. In the trial group, Ashvattha Kshirpaka prepared with 10 g powder of its root bark, stem bark, fruit and tender leaf buds was given twice a day. In both the diabetic and the non-diabetic subjects, Ashvattha provided encouraging results on ED as well as on seminal parameters in comparison to the placebo. PMID:22131726

  5. Studying fringe field effect of a field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfullin, M. F.; Nikiforov, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    Field emitter arrays on heavy As-doped Si wafer are studied in vacuum nanoelectronics diode configuration. Different shapes of emitters are considered: cone-shaped point-emitters and cylinder-shaped sharp-edge-emitters are compared. Micro scale field enhancement factor on the edge of cylindrical emitter was calculated via home-developed Matlab application and the results are presented. Two types of anode geometry are proposed: plane anode and spherical anode. Experimental and modelling results of surface electric field distribution are presented. The spherical shape of anode allows higher voltage (and higher field emission current) without destructive arcs risk.

  6. Early aggregation studies of diabetic amyloid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sadanand; de Pablo, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, also known as amylin) is responsible for pancreatic amyloid deposits in type II diabetes. The deposits, as well as intermediates in their assembly, are cytotoxic to pancreatic β -cells and contribute to the loss of β -cell mass associated with type II diabetes. To better understand the mechanism and cause of such aggregation, molecular simulations with explicit solvent models were used to compare monomer structure and early aggregation mechanism. Using free-energy maps generated~through~a variety of novel, enhanced sampling free-energy calculation techniques, we have found that, in water, the peptide adopts three major structures. One has a small α -helix at the N-terminus and a small β -hairpin at the other end. The second and the most stable one, is a complete β -hairpin, and the third is a random coil structure. Transition Path Sampling simulations along with reaction coordinate analysis reveal that the peptide follows a ``zipping mechanism'' in folding from α -helical to β -hairpin state. From studies of the dimerization of monomers in water, we have found that the early aggregation proceeds by conversion of all α -helical configurations to β -hairpins, and by two β -hairpins coming together to form a parallel β -sheet. Several aspects of the proposed mechanism have been verified by concerted 2D IR experimental measurements, thereby adding credence to the validity of our predictions.

  7. Antihyperlipidemic effect of fisetin, a bioflavonoid of strawberries, studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Prasath, Gopalan Sriram; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2014-10-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia in diabetes is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, with resultant alterations in particle distribution within lipoprotein classes. In the present study, an attempt has been made to explore the antihyperlipidemic effect of fisetin in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats. Upon fisetin treatment to diabetic rats, the levels of blood glucose were significantly reduced with an improvement in plasma insulin. The increased levels of lipid contents in serum, hepatic, and renal tissues observed in diabetic rats were normalized upon fisetin administration. Also, the decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very LDL (VLDL) cholesterol in serum of diabetic rats were normalized. Oil Red O staining established a large number of intracellular lipid droplets accumulation in the diabetic rats. Fisetin treatment exacerbated the degree of lipid accumulation. The results of the present study exemplify the antihyperlipidemic property of the fisetin.

  8. [Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and distal symmetrical diabetic polyneuropathy, and glomerular filtration screening upon the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus - a cohort study].

    PubMed

    Buková, L; Galajda, P; Mokáň, M

    2013-11-01

    The prospective cohort study analyzes the prevalence of microvascular complications at the time of dia-gnosis type 2 diabetes (DM 2). We were monitoring 200 outpatients (117 men and 83 women, aged from 30 to 92 years) with newly diagnosed and previously untreated type 2 diabetes mellitus during the period of August 2007 -  August 2011 accidentally sending GP or internists. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in men was 0.85% and in women 1.2%. The prevalence of diabetic distal symetric polyneuropathy in men was 53% and in women 62%. The median of glomerular filtration based on a simplified MDRD 4 equation (according to the study Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) was 1.27 ± 0.6 ml/ s/ 1.73 m2 for men and 1.05 ± 0.32 ml/ s/ 1.73 m2 for women. At baseline, 16.6% of men and 46.2% of women enrolled in our cohort study had glomerular filtration rate < 1 ml/ s/ 1.73 m2. PMID:24279438

  9. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2) by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups) were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours); interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer) about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined) by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment) and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources). Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints) was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial) and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them. Conclusion Self

  10. DIABETES, OBESITY AND DIAGNOSIS OF AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS: A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Rotem, Ran S.; Seals, Ryan M.; Gredal, Ole; Hansen, Johnni; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although prior studies have suggested a role of cardiometabolic health on pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the association with diabetes has not been widely examined. Objective Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common motor neuron disorder. Several vascular risk factors have been associated with decreased risk for ALS. Although diabetes is also a risk factor for vascular disease, the few studies of diabetes and ALS have been inconsistent. We examined the association between diabetes and obesity, each identified through ICD-8 or 10 codes in a hospital registry, and ALS using data from the Danish National Registers. Design and Setting Population-based nested case-control study. Participants 3,650 Danish residents diagnosed with ALS between 1982 and 2009, and 365,000 controls (100 for each ALS case), matched on age and sex. Main Outcome Measure Adjusted odds ratio (OR) for ALS associated with diabetes or obesity diagnoses at least three years prior to the ALS diagnosis date. Results When considering diabetes and our obesity indicator together, the estimated OR for ALS was 0.61 (95%CI: 0.46–0.80) for diabetes and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.57–1.16) for obesity. We observed no effect modification on the association with diabetes by gender, but a significant modification by age at first diabetes or age at ALS, with the protective association stronger with increasing age, consistent with different associations by diabetes type. Conclusions and Relevance We conducted a nationwide study to investigate the association between diabetes and ALS diagnosis. Our findings are in agreement with previous reports of a protective association between vascular risk factors and ALS, and suggest type 2 diabetes, but not type 1, is protective for ALS. PMID:26030836

  11. Associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-management behavior in adults with diabetes: results of a dutch cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Rademakers, Jany; Struijs, Jeroen N; Schuit, A Jantine; Baan, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have examined the association between health literacy and self-management behavior, but few have explored ways through which this occurs. The present study examines to what extent health literacy is associated with diabetes self-management behavior and to what extent diabetes knowledge is a mechanism in this association. The study was based on cross-sectional data retrieved from patient registrations and questionnaires completed in 2010. The sample included 1,714 predominantly type 2 diabetes patients, with a mean age of 67 years. Diabetes self-management was indicated by HbA1c level, glucose self-control and self-reported monitoring of glucose levels, physical activity, and smoking. Multilevel analyses were applied based on multiple imputed data. Lower health literacy was significantly associated with less diabetes knowledge, higher HbA1c level, less self-control of glucose level, and less physical activity. Participants with more diabetes knowledge were less likely to smoke and more likely to control glucose levels. Diabetes knowledge was a mediator in the association between health literacy and glucose self-control and between health literacy and smoking. This study indicates that higher health literacy may contribute to participation in certain self-management activities, in some cases through diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge and health literacy skills may be important targets for interventions promoting diabetes self-management.

  12. A Pilot Study of School Counselor's Preparedness to Serve Students with Diabetes: Relationship to Self-Reported Diabetes Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Julie; James, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional, observational pilot study investigated the knowledge, attitudes, and awareness of 132 school counselors regarding students with diabetes. Respondents were primarily white, female, with a masters degree, aged 42 years, and with 10 years of school counseling experience. Most counselors worked at large, public, suburban, and…

  13. Prediction of Outcome in Diabetic Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Hospital-Based Pilot Study Report

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Amit R.; Badar, Shweta R.; Lande, Neha; Kawle, Anuja P.; Kabra, Dinesh P.; Chandak, Nitin H.; Raje, Dhananjay V.; Singh, Lokendra R.; Daginawala, Hatim F.; Kashyap, Rajpal S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Demographic and clinical characteristics are known to influence the outcome in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Purpose This study is aimed at evaluating short- and long-term outcomes in diabetic AIS patients. In addition, the study also evaluates the impact of diabetes on the performance of indigenously reported biomarker, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and known biomarkers, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and glial-derived S-100 beta beta protein (S-100ββ). Methods This study was performed on 29 diabetes and 75 non-diabetes AIS patients. Outcome of AIS patients was analyzed by using modified Rankin scale at discharge, then at 12 and 18 months after discharge. Based on the obtained scores, patients were classified as improved group (scales 1-3) and dependent/expired group (scales 3-6). Blood samples were collected during admission and at discharge/expired time. Levels of NSE, S100ββ, and ITIH4 were analyzed in all samples. Results On discharge, frequencies of dependent/expired outcome were 4/29 (14%) and 19/75 (17%) in diabetic and non-diabetic AIS patients. However, follow-up outcome at 12 and 18 months showed higher dependent/expired cases of 43 and 41% among diabetic AIS patients compared to 27 and 21% in non-diabetic patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes is an independent risk factor for dependent/expired outcome in AIS patients (OR 0.484 (at discharge); 1.307 (at 12 months) and 1.675 (at 18 months)). NSE, S100ββ, and ITIH4 showed a differential expression in both the outcome groups of AIS patients, irrespective of diabetes. Conclusion Diabetes increases the risk of dependent/expired outcome in AIS patients. Also, serum NSE, S100ββ, and ITIH4 are independent biomarkers for prognosis of outcome in AIS patients, irrespective of diabetes. PMID:27780987

  14. [Studies of lipoprotein lipase activity and adipocyte characteristics in the human: effect of obesity and diabetes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jaillard, J; Sezille, G; Fruchart, J C; Dewailly, P; Romon, M

    1976-03-01

    Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity (LPLA) and cellularity have been studied in controls, in diabetic or non-diabetic obese subjects and in insulin dependent diabetic patients. LPLA is increased in diabetic or non-diabetic obese subjects and in insulin dependent diabetic patients. LPLA is increased in diabetic or non-diabetic obese subjects (p less than 0.02) and decreased in insulin dependent diabetic patients (p less than 0.02). Adipocyte size is larger in obese subjects, whether diabetic or not (p less than 0.05). As defined by LPLA and cell size means, the different groups are related linearly. The implications of this relationship between LPLA and adipocyte size are considered.

  15. Kidney disease and related findings in the diabetes control and complications trial/epidemiology of diabetes interventions and complications study.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Kidney disease manifests clinically as elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or both, and is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study tested whether intensive diabetes therapy (INT) aimed at lowering glucose concentrations as close as safely possible to the normal range reduces the risks of kidney disease and other diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the DCCT, 1,441 participants with T1D were randomly assigned to INT or conventional diabetes therapy (CON) for a mean duration of 6.5 years. Subsequently, participants have been followed for 18 years in the ongoing observational EDIC. Standardized longitudinal measurements of AER, estimated GFR, and blood pressure were made throughout the DCCT/EDIC. RESULTS During the DCCT, INT reduced the risks of incident microalbuminuria (AER ≥40 mg/24 h) and macroalbuminuria (AER ≥300 mg/24 h) by 39% (95% CI 21-52%) and 54% (29-74%), respectively. During EDIC years 1-8, participants previously assigned to DCCT INT continued to experience lower rates of incident microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, with risk reductions of 59% (39-73%) and 84% (67-92%), respectively. Beneficial effects of INT on the development of impaired GFR (sustained estimated GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and hypertension became evident during combined DCCT/EDIC follow-up, with risk reductions of 50% (18-69%) and 20% (6-21%), respectively, compared with CON. CONCLUSIONS In the DCCT/EDIC, INT resulted in clinically important, durable reductions in the risks of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, impaired GFR, and hypertension.

  16. Pregnancy outcomes in youth with type 2 diabetes: The TODAY Study experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated pregnancy outcomes, maternal and fetal/neonatal, during the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. The TODAY study was a randomized controlled trial comparing three treatment options for youth with type 2 diabetes. Informed consent included the req...

  17. Diabetes Control among Vietnamese Patients in Ho Chi Minh City: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokokawa, Hirohide; Khue, Nguyen Thy; Goto, Aya; Nam, Tran Quang; Trung, Tran The; Khoa, Vo Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Boi; Minh, Pham Nghiem; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Okayama, Akira; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the extent of diabetic control and its associated factors among Vietnamese patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The study was conducted among 652 outpatients who were recruited at a public general hospital (People Hospital 115) and a private clinic (Medic Center) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Median age…

  18. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Darabadi, Siamak; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Farshid, Amir-Abbas; Baradar-Jalili, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg(-1), IV) was used for diabetes induction. In each wether, an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animal. Photographs were taken in distinct times for planimetric evaluation. Wound samples were taken on day 21 post-wounding for histopathologic evaluations of epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of new blood vessels. The planimetric study showed slightly delay in wound closure of diabetic animals, however, it was not significantly different from nondiabetic wounds (p ≥ 0.05). Furthermore, epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of blood vessels were significantly lower in diabetic group (p < 0.05). We concluded that healing of excisional diabetic wounds in sheep may be compromised, as seen in other species. However, contraction rate of these wounds may not be delayed due to metabolic features of ruminants and these animals might go under surgeries without any serious concern. However, healing quality of these wounds may be lower than normal wounds.

  19. Field of Dreams Program Evaluation: Empowering the Latino Population in Type2 Diabetes Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urteaga, Edie

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset, type2 diabetes affects Latino families at a higher rate than other ethnicities and negatively impacting their quality of life, ability to financially succeed, and ultimately impacting our overall economy. Multiple resources are available in the country to help people learn how to prevent, control, and manage diabetes. However, the…

  20. Re-analysis of Ranch Hand study supports reverse causation hypothesis between dioxin and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kerger, Brent D; Scott, Paul K; Pavuk, Marian; Gough, Michael; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2012-09-01

    A dose-response relationship between serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) and adult diabetes risk has been reported among U.S. Vietnam veterans in the Ranch Hand (RH) cohort. We examine the hypothesis that diabetes progression leads to higher serum dioxin (reverse causation) rather than higher serum dioxin leading to diabetes (causation) across the longitudinal medical monitoring data on these airmen. Lipid-adjusted serum dioxin levels and clinical parameters relating to diabetes progression were examined. Potential confounding due to age, race, diabetes family history, serum total lipid, and body mass index (BMI) was accounted for. The similar incidence of diabetes in RH and Comparison veterans, along with generally similar incidence trends with dioxin decile and lipid decile despite the large differential in serum dioxin, is evidence consistent with reverse causation. Of 135 RH diabetics with at least two dioxin measurements, 32.6% had a temporary serum dioxin increase more than a decade after Vietnam tour and another 22.2% had an interval of unusually slow half-life (>15.5 years); these diabetes-related changes shifted more diabetics into the higher dioxin deciles. Further, the increased diabetes odds ratio among the generally younger RH veterans in the highest dioxin decile is associated with a higher incidence of adult obesity in this RH subgroup, both at tour of duty and decades later. Change in serum dioxin levels is likely due to diabetes progression or poor control and is not independently related to serum dioxin concentrations. In summary, the data from the Ranch Hand studies does not indicate that dioxin increases adult diabetes risk.

  1. Type 2 diabetes in grandparents and birth weight in offspring and grandchildren in the ALSPAC study

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, P; Davey, S; Hattersley, A

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between a history of type 2 diabetes and birth weight of offspring and grandchildren. Design: Prospective observational study. Diabetic status, as reported by mothers (F1 generation) was collected on grandparents (F0) of babies (F2) born to mothers (F1) who participated in a study of maternal and child health. Associations between risk of grandparental diabetes and birth weight in mothers (F1) and grandchildren (F2) were analysed using linear and logistic regression. Setting: Avon: comprising of the city of Bristol and surrounding areas. Participants: 12 076 singleton babies (F2), their parents (F1) and maternal and paternal grandparents (F0). Results: Women (F1) who had no parents with type 2 diabetes had lower birth weights than women with one or two diabetic parents, after controlling for the age of both parents. There was a U shaped association between maternal birth weight and grandmaternal diabetes, but no evidence of an association with grandpaternal diabetes. The grandchildren of maternal grandparents with type 2 diabetes were more likely to be in the top tertile of birth weight than grandchildren of non-diabetics. There was evidence for an inverted U shaped association between birth weight of grandchildren and diabetes in paternal grandmothers. Conclusions: This is the first study to show intergenerational associations between type 2 diabetes in one generation and birth weight in the subsequent two generations. While the study has limitations mainly because of missing data, the findings nevertheless provide some support for the role of developmental intrauterine effects and genetically determined insulin resistance in impaired insulin mediated growth in the fetus. PMID:15143122

  2. The Factors Associated With Disease Mismanagement in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Selda; Kelleci, Meral; Satman, Ilhan

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this qualitative study on young adults with type 1 diabetes was to determine the factors associated with mismanagement of diabetes. Methods In this qualitative study, a descriptive phenomenological and psychological method was followed. Purposeful sampling method was used in this study. 28 young adults aged 18-25 with type 1 diabetes (16 females, 12 males) with HbA1c levels >6.5% were interviewed in-depth. Each interview lasted 40-45 minutes. The recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, examined line-by-line and coded using open coding techniques and managed by QSR NVivo 7. During the research period, Guba ve Lincolln criteria were used to ensure the accuracy and precision of the study findings. Results The study identified seven themes which affect the diabetes management of the patients. These themes were negative emotions about the disease, difficulties arising from living condition, difficulties arising from the treatment treatment process, lack of social support, not solution oriented coping methods, concerns about the future and issues of developing knowledge and attitude regarding diabetes management. Conclusion There are multiple factors affecting the management of diabetes in young adults with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes has a biopsychosocial impact on young adults’ lives, developing a negative attitude toward their future and that of their family. PMID:26005688

  3. Prevalence of Undiagnosed Diabetes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: an OGTT Study

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Arturi, Franco; Hribal, Marta Letizia; D’Antona, Lucia; Bruno, Caterina; Tripepi, Giovanni; Naty, Saverio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Olivieri, Ignazio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by an excess of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, estimated to be at least 50% greater when compared to the general population. Although the widespread diffusion of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) awareness, there is still a significant proportion of patients with T2DM that remain undiagnosed. Aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in RA patients. For the present study, 100 consecutive nondiabetic RA patients were recruited. Age- and sex-matched subjects with noninflammatory diseases (osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia) were used as controls. After overnight fasting, blood samples were obtained for laboratory evaluation including serum glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies (ACPA). A standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose was performed and blood samples were collected at time 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, for measurement of plasma glucose concentrations. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (9/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.49), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (19/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.17), and concomitant IFG/IGT (5/100 vs 9/100, P = 0.27) was similar between groups, whereas the prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in RA patients (10/100 vs 2/100, P = 0.02). In a logistic regression analysis, increasing age (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.028–1.245, P = 0.01) and disease duration (OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.210–2.995, P = 0.005) were both associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as prediabetes (i.e. IFG and/or IGT) or T2DM. A ROC curve was built to evaluate the predictivity of disease

  4. Challenges of diabetes prevention in the real world: results and lessons from the Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, James A; Hernan, Andrea L; Janus, Edward D; Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Versace, Vincent L; Reynolds, John; Best, James D; Skinner, Timothy C; O'Reilly, Sharleen L; Mc Namara, Kevin P; Stewart, Elizabeth; Coates, Michael; Bennett, Catherine M; Carter, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess effectiveness and implementability of the public health programme Life! Taking action on diabetes in Australian people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS) was a unique study assessing effectiveness of Life! that used a randomized controlled trial design. Intervention participants with AUSDRISK score ≥15 received 1 individual and 5 structured 90 min group sessions. Controls received usual care. Outcome measures were obtained for all participants at baseline and 12 months and, additionally, for intervention participants at 3 months. Per protocol set (PPS) and intention to treat (ITT) analyses were performed. Results PPS analyses were considered more informative from our study. In PPS analyses, intervention participants significantly improved in weight (−1.13 kg, p=0.016), waist circumference (−1.35 cm, p=0.044), systolic (−5.2 mm Hg, p=0.028) and diastolic blood pressure (−3.2 mm Hg, p=0.030) compared with controls. Based on observed weight change, estimated risk of developing diabetes reduced by 9.6% in the intervention and increased by 3.3% in control participants. Absolute 5-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduced significantly for intervention participants by 0.97 percentage points from 9.35% (10.4% relative risk reduction). In control participants, the risk increased by 0.11 percentage points (1.3% relative risk increase). The net effect for the change in CVD risk was −1.08 percentage points of absolute risk (p=0.013). Conclusions MDPS effectively reduced the risk of diabetes and CVD, but the intervention effect on weight and waist reduction was modest due to the challenges in recruiting high-risk individuals and the abbreviated intervention. PMID:26464804

  5. Study of the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes mellitus through animal models.

    PubMed

    Brito-Casillas, Yeray; Melián, Carlos; Wägner, Ana María

    2016-01-01

    Most research in diabetes mellitus (DM) has been conducted in animals, and their replacement is currently a chimera. As compared to when they started to be used by modern science in the 17th century, a very high number of animal models of diabetes is now available, and they provide new insights into almost every aspect of diabetes. Approaches combining human, in vitro, and animal studies are probably the best strategy to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of diabetes, and the choice of the best model to achieve such objective is crucial. Traditionally classified based on pathogenesis as spontaneous or induced models, each has its own advantages and disadvantages. The most common animal models of diabetes are described, and in addition to non-obese diabetic mice, biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rats, streptozotocin-induced models, or high-fat diet-induced diabetic C57Bl/6J mice, new valuable models, such as dogs and cats with spontaneous diabetes, are described.

  6. Study of the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes mellitus through animal models.

    PubMed

    Brito-Casillas, Yeray; Melián, Carlos; Wägner, Ana María

    2016-01-01

    Most research in diabetes mellitus (DM) has been conducted in animals, and their replacement is currently a chimera. As compared to when they started to be used by modern science in the 17th century, a very high number of animal models of diabetes is now available, and they provide new insights into almost every aspect of diabetes. Approaches combining human, in vitro, and animal studies are probably the best strategy to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of diabetes, and the choice of the best model to achieve such objective is crucial. Traditionally classified based on pathogenesis as spontaneous or induced models, each has its own advantages and disadvantages. The most common animal models of diabetes are described, and in addition to non-obese diabetic mice, biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rats, streptozotocin-induced models, or high-fat diet-induced diabetic C57Bl/6J mice, new valuable models, such as dogs and cats with spontaneous diabetes, are described. PMID:27246633

  7. Levels of albuminuria and risk of developing macroalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes: historical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Shoma; Fujita, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Akifumi; Hayashi, Akinori; Ichikawa, Raishi; Kamata, Yuji; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Takano, Koji; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Although increased urinary albumin excretion may increase the risk of adverse renal outcomes in patients with diabetes, it remains unclear whether microalbuminuria is associated with a higher incidence of macroalbuminuria in the absence of non-diabetic kidney events that frequently develop during the long-term course of type 2 diabetes. This historical cohort study included patients with type 2 diabetes, spot urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) <300 mg/gCr and normal serum creatinine concentrations treated between August 1988 and April 2015. Patients with any evidence suggesting non-diabetic kidney diseases at baseline were excluded. Over a median follow-up of 50 months, 70 of the 1760 included patients developed macroalbuminuria. Twenty-one of these patients were diagnosed with non-diabetic renal events. The five-year cumulative incidence of macroalbuminuria in patients with ACRs of 0–7.5 mg/gCr, 7.5–30 mg/gCr, 30–150 mg/gCr, and 150–300 mg/gCr were 0%, 0.53%, 3.5%, and 36.0%, respectively, with significant differences between each pair of ACR categories. In type 2 diabetes, higher urinary ACR, even within a level of normoalbuminuria, was associated with a greater incidence of macroalbuminuria when non-diabetic renal events were excluded. These results conflict with findings suggesting that microalbuminuria is a poor indicator for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27210499

  8. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Abreu, Angel A Méndez; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Marín, Maria Isabel Martínez; Fernández, Elia Pérez

    2015-07-09

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features.

  9. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  10. The DISC (Diabetes in Social Context) Study-evaluation of a culturally sensitive social network intervention for diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups, diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups have less favourable metabolic control and experience more diabetes-related complications. They encounter specific barriers that hinder optimal diabetes self-management, including a lack of social support and other psychosocial mechanisms in their immediate social environments. Powerful Together with Diabetes is a culturally sensitive social network intervention specifically targeted to ethnic Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, and Surinamese diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups. For ten months, patients will participate in peer support groups in which they will share experiences, support each other in maintaining healthy lifestyles, and learn skills to resist social pressure. At the same time, their significant others will also receive an intervention, aimed at maximizing support for and minimizing the negative social influences on diabetes self-management. This study aims to test the effectiveness of Powerful Together with Diabetes. Methods/Design We will use a quasi-experimental design with an intervention group (Group 1) and two comparison groups (Groups 2 and 3), N = 128 in each group. Group 1 will receive Powerful Together with Diabetes. Group 2 will receive Know your Sugar, a six-week group intervention that does not focus on the participants' social environments. Group 3 receives standard care only. Participants in Groups 1 and 2 will be interviewed and physically examined at baseline, 3, 10, and 16 months. We will compare their haemoglobin A1C levels with the haemoglobin A1C levels of Group 3. Main outcome measures are haemoglobin A1C, diabetes-related quality of life, diabetes self-management, health-related, and intermediate outcome measures. We will conduct a process evaluation and a qualitative study to gain more insights into the intervention fidelity, feasibility, and changes in the psychosocial mechanism in the participants' immediate

  11. Studies in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo

    We analyze several topics in quantum field theory, mainly motivated by their role in the formulation of string theories. The common theme in what follows is the implementation of symmetries, such as local supersymmetry or BRST symmetry, through an action principle and the analysis of anomalies, the latter describing the breakdown of these symmetries at the quantum level. In the first part of this dissertation, we analyze "chiral bosons", i.e. massless scalar fields in a two -dimensional spacetime propagating in only one of the two light-cone directions. We present a general method for constructing couplings for chiral bosons and give details for the coupling to supergravity. The notion of a two dimensional chiral boson is generalized in d = 4k + 2 spacetime dimensions to that of a self-dual antisymmetric tensor field. We derive the coupling to gravity and compute the gravitational anomalies using the Feynman rules obtained from the action. We find agreement with the important work of Alvarez-Gaume and Witten, who conjectured the relevant Feynman rules. Our result therefore completes and justifies the Alvarez-Gaume-Witten findings. For the case of d = 2 we also show how to use the method of Fujikawa for computing anomalies from the non-invariance of the path integral measure. We obtain the full effective action by integrating the anomaly equation. In the second part we focus on a method for computing the consistent anomalies in the Fujikawa scheme. In a first application, we derive the consistent regulators for the various fields of the quantum action of the spinning string in superspace. These regulators produce the anomalies which satisfy the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions. In a second application, we analyze the anomalous structure of the Green-Schwarz formulation of the heterotic string. We find anomalies which generically do not cancel on an arbitrary world-sheet manifold. This raises questions concerning the possible validity of such a formulation of

  12. Ethnic differences in prediabetes and diabetes in the Suriname Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Nahar-van Venrooij, Lenny M

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is increasing worldwide, and information on risk factors to develop targeted interventions is limited. Therefore, we analyzed data of the Suriname Health Study to estimate the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes. We also explored whether ethnic differences in prediabetes or diabetes risk could be explained by biological, demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and metabolic risk factors. Method The study was designed according to the WHO Steps guidelines. Fasting blood glucose levels were measured in 3393 respondents, aged 15–65 years, from an Amerindian, Creole, Hindustani, Javanese, Maroon or Mixed ethnic background. Prediabetes was defined by fasting blood glucose levels between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/L and diabetes by fasting blood glucose levels ≥7.0 mmol/L or ‘self-reported diabetes medication use.’ For all ethnicities, we analyzed sex, age, marital status, educational level, income status, employment, smoking status, residence, physical activity, body mass index, waist circumference, hypertension, and the levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Results The prevalence of prediabetes was 7.4%, while that of diabetes was 13 0%. From these diabetes cases, 39.6% were not diagnosed previously. No ethnic differences were observed in the prevalence of prediabetes. For diabetes, Hindustanis (23.3%) had twice the prevalence compared to other ethnic groups (4.7–14.2%). The associations of the risk factors with prediabetes or diabetes varied among the ethnic groups. The differences in the associations of ethnic groups with prediabetes or diabetes were partly explained by these risk factors. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetes in Suriname is high and most elevated in Hindustanis. The observed variations in risk factors among ethnic groups might explain the ethnic differences between these groups, but follow-up studies are needed to explore this in more

  13. Effects of Type 2 Diabetes on Brain Structure and Cognitive Function: African American–Diabetes Heart Study MIND

    PubMed Central

    Whitlow, C.T.; Sink, K.M.; Divers, J.; Smith, S.C.; Xu, J.; Palmer, N.D.; Hugenschmidt, C.E.; Williamson, J.D.; Bowden, D.W.; Freedman, B.I.; Maldjian, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Rates of type 2 diabetes are higher among African Americans compared with individuals of European ancestry. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between MR imaging measures of brain structure (volume of GM, WM, WM lesions) and cognitive function in a population of African Americans with type 2 diabetes. These MR imaging measures of brain structure are affected by type 2 diabetes–associated macrovascular and microvascular disease and may be associated with performance on tasks of cognitive function in the understudied African American population. MATERIALS AND METHODS African Americans with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the African American–Diabetes Heart Study MIND study (n = 263) were evaluated across a broad range of cognitive domains and imaged with brain MR imaging. Associations between cognitive parameters and MR imaging measures of whole-brain GM, WM, and WM lesion volumes were assessed by using adjusted multivariate models. RESULTS Lower GM volume was associated with poorer performance on measures of general cognitive function, working memory, and executive function. Higher WM lesion volume was associated with poorer performance on a smaller subset of cognitive domains compared with GM volume but included aspects of working memory and executive function. There were no statistically significant associations with WM volume. CONCLUSIONS Markers of cortical atrophy and WM lesion volume are associated with cognitive function in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. These associations are described in an African American cohort with disease control similar to that of individuals of European ancestry, rather than underserved African Americans with poor access to health care. Interventions to reduce cortical atrophy and WM disease may improve cognitive outcomes in this understudied population. PMID:26206811

  14. Recent biophysical studies in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Georg

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview of biophysical effects of steady magnetic fields is given. The need of high field strength is illustrated by several recent diamagnetic orientation experiments. They include rod-like viruses, purple membranes and chromosomes. Results of various studies on bees, quails, rats and pigeons exposed to fields above 7 T are also resumed.

  15. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  16. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection: An Observational Population-Based Study in Spain From 2001 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; González-Pascual, Montserrat; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José M; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Diez, Javier; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2016-05-01

    To describe trends in the rates of discharge due to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) among patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain (2001-2012).We used national hospital discharge data to select all of the patients who were discharged from the hospital after TAAD. We focused our analysis on patients with TAAD in the primary diagnosis field. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status (diabetic or nondiabetic). Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status. We divided the study period into 4 periods of 3 years each. We analyzed diagnostic and surgical procedures, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality.We identified 48,746 patients who were discharged with TAAD. The rates of discharge due to TAAD increased significantly in both diabetic patients (12.65 cases per 100,000 in 2001/2003 to 23.92 cases per 100,000 in 2010/2012) and nondiabetic patients (17.39 to 21.75, respectively). The incidence was higher among nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients in 3 of the 4 time periods.The percentage of patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair increased in both groups, whereas the percentage of patients who underwent open repair decreased. The frequency of hospitalization increased at a higher rate among diabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.20) than among nondiabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.07-1.11). The in-hospital mortality was lower in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients (odds ratio 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-0.99).The incidence rates were higher in nondiabetic patients. Hospitalizations seemed to increase at a higher rate among diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly lower mortality, possibly because of earlier diagnoses, and improved and more readily available treatments.

  17. Study on The Effect of Royal Jelly on Reproductive Parameters in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Elham; Nejati, Vahid; Najafi, Gholamreza; Khazaei, Mozafar; Babaei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus has a variety of structural and functional effects on the male reproductive system. Diabetes results in reduced sperm parameters and libido. The present study aims to investigate the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on reproductive parameters of testosterone and malondialdehyde (MDA) production in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods This experimental study was conducted on adult male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups (n=8 per group): control, RJ, diabetic and diabetic treated with RJ. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg body weight (BW) of streptozotocin (STZ). RJ, at a dose of 100 mg/kg BW was given by gavage. The duration of treatment was six weeks. After the treatment period the rats were sacrificed. The testes were weighed and changes in sperm count, motility, viability, deformity, DNA integrity and chromatin quality were analyzed. Serum testosterone and MDA concentrations of testicular tissue were determined. Data were analyzed by oneway ANOVA with p<0.05 as the significant level. Results STZ-induced diabetes decreased numerous reproductive parameters in rats. Testicular weight, sperm count, motility, viability and serum testosterone levels increased in the diabetic group treated with RJ. There was a significant decrease observed in sperm deformity, DNA integrity, chromatin quality, and tissue MDA levels in diabetic rats treated with RJ compared to the diabetic group (p<0.05). Conclusion RJ improved reproductive parameters such as testicular weight, sperm count, viability, motility, deformity, DNA integrity, chromatin quality, serum testosterone and testicular tissue MDA levels in diabetic rats. PMID:25918599

  18. Risk factors of diabetic foot Charcot arthropathy: a case-control study at a Malaysian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Aishah Ahmad; Chung, Tze Yang; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine the risk factors of diabetic Charcot arthropathy of the foot among diabetic patients with and without foot problems. METHODS This was a case-control study involving diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Foot Care and Wound Management Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from June 2010 to June 2011. Data on sociodemographic profiles, foot factors and diabetes characteristics was collected and analysed. RESULTS A total of 48 diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the foot were identified. Data from these 48 patients was compared with those of 52 diabetic patients without foot problems. Up to 83.3% of patients with diabetic Charcot arthropathy presented with unilateral Charcot foot, most commonly located at the midfoot (45.8%). Patients with a history of foot problems, including foot ulcer, amputation, surgery or a combination of problems, had the highest (26-time) likelihood of developing Charcot arthropathy (odds ratio 26.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4–109.6). Other significant risk factors included age below 60 years, more than ten years’ duration of diabetes mellitus and the presence of nephropathy. CONCLUSION A history of prior diabetic foot problems is the greatest risk factor for developing diabetic Charcot arthropathy, compared with other risk factors such as diabetes characteristics and sociodemographic profiles. Preventive management of diabetic foot problems in the primary care setting and multidisciplinary care are of paramount importance, especially among chronic diabetic patients. PMID:27075668

  19. Cohort profile: The Japan diabetes complications study: a long-term follow-up of a randomised lifestyle intervention study of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiro; Tanaka, Sachiko; Iimuro, Satoshi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Katayama, Shigehiro; Ohashi, Yasuo; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-08-01

    The Japan Diabetes Complications Study, a randomised lifestyle intervention study of type 2 diabetes conducted at 59 institutes throughout Japan that enrolled 2033 eligible patients from January 1995 to March 1996, was directed at: (i) determining the incidence and progression rates of complications of diabetes; (ii) exploring clinical risk factors for complications of diabetes; and (iii) determining the association between lifestyle factors, including diet and physical activity, and complications of diabetes, in addition to comparing, in a randomised manner, the effects on type 2 diabetes of an extensive lifestyle intervention and conventional treatment. The protocol for the study originally specified four study populations according to primary outcomes, consisting of: (1) a macroangiopathy group (N = 1771); (ii) a nephropathy group (N = 1607); (iii) a retinopathy-incident group (N = 1221); and (iv) a retinopathy-progression group (N = 410). The primary outcomes were: (i) development of retinopathy; (ii) progression of retinopathy; (iii) development of overt nephropathy; and (iv) occurrence of macroangiopathic events including proven coronary heart disease and stroke. The study was originally planned to follow patients for 8 years, and an extended follow-up is ongoing. Information about primary outcomes, laboratory tests, and other clinical variables for each patient was collected at a central data centre through an annual report from each investigator. Additionally, extensive lifestyle surveys were conducted at baseline and 5 years after the beginning of the study intervention in both the intervention and conventional treatment groups. A description of the occurrence of complications of diabetes and of all-cause mortality, provided in this paper, demonstrated a clear gender-based difference in cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality.

  20. Older Adult Self-Efficacy Study of Mobile Phone Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charlene C; Khokhar, Bilal; Weed, Kelly; Barr, Erik; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participant self-efficacy and use of a mobile phone diabetes health intervention for older adults during a 4-week period. Participants included seven adults (mean age, 70.3 years) with type 2 diabetes cared for by community-based primary care physicians. Participants entered blood glucose data into a mobile phone and personalized patient Internet Web portal. Based on blood glucose values, participants received automatic messages and educational information to self-manage their diabetes. Study measures included prior mobile phone/Internet use, the Stanford Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale, the Stanford Energy/Fatigue Scale, the Short Form-36, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (depression), the Patient Reported Diabetes Symptom Scale, the Diabetes Stages of Change measure, and a summary of mobile system use. Participants had high self-efficacy and high readiness and confidence in their ability to monitor changes to control their diabetes. Participants demonstrated ability to use the mobile intervention and communicate with diabetes educators.

  1. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This ... as 10 pounds or more at term. Gestational diabetes In the NHSII 1989 baseline questionnaire and subsequent ...

  2. Factors Affecting Recruitment of Participants for Studies of Diabetes Technology in Newly Diagnosed Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Focus Group Study with Parents and Children

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Janet; Tauschmann, Martin; Randell, Tabitha; Trevelyan, Nicola; Hovorka, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Relatively little is known about parents' or children's attitudes toward recruitment for, and participation in, studies of new diabetes technologies immediately after diagnosis. This study investigated factors affecting recruitment of participants for studies in newly diagnosed youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods: Qualitative focus group study incorporating four recorded focus groups, conducted in four outpatient pediatric diabetes clinics in large regional hospitals in England. Participants comprised four groups of parents (n = 22) and youth (n = 17) with type 1 diabetes, purposively sampled on the basis of past involvement (either participation or nonparticipation) in an ongoing two-arm randomized trial comparing multiple daily injection with conventional continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion regimens from the onset of type 1 diabetes. Results: Stress associated with diagnosis presents significant challenges in terms of study recruitment, with parents demonstrating varied levels of willingness to be approached soon after diagnosis. Additional challenges arise regarding the following: randomization when study arms are perceived as sharply differentiated in terms of therapy effectiveness; burdens arising from study participation; and the need to surrender new technologies following the end of the study. However, these challenges were mostly insufficient to rule out study participation. Participants emphasized the benefits and reassurance arising from support provided by staff and fellow study participants. Conclusions: Recruitment to studies of new diabetes technologies immediately after diagnosis in youth presents significant challenges, but these are not insurmountable. The stress and uncertainty arising from potential participation may be alleviated by personalized discussion with staff and peer support from fellow study participants. PMID:27355100

  3. The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P = 0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

  4. Situational analysis of services for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy and evaluation of programs for the detection and treatment of diabetic retinopathy in India: Methods for the India 11-city 9-state study

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, G. V. S.; Gilbert, Clare E.; Shukla, Rajan; Vashist, Praveen; Shamanna, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of visual impairment in India. Available evidence shows that there are more than 60 million persons with diabetes in India and that the number will increase to more than a 100 million by 2030. There is a paucity of data on the perceptions and practices of persons with diabetes and the available infrastructure and uptake of services for DR in India. Objectives: Assess perception of care and challenges faced in availing eye care services among persons with diabetics and generate evidence on available human resources, infrastructure, and service utilization for DR in India. Methods: The cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in eleven cities across 9 States in India. In each city, public and private providers of eye-care were identified. Both multispecialty and standalone facilities were included. Specially designed semi-open ended questionnaires were administered to the clients. Semi-structured interviews were administered to the service providers (both diabetic care physicians and eye care teams) and observational checklists were used to record findings of the assessment of facilities conducted by a dedicated team of research staff. Results: A total of 859 units were included in this study. This included 86 eye care and 73 diabetic care facilities, 376 persons with diabetes interviewed in the eye clinics and 288 persons with diabetes interviewed in the diabetic care facilities. Conclusions: The findings will have significant implications for the organization of services for persons with diabetes in India. PMID:27144132

  5. Overcoming cultural barriers to diabetes control: a qualitative study of southwestern New Mexico Hispanics.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Joanne; Flenniken, Donna

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of cultural barriers on self-management of diabetes among Hispanic participants in LA VIDA (Lifestyle and Values Impact Diabetes Awareness), a diabetes intervention program in southwestern New Mexico. As part of the LA VIDA program evaluation, in depth interviews were conducted with 50 Hispanics who had participated in one or more activities, including diabetes education classes, grocery store tours, and support groups, and who had interacted with promotores (community health workers). LA VIDA participants reported that a sense of empowerment and increased self-efficacy enabled them to overcome cultural barriers related to the traditional Hispanic diet, lack of social support, and denial about having diabetes. PMID:20860336

  6. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes among hypertensive patients attending Kiambu district Hospital, Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meme, Nkatha; Amwayi, Samuel; Nganga, Ziporrah; Buregyeya, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that are closely linked: one cannot be properly managed without attention to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic and pre-diabetic states that is abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and factors associated with it among hypertensive patients in Kiambu Hospital, Kenya. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 2014 to April 2014. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 attending the out-patient medical clinic were included in the study. Pregnant and known diabetic patients were excluded. Data was collected on socio-demographics, behavior, and anthropometrics. Diabetes status was based on a Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) classification of ≥6.5% for diabetes, 6.0-6.4% for pre-diabetes and ≤6.0% for normal. AGR was the dependable variable and included two diabetic categories; diabetes and pre-diabetes. Results We enrolled 334 patients into the study: the mean age was 59 years (Standard deviation= 14.3). Of these patients 254 (76%) were women. Thirty two percent (107/334; 32%) were found to have AGR, with 14% (46) having un-diagnosed DM and 18%(61) with pre-diabetes. Factors associated with AGR were age ≥45 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI 1.37 ≥ 7.62), basal metabolic index (BMI) ≥ 25 Kg/m2 (OR= 3.13; 95% CI 1.53 - 6.41), low formal education (primary/none)(OR= 2; 95%CI 1.08 - 3.56) and family history of DM (OR = 2.19; 95%CI 1.16 - 4.15). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of undiagnosed AGR among hypertensive patients. This highlights the need to regularly screen for AGR among hypertensive patients as recommended by WHO. PMID:26966482

  7. Preliminary study on overproduction of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ridzuan, Noridzzaida; John, Cini Mathew; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Maqbool, Maryam; Liew, Lee Chuen; Lim, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the amount and pattern of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in diabetic patient-derived neutrophils. METHODS: Blood samples from type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and volunteers (controls) were subjected to neutrophil isolation and the assessment of neutrophil oxidative burst using chemiluminescence assay. Neutrophils were activated by using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and neutrophils without activation were kept as a negative control. The chemiluminescence readings were obtained by transferring cell suspension into a 1.5 mL Eppendorf tube, with PMA and luminol. Reaction mixtures were gently vortexed and placed inside luminometer for a duration of 5 min. RESULTS: Our results showed that in the resting condition, the secretion of ROS in normal non-diabetic individuals was relatively low compared to diabetic patients. However, the time scale observation revealed that the secreted ROS declined accordingly with time in non-diabetic individuals, yet such a reduction was not detected in diabetic patients where at all the time points, the secretion of ROS was maintained at similar magnitudes. This preliminary study demonstrated that ROS production was significantly higher in patients with DM compared to non-diabetic subjects in both resting and activated conditions. CONCLUSION: The respiratory burst activity of neutrophils could be affected by DM and the elevation of ROS production might be an aggravating factor in diabetic-related complications. PMID:27433296

  8. Correlation Between the Severity of Diabetic Peripheral Polyneuropathy and Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Jae; Jang, Sol; Lee, Seung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy and their correlation with the quantified severity of nerve dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods A total of 187 diabetic patients with clinically suspected polyneuropathy (PN) were subclassified into 2 groups according to electrodiagnostic testing: a DM-PN group of 153 diabetic patients without electrophysiological abnormality and a DM+PN group of 34 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy. For all patients, age, sex, height, weight, duration of DM, and plasma glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level were comparatively investigated. A composite score was introduced to quantitatively analyze the results of the nerve conduction studies. Logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate correlations between significant risk factors and severity of diabetic polyneuropathy. Results The DM+PN group showed a significantly higher HbA1c level and composite score, as compared with the DM-PN group. Increased HbA1c level and old age were significant predictive factors for polyneuropathy in diabetic patients (odds ratio=5.233 and 4.745, respectively). In the multiple linear regression model, HbA1c and age showed a significant positive association with composite score, in order (β=1.560 and 0.253, respectively). Conclusion Increased HbA1c level indicative of a state of chronic hyperglycemia was a risk factor for polyneuropathy in diabetic patients and a quantitative measure of its severity. PMID:27152276

  9. [Enteral nutrition and changes in taste in diabetic patients: a double-blind prospective study].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Nebra, J; Aníbarro García, L; Vázquez Vizoso, F; Carabelos Acuña, P; Cristóbal García, F; García Vázquez, M; Martínez-Almeida, R; Gutiérrez-Solana, V; Fernández García, L; Luna Ortiz de Zárate, B

    1993-12-01

    The authors present a prospective double blind test aimed at objectively determining the acceptance of flavoured orally administered enteric diets specific to patients with glucose metabolism alterations (Glucerna and Precitene Diabet), in the light of the taste disorders described in such patients. Sixty-two patients were studied, 32 diabetics and 32 control patients, who were given a sample of each product; the level of acceptance was quantified on a modified wine-tasting scale. The average taste of the diabetics was 12.1 points (SD = 4.34) for Glucerna, and 10.1 (SD = 3.91) for the Precitene Diabet. In the control patients, the scores were 12.7 (SD = 3.78) and 13.2 (SD = 3.23) respectively. Multiple regression analysis did not reveal significant differences in taste according to age, sex or place of origin. Average taste among the diabetic patients as a whole with both products was 11.2 points and, for the nondiabetics, 12.92. The model detected significant differences (p = 0.01) between the two groups. The average taste of the diabetics was less than that of the non-diabetics, irrespective of all the remaining variables examined, including the type of preparation. These results confirm the lower oral acceptance in diabetic patients, possibly associated with disorders in the sense of taste, showing the utility of the modified wine-tasting scale as a test in evaluating the acceptance of enteric diets which must be administered orally.

  10. Biochemical study on the hypoglycemic effects of onion and garlic in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Demerdash, F M; Yousef, M I; El-Naga, N I Abou

    2005-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of onion (Allium cepa Linn) and garlic (Allium sativum Linn) juices on biochemical parameters, enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Alloxan was administered as a single dose (120 mg/kg BW) to induce diabetes. A dose of 1 ml of either onion or garlic juices/100 g body weight (equivalent to 0.4 g/100 g BW) was orally administered daily to alloxan-diabetic rats for four weeks. The levels of glucose, urea, creatinine and bilirubin were significantly (p<0.05) increased in plasma of alloxan-diabetic rats compared to the control group. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and alkaline and acid phosphatases (AlP, AcP) activities were significantly (p<0.05) increased in plasma and testes of alloxan-diabetic rats, while these activities were decreased in liver compared with the control group. Brain LDH was significantly (p<0.05) increased. The concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the activity of glutathione S-transferase in plasma, liver, testes, brain, and kidney were increased in alloxan-diabetic rats. Treatment of the diabetic rats with repeated doses of either garlic or onion juices could restore the changes of the above parameters to their normal levels. The present results showed that garlic and onion juices exerted antioxidant and antihyperglycemic effects and consequently may alleviate liver and renal damage caused by alloxan-induced diabetes. PMID:15582196

  11. What is important for you? A qualitative interview study of living with diabetes and experiences of diabetes care to establish a basis for a tailored Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for the Swedish National Diabetes Register

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Unn-Britt; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is a growing emphasis on the perspective of individuals living with diabetes and the need for a more person-centred diabetes care. At present, the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) lacks patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) based on the perspective of the patient. As a basis for a new PROM, the aim of this study was to describe important aspects in life for adult individuals with diabetes. Design Semistructured qualitative interviews analysed using content analysis. Setting Hospital-based outpatient clinics and primary healthcare clinics in Sweden. Participants 29 adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=15) and type 2 DM (n=14). Inclusion criteria: Swedish adults (≥18 years) living with type 1 DM or type 2 DM (duration ≥5 years) able to describe their situation in Swedish. Purposive sampling generated heterogeneous characteristics. Results To live a good life with diabetes is demanding for the individual, but experienced barriers can be eased by support from others in the personal sphere, and by professional support from diabetes care. Diabetes care was a crucial resource to nurture the individual's ability and knowledge to manage diabetes, and to facilitate life with diabetes by supplying support, guidance, medical treatment and technical devices tailored to individual needs. The analysis resulted in the overarching theme ‘To live a good life with diabetes’ constituting the two main categories ‘How I feel and how things are going with my diabetes’ and ‘Support from diabetes care in managing diabetes’ including five different categories. Conclusions Common aspects were identified including the experience of living with diabetes and support from diabetes care. These will be used to establish a basis for a tailored PROM for the NDR. PMID:27013595

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Diabetic Patients - A Cross Sectional Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mysore.

    PubMed

    Babu, M Suresh; Gowdappa, H Basavana; Kalpana, T; Vidyalaxmi, K; Nikhil, B; Chakravarthy, T

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence rates of diabetes are rising rapidly both in urban and rural India with the present prevalence in urban India being 12-19% and in rural India 4 - 10% in different published Indian studies.1 All involved in diabetes care agree that patients play a major role in the successful management of diabetes. There is an increasing amount of evidence that patient education is the most effective way to lessen the diabetic complications and its management.2 Education is likely to be effective if we know the characteristics of the patients in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices about diabetes. This study was conducted in Mysore to know the knowledge, attitude and practices of diabetic patients attending JSS Hospital. A total of 900 patients were included in the study. Five hundred sixteen (57.3%) patients were males, while 384 (42.7%) patients were females. Four hundred twenty-three (47%) patients were from urban area, while 477 (53%) were from rural area. Five hundred sixty-five (62.5%) diabetic patients were unaware of the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, 661 (73.4%) patients about cause of diabetes, 264 (29.3%) patients about common symptoms of diabetes, 256 (28.4%) patients about symptoms of hypoglycemia. Diabetes is a chronic disease which can affect many systems in the body like the heart, eyes, kidneys and nerves contributing to increased morbidity and mortality. 29%, 30.7%, 31.2% and 35.7% of diabetic patients were not aware of the diabetic complications to heart, eyes, kidneys and nerves respectively. Even patients with diabetes for more than 10 years, 18.8% were not aware of the heart complications while 21.5% were not aware of the diabetes complications to eyes, kidneys and nerves. 834 (92.6%) diabetic patients were not aware of HbA1C. 790 (87.7%) diabetic patients did not know that fruits can be eaten by diabetics. Eight hundred seventeen (90.8%) diabetic patients had not attended a formal diabetic education class. This possibly is a

  13. Yearly evolution of organ damage markers in diabetes or metabolic syndrome: data from the LOD-DIABETES study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease morbidity-mortality is greater in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the yearly evolution of organ damage markers in diabetes or metabolic syndrome, and to analyze the associated factors. Methods An observational prospective study was carried out in the primary care setting, involving 112 patients: 68 diabetics and 44 subjects with metabolic syndrome, subjected to 12 months of follow-up. Measurements: traditional cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, smoking, body mass index (BMI) and) and non-traditional risk factors (waist circumference, hsC Reactive Protein and fibrinogen); subclinical vascular (carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity and ankle/brachial index), cardiac (Cornell voltage-duration product), renal organ damage (creatinine, glomerular filtration and albumin/creatinine index), and antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs. Results At baseline, the diabetics presented a mean age of 59.9 years, versus 55.2 years in the subjects with metabolic syndrome (p = 0.03). Diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol were lower among the patients with diabetes, while blood glucose and HbA1c, as well as antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drug use, were greater. At evaluation after one year, the diabetics showed a decrease in BMI (-0.39), diastolic blood pressure (-3.59), and an increase in fibrinogen (30.23 mg/dL), ankle/brachial index (0.07) and the number of patients with ankle/brachial index pathologic decreased in 6. In turn, the patients with metabolic syndrome showed an increase in HDL-cholesterol (1-91 mg/dL), fibrinogen (25.54 mg/dL), Cornell voltage-duration product (184.22 mm/ms), ankle/brachial index (0.05) and the use of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs, and a reduction in serum glucose (3.74 mg/dL), HOMA, systolic (-6.76 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-3.29 mmHg), and pulse wave

  14. Healer shopping in Africa: new evidence from rural-urban qualitative study of Ghanaian diabetes experiences

    PubMed Central

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To provide counterevidence to existing literature on healer shopping in Africa through a systematic analysis of illness practices by Ghanaians with diabetes; to outline approaches towards improving patient centred health care and policy development regarding diabetes in Ghana. Design Longitudinal qualitative study with individual interviews, group interviews, and ethnographies. Settings Two urban towns (Accra, Tema) and two rural towns (Nkoranza and Kintampo) in Ghana. Participants 26 urban people and 41 rural people with diabetes with diverse profiles (sex, age, education, socioeconomic status, diabetes status). Results Six focus groups, 20 interviews, and three ethnographical studies were conducted to explore experiences and illness practices. Analysis identified four kinds of illness practice: biomedical management, spiritual action, cure seeking (passive and active), and medical inaction. Most participants privileged biomedicine over other health systems and emphasised biomedical management as ideal self care practice. However, the psychosocial impact of diabetes and the high cost of biomedical care drove cure seeking and medical inaction. Cure seeking constituted healer shopping between biomedicine, ethnomedicine, and faith healing; medical inaction constituted passive disengagement from medical management and active engagement with faith healing. Crucially, although spiritual causal theories of diabetes existed, they were secondary to dietary, lifestyle, and physiological theories and did not constitute the primary motivation for cure seeking. Cure seeking within unregulated ethnomedical systems and non-pharmacological faith healing systems exacerbated the complications of diabetes. Conclusions To minimise inappropriate healer shopping and maximise committed biomedical and regulated ethnomedical management for Ghanaians with diabetes, the greatest challenges lie in providing affordable pharmaceutical drugs, standardised ethnomedical drugs

  15. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes Development – Biomarker and Genotype Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Jujić, Amra; Nilsson, Peter M.; Engström, Gunnar; Hedblad, Bo; Melander, Olle; Magnusson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background We have recently shown that low plasma levels of mid-regional atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-ANP) predict development of diabetes and glucose progression over time, independently of known risk factors for diabetes development. However, since MR-ANP levels might be influenced by unknown factors causing diabetes, we cannot rule out that such relationship might be confounded. Previous studies have shown an association of a single nucleotide polymorphism rs5068 on the natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) locus gene with higher levels of circulating ANP. Since gene variants are inherited randomly and not subject to confounding, we aimed to investigate whether the variant rs5068 within the NPPA locus is associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Methods We genotyped the variant rs5068 within the NPPA locus in 27,307 individuals without known diabetes from the Malmö Diet Cancer Study. Incident diabetes was retrieved through national and regional registers (median follow-up time of 14 years, 2,823 incident diabetes cases). Results In Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and BMI, we found that the carriers of at least one copy of the G allele of rs5068 had lower likelihood of incident diabetes within 14 years (HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78–0.99, p = 0.037). Conclusion Our results indicate a role of the ANP system in the etiology of type 2 diabetes and might help provide insight in the metabolic actions of natriuretic peptides and the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:24586593

  16. Risk factors for ulceration and amputation in diabetic foot: study in a cohort of 496 patients.

    PubMed

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz; Nery, Marcia; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Treatment strategies for foot at risk and diabetic foot are mainly preventive. Studies describing demographic data, clinical and impacting factors continue to be, however, scarce. Our objective was to determine the epidemiological presentation of diabetic foot and understand whether there were easily assessable variables capable of predicting the development of diabetic foot. This was a retrospective study of 496 patients with established foot at risk or diabetic foot, who were evaluated based on age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, foot at risk classification, and the presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation. The presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation was recorded in 45.9, 25.3, and 12.9 % of patients, respectively. As for diabetic foot classification, the great majority of our cohort had diabetic neuropathy (92.9 %). Approximately 30 % had neuro-ischemic disease and only 7.1 % had ischemic disease alone. Sixty-two percent of patients presented neuropathy with no signs of arteriopathy. Foot classification was as a significant predictor for the presence of ulcer (p = 0.009; OR = 3.2; 95 % CI = 1.18-7.3). Only male gender was a significant predictor for ulceration (p < 0.001). Predictors of amputation were male gender (p < 0.001; OR = 3.44 95 % CI = 1.81-6.56) and neuro-ischemic diabetic foot (p < 0.049; OR = 4.6; 95 % CI = 1.01-20.9). The predictors for diabetic foot were male gender and the presence of neuropathy. The combination of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease adds significantly to the risk for amputation among patients with the diabetic foot syndrome. Men, presenting combined risk factors, should be a group receiving special attention and in the foot clinic, due to their potentially worse evolution.

  17. Early Cognitive Deficits in Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Anna; Fratiglioni, Laura; Laukka, Erika J; Santoni, Giola; Pedersen, Nancy L; Bäckman, Lars; Xu, Weili

    2016-06-15

    Evidence links type 2 diabetes to dementia risk. However, our knowledge on the initial cognitive deficits in diabetic individuals and the factors that might promote such deficits is still limited. This study aimed to identify the cognitive domains initially impaired by diabetes and the factors that play a role in this first stage. Within the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen, 2305 cognitively intact participants aged ≥60 y were identified. Attention/working memory, perceptual speed, category fluency, letter fluency, semantic memory, and episodic memory were assessed. Diabetes (controlled and uncontrolled) and prediabetes were ascertained by clinicians, who also collected information on vascular disorders (hypertension, heart diseases, and stroke) and vascular risk factors (VRFs, including smoking and overweight/obesity). Data were analyzed with linear regression models. Overall, 196 participants (8.5%) had diabetes, of which 144 (73.5%) had elevated glycaemia (uncontrolled diabetes); 571 (24.8%) persons had prediabetes. In addition, diabetes, mainly uncontrolled, was related to lower performance in perceptual speed (β - 1.10 [95% CI - 1.98, - 0.23]), category fluency (β - 1.27 [95% CI - 2.52, - 0.03]), and digit span forward (β - 0.35 [95% CI - 0.54, - 0.17]). Critically, these associations were present only among APOEɛ4 non-carriers. The associations of diabetes with perceptual speed and category fluency were present only among participants with VRFs or vascular disorders. Diabetes, especially uncontrolled diabetes, is associated with poorer performance in perceptual speed, category fluency, and attention/primary memory. VRFs, vascular disorders, and APOE status play a role in these associations. PMID:27314527

  18. Early Cognitive Deficits in Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Anna; Fratiglioni, Laura; Laukka, Erika J.; Santoni, Giola; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Bäckman, Lars; Xu, Weili

    2016-01-01

    Evidence links type 2 diabetes to dementia risk. However, our knowledge on the initial cognitive deficits in diabetic individuals and the factors that might promote such deficits is still limited. This study aimed to identify the cognitive domains initially impaired by diabetes and the factors that play a role in this first stage. Within the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care–Kungsholmen, 2305 cognitively intact participants aged ≥60 y were identified. Attention/working memory, perceptual speed, category fluency, letter fluency, semantic memory, and episodic memory were assessed. Diabetes (controlled and uncontrolled) and prediabetes were ascertained by clinicians, who also collected information on vascular disorders (hypertension, heart diseases, and stroke) and vascular risk factors (VRFs, including smoking and overweight/obesity). Data were analyzed with linear regression models. Overall, 196 participants (8.5%) had diabetes, of which 144 (73.5%) had elevated glycaemia (uncontrolled diabetes); 571 (24.8%) persons had prediabetes. In addition, diabetes, mainly uncontrolled, was related to lower performance in perceptual speed (β – 1.10 [95% CI – 1.98, – 0.23]), category fluency (β – 1.27 [95% CI – 2.52, – 0.03]), and digit span forward (β – 0.35 [95% CI – 0.54, – 0.17]). Critically, these associations were present only among APOE ɛ4 non–carriers. The associations of diabetes with perceptual speed and category fluency were present only among participants with VRFs or vascular disorders. Diabetes, especially uncontrolled diabetes, is associated with poorer performance in perceptual speed, category fluency, and attention/primary memory. VRFs, vascular disorders, and APOE status play a role in these associations. PMID:27314527

  19. Passive smoke exposure and risk of diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kan; Liu, Dan; Wang, Chuan; Ren, Men; Yang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that passive smoke exposure is related to the development of diabetes. However, data on this issue are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of the association between passive smoking and the risk of diabetes. We searched the Medline and Embase databases up to October 2013 to identify prospective cohort studies related to passive smoke exposure and incident diabetes. Summary effect estimates with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were derived using a fixed or random effects model, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Six prospective studies that span three continents involving 154,406 participants (ages 18-74) with 7,116 new diabetes cases were included in the meta-analysis. On the basis of the Newcastle Ottawa Scale system, five studies were identified as relatively high-quality. In our primary analysis, compared to never smokers without passive smoke exposure, never smokers reporting passive smoke exposure was associated with increased risk of diabetes (pooled relative risk 1.21, 95 % CI 1.07-1.38). Such association persisted in the dose-response analysis. No indications of significant heterogeneity and publication bias were detected. Estimates of total effects were generally consistent in the sensitivity and subgroup analyses. Findings of the present meta-analysis suggest that passive smoke exposure is independently associated with the risk of diabetes. The conclusion may have a far-reaching significance for public health in countries of high smoking intensity and high incident diabetes.

  20. An ethno-medicinal study of medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand-Ahmadi, Babak; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Tajeddini, Pegah; Naghdi, Nasrollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is the greatest public health problem and is considered as the silent epidemic of the 21st century. In Iran, there are approximately 1.5 million diabetic patients. Before the discovery of insulin, medicinal plants were widely used for the treatment of diabetes in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the indigenous plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Shiraz, southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured direct interviews were conducted with 25 herbalists to identify medicinal plants used to treat diabetes. Questionnaires were included herbalist personal information, plant local name, growth season, plant parts used, preparation methods, and traditional therapies. Results: The interview data indicated that, 24 medicinal plants from 19 families are used for the treatment of diabetes in Shiraz. The families with most antidiabetic species were Compositae (13%), Rosaceae (13%) and Cucurbitaceae (8%). The most frequently used plant parts were fruits (38%) and the most common preparation method was decoction (62%). For 45% of reported plants, pharmaceutical studies approved antidiabetic effects in animal or humane model of diabetes. Results of this study showed that the plants recommended by Shirazian herbalists have potential antidiabetic effects. Conclusions: It is suggested that the ingredients of indigenous plants be studied to determine therapeutic effects and mechanism of action. If they were safe and effective, they can be refined and processed to produce natural drugs. PMID:27047810

  1. Association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2; a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    De la Cruz-Cano, Eduardo; Tovilla-Zarate, Carlos Alfonso; Reyes-Ramos, Emilio; Gonzalez-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Juarez-Castro, Isela; López-Narváez, Maria Lilia; Fresan, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus and depression are highly prevalent conditions throughout the world and have significant impact on health outcomes. It has been estimated that diabetes mellitus type 2 affects about 246 million people in the world; nevertheless, incidence varies among countries. There is evidence that depression is associated with a poor metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that present other health problems (such as hypertension and obesity). The aim of this study protocol is to determine if obesity increases the risk for depression in patient with diabetes type 2. Methods: The analysis will be reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).The studies suitable for inclusion will be assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) to determine their methodological quality. To identify the studies of interest, we will search on PubMed and EBSCO databases. We will use the following keyword combinations: "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND obesity AND depression", "depression AND Diabetes Mellitus type 2", "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND body mass index cross sectional study", "depression AND obesity cross-sectional study". Causes for exclusion will be publications that studied patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1; articles that focused on the treatment and complications of diabetes mellitus type 2; publications that have studied other clinical or psychiatric conditions (for instance, seizure disorder or history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychotic symptoms or dementia). Conclusion: The results of this study will form the basis for a better understanding of the association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, and will allow development of prediction tools and better interventions. It is evident that several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes among population. Currently

  2. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic β‐cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population‐matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder. PMID:17551080

  3. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls.

    PubMed

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta-cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population-matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder.

  4. Ethnic difference in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in regions with Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway – the SAMINOR1 study

    PubMed Central

    Naseribafrouei, Ali; Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Melhus, Marita; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in rural populations of Norway, as well as to explore potential ethnic disparities with respect to dysglycaemia in Sami and non-Sami populations. Design Cross-sectional population-based study. Methods The SAMINOR1 study was performed in 2003–2004. The study took place in regions with both Sami and non-Sami populations and had a response rate of 60.9%. Information in the SAMINOR1 study was collected using two self-administered questionnaires, clinical examination and laboratory tests. The present analysis included 15,208 men and women aged 36–79 years from the SAMINOR1 study. Results Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami men was 3.4 and 5.5%, respectively. Corresponding values for non-Sami men were 3.3 and 4.6%. Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus for Sami women was 2.7 and 4.8%, respectively, while corresponding values for non-Sami women were 2.3 and 4.5%. Relative risk ratios for dysglycaemia among Sami participants compared with non-Sami participants were significantly different in different geographical regions, with the southern region having the highest prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami participants. Conclusion We observed a heterogeneity in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in different geographical regions both within and between different ethnic groups. PMID:27507149

  5. The Effect of Diabetes Medication on Cognitive Function: Evidence from the PATH Through Life Study

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Pushpani M.; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Eramudugolla, Ranmalee; Anstey, Kaarin J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effect of diabetes treatment on change of measures of specific cognitive domains over 4 years. Research Design and Methods. The sample was drawn from a population-based cohort study in Australia (the PATH Through Life Study) and comprised 1814 individuals aged 65–69 years at first measurement, of whom 211 were diagnosed with diabetes. Cognitive function was measured using 10 neuropsychological tests. The effect of type of diabetes treatment (diet, oral hypoglycemic agents, and insulin) on measures of specific cognitive domains was assessed using Generalized Linear Models adjusted for age, sex, education, smoking, physical activity level, BMI, and hypertension. Results. Comparison of cognitive function between diabetes treatment groups showed no significant effect of type of pharmacological treatment on cognitive function compared to diet only group or no diabetes group. Of those on oral hypoglycaemic treatment only, participants who used metformin alone had better cognitive function at baseline for the domains of verbal learning, working memory, and executive function compared to participants on other forms of diabetic treatment. Conclusion. This study did not observe significant effect from type of pharmacological treatment for diabetes on cognitive function except that participants who only used metformin showed significant protective effect from metformin on domain of verbal learning, working memory, and executive function. PMID:27195294

  6. Terbufos-sulfone exacerbates cardiac lesions in diabetic rats: a sub-acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Nurulain, Syed M; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Yasin, Javed; Adem, Abdu; Kaabi, Juma Al; Tariq, Saeed; Adeghate, Ernest; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) have a wide range of applications, from agriculture to warfare. Exposure to these brings forward a varied kind of health issues globally. Terbufos is one of the leading OPCs used worldwide. The present study investigates the cardiac effect of no observable dose of a metabolite of terbufos, terbufos-sulfone (TS), under non-diabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic condition. One hundred nanomoles per rat (1/20 of LD50) was administered intraperitoneally to adult male Wister rats daily for fifteen days. The left ventricle was collected for ultrastructural changes by transmission electron microscopy. The blood samples were collected for biochemical tests including RBC acetylcholinesterase, creatinine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, ALT, AST, and GGT. The study revealed about 10 % inhibition of RBC-AChE in two weeks of TS treatment in non-diabetic rats whereas RBC-AChE activity was significantly decreased in diabetic TS treated rats. CK, LDH, and triglycerides were significantly higher in diabetic TS treated rats. Electron microscopy of the heart showed derangement and lesions of the mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in the TS treated groups. The present study concludes that a non-lethal dose of TS causes cardiac lesions which exacerbate under diabetic condition. Biochemical tests confirmed the ultrastructural changes. It is concluded that a non-lethal dose of TS may be a risk factor for a cardiovascular disease, which may be fatal under diabetic condition. PMID:27331300

  7. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  8. Liver enzymes, race, gender and diabetes risk: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A. L. C.; Lazo, M.; Ndumele, C. E.; Pankow, J. S.; Coresh, J.; Clark, J. M.; Selvin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the associations of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase with diabetes risk and to determine whether associations differ by race and/or gender. We hypothesized that all liver enzymes would be associated with diabetes risk and that associations would differ by race and gender. Methods Prospective cohort of 7495 white and 1842 black participants without diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Poisson and Cox models adjusted for demographic, socio-behavioural, and metabolic and health-related factors were used. Results During a median of 12 years of follow-up, 2182 incident cases of diabetes occurred. Higher liver enzyme levels were independently associated with diabetes risk: adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.68 (1.49–1.89), 1.16 (1.02–1.31) and 1.95 (1.70–2.24) comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), respectively. gamma-Glutamyl transferase was most strongly related to diabetes risk, even at levels considered within normal range (≤ 60 U/l) in clinical practice. Adjusted incidence rates by quartiles of liver enzymes were similar by gender but higher in black versus white participants. Nonetheless, relative associations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) with diabetes were similar by race (P for interactions > 0.05). Conclusions Compared with aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase was more strongly associated with diabetes risk. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in liver enzymes precede the diagnosis of diabetes by many years and that individuals with elevated liver enzymes, even within the normal range as defined in clinical practice, are at high risk for diabetes. PMID:23510198

  9. Has carbohydrate-restriction been forgotten as a treatment for diabetes mellitus? A perspective on the ACCORD study design

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Eric C; Vernon, Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of medical treatment for diabetes, carbohydrate-restriction was the predominant treatment recommendation to treat diabetes mellitus. In this commentary we argue that carbohydrate-restriction should be reincorporated into contemporary treatment studies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:18400080

  10. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  11. Quality of life in people with diabetes: a systematic review of studies in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among people with diabetes has been growing in Iran over the last decade. The main aim of the current study was to systematically review the characteristics of these studies and examine quality of their findings. Persian (SID, Magiran) and English (Pubmed, Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO and ERIC) databases were systematically searched using the search terms: “diabetes” AND “quality of life” AND “Iran”. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. A total of 46 studies passed the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The included studies were conducted in 20 out of 30 provinces of the country. Most studies investigated HRQoL among people with type 2 diabetes. The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and WHO quality of life instruments (WHOQOL) were the main instruments used in these studies. Studies showed that people with diabetes had lower HRQoL than people without diabetes. Better socioeconomic status and better control of cardiovascular risk factors were associated with better HRQoL among the patients with diabetes. In general, the predictors of HRQoL among Iranian patients were similar to their international counterparts implying that diabetes patients share many common features. The reviewed studies suffer from major methodological and reporting flaws which limit validity and generalizability of their findings. PMID:24354933

  12. Compound Danshen Dripping Pill for Treating Early Diabetic Retinopathy: A Randomized, Double-Dummy, Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Qin, Yali; Yuan, Wei; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Youhua; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, double-dummy, double-blind study was to observe the therapeutic effects of compound Danshen dripping pill (CDDP) in treating early diabetic retinopathy (DR). All the 57 type 2 diabetes cases in nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) stage were divided into two groups randomly: 28 cases treated with CDDP as the treated group and 29 cases treated with calcium dobesilate as the control group. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in the treated group was significantly improved after treatment when compared to that before treatment (P < 0.05). Mean defect (MD) of visual field, hemorrhage area of the fundus, microaneurysm number, fluorescent leakage area, and capillary nonperfusion area evaluated by visual field, fundus photography, and fundus fluorescein angiography in the treated group had the same results as BCVA. However, there was no statistical difference in each index between the two groups. No obvious adverse events with clinical significance occurred. Our present study showed that CDDP has a similar improvement and safety to calcium dobesilate for NPDR. In future DR treatments, CDDP may function as the auxiliary drug. PMID:26457110

  13. Screening for diabetes in lower limb amputees: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Treweek, S P; Condie, M E; Gilmour, D G

    1998-04-01

    The Saint Vincent Declaration includes 5-year targets to improve the outcome of diabetic patients as a central tenet. Meeting these targets requires a comprehensive screening and monitoring programme to establish the current incidence of diabetic complications and show that the major goals of the declaration are being achieved. The Scottish Physiotherapy Amputee Research Group and the Scottish Vascular Audit Group jointly organized a three month prospective screening programme of 146 patients presenting for a lower limb amputation. The results suggest that a significant proportion of patients have undiagnosed diabetes. Further, only around half of the patients eligible for testing actually had a test done, highlighting the difficulties associated with establishing a national screening programme. This programme is now ongoing and particular importance is being given to improving the proportion of patients actually being tested. PMID:9621529

  14. Association between Albuminuria and Different Body Constitution in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Taichung Diabetic Body Constitution Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Li, Tsai-Chung; Tsai, Chia-I; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Ya-Chi; Su, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Albuminuria in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients increases the risk of diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Because albuminuria is modifiable, identifying relevant risk factors could facilitate prevention and/or management. This cross-sectional study investigated whether body constitution (BC) independently predicts albuminuria. Method. Patients with T2DM (n = 846) received urinalysis, a blood test, and diabetic retinopathy examination. Albuminuria was defined by an elevated urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (≥30 μg/mg). BC type (Yang deficiency, Yin deficiency, and Phlegm stasis) was assessed using a body constitution questionnaire (BCQ). Traditional risk factors for albuminuria were also recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) of albuminuria for BC were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Albuminuria was more prevalent in patients with Yang deficiency or Phlegm stasis (both P < 0.01). After adjustment, patients with both Yang deficiency and Phlegm stasis exhibited a significantly higher risk of albuminuria (OR = 3.037; 95% confidence interval = 1.572–5.867, and P < 0.001). Conclusion. BC is strongly associated with albuminuria in T2DM patients. Using a BCQ to assess BC is noninvasive, convenient, and inexpensive and can provide information for health care professionals to identify T2DM patients who are at a high risk of albuminuria. PMID:26587046

  15. Hospital Admission Rates for a Racially Diverse Low-Income Cohort of Patients With Diabetes: The Urban Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jessica M.; Webb, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective. We sought to determine the frequency and costs of hospitalization and to assess possible racial/ethnic disparities in a large cohort of low-income patients with diabetes who had received primary care at municipal health clinics. Methods. Administrative data from Philadelphia Health Care Centers were linked with discharge data from Pennsylvania hospitals for March 1993 through December 2001. We tested differences in hospitalization rates and mean hospital charges by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Results. A total of 18 800 patients with diabetes experienced 30 528 hospital admissions, for a hospitalization rate of 0.35 per person-year. Rates rose with age and with the interaction of male gender and age. Rates for non-Hispanic Whites were higher than those for African Americans, whereas those for Hispanics, Asian Americans, and “others” were lower. Patients who were hospitalized at least 5 times made up 10.5% of the study population and accounted for 64% of hospital admissions and hospital charges in this cohort. Conclusions. Hospitalization rates for this low-income cohort with access to primary care and pharmacy services were comparable to those of other diabetic patient populations, suggesting that reducing financial barriers to care may have benefited these patients. A subgroup of patients with multiple hospitalizations accounted for the majority of hospital admissions. PMID:16735627

  16. Associations with fracture in patients with diabetes: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Starup-Linde, Jakob; Gregersen, Søren; Vestergaard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fractures, which is not fully explained by bone mineral density and common risk factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of medication and biochemical markers on the risk of fracture in a diabetes population. Design and setting A nested case–control study was conducted based on Danish diabetes patients from The Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry. Participants The cases of the study were diabetes patients with a fracture (n=24 349), and controls were diabetes patients with no fracture (n=132 349). A total of 2627 diabetes patients were available for an analysis of patient characteristics, comorbidities, biochemical parameters and drug usage. Results Age (OR=1.02, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.04), diabetes duration (OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.09), a diagnosis of previous fracture (OR=2.20, 95% CI 1.55 to 3.11), an alcohol-related diagnosis (OR=2.94, 95% CI 1.76 to 4.91), total cholesterol level (OR=2.50, 95% CI 1.20 to 5.21) and the usage of antiepileptics (OR=2.12, 95% CI 1.39 to 3.59) all increased the odds of fracture. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased the odds of fracture (OR =0.34, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.74), where the level of 3.04–5.96 mmol/L was optimal with regard to fracture risk. Conclusions Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol may improve our understanding of fractures in diabetes patients, and it may be added to current fracture risk models in diabetes patients. PMID:26873048

  17. Intuitive Eating Practices Among African-American Women Living With Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Willig, Amanda L.; Richardson, Brittany S.; Agne, April; Cherrington, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Intuitive Eating programs that improve self-efficacy and dietary habits could enhance glycemic control in African-American women with type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate how current eating practices and beliefs of African-American women living with diabetes aligned with intuitive eating concepts. African-American women with type 2 diabetes referred for diabetes education class in 2009–2012 were recruited for a qualitative study using focus groups for data collection. Verbatim group transcriptions were analyzed by two independent reviewers for themes using a combined inductive-deductive approach. Participants (n=35) had an average age of 52±9 years, mean body mass index of 39±7, and mean time with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis of 10±10 years. Participants’ self-reported dietary practices were poorly aligned with intuitive eating concepts. The women reported a lack of self-control with food and regularly eating in the absence of hunger, yet stated that the determinant factor for when to stop eating was to recognize a feeling of fullness. Participants reported knowing they were full when they felt physically uncomfortable or actually became sick. Women frequently cited the belief that individuals with diabetes have to follow a different diet than that recommended for the general public. Many women also discussed diabetes-related stigma from family/friends, and often did not tell others about their diabetes diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that intuitive eating techniques are not currently applied by the women in this sample. Future studies should assess the impact of intuitive eating interventions on dietary habits among low-income African-American women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24699138

  18. Use of Commonly Available Technologies for Diabetes Information and Self-Management Among Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: A Web-Based Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaala, Sarah E; Hood, Korey K; Laffel, Lori; Kumah-Crystal, Yaa A; Lybarger, Cindy K

    2015-01-01

    Background For individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D), following a complicated daily medical regimen is critical to maintaining optimal health. Adolescents in particular struggle with regimen adherence. Commonly available technologies (eg, diabetes websites, apps) can provide diabetes-related support, yet little is known about how many adolescents with T1D use them, why they are used, or relationships between use and self-management. Objective This study examined adolescent and parent use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes, including proportions who use each technology, frequency of use, and number of different technologies used for diabetes. Analyses also investigated the reasons adolescents reported for using or not using technologies for diabetes, and factors correlated with adolescents’ technology use. Finally, this study examined relationships between the type and number of technologies adolescents use for diabetes and their self-management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents (12-17 years) and their parents (N=174 pairs), recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic (n=134) and the Children with Diabetes community website (n=40), participated in this Web-based survey study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) values were obtained from medical records for pediatric clinic patients. Adolescents reported their use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes (ie, social networking, diabetes websites, mobile diabetes apps, text messaging, and glucometer/insulin pump software), reasons for use, and self-management behavior (Self-Care Inventory-Revised, SCI-R). Results Most adolescents and parents used at least one of the 5 technologies for diabetes. Among adolescents, the most commonly used technology for diabetes was text messaging (53%), and the least commonly used was diabetes websites (25%). Most adolescents who used diabetes apps, text messaging, or pump/glucometer software did so more frequently (≥2 times per week), compared to social

  19. Effect of Urtica dioica on morphometric indices of kidney in streptozotocin diabetic rats--a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Ghafari, Sorya; Afshar, Mohammad

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica on Morphometric indices of kidney in diabetic rats. Thirty male adult albino wistar rats of 125-175 g divided into control, diabetic and Urtica dioica treatment groups. In treatment Group, diabetic rats received 100 mg kg(-1) daily hydroalcoholic extract of U. dioica intraperitoneally for 4 weeks. After the animals had been sacrified, the kidneys were removed and fixed by formaldehyde, cut horizontally into 1 mm slices and processed, Stained with H and E. Stereological study performed using light microscope and the image projected on a table of olysa software. Cavalieri principle was used to estimate the volume of cortex, medulla and whole kidney. All the grouped data statistically evaluated using Student's t-test, expressed as the Mean +/- SE. Ration of kidney weight/body weight in diabetes (0.51) and diabetes-extract group (0.67) were higher then control group (0.42). Ratio of kidney volume/body weight in diabetes (350) and diabetes-extract group (348) were higher then control group (323). Volume Ratio of cortex/medulla in diabetes-extract group (1.65) was higher then control (1.34) and diabetes group (1.33). Glomerular area and diameter and proximal tubule diameter in diabetes-Extract group was higher than control and diabetes groups. This study revealed that Urtica dioica has no effect on renal morphometric indices in induced diabetic rats. PMID:19090245

  20. Berberine as a therapy for type 2 diabetes and its complications: From mechanism of action to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Chen, Li; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide, and the development of novel anti-diabetic drugs is emerging. However, most anti-diabetic drugs cannot be used in patients with hepatic dysfunction, renal disease, and heart disease, which makes pharmacological therapy of type 2 diabetes complicated. Despite continued introduction of novel agents, the search for an ideal drug that is useful as both a hypoglycemic agent and to reduce diabetes-related complications remains elusive. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract that has shown promise as a hypoglycemic agent in the management of diabetes in animal and human studies. Mechanistic studies have revealed beneficial effects of berberine on diabetes-related complications. Although there have been few clinical reports of the anti-diabetic effects of berberine, little documentation of adverse effects in humans positions it as a potential candidate drug to treat type 2 diabetes. In the present review, the anti-diabetic mechanism of berberine, its effect on diabetes-related complications, and its recent use in human clinical studies is highlighted. In addition, we summarize the different treatments for type 2 diabetes in adults and children.

  1. [Cytological study of gum epithelium in connection with diabetes mellitus compensation stage].

    PubMed

    Ashurov, G G; Dzhuraeva, Sh F

    2009-01-01

    The structure of interphased nuclei of gum's epithelium and inflammation of periodontal structure in patients with glycolitic disorders in coonection of degree compensation of diabetes mellitus were studied. In patients with diabetes mellitus and inflammation of gum mucosa 67,33+/-0,05% of gum's cells epithelium had morphology changes nuclei from the date of control group (50,99+/-0,05%) patients. This difference were more essential at deterioration of compensation (62,03+/-0,08%), sub - (67,05+/-0,05%), decompensate (75,11+/-0,07%) diabetes mellitus. PMID:19491782

  2. Xenopus as a model system for studying pancreatic development and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kofent, Julia; Spagnoli, Francesca M

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreas. To date, much of our knowledge about β-cells in humans comes from studying rare monogenic forms of diabetes. Importantly, the majority of mutations so far associated to monogenic diabetes are in genes that exert a regulatory role in pancreatic development and/or β-cell function. Thus, the identification and study of novel mutations open an unprecedented window into human pancreatic development. In this review, we summarize major advances in the genetic dissection of different types of monogenic diabetes and the insights gained from a developmental perspective. We highlight future challenges to bridge the gap between the fast accumulation of genetic data through next-generation sequencing and the need of functional insights into disease mechanisms. Lastly, we discuss the relevance and advantages of studying candidate gene variants in vivo using the Xenopus as model system. PMID:26806634

  3. Impact of diagnosis of diabetes on health-related quality of life among high risk individuals: the Diabetes Prevention Program outcomes study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Q.; Barrett-Connor, E.; de Groot, M.; Zhang, P.; Percy, C.; Florez, H.; Ackermann, R.; Montez, M.; Rubin, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess if diagnosis of type 2 diabetes affected health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program/Diabetes Prevention Program Outcome Study and changes with treatment or diabetes duration. Methods 3,210 participants with pre-diabetes were randomized to metformin (MET), intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS), or placebo (PLB). HRQoL was assessed using the SF-36 including: (1) 8 SF-36 subscales; (2) the physical component (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores; and (3) the SF-6D. The sample was categorized by diabetes free versus diagnosed. For diagnosed subgroup, mean scores in the diabetes-free period, at 6 months, 2, 4 and 6 years post-diagnosis, were compared. Results PCS and SF-6D scores declined in all participants in all treatment arms (P <.001). MCS scores did not change significantly in any treatment arm regardless of diagnosis. ILS participants reported a greater decrease in PCS scores at 6 months post-diagnosis (P <.001) and a more rapid decline immediately post-diagnosis in SF-6D scores (P = .003) than the MET or PLB arms. ILS participants reported a significant decrease in the social functioning subscale at 6 months (P <.001) and two years (P <.001) post-diagnosis. Conclusions Participants reported a decline in measures of overall health state (SF-6D) and overall physical HRQoL, whether or not they were diagnosed with diabetes during the study. There was no change in overall mental HRQoL. Participants in the ILS arm with diabetes reported a more significant decline in some HRQoL measures than those in the MET and PLB arms that developed diabetes. PMID:23709097

  4. Diabetes Is a Risk Factor for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study from Mwanza, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George; Jeremiah, Kidola; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Aabye, Martine Grosos; Changalucha, John; Christensen, Dirk Lund; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Krarup, Henrik; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Friis, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent. Methods A case-control study was conducted in an urban population in Tanzania among culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients and non-TB neighbourhood controls. Participants were tested for diabetes according to WHO guidelines and serum concentrations of acute phase reactants were measured. The association between diabetes and TB, and the role of HIV as an effect modifier, were examined using logistic regression. Since blood glucose levels increase during the acute phase response, we adjusted for elevated serum acute phase reactants. Results Among 803 cases and 350 controls the mean (SD) age was 34.8 (11.9) and 33.8 (12.0) years, and the prevalence of diabetes was 16.7% (95% CI: 14.2; 19.4) and 9.4% (6.6; 13.0), respectively. Diabetes was associated with TB (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 3.4, p<0.001). However, the association depended on HIV status (interaction, p = 0.01) due to a stronger association among HIV uninfected (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 11.6, p = 0.01) compared to HIV infected (OR 0.1, 95% CI: 0.01; 1.8, p = 0.13) after adjusting for age, sex, demographic factors and elevated serum acute phase reactants. Conclusion Diabetes is a risk factor for TB in HIV uninfected, whereas the association in HIV infected patients needs further study. The increasing diabetes prevalence may be a threat to TB control. PMID:21912626

  5. The association of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with perceived quality of life in a biethnic population: the San Luis Valley Diabetes Study.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, E M; Baxter, J; Mitchell, C M; Shetterly, S M; Hamman, R F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association between quality of life and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) status, and whether this association differs between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites. METHODS: Between 1986 and 1989, cross-sectional data on perceived quality of life (PQOL) were collected from 223 persons with NIDDM and 753 non-diabetic subjects. RESULTS: After adjustment, persons with NIDDM rated their PQOL significantly lower than did control subjects. The relationship of diabetes and PQOL did not differ by ethnicity. The number of complications of diabetes was not associated with lower PQOL scores. CONCLUSIONS: Control and treatment strategies should reflect an understanding of the impact that diabetes has on social functioning, leisure activities, and physical and mental health. PMID:9702155

  6. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Amanda G; Chen, Jian; Moran, Christopher; Phan, Thanh; Beare, Richard; Cooper, Kimberley; Litras, Stacey; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years) without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ) pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline. PMID:27314047

  7. Comparative Study of Epidemiological and Anthropological Aspects of Diabetes and Hypertension in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Fongnzossie, E; Donfack, D; Yedjou, CG; Tchounwou, PB; Minkande, JZ; Nouedou, C; Van, PD; Sonwa

    2016-01-01

    The traditional medicine in Africa in general and specifically in Cameroon does not manage diabetes and arterial hypertension very well. Yet, these pathologies are becoming more prevalent among the populations that need adequate knowledge to fight against them. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of indigenous people regarding diabetes and hypertension control, and to assess the epidemiological aspects of these diseases in order to reinforce their health education and promote a better health care through traditional medicine. To achieve this objective, 1,131 households including 70 traditional healers, 114 diabetics, 167 hypertensive patients, 30 hypertensive patients-diabetics and other Cameroonians were questioned on their ethnomedical knowledge of diabetes and arterial hypertension. Fifty-eight randomly distributed tribes were taking in account. The elucidation of anthropological and epidemiological aspects of diabetes and hypertension improved the beliefs of indigenous people and facilitated the modernization of diabetes and hypertension comprehension that remained focused on the elucidation of diseases' causes and complications, as well as on the behaviors that could help translate biomedical terms into locally meaningful metaphors.

  8. Prediction of Incident Diabetes in the Jackson Heart Study Using High-Dimensional Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Ramon; Saldana, Santiago; Simpson, Sean L.; Lacy, Mary E.; Subauste, Angela R.; Blackshear, Chad; Wagenknecht, Lynne; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical models to predict incident diabetes are often based on limited variables. Here we pursued two main goals: 1) investigate the relative performance of a machine learning method such as Random Forests (RF) for detecting incident diabetes in a high-dimensional setting defined by a large set of observational data, and 2) uncover potential predictors of diabetes. The Jackson Heart Study collected data at baseline and in two follow-up visits from 5,301 African Americans. We excluded those with baseline diabetes and no follow-up, leaving 3,633 individuals for analyses. Over a mean 8-year follow-up, 584 participants developed diabetes. The full RF model evaluated 93 variables including demographic, anthropometric, blood biomarker, medical history, and echocardiogram data. We also used RF metrics of variable importance to rank variables according to their contribution to diabetes prediction. We implemented other models based on logistic regression and RF where features were preselected. The RF full model performance was similar (AUC = 0.82) to those more parsimonious models. The top-ranked variables according to RF included hemoglobin A1C, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference, adiponectin, c-reactive protein, triglycerides, leptin, left ventricular mass, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and aldosterone. This work shows the potential of RF for incident diabetes prediction while dealing with high-dimensional data. PMID:27727289

  9. Comparative Study of Epidemiological and Anthropological Aspects of Diabetes and Hypertension in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Fongnzossie, E; Donfack, D; Yedjou, CG; Tchounwou, PB; Minkande, JZ; Nouedou, C; Van, PD; Sonwa

    2016-01-01

    The traditional medicine in Africa in general and specifically in Cameroon does not manage diabetes and arterial hypertension very well. Yet, these pathologies are becoming more prevalent among the populations that need adequate knowledge to fight against them. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of indigenous people regarding diabetes and hypertension control, and to assess the epidemiological aspects of these diseases in order to reinforce their health education and promote a better health care through traditional medicine. To achieve this objective, 1,131 households including 70 traditional healers, 114 diabetics, 167 hypertensive patients, 30 hypertensive patients-diabetics and other Cameroonians were questioned on their ethnomedical knowledge of diabetes and arterial hypertension. Fifty-eight randomly distributed tribes were taking in account. The elucidation of anthropological and epidemiological aspects of diabetes and hypertension improved the beliefs of indigenous people and facilitated the modernization of diabetes and hypertension comprehension that remained focused on the elucidation of diseases' causes and complications, as well as on the behaviors that could help translate biomedical terms into locally meaningful metaphors. PMID:27708987

  10. Impact of Ellagic Acid in Bone Formation after Tooth Extraction: An Experimental Study on Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Al-Bayaty, Fouad Hussain; Hussaini, Jamal; Khor, Goot Heah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the impact of ellagic acid (EA) towards healing tooth socket in diabetic animals, after tooth extraction. Methods. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley male rats weighing 250–300 g were selected for this study. All animals were intraperitoneally injected with 45 mg/kg (b.w.) of freshly prepared streptozotocin (STZ), to induce diabetic mellitus. Then, the animals were anesthetized, and the upper left central incisor was extracted and the whole extracted sockets were filled with Rosuvastatin (RSV). The rats were separated into three groups, comprising 8 rats each. The first group was considered as normal control group and orally treated with normal saline. The second group was regarded as diabetic control group and orally treated with normal saline, whereas the third group comprised diabetic rats, administrated with EA (50 mg/kg) orally. The maxilla tissue stained by eosin and hematoxylin (H&E) was used for histological examinations and immunohistochemical technique. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were used to evaluate the healing process in the extracted tooth socket by immunohistochemistry test. Results. The reactions of immunohistochemistry for FGF-2 and ALP presented stronger expression, predominantly in EA treated diabetic rat, than the untreated diabetic rat. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the administration of EA combined with RSV may have accelerated the healing process of the tooth socket of diabetic rats, after tooth extraction. PMID:25485304

  11. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Amanda G.; Chen, Jian; Moran, Christopher; Phan, Thanh; Beare, Richard; Cooper, Kimberley; Litras, Stacey; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years) without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ) pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline. PMID:27314047

  12. PAI-1 -675 4G/5G Polymorphism in Association with Diabetes and Diabetic Complications Susceptibility: a Meta-Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Cui, Dai; Shi, Yun; Shen, Chong; Tang, Wei; Yang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism and susceptibility to diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetic nephropathy (DN), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic coronary artery disease (CAD). A literature-based search was conducted to identify all relevant studies. The fixed or random effect pooled measure was calculated mainly at the allele level to determine heterogeneity bias among studies. Further stratified analyses and sensitivity analyses were also performed. Publication bias was examined by the modified Begg’s and Egger’s test. Twenty published articles with twenty-seven outcomes were included in the meta-analysis: 6 studies with a total of 1,333 cases and 3,011 controls were analyzed for the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetes risk, 7 studies with 1,060 cases and 1,139 controls for DN risk, 10 studies with 1,327 cases and 1,557 controls for DR and 4 studies with 610 cases and 1,042 controls for diabetic CAD risk respectively. Using allelic comparison (4G vs. 5G), the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism was observed to have no significant association with diabetes (REM OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96, 1.20), DN (REM OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.98, 1.25), DR (REM OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.97, 1.22) or diabetic CAD risk (REM OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.81, 1.42), and similar results were obtained in the dominant, recessive and co-dominant models. Our meta-analyses suggest that the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism might not be a risk factor for DM, DN, DR or diabetic CAD risk in the populations investigated. This conclusion warrants confirmation by further studies. PMID:24223897

  13. [Primary cardiorenal prevention in patients with type-2 diabetes. The Roadmap study].

    PubMed

    Halimi, S

    2005-10-22

    The incidence of type-2 diabetes is increasing throughout the world. By 2010, 350 million people will have this disease. Microalbuminuria is present in more than one third, for some at diabetes diagnosis. Rather than a complication, it is an indication of a vascular disorder that is part of the metabolic syndrome. 25% will develop end-stage kidney failure. Several studies have identified microalbuminuria or proteinuria as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Others have shown that antihypertensive treatments acting on the renin-angiotensin system (ACE inhibitors, ARBs agents) can reduce the progression of nephropathy in people with hypertension, type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. The "nephroprotective" effects of these drug classes, beyond their role in blood-pressure reduction, are suggested by modifications in renal structure and protein expression. But no study has so far examined their value in primary prevention in persons with type 2 diabetes without--but at risk of developing--microalbuminuria. The Roadmap study (Randomized Olmesartan And Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention Study) of primary prevention has as its objective measurement of the impact of ARBs (olmesartan 40 mg/d) treatment on renal outcome in 4400 patients with type 2 diabetes without microalbuminuria. Follow-up of this placebo-controlled study will last for 5 years. Conducted in 200 European centers, its results are expected for 2012. PMID:16269993

  14. Depressive symptoms in youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: Results of the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium screening assessment of depression in diabetes study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the frequency of depressive symptoms and the diagnosis and management of depression in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) enrolled in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium T1D and T2D registries. The Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) 2 Self-Report (Short) version ...

  15. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains unknown, but a growing body of evidence points to infectious agents and/or components of early childhood diet. The National Institutes of Health has established the TEDDY Study consortium of six clinical centers in the United States and Europe and a data coordinating center to identify environmental factors predisposing to, or protective against, islet autoimmunity and T1D. From 2004–2009, TEDDY will screen more than 360,000 newborns from both the general population and families already affected by T1D to identify an estimated 17,804 children with high-risk HLA-DR, DQ genotypes. Of those, 7,801 (788 first-degree relatives and 7,013 newborns with no family history of T1D) will be enrolled in prospective follow-up beginning before the age of 4.5 months. As of May 2008, TEDDY has screened more than 250,000 newborns and enrolled nearly 5,000 infants—approximately 70% of the final cohort. Participants are seen every 3 months up to 4 years of age, with subsequent visits every 6 months until the subject is 15 years of age. Blood samples are collected at each visit for detection of candidate infectious agents and nutritional biomarkers; monthly stool samples are collected for infectious agents. These samples are saved in a central repository. Primary endpoints include (1) appearance of one or more islet autoantibodies (to insulin, GAD65 or IA-2) confirmed at two consecutive visits; (2) development of T1D. By age 15, an estimated 800 children will develop islet autoimmunity and 400 will progress to T1D; 67 and 27 children have already reached these endpoints. PMID:19120261

  16. Molecular approaches to field studies of malaria.

    PubMed

    Beck, Hans-Peter; Tetteh, Kevin

    2008-12-01

    The third 'Molecular Approaches to Malaria' conference was held in Lorne, Australia, in February 2008 and provided extensive information on the application of molecular tools in field studies on malaria. In recent years, technological advances and capacity building in malaria-endemic countries have permitted molecular tools to be applied much more frequently and successfully with exciting new findings. In this review, Hans-Peter Beck and Kevin Tetteh report on the most recent findings using molecular tools in field studies.

  17. HLA antigens and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. A family study.

    PubMed

    Savi, M; Neri, T M; Zavaroni, I; Coscelli, I

    1977-12-01

    Sixteen insulin dependent diabetic patients (age at onset less than 35 years) and their families were tissue typed for HLA antigens. Glucose tolerance of relatives was also tested. Among diabetic patients two HLA antigens were found with increased frequency: B8 (31 percent, control 15 percent) and Bw35 (38 percent, control 23 percent). Among normal relatives B8 and Bw35 had the same frequency as the control group. Bw15 frequency was not increased in either group. In relatives, no correlation between HLA antigens (B8 or Bw35) and abnormal glucose tolerance, obesity and over-weight at birth was found. Present data confirm previous reports of high B8 frequency in early onset diabetic patients, but fail to demonstrate a raised frequency of abnormal glucose tolerance among relatives bearing B8 (or, in our cases, Bw35). B8 may be considered a genetic indicator for susceptibility to juvenile diabetes. On the basis of present results in families, however non genetic factors clearly also play a determinant role. Furthermore, that diabetogenesis arises from a link between Ir-genes and HLA-B8 antigen should only be considered a suggestive hypothesis. PMID:413751

  18. Profiling Amino Acids of Jordanian Scalp Hair as a Tool for Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rashaid, Ayat H B; Harrington, Peter de B; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-07-21

    Hair analysis is an area of increasing interest in the fields of medical and forensic sciences. Human scalp hair has attractive features in clinical studies because hair can be sampled easily and noninvasively from human subjects, and unlike blood and urine samples, it contains a chronological record of medication use. Keratin protein is the major component of scalp hair shaft material and it is composed of 21 amino acids. The method used herein for the amino acid determination in hair included keratin protein acid hydrolysis using 6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), followed by amino acids derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), and the determination of derivatized amino acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Amino acid profiles of scalp hair of 27 Jordanian subjects (15 diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 patients and 12 control subjects) were analyzed. A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) classified the amino acid profiles into diabetic and control groups based on multivariate analyses of the abundance of 14 amino acids. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% for diabetes detection using leave-one-individual-out cross-validation. The areas under the receiver operative characteristics (ROC) curves were 1.0, which represents a highly sensitive and specific diabetes test. The nonessential amino acids Gly and Glu, and the essential amino acid Ile were more abundant in the scalp hair of diabetic patients compared to the hair of control subjects. The associations between the abundance of amino acids of human hair and health status may have clinical applications in providing diagnostic indicator or predicting other chronic or acute diseases.

  19. Regional differences in clinical care among patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil: Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the characteristics of clinical care offered to type 1 diabetic patients across the four distinct regions of Brazil, with geographic and contrasting socioeconomic differences. Glycemic control, prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, screening for chronic complications and the frequency that the recommended treatment goals were met using the American Diabetes Association guidelines were evaluated. Methods This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted from December 2008 to December 2010 in 28 secondary and tertiary care public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities in north/northeast, mid-west, southeast and south regions. The data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% females and 57.1% Caucasians) aged 21.2 ± 11.7 years with a disease duration of 9.6 ± 8.1 years (<1 to 50 years). Results Overall, 18.4% patients had HbA1c levels <7.0%, and 47.5% patients had HbA1c levels ≥ 9%. HbA1c levels were associated with lower economic status, female gender, age and the daily frequency of self-blood glucose monitoring (SBGM) but not with insulin regimen and geographic region. Hypertension was more frequent in the mid-west (32%) and north/northeast (25%) than in the southeast (19%) and south (17%) regions (p<0.001). More patients from the southeast region achieved LDL cholesterol goals and were treated with statins (p<0.001). Fewer patients from the north/northeast and mid-west regions were screened for retinopathy and nephropathy, compared with patients from the south and southeast. Patients from the south/southeast regions had more intensive insulin regimens than patients from the north/northeast and mid-west regions (p<0.001). The most common insulin therapy combination was intermediate-acting with regular human insulin, mainly in the north/northeast region (p<0.001). The combination of insulin glargine with lispro and glulisine was more frequently used in the mid-west region (p<0.001). Patients from the north/northeast region were younger

  20. Corneal oedema after phacoemulsification in the early postoperative period: A qualitative comparative case-control study between diabetics and non-diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousis, Konstantinos T.; Panagiotou, Dimitrios Z.; Kostopoulou, Eirini; Vlatsios, Vasileios; Stampouli, Despoina

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence and severity of corneal oedema after phacoemulsification is dependent on the integrity of corneal endothelial cells. The function of these cells is affected by diabetes mellitus and consequently the behaviour of the cornea in diabetic patients is of special interest. Aim To compare the frequency of corneal oedema in two age-matched groups of diabetics and non diabetic patients that underwent cataract surgery in the Ophthalmology Department of Xanthi General Hospital in Greece. Methods A retrospective case control study was conducted in a retrospective fashion. Patients in the control and study groups were assessed regarding the severity of corneal oedema at three postoperative visits: days 1, 3–7, 10–14 after the operation. Ultrasound energy consumed during phacoemulsification was also a parameter of interest and possible correlations with the pre-existent cataract severity and the subsequent incidence of corneal oedema were investigated. Results The difference in the incidence of severe corneal oedema between the study and control group was statistically significant: (4.5% non diabetics vs 14.3% diabetics). The consumed ultrasound energy did not define final clinical outcome. Conclusions The existence of diabetes mellitus type 2 appears to be a significant risk factor for the development of persistent corneal oedema. The results of our study led to the modification of the algorithm for postoperative follow-up of patients of this remote area of Greece. PMID:26865977

  1. Four-Year Incidence of Diabetic Retinopathy in a Spanish Cohort: The MADIABETES Study

    PubMed Central

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Á.; San Andrés-Rebollo, Francisco Javier; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Arrieta-Blanco, Francisco Jesús; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, to identify the risk factors associated with the incidence of retinopathy and to develop a risk table to predict four-year retinopathy risk stratification for clinical use, from a four-year cohort study. Design The MADIABETES Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,443 outpatients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, sampled from 56 primary health care centers (131 general practitioners) in Madrid (Spain). Results The cumulative incidence of retinopathy at four-year follow-up was 8.07% (95% CI = 7.04–9.22) and the incidence density was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.75–2.33) cases per 1000 patient-months or 2.43 (95% CI = 2.10–2.80) cases per 100 patient-years. The highest adjusted hazard ratios of associated risk factors for incidence of diabetic retinopathy were LDL-C >190 mg/dl (HR = 7.91; 95% CI = 3.39–18.47), duration of diabetes longer than 22 years (HR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.18–3.39), HbA1c>8% (HR = 1.90; 95% CI = 1.30–2.77), and aspirin use (HR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.22–2.24). Microalbuminuria (HR = 1.17; 95% CI = 0.75–1.82) and being female (HR = 1.12; 95% CI = 0.84–1.49) showed a non-significant increase of diabetic retinopathy. The greatest risk is observed in females who had diabetes for more than 22 years, with microalbuminuria, HbA1c>8%, hypertension, LDL-Cholesterol >190 mg/dl and aspirin use. Conclusions After a four-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of retinopathy was relatively low in comparison with other studies. Higher baseline HbA1c, aspirin use, higher LDL-Cholesterol levels, and longer duration of diabetes were the only statistically significant risk factors found for diabetic retinopathy incidence. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between aspirin use and diabetic retinopathy risk in a well-defined cohort of patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at low risk of

  2. A case-control study of osteopathic palpatory findings in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Licciardone, John C; Fulda, Kimberly G; Stoll, Scott T; Gamber, Russell G; Cage, A Clifton

    2007-01-01

    Background Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is often managed by osteopathic physicians, osteopathic palpatory findings in this disease have not been adequately studied. Methods A case-control study was used to measure the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and a series of 30 osteopathic palpatory findings. The latter included skin changes, trophic changes, tissue changes, tenderness, and immobility at spinal segmental levels T5–T7, T8–T10, and T11-L2 bilaterally. Logistic regression models that adjusted for age, sex, and comorbid conditions were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between type 2 diabetes mellitus and each of these findings. Results and discussion A total of 92 subjects were included in the study. After controlling for age, sex, hypertension, and clinical depression, the only significant finding was an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and tissue changes at T11-L2 on the right side (OR, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.76–17.47; P = .003). Subgroup analyses of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension demonstrated significant associations with tissue changes at T11-L2 bilaterally (OR, 27.38; 95% CI, 1.75–428; P = .02 for the left side and OR, 24.00; 95% CI, 1.51–382; P = .02 for the right side). Among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, there was also a strong diabetes mellitus duration effect for tissue changes at T11-L2 bilaterally (OR, 12.00; 95% CI, 1.02–141; P = .05 for short duration vs. OR, 32.00; 95% CI, 2.29–448; P = .01 for long duration on the left side; and OR, 17.33; 95% CI, 1.39–217; P = .03 for short duration vs. OR, 32.00; 95% CI, 2.29–448; P = .01 for long duration on the right side). Conclusion The only consistent finding in this study was an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and tissue changes at T11-L2 on the right side. Potential explanations for this finding include reflex viscerosomatic changes directly

  3. Therapeutic effect of sunitinib on diabetes mellitus related ovarian injury: an experimental rat model study.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Oytun; Pala, Halil Gursoy; Pala, Emel Ebru; Artunc Ulkumen, Burcu; Akman, Levent; Akman, Tulay; Oltulu, Fatih; Aktug, Huseyin; Yavasoglu, Altug

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the effect of sunitinib on diabetes mellitus related-ovarian injury and fibrosis in rat models. An experimental diabetes mellitus model was created in 16 rats, and eight rats with normal blood glucose levels were included in control group (Group-1). The diabetic rats were divided into two groups:diabetic control group (water given) - Group-2 and sunitinib treatment group - Group-3. After four weeks, bilateral oophorectomy was performed and ovaries were examined histologically. The groups were compared by Student's t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney's U-test. There was a significant increase in no-medication (water given) diabetic rat's ovary (Group-2) in terms of follicular degeneration, stromal degeneration, stromal fibrosis and NF-kappaB immune-expression compared with control group normal rats' ovary (Group-1) (p < 0.0001). Stromal degeneration (p = 0.04), stromal fibrosis (p = 0.01), follicular degeneration (p = 0.02), NF-kappaB immune-expression (p = 0.001) significantly decreased in sunitinib-treated diabetic rat's ovary (Group-3) when compared with no-medication (water given) diabetic rat's ovary (Group-2) (p < 0.05). When we used sunitinib in the treatment of diabetic rats, ovarian injury, fibrosis and NF-kappaB immunoexpression decreased significantly. The effects of sunitinib in rat models give hope to the improved treatment of premature ovarian failure due to diabetes mellitus in humans.

  4. Betacellulin in Chronic Periodontitis Patients With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.; Bilichodmath, Shivaprasad; Warad, Shivaraj B.; Ugale, Mahesh S.; Koregol, Arati C.; Bijjargi, Shobha C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The host immune response to bacterial dental plaque determines periodontal disease susceptibility by increasing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The Epidermal Growth Factor family cytokines stimulate proliferation and keratinization of cells in dermis and oral epithelium. Epidermal Growth Factor family consists of Amphiregulin, Betacellulin, Epiregulin, Epigen, Heparin binding Epidermal Growth Factor like growth factor and transforming Growth Factor-alpha. Aim The current study aimed to investigate expression of Betacellulin in chronic periodontitis patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and thereby assessing role of betacellulin in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods Present study comprised of 90 participants, age ranges from 18 to 60-year-old, for the period of March 2010 to May 2011. Participants were categorized into three groups based Gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CA Loss). Group 1 consisted 30 individuals with clinically healthy periodontium, Group-2 consisted 30 individuals with GI>1, PD≥5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Group-3 (Chronic Periodontitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus) consisted 30 with GI >1, PD≥5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of Betacellulin was done in gingival tissue samples from all groups. Results Data showed expression of Betacellulin were higher in chronic periodontitis as compared to healthy. A positive correlation found in Betacellulin expression and Probing Depth in chronic periodontitis. Conclusion This footmark study impacts the role of Betacellulin in pathogenesis and progression of periodontal disease which will help in exploration of novel immunotherapeutic strategies and immunological research activity in this field. PMID:26673371

  5. Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331 288 participants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Diabetes has been defined on the basis of different biomarkers, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), and HbA1c. We assessed the effect of different diagnostic definitions on both the population prevalence of diabetes and the classification of previously undiagnosed individuals as having diabetes versus not having diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examination surveys in different regions. Methods We used data from 96 population-based health examination surveys that had measured at least two of the biomarkers used for defining diabetes. Diabetes was defined using HbA1c (HbA1c ≥6·5% or history of diabetes diagnosis or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs) compared with either FPG only or FPG-or-2hOGTT definitions (FPG ≥7·0 mmol/L or 2hOGTT ≥11·1 mmol/L or history of diabetes or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs). We calculated diabetes prevalence, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights. We compared the prevalences of diabetes using different definitions graphically and by regression analyses. We calculated sensitivity and specificity of diabetes diagnosis based on HbA1c compared with diagnosis based on glucose among previously undiagnosed individuals (ie, excluding those with history of diabetes or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs). We calculated sensitivity and specificity in each survey, and then pooled results using a random-effects model. We assessed the sources of heterogeneity of sensitivity by meta-regressions for study characteristics selected a priori. Findings Population prevalence of diabetes based on FPG-or-2hOGTT was correlated with prevalence based on FPG alone (r=0·98), but was higher by 2–6 percentage points at different prevalence levels. Prevalence based on HbA1c was lower than prevalence based on FPG in 42·8% of age–sex–survey groups and higher in another 41·6%; in

  6. Beliefs about Racism and Health among African American Women with Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Julie A.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Mendenhall, Emily A.; Budris, Lisa M.; Belay, Sophia; Tennen, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to racism has been linked to poor health outcomes. Little is known about the impact of racism on diabetes outcomes. This study explored African American (AA) women’s beliefs about how racism interacts with their diabetes self-management and control. Four focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 28 adult AA women with type 2 diabetes who were recruited from a larger quantitative study on racism and diabetes. The focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by the authors. Women reported that exposure to racism was a common phenomenon, and their beliefs did in fact link racism to poor health. Specifically, women reported that exposure to racism caused physiological arousal including cardiovascular and metabolic perturbations. There was consensus that physiological arousal was generally detrimental to health. Women also described limited, and in some cases maladaptive, strategies to cope with racist events including eating unhealthy food choices and portions. There was consensus that the subjective nature of perceiving racism and accompanying social prohibitions often made it impossible to address racism directly. Many women described anger in such situations, and the tendency to internalize anger and other negative emotions, only to find that the negative emotions would be reactivated repeatedly with exposure to novel racial stressors, even long after the original racist event remitted. AA women in this study believed that racism affects their diabetes self-management and control. Health beliefs can exert powerful effects on health behaviors and may provide an opportunity for health promotion interventions in diabetes. PMID:21528110

  7. Beliefs about racism and health among African American women with diabetes: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie A; Osborn, Chandra Y; Mendenhall, Emily A; Budris, Lisa M; Belay, Sophia; Tennen, Howard A

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to racism has been linked to poor health outcomes. Little is known about the impact of racism on diabetes outcomes. This study explored African American women's beliefs about how racism interacts with their diabetes self-management and control. Four focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 28 adult African American women with type 2 diabetes who were recruited from a larger quantitative study on racism and diabetes. The focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by the authors. Women reported that exposure to racism was a common phenomenon, and their beliefs did in fact link racism to poor health. Specifically, women reported that exposure to racism caused physiological arousal including cardiovascular and metabolic perturbations. There was consensus that physiological arousal was generally detrimental to health. Women also described limited, and in some cases maladaptive, strategies to cope with racist events, including eating unhealthy food choices and portions. There was consensus that the subjective nature of perceiving racism and accompanying social prohibitions often made it impossible to address racism directly. Many women described anger in such situations and the tendency to internalize anger and other negative emotions, only to find that the negative emotions would be reactivated repeatedly with exposure to novel racial stressors, even long after the original racist event remitted. African American women in this study believed that racism affects their diabetes self-management and control. Health beliefs can exert powerful effects on health behaviors and may provide an opportunity for health promotion interventions in diabetes.

  8. Diabetes Is Associated with Worse Clinical Presentation in Tuberculosis Patients from Brazil: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Lucas S.; Daltro, Carla; Castro, Simone; Kornfeld, Hardy; Netto, Eduardo M.; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) worldwide, especially in developing countries, and the persistence of tuberculosis (TB) as a major public health issue in these same regions, emphasize the importance of investigating this association. Here, we compared the clinical profile and disease outcomes of TB patients with or without coincident DM in a TB reference center in Brazil. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of a TB patient cohort (treatment naïve) of 408 individuals recruited at a TB primary care center in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. Data on diagnosis of TB and DM were used to define the groups. The study groups were compared with regard to TB disease presentation at diagnosis as well as to clinical outcomes such as cure and mortality rates upon anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) initiation. A composite score utilizing clinical, radiological and microbiological parameters was used to compare TB severity between the groups. Results DM patients were older than non-diabetic TB patients. In addition, diabetic individuals more frequently presented with cough, night sweats, hemoptysis and malaise than those without DM. The overall pattern of lung lesions assessed by chest radiographic examination was similar between the groups. Compared to non-diabetic patients, those with TB-diabetes exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli in sputum samples more frequently at diagnosis and at 30 days after ATT initiation. Notably, higher values of the TB severity score were significantly associated with TB-diabetes comorbidity after adjustment for confounding factors. Moreover, during ATT, diabetic patients required more frequent transfers to TB reference hospitals for complex clinical management. Nevertheless, overall mortality and cure rates were indistinguishable between the study groups. Conclusions These findings reinforce the idea that diabetes negatively impacts pulmonary TB severity. Our study argues for the systematic screening for DM in TB

  9. Cow's milk consumption, HLA-DQB1 genotype, and type 1 diabetes: a nested case-control study of siblings of children with diabetes. Childhood diabetes in Finland study group.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S M; Läärä, E; Hyppönen, E; Reijonen, H; Räsänen, L; Aro, A; Knip, M; Ilonen, J; Akerblom, H K

    2000-06-01

    The evidence for the putative role of cow's milk in the development of type 1 diabetes is controversial. We studied infant feeding patterns and childhood diet by structured questionnaire (n = 725) and HLA-DQB1 genotype by a polymerase chain reaction-based method (n = 556) in siblings of affected children and followed them for clinical type 1 diabetes. In a nested case-control design in a population who had both dietary and genetic data available, we selected as cases those siblings who progressed to clinical diabetes during the follow-up period (n = 33). For each case, we chose as matched control subjects siblings who fulfilled the following criteria: same sex, age within 1 year, not from the same family, the start of the follow-up within 6 months of that of the respective case, and being at risk for type 1 diabetes at the time the case presented with that disease (n = 254). The median follow-up time was 9.7 years (range 0.2-11.3). Early age at introduction of cow's milk supplements was not significantly associated with progression to clinical type 1 diabetes (relative risk adjusted for matching factors, maternal education, maternal and child's ages, childhood milk consumption, and genetic susceptibility markers was 1.60 [95% CI 0.5-5.1]). The estimated relative risk of childhood milk consumption for progression to type 1 diabetes was 5.37 (1.6-18.4) when adjusted for the matching and aforementioned sociodemographic factors, age at introduction of supplementary milk feeding, as well as for genetic susceptibility markers. In conclusion, our results provide support for the hypothesis that high consumption of cow's milk during childhood can be diabetogenic in siblings of children with type 1 diabetes. However, further studies are needed to assess the possible interaction between genetic disease susceptibility and dietary exposures in the development of this disease. PMID:10866042

  10. Effects of aldose reductase inhibitor treatment in diabetic polyneuropathy - a clinical and neurophysiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Fagius, J; Jameson, S

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor (1,3-dioxo-1 H-benz-de-isoquinoline-2(3H)-acetic acid, AY-22,284, Alrestatin) on peripheral nerve function in diabetic polyneuropathy was assessed. Thirty patients with long-standing diabetes and slight to moderate neuropathy participated in the double-blind placebo trial. Clinical examination, sensory threshold determinations for vibratory, tactile and thermal stimuli, conduction velocity measurements and studies of automatic function were performed to evaluate the treatment. Significant differences favouring Alrestatin over placebo were found for many of the measured variables, whereas no changes occurred on placebo. The apparent improvement of neuropathy occurred despite persisting hyperglycaemia. The results indicate that aldose reductase inhibitor treatment may be of value in diabetic polyneuropathy, and provide support for the sorbitol pathway hypothesis of diabetic polyneuropathy. PMID:6801211

  11. A study of type-1 diabetes associated autoantibodies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hallford, Philomena; Clair, David St; Halley, Lorna; Mustard, Colette; Wei, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies revealed an association between type-1 diabetes (T1D) and schizophrenia but the findings reported to date have been controversial. To clarify the inconsistency across studies, T1D-associated autoantibodies were examined in plasma samples collected from 272 patients with schizophrenia and 276 control subjects. An in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using three linear peptide antigens, one of which was derived from glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two were derived from insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA2). Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant decrease in the levels of plasma IgG against the IA2b antigen in schizophrenia patients as compared to control subjects (Z=-3.54, p=0.0007), while no significant difference was found between these two groups either in anti-IA2a IgG levels (Z=-1.62, p=0.105) or in anti-GAD IgG levels (Z=-1.63, p=0.104). Linear regression analysis indicated no association of antipsychotic medication with the levels of plasma IgG against IA2a, IA2b or GAD, while the levels of plasma IgG for these 3 peptide antigens were significantly correlated with each other. Binary logistic regression showed that neither the DQ2.5 variant nor the DQ8 variant was associated with circulating levels of 3 T1D-associated autoantibodies in both the patient group and the control group. The coefficient of variation was 10.7% for anti-IA2a IgG assay, 10.1% for anti-IA2b IgG assay and 10.7% for anti-GAD IgG assay. The present work suggests that T1D-associated antibodies are unlikely to confer risk of schizophrenia and that the in-house ELISA developed with linear peptide antigens is highly reproducible. PMID:27474348

  12. The impact of knowledge about diabetes, resilience and depression on glycemic control: a cross-sectional study among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and the factors of knowledge about diabetes, resilience, depression and anxiety among Brazilian adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods This cross-sectional study included 85 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, aged between 11–22 years, with an average age of 17.7 ± 3.72 years. Glycemic control degree was evaluated through HbA1c. To assess psychosocial factors, the following questionnaires were used: resilience (Resilience Scale, RS) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). The Diabetes Knowledge Assessment Scale (DKNA) was used to assess knowledge about diabetes. Results Significant correlations were found between HbA1c and resilience, anxiety and depression. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the only variable which presented significant association with the value of HbA1c was depression. Conclusions Depression has a significant association with higher HbA1c levels, as demonstrated in a regression analysis. The results suggest that depression, anxiety and resilience should be considered in the design of a multidisciplinary approach to type 1 diabetes, as these factors were significantly correlated with glycemic control. Glycemic control was not correlated with knowledge of diabetes, suggesting that theoretical or practical understanding of this disease is not by itself significantly associated with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%). PMID:24289093

  13. Age and diabetes related changes of the retinal capillaries: An ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Ripandelli, Guido; Taurone, Samanta; Feher, Janos; Plateroti, Rocco; Kovacs, Illes; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Orlando, Maria Patrizia; Micera, Alessandra; Battaglione, Ezio; Artico, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Normal human aging and diabetes are associated with a gradual decrease of cerebral flow in the brain with changes in vascular architecture. Thickening of the capillary basement membrane and microvascular fibrosis are evident in the central nervous system of elderly and diabetic patients. Current findings assign a primary role to endothelial dysfunction as a cause of basement membrane (BM) thickening, while retinal alterations are considered to be a secondary cause of either ischemia or exudation. The aim of this study was to reveal any initial retinal alterations and variations in the BM of retinal capillaries during diabetes and aging as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in diabetic retina.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on 46 enucleated human eyes with particular attention to alterations of the retinal capillary wall and Müller glial cells. Inflammatory cytokines expression in the retina was investigated by immunohistochemistry.Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that thickening of the BM begins primarily at the level of the glial side of the retina during aging and diabetes. The Müller cells showed numerous cytoplasmic endosomes and highly electron-dense lysosomes which surrounded the retinal capillaries. Our study is the first to present morphological evidence that Müller cells start to deposit excessive BM material in retinal capillaries during aging and diabetes. Our results confirm the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β within the retina as a result of diabetes.These observations strongly suggest that inflammatory cytokines and changes in the metabolism of Müller glial cells rather than changes in of endothelial cells may play a primary role in the alteration of retinal capillaries BM during aging and diabetes. PMID:26604209

  14. New Research Methods Developed for Studying Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Brian Davis, one of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's researchers, has been investigating the risk factors related to diabetic foot ulceration, a problem that accounts for 20 percent of all hospital admissions for diabetic patients. He had developed a sensor pad to measure the friction and pressure forces under a person's foot when walking. As part of NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Act Agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Dr. Davis requested Lewis' assistance in visualizing the data from the sensor pad. As a result, Lewis' Interactive Data Display System (IDDS) was installed at the Cleveland Clinic. This computer graphics program is normally used to visualize the flow of air through aircraft turbine engines, producing color two- and three-dimensional images.

  15. Lessons from a Dominican Republic Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Michael M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing student-centered pedagogy, this case study explores an increasingly prominent and instructive addition to traditional academic coursework--the field study experience. This is particularly true in the arena of environmental education where students learn best by experiencing environmental problems first-hand and then interacting with…

  16. Indigenous Studies as an International Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Robles, Rodolfo

    This paper proposes the development of Indigenous Studies as an international field, both in the sense of advancing the discipline internationally, wherever there are Indigenous peoples, and in the sense of incorporating international perspectives into curricula. In Canada, Indigenous Studies has been and is still treated as something to be done…

  17. Presence of diabetic microvascular complications does not incrementally increase risk of ischemic stroke in diabetic patients with atrial fibrillation: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Annie Y; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chao, Tze-Fan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-07-01

    Conventional stroke risk prediction tools used in atrial fibrillation (AF) incorporate the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor. However, it is unknown whether this risk is homogenous or dependent on the presence of diabetic microvascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The present study examined the risk of ischemic stroke in diabetic patients with and without microvascular complications. The present study used the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan with detailed healthcare data on all-comers to the Taiwanese medical system from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2011. AF and DM were identified when listed as discharge diagnoses or confirmed more than twice in the outpatient department. Patients on antithrombotic agents were excluded. The clinical endpoint was ischemic stroke. Among the 50,180 AF patients with DM, the majority had no microvascular complications (72.7%), while 2.6% had diabetic retinopathy, 8.4% had diabetic nephropathy, and 16.1% had diabetic neuropathy. Ischemic stroke occurred in 6003 patients, with a 4.74% annual risk of ischemic stroke. When compared with DM patients without microvascular complications, those with diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy had higher incidences of ischemic stroke (4.65 vs 5.07, 4.77, or 5.20 per 100 person-years, respectively). However, after adjusting for confounding factors, the differences were no longer significant. In a large nationwide AF cohort with DM, risk of ischemic stroke was similar between patients with and without microvascular complications, suggesting that risk stratification of these patients does not require inclusion of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. PMID:27399075

  18. Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in People with and without Diabetes Mellitus: A Middle Eastern Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri-Noudeh, Younes; Akbarpour, Samaneh; Lotfaliany, Mojtaba; Zafari, Neda; Khalili, Davood; Tohidi, Maryam; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis To investigate secular trends in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors during a decade of follow-up in a Middle Eastern cohort, and to compare observed trends between diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Methods In a population of 6181 participants (2622 males and 3559 females), diabetes status and CVD risk factors were evaluated in 4 study phases from 1999–2011. 1045 subjects had type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline and 5136 participants were diabetes-free. To examine the trends of CVD risk factors, generalized estimation equation models were constructed. The interaction between the diabetes status and each phase of the study was checked in a separate model. Results During the follow-up period diabetic females significantly gained better control of their blood pressure, serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol and general and central obesity measures compared to non-diabetic counterparts, although 60% of them had high BP and 64% had high serum LDL-C levels till the end of the study. Diabetic males however, experienced significantly better control on their serum LDL-C and general and central obesity measures compared to their non-diabetic controls; but 24% of them were still smoker, 63% had high BP and 60% had high serum LDL-C levels at the end of the follow-up (all Ps interaction <0.05). Use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications increased consistently in both diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Conclusions/Interpretation Although CVD risk factors have been controlled to some extent among diabetic population in Iran, still high numbers of people with diabetes have uncontrolled CVD risk factors that prompt more attention. PMID:25461381

  19. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  20. Prospective study of self-reported diabetes and risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Wen; Freedman, Neal D.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Abnet, Christian C.

    2011-01-01

    Background While gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA) incidence rates in the US have decreased, the rates of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC) have increased. Obesity increases the risks of GCA and EADC, and the associations may be partially mediated by insulin resistance. A few case-control studies have shown an association between diabetes and an increased risk of EADC. Methods We prospectively examined the association between diabetes and upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancers in a cohort of 469,448 people in the US, ages 50-71 at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for diabetes and UGI cancers, controlling for multiple potential confounders, including body mass index (BMI). Results We observed no association of self-reported diabetes with risk of EADC, HR (95%CI) = 0.98 (0.73-1.31), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), HR (95%CI) = 1.02 (0.60-1.74), or GNCA, HR (95%CI) = 0.98 (0.70-1.37). However, diabetes was significantly associated with an increased risk of GCA, HR (95%CI) = 1.89 (1.43-2.50). The significant association between diabetes and risk of GCA remained after adjustment for BMI, HR (95%CI) = 1.70 (1.28-2.26) and did not differ by BMI strata (pinteraction =0.83). The significant association was unchanged when restricting to only overweight subjects (BMI 25 - ≤30), HR (95%CI) = 1.83 (1.18-2.85). Conclusions We found a significant association between self-reported diabetes and increased risk of GCA. Impact Our results suggest that the metabolic and hormonal changes related to diabetes may play a role in the etiology of GCA independently from BMI. PMID:21415356

  1. A prospective study of moderate alcohol drinking and risk of diabetes in women.

    PubMed

    Stampfer, M J; Colditz, G A; Willett, W C; Manson, J E; Arky, R A; Hennekens, C H; Speizer, F E

    1988-09-01

    Several investigators have observed an association between alcohol consumption and elevated glucose levels, raising the possibility that alcohol may increase the risk of diabetes. This hypothesis was evaluated prospectively among 85,051 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study who were 34 to 59 years of age in 1980 and had no history of cancer, coronary heart disease, or diabetes. At baseline, participants completed an independently validated dietary questionnaire which included information on the consumption of beer, wine, and liquor. Incident cases of non-insulin-dependent diabetes were reported on follow-up questionnaires sent in 1982 and 1984 (98% response to at least one follow-up); 526 cases were confirmed by a supplementary questionnaire regarding symptoms, laboratory values, and treatment. The risk of diabetes decreased monotonically with increasing alcohol consumption (chi trend = -9.4, p less than 0.0001). Compared with nondrinkers, women consuming 5-14.9 g of alcohol per day (about 4-10 drinks per week) had an age-adjusted relative risk of diabetes of 0.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3-0.6); for 15 g or more per day, the relative risk was 0.3 (95% CI 0.2-0.4). However, a strong inverse association between alcohol drinking and body weight explained much of the apparent protective effect of alcohol. After simultaneous adjustment for Quetelet index (weight (kg)/height (m)2), family history of diabetes, total caloric intake, and age, the relative risk of diabetes for consumers of 5-14.9 g per day was 0.8 (95% CI 0.6-1.2), and for women who drank 15+ g per day, the relative risk was 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-0.9). These data provide no support for the hypothesis that moderate alcohol intake increases the risk of non-insulin-dependent diabetes. PMID:3414660

  2. Pathophysiological study of the non-insulin-dependent phase of type I diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Torella, R; Salvatore, T; Cozzolino, D; Grandillo, F; Giugliano, D

    1988-01-01

    The usual practice of considering type I diabetes synonymous with insulin-dependent diabetes has been criticized. Since type I diabetes can have a non-insulin-dependent phase (pre-type I diabetes and/or honeymoon) the differentiation of two main types of diabetes according to insulin-dependency is not absolute. We studied the insulin, C-peptide and glucagon responses to various tests (OGTT, IVGTT, glibenclamide test, mixed meal tolerance test and ITT) performed during the non-insulin-dependent phase of 3 young patients (range 8-18 years) who developed ketosis 12-24 months after the discovery of fasting hyperglycemia, and in 6 patients (age 15-23 years) who presented a remission phase 4-6 months after the sudden clinical onset of type I diabetes. An insignificant insulin and C-peptide increase following i.v. glucose was observed in all patients, whereas the B-cell response to both oral glucose and other secretagogues was preserved, although at a subnormal level. In the three hyperglycemic and preketoacidotic patients the basal levels of glucagon were low and no significant increase after secretagogues was seen. Sensitivity to exogenous insulin in all patients was good. Thus, B-cell response in our patients was reminiscent of the differential responsiveness to various stimulants in the early stage of type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. These results suggest that type I and type II diabetes can be characterized by the same functional B-cell defect during a period of their natural history.

  3. Preliminary study of urine metabolism in type two diabetic patients based on GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Geng, Fang; Hu, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Bin; Wang, Ye-Qiu; Liu, Jun-Cen; Qi, Yong-Hua; Li, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparative study of type 2 diabetes and healthy controls by metabolomics methods to explore the pathogenesis of Type II diabetes. Methods: Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a variety of multivariate statistical analysis methods to the healthy control group 58 cases, 68 cases of Type II diabetes group were analyzed. Chromatographic conditions: DB-5MS column; the carrier gas He; flow rate of 1 mL·min-1, the injection volume 1 uL; split ratio is 100: 1. MS conditions: electron impact (EI) ion source, an auxiliary temperature of 280°C, the ion source 230°C, quadrupole 150°C; mass scan range 30~600 mAu. Results: Established analytical method based on urine metabolomics GC-MS of Type II diabetes, determine the urine succinic acid, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, tyrosine, slanine, acetoace acid, mannose, L-isoleucine, L-threonine, Phenylalanine, fructose, D-glucose, palmi acid, oleic acid and arachidonic acid were significantly were significantly changed. Conclusion: Based on metabolomics of GC-MS detection and analysis metabolites can be found differences between type 2 diabetes and healthy control group, PCA diagram can effectively distinguish Type II diabetes and healthy control group, with load diagrams and PLS-DA VIP value metabolite screening, the resulting differences in metabolic pathways involved metabolites, including amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism and energy metabolism. PMID:27508010

  4. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Douloumpakas, I; Pyrpasopoulou, A; Triantafyllou, A; Sampanis, Ch; Aslanidis, S

    2007-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of musculoskeletal disorders. The prevalence of connective tissue disorders in these patients has increased in the recent years affecting significantly their quality of life. Methods - Results: We conducted a pilot study including 208 sequentially selected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus regularly followed-up at the Diabetes Center of the Hippokration University Hospital. Among the diabetic patients who were screened according to the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire for musculoskeletal symptoms and findings, 82.6% were found to exhibit musculoskeletal abnormalities, mainly of the degenerative, noninflammatory type. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal disorders are a common finding among patients with type 2 diabetes. Obesity and accumulation of abnormally glycosylated byproducts have been proposed as potential pathogenetic mediators of these connective tissue abnormalities. Of particular interest is, however, the common association of osteoarthritis, involving even non-weight bearing joints in patients with type 2 diabetes, indicating a common pathophysiologic mechanism connecting these two clinical conditions. PMID:19582198

  5. Psoriasis and Diabetes: A Multicenter Study in 222078 Type 2 Diabetes Patients Reveals High Levels of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schwandt, Anke; Bergis, Dominik; Dapp, Albrecht; Ebner, Stefan; Jehle, Peter M.; Köppen, Stefan; Risse, Alexander; Zimny, Stefan; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to investigate the association between psoriasis and disease outcome in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods. 222078 T2D patients (≥10 years old) from the prospective, multicenter diabetes patient registry were analyzed. Specific search items were used to identify psoriasis patients. Multiple regression models were fitted and adjusted for demographic confounder. Results. 232 T2D patients had comorbid psoriasis. After adjusting psoriasis patients revealed a higher BMI (31.8 [31.0; 32.6] versus 30.6 [30.5; 30.6] kg/m2, p = 0.004) and HbA1c (64.8 [62.1; 67.6] versus 59.0 [58.9; 59.1] mmol/mol, p < 0.0001). Insulin was used more frequently (62.3 [55.7; 68.5] versus 50.9 [50.7; 51.1] %, p = 0.001), only OAD/GLP-1 was similar, and nonpharmacological treatment was less common (13.3 [9.5; 18.3] versus 21.9 [21.7; 22.1] %, p = 0.002). Severe hypoglycemia (0.31 [0.238; 0.399] versus 0.06 [0.057; 0.060] events per patient-year, p < 0.0001), hypertension (86.1 [81.1; 90.0] versus 68.0 [67.8; 68.2] %, p < 0.0001), and thyroid disease (14.0 [10.1; 19.2] versus 4.6 [4.5; 4.7] %, p < 0.0001) were more prevalent. Depression occurred more often (10.5 [7.1; 15.2] versus 2.8 [2.7; 2.8] %, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Clinical diabetes characteristics in psoriasis T2D patients were clearly worse compared to patients without psoriasis. Comorbid conditions and depression were more prevalent, and more intensive diabetes therapy was required. PMID:26357664

  6. Predicting major outcomes in type 1 diabetes: a model development and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Costacou, Tina; Miller, Rachel G.; Zgibor, Janice; Chaturvedi, Nish; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fuller, John H.; Moons, Karel G.M.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 1 diabetes is associated with a higher risk of major vascular complications and death. A reliable method that predicts these outcomes early in the disease process would be helpful in risk classification. We therefore developed such a prognostic model and quantified its performance in independent cohorts. Methods Data were analysed of 1,973 participants with type 1 diabetes who were followed for seven years in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study. Strong prognostic factors of major outcomes were combined in a Weibull regression model. The model performance was tested in three different prospective cohorts: Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study (EDC, n=554), Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy study (FinnDiane, n=2,999) and Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study (CACTI, n=580). Major outcomes included major coronary heart disease, stroke, end-stage renal failure, amputations, blindness and all-cause death. Results 95 EURODIAB patients with type 1 diabetes developed major outcomes during follow-up. Prognostic factors were age, glycated haemoglobin, waist-hip ratio, albumin/creatinine ratio, and HDL cholesterol. A high risk group could be identified with 15% risk after 3-years of follow-up, 24% after 5-years and 32% after 7-years. The discriminative ability of the model was adequate with a C-statistic of 0.74. Discrimination was similar or even better in the independent cohorts: EDC, C-statistic = 0.79; FinnDiane, 0.82; and CACTI, 0.73. Conclusions/Interpretation Our prognostic model that uses easily accessible clinical features can discriminate between type 1 diabetes patients with good and poor prognosis. Such a prognostic model may be helpful in clinical practice and for risk stratification in clinical trials. PMID:25186291

  7. A pilot study on the effects of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Kesavan, Rajesh; Kavitha, K.V.; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in developing countries. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of using a polyherbal formulation in healing diabetic foot ulcers in comparison with standard silver sulphadiazine cream among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 40 (M:F=29:14) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with foot ulcers were enrolled in this study. They were randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each; Group 1 was treated with polyherbal formulation and group 2 with silver sulphadiazine cream. All the patients were followed up for a period of 5 months. The baseline ulcer size was noted and photograph of the wound was taken at the baseline and at each follow up visit. Number of days taken for healing of the wound was recorded. Results: The mean age of patients, duration of diabetes and HbA1c% were similar in both the study groups. The mean length and width of the ulcers was also similar in both the groups at baseline visit. There was a significant decrease in the size of the wound (length and width) in both the study groups (P<0.001). The mean time taken for the healing of the ulcer was around 43 days in both groups. Interpretation & conclusions: Diabetic wound cream prepared by using polyherbal formulation was found to be effective as well as safe in healing diabetic foot ulcers like the standard silver sulphadiazine cream. PMID:21911968

  8. Increased circulating heat shock protein 70 (HSPA1A) levels in gestational diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garamvölgyi, Zoltán; Prohászka, Zoltán; Rigó, János; Kecskeméti, András; Molvarec, Attila

    2015-07-01

    Recent data indicate that serum Hsp70 (HSPA1A) levels are increased in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is no report in the literature on circulating Hsp70 levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we measured serum Hsp70 levels in 11 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes, 38 women with gestational diabetes, and 40 healthy pregnant women with ELISA. Plasma glucose levels, serum insulin concentrations, HbA1c values, and the Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index were also determined. According to our results, serum Hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher in women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus than in healthy pregnant women. In addition, pregestational diabetic women had significantly higher Hsp70 levels than those with gestational diabetes. Furthermore, in the group of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, serum Hsp70 levels showed a significant positive correlation with HbA1c values. However, there was no other relationship between clinical features and metabolic parameters of the study subjects and their serum Hsp70 levels in either study group. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time in the literature that serum Hsp70 levels are increased and correlate with HbA1c values in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to determine whether circulating Hsp70 plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes or elevated serum Hsp70 levels are only consequences of the disease.

  9. Prevention of type 2 diabetes by dietary patterns: a systematic review of prospective studies and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Kastorini, Christina-Maria; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Giugliano, Dario

    2010-12-01

    Lifestyle intervention may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of dietary patterns in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We did an electronic search through November 30, 2009, for prospective studies that evaluated the role of dietary patterns in type 2 diabetes prevention. Ten large prospective studies were identified, comprising more than 190,000 subjects free of diabetes at baseline, followed for a time ranging from 2 to 23 years, and 8,932 cases of incident diabetes. All ten studies showed consistent results: Relative risk reduction of type 2 diabetes ranged from 83% to 15%. Overall, adherence to a healthy dietary pattern was associated with reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes: Combined mean difference  = -0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.54 to -0.24. The reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes was still present after sensitivity analysis (-0.34, 95% CI -0.44 to -0.24). Dietary patterns characterized by high consumption of fruit and vegetables, whole grains, fish, and poultry, and by decreased consumption of red meat, processed foods, sugar-sweetened beverages, and starchy foods may retard the progression of type 2 diabetes. Healthy diets can help people to live more years without type 2 diabetes.

  10. Cardiogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Villafranca, Arnaldo; Morrison, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    It has been well established since the Framingham studies that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for heart failure. Several recent reports suggested that the reverse is also true, and heart failure may also predispose to diabetes. We reviewed the literature and summarized the evidence of a higher incidence of new-onset diabetes in heart failure. Because a high rate of insulin resistance in heart failure is a known phenomenon, a higher incidence of diabetes in heart failure is intuitive. Although the facts confirming such connection is surprisingly scarce, we felt it was important to collect, analyze, and summarize the evidence. PMID:24174218

  11. [Fiability Study of Diabetes Empowerment Scale: Short Version].

    PubMed

    Aveiro, Marcelo; Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes; Simões, José Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Avaliar a correlação entre o valor obtido pelo instrumento de medição Diabetes Empowerment Scale - Short Form e o controlo da pessoa com diabetes medido pelo valor da hemoglobina glicada A1c.Material e Métodos: Estudo observacional transversal pela aplicação do Diabetes Empowerment Scale - Short Form a pessoas com diabetes de três Unidades de Saúde Familiar da Região Centro de Portugal após realização de teste e reteste (primeiro por escrito e, passados cinco minutos, oralmente) para determinação da coerência interna através do valor de alfa de Cronbach em 20 elementos que não foram depois estudados. A aplicação a pacientes diabéticos foi feita após a consulta de enfermagem e antes da entrada na consulta médica. Foi realizada estatística descritiva e inferencial apos verificação da normalidade dos dados.Resultados: Na primeira fase o valor de alfa de Cronbach de 0,90 a 1,00 relativamente aos oito itens da escala. Na aplicação escrita, a média de resultados foi de 3,78 ± 0,71 e na aplicação oral de 3,79 ± 0,65, p = 0,629. A amostra da segunda fase foi de 81 pessoas com diabetes, sendo 55,6% do sexo masculino. A idade média foi de 68,5 ± 1,1 anos com uma HbA1c média de 6,8 ± 0,2 e um tempo de evolução desde o diagnóstico de 9,2 ± 0,9 anos. A média da pontuação final da escala foi de 4,1 ± 0,8. Verificou-se uma correlação significativa entre a pontuação final e os níveis de Hba1C (ÏÅ = -0,114; p = 0,312).Conclusão: A Escala de Capacidade de Controlo da Diabetes âÄì Versão Breve revelou ser uma escala fiável para medir a capacitação em doentes diabéticos em Portugal. Confirmou-se a presença de uma correlação estatisticamente significativa entre o resultado obtido no final da escala e o valor de HbA1c.

  12. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy class prediction by multicategory support vector machine model: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Diabetes is increasing in worldwide prevalence, toward epidemic levels. Diabetic neuropathy, one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus, is a serious condition that can lead to amputation. This study used a multicategory support vector machine (MSVM) to predict diabetic peripheral neuropathy severity classified into four categories using patients’ demographic characteristics and clinical features. METHODS In this study, the data were collected at the Diabetes Center of Hamadan in Iran. Patients were enrolled by the convenience sampling method. Six hundred patients were recruited. After obtaining informed consent, a questionnaire collecting general information and a neuropathy disability score (NDS) questionnaire were administered. The NDS was used to classify the severity of the disease. We used MSVM with both one-against-all and one-against-one methods and three kernel functions, radial basis function (RBF), linear, and polynomial, to predict the class of disease with an unbalanced dataset. The synthetic minority class oversampling technique algorithm was used to improve model performance. To compare the performance of the models, the mean of accuracy was used. RESULTS For predicting diabetic neuropathy, a classifier built from a balanced dataset and the RBF kernel function with a one-against-one strategy predicted the class to which a patient belonged with about 76% accuracy. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study indicate that, in terms of overall classification accuracy, the MSVM model based on a balanced dataset can be useful for predicting the severity of diabetic neuropathy, and it should be further investigated for the prediction of other diseases. PMID:27032459

  13. Plasma Homocysteine and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Type 1 Diabetes: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Julie A.; Thorpe, Suzanne R.; Klein, Richard L.; Lopes-Virella, Maria F.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Lyons, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Plasma homocysteine (tHcy) has been positively associated with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in non-diabetic populations and in a few cross-sectional studies of diabetic patients. We investigated cross-sectional and prospective associations of a single measure of tHcy with common and internal carotid IMT over a 6-year period in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS tHcy levels were measured once, in plasma obtained in 1997-1999 from patients (n=599) in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, the observational follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). Common and internal carotid IMT were determined twice, in EDIC “Year 6” (1998-2000) and “Year 12” (2004-2006), using B-mode ultra-sonography. RESULTS After adjustment, plasma tHcy [median (interquartile range): 6.2 (5.1, 7.5) μmol/L] was significantly correlated with age, diastolic blood pressure, renal dysfunction, and smoking (all p<0.05). In an unadjusted model only, increasing quartiles of tHcy correlated with common and internal carotid IMT, again at both EDIC time-points (p<0.01). However, multivariate logistic regression revealed no significant associations between increasing quartiles of tHcy and the 6-year change in common and internal carotid IMT (highest vs. lowest quintile) when adjusted for conventional risk factors. CONCLUSIONS In a type 1 diabetes cohort from the EDIC study, plasma tHcy measured in samples drawn in 1997-1999 was associated with measures of common and internal carotid IMT measured both one and seven years later, but not with IMT progression between the two time-points. The data do not support routine measurement of tHcy in people with Type 1 diabetes. PMID:25063949

  14. Long term exposure to NO2 and diabetes incidence in the Black Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Patricia F; White, Laura F; Yu, Jeffrey; Burnett, Richard T; Marshall, Julian D; Seto, Edmund; Brook, Robert D; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn; Jerrett, Michael

    2016-07-01

    While laboratory studies show that air pollutants can potentiate insulin resistance, the epidemiologic evidence regarding the association of air pollution with diabetes incidence is conflicting. The purpose of the present study was to assess the association of the traffic-related nitrogen dioxide (NO2) with the incidence of diabetes in a longitudinal cohort study of African American women. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for diabetes associated with exposure to NO2 among 43,003 participants in the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS). Pollutant levels at participant residential locations were estimated with 1) a land use regression model for participants living in 56 metropolitan areas, and 2) a dispersion model for participants living in 27 of the cities. From 1995 to 2011, 4387 cases of diabetes occurred. The hazard ratios per interquartile range of NO2 (9.7 ppb), adjusted for age, metropolitan area, education, vigorous exercise, body mass index, smoking, and diet, were 0.96 (95% CI 0.88-1.06) using the land use regression model estimates and 0.94 (95% CI 0.80, 1.10) using the dispersion model estimates. The present results do not support the hypothesis that exposure to NO2 contributes to diabetes incidence in African American women.

  15. Passive Smoking and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-jian; Deng, Xuan; He, Qi-qiang

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds/Objective The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on passive smoking and type 2 diabetes have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore whether an association exists between passive smoking and risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and Web of Science up to April 9th, 2013, to identify prospective cohort studies that assessed passive smoking and risk of type 2 diabetes. The fixed-effect model was used to calculate the overall relative risk (RR). Result 4 prospective cohort studies were included for analysis, with a total of 112,351 participants involved. The pooled RR was 1.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 to 1.44) comparing those who were exposed to passive smoking with those who were not. Subgroup, sensitivity analysis and publication bias test suggested the overall result of this analysis was robust. Conclusions Passive smoking is associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Further well-designed studies are warranted to confirm this association. PMID:23922856

  16. Diabetic Foot Complications and Their Risk Factors from a Large Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al Derwish, Mohammad; Ouizi, Samir; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ibrahim, Heba M.; Alamri, Bader N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR), being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of (3.16%–3.44%), whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%–2.16%), 0.19% (0.16%–0.22%), and 1.06% (0.98%–1.14%), respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD), poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD), male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16–99.62), 14.47 (8.99–23.31), 12.06 (10.54–13.80), 7.22 (6.10–8.55), 4.69 (4.28–5.14), 4.45 (4.05–4.89), 2.88 (2.43–3.40), 2.81 (2.31–3.43), 2.24 (1.98–2.45), 2.02 (1.84–2.22), 1.54 (1.29–1.83), and 1.51 (1.38–1.65), respectively. Conclusions Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact

  17. The Direct Medical Costs of Outpatient Cares of Type 2 Diabetes in Iran: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Majid; Boroumand, Zahra; Amini, Masoud; Aslani, Abolfazl; Hosseini, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease which many factors are involved and is developing considerably worldwide. Increasing aging population and obesity in the societies has improved the scale of the type 2 diabetes significantly. The aim of this study was to determine the direct medical costs of outpatient cares of diabetes in Iran. Methods: Active patients of Isfahan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center (IEMRC) by the end of March 2011 were employed for data extraction. Type 2 diabetics were classified into 4 groups based on their therapeutic regimens. Type and frequency of health care services were extracted from the patients’ profiles manually. The incidence of major diabetes complications were also examined from the subjects’ profiles. The numbers of services used by the patients in different treatment groups were multiplied by the desired medical tariffs to calculate the direct medical costs. Results: 2898 number of cases was reviewed in this study; 63.8 % women and 36.2% men. 4.3% of the patients were placed group I; 50.1% in group II, and 34.6% and 11% in groups III and IV respectively. The age distribution of the patients varied widely from 30 to 90 years; 5.8% between 30 and 39 years, 62.3% between 40 and 59, and 31.9% at 60 and over. Nephropathy (72.4%), and neuropathy (39%) were the most frequent adverse effect between the type 2 diabetics in Isfahan. The group III with spending $192.3 in total was absorbed the highest amount of the resources between the patients’ groups. The average direct medical cost of outpatient cares of diabetics per year was 155.8 US $. Conclusions: The direct medical cost of diabetes management is progressed sharply in past years in Iran. Pharmaceutical expenditures was the main cost component of outpatient cares for diabetes. It is estimated that the Iranians directly spend approximately $4.05 milliard annually to manage 5.2 million diabetics in the country. PMID:27217937

  18. Development of cataract caused by diabetes mellitus: Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furić, Krešimir; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Hadžija, Mirko

    2005-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus succeeded by diabetic cataract was induced to experimental animals (Wistar rats) by applying an Alloxan injection. Eye properties deterioration were monitored from clinical standpoint and using Raman and infrared spectroscopies. All cases of developed cataract were followed by important changes in vibrational spectra, but Raman spectroscopy proved to be more useful because of larger number of resolved bands. Each kth Raman spectrum of diseased lens (in our notation k denotes disease age and cataract degree as described in chapter Alloxan diabetes) can be expressed as a sum of the Raman spectrum of healthy lens, I R, multiplied by a suitable constant ck, and the fluorescent background spectrum, I FB. We introduce the ratio of integrated intensities IFB and ck* IR as a physical parameter called fluorescent background index F FB. It turns out that FFB grows as cataract progresses and has its maximum at approx. 4, whence it decreases. FFB values are larger for 200-1800 cm -1 spectral interval than for 2500-4000 cm -1 interval. In the same manner another quantity called water band index FW is defined for each Raman spectrum of diseased lens in the 2800-3730 cm -1 interval. It is the ratio of the integrated intensity from 3100 to 3730 cm -1 (water band interval) divided by the integrated intensity of the 2800-3100 cm -1 interval (C-H stretching region). FW increases monotonously with cataract progression with maximum at the end of monitored period (5 months). These two indices helped us to formulate a model describing disease development from the earliest molecular changes to its macroscopic manifestation. As glucose and other small saccharide molecules enter the lens tissue, they bind to crystallin and other proteins via O- and S-glycosidic linkages which occur probably at tyrosine and cystein sites. In Raman spectrum this corresponds to broad bands at 540 and 1100 cm -1 which grow together with the fluorescent background, because both contributions

  19. Diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression: improvement of both diseases with milnacipran. A replication study (results of the Austrian Major Depression Diabetes Mellitus study group).

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Hofmann, Peter; Kinzl, Johann; Toplak, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Comorbid depression is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with greater mortality risk and a higher incidence of diabetic complications and decreased quality of life. In an earlier pilot study, we found that treatment with the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, milnacipran, significantly improved metabolic parameters in diabetic patients with comorbid depression who had an antidepressant response. We sought to replicate these results in a larger cohort (n = 135). Patients received milnacipran and metformin for 6 months and metabolic parameters and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. At the end of the study, 72.6% of patients had an antidepressant response (≥50% reduction of baseline Beck Depression Inventory score). Overall, there was significant improvement in the metabolic and anthropometric parameters measured. The number of patients with glycated hemoglobin > 8% (>63.9 mmol/mol), an indicator of poor metabolic control requiring intensive therapeutic intervention, decreased from 31.9% at baseline to 11.9% during the study. As found in the pilot study, levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides were only significantly decreased in antidepressant responders. Body weight was significantly reduced in both responders and nonresponders but the effect size was significantly greater in the responder group. In contrast to the pilot study, fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin were significantly decreased to a similar extent in both antidepressant-responders and nonresponders. The present study thus replicates some of the original findings. The main difference between the present and the pilot study is that in the larger cohort significant reductions in fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin were found in all patients irrespective of whether or not they responded to antidepressant treatment. The present data underline the importance of diagnosis and treatment of

  20. Depression and All-Cause Mortality Among Persons With Diabetes: Are Older Adults at Higher Risk? - Results from the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kimbro, Lindsay B.; Mangione, Carol M.; Steers, W. Neil; Duru, O. Kenrik; McEwen, Laura; Karter, Andrew; Ettner, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Several studies have found that depression leads to an increased risk of mortality among patients with diabetes. Our goal is to compare the strength of the association between depression and mortality between the elderly and non-elderly population. Design A survival analysis conducted in a longitudinal cohort study of persons with diabetes to test the association of depression and mortality among Medicare-aged and non-Medicare aged persons. Setting Managed care. Participants 3341 persons aged 18 and over with diabetes who participated in the wave 2 survey of the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) study. Measurements The primary outcome was mortality risk, which was measured as days until death using linked data from the National Death Index. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ8). Results After controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, income, and other comorbidities, mortality risk among depressed persons with diabetes was 49% higher than among non-depressed persons with diabetes. However, our results varied by age. After controlling for the same variables, mortality risk among persons over the age 65 years and older with depression was 78% greater than among elderly persons without depression. For the less than 65-year-old cohort, the effect of depression on mortality was smaller and not statistically significant. Conclusion This analysis suggests that the effect of depression on mortality among persons with diabetes is most significant for older adults. Because there is evidence in the literature that treatment of depression in the elderly can lead to lower mortality, our results may suggest that older adults with diabetes should be considered a high priority population for depression screening and treatment. PMID:24823259

  1. Prevalence of diabetes complications in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with baseline characteristics in the multinational A1chieve study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current International Diabetes Federation guidelines recommend a target HbA1c <7.0%, but many people with diabetes worldwide find this difficult to achieve, increasing their risk of developing complications. This publication examines the prevalence of diabetes complications and its association with baseline characteristics in people with type 2 diabetes who participated in the A1chieve study. Methods A1chieve was a 24-week, multinational, open-label, observational study of 66,726 people with type 2 diabetes who had begun using biphasic insulin aspart 30, insulin aspart, or insulin detemir in routine clinical care. Participants were enrolled from 28 countries across four continents (Asia, Africa, Europe and South America). Baseline measurements of disease characteristics included: glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting (FPG) and post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (H- or LDL-C), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and body mass index (BMI). Data on complications and use of vascular disease preventative drugs were collected. Results Complication rates were high (27.2% had macrovascular complications and 53.5% had microvascular complications), particularly in Russia, and use of vascular disease preventative drugs was lower than expected. Age, BMI, diabetes duration, LDL-C, and SBP were positively associated, and HDL-C negatively associated, with macro- and microvascular complications (all p < 0.05). HbA1c and FPG were negatively associated with macrovascular complications (both p < 0.05), which may be linked to the cross-sectional study design. Conclusions These results suggest a worldwide failure to achieve glycaemic targets. Better diabetes management with earlier initiation and optimisation of insulin regimens (e.g., with insulin analogues in the A1chieve population) may reduce the prevalence of vascular complications, improve the lives of people with diabetes and reduce the burden on healthcare systems

  2. Marine and Environmental Studies Field Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    This laboratory manual was developed for a field-oriented high school oceanology program. The organization of the units includes a selection of supplementary activities to allow students to explore ocean studies in more depth. Included are 19 units. The units include biological oceanography, physical oceanography, and some social science topics. A…

  3. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  4. Outdoor Education, Junior Biology Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, John H.; And Others

    Field studies for grade nine and ten biology students are developed in this teacher and student guide for outdoor education. A small section is devoted to teacher pre-planning and final sections are concerned with equipment, audio-visual resources, and a large booklist. Twenty-three investigations related to earth science and biology topics are…

  5. Screening tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Fiji: notes from the field.

    PubMed

    Gounder, S; Harries, A D

    2012-12-21

    Diabetes (DM) is a problem in Fiji and threatens tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. A review was conducted of all TB patients registered in Fiji in 2011 to assess routine practices of screening for DM. Of 221 TB patients, 138 (62%) had their DM status recorded in their case folders; 18 (13%) had a known history of DM. Random blood glucose (RBG) was performed in 91 (76%) of the remaining 120 patients: 47(52%) had RBG ≥ 6.1 mmol/l, but only three were further investigated, of whom one was diagnosed with DM. There are deficiencies in screening TB patients for DM in Fiji, and improvements are needed.

  6. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE POLYMORPHISMS ARE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETIC RETINOPATHY: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITIES STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE: Polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. This study examines the association of APOE polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We studied 1,398 people aged 49 to ...

  7. Subclinical Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Patients with Diabetes: A Study from United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Aburawi, Elhadi H.; AlKaabi, Juma; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Shehab, Abdullah; Lessan, Nader; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Saadi, Hussain; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of obesity and dyslipidemia on cardiovascular health in adolescents and young adults with diabetes is incompletely understood. This study evaluated the effects of these co-morbidities on markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in young patients with the disease. Methods The study investigated sets of inflammatory, endothelial, and adipocyte biomarkers in 79 patients with type 1 diabetes, 55 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 47 controls. Results Mean (±SD) age was 20±6 y (median = 17, range = 12–31). Patients with diabetes had higher levels of cytoadhesive molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, p<0.001), adiponectin (p<0.001), and haptoglobin (p = 0.023). Their heart rate variability assessment revealed lower standard deviation of beat-to-beat intervals and lower total power (p≤0.019), reflecting autonomous nervous dysfunction. Hemoglobin A1c >8.0% (estimated average blood glucose >10 mmol/L) was associated with higher adiponectin (p<0.001) and obesity was associated with lower adiponectin (p<0.001); thus, obesity damped the effect of hyperglycemia on adiponectin. Obesity was associated with higher sICAM-1 (p≤0.015), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), p<0.001. Similarly, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) <1.02 mmol/L was associated with higher sICAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and hsCRP (p≤0.009) and lower adiponectin (p<0.001). Adiponectin correlated negatively with the inflammatory biomarkers in patients with diabetes. Conclusion Subclinical inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are common among young patients with diabetes. Poor diabetes control is associated with higher adiponectin. Obesity and dyslipidemia are associated with lower adiponectin and higher inflammatory and endothelial biomarkers. Intuitively, these predictors of cardiovascular disease are amenable to proper glycemic control, nutritional choices, and regular exercise. PMID:27459718

  8. Opium consumption and coronary atherosclerosis in diabetic patients: a propensity score-matched study.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Kianoosh; Masoudkabir, Farzad; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali; Alipour-Parsa, Saeed; Sheikh Fathollahi, Mahmood; Rahimi-Foroushani, Abbas; Hakki, Elham; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Eftekhar, Hassan

    2011-11-01

    There is a traditional belief among Eastern people that opium may have ameliorating effects on cardiovascular risk factors, especially diabetes; thus, it is widely used among diabetic patients. We attempted to investigate the association of opium consumption with coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on diabetic patients undergoing coronary angiography in our center. Out of 1925 diabetic patients included in the study, 228 were opium users, and the remaining 1697 non-opium users were used as a pool of potential comparators. Propensity scores were used to match the 228 opium consumers with 228 matched comparators for age, sex, and smoking status. The Gensini score and extent score were respectively used to assess the angiographic severity and extent of CAD. The mean Gensini score (86.9 ± 62.7 vs. 59.6 ± 43.4, p < 0.0001) and extent score (7.1 ± 2.9 vs. 5.9 ± 2.9, p < 0.0001) were significantly higher in opium user diabetic patients than in non-opium users. After adjustment for potential confounders, a dose-response relationship was observed between dose of opium and the Gensini score ( β = 0.27, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences between the routes of opium administration (inhalation vs. oral) regarding the severity and extent of CAD. In conclusion, exposure to opium in diabetic patients may be positively associated with the risk of CAD, and with the angiographically determined severity and extent of the disease. Furthermore, dosage of opium consumption may correlate with severity of CAD.

  9. Study of antihyperglycaemic activity of medicinal plant extracts in alloxan induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Attanayake, Anoja P.; Jayatilaka, Kamani A. P. W.; Pathirana, Chitra; Mudduwa, Lakmini K. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus, for a long time, has been treated with plant derived medicines in Sri Lanka. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and dose response of oral antihyperglycaemic activity of eight Sri Lankan medicinal plant extracts, which are used to treat diabetes in traditional medicine in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Medicinal plants selected for the study on the basis of documented effectiveness and wide use among traditional Ayurveda physicians in the Southern region of Sri Lanka for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The effect of different doses of aqueous stem bark extracts of Spondias pinnata (Anacardiaceae), Kokoona zeylanica (Celastraceae), Syzygium caryophyllatum (Myrtaceae), Gmelina arborea (Verbenaceae), aerial part extracts of Scoparia dulcis (Scrophulariaceae), Sida alnifolia (Malvaceae), leaf extract of Coccinia grandis (Cucurbitaceae) and root extract of Languas galanga (Zingiberaceae) on oral glucose tolerance test was evaluated. A single dose of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 2.00 g/kg of plant extract was administered orally to alloxan induced (150 mg/kg, ip) diabetic Wistar rats (n = 6). Glibenclamide (0.50 mg/kg) was used as the standard drug. The acute effect was evaluated over a 4 h period using area under the oral glucose tolerance curve. Statistical Analysis: The results were evaluated by analysis of variance followed by Dunnett's test. Results: The eight plant extracts showed statistically significant dose dependent improvement on glucose tolerance (P < 0.05). The optimum effective dose on glucose tolerance for six extracts was found to be 1.00 g/kg in diabetic rats with the exception of C. grandis: 0.75 g/kg and L. galanga: 1.25 g/kg. Conclusion: The aqueous extract of G. arborea, S. pinnata, K. zeylanica, S. caryophyllatum, S. dulcis, S. alnifolia, L. galanga and C. grandis possess potent acute antihyperglycaemic activity in alloxan induced diabetic rats. PMID:24991066

  10. Study of ambulatory blood pressure in diabetic children: prediction of early renal insult

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Nehad Mohamed; Shalaby, Naglaa M

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Elevated blood pressure (BP) promotes the development and progression of microvascular complications, eg, nephropathy and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to identify and detect early BP changes in diabetic children and adolescents, aiming for the early prediction of future renal and cardiovascular disease risk during childhood. Methods and materials Ambulatory BP monitoring was undertaken for 40 normotensive type 1 diabetic children with mean age of 11.56±2.82 years, and 24 healthy children as control group with matched age and sex. Albumin/creatinine ratio and glycated hemoglobin were tested. BP indices and standard deviation scores were calculated using reference standards. The data were analyzed by SPSS software version 20 using mean and standard deviations for descriptive data. Correlation and regression analysis tests were used to study relations between BP indices and diabetic parameters. Results All parameters of BP z-scores were highly significantly increased in diabetic patients compared with controlled group (P<0.0001). The frequency of non-dipping was greater and highly significant in microalbuminuric diabetic patients (P<0.0001). Regression analysis revealed that BP parameters were significantly related to albumin/creatinine ratio, glycated hemoglobin, insulin dose, and body mass index. Conclusion Our observation revealed a clear link between the nocturnal BP and microalbuminuria which mandates BP follow-up via ambulatory BP monitoring with therapeutic intervention to prevent renal and cardiovascular diabetic complications in adulthood. PMID:26491340

  11. Genome-wide Association Studies Identify Genetic Loci Associated With Albuminuria in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Gorski, Mathias; Yeo, Nan Cher; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Li, Yong; Mijatovic, Vladan; Ko, Yi-An; Taliun, Daniel; Luciani, Alessandro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yang, Qiong; Foster, Meredith C; Olden, Matthias; Hiraki, Linda T; Tayo, Bamidele O; Fuchsberger, Christian; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Shuldiner, Alan R; Smith, Albert V; Zappa, Allison M; Lupo, Antonio; Kollerits, Barbara; Ponte, Belen; Stengel, Bénédicte; Krämer, Bernhard K; Paulweber, Bernhard; Mitchell, Braxton D; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Langenberg, Claudia; Ackermann, Daniel; Siscovick, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kronenberg, Florian; Ehret, Georg B; Homuth, Georg; Waeber, Gerard; Navis, Gerjan; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H Erich; Grallert, Harald; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Herrmann; Kramer, Holly; Mateo Leach, I; Rudan, Igor; Hillege, Hans L; Beckmann, Jacques S; Lambert, Jean Charles; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Chalmers, John; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Butterbach, Katja; Launer, Lenore J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Haun, Margot; Metzger, Marie; Woodward, Mark; Hoffman, Matthew J; Nauck, Matthias; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Wareham, Nicholas J; Endlich, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Polasek, Ozren; van der Harst, Pim; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Vollenweider, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Gansevoort, Ron T; Rettig, Rainer; Biffar, Reiner; Carroll, Robert J; Katz, Ronit; Loos, Ruth J F; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Coassin, Stefan; Bergmann, Sven; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Corre, Tanguy; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Tanaka, Toshiko; Lendeckel, Uwe; Völker, Uwe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kutalik, Zoltan; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Parsa, Afshin; Heid, Iris M; Paterson, Andrew D; de Boer, Ian H; Devuyst, Olivier; Lazar, Jozef; Endlich, Karlhans; Susztak, Katalin; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Jacob, Howard J; Böger, Carsten A; Fox, Caroline S; Pattaro, Cristian; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Elevated concentrations of albumin in the urine, albuminuria, are a hallmark of diabetic kidney disease and are associated with an increased risk for end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. To gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying albuminuria, we conducted meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies and independent replication in up to 5,825 individuals of European ancestry with diabetes and up to 46,061 without diabetes, followed by functional studies. Known associations of variants in CUBN, encoding cubilin, with the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were confirmed in the overall sample (P = 2.4 × 10(-10)). Gene-by-diabetes interactions were detected and confirmed for variants in HS6ST1 and near RAB38/CTSC. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at these loci demonstrated a genetic effect on UACR in individuals with but not without diabetes. The change in the average UACR per minor allele was 21% for HS6ST1 (P = 6.3 × 10(-7)) and 13% for RAB38/CTSC (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)). Experiments using streptozotocin-induced diabetic Rab38 knockout and control rats showed higher urinary albumin concentrations and reduced amounts of megalin and cubilin at the proximal tubule cell surface in Rab38 knockout versus control rats. Relative expression of RAB38 was higher in tubuli of patients with diabetic kidney disease compared with control subjects. The loci identified here confirm known pathways and highlight novel pathways influencing albuminuria. PMID:26631737

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Risk among Asian Indians in the US: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Annie; Ashcraft, Alyce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate type 2 diabetes risk among Asian Indians of Kerala ethnicity living in a West Texas County of the USA. The study used a descriptive correlational design with thirty-seven adult nondiabetic Asian Indian subjects between 20 and 70 years of age. The measurement included nonbiochemical indices of obesity, family history of type 2 diabetes, length of immigration in the US, history of hypertension, physical activity pattern, and fruit and vegetable intake. The majority of the subjects showed an increased nonbiochemical indices corresponding with overweight and obesity, placing them at risk for type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications. The physical activity pattern indicated a sedentary lifestyle. The decreased physical activity was associated with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) and body fat percentage; length of residence in the US greater than 10 years was associated with increased body fat percentage and BMI; family history of type 2 diabetes was associated with an increase in body fat percentage. Fruit and vegetable intake pattern was not associated with a risk for type 2 diabetes. Further studies are recommended for risk surveillance among Asian Indian population living in the US. PMID:23970965

  13. A Clinical Study of Meibomian Gland Dysfunction in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shamsheer, R. P.; Arunachalam, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the Study: To study the frequency of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) in patients of diabetes mellitus with dry eye. Materials and Methods: A case-control cross sectional study. Sampling: Purposive random sampling. Totally, 200 eyes of 100 patients of diabetes mellitus and an equal number of eyes of normal subjects as control, who were gender and age matched and all of whom were symptomatic for dry eye were assessed for MGD by noting the symptoms and determining the meibomian gland expression scale for volume and viscosity, and ocular surface staining with Lissamine green, and Fluorescein sodium. All the subjects were graded for the severity of MGD. The results were compared in both the groups to ascertain whether the frequency of MGD in diabetics is significantly more as compared to nondiabetics. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by Chi-square test for significance. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was a significant increase in the frequency of MGD in diabetics as compared to the nondiabetics. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus is associated with MGD. PMID:26692718

  14. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Iman M; Khalil, Noha M; El-Gendy, Heba A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P = 0.002), with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status.

  15. Improving management of type 2 diabetes in South Asian patients: a systematic review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Bhurji, N; Javer, J; Gasevic, D; Khan, N A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Optimal control of type 2 diabetes is challenging in many patient populations including in South Asian patients. We systematically reviewed studies on the effect of diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asian patients with type 2 diabetes on glycaemic control. Design Systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and pre-post-test studies (January 1990 to February 2014). Studies were stratified by where interventions were conducted (South Asia vs Western countries). Participants Patients originating from Pakistan, Bangladesh or India with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcome Change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary end points included change in blood pressure, lipid levels, anthropomorphics and knowledge. Results 23 studies (15 RCTs) met criteria for analysis with 7 from Western countries (n=2532) and 16 from South Asia (n=1081). Interventions in Western countries included translated diabetes education, additional clinical care, written materials, visual aids, and bilingual community-based peers and/or health professionals. Interventions conducted in South Asia included yoga, meditation or exercise, community-based peers, health professionals and dietary education (cooking exercises). Among RCTs in India (5 trials; n=390), 4 demonstrated significant reductions in HbA1c in the intervention group compared with usual care (yoga and exercise interventions). Among the 4 RCTs conducted in Europe (n=2161), only 1 study, an education intervention of 113 patients, reported a significant reduction in HbA1c with the intervention. Lipids, blood pressure and knowledge improved in both groups with studies from India more often reporting reductions in body mass index and waist circumference. Conclusions Overall, there was little improvement in HbA1c level in diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asians living in Europe compared with usual care, although other outcomes did improve. The

  16. Association between Nutrient Intake and Obesity in Type 2 Diabetic Patients from the Korean National Diabetes Program: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Hun; Hong, Seong Bin; Suh, Young Ju; Choi, Yun Jin; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Park, Ie Byung; Chon, Suk; Woo, Jeong-Taek; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Yongsoo; Kim, Dae Jung; Lee, Kwan Woo; Kim, Young Seol

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the association between usual dietary nutrient intake and obesity in Korean type 2 diabetic patients. We examined 2,832 type 2 diabetic patients from the Korean National Diabetes Program cohort who completed dietary assessment and clinical evaluation in this cross-sectional study. In men, higher dietary fiber intake was associated with a lower odds of being obese (Ptrend = 0.003) and in women, higher protein intake was associated with a lower odds of being obese (Ptrend = 0.03) after adjustment for age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, alcohol drinking, income, education level, and calorie intake. In men, higher fiber intake was associated with lower odds of obesity after further adjustment for diastolic blood pressure, physical activity, and possible confounding nutritional intake and medication. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio for the highest quintile of fiber intake was 0.37 (Ptrend < 0.001). In women, protein intake was not associated with obesity after further adjustment. In conclusion, higher intake of dietary fiber is associated with lower odds of being obese in type 2 diabetic men, suggesting a role for dietary fiber in the management and prevention of obesity in type 2 diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT 01212198). PMID:23091316

  17. Diabetes Text-Message Self-Management Support Program (SMS4BG): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Karen; Cutfield, Richard; Hulme, Ashley; Hulme, Richard; McNamara, Catherine; Maddison, Ralph; Murphy, Rinki; Shepherd, Matthew; Strydom, Johan; Whittaker, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of diabetes and costly long-term complications associated with poor glycemic control are issues facing health services worldwide. Diabetes self-management, with the support of health care providers, is critical for successful outcomes, however, frequent clinical contact is costly. Text messages via short message service (SMS) have the advantage of instant transmission at low cost and, given the ubiquity of mobile phones, may be the ideal platform for the delivery of diabetes self-management support. A tailored text message-based diabetes support intervention called Self-Management Support for Blood Glucose (SMS4BG) was developed. The intervention incorporates prompts around diabetes education, management, and lifestyle factors (healthy eating, exercise, and stress management), as well as blood glucose monitoring reminders, and is tailored to patient preferences and clinical characteristics. Objective To determine the usability and acceptability of SMS4BG among adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Methods Adults (aged 17 to 69 years) with type 1 (n=12) or type 2 diabetes (n=30), a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) over 70 mmol/mol (8.6%), and who owned a mobile phone (n=42) were recruited to take part in a 3-month pilot study of SMS4BG. At registration, participants selected the modules they would like to receive and, where appropriate, the frequency and timing of blood glucose monitoring reminders. Patient satisfaction and perceptions of the usability of the program were obtained via semistructured phone interviews conducted at completion of the pilot study. HbA1c was obtained from patient records at baseline and completion of the pilot study. Results Participants received on average 109 messages during the 3-month program with 2 participants withdrawing early from the study. Follow-up interviews were completed with 93% of participants with all reporting SMS4BG to be useful and appropriate to their age and culture. Participants reported

  18. Factors affecting the disclosure of diabetes by ethnic minority patients: a qualitative study among Surinamese in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes and related complications are common among ethnic minority groups. Community-based social support interventions are considered promising for improving diabetes self-management. To access such interventions, patients need to disclose their diabetes to others. Research on the disclosure of diabetes in ethnic minority groups is limited. The aim of our study was to explore why diabetes patients from ethnic minority populations either share or do not share their condition with people in their wider social networks. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with 32 Surinamese patients who were being treated for type 2 diabetes by general practitioners in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results Most patients disclosed their diabetes only to very close family members. The main factor inhibiting disclosure to people outside this group was the Surinamese cultural custom that talking about disease is taboo, as it may lead to shame, gossip, and social disgrace for the patient and their family. Nevertheless, some patients disclosed their diabetes to people outside their close family circles. Factors motivating this decision were mostly related to a need for facilities or support for diabetes self-management. Conclusions Cultural customs inhibited Surinamese patients in disclosing their diabetes to people outside their very close family circles. This may influence their readiness to participate in community-based diabetes self-management programmes that involve other groups. What these findings highlight is that public health researchers and initiatives must identify and work with factors that influence the disclosure of diabetes if they are to develop community-based diabetes self-management interventions for ethnic minority populations. PMID:21619571

  19. Severity of coronary artery disease and retinal microvascular signs in patients with diagnosed versus undiagnosed diabetes: cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Plant, Adam J.; Wang, Sarah B.; Xu, Joshua; Chiha, Joseph; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that a considerable proportion of patients with diabetes remain undiagnosed and untreated, however, it is unclear whether this is associated with more severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and microvasculature changes compared with diagnosed patients. We assessed CAD extent and severity, along with changes to the retinal microvascular structure in participants with undiagnosed versus diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods Participants of the Australian Heart Eye Study were stratified into participants with previously diagnosed diabetes (n=489), undiagnosed diabetes (n=76) and no diabetes (n=1,112). Retinal vessel caliber was measured from digital retinal images. Extent and severity of CAD was assessed using Extent and Gensini scores from angiography findings, respectively. Results Participants with undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes versus those with no diabetes (reference group) had increased odds of being in the highest quartile of Gensini scores, multivariate adjusted odds ratios (OR) =7.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.04–24.1] and OR =2.76 (95% CI, 1.67–4.55), respectively. Participants with undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes versus those with no diabetes also had increased odds of being in the highest quartile of Extent scores, multivariate adjusted OR =7.63 (95% CI, 2.15–27.10) and OR =3.72 (95% CI, 2.22–6.27), respectively. No significant differences were observed in retinal vessel caliber between participants with undiagnosed versus diagnosed diabetes. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that participants with undiagnosed diabetes compared to those with previously diagnosed diabetes, had a stronger likelihood of having more severe and extensive CAD. However, retinal microvascular signs did not differ by diabetes status. PMID:27499940

  20. A study on prevalence of thyroid auto-immunity in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dosi, Rupal V; Tandon, Nidhi

    2010-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an auto-immune disease. It is associated with other auto-immune endocrine disorders and auto-immune impairment of non-endocrine tissue. Auto-immune thyroid disease is one of the most frequent auto-immune diseases associated with it. Hypothyroidism can decrease insulin requirement in such patients and hyperthyroidism may cause glucose intolerance. This study attempts to review this concept and detect overt and subclinical forms of auto-immune thyroid disease in type 1 diabetics and to find its correlation with age, sex and duration of diabetes. Fifty type 1 diabetes mellitus patients were selected from SSG Hospital, Vadodara between April 2007 and September 2008. After detailed history and examination, haemogram, urine analysis, fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level, serum free T4, TSH and antithyroid peroxidase antibody level were performed. The prevalence of auto-immune thyroid disease in type 1 diabetics was 60% with 40% having thyroid disorders (24% overt hypothyroidism, 8% subclinical hypothyroidism and 8% hyperthyroidism). Patients who were females (70% versus 53% in males), older (53.3% in 15-20 years age group versus 71% in 25-30 years age group), had a longer duration of diabetes (25% in those with the disease for <2 years and 100% in those >6 years) were more likely to have auto-immune thyroid disease than their counterparts. Thyroid auto-immunity is frequently associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus and patients should undergo antibody screening to detect the same and to find out assosiated undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction.

  1. Do Asians with diabetes in Sandwell receive inferior primary care? A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A; Rao, J N

    2000-12-01

    Although diabetes is more prevalent among Asian people, Asians with diabetes are anecdotally believed to receive a lesser standard of care, compared with non-Asians. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Asian patients with diabetes in Sandwell receive an inferior standard of care in primary care compared with non-Asians. Standards were based on tests carried out, in compliance with Sandwell's Diabetes Local Clinical Guideline. Data were collected from records of 774 patients with diabetes in 14 Sandwell practices. Proportions were recorded of Asian patients receiving specified tests, compared with non-Asians. No significant differences were observed between Asians and non-Asians for checks on feet, eyes, body mass index (BMI), smoking or blood pressure. Significantly fewer Asians received an HbA1c check. The mean HbA1c value was higher in Asians. More Asian patients received a urine test than non-Asians. Asian patients generally had lower BMI values. When stratified by practice however, no significant differences between Asians and non-Asians were observed for any single check. No significant differences were found between the overall proportions of checks carried out between Asians and non-Asians. A wide variation was observed in the proportion of patients who had individual checks done, between practices. There were no systematic differences in the standard of care given to Asian and non-Asian patients. Practices varied a great deal in the extent to which they carry out, and record, checks on patients with diabetes. A possible explanation for the reason that no summary result showed a significant difference was due to the confounding effect of the practice: that general practices tended to treat all their patients--Asian and non-Asian--similarly. Nevertheless, general practitioners should therefore take steps to ensure that all patients with diabetes have these checks at recommended intervals.

  2. Diabetes research in Middle East countries; a scientometrics study from 1990 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Peykari, Niloofar; Djalalinia, Shirin; Kasaeian, Amir; Naderimagham, Shohreh; Hasannia, Tahereh; Larijani, Bagher; Farzadfar, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes burden is a serious warning for urgent action plan across the world. Knowledge production in this context could provide evidences for more efficient interventions. Aimed to that, we quantify the trend of diabetes research outputs of Middle East countries focusing on the scientific publication numbers, citations, and international collaboration. Materials and Methods: This scientometrics study was performed based on the systematic analysis through three international databases; ISI, PubMed, and Scopus from 1990 to 2012. International collaboration of Middle East countries and citations was analyzed based on Scopus. Diabetes’ publications in Iran specifically were assessed, and frequent used terms were mapped by VOSviewer software. Results: Over 23-year period, the number of diabetes publications and related citations in Middle East countries had increasing trend. The number of articles on diabetes in ISI, PubMed, and Scopus were respectively; 13,994, 11,336, and 20,707. Turkey, Israel, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt have devoted the five top competition positions. In addition, Israel, Turkey, and Iran were leading countries in citation analysis. The most collaborative country with Middle East countries was USA and within the region, the most collaborative country was Saudi Arabia. Iran in all databases stands on third position and produced 12.7% of diabetes publications within region. Regarding diabetes researches, the frequent used terms in Iranian articles were “effect,” “woman,” and “metabolic syndrome.” Conclusion: Ascending trend of diabetes research outputs in Middle East countries is appreciated but encouraging to strategic planning for maintaining this trend, and more collaboration between researchers is needed to regional health promotion. PMID:26109972

  3. Nursing consultations and control of diabetes in general practice: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Murrells, Trevor; Ball, Jane; Maben, Jill; Ashworth, Mark; Griffiths, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects around 3.6 million people in the UK. Previous research found that general practices employing more nurses delivered better diabetes care, but did not include data on individual patient characteristics or consultations received. Aim To examine whether the proportion of consultations with patients with diabetes provided by nurses in GP practices is associated with control of diabetes measured by levels of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Design and setting A retrospective observational study using consultation records from 319 649 patients with diabetes from 471 UK general practices from 2002 to 2011. Method Hierarchical multilevel models to examine associations between proportion of consultations undertaken by nurses and attaining HbA1c targets over time, controlling for case-mix and practice level factors. Results The proportion of consultations with nurses has increased by 20% since 2002 but patients with diabetes made fewer consultations per year in 2011 compared with 2002 (11.6 versus 16.0). Glycaemic control has improved and was more uniformly achieved in 2011 than 2002. Practices in which nurses provide a higher proportion of consultations perform no differently to those where nurse input is lower (lowest versus highest nurse contact tertile odds ratio [OR] [confidence interval {95% CI}]: HbA1c ≤53 mmol/mol (7%) 2002, 1.04 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.25] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.03]; HbA1c ≤86 mmol/mol (10%) 2002, 0.97 [95% CI = 0.73 to 1.29] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.86 to 1.04]). Conclusion Practices that primarily use GPs to deliver diabetes care could release significant resources with no adverse effect by switching their services towards nurse-led care. PMID:26412840

  4. Patients’ management of type 2 diabetes in Middle Eastern countries: review of studies

    PubMed Central

    Alsairafi, Zahra Khalil; Taylor, Kevin Michael Geoffrey; Smith, Felicity J; Alattar, Abdulnabi T

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of diabetes in Middle Eastern countries is a health policy priority. Important risk factors for diabetes have been identified. Lifestyle interventions and adherence to medications are central to disease prevention and management. This review focuses on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Middle Eastern countries. The aim is to identify the ways in which knowledge, health beliefs, and social and cultural factors influence adherence to medication and lifestyle measures. Thirty-four studies were identified following a systematic search of the literature. The studies describe the influence of knowledge, health beliefs, culture, and lifestyle on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Middle East. Findings indicate a lack of health knowledge about diabetes among populations, which has implications for health behaviors, medication adherence, and treatment outcomes. Many identified health beliefs and cultural lifestyle factors, such as religious beliefs, beliefs about fasting during Ramadan, and sedentary lifestyles played a role in patients’ decisions. For better management of this disease, a collaborative approach between patients, their families, health care professionals, and governments should be adopted. Implementing behavioral strategies and psychological interventions that incorporate all health care professionals in the management process have been shown to be effective methods. Such services help patients change their behavior. However, the utilization of such services and interventions is still limited in Arabian countries. Physicians in the Middle East are the health care professionals most involved in the care process. PMID:27354775

  5. An open label study on the supplementation of Gymnema sylvestre in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Smriti Nanda; Mani, Uliyar Vitaldas; Mani, Indirani

    2010-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, and associated with long-term damage and dysfunction of various organs. Management of diabetes is therefore vital and involves maintaining euglycemia as much as possible by reducing blood glucose and by increasing insulin sensitivity and peripheral glucose uptake. Ayurveda has promoted the management of diabetes by regulating carbohydrate metabolism using several medicinal herbs, one of which is Gymnema sylvestre (GS). GS has been used in parts of India as a hypoglycemic agent and the results have been encouraging. Accordingly, we planned a quasi-experimental study to investigate the efficacy of the herb among type 2 diabetics. Patients enrolled from free-living population were purposively assigned to experimental or control groups, based on their willingness to participate in the study. The experimental group was supplemented with 500 mg of the herb per day for a period of 3 months, and the efficacy of the herb was assessed through a battery of clinical and biochemical tests. Supplementation of the diet with GS reduced polyphagia, fatigue, blood glucose (fasting and post-prandial), and glycated hemoglobin and there was a favorable shift in lipid profiles and in other clinico-biochemical tests. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of GS in the management of diabetes mellitus.

  6. An open label study on the supplementation of Gymnema sylvestre in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Smriti Nanda; Mani, Uliyar Vitaldas; Mani, Indirani

    2010-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, and associated with long-term damage and dysfunction of various organs. Management of diabetes is therefore vital and involves maintaining euglycemia as much as possible by reducing blood glucose and by increasing insulin sensitivity and peripheral glucose uptake. Ayurveda has promoted the management of diabetes by regulating carbohydrate metabolism using several medicinal herbs, one of which is Gymnema sylvestre (GS). GS has been used in parts of India as a hypoglycemic agent and the results have been encouraging. Accordingly, we planned a quasi-experimental study to investigate the efficacy of the herb among type 2 diabetics. Patients enrolled from free-living population were purposively assigned to experimental or control groups, based on their willingness to participate in the study. The experimental group was supplemented with 500 mg of the herb per day for a period of 3 months, and the efficacy of the herb was assessed through a battery of clinical and biochemical tests. Supplementation of the diet with GS reduced polyphagia, fatigue, blood glucose (fasting and post-prandial), and glycated hemoglobin and there was a favorable shift in lipid profiles and in other clinico-biochemical tests. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of GS in the management of diabetes mellitus. PMID:22432517

  7. Cardiovascular risk assessment in prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus study: international collaboration research overview.

    PubMed

    Nwose, Ezekiel Uba; Richards, Ross Stuart; Digban, Kester; Bwititi, Philip Taderera; Ennis, Gretchen; Yee, Kwang Choon; Oguoma, Victor Maduabuchi; Liberato, Selma

    2013-11-01

    The study aims to develop a screening protocol for the risk of future cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in people with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes; and to establish a framework for early identification and intervention of prediabetes including strategies for holistic management and monitoring of progression. The first phase is to identify prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes in volunteers who are ≥18-years-old for 5 years. Point-of-care testing and questionnaire will be used to screen for prediabetes and cardiovascular disease. We anticipate screening more than 2000 individuals of both genders by the end of first phase. The second and third phases which shall run for 5-10 years will be longitudinal study involving participants identified in the first phase as having prediabetes without dyslipidaemia, or clinically established cardiovascular disease. The second phase shall focus on preventive management of risk of progress to diabetes with explicit diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Oxidative stress measurements will be performed cum evaluation of the use of antioxidants, exercise, and nutrition. The third phase will include probing the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Binomial logistic regression would be performed to generate and propose a model chart for the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk in prediabetes.

  8. The Diabetes Care Project: an Australian multicentre, cluster randomised controlled trial [study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent metabolic disorder that is associated with substantial disease burden. Australia has an opportunity to improve ways of caring for the growing number of people with diabetes, but this may require changes to the way care is funded, organised and delivered. To inform how best to care for people with diabetes, and to identify the extent of change that is required to achieve this, the Diabetes Care Project (DCP) will evaluate the impact of two different, evidence-based models of care (compared to usual care) on clinical quality, patient and provider experience, and cost. Methods/Design The DCP uses a pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial design. Accredited general practices that are situated within any of the seven Australian Medicare Locals/Divisions of General Practice that have agreed to take part in the study were invited to participate. Consenting practices will be randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups for approximately 18 to 22 months: (a) control group (usual care); (b) Intervention 1 (which tests improvements that could be made within the current funding model, facilitated through the use of an online chronic disease management network); or (c) Intervention 2 (which includes the same components as Intervention 1, as well as altered funding to support voluntary patient registration with their practice, incentive payments and a care facilitator). Adult patients who attend the enrolled practices and have established (≥12 month’s duration) type 1 diabetes mellitus or newly diagnosed or established type 2 diabetes mellitus are invited to participate. Multiple outcomes will be studied, including changes in glycosylated haemoglobin (primary outcome), changes in other biochemical and clinical metrics, incidence of diabetes-related complications, quality of life, clinical depression, success of tailored care, patient and practitioner satisfaction, and budget sustainability. Discussion

  9. The evaluation of body image in children with type 1 diabetes: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Troncone, Alda; Prisco, Francesco; Cascella, Crescenzo; Chianese, Antonietta; Zanfardino, Angela; Iafusco, Dario

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the body image perception in children with type 1 diabetes in order to identify symptoms of disordered eating behaviours early. Children with type 1 diabetes and controls showed underestimation and dissatisfaction with body size. The patients, especially girls, were more accurate in their perception of body size than the control group. The study sheds light on some of the underlying factors that may contribute to the development of disordered eating behaviours in adolescence. The causes of the differences of perception of body size are discussed. PMID:24752557

  10. Creative Expression as a Way of Knowing in Diabetes Adult Health Education: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckey, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    This action research study explores the meaning-making process using forms of creative expression for eight women with insulin-dependent diabetes. The study is theoretically informed by arts-based ways of knowing and aspects of feminist poststructuralism, and explains the process of creativity used in the action research process. The findings…

  11. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  12. Resources, roadblocks and turning points: a qualitative study of American Indian/Alaska Native adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jennifer L; Brown, Jennifer; Khan, Burhan; Mau, Marjorie K; Dillard, Denise

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a worldwide health problem that has reached epidemic proportions in some communities. Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people are disproportionately diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and incidence is increasing in many Alaska communities. Developing effective interventions requires understanding the social and psychological factors that impact effective management of diabetes, yet little is known about these factors in AN/AI communities. The objective of this study was to explore perceived psychosocial needs and barriers to management of diabetes among AN/AI adults with type 2 diabetes receiving care at the Alaska Native Primary Care Center (ANPCC) to inform programmatic efforts and potential future research. We conducted three focus groups and five interviews with 13 AN/AI adults with type 2 diabetes. Interview and focus group questions elicited perceived factors that affect management of diabetes, with a focus on the psychological, social and spiritual impacts of diabetes. Data were transcribed, coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Key themes that emerged from these data included resources and roadblocks, as well as turning points in the trajectory of diabetes. Resources are factors with a perceived positive impact on management of diabetes, including: (1) knowledge and education about diabetes, (2) social support from other people with diabetes, (3) spirituality, and (4) self-efficacy. Roadblocks are factors with a perceived negative impact on management of diabetes and include: (1) self-reported lack of knowledge about nutrition and diet, (2) social difficulties caused by dietary restrictions, and (3) co-morbid medical conditions. Finally, turning points are experiences described by participants as having transformed roadblocks in resources and thus facilitating improvement in the management of diabetes. Future programmatic interventions to improve management of diabetes with this population should focus on improving dietary

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study hepatic metabolism in diffuse liver diseases, diabetes and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagnelie, Pieter C; Leij-Halfwerk, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the current state of the art of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in in vivo investigations of diffuse liver disease. So far, MRS of the human liver in vivo has mainly been used as a research tool rather than a clinical tool. The liver is particularly suitable for static and dynamic metabolic studies due to its high metabolic activity. Furthermore, its relatively superficial position allows excellent MRS localization, while its large volume allows detection of signals with relatively low intensity. This review describes the application of MRS to study the metabolic consequences of different conditions including diffuse and chronic liver diseases, congenital diseases, diabetes, and the presence of a distant malignancy on hepatic metabolism. In addition, future prospects of MRS are discussed. It is anticipated that future technical developments such as clinical MRS magnets with higher field strength (3 T) and improved delineation of multi-component signals such as phosphomonoester and phosphodiester using proton decoupling, especially if combined with price reductions for stable isotope tracers, will lead to intensified research into metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, hepato-biliary diseases, as well as non-metastatic liver metabolism in patients with a distant malignant tumor. PMID:20355236

  14. Obesity and Coronary Artery Calcium in Diabetes: The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Veyna, Adrienne M.; Haarhues, Michelle D.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rewers, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim was to examine whether excess weight is associated with coronary artery calcium (CAC), independent of metabolic parameters in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods Subjects between 19 and 56 years of age with T1D (n=621) from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study were classified as abnormal on four metabolic parameters: blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg or on antihypertensive treatment; high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol of <40 mg/dL for men or <50 mg/dL for women; triglycerides of ≥150 mg/dL; or C-reactive protein of ≥3 μg/mL. Study participants with two or more abnormal parameters were classified as metabolically abnormal. Weight categories by body mass index were normal (<25 kg/m2), overweight (25 to <30 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2). CAC was measured at two visits 6.0±0.5 years apart. Progression of CAC was defined as an increase in square root transformed CAC volume of ≥2.5 mm3 or development of clinical coronary artery disease. Results Among subjects with T1D, 48% of normal, 61% of overweight, and 73% of obese participants were classified as metabolically abnormal (P<0.0001). Overweight and obesity were independently associated with presence of CAC, independent of presence of metabolically abnormal. Obesity but not overweight was associated with CAC progression, independent of the other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Although obesity is known to increase cardiovascular disease risk through inducing metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and inflammation, it is also a strong predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis progression in adults with T1D independent of these factors. PMID:21770813

  15. Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluation Studies.

    PubMed

    Alouki, Koffi; Delisle, Hélène; Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Johri, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize key findings of economic evaluations of lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in high-risk subjects. Methods. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed original studies published since January 2009 in English, French, and Spanish. Eligible studies were identified through relevant databases including PubMed, Medline, National Health Services Economic Evaluation, CINHAL, EconLit, Web of sciences, EMBASE, and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature. Studies targeting obesity were also included. Data were extracted using a standardized method. The BMJ checklist was used to assess study quality. The heterogeneity of lifestyle interventions precluded a meta-analysis. Results. Overall, 20 studies were retained, including six focusing on obesity control. Seven were conducted within trials and 13 using modeling techniques. T2D prevention by physical activity or diet or both proved cost-effective according to accepted thresholds, except for five inconclusive studies, three on diabetes prevention and two on obesity control. Most studies exhibited limitations in reporting results, primarily with regard to generalizability and justification of selected sensitivity parameters. Conclusion. This confirms that lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of diabetes are cost-effective. Such interventions should be further promoted as sound investment in the fight against diabetes. PMID:26885527

  16. Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alouki, Koffi; Delisle, Hélène; Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize key findings of economic evaluations of lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in high-risk subjects. Methods. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed original studies published since January 2009 in English, French, and Spanish. Eligible studies were identified through relevant databases including PubMed, Medline, National Health Services Economic Evaluation, CINHAL, EconLit, Web of sciences, EMBASE, and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature. Studies targeting obesity were also included. Data were extracted using a standardized method. The BMJ checklist was used to assess study quality. The heterogeneity of lifestyle interventions precluded a meta-analysis. Results. Overall, 20 studies were retained, including six focusing on obesity control. Seven were conducted within trials and 13 using modeling techniques. T2D prevention by physical activity or diet or both proved cost-effective according to accepted thresholds, except for five inconclusive studies, three on diabetes prevention and two on obesity control. Most studies exhibited limitations in reporting results, primarily with regard to generalizability and justification of selected sensitivity parameters. Conclusion. This confirms that lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of diabetes are cost-effective. Such interventions should be further promoted as sound investment in the fight against diabetes. PMID:26885527

  17. HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOBIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF GREEN TEA AND GINGER EXTRACTS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DIABETIC RABBITS.

    PubMed

    Elkirdasy, Ahmed; Shousha, Saad; Alrohaimi, Abdulmohsen H; Arshad, M Faiz

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of the extract of green tea and/or ginger on some hematological and immunobiochemical profiles in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits. The results revealed that treatment of diabetic animals with extract of green tea and/or ginger elevated the decreased HDL-c and LDL-c but significantly decreased triglycerides, the elevated glucose and GOT concentrations. The result also displayed a non-significant increase in the levels of CRP and fibrinogen. The experiment also revealed that the elevated MDA and GSH level fell down to the normal control group. The result also showed that after green tea and/or ginger extract treatment, the lowered RBC, WBC counts, PCV, percentage of neutrophils were increased and the elevated MCV, MCH, and MCHC of diabetic rabbits were decreased to normal levels. Thus, the overall results may indicate that green tea and/or ginger extracts have a significant hypoglycemic effect in diabetic rabbits. In addition, the extracts may be capable of improving hyperlipidemia, the impaired kidney function and hemogram in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits.

  18. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for monitoring diabetic foot ulcer - A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Sujatha, N.; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, Richa

    2014-02-01

    Foot ulceration due to diabetes mellitus is a major problem affecting 12-25% of diabetic subjects in their lifetime. An untreated ulcer further gets infected which causes necrosis leading to amputation of lower extremities. Early identification of risk factors and treatment for these chronic wounds would reduce health care costs and improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. Recent clinical investigations have shown that a series of factors including reduced oxygen delivery and disturbed metabolism have been observed on patients with foot ulceration due to diabetes. Also, these factors can impair the wound healing process. Optical techniques based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provide characteristic spectral finger prints shed light on tissue oxygenation levels and morphological composition of a tissue. This study deals with the application of diffuse reflectance intensity ratios based on oxyhemoglobin bands (R542/R580), ratios of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin bands (R580/R555), total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation between normal and diabetic foot ulcer sites. Preliminary results obtained are found to be promising indicating the application of reflectance spectroscopy in the assessment of foot ulcer healing.

  19. Alterations of the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children. A chemiluminescence study.

    PubMed

    Kantar, A; Wilkins, G; Swoboda, B; Littarru, G P; Bertoli, E; Catassi, C; Coppa, G; Giorgi, P L

    1990-05-01

    The respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was investigated in 24 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 24 healthy controls. This oxygen dependent, membrane associated process generates a number of toxic oxygen metabolites which are implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial damage. The activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied in terms of luminol amplified chemiluminescence. It was found that the resting luminol amplified chemiluminescence activity of isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children was significantly higher than that of controls (342,000 +/- 174,000 cpm vs. 165,000 +/- 82,000 cpm, p less than 0.01). The addition of respiratory burst inhibitors caused a significant reduction of basal chemiluminescence (greater than 80%). When the ratio of phorbol myristate acetate stimulated activity to basal activity was calculated and used as an activation index, it was found to be significantly reduced in diabetics relative to controls (4.29 +/- 2.46 vs. 8.34 +/- 3.21, p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that increased release of toxic oxygen metabolites from polymorphonuclear leukocytes in diabetic subjects may play a role in the development of diabetic angiopathies. PMID:2166990

  20. A national study of problematic care experiences among Latinos with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Chen, Jie; Rodriguez, Michael A

    2010-11-01

    Despite the large disease burden of diabetes, little is known about the care experiences of Latinos with diabetes across diverse primary care settings. This study compares problematic care experiences among Latinos with diabetes across usual care sites (community health centers [CHCs], private physician practices, or without a usual source of care), using a national sample of Latino diabetic patients (N=583). Nearly half of the respondents reported at least one problematic care experience during their last clinician visit. Compared with respondents treated primarily by private physicians, respondents receiving care in CHCs or without a usual source of care reported more problematic care experiences. However, patient health insurance coverage and acculturation accounted for the highest proportion of explainable differences in problematic care experiences between CHCs and private physician offices. Initiatives should clarify the extent to which the care experiences of Latino diabetics, particularly uninsured and less acculturated patients who tend to be cared for by CHCs, can be improved through clinician communication and patient self-management interventions.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy: a study of Wolfram syndrome in the Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Medlej, R; Wasson, J; Baz, P; Azar, S; Salti, I; Loiselet, J; Permutt, A; Halaby, G

    2004-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). WFS seems to be a heterogeneous disease that has not yet been fully characterized in terms of clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms because the number of patients in most series was small. In this study we describe 31 Lebanese WFS patients belonging to 17 families; this, to our knowledge, is the largest number of patients reported in one series so far. Criteria for diagnosis of WFS were the presence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy unexplained by any other disease. Central diabetes insipidus was found in 87% of the patients, and sensorineural deafness confirmed by audiograms was present in 64.5%. Other less frequent features included neurological and psychiatric abnormalities, urodynamic abnormalities, limited joint motility, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in males, and diabetic microvascular disease. New features, not reported in previous descriptions, such as heart malformations and anterior pituitary dysfunction, were recognized in some of the patients and participated in the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Genetic analysis revealed WFS1 gene mutations in three families (23.5%), whereas no abnormalities were detected in mitochondrial DNA. In conclusion, WFS is a devastating disease for the patients and their families. More information about WFS will lead to a better understanding of this disease and hopefully to improvement in means of its prevention and treatment.

  2. Does the new American Diabetes Association definition for impaired fasting glucose improve its ability to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spanish persons? The Asturias Study.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Sergio; Botas, Patricia; Delgado, Elías; Alvarez, Francisco; Cadórniga, Francisco Diaz

    2008-03-01

    In 2003, the American Diabetes Association reduced the lower limit defining impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to 100 mg/dL. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of this change in the definition of IFG in a low-risk white population from northern Spain. The Asturias Study is a prospective, population-based survey of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors. The baseline examination was carried out between 1998 and 1999 when 1034 individuals (age range, 30-75 years) were randomly selected to determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in the Principality of Asturias (northern Spain). In 2004 to 2005, these same subjects were invited for a follow-up examination. All participants without known diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test both at baseline and follow-up. Application of the new American Diabetes Association definition resulted in 3 times more persons having IFG. The incidence rates of diabetes were 3.8, 19.5, and 58.0 per 1000 person-years in subjects with initial FPG values <100, 100 to 109, and 110 to 125 mg/dL, respectively. Inclusion of persons with an intermediate risk in the 100- to 109-mg/dL zone to the definition of IFG changed its positive predictive value, specificity, and sensitivity to predict diabetes from 36.5%, 94.5%, and 43.2% to 19.9%, 77.3%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis including all the baseline fasting plasma glucose levels from 64 to 125 mg/dL depending on their ability to predict diabetes showed that the point closest to the ideal of 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity was 100 mg/dL. In conclusion, this study indicated that lowering the cutoff point for IFG optimizes its ability to predict diabetes in this Spanish population. The addition of other risk factors such as impaired glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and overweight to IFG can stratify diabetes risk better.

  3. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  4. Buddy Study: Partners for better health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sylvetsky, Allison C; Nandagopal, Radha; Nguyen, Tammy T; Abegg, Marisa R; Nagarur, Mahathi; Kaplowitz, Paul; Rother, Kristina I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether assigning young, healthy and motivated lay volunteer partners (“buddies”) to adolescents with type 2 diabetes improves hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). METHODS: Adolescents with type 2 diabetes were randomized to partnering with a “buddy” or to conventional treatment. During the initial screening visit, which coincided with a routine outpatient diabetes clinic visit, patients with type 2 diabetes underwent a physical examination, detailed medical history, laboratory measurement of HbA1c, and completed two questionnaires (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory and Children’s Depression Inventory) to assess their overall quality of life and the presence of depressive symptoms. Patients were then randomized to the intervention (the buddy system) or conventional treatment (standard care). All patients were scheduled to return for follow-up at 3- and 6-mo after their initial visit. HbA1c was determined at all visits (i.e., at screening and at the 3- and 6-mo follow-up visits) and quality of life and depressive symptoms were evaluated at the screening visit and were reassessed at the 6-mo visit. RESULTS: Ten adolescents, recruited from a pool of approximately 200 adolescents, enrolled over a two-year time period, leading to premature termination of the study. In contrast, we easily recruited motivated lay volunteers. We found no change in HbA1c from the initial to the 6-mo visit in either group, yet our small sample size limited systematic assessment of this outcome. Participants repeatedly missed clinic appointments, failed to conduct self-glucose-monitoring and rarely brought their glucometers to clinic visits. Total quality of life scores (72.6 ± 6.06) at screening were similar to previously reported scores in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (75.7 ± 15.0) and lower than scores reported in normal-weight (81.2 ± 0.9), overweight (83.5 ± 1.8), and obese youths without diabetes (78.5 ± 1.8) or in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (80.5 ± 13

  5. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to...

  6. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to...

  7. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to...

  8. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to...

  9. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to...

  10. Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus; frequency and related risk factors: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Ali; PourAli, Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Hatami, Sanaz; Modarres, Vanooshe

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a serious complication after organ transplantation, which could lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The rate of PTDM increased in recent years, probably due to new immunosuppressive drugs such as Tacrolimus. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the frequency of PTDM and related risk factors in 644 non diabetic patients who underwent renal transplantation. Data was analyzed by chi-square and Fisher's exact test in SPSS software ver11.5. Among 644 patients PTDM developed in 10.2% similar to literature. PTDM was significantly correlated to age (P value = 0.000), positive familial history (P= 0.003) and HBV infection (P= 0.046). In conclusion, PTDM is not uncommon in Iranian patients and a positive family history of diabetes, HBV infection and older age increases the likelihood to develop PTDM. PMID:20814117

  11. Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus; frequency and related risk factors: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Ali; PourAli, Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Hatami, Sanaz; Modarres, Vanooshe

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a serious complication after organ transplantation, which could lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The rate of PTDM increased in recent years, probably due to new immunosuppressive drugs such as Tacrolimus. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the frequency of PTDM and related risk factors in 644 non diabetic patients who underwent renal transplantation. Data was analyzed by chi-square and Fisher's exact test in SPSS software ver11.5. Among 644 patients PTDM developed in 10.2% similar to literature. PTDM was significantly correlated to age (P value = 0.000), positive familial history (P= 0.003) and HBV infection (P= 0.046). In conclusion, PTDM is not uncommon in Iranian patients and a positive family history of diabetes, HBV infection and older age increases the likelihood to develop PTDM.

  12. Molecular physiology of cellular glucose transport - a potential area for clinical studies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tatoń, Jan; Piatkiewicz, Paweł; Czech, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The normalization of cellular glucose assimilation is the basic aim of metabolic therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It requires parallel changes in the process of cellular glucose transport (CGT). This review presents the pathophysiological and clinical outlines of CGT. Sequentially, the advances in the mechanisms and classification of CGT and their physiological and molecular base are described. The role of CGT pathogenetic significance in diabetes mellitus is stressed. Finally, the opinion is expressed that the CGT study is a potentially important approach to clinical interpretation of glucose metabolism disturbances and their pharmacotherapy. PMID:20602306

  13. Aboriginal Women's Experiences With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Participatory Study With Mi'kmaq Women in Canada.

    PubMed

    Whitty-Rogers, Joanne; Caine, Vera; Cameron, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    In Canada, diabetes is 3 to 5 times more common among Aboriginal people than in the general population. Women with a diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing glucose intolerance later in life, with almost half developing type II diabetes within 15 years. A participatory action research study using a Two-Eyed Seeing approach was conducted. Conversational interviews with 9 Mi'kmaq women who experienced gestational diabetes mellitus and talking circles were held. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used for data analysis. Themes included life-altering experience; barriers limiting access to health care; social support during pregnancy; and feeling compelled to take action. PMID:27149230

  14. Patient Characteristics Associated with Measurement of Routine Diabetes Care: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorn-Klomberg, Arna L.; Braspenning, Jozé C. C.; Atsma, Femke; Jansen, Birgit; Bouma, Margriet; Wolters, René J.; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-modifiable patient characteristics, including age, gender, ethnicity as well as the occurrence of multi-morbidities, are associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. Information on these factors can be used in case mix adjustment of performance measures. However, the practical relevance of such adjustment is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between patient factors and diabetes care processes and outcomes. Methods We performed an observational study based on routinely collected data of 12,498 diabetes patients in 59 Dutch primary care practices. Data were collected on patient age, gender, whether the patient lived in a deprived area, body mass index and the co-occurrence of cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression or anxiety. Outcomes included 6 dichotomous measures (3 process and 3 outcome related) regarding glycosylated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. We performed separate hierarchical logistic mixed model regression models for each of the outcome measures. Results Each of the process measure models showed moderate effect sizes, with pooled areas under the curve that varied between 0.66 and 0.76. The frequency of diabetes related consultations as a measure of patient compliance to treatment showed the strongest association with all process measures (odds ratios between 5.6 and 14.5). The effect sizes of the outcome measure models were considerably smaller than the process measure models, with pooled areas under the curve varying from 0.57 to 0.61. Conclusions Several non-modifiable patient factors could be associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. However, associations were small. These results suggest that case-mix correction or stratification in assessing diabetes care has limited practical relevance. PMID:25822978

  15. Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Are at an Increased Risk of Gout But This Is Not Due to Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, José Maria Andreas; van Durme, Caroline Marie Pierre Ghislaine; Driessen, Johanna Hendrika Maria; Boonen, Annelies; Klop, Corinne; Leufkens, Bert; Cooper, Cyrus; Stehouwer, Coen Dirk Adriaan; de Vries, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between type 2 diabetes and gout is complex. The objective of this study was to understand the role of diabetes itself and its comorbidities within the association between type 2 diabetes and gout.We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) GOLD. Persons with type 2 diabetes were identified as persons on a noninsulin antidiabetic drug (NIAD) between 2004 and 2012, and were matched to 1 control based on age, sex, and general practice. We estimated gout risk in NIAD users using Cox regression analysis. All analyses were stratified for sex.In total, 221,117 NIAD users were identified. NIAD users had an increased risk of gout (hazard ratio (HR) 1.48; 95% CI 1.41-1.54). This association was stronger in women (HR 2.23; 95% CI 2.07-2.41) compared with men (HR 1.19; 95% CI 1.13-1.26). After adjustments for BMI, eGFR, hypertension, renal transplantation, diuretics, statins, low-dose aspirin, ciclosporin, and tacrolimus, the risk disappeared in women (HR 1.01; 95% CI 0.92-1.11) and reversed in men (HR 0.61; 95% CI 0.58-0.66) (P for interaction <0.001). When stratifying gout risk according to HbA1c in male and female NIAD users, we found an inverse association between raising HbA1c and incident gout in men only. Further adjustment gave similar results.Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of gout. This is not due to diabetes itself, but to the comorbid conditions. Diabetes itself is apparently associated with a decreased risk of gout, especially in men.

  16. Resistance Exercise in Already-Active Diabetic Individuals (READI): study rationale, design and methods for a randomized controlled trial of resistance and aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Jane E; Kenny, Glen P; Perkins, Bruce A; Riddell, Michael C; Goldfield, Gary S; Donovan, Lois; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Wells, George A; Phillips, Penny; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    The Resistance Exercise in Already Active Diabetic Individuals (READI) trial aimed to examine whether adding a 6-month resistance training program would improve glycemic control (as reflected in reduced HbA₁c) in individuals with type 1 diabetes who were already engaged in aerobic exercise compared to aerobic training alone. After a 5-week run-in period including optimization of diabetes care and low-intensity exercise, 131 physically active adults with type 1 diabetes were randomized to two groups for 22weeks: resistance training three times weekly, or waiting-list control. Both groups maintained the same volume, duration and intensity of aerobic exercise throughout the study as they did at baseline. HbA₁c, body composition, frequency of hypoglycemia, lipids, blood pressure, apolipoproteins B and A-1 (ApoB and ApoA1), the ApoB-ApoA1 ratio, urinary albumin excretion, serum C-reactive protein, free fatty acids, total daily insulin dose, health-related quality of life, cardiorespiratory fitness and musculoskeletal fitness were recorded at baseline, 3 (for some variables), and 6 months. To our knowledge, READI is the only trial to date assessing the incremental health-related impact of adding resistance training for individuals with type 1 diabetes who are already aerobically active. Few exercise trials have been completed in this population, and even fewer have assessed resistance exercise. With recent improvements in the quality of diabetes care, the READI study will provide conclusive evidence to support or refute a major clinically relevant effect of exercise type in the recommendations for physical activity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25559915

  17. Feeding in infancy and the risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Finnish children. The 'Childhood Diabetes in Finland' Study Group.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S M; Räsänen, L; Aro, A; Ylönen, K; Lounamaa, R; Tuomilehto, J; Akerblom, H K

    1992-11-01

    In a case-control design the feeding in infancy of newly diagnosed 7- to 14-year-old diabetic children (n = 426) was compared with that of age- and sex-matched non-diabetic children (n = 426) randomly selected from the Finnish population registry. All 7- to 14-year-old diabetic children diagnosed from September 1986 to the end of April 1989 from all hospitals which treat diabetic children in Finland were invited to participate in the study. Breast-feeding was initiated in almost all children, but during the birth years of this study population (1972-1982), an increase was observed in the duration of breast-feeding (whether alone or in combination with supplementary feeding) and in the age of introduction of supplementary milk feeding. The risk of Type 1 diabetes was decreased in the children who were totally breast-fed for at least 2 months (odds ratio (OR) 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.98) or 3 months (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.48-0.95) or exclusively breast-fed for at least 2 months (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.41-0.89) or 3 months (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.43-0.93). Those children who were younger than 2 months (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.08-2.18) or 3 months (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.11-2.08) at the time when supplementary milk feeding was begun had an increased risk of Type 1 diabetes. These associations remained significant after adjusting for the mother's education. The results suggest that early infant feeding patterns are associated with the risk of Type 1 diabetes developing at the age of 7 to 14 years. PMID:1473321

  18. Resistance Exercise in Already-Active Diabetic Individuals (READI): study rationale, design and methods for a randomized controlled trial of resistance and aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Jane E; Kenny, Glen P; Perkins, Bruce A; Riddell, Michael C; Goldfield, Gary S; Donovan, Lois; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Wells, George A; Phillips, Penny; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    The Resistance Exercise in Already Active Diabetic Individuals (READI) trial aimed to examine whether adding a 6-month resistance training program would improve glycemic control (as reflected in reduced HbA₁c) in individuals with type 1 diabetes who were already engaged in aerobic exercise compared to aerobic training alone. After a 5-week run-in period including optimization of diabetes care and low-intensity exercise, 131 physically active adults with type 1 diabetes were randomized to two groups for 22weeks: resistance training three times weekly, or waiting-list control. Both groups maintained the same volume, duration and intensity of aerobic exercise throughout the study as they did at baseline. HbA₁c, body composition, frequency of hypoglycemia, lipids, blood pressure, apolipoproteins B and A-1 (ApoB and ApoA1), the ApoB-ApoA1 ratio, urinary albumin excretion, serum C-reactive protein, free fatty acids, total daily insulin dose, health-related quality of life, cardiorespiratory fitness and musculoskeletal fitness were recorded at baseline, 3 (for some variables), and 6 months. To our knowledge, READI is the only trial to date assessing the incremental health-related impact of adding resistance training for individuals with type 1 diabetes who are already aerobically active. Few exercise trials have been completed in this population, and even fewer have assessed resistance exercise. With recent improvements in the quality of diabetes care, the READI study will provide conclusive evidence to support or refute a major clinically relevant effect of exercise type in the recommendations for physical activity in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  19. High prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes in adult Zoroastrians in Yazd, Iran: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khalilzadeh, Saeedhossein; Afkhami-Ardekani, Mohammad; Afrand, Mohammadhosain

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) varies among ethnic groups. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) for the first time in an ethnic population, specifically Zoroastrian citizens in Yazd, Iran whose ages were 30 or older. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, participants aged≥30 years were selected using systematic random sampling. An inventory, including socio-demographic data, was completed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) were measured using standard methods. Also, blood levels of glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), urea, creatinine (Cr), and uric acid were measured. The latest criteria established by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) were used to diagnose DM. Results: The mean age of the participants (n=403) was 56.9±12.8 years. The total prevalence of diabetes, including previously diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, IFG, and IGT was 26.1%, 18.6%, 7.5%, 34.7% and 25.8%, respectively. Participants with diabetes had higher fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P<0.001), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (P<0.001), urea (P=0.019), BMI (P=0.001), systolic blood pressures (P<0.001), TG (P=0.007) and lower HDL (P=0.034) than patients with IFG, IGT, and normoglycemic subjects. Conclusions: The current study showed a high prevalence of T2DM in the Zoroastrian population of Yazd, Iran. One-third of the total cases with diabetes were undiagnosed. PMID:26052411

  20. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  1. Elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, Iraj; Vahdat, Katayoun; Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Beigi, Saeideh; Assadi, Majid; Azizi, Fatemeh; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that low-grade systemic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, limited information is available about the relationship of diabetes mellitus and inflammation in Asia. We examined the association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and diabetes in a general Iranian population. In an ancillary study to the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study, a cohort study of men and women aged > or = 25 years, a random sample of 1754 (49.2 percent males, 50.8 percent females) subjects were evaluated. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Elevated serum CRP was defined as more than 3.0 mg/l. The diabetes classification was based on the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. A total of 8.6 percent of the subjects (8.0 percent of males & 9.1 percent of females; p>0.05) had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Geometric mean of CRP was 1.94 mg/l (3.80 SD) in the studied population. The subjects with diabetes had a higher geometric mean of CRP levels than the subjects with no diabetes [3.67 (SD 3.71) versus 1.85 (3.83) respectively; p<0.0001)]. In multiple logistic regression analysis, diabetes showed a significant age-adjusted association with elevated CRP levels [Odds Ratio = 2.03, Confidence Interval (1.38-2.98); p<0.0001] after adjusting for sex, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol blood pressure, smoking and body mass index. In conclusion, beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors, elevated CRP is significantly correlated with diabetes in general population of the northern Persian Gulf. Further insight into the specific effects of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins will be essential for the development of new preventive strategies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:18493107

  2. Universal HbA1c Measurement in Early Pregnancy to Detect Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Ethnic Disparities in Antenatal Diabetes Screening: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In response to the type 2 diabetes epidemic, measuring HbA1c with the first-antenatal blood screen was recently recommended in NZ. This would enable prompt treatment of women with unrecognised type 2 diabetes, who may otherwise go undetected until the gestational diabetes (GDM) screen. We compare inter-ethnic antenatal screening practices to examine whether the HbA1c test would be accessed by ethnicities most at risk of diabetes, and we determined the prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in our pregnant population. This is an observational study of pregnancies in Christchurch NZ during 2008–2010. Utilising electronic databases, we matched maternal characteristics to first-antenatal bloods, HbA1c, and GDM screens (glucose challenge tests and oral glucose tolerance tests). Overall uptake of the first-antenatal bloods versus GDM screening was 83.1% and 53.8% respectively in 11,580 pregnancies. GDM screening was lowest in Māori 39.3%, incidence proportion ratio (IPR) 0.77 (0.71, 0.84) compared with Europeans. By including HbA1c with the first-antenatal bloods, the number screened for diabetes increases by 28.5% in Europeans, 40.0% in Māori, 28.1% in Pacific People, and 26.7% in ‘Others’ (majority of Asian descent). The combined prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by NZ criteria, HbA1c ≥5.9% (41mmol/mol), was 2.1% in Europeans, Māori 4.7% IPR 2.59 (1.71, 3.93), Pacific People 9.5% IPR 4.76 (3.10, 7.30), and ‘Others’ 6.2% IPR 2.99 (2.19, 4.07). Applying these prevalence data to 2013 NZ national births data, routine antenatal HbA1c testing could have identified type 2 diabetes in 0.44% and prediabetes in 3.96% of women. Routine HbA1c measurement in early pregnancy is an ideal screening opportunity, particularly benefitting vulnerable groups, reducing ethnic disparities in antenatal diabetes screening. This approach is likely to have world-wide relevance and applicability. Further research is underway to establish

  3. Twelve-Year Cardiovascular and Mortality Risk in Relation to Smoking Habits in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Men: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadaegh, Farzad; Derakhshan, Arash; Mozaffary, Amirhossein; Hasheminia, Mitra; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To examine the associations between smoking and cardiovascular disease (CVD) / coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality events in men with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a Middle Eastern cohort during a median follow-up of 12 years. Methods The study population included 2230 subjects aged ≥ 40 years, free from CVD, comprised of 367 participants with diabetes (21.2% current smokers) and 1863 without (27.3% current smokers). Multivariate Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for smoking (considering different definitions) for those with and without diabetes. Potential confounding factors including age, body mass index, estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and educational level were entered in the multivariate analysis. Results In men with diabetes, the HR (95% CI) of comparing current and non-smokers was 1.25 (0.74–2.12) for incident CHD, 1.52 (0.96–2.40) for CVD and 2.10 (1.27–3.47) for mortality events; the corresponding values for men without diabetes were 1.65 (1.24–2.20), 1.70 (1.30–2.22) and 1.72 (1.14–2.58), respectively (all P values for interactions > 0.46). After pooling past smokers with current smokers, among diabetic individuals there was no significant risk for CVD [1.29 (0.89–1.86)] or mortality events [1.25 (0.81–1.92)]; however, among non-diabetic individuals the HRs of current/past smokers reached significant levels for CVD [1.53 (1.23–1.91)] but not for mortality outcomes (all P values for interactions > 0.51). Conclusions The strength of the associations between smoking habits and incident CVD/CHD and mortality events from all causes did not differ significantly among diabetic and non-diabetic participants. Therefore, a comprehensive community-based smoking prevention program is important, given the increasing trend of smoking among the Iranian population regardless of diabetes status. PMID:26930192

  4. Evaluation of the Association between Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and Diabetes in Epidemiological Studies: A National Toxicology Program Workshop Review

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Raymond F.; Anderson, Henry A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Blystone, Chad; DeVito, Michael; Jacobs, David; Köhrle, Josef; Lee, Duk-Hee; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Turyk, Mary E.; Boyles, Abee L.; Thayer, Kristina A.; Lind, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a major threat to public health in the United States and worldwide. Understanding the role of environmental chemicals in the development or progression of diabetes is an emerging issue in environmental health. Objective: We assessed the epidemiologic literature for evidence of associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and type 2 diabetes. Methods: Using a PubMed search and reference lists from relevant studies or review articles, we identified 72 epidemiological studies that investigated associations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) with diabetes. We evaluated these studies for consistency, strengths and weaknesses of study design (including power and statistical methods), clinical diagnosis, exposure assessment, study population characteristics, and identification of data gaps and areas for future research. Conclusions: Heterogeneity of the studies precluded conducting a meta-analysis, but the overall evidence is sufficient for a positive association of some organochlorine POPs with type 2 diabetes. Collectively, these data are not sufficient to establish causality. Initial data mining revealed that the strongest positive correlation of diabetes with POPs occurred with organochlorine compounds, such as trans-nonachlor, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dioxins and dioxin-like chemicals. There is less indication of an association between other nonorganochlorine POPs, such as perfluoroalkyl acids and brominated compounds, and type 2 diabetes. Experimental data are needed to confirm the causality of these POPs, which will shed new light on the pathogenesis of diabetes. This new information should be considered by governmental bodies involved in the regulation of environmental contaminants. PMID:23651634

  5. Therapeutic effects of Citrullus colocynthis fruit in patients with type II diabetes: A clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Barghamdi, Batol; Ghorat, Fereshteh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Peyghambari, Robab; Abangah, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Citrullus colocynthis plant was traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Sabzevar city, Iran. This study aimed to investigate the effects of C. colocythis on fasting blood sugar (FBS) and HbA1c in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: Totally 70 patients with type II diabetes attending the diabetes clinic in Sabzevar city were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups of intervention and placebo randomly and were studied for 2 months. Mean serum level of FBS and HbA1c was compared within and between groups at the end of the study. Data were analyzed using student and paired t-tests via SPSS software version 16. Results: A significant difference was revealed between before and after intervention for HbA1c and FBS levels in the intervention group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). The difference between before and after intervention for FBS and HbA1c levels in the placebo group were not significant (P = 0.8, P = 0.68 respectively). This study showed a negative relationship between either the mean ± standard deviation serum level of FBS or HbA1c and body mass index in the treatment group significantly (P = 0.03, 0.008, respectively). The present study did not identify any side effects during the study period among the treatment group. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, application of 125 mg C. colocynthis once per day for 2 months can lead to considerable decrease in the mean levels of HbA1c and FBS among the patients with type II diabetes without any side effects. PMID:27134465

  6. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  7. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D Score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  8. Early Malnutrition and Child Neurobehavioral Development: Insights from the Study of Children of Diabetic Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzo, Thomas A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studied whether disturbances in mothers' metabolism (N=139) during pregnancy may exert long-range effects on neurobehavioral development of singleton progeny. Examined detailed pregnancy and perinatal records of mothers who experienced diabetes in pregnancy and intelligence tests of their offspring, administered at ages 7 to 11 years. All…

  9. Mixed methods study of engagement in behaviors to prevent type 2 diabetes among employees with pre-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kullgren, Jeffrey T; Knaus, Megan; Jenkins, Kristi Rahrig; Heisler, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background Many employers use screenings to identify and recommend modification of employees' risk factors for type 2 diabetes, yet little is known about how often employees then engage in recommended behaviors and what factors influence engagement. We examined the frequency of, facilitators of, and barriers to engagement in recommended behaviors among employees found to have pre-diabetes during a workplace screening. Methods We surveyed 82 University of Michigan employees who were found to have pre-diabetes during a 2014 workplace screening and compared the characteristics of employees who 3 months later were and were not engaged in recommended behaviors. We interviewed 40 of these employees to identify the facilitators of and barriers to engagement in recommended behaviors. Results 3 months after screening, 54% of employees with pre-diabetes reported attempting to lose weight and getting recommended levels of physical activity, had asked their primary care provider about metformin for diabetes prevention, or had attended a Diabetes Prevention Program. These employees had higher median levels of motivation to prevent type 2 diabetes (9/10 vs 7/10, p<0.001) and lower median estimations of their risk for type 2 diabetes (40% vs 60%, p=0.02). Key facilitators of engagement were high motivation and social and external supports. Key barriers were lack of motivation and resources, and competing demands. Conclusions Most employees found to have pre-diabetes through a workplace screening were engaged in a recommended preventive behavior 3 months after the screening. This engagement could be enhanced by optimizing motivation and risk perception as well as leveraging social networks and external supports. PMID:27738513

  10. Lesser than diabetes hyperglycemia in pregnancy is related to perinatal mortality: a cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes related morbidity increases along the continuum of the glycemic spectrum. Perinatal mortality, as a complication of gestational diabetes, has been little investigated. In early studies, an association was found, but in more recent ones it has not been confirmed. The Brazilian Study of Gestational Diabetes, a cohort of untreated pregnant women enrolled in the early 1990's, offers a unique opportunity to investigate this question. Thus, our objective is to evaluate whether perinatal mortality increases in a continuum across the maternal glycemic spectrum. Methods We prospectively enrolled and followed 4401 pregnant women attending general prenatal care clinics in six Brazilian state capitals, without history of diabetes outside of pregnancy, through to birth, and their offspring through the early neonatal period. Women answered a structured questionnaire and underwent a standardized 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Obstetric care was maintained according to local protocols. We obtained antenatal, delivery and neonatal data from hospital records. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using logistic regression. Results We ascertained 97 perinatal deaths (67 fetal and 31 early neonatal). Odds of dying increased according to glucose levels, statistically significantly so only for women delivering at gestational age ≥34 weeks (p < 0.05 for glycemia-gestational age interaction). ORs for a 1 standard deviation difference in glucose, when analyzed continuously, were for fasting 1.47 (95% CI 1.12, 1.92); 1-h 1.55 (95% CI 1.15, 2.07); and 2-h 1.53 (95% CI 1.15, 2.02). The adjusted OR for IADPSG criteria gestational diabetes was 2.21 (95% CI 1.15, 4.27); and for WHO criteria gestational diabetes, 3.10 (95% CI 1.39, 6.88). Conclusions In settings of limited detection and treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus, women across a spectrum of lesser than diabetes hyperglycemia, experienced a continuous rise in perinatal death with

  11. [Surgery for diabetes type 2?].

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus K; Nocito, A; Schiesser, M

    2010-02-17

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence in western society. Obesity represents a well established risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. Several studies on surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity have shown a postoperative reduction of obesity-related co-morbidities. Thus, diabetes mellitus type 2 was shown to resolve or improve in more than 75% of morbidly obese patients (BMI >35) after bariatric surgery. These insights paved the way for the advent of metabolic surgery - a novel field with the goal to improve glucose metabolism in patients with a BMI of less than 35. Encouraging results from mostly observational studies have sparked the interest in the surgical management of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  12. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus: lessons learned from the TODAY study.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sumana; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2014-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasingly diagnosed in obese children and adolescents. Evidence suggests that this disease commonly progresses more rapidly in youth compared with adults and is associated with high rates of early microalbuminuria, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study was the first multiethnic, multicenter randomized trial in the United States to compare 3 treatment approaches in obese youth with new-onset type 2 diabetes (n=699; ages 10-17 years): monotherapy with metformin, metformin with rosiglitazone, and metformin with an intensive lifestyle intervention. The primary outcome was glycemic control. Diabetes-related complications and cardiovascular risk factors were also examined. Approximately half of the participants could not maintain glycemic control by using metformin alone. Combination therapy with metformin and rosiglitazone resulted in better durability of glycemic control, and metformin plus intensive lifestyle intervention was intermediate but not superior to metformin alone. Deterioration in glycemic control was associated with rapid loss of beta cell function, not worsened insulin sensitivity, and could not be explained by differences in adherence or body mass index. After 3.9 years, 236 (33.8%) of participants had hypertension and 116 participants (16.6%) had microalbuminuria. Only 55.9% of participants had a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL (to convert to mmol/L, multiply by 0.0259) after 3 years, and 71 of 517 participants (13.7%) had retinopathy. The significance of the findings from this important trial for the management of youth and young adults with youth-onset type 2 diabetes and its complications is discussed. An aggressive multifaceted approach is needed to prevent or forestall premature microvascular and macrovascular complications in youth-onset type 2 diabetes.

  13. Television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L; Hamer, M

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the longitudinal association between television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus in an elderly sample of adults in England. Methods Analyses of data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. At baseline (2008), participants reported their television viewing time and physical activity level. Diabetes mellitus was recorded from self-reported physician diagnosis at 2-year follow-up. Associations between television viewing time and combined television viewing time and physical activity level with risk of incident diabetes mellitus at follow-up were examined using adjusted logistic regression models. Results A total of 5964 participants (mean ± sd age 65 ± 9 years at baseline, 44% male) were included in the analyses. There was an association between baseline television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up (≥ 6 h/day compared with <2 h/day; odds ratio 4.27, 95% CI 1.69, 10.77), although the association was attenuated to the null in final adjusted models that included BMI. Participants who were inactive/had high television viewing time at baseline were almost twice as likely to have diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up than those who were active/had low television viewing time (fully adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.02, 3.68), although active participants reporting high television viewing were not at risk. Conclusion Interventions to reduce the incidence of diabetes in the elderly that focus on both increasing physical activity and reducing television viewing time might prove useful. PMID:24975987

  14. Serum uric acid predicts vascular complications in adults with type 1 diabetes: the coronary artery calcification in type 1 diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M; Rivard, Christopher J; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association's ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study participants (N = 652) were 19-56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6 years later. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3 %/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root-transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2-2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1-3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1-1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4-3.0) and CACp (1.5, 1.1-1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6 years. SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  15. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Vascular Complications in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Epidemiologic evidence support a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years, and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association’s ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed-tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root transformed CAC-volume ≥ 2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated-discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1–3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1–1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4–3.0) and CACp (1.5 (1.1–1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6-years. Conclusion SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes, and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  16. The Influence of Health Literacy and Depression on Diabetes Self-Management: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Everett, B.; Astorga, C.; Yogendran, D.; Salamonson, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on health literacy in the clinical setting and in the literature, there is still ongoing debate about its influence on diabetes self-management. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological factors on health literacy and diabetes self-management. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 224 patients with type 2 diabetes at two diabetes centres in Sydney, Australia. Findings showed that people with low health literacy were more likely to (a) have lower educational attainment; (b) be migrants; and (c) have depressed mood. Unexpectedly, those who met HbA1c threshold of good glucose control were more likely to have low health literacy. Predictors of low diabetes self-management included (a) younger age group (AOR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.24–4.64); (b) having postsecondary education (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.05–5.01); (c) low knowledge of diabetes management (AOR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25–4.20); and (d) having depressed mood (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30–4.06). The finding that depressed mood predicted both low health literacy and low diabetes self-management stresses the importance of screening for depression. Increasing people's understanding of diabetes self-management and supporting those with depression are crucial to enhance participation in diabetes self-management.

  17. The Influence of Health Literacy and Depression on Diabetes Self-Management: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Everett, B.; Astorga, C.; Yogendran, D.; Salamonson, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on health literacy in the clinical setting and in the literature, there is still ongoing debate about its influence on diabetes self-management. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological factors on health literacy and diabetes self-management. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 224 patients with type 2 diabetes at two diabetes centres in Sydney, Australia. Findings showed that people with low health literacy were more likely to (a) have lower educational attainment; (b) be migrants; and (c) have depressed mood. Unexpectedly, those who met HbA1c threshold of good glucose control were more likely to have low health literacy. Predictors of low diabetes self-management included (a) younger age group (AOR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.24–4.64); (b) having postsecondary education (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.05–5.01); (c) low knowledge of diabetes management (AOR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25–4.20); and (d) having depressed mood (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30–4.06). The finding that depressed mood predicted both low health literacy and low diabetes self-management stresses the importance of screening for depression. Increasing people's understanding of diabetes self-management and supporting those with depression are crucial to enhance participation in diabetes self-management. PMID:27595113

  18. The Influence of Health Literacy and Depression on Diabetes Self-Management: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Maneze, D; Everett, B; Astorga, C; Yogendran, D; Salamonson, Y

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on health literacy in the clinical setting and in the literature, there is still ongoing debate about its influence on diabetes self-management. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological factors on health literacy and diabetes self-management. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 224 patients with type 2 diabetes at two diabetes centres in Sydney, Australia. Findings showed that people with low health literacy were more likely to (a) have lower educational attainment; (b) be migrants; and (c) have depressed mood. Unexpectedly, those who met HbA1c threshold of good glucose control were more likely to have low health literacy. Predictors of low diabetes self-management included (a) younger age group (AOR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.24-4.64); (b) having postsecondary education (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.05-5.01); (c) low knowledge of diabetes management (AOR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25-4.20); and (d) having depressed mood (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30-4.06). The finding that depressed mood predicted both low health literacy and low diabetes self-management stresses the importance of screening for depression. Increasing people's understanding of diabetes self-management and supporting those with depression are crucial to enhance participation in diabetes self-management. PMID:27595113

  19. Reticuloendothelial hyperphagocytosis occurs in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Studies with colloidal carbon, albumin microaggregates, and soluble fibrin monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, R.P.

    1982-02-01

    In contrast to previous studies of diabetic humans and animals, which reported unchanged or depressed function, reticuloendothelial system (RES) hyperphagocytosis of colloidal carbon, /sup 125/I-albumin microaggregates, and /sup 125/I-fibrin monomers were observed in rats as early as 14 days after the induction of diabetes with streptozotocin (STZ). The fact that enhanced phagocytosis by RE macrophages was prevented by chronic insulin replacement therapy indicates that the diabetic internal environment of hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia was perhaps responsible for the observed changes. Experiments involving organ localization of intravenously administered particles, perfusion of isolated livers, and microscopic examination of the liver all suggested that increased Kupffer cell activity was the primary event in RES hyperphagocytosis by STZ-diabetic rats. Both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Kupffer cells were apparent in livers of STZ-diabetic animals as evidenced by photomicrographs and hepatic cell quantification. Plasma fibronectin, which binds fibrin monomers to RE macrophages before phagocytosis, was significantly decreased in the circulation of STZ-diabetic rats, but the level of cell-associated fibronectin was not measured. Renal localization of urea-soluble /sup 125/I-fibrin monomers exceeded splenic and pulmonary uptake in normal control rats and was enhanced in animals with STZ-diabetes. Changes in fibronectin levels, fibrin monomer localization, and Kupffer cell size and numbers in experimental diabetes in rats may have implications for the pathogenesis of vascular disease involving phagocytic mesangial and foam cells in diabetic humans.

  20. Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Julius; Bellmann, Maike; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile apps for people with diabetes offer great potential to support therapy management, increase therapy adherence, and reduce the probability of the occurrence of accompanying and secondary diseases. However, they are rarely used by elderly patients due to a lack of acceptance. Objective We investigated the question “Which factors influence the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older?” Particular emphasis was placed on the current use of mobile devices/apps, acceptance-promoting/-inhibiting factors, features of a helpful diabetes app, and contact persons for technical questions. This qualitative study was the third of three substudies investigating factors influencing acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older. Methods Guided interviews were chosen in order to get a comprehensive insight into the subjective perspective of elderly diabetes patients. At the end of each interview, the patients tested two existing diabetes apps to reveal obstacles in (first) use. Results Altogether, 32 patients with diabetes were interviewed. The mean age was 68.8 years (SD 8.2). Of 32 participants, 15 (47%) knew apps, however only 2 (6%) had already used a diabetes app within their therapy. The reasons reported for being against the use of apps were a lack of additional benefits (4/8, 50%) compared to current therapy management, a lack of interoperability with other devices/apps (1/8, 12%), and no joy of use (1/8, 12%). The app test revealed the following main difficulties in use: nonintuitive understanding of the functionality of the apps (26/29, 90%), nonintuitive understanding of the menu navigation/labeling (19/29, 66%), font sizes and representations that were too small (14/29, 48%), and difficulties in recognizing and pressing touch-sensitive areas (14/29, 48%). Furthermore, the patients felt the apps lacked individually important functions (11/29, 38%), or felt the functions that were offered were unnecessary for their own

  1. Intervention with vitamins in patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Smolek, Michael K; Notaroberto, Neil F; Jaramillo, Arley G; Pradillo, Lisa R

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether a combination of vitamins B6, B9, and B12 is an effective intervention for reducing the signs and symptoms of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods Ten subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 20 eyes) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy were recruited from a private practice ophthalmology clinic for this open-label, uncontrolled, prospective six-month study. Metanx® vitamin tablets (containing 3 mg L-methylfolate calcium, 35 mg pyridoxal-5′-phosphate, and 2 mg methylcobalamin) were administered at a dosage of two tablets daily. Primary outcome indicators were the percent change in mean retinal sensitivity threshold measured by macular microperimetry and the percent change in mean central retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Results Three subjects were lost to follow-up. In the remaining seven subjects, two of 14 eyes had foveal edema that prevented microperimetry measurements due to poor fixation. The remaining 12 eyes showed a nonlinear improvement in mean threshold retinal sensitivity (P < 0.001). Overall change in mean central retinal thickness in 14 eyes was linear (R2 = 0.625; P = 0.034), with a significant reduction between one and six months (P = 0.012). Conclusion In this pilot study, the Metanx intervention appeared to have some beneficial effects with respect to reducing retinal edema and increasing light sensitivity in subjects with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23898220

  2. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  3. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  4. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  5. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Iceland and Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. These studies, conducted in Iceland and in Antarctica, investigated physical and chemical weathering mechanisms and rates, eolitan processes, mudflow phenomena, drainage development, and catastrophic fluvial and volcanic phenomena. Continuing investigations in Iceland fall in three main catagories: (1) catastrophic floods of the Jokulsa a Fjollum, (2) lahars associated with explosive volcanic eruptions of Askja caldera, and (3) rates of eolian abrasion in cold, volcanic deserts. The ice-free valleys of Antarctica, in particular those in South Victoria Land, have much is common with the surface of Mars. In addition to providing independent support for the application of the Iceland findings to consideration of the martian erosional system, the Antarctic observations also provide analogies to other martian phenomena. For example, a family of sand dunes in Victoria Valley are stabilized by the incorporation of snow as beds.

  6. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Washington and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. Investigations discussed address principally mudflow phenomena and drainage development. At the Valley of 10,000 Smokes (Katmai, AK) and Mount St. Helens, WA, studies of the development of erosional landforms (in particular, drainage) on fresh, new surfaces permitted analysis of the result of competition between geomorphic processes. Of specific interest is the development of stream pattern as a function of the competition between perennial seepage overland flow (from glacial or groundwater sources), ephemeral overland flow (from pluvial or seasonal melt sources), and ephemeral/perennial groundwater sapping, as a function of time since initial resurfacing, material properties, and seasonal/annual environmental conditions.

  7. Sense of coherence in people with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus: an observational study from Greece.

    PubMed

    Merakou, K; Koutsouri, A; Antoniadou, E; Barbouni, A; Bertsias, A; Karageorgos, G; Lionis, C

    2013-01-01

    Background Antonovsky's concept of sense of coherence (SOC) has been suggested to relate to health, especially mental health and preventive health behaviours. Psychological distress has been identified as a risk factor for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study of SOC and diabetes has not received much attention in Greece. This study aims to explore the extent to which type 2 diabetes mellitus can affect the SOC score. Methods An observational design was used to test the study hypothesis that individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus would have a lower SOC than those without diabetes mellitus. A total of 202 individuals were studied, consisting of 100 people with diabetes mellitus (the study group) and 102 people with non-chronic orthopaedic conditions (the control group). All of the participants were patients of the Diabetic Clinic or the Orthopaedic Clinic of Livadia Hospital in Central Greece. SOC was assessed using a 29-item SOC questionnaire that had been translated into Greek and validated. Results Patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus had 2.4 times higher odds of having a high SOC score than patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (P = 0.036; odds ratio [OR] = 2.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-5.23). Male patients had 3.9 times higher odds of having a high SOC score (P < 0.001; OR = 3.85, 95% CI = 1.71-8.67) than female patients. With regard to education, patients with a lower level of education had almost three times higher odds of having a high SOC score than patients with a higher level of education (P = 0.024; OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.15-7.67). Conclusions This study adds to the existing literature and indicates that SOC is a health asset. A study with an experimental design would clarify the interesting hypothesis of this study. PMID:24381649

  8. Association between Genetic Variants and Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Populations: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khodaeian, Mehrnoosh; Enayati, Samaneh; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Amoli, Mahsa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as the most prevalent metabolic disease is a multifactorial disease which is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. In this systematic review, we assessed the association between genetic variants and diabetes/its complications in studies with Iranian populations. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Persian web databases were systematically searched up to January 2014. The search terms were “gene,” “polymorphism,” “diabetes,” and “diabetic complications”; nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, foot ulcer, and CAD (coronary artery diseases); and Persian equivalents. Animal studies, letters to editor, and in vitro studies were excluded. Results. Out of overall 3029 eligible articles, 88 articles were included. We found significant association between CTLA-4, IL-18, VDR, TAP2, IL-12, and CD4 genes and T1DM, HNFα and MODY, haptoglobin, paraoxonase, leptin, TCF7L2, calreticulin, ERα, PPAR-γ2, CXCL5, calpain-10, IRS-1 and 2, GSTM1, KCNJ11, eNOS, VDR, INSR, ACE, apoA-I, apo E, adiponectin, PTPN1, CETP, AT1R, resistin, MMP-3, BChE K, AT2R, SUMO4, IL-10, VEGF, MTHFR, and GSTM1 with T2DM or its complications. Discussion. We found some controversial results due to heterogeneity in ethnicity and genetic background. We thought genome wide association studies on large number of samples will be helpful in identifying diabetes susceptible genes as an alternative to studying individual candidate genes in Iranian populations. PMID:26587547

  9. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  10. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and risk of diabetes in Indian women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Fledderjohann, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data from high-income countries suggest that women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are more likely to develop diabetes later in life. Objective We investigated the association between pre-eclampsia and eclampsia (PE&E) during pregnancy and the risk of diabetes in Indian women. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting India. Methods Data from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005–2006), a cross-sectional survey of women aged 15–49 years, are used. Self-reported symptoms suggestive of PE&E were obtained from 39 657 women who had a live birth in the 5 years preceding the survey. The association between PE&E and self-reported diabetes status was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for dietary intake, body mass index (BMI), tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, frequency of TV watching, sociodemographic characteristics and geographic region. Results The prevalence of symptoms suggestive of PE&E in women with diabetes was 1.8% (n=207; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.0; p<0.0001) and 2.1% (n=85; 95% CI 1.8 to 2.3; p<0.0001), respectively, compared with 1.1% (n=304; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.4) and 1.2% (n=426; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.5) in women who did not report any PE&E symptoms. In the multivariable analysis, PE&E was associated with 1.6 times (OR=1.59; 95% CI 1.31 to 1.94; p<0.0001) and 1.4 times (OR=1.36; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.77; p=0.001) higher risk for self-reported diabetes even after controlling for dietary intake, BMI and sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions HDP is strongly associated with the risk of diabetes in a large nationally representative sample of Indian women. These findings are important for a country which is already tackling the burden of young onset of diabetes in the population. However, longitudinal medical histories and a clinical measurement of diabetes are needed in this low-resource setting. PMID:27496230

  11. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  12. Studies of the Martian Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    This report covers two awards: the first NAGW-2573 was awarded to enable participation in the Mars 94 mission that slipped to become the Mars 96 mission. Upon the unfortunate failure of Mars 96 to achieve its intended trajectory, the second grant was awarded to closeout the Mars 96 activities. Our initial efforts concentrated on assisting our colleagues: W. Riedler, K. Schwingenschuh, K. Gringanz, M. Verigin and Ye. Yeroshenko with advice on the development of the magnetic field portion of the investigation and to help them with test activities. We also worked with them to properly analyze the Phobos magnetic field and plasma data in order to optimize the return from the Mars 94/96 mission. This activity resulted in 18 papers on Mars scientific topics, and two on the instrumentation. One of these latter two papers was the last of the papers written, and speaks to the value of the closeout award. These 20 papers are listed in the attached bibliography. Because we had previously studied Venus and Titan and since it was becoming evident that the magnetic field was very weak, we compared the various properties of the Martian interaction with those of the analogous interactions at Venus and Titan while other papers simply analyzed the properties of the interaction as Phobos 2 observed them. One very interesting observation was the identification of ions picked up in the solar wind, originating in Mars neutral atmosphere. These had been predicted by our earlier observation of cyclotron waves at the proton gyrofrequency in the region upstream from Mars in the solar wind. Of course, the key question we addressed was that of the intrinsic or induced nature of the Martian magnetic field. We found little evidence for the former and much for the latter point of view. We also discussed the instrumentation planned for the Mars balloon and the instrumentation on the orbiter. In all these studies were very rewarding despite the short span of the Phobos data. Although they did not

  13. Diet, lifestyle, and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes: a review from the Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence collected from three large US cohorts (Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study) has yielded important information regarding the roles of overall diet, individual foods and nutrients, physical activity and other lifestyle factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. Excess adiposity is a major risk factor for diabetes, and thus, maintaining a healthy body weight and avoidance of weight gain during adulthood is the cornerstone of diabetes prevention. Independent of body weight, the quality or type of dietary fat and carbohydrate is more crucial than the quantity in determining diabetes risk. Higher consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits, and nuts is associated with lower risk of diabetes, whereas regular consumption of refined grains, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages including fruits juices is associated with increased risk. Dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and nuts and legumes but lower in red and processed meats, refined grains, and sugar-sweetened beverages are consistently associated with diabetes risk, even after adjustment for body mass index. The genome-wide association studies conducted in these cohorts have contributed substantially to the discoveries of novel genetic loci for type 2 diabetes and other metabolic traits, although the identified common variants explain only a small proportion of overall diabetes predisposition. Taken together, these ongoing large cohort studies have provided convincing epidemiologic evidence that a healthy diet, together with regular physical activity, maintenance of a healthy weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and avoidance of sedentary behaviors and smoking would prevent the majority of type 2 diabetes cases. PMID:25599007

  14. Cognitive Impairment in Diabetes: Rationale and Design Protocol of the Cog-ID Study

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Jolien; Kooistra, Minke; van den Berg, Esther; Kappelle, L Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment frequently co-occurs with type 2 diabetes but is often undiagnosed. Cognitive impairment affects self-management leading to treatment-related complications. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a stepped diagnostic procedure, consisting of a screening test complemented by an evaluation by a general practitioner (GP), to detect undiagnosed cognitive impairment in older people with type 2 diabetes. Methods The accuracy of two self-administered cognitive tests, the “Test Your Memory” (TYM) and “Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination” (SAGE) alone, and in combination with an evaluation by a GP will be assessed. A diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia at a memory clinic will serve as reference standard. This cognitive impairment in diabetes (Cog-ID) study will include 513 people from primary care facilities aged ≥70 with type 2 diabetes. The participants will first fill out the TYM and SAGE tests, followed by a standardized GP evaluation for cognitive impairment, including a mini mental state examination (MMSE). Subsequently, participants suspected of cognitive impairment (on either test or the GP assessment) and a random sample of 15% (65/435) of participants without suspected cognitive impairment will be referred to the memory clinic. At the memory clinic, a medical examination, neuropsychological examination, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain will be performed. Participants will also fill out questionnaires assessing health status and depressive symptoms at baseline and after 6 and 24 months. Results This research obtained funding and ethical approval. Enrolment started in August, 2012, and all study-related activities will be completed in September, 2016. Conclusions With the results from this study, physicians will be able to detect cognitive impairment affecting type 2 diabetes patients through case-finding, and can use tailored care to reduce associated complications

  15. Protocol and baseline data from The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service evaluation study: a health services intervention study for diabetes care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most disabling chronic conditions worldwide, resulting in significant human, social and economic costs and placing huge demands on health care systems. The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service aims to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of care for patients with type 2 diabetes who have been referred by their general practitioner to a specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Care is provided by a multidisciplinary, integrated team consisting of an endocrinologist, diabetes nurse educators, General Practitioner Clinical Fellows (general practitioners who have undertaken focussed post-graduate training in complex diabetes care), and allied health personnel (a dietitian, podiatrist and psychologist). Methods/Design Using a geographical control, this evaluation study tests the impact of this model of diabetes care provided by the service on patient outcomes compared to usual care provided at the specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Data collection at baseline, 6 and 12-months will compare the primary outcome (glycaemic control) and secondary outcomes (serum lipid profile, blood pressure, physical activity, smoking status, quality of life, diabetes self-efficacy and cost-effectiveness). Discussion This model of diabetes care combines the patient focus and holistic care valued by the primary care sector with the specialised knowledge and skills of hospital diabetes care. Our study will provide empirical evidence about the clinical effectiveness of this model of care. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000010392. PMID:20492731

  16. Study on Total Antioxidant Status in Relation to Oxidative Stress in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rani, A. Jamuna; Mythili, S.V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a condition of increased oxidative stress and requiries antioxidants. The sum of endogenous and food derived antioxidants represents the total antioxidant activity of the system. The cooperation among different antioxidants provides greater protection against damage caused by reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species, than any single compound alone. Thus the overall antioxidant capacity may provide more relevant biological information compared to that obtained by the measurement of individual components, as it considers the cumulative effect of all antioxidants present in plasma and body fluids and hence the study. Materials and Methods: The study population included healthy volunteers from staff of Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital (SBMC&H) and Type 2 Diabetic patients attending SBMC&H, Chennai, India. Malondialdehyde levels and total antioxidant status of the case and controls was assessed. Results: A significant decrease in the total antioxidant status among Diabetic patients and significant increase in their malondialdehyde levels in comparison to healthy controls was observed. Conclusion: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a condition in which there is increased oxidative stress as evident by increased Malondialdehyde levels and the condition calls for utilization of antioxidants to combat the oxidants thereby resulting in decreased total antioxidants status. PMID:24783095

  17. Diagnostic perspective of saliva in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus children: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, P. V. S. Deepa; Sridevi, E.; Sai Sankar, A. J.; Manoj Kumar, M. G.; Sridhar, M.; Sujatha, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The absence, destruction, or loss of β-cells of pancreas results in type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM]). Presently, diagnosis and periodic monitoring of diabetes is achieved by evaluating blood glucose levels as it is relatively invasive and dreaded by children. In the light of this, present study was planned to compare salivary glucose values with blood glucose values and the biochemical characteristics of saliva in IDDM children were evaluated and obtained results were compared with the salivary parameters of normal children. Materials and Methods: Thirty IDDM children and 30 healthy children were selected for the study. Fasting blood sample and unstimulated salivary sample were collected from all the subjects and were subjected for analysis. Results: A weak positive correlation was noticed between fasting blood glucose and salivary glucose values in IDDM children. But a mean average of salivary glucose was high in IDDM children when compared with healthy children. The biochemical parameters like acid phosphatase, total protein count, and α-amylase were increased, whereas salivary urea did not show significant variation between the groups. Conclusion: With presently used diagnostic armamentarium, estimation of salivary glucose cannot replace the standard method of estimation of glucose in diabetic mellitus children. The established relationship was very weak with many variations. PMID:26681845

  18. Analysis of the Indian Council of Medical Research-India Diabetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study.

    PubMed

    Narayan, K M Venkat; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B

    2011-07-01

    The Indian Council of Medical Research-India Diabetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study is the first nationally representative survey of diabetes in India. It aims to provide national and regional counts of diabetes and prediabetes and also of cardiovascular risk factors. This ambitious and complex survey uses robust sampling techniques, standardized methods, appropriate quality assurance, and a three-phase data collection. However, the survey should be completed within a reasonable time span to avoid a differential effect of secular trends on regional estimates. A high response rate and low missing values must also be ensured. Reliance on capillary whole blood glucose (CBG) for the diagnosis of hyperglycemic states is a limitation of the survey. However, this is a reasonable compromise given the practical challenges of such a large study. Despite a good correlation between CBG and venous plasma glucose (VPG), the use of CBG may misclassify glycemic status. A better characterization of the CBG-VPG relationship, and the performance of CBG for detecting hyperglycemia, using a much larger sample, seems therefore advisable. This should be possible given that venous blood has been collected on a sizeable subset of participants. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the Madras Diabetes Research Foundation deserve praise for this massive undertaking, which will highlight areas for policy action and establish a national framework for noncommunicable disease (NCD) surveillance. The ICMR-INDIAB survey lays the foundation for effective NCD prevention and control and for applied public health research.

  19. Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus epidemiology: HLA genotype study in 12 north eastern Italian families with two siblings affected by type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, L; Drei, F; Gonfiantini, E; Visentin, A; Roata, C; Ciaffoni, S; Maffeis, C

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the histocompatibility antigens and type I diabetes mellitus in families living in the north-eastern part of Italy. In each family two siblings were affected by diabetes. HLA-antigens were determined with the lymphocytotoxicity test, utilizing antisera of the series A-B-C-DR. The phenotypic frequencies were compared with those observed in controls. We showed that diabetes has a strong association with HLA DR 3 and/or DR 4 antigens. In particular we registered high frequency of compound heterozygous DR 3 - DR 4 subjects, and this fact supports the hypothesis of the existence of two different genes for diabetes associated with these HLA antigens. Moreover we observed a particular haplotype segregation with a very high percentage of HLA identity between patients belonging to the same family, confirming the association between HLA and genetic susceptibility to insulin dependent diabetes. These results confirm data in the literature and, completed by other data from other patients' families living in our area, will be useful in providing reliable genetic counselling. PMID:2606174

  20. Geometrical study of nanoscale field effect diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manavizadeh, Negin; Raissi, Farshid; Asl Soleimani, Ebrahim; Pourfath, Mahdi

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the previously proposed side-contacted field effect diode (FED) is carefully studied and its characteristic is compared against that of a modified FED and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). The influences of the body thickness, each gate length and access resistance are investigated. The figures of merit including intrinsic gate delay time and energy-delay product, which represent the speed and switching energy of the device, respectively, are studied. Our results highlight that FEDs are good candidates for obtaining a high Ion/Ioff ratio with a relatively short delay time compared to conventional FEDs and MOSFETs. We show that by a careful scaling of the source-drain region, the access resistance can be optimized. We demonstrate that a well-tempered device with a high switching response and a lower energy consumption can be achieved with a 30 nm body thickness, 85 nm source-drain length and a drain gate length longer than the source gate length.

  1. Potassium intake and risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, L. A.; Yeh, H. C.; Anderson, C. A.; Daviglus, M. L.; Liu, K.; Brancati, F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Serum potassium has been found to be a significant predictor of diabetes risk, but the effect of dietary potassium on diabetes risk is not clear. We sought to determine if dietary potassium is associated with risk of incident type 2 diabetes in young adults. Methods We used data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Potassium intake was measured by (1) an average of three 24 h urinary potassium collections at the 5-year study visit, and (2) the CARDIA dietary assessment instrument at baseline. Incident type 2 diabetes cases were ascertained on the basis of use of diabetes medication and laboratory measurements. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders including intake of fruit and vegetables and other dietary factors. Results Of 1,066 participants with urinary potassium measurements, 99 (9.3%) developed diabetes over 15 years of follow-up. In multivariate models, adults in the lowest urinary potassium quintile were more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as their counterparts in the highest quintile (HR 2.45; 95% CI 1.08, 5.59). Of 4,754 participants with dietary history measurements, 373 (7.8%) developed diabetes over 20 years of follow-up. In multivariate models, African-Americans had a significantly increased risk of diabetes with lower potassium intake, which was not found in whites. Conclusions/interpretation Low dietary potassium is associated with increased risk of incident diabetes in African-Americans. Randomised clinical trials are needed to determine if potassium supplementation, from either dietary or pharmacological sources, could reduce the risk of diabetes, particularly in higher-risk populations. PMID:22322920

  2. Study of Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Sonal; Gupta, Neeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic retina undergoes degenerative changes in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in addition to vascular changes. Loss of RNFL with changes in inner retina and their association with metabolic control have been studied with varied results in diabetic patients. Aim To compare the RNFL thickness between diabetic patients and age matched healthy controls and to correlate the thickness to metabolic control. Materials and Methods One hundred and sixty five patients were enrolled in the study out of which 50 served as controls, 58 patients were diabetic without retinopathy and 57 patients had diabetic retinopathy. Both eyes of all patients underwent optical coherence tomography scans for RNFL and ganglion cell complex. Foveal and parafoveal thickness were also measured. All the parameters were compared to patient’s metabolic control. Results RNFL thinning was observed in superotemporal (p-value = 0.001) and upper nasal sectors (p-value = 0.031) around the optic disc in eyes with diabetic retinopathy. Ganglion cell complex also showed statistically significant thinning in diabetic patients. Creatinine levels showed a weak negative correlation to the RNFL. Conclusion This study positively concluded that neurodegeneration in an early component of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27630874

  3. Lactate and Risk of Incident Diabetes in a Case-Cohort of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Shantha, Ghanshyam Palamaner Subash; Chu, Audrey Y.; Miller, Edgar R.; Guallar, Eliseo; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Pankow, James S.; Young, J. Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxidative capacity is decreased in type 2 diabetes. Whether decreased oxidative capacity is a cause or consequence of diabetes is unknown. Our purpose is to evaluate whether lactate, a marker of oxidative capacity, is associated with incident diabetes. Methods and Findings We conducted a case-cohort study in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study at year 9 of follow-up. We evaluated lactate’s association with diabetes risk factors at baseline and estimated the hazard ratio for incident diabetes by quartiles of plasma lactate in 544 incident diabetic cases and 533 non-cases. Plasma lactate showed a graded positive relationship with fasting glucose and insulin (P<0.001). The relative hazard for incident diabetes increased across lactate quartiles (P-trend ≤0.001). Following adjustment for demographic factors, medical history, physical activity, adiposity, and serum lipids, the hazard ratio in the highest quartile was 2.05 times the hazard in the lowest quartile (95% CI: 1.28, 3.28). After including fasting glucose and insulin the association became non-significant. Conclusions Lactate, an indicator of oxidative capacity, predicts incident diabetes independent of many other risk factors and is strongly related to markers of insulin resistance. Future studies should evaluate the temporal relationship between elevated lactate and impaired fasting glucose and insulin resistance. PMID:23383072

  4. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus in patients with diabetes mellitus: a comparative cross sectional study at Woldiya General Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Daniel; Gebre-Selassie, Solomon; Fantaw, Surafel; Hunegnaw, Andualem; Mihret, Adane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The overall prevalence of HBV in Ethiopia varies from 4.7-16.8% for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 70-76.38% for at least one marker positive. Patients suffering from type I Diabetes Mellitus (DM) incur high risk of infection with hepatotropic viruses because of frequent hospitalization and blood tests. Methods A comparative cross sectional study was conducted at Woldiya General Hospital using 108 consented study populations from Diabetes and 108 non diabetes control groups during the period November 2010 - January 2011. VISITECT HBsAg rapid test kit and Humastat 80 chemistry analyzer were used. Multivariate logistic regression was used to see the association of HBV with clinical history of participants and Sociodemographic variables. All tests were two-sided with α-level of 0.05 and 80% power. Results Prevalence of HBsAg was equal between diabetic and non diabetic individuals, 3.7% indicating that there was no difference between the two groups. Only history of invasive procedures and chronic liver disease showed association with HBsAg seropositivity. Conclusion In this study a positive relation was not indicated between HBV and Diabetes and the prevalence of HBsAg was equal between diabetic and non diabetic individuals. PMID:24932351

  5. Longitudinal association between toenail zinc levels and the incidence of diabetes among American young adults: The CARDIA Trace Element Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Suk; Xun, Pengcheng; Li, Jing; Morris, Steve J; Jacobs, David R; Liu, Kiang; He, Ka

    2016-01-01

    Data on primary prevention of zinc status and diabetes risk are sparse and inconsistent. Of note, the previous studies measured either dietary zinc intake with questionnaire or zinc status in serum or hair. Toenail zinc levels are reliable biomarkers of a relatively long-term exposure. A total of 3,960 American young adults, aged 20-32 years, free of diabetes at baseline in 1987 when toenail clippings were collected, were examined for incident diabetes through 2010. Toenail zinc levels were measured with an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectroscopy method. Incident diabetes cases were identified by fasting or non-fasting plasma glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests, hemoglobin A1C levels, and/or antidiabetic medications. During the 23-year follow-up, 418 incident diabetes occurred. After adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, study center, body mass index, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, family history of diabetes, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and other dietary and non-dietary potential confounders, the hazard ratio of incident diabetes comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of toenail zinc levels was 1.21 (95% CI: 0.90-1.63; Ptrend = 0.20). Findings from this study do not support the hypothesis that zinc status is inversely and longitudinally associated with the incidence of diabetes in American young adults. PMID:26980156

  6. Longitudinal association between toenail zinc levels and the incidence of diabetes among American young adults: The CARDIA Trace Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Suk; Xun, Pengcheng; Li, Jing; Morris, Steve J.; Jacobs, David R.; Liu, Kiang; He, Ka

    2016-01-01

    Data on primary prevention of zinc status and diabetes risk are sparse and inconsistent. Of note, the previous studies measured either dietary zinc intake with questionnaire or zinc status in serum or hair. Toenail zinc levels are reliable biomarkers of a relatively long-term exposure. A total of 3,960 American young adults, aged 20–32 years, free of diabetes at baseline in 1987 when toenail clippings were collected, were examined for incident diabetes through 2010. Toenail zinc levels were measured with an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectroscopy method. Incident diabetes cases were identified by fasting or non-fasting plasma glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests, hemoglobin A1C levels, and/or antidiabetic medications. During the 23-year follow-up, 418 incident diabetes occurred. After adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, study center, body mass index, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, family history of diabetes, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and other dietary and non-dietary potential confounders, the hazard ratio of incident diabetes comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of toenail zinc levels was 1.21 (95% CI: 0.90–1.63; Ptrend = 0.20). Findings from this study do not support the hypothesis that zinc status is inversely and longitudinally associated with the incidence of diabetes in American young adults. PMID:26980156

  7. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  8. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  9. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  10. Circadian Gene Variants and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. Ann; Rees, Simon D.; Hydrie, M. Zafar I.; Shera, A. Samad; Bellary, Srikanth; O’Hare, J. Paul; Kumar, Sudhesh; Taheri, Shahrad; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732) and without (N = 1780) type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium) and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+) using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66–0.86], p = 3.18×10−5), while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07–1.39], p = 0.003). Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01–1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91–0.99], p = 0.015 respectively). Conclusions/significance None of the selected circadian gene

  11. Assessing adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: a multiple perspective pilot study using visual illness narratives and interviews.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara H; Detzer, Mark J; Welsch, Robert L; Christiano, Ann S; Patashnick, Jennifer L; Rich, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This study explored the illness experiences of adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) using Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment (VIA). Five adolescents with IDDM were asked to videotape 8 hours of their lives over a 1-month period. At the conclusion of the study, the primary investigator interviewed each adolescent and their diabetes clinician. VIA visual illness narratives and follow-up interviews provided clinically important, previously unknown information about how adolescents live with diabetes, including the negative and positive influences of diabetes on the family unit and the individual, that parental involvement was associated with adolescents' diabetes control, and that gender may be a significant mediating factor in control. PMID:15661602

  12. The role of religion and spirituality in coping with type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study among Black men.

    PubMed

    Namageyo-Funa, Apophia; Muilenburg, Jessica; Wilson, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Religion and spirituality are instrumental to coping with health; however, there is limited literature on the use of religion and spirituality among Black men with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study is to explore how Black men use religion or spirituality to cope with diabetes management. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 Black men recruited from a diabetes clinic in Atlanta, Georgia as part of a larger study. This article reports on data from 12 of the 30 Black men who reported the use of religion and spirituality as a coping strategy for diabetes management. The following coping strategies were reported: prayer and belief in God, keeping me alive, turning things over to God, changing my unhealthy behaviors, supplying my needs, reading the Bible, and religious or spiritual individuals helping me. Healthcare professionals and researchers involved in diabetes management among Black men should consider these findings in their efforts. PMID:24357011

  13. Experiences of self-management support from GPs among Australian ethnically diverse diabetes patients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rose, Vanessa K; Harris, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Ethnically diverse diabetes patients face significant challenges in diabetes self-management ranging from cultural expectations to inequalities in health care provision. This study explored the experiences of ethnically diverse patients with diabetes attending group diabetes education in receiving self-management support from GPs. An approach based on phenomenology was used to analyse participants' experiences in self-management support across three group interviews comprising 28 Australian ethnically diverse diabetes patients: Arabic-speaking group (n = 11), English-speaking group (n = 9) and Vietnamese-speaking group (n = 8). Two themes emerged related to the poor quality of information to support self-management and challenges in negotiating traditional consultation styles. In particular, participants believed they knew more about diabetes self-management than their GPs but felt unable to influence consultation style and communicate their changing needs in self-management support. The health care and information needs of ethnically diverse patients continue to be marginalised within health systems. This small exploratory study highlights the need for further research to illuminate interactions between ethnically diverse diabetes patients and GPs in supporting long-term diabetes self-management.

  14. Swedish pediatric diabetes teams' perception of fathers' involvement: A Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Boman, Ase; Povlsen, Lene; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Borup, Ina

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how Swedish pediatric diabetes teams perceived and discussed fathers' involvement in the care of their child with type 1 diabetes. It also aimed to discuss how the teams' attitudes towards the fathers' involvement developed during the data collection process. The Constructivist Grounded Theory design was used and data were collected during three repeated focus group discussions with three Swedish pediatric diabetes teams. The core category of the teams' perception of fathers' involvement emerged as: If dad attends, we are happy - if mom doesn't, we become concerned. Initially the teams balanced their perception of fathers' involvement on the mother's role as the primary caregiver. In connection with the teams' directed attention on fathers, in the focus group discussions, the teams' awareness of the importance of fathers increased. As a consequence, the team members began to encourage fathers' engagement in their child's care. We conclude that by increasing the teams' awareness of fathers as a health resource, an active health promotion perspective could be implemented in pediatric diabetes care.

  15. A cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on diabetic metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Huang, Yanping; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Shouquan; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-26

    Breath acetone is a known biomarker for diabetes mellitus in breath analysis. In this work, a cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on clinical metabolic disorders of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was carried out. Breath acetone concentrations of 113 T2DM patients and 56 apparently healthy individuals were measured at a single time point. Concentrations varied from 0.22 to 9.41 ppmv (mean 1.75 ppmv) for T2DM, which were significantly higher than those for normal controls (ranged from 0.32 to 1.96 ppmv, mean 0.72 ppmv, p = 0.008). Observations in our work revealed that breath acetone concentrations elevated to different degrees, along with the abnormality of blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride and cholesterol. Breath acetone showed obviously positive correlations with blood ketone and urine ketone. Possible metabolic relations between breath acetone and diabetic disorders were also discussed. This work aimed at giving an overall assessment of breath acetone from the perspective of clinical parameters for type 2 diabetes.

  16. Effects of erythritol on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Flint, Nir; Hamburg, Naomi M; Holbrook, Monika; Dorsey, Pamela G; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Berger, Alvin; de Cock, Peter; Bosscher, Douwina; Vita, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    Sugar substitutes are important in the dietary management of diabetes mellitus. Erythritol is a non-caloric dietary bulk sweetener that reverses endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats. We completed a pilot study to examine the effects of erythritol on vascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Participants (n = 24) consumed erythritol 36 g/day as an orange-flavored beverage for 4 weeks and a single dose of 24 g during the baseline and final visits. We assessed vascular function before and after acute (2 h) and chronic (4 weeks) erythritol consumption. Acute erythritol improved endothelial function measured by fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry (0.52 ± 0.48 to 0.87 ± 0.29 au, P = 0.005). Chronic erythritol decreased central pulse pressure (47 ± 13 to 41 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.02) and tended to decrease carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (P = 0.06). Thus, erythritol consumption acutely improved small vessel endothelial function, and chronic treatment reduced central aortic stiffness. Erythritol may be a preferred sugar substitute for patients with diabetes mellitus.

  17. New Methods in Exploring Old Topics: Case Studying Brittle Diabetes in the Family Context

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Wudy, Stefan A.; Brosig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. In questing for a more refined quantitative research approach, we revisited vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling for the analysis of time series data in the context of the so far poorly explored concept of family dynamics surrounding instable diabetes type 1 (or brittle diabetes). Method. We adopted a new approach to VAR analysis from econometrics referred to as the optimized multivariate lag selection process and applied it to a set of raw data previously analyzed through standard approaches. Results. We illustrated recurring psychosomatic circles of cause and effect relationships between emotional and somatic parameters surrounding glycemic control of the child's diabetes and the affective states of all family members. Conclusion. The optimized multivariate lag selection process allowed for more specific, dynamic, and statistically reliable results (increasing R2 tenfold in explaining glycemic variability), which were derived from a larger window of past explanatory variables (lags). Such highly quantitative versus historic more qualitative approaches to case study analysis of psychosomatics surrounding diabetes in adolescents were reflected critically. PMID:26634215

  18. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  19. Biomechanical characteristics of bone in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: An in-vivo randomized controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Korres, Nektarios; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Pavlou, George; Mitsoudis, Athanasios; Perrea, Despina N; Zoumbos, Aristedes B

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vivo effects of type I diabetes on the mechanical strength of tibial bone in a rodent model. METHODS: The biomechanical effect of diabetes on the structural integrity of the tibia in streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats was analysed. Induction of diabetes was achieved by an intra-peritoneal injection and confirmed by measuring serial blood glucose levels (> 150 mg/dL). After 8 wk the tibiae were harvested and compared to a control group. Biomechanical analysis of harvested tibiae was performed using a three-point bending technique on a servo hydraulic MTS 858 MiniBionix frame. Maximum force applied to failure (N), stiffness (N × mm) and energy absorbed (N/mm) were recorded and plotted on load displacement curves. A displacement control loading mode of 1 mm/min was selected to simulate quasi-static loading conditions. Measurements from load-displacement curves were directly compared between groups. RESULTS: Fourteen streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were compared against nineteen non-diabetic controls. An average increase of 155.2 g in body weight was observed in the control group compared with only 5 g in the diabetic group during the experimental study period. Levels of blood glucose increased to 440.25 mg/dL in the diabetic group compared to 116.62 mg/dL in the control group.The biomechanical results demonstrate a highly significant reduction in the maximum load to failure from 69.5 N to 58 N in diabetic group compared to control (P = 0.011). Energy absorption to fracture was reduced from 28.2 N in the control group to 23.5 N in the diabetic group (P = 0.082). No significant differences were observed between the groups for bending stiffness. CONCLUSION: Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rodents reduces the maximum force and energy absorption to failure of bone, suggesting a predisposition for fracture risk. PMID:23878780

  20. Association of lipoprotein lipase D9N polymorphism with myocardial infarction in type 2 diabetes: the genetics, outcomes, and lipids in type 2 diabetes (GOLD) study.

    PubMed

    Izar, Maria C; Helfenstein, Tatiana; Ihara, Silvia S; Relvas, Waldir G; Santos, Andreza O; Fischer, Simone C; Pinto, Leonor E; Lopes, Ieda E; Pomaro, Daniel R; Fonseca, Marilia I; Bodanese, Luis C; Moriguchi, Emilio H; Saraiva, Jose F; Introcaso, Luiz; Souza, Agnaldo D; Scartezini, Marileia; Torres, Kerginaldo P; Zagury, Leao; Jardim, Paulo C; Costa, Eduardo A; Tacito, Lucia H; Forti, Adriana; Magalhaes, Maria E; Chacra, Antonio R; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Loures-Vale, Andreia A; Barros, Marco A; Xavier, Hermes T; Lyra, Ruy; Argamanijan, Dikran; Guimaraes, Armenio; Novazzi, Jose P; Kasinski, Nelson; Afiune, Abrahao; Martinez, Tania L; Santos, Raul D; Nicolau, Jose C; Cesar, Luiz A; Povoa, Rui M; Carvalho, Antonio C; Han, Sang W; Fonseca, Francisco A

    2009-05-01

    The association of polymorphisms affecting lipid metabolism with the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in type 2 diabetes mellitus was investigated. The Genetics, Outcomes and Lipids in type 2 Diabetes (GOLD) Study is a prospective, multicenter study, conducted on 990 patients presenting diabetes and MI (n=386), or diabetes without previous manifestation of stroke, peripheral or coronary arterial disease (n=604), recruited from 27 institutions in Brazil. APO A1 (A/G -75 and C/T +83) and APO C3 (C/G 3'UTR) non-coding sequences, CETP (Taq 1B), LPL (D9N), APO E (epsilon2, epsilon3, epsilon4,), PON-1 (Q192R), and two LCAT variants Arg(147)-->Trp and Tyr(171)-->Stop were tested by PCR-RFLP. There was a higher prevalence of LPL DN genotype (19% vs.12%, p=0.03) and a higher frequency of the N allele (11% vs. 7%) among subjects with MI when compared to controls, with an odds ratio of MI for carriers of 9N allele of 2.46 (95% CI=1.79-3.39, p<0.0001). This association was present in men and women, in non-smokers and in hypertensive patients. A logistic regression model including gender, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, HDL-C, left ventricle hypertrophy and D9N polymorphism showed that the latter still remained significantly associated with MI (OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.02-2.25, p=0.049). These findings suggest that D9N polymorphism can be a useful risk marker for myocardial infarction and that further potential candidate genes should be screened for exploratory analysis and for future therapeutic intervention in diabetes. PMID:18823627

  1. Dual rover human habitation field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    For the last 3 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been testing a pressurized rover prototype in the deserts of Arizona to obtain human-in-the-loop performance data. This year's field trial consisted of operating two rovers simultaneously while embarking on two 7-day flight-like exploration missions. During the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) at Black Point Lava Flow and SP Mountain in Arizona, NASA human factors investigators, in cooperation with other engineers and scientists, collected data on both the daily living and working within and around the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). Both objective and subjective data were collected using standard human factors metrics. Over 305 h of crew habitability data were recorded during the field trial with 65 elements of habitation examined. Acceptability of the vehicles over the course of the missions was considered satisfactory by the majority of the crews. As with previous testing, habitation was considered acceptable by the crews, but some issues concerning stowage, Waste Containment System (WCS) volume, and sleep curtains need to be considered for redesign for the next generation vehicle.

  2. Diabetic nephropathy in a sibling and albuminuria predict early GFR decline: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy is a growing clinical problem, and the cause for >40% of incident ESRD cases. Unfortunately, few modifiable risk factors are known. The objective is to examine if albuminuria and history of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a sibling are associated with early DN progression or mortality. Methods In this longitudinal study of adults >18 yrs with diabetes monitored for up to 9 yrs (mean 4.6 ± 1.7 yrs), 435 subjects at high risk (DN family history) and 400 at low risk (diabetes >10 yrs, normoalbuminuria, no DN family history) for DN progression were evaluated for rate of eGFR change using the linear mixed effects model and progression to ESRD. All-cause mortality was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analyses while controlling for baseline covariates in a Cox proportional hazards model. Covariates included baseline eGFR, age, gender, race, diabetes duration, blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c and urine albumin:creatinine ratio. Propensity score matching was used to identify high and low risk group pairs with balanced covariates. Sensitivity analyses were employed to test for residual confounding. Results Mean baseline eGFR was 74 ml/min/1.73 m2 (86% of cohort >60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Thirty high risk and no low risk subjects developed ESRD. eGFR decline was significantly greater in high compared to low risk subjects. After controlling for confounders, change in eGFR remained significantly different between groups, suggesting that DN family history independently regulates GFR progression. Mortality was also significantly greater in high versus low risk subjects, but after controlling for baseline covariates, no significant difference was observed between groups, indicating that factors other than DN family history more strongly affect mortality. Analyses of the matched pairs confirmed change in eGFR and mortality findings. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the eGFR results were not due to residual confounding by unmeasured covariates of a

  3. Ginseng and Diabetes: The Evidences from In Vitro, Animal and Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hai-Dan; Kim, Jung Tae; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Sung Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Panax ginseng exhibits pleiotropic beneficial effects on cardiovascular system, central nervous system, and immune system. In the last decade, numerous preclinical findings suggest ginseng as a promising therapeutic agent for diabetes prevention and treatment. The mechanism of ginseng and its active components is complex and is demonstrated to either modulate insulin production/secretion, glucose metabolism and uptake, or inflammatory pathway in both insulin-dependent and insulin-independent manners. However, human studies are remained obscure because of contradictory results. While more studies are warranted to further understand these contradictions, ginseng holds promise as a therapeutic agent for diabetes prevention and treatment. This review summarizes the evidences for the therapeutic potential of ginseng and ginsenosides from in vitro studies, animal studies and human clinical trials with a focus on diverse molecular targets including an AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:23717101

  4. The Effect of Intensive Glycemic Treatment on Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetic Participants of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Patricia A.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Genuth, Saul; Wong, Nathan D.; Detrano, Robert; Backlund, Jye-Yu C.; Zinman, Bernard; Jacobson, Alan; Sun, Wanjie; Lachin, John M.; Nathan, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, an observational follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) type 1 diabetes cohort, measured coronary artery calcification (CAC), an index of atherosclerosis, with computed tomography (CT) in 1,205 EDIC patients at ~7–9 years after the end of the DCCT. We examined the influence of the 6.5 years of prior conventional versus intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT, as well as the effects of cardiovascular disease risk factors, on CAC. The prevalences of CAC >0 and >200 Agatston units were 31.0 and 8.5%, respectively. Compared with the conventional treatment group, the intensive group had significantly lower geometric mean CAC scores and a lower prevalence of CAC >0 in the primary retinopathy prevention cohort, but not in the secondary intervention cohort, and a lower prevalence of CAC >200 in the combined cohorts. Waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, before or at the time of CT, were significantly associated with CAC in univariate and multivariate analyses. CAC was associated with mean HbA1c (A1C) levels before enrollment, during the DCCT, and during the EDIC study. Prior intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT was associated with less atherosclerosis, largely because of reduced levels of A1C during the DCCT. PMID:17130504

  5. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  6. Implications of Type1/2 Diabetes Mellitus in Breast Cancer Development: A General Female Population-based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Yung-Po; Ko, Pei-Chieh; Jan, Shiou-Rung; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Lung, Chia-Chi; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Yeh, Liang-Tsai; Chou, Ming-Chih; Tsai, Horng-Der; Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The current study assessed the potential impact of diabetes type 1 and type 2 for female breast cancer risk. Materials and Methods: The health information and medical record of the entire adult female residents in Taiwan were retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models and descriptive statistics were used to identify potential correlations between type 1/2 diabetes and breast cancer. In addition, this study statistically assessed the possible association of diabetes and breast cancer risk with age, insurance amount (quality of care), and regions. Results: The diabetic status of the entire adult female population was assessed between 2001 and 2003. Of 10,827,079 adult females, 4,738 (0.04%) were diagnosed with type 1 and 830,546 (7.7%) with type 2 diabetes, and 9, 991,795 (92.3%) were free of diabetes. From 2004 to 2010, a total of 57,283 cases of breast cancer were detected, with an average breast cancer incidence rate of 0.53% in the generation population. The actual breast cancer incidence rate was 0.30% (14 of 4,738) in patients with type 1 diabetes, 1.10% (9,105 of 830,546) in patients with type 2 diabetes, and 0.48% (48,164 of 9,991,795) in patients free of diabetes. The breast cancer incidence rate is significantly higher (p < 0.001) in patients with type 2 diabetes than that in patients with type 1 diabetes and in patients free of diabetes. After adjusting for the covariates of age, insurance cost, and region, hazard ratios (HRs) for the association between breast cancer risk and types 1 and 2 DM were 1.01 (CI = 0.60-1.71) and 1.13 (CI = 1.10-1.16), respectively. Women with type 2 diabetes were at a significantly higher risk for development of breast cancer compared with those free of diabetes, but there appeared to have no significant increase in risk for those with type 1 diabetes. Our study also revealed that age, insurance amount (quality of care), and region are

  7. ERICA plans for winter storms field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadlock, Ron

    The Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) field study will be conducted between December 1, 1988, and February 28, 1989. The oceanic area that is approximately bounded by t he Gulf Stream and North America, from coastal Carolina to just east of Newfoundland, will be the region for special observations obtained by recently developed measurement systems, including high-resolution and safe Loran-C dropwindsondes, CLASS rawinsondes, an array of drifting data buoys, and multiple airborne Doppler radars. The special observations will be acquired within a framework of all conventional operational data available for the eastern United States and Canada, including that from the National Weather Service's land sites (plus supplemental rawinsonde observations), ocean platforms, U.S. Air Force WC-130 National Winter Storms Operations Plan reconnaissance flights, and civilian and military weather satellites. Satellite imagery and soundings willl be available in real time and archived through facilities of NOAA and the military.

  8. Coulomb Glass: a Mean Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandra, Salvatore; Palassini, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    We study the Coulomb glass model of disordered localized electrons with long-range Coulomb interaction, which describes systems such as disordered insulators, granular metals, amorphous semiconductors, or doped crystalline semiconductors. Long ago Efros and Shklovskii showed that the long-range repulsion induces a soft Coulomb gap in the single particle density of states at low temperatures. Recent works suggested that this gap is associated to a transition to a glass phase, similar to the Almeida-Thouless transition in spin glasses. In this work, we use a mean field approach to characterize several physical properties of the Coulomb glass. In particular, following a seminal work of Bray and Moore, we show that the Edward-Anderson parameter qEA and the spin glass susceptibility χSG are directly related to spectrum distribution of the Hessian matrix around free energy minima. Using this result, we show that no glass transition is associated to the gap formation.

  9. Gut microbiota in children with type 1 diabetes differs from that in healthy children: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A recent study using a rat model found significant differences at the time of diabetes onset in the bacterial communities responsible for type 1 diabetes modulation. We hypothesized that type 1 diabetes in humans could also be linked to a specific gut microbiota. Our aim was to quantify and evaluate the difference in the composition of gut microbiota between children with type 1 diabetes and healthy children and to determine the possible relationship of the gut microbiota of children with type 1 diabetes with the glycemic level. Methods A case-control study was carried out with 16 children with type 1 diabetes and 16 healthy children. The fecal bacteria composition was investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The mean similarity index was 47.39% for the healthy children and 37.56% for the children with diabetes, whereas the intergroup similarity index was 26.69%. In the children with diabetes, the bacterial number of Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, and the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio were all significantly decreased, with the quantity of Bacteroidetes significantly increased with respect to healthy children. At the genus level, we found a significant increase in the number of Clostridium, Bacteroides and Veillonella and a significant decrease in the number of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Blautia coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group and Prevotella in the children with diabetes. We also found that the number of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, and the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio correlated negatively and significantly with the plasma glucose level while the quantity of Clostridium correlated positively and significantly with the plasma glucose level in the diabetes group. Conclusions This is the first study showing that type 1 diabetes is associated with compositional changes in gut microbiota. The significant differences in the number of

  10. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  11. Characteristics of nursing studies in diabetes research published over three decades in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Iceland: a narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marjolein M; Graue, Marit; Leksell, Janeth; Smide, Bibbi; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Sigurdardottir, Arun K

    2016-06-01

    Similarities and differences across borders of Nordic countries constitute a suitable context for investigating and discussing factors related to the development of diabetes nursing research over the last three decades. The present study reviewed the entire body of contemporary diabetes nursing research literature originating in four Nordic countries: Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland. Our aims were (i) to catalogue and characterise trends in research designs and research areas of these studies published over time and (ii) to describe how research involving nurses in Nordic countries has contributed to diabetes research overall. The larger goal of our analyses was to produce a comprehensive picture of this research in order to guide future studies in the field. We conducted a narrative literature review by systematically searching Medline, Medline in process, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases. These searches were limited to studies published between 1979 and 2009 that had an abstract available in English or a Nordic language. Two researchers independently selected studies for analysis, leading to the inclusion of 164 relevant publications for analysis. In summary, Nordic nurse researchers have contributed to the development of new knowledge in self-management of diabetes in childhood, adolescence and adulthood, and to some extent also in the treatment and care of diabetes foot ulcers. Future research may benefit from (i) larger nurse-led research programmes organised in networks in order to share knowledge and expertise across national groups and borders, (ii) more multidisciplinary collaborations in order to promote patient-centred care and (iii) further research directed towards improving the dissemination and implementation of research findings. Using complex intervention designs and a mix of research methods will enrich the research.

  12. Factors Affecting Mobile Diabetes Monitoring Adoption Among Physicians: Questionnaire Study and Path Model

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, José Alberto; Sanz, Silvia; Henseler, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes often find it difficult to control their blood glucose level on a daily basis because of distance or physical incapacity. With the increase in Internet-enabled smartphone use, this problem can be resolved by adopting a mobile diabetes monitoring system. Most existing studies have focused on patients’ usability perceptions, whereas little attention has been paid to physicians’ intentions to adopt this technology. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the perceptions and user acceptance of mobile diabetes monitoring among Japanese physicians. Methods A questionnaire survey of physicians was conducted in Japan. The structured questionnaire was prepared in a context of a mobile diabetes monitoring system that controls blood glucose, weight, physical activity, diet, insulin and medication, and blood pressure. Following a thorough description of mobile diabetes monitoring with a graphical image, questions were asked relating to system quality, information quality, service quality, health improvement, ubiquitous control, privacy and security concerns, perceived value, subjective norms, and intention to use mobile diabetes monitoring. The data were analyzed by partial least squares (PLS) path modeling. Results In total, 471 physicians participated from 47 prefectures across Japan, of whom 134 were specialized in internal and gastrointestinal medicine. Nine hypotheses were tested with both the total sample and the specialist subsample; results were similar for both samples in terms of statistical significance and the strength of path coefficients. We found that system quality, information quality, and service quality significantly affect overall quality. Overall quality determines the extent to which physicians perceive the value of mobile health monitoring. However, in contrast to our initial predictions, overall quality does not have a significant direct effect on the intention to use mobile diabetes

  13. Material need insecurities, diabetes control, and care utilization: Results from the Measuring Economic iNsecurity in Diabetes (MEND) study

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Seth A.; Meigs, James B.; DeWalt, Darren; Seligman, Hilary K.; Barnard, Lily S.; Bright, Oliver-John M.; Schow, Marie; Atlas, Steven J.; Wexler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increasing access to care may be insufficient to improve health for diabetes patients with unmet basic needs. However, how specific material need insecurities relate to clinical outcomes and care utilization in a setting of near-universal care access is unclear. Objective To determine the association of food insecurity, cost-related medication underuse, housing instability, and energy insecurity with diabetes control and healthcare utilization. Design Cross-sectional(data collected June 2012 -- October 2013). Setting One academic primary care clinic, two community health centers and one specialty diabetes center in Massachusetts. Participants Random sample, stratified by clinic, of adult(age >20 years) diabetes patients. 411 patients were included(response rate: 62.3%). Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) The pre-specified primary outcome was a composite indicator of poor diabetes control(Hemoglobin A1c >9.0%, LDL cholesterol >100mg/dL, or blood pressure >140/90mm/Hg). Pre-specified secondary outcomes included outpatient visits and emergency department visits/acute care hospitalizations (ED/inpatient). Results Overall, 19% of respondents reported food insecurity, 28% cost-related medication underuse, 11% housing instability, and 14% energy insecurity; 40% reported at least one material need insecurity. Forty-two percent of respondents had poor diabetes control. In multivariable models, food insecurity was associated with greater odds of poor diabetes control(adjusted Odds Ratio[OR] 1.97, 95% confidence interval[95%CI]1.58 – 2.47) and increased outpatient visits(adjusted Incident Rate Ratio[IRR] 1.19 95%CI 1.05 – 1.36), but not increased ED/inpatient visits(IRR 1.00 95%CI 0.51 – 1.97). Cost-related medication underuse was associated with poor diabetes control(OR 1.91 95%CI 1.35 – 2.70) and greater ED/inpatient utilization(IRR 1.68 95%CI 1.21 – 2.34), but not outpatient visits(IRR 1.07 95%CI 0.95 – 1.21). Housing instability(IRR 1.31 95%CI 1.14– 1

  14. Anaemia and type 2 diabetes: implications from a retrospectively studied primary care case series.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Xr; Li, Y C; Chan, S L; Chan, K H

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To identify the prevalence of anaemia in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients managed in a primary care setting and to explore its associations with cardiovascular complications and kidney disease. DESIGN. Retrospective case series study. SETTING. General Out-patient Clinic of Hospital Authority, Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Chinese type 2 diabetic patients who had annual assessments between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2011 were recruited. Their complete blood picture, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (calculated by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease method), haemoglobin A1c, and urine albumin-creatinine ratio were retrieved. Anaemia was defined as a haemoglobin level of <130 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women (World Health Organization criteria). Student's t test and analysis of variance were used to analyse continuous variables and the Chi squared test for categorical data. Pearson's correlation coefficient and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine associations between haemoglobin level and different variables including age, gender, serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urine albumin-creatinine ratio. All statistical tests were two-sided, and a P value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS. Among 6325 Chinese type 2 diabetic patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 1441 were found to have anaemia with a period prevalence of 22.8%. The prevalence of anaemia increased significantly with deterioration of renal function. Compared with diabetic patients with normal haemoglobin levels, anaemic diabetic patients had a higher co-morbidity rate for stroke, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease (P<0.001). Independent predictors for haemoglobin level among diabetic patients were age, gender, serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, haemoglobin A1c, and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, old age

  15. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M.; Ingul, Charlotte B.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key points Low volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetes The weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  16. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  17. The study of the structural features of the lymphocytes in patients with diabetes using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbovskaya, Olga V.; Khairullin, Radik M.; Kostishko, Boris B.; Pchelintseva, Ekaterina S.; Krasnikova, Ekaterina S.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.

    2016-04-01

    The results of the study of morphological and biophysical parameters of the cell membrane of live lymphocytes in patients with insulin-dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and healthy donors using atomic force microscopy have been presented. It is found that lymphocytes from patients with diabetes are characterized by a decrease in volume and cell surface roughness compared to normal lymphocytes. An increase in the Young's modulus of lymphocytes in patients with diabetes more than 3 times compared to normal rates has been shown. Increased stiffening of lymphocyte cytolemma in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus leads to a decrease in its adhesive properties, unlike lymphocytes in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  18. Characteristics of Marshallese with Type 2 Diabetes on Oahu: A Pilot Study to Implement a Community-Based Diabetic Health Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ravi; Shehata, Cherie; Smith, Garrett

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of a resident physician-based, culturally appropriate method of decreasing the disease burden of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2) in a group of Pacific Islanders, Marshallese living in Hawai’i. Methods Thirty one Marshallese with diabetes who live on the island of Oahu, Hawaii were recruited. Baseline health status of the participants was characterized. Health parameters included HgbA1c, random blood sugar (RBS), lipid panels, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and medical history, along with qualitative information. A focus group was held with participants prior to beginning the curriculum to determine cultural views on diabetes, health, treatment, and to identify potential obstacles to health improvement. A DM2 educational curriculum culturally relevant to Marshallese populations was then started, including instruction in lifestyle modification, adherence to medication regimens, and planned quarterly assessment of health improvement. Results Baseline quantitative analysis revealed Marshallese with diabetes to be obese and hyperglycemic, with average BMI of 30 kg/m2, RBS of 285, and HgbA1c of 9.3. Qualitative analysis revealed that nearly half the participants admitted to symptoms of severe hyperglycemia. The initial focus group had a substantial turnout. Attendance rapidly declined, becoming so low that classes were eventually terminated. However, in two participants who attended more than three classes there was evidence of major improvements in HgbA1c, cholesterol, and qualitative markers, which were sustained after one year. Conclusions This pilot study of Marshallese with diabetes on Oahu showed that the majority had poor glycemic control with secondary co-morbid conditions. Although many barriers exist for successful implementation of a diabetes health improvement project in this group, the groundwork for translation of this project to the Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI) has been laid; curriculum translation and

  19. The effect of partial-pancreatectomy-induced diabetes on would healing subsequent to tooth extraction. Histologic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Grandini, S A

    1978-02-01

    A histologic study of the effects of diabetes on wound healing of dental sockets was undertaken in rats. The diabetic sate was achieved by performing partial pancreatectomies. The subjects were perfused with 25 percent glutaraldehyde (fixation) and the healing sockets were studied at 3-day intervals during a period of 22 days. The delayed healing observed in this study, when the diabetic condition was due to partial pancreatectomy, was not influenced by the technique used, but was the result of the metabolic modifications of the induced disease.

  20. Evaluation of Salivary Glucose, IgA and Flow Rate in Diabetic Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bakianian Vaziri, P.; Vahedi, M.; Mortazavi, H.; Abdollahzadeh, Sh.; Hajilooi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An association between diabetes mellitus and alterations in the oral cavity has been noted. In this study, we evaluated differences between salivary IgA, glucose and flow rate in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with type 1 diabetes, 40 patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 healthy controls were selected. Whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected by the standard method and the salivary flow rate was determined. Nephelometric and Pars method were used to measure salivary IgA and salivary glucose concentrations, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-square and t test. Results: There were no significant differences in salivary IgA and glucose concentrations between type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and their matched control subjects (P>0.05). Salivary flow rate was significantly lower in diabetic patients (P<0.05). In addition, DMFT was higher in diabetic patients than the controls. Conclusion: Determination of salivary constituents may be useful in the description and management of oral findings in diabetic patients. PMID:21998770

  1. Increased coronary intervention rate among diabetic patients with poor glycaemic control: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Süha; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Barındık, Nadir; İmren, Ersin; Peker, Yüksel

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between glycaemic control and coronary artery disease (CAD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is controversial. In the current cross-sectional study, we addressed the relationship between Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values and the need for revascularization among diabetic patients undergoing coronary angiography. A total of 301 consecutive patients with known T2DM (age 61.8±10.1 years, 46.2 % women) requiring coronary angiography due to CAD symptoms were included. T2DM patients were categorized into two groups based on their HbA1c values: 93 (30.9%) diabetics with good glycaemic control (HbA1c≤7 %), and 208 (69.1%) diabetics with poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7 %). A total of 123 patients (40.9%) required revascularization. The revascularization rate was 28.0% among T2DM patients with good glycaemic control and 46.6% among T2DM patients with poor glycaemic control, respectively (p=0.002). In a logistic regression analysis, the need for revascularization was predicted by poor glycaemic control (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.32-3.82; p=0.003) adjusted for age, gender, Body-Mass-Index and diabetes duration. Moreover, there was a linear relationship between HbA1c values and number of affected coronary arteries (r= 0.169; p=0.003). Our data suggest that there is a close association between poor glycaemic control and increased revascularization rate in T2DM, which should be considered in primary and secondary prevention models.

  2. Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Korea: A National Health Insurance Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Introduction This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and use of anti-diabetic medications for patients with GDM in Korea, using data of the period 2007–2011 from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) database, which includes the claims data of 97% of the Korean population. Materials and Methods We used the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes provided by the HIRA to identify women with delivery in the HIRA database between 2009 and 2011. GDM was defined according to ICD-10 codes, and patients with pre-existing diabetes between January 1, 2007 and pregnancy were excluded. A Poisson regression was performed to evaluate the trends in annual prevalence rates. Results The annual numbers of deliveries in 2009–2011 were 479,160 in 2009, 449,747 in 2010, and 377,374 in 2011. The prevalence of GDM during that period was 7.5% in 2009–2011: 5.7% in 2009, 7.8% in 2010, and 9.5% in 2011. The age-stratified analysis showed that the prevalence of GDM was highest in women aged 40–44 years, at 10.6% in 2009–2011, and that the annual prevalence significantly increased even in young women aged 20–29 years during that period (P < 0.05). More than 95% of the patients with GDM did not take any anti-diabetic medication. Among the anti-diabetic medications prescribed for patients with GDM, insulin was most commonly prescribed (for >98% of the patients with GDM on medication). Conclusions The prevalence of GDM in Korean women recently reached 5.7–9.5% in recent years. This represents a public health concern that warrants proper screening and medical care for GDM in women during the childbearing years. PMID:27046149

  3. Prevention of type 2 diabetes in British Bangladeshis: qualitative study of community, religious, and professional perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Reha; Subhani, Syed; Kopelman, Peter; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2008-01-01

    Objective To understand lay beliefs and attitudes, religious teachings, and professional perceptions in relation to diabetes prevention in the Bangladeshi community. Design Qualitative study (focus groups and semistructured interviews). Setting Tower Hamlets, a socioeconomically deprived London borough, United Kingdom. Participants Bangladeshi people without diabetes (phase 1), religious leaders and Islamic scholars (phase 2), and health professionals (phase 3). Methods 17 focus groups were run using purposive sampling in three sequential phases. Thematic analysis was used iteratively to achieve progressive focusing and to develop theory. To explore tensions in preliminary data fictional vignettes were created, which were discussed by participants in subsequent phases. The PEN-3 multilevel theoretical framework was used to inform data analysis and synthesis. Results Most lay participants accepted the concept of diabetes prevention and were more knowledgeable than expected. Practical and structural barriers to a healthy lifestyle were commonly reported. There was a strong desire to comply with cultural norms, particularly those relating to modesty. Religious leaders provided considerable support from Islamic teachings for messages about diabetes prevention. Some clinicians incorrectly perceived Bangladeshis to be poorly informed and fatalistic, although they also expressed concerns about their own limited cultural understanding. Conclusion Contrary to the views of health professionals and earlier research, poor knowledge was not the main barrier to healthy lifestyle choices. The norms and expectations of Islam offer many opportunities for supporting diabetes prevention. Interventions designed for the white population, however, need adaptation before they will be meaningful to many Bangladeshis. Religion may have an important part to play in supporting health promotion in this community. The potential for collaborative working between health educators and religious

  4. Outcome of liver transplantation in patients with diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    John, P R; Thuluvath, P J

    2001-11-01

    The influence of preexisting diabetes mellitus (DM) on outcome after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has not been well defined. The objective of our study was to compare the morbidity and mortality after OLT in 57 patients with preexisting DM (3 type I, 54 type II) with 114 age-, sex-, and race-matched patients without DM (case controls). The demographics were similar in both groups. Pretransplantation serum creatinine was significantly higher in the diabetic group compared with case controls. The incidence of the following complications was significantly higher in the diabetic group after OLT: cardiovascular (61.4% vs. 21.9%, P <.001), major (54.4% vs. 29.8%, P =.002) and minor infections (29.8% vs. 7.9%, P <.0001), renal (59.7% vs. 20.2%, P <.001), ophthalmologic (10.5% vs. 0.9%, P =.01), respiratory (24.6% vs. 7.0%, P =.001), neurologic (31.6% vs. 7.0%, P <.001), hematologic (19.3% vss 2.6%, P =.001), musculoskeletal (24.6% vs. 5.3%, P =.001), and malignancy (22.8% vs. 10.5%, P =.03). The duration of hospital stay, cost of hospitalization, retransplantation, and overall graft survival were similar. Acute rejection was seen in 50.9% of diabetics compared with 25.4% in controls (P =.0009). One-year (87% vs. 77%) and 2-year (81.6% vs. 70.1%) patient survival was similar, but 5-year survival was lower in the DM group (34.4% vs. 67.7%, P =.002). In conclusion, preexisting diabetes is associated with a significant post-OLT morbidity and mortality, and our observations suggest that patients with DM warrant more rigorous pre- and post-OLT evaluation. PMID:11679959

  5. Ethnic Differences in Associations Between Fat Deposition and Incident Diabetes and Underlying Mechanisms: The SABRE Study

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Dehbi, Hakim-Moulay; Wright, Andrew; Forouhi, Nita G; Godsland, Ian; Whincup, Peter; Sattar, Naveed; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine ethnic differences in ectopic fat and associations with incident diabetes. Methods In a UK cohort study, 1338 Europeans, 838 South Asians, and 330 African Caribbeans living in London were aged 40-69 years at baseline. Baseline assessment included blood tests, anthropometry, and questionnaires. Anthropometry-based prediction equations estimated baseline visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Incident diabetes was ascertained from record review, self-report, or oral glucose tolerance testing. Results South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less estimated VAT than Europeans. Both ethnic minorities had larger truncal skinfolds than Europeans. In men, adjustment for risk factors (BMI, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and HDL-cholesterol) markedly attenuated the association between estimated VAT and diabetes in Europeans (standardized subhazard ratios [95% CI]: from 1.74 [1.49, 2.03] to 1.16 [0.77, 1.76]) and African Caribbeans (1.72 [1.26, 2.35] to 1.44 [0.69, 3.02]) but not South Asians (1.60 [1.38, 1.86] to 1.90 [1.37, 2.64]). In women, attenuation was observed only for South Asians (1.80 [1.01, 3.23] to 1.07 [0.49, 2.31]). Associations between truncal skinfolds and diabetes appeared less affected by multivariable adjustment in South Asians and African Caribbeans than Europeans (1.24 [0.97, 1.57] and 1.28 [0.89, 1.82] versus 1.02 [0.77, 1.36] in men; 1.91 [1.03, 3.56] and 1.42 [0.86, 2.34] versus 1.23 [0.74, 2.05] in women). Conclusions Differences in overall truncal fat, as well as VAT, may contribute to the excess of diabetes in South Asian and African Caribbean groups, particularly for women. PMID:25645144

  6. The clinical impact of identifying metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bulugahapitiya, Uditha; Siyambalapitiya, Sajith; Sithole, Jabulani; Fernando, Devaka J; Idris, Iskandar

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine whether identifying patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) (as defined by International Diabetes Federation [IDF] criteria) among patients with diabetes would affect the decision to prescribe statin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), based on currently available public health guidelines. We analysed the most recent recorded CVD risk profiles obtained from electronic patient files from 304 general practices in England and Wales. Of 60,258 patients with diabetes, 11,005 men and women aged 30-74 years fulfilled criteria for primary CVD prevention and were not on lipid-lowering drugs. Outcome data were extrapolated to an estimated national diabetes prevalence of 3.6%. Identifying MetS in this group of patients would produce an additional 29,536 (8.4%; 95% CI: 7.7, 9.0), 104,288 (29.6%; 95% CI: 28.5, 30.7) and 147, 328 (41.9%; 95% CI: 40.8, 43.0) patients nationally who would not have been eligible otherwise for primary CVD prevention strategies with statins, based on the Joint British Societies', the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and the General Medical Services contract guidelines, respectively. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of these different strategies to detect metabolic syndrome were 87.5% and 69.1%; 57.3% and 76.8%; and 37.8% and 70.2%, respectively. In conclusion, among individuals with diabetes, identifying patients with MetS may further increase the use of statin therapy for primary CVD prevention. PMID:19156624

  7. A Novel Intra-Oral Diabetes Screening Approach in Periodontal Patients: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Tuthill, Janet; Singh, Geetika; Rindskopf, David; Maggiore, Jack A.; Schoor, Robert; Brodsky, Anya; Einhorn, Adi; Hochstein, Amanda; Russell, Stefanie; Rosedale, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Background This pilot study examined whether a novel diabetes screening approach using gingival crevicular blood (GCB) could be used to test for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) during the periodontal visit. Methods At a large periodontics clinic, finger stick blood (FSB) samples from 120 patients as well as GCB samples from those patients with adequate bleeding on probing were collected on special blood collection cards and were analyzed for HbA1c levels in a laboratory. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure correlation between FSB and GCB HbA1c values for 75 paired FSB and GCB samples. A Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve (ROC) analysis was performed to determine an optimal GCB HbA1c criterion value for a positive diabetes screen. Results For the 75 paired samples, the Pearson correlation coefficient was .842. The ROC analysis identified a criterion value of 6.3% for the GCB HbA1c test with high sensitivity (.933) and high specificity (.900) corresponding to FSB HbA1c values of 6.5% or greater (in the diabetes range). Using this GCB HbA1c criterion value for 27 additional paired samples in which there was an unidentified component observed to co-elute within the elution window of GCB HbA1c in the laboratory, there was agreement between FSB and GCB values for 24 of the pairs according to whether they were both within, or both outside of the diabetes range. Conclusions Using a criterion value of 6.3%, GCB samples are acceptable for HbA1c testing to screen for diabetes in most persons with bleeding on probing at the GCB collection site. PMID:22087806

  8. Study of the lipidemic profile of diabetic patients. Negative correlation of cholesterol levels of diabetes type I patients with serum amylase concentration.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Phaedra; Tseka, Eros; Varaga, Evagelia; Nasiou, Margarita; Sampanis, Christos; Zografou, Ioanna; Oulorgia, Jensila; Damontsidou, Katerina; Zaimi, Terpsithea; Markou, Helen-Irene; Varsamidis, Kostantinos; Petrou, Christos; Limberaki, Eugenia; Ganou, Christina-Joulia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus type I (DM1) and II (DM2) share the common characteristic of high blood glucose concentration and the health complications resulting from uncontrolled hyperglycemia such as hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular problems, stroke, ketoacidosis, kidney failure and blindness but have different etiology. DM1 is practically an autoimmune disease. Genetic susceptibility together with environmental factors leads to disease development. The main characteristics of Diabetes type II (DM2) is insulin resistance in muscle and liver cells accompanied by loss of β-cell function. However, adipose tissue, gastro-intestinal tract, pancreatic a-cell activity, may be involved in disease development. In parallel to the impairment of endocrine pancreatic function, a reduction in exocrine function has also been observed in all types of Diabetes Mellitus. A decrease in amylase and lipase activity has been mentioned by many authors, although cases with elevated amylase have been referred. Most recently a trend for positive correlation between HDL cholesterol and amylase in Diabetes type II patients was shown. In the present study we evaluated the lipidemic profile and related factors such as cortisol, total serum antioxidant capacity (TAC) and amylase in patients suffering from diabetes type I and II. The relationship between different parameters was examined. Blood serum from 20 DM1 patients and 45 DM2 patients was used. Serum from 50 healthy individuals was used as control. Total cholesterol and triglycerides were measured using an enzymatic colorimetric method. Serum cortisol, auto-antibodies and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies were measured using immunoenzyme assays and TAC measurement was made using the ABTS method. Mean total cholesterol was 245.5mg/dL in Diabetes I patients and was significantly elevated compared to healthy individuals as well as Diabetes II patients (168.71±76.0mg/dL). The observed difference was statistically significant (P=0.0004). On the contrary

  9. The 3-Year Clinical and Functional Course of Schizophrenia Among Individuals With and Without Diabetes at Study Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Zhu, Baojin; Ernst, Frank R.; Faries, Douglas E.; Jacobson, Jennie G.; Doebbeling, Caroline C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This prospective observational study compared the 3-year clinical and functional course of schizophrenia among individuals with and without diabetes at study entry. Method: Data were drawn from a large, 3-year, multisite, prospective, naturalistic study of treatment for schizophrenia-related disorders. The study was conducted in the United States between July 1997 and September 2003 and represented treatment practices in diverse systems of care. Participants were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective or schizophreniform disorders based on DSM-IV criteria. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed at study enrollment and at 12-month intervals using standard psychiatric measures, medical records, and a validated patient-reported questionnaire. Diabetes status was determined by participant interview at enrollment. Statistical analyses used mixed models with repeated measures. Results: Of 594 participants queried about comorbid medical conditions at enrollment, 76 (12.8%) reported having diabetes. Other comor-bid conditions were reported by 79% of the diabetes group (N = 60) and 50% of the nondiabetes group (N = 259). Across the 3-year study, participants with diabetes differed significantly from participants without diabetes on 2 of 36 outcome measures: more contacts with nonpsychiatrist physicians (p < .001) and poorer physical health (p = .015). Groups did not differ significantly on mental health symptomatology, mental health resource utilization, legal and safety issues, substance use, productivity, activities and relationships, or quality of life. Conclusions: In this 3-year, prospective, naturalistic study, the course of schizophrenia did not differ significantly between participants with and without diabetes, although persons with diabetes did have poorer physical health and more contacts with nonpsychiatrist physicians. Findings highlight the need for better medical treatment for people with schizophrenia, both with and without

  10. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Complications of Diabetes in the Kilimanjaro Region: A Population-Based Study from Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Makuka, Gerald Jamberi; Egger, Joseph R.; Maro, Venance; Maro, Honest; Karia, Francis; Patel, Uptal D.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, diabetes is a growing burden, yet little is known about its prevalence, risk factors, and complications. To address these gaps and help inform public health efforts aimed at prevention and treatment, we conducted a community-based study assessing diabetes epidemiology. Methods and Findings We conducted a stratified, cluster-designed, serial cross-sectional household study from 2014–2015 in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. We used a three-stage cluster probability sampling method to randomly select individuals. To estimate prevalence, we screened individuals for glucose impairment, including diabetes, using hemoglobin A1C. We also screened for hypertension and obesity, and to assess for potential complications, individuals with diabetes were assessed for retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. We enrolled 481 adults from 346 urban and rural households. The prevalence of glucose impairment was 21.7% (95% CI 15.2–29.8), which included diabetes (5.7%; 95% CI 3.37–9.47) and glucose impairment with increased risk for diabetes (16.0%; 95% CI 10.2–24.0). Overweight or obesity status had an independent prevalence risk ratio for glucose impairment (2.16; 95% CI 1.39–3.36). Diabetes awareness was low (35.6%), and few individuals with diabetes were receiving biomedical treatment (33.3%). Diabetes-associated complications were common (50.2%; 95% CI 33.7–66.7), including renal (12.0%; 95% CI 4.7–27.3), ophthalmic (49.6%; 95% CI 28.6–70.7), and neurological (28.8%; 95% CI 8.0–65.1) abnormalities. Conclusions In a northern region of Tanzania, diabetes is an under-recognized health condition, despite the fact that many people either have diabetes or are at increased risk for developing diabetes. Most individuals were undiagnosed or untreated, and the prevalence of diabetes-associated complications was high. Public health efforts in this region will need to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors, which appear to include

  11. Vasodilation Responses to Non-Selective α-Adrenergic Blockage of Coronary Bypass Grafts in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Ozcan; Gur, Demet Ozkaramanli; Gocmez, Semil Selcen; Ege, Turan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adrenergic tonus is increased in atherosclerotic coronary arteries. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate in vitro effects of phentolamine, a reversible nonselective alpha (α) adrenergic blocker, on coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) and compare its effects in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Methods: A total number of 30 patients (15 diabetic and 15 nondiabetic) who were assigned to elective CABG surgery were enrolled into the study. For both groups of patients, 16 internal mammarian artery (IMA) samples, 16 saphenous vein (SV) samples and 16 radial artery (RA) samples were collected and studied in the tissue bath system. The vasodilatation responses to increasing doses of phentolamine were recorded. Results: When grafts were compared in terms of amount of vasodilatation to phentolamine, IMA had the most prominent vasodilatation followed by RA and SV respectively. Although the vasodilatation responses in nondiabetic patients were numerically higher than diabetic patients, there was no statistically difference between the groups. Conclusion: Phentolamine, a nonselective α adrenergic blocker, is proven to have equal vasodilatory effects in diabetic and nondiabetic CABG grafts and can safely be used both intravenously and topically in the perioperative period. PMID:25273273

  12. Liver enzymes and risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease: results of the Firenze Bagno a Ripoli (FIBAR) study.

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Bardini, Gianluca; Lamanna, Caterina; Pala, Laura; Cresci, Barbara; Francesconi, Paolo; Buiatti, Eva; Rotella, Carlo M; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT), alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in the prediction of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects free from hepatic diseases other than nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The present analysis was performed on the cohort of subjects enrolled in the Firenze Bagno a Ripoli (FIBAR) study, a screening program for diabetes performed between 1 March 2001 and 31 December 2003 in the city of Florence on 3124 subjects who underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Incident cases of diabetes in nondiabetic subjects (n = 2662) were obtained through databases of drug prescriptions, hospital admissions, and lists of subjects eligible for reimbursement. Incident CVD in subjects free of diabetes and CVD at enrollment (n = 2617) was identified through hospital admissions and through the register of causes of death. Mean follow-up was 39.6 +/- 12.0 months and 39.8 +/- 11.4 months for diabetes and CVD, respectively. Yearly incidence of diabetes and CVD was 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. After adjustment for age and sex, gamma-GT >40 U/L was associated with increased incidence of diabetes and CVD (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.54 [1.26-5.11], P < .05 and 2.21 [0.98-5.43], P < .10, respectively). Risk of diabetes, but not of CVD, was increased in patients with gamma-GT in the 25- to 40-U/L range. After adjustment for confounders, AST >40 U/L predicted CVD (hazard ratio, 6.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.5-28.1]), but not diabetes. Elevated gamma-GT or AST is an independent predictor of CVD. An increase of gamma-GT levels above the reference range, or also in the upper reference range, is an independent predictor of incident diabetes.

  13. Diabetic retinopathy and blockade of the renin-angiotensin system: new data from the DIRECT study programme.

    PubMed

    Wright, A D; Dodson, P M

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis and medical management of diabetic retinopathy is reviewed. The importance of good control of blood glucose and blood pressure remain key elements in the prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, and a number of specific metabolic pathways have been identified that may be useful additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Trial data, however, aimed specifically to answer the questions of optimum medical management are limited, so the DIRECT study of renin-angiotensin blockade using oral candesartan 32 mg daily is a welcome addition to our knowledge. This arose from the promising improvement of retinopathy outcomes in the EUCLID study of lisinopril in type I diabetes. In DIRECT, 5 years of candesartan treatment in type I diabetes reduced the incidence of retinopathy by two or more steps (EDTRS) in severity by 18% (P=0.0508) and, in a post hoc analysis, reduced the incidence of retinopathy by three-step progression by 35% (P=0.034). In type I diabetes patients there was no effect on progression of established retinopathy. In contrast, in type II diabetes, 5 years of candesartan treatment resulted in 34% regression of retinopathy (P=0.009). Importantly, an overall significant change towards less-severe retinopathy was noted in both type I and II diabetes (Pdiabetic retinopathy, to prevent the problem in type I diabetes and to treat the early stages in type II diabetes.

  14. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: A risk factor for Helicobacter pylori infection: A hospital based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Devrajani, Bikha Ram; Shah, Syed Zulfiquar Ali; Soomro, Aftab Ahmed; Devrajani, Tarachand

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to compare the frequency of H. pylori infection in both groups. Study Design: Case control. Place and Duration: Department of Medicine, Liaquat University Hospital from October 2007 to March 2008. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was conducted on 148 subjects and divided into two groups i.e. type 2 diabetics and non-diabetics; each group consisting of 74 patients. All diabetic patients of ≥ 35 years of age, both gender and the known cases with history of dyspepsia, epigastric pain or bloating for more than a month were screened for Helicobacter pylori infection. The collected data of both groups was evaluated and separated for analysis. Results: Majority of the patients were male with mean age ± SD, 52.86 ± 8.51. Among the diabetic group, HpSA was positive in 54/74 (73%), whereas in the non-diabetic group HpSA was positive in 38/74 (51.4%) cases. Fasting blood glucose was identified as low in 04 (5.40%) H. pylori infected - diabetic patients where as the blood glucose level of 07 (9.45%) known diabetic patients was raised despite the ongoing medication. Conclusion: Diabetic patients are more prone and at risk to acquire H. Pylori infection. Therefore proper monitoring of blood glucose level and screening for H. pylori infection are effective preventive measures for this life threatening infection. PMID:20431802

  15. Self-reported knowledge on diabetes and its related factors among Chinese college students: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Zhang, Dongdong; Liu, Kaiqian; Guo, Yanfang; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increasing trend in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been observed among youths; however, little is known about how informed young people are of its existence and dangers. This study is to assess the level of knowledge on type 2 diabetes among Chinese college students and to explore related factors influencing the knowledge. Setting A cross-sectional survey was conducted among college students in Guangzhou, China, from September to November 2013. Participants A total of 658 students were randomly recruited using a multistage sampling method and were invited to participate in the confidential interviews. Primary and secondary outcome measures Self-reported knowledge on diabetes and its main sources were measured by a self-designed questionnaire. Results A total of 521 students participated in this study. The mean total score of knowledge was 13.3±3.44 of 22. Less than 50% of participants could correctly answer the questions about the onset of type 2 diabetes, the adverse effects of sedentary lifestyles, the complications, the therapeutic methods and the monitoring index of diabetes. The factors associated with higher levels of knowledge about type 2 diabetes in stepwise regression models were: being in a high grade, having a better academic performance, having a medical specialty and having relatives or friends with diabetes. Newspapers and books (61.4%), television and the Internet (46.3%) were the major sources of knowledge about type 2 diabetes, and more than half of the participants (55.9%) considered that medical staff was the most reliable source. Conclusions The college students had limited knowledge about type 2 diabetes. Public education, especially among individuals with non-medical specialties, a low-level grade, poor academic performance or no relatives and friends with diabetes, would be extremely beneficial. PMID:27609848

  16. A study of myocardial muscarinic receptors in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide.

    PubMed

    Mardon, K; Kassiou, M; Katsifis, A; Najdovski, L

    1999-07-01

    In previous studies we have shown that iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide ([123I]MIDEX) is a suitable single-photon emission tomography radiotracer for the characterisation of myocardial muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m-AChR) in the normal state. It has been demonstrated that m-AChR are altered as a consequence of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to examine myocardial m-AChR density using [123I]MIDEX in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. In vitro binding experiments were conducted on left and right ventricle and atrium homogenate membranes of 1-week, 5-week and 10-week STZ-induced diabetic and aged-matched normal rats. The m-AChR densities (Bmax values), as determined by saturation experiments with [123I]MIDEX, revealed no difference in left and right ventricles or atrium in 1-week and 5-week STZ-diabetic rats when compared with normal rats. However, the 10-week STZ-diabetic group revealed a 39% (P<0.001) decrease in m-AChR density in atrium with no change in left and right ventricles. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd values) was similar in all groups. In vitro binding autoradiography revealed a 40% decrease in m-AChR density in atrium in the same 10-week diabetic rats. No statistically significant difference was found in 1-week and 5-week diabetic rats compared with normals. Ex vivo autoradiography showed a 50% decrease in [123I]MIDEX uptake in atrium in 5-week diabetic rats and a 60% decrease in 10-week diabetic rats. These results demonstrate the ability of the single-photon agent [123I]MIDEX to measure in vitro and ex vivo alterations in myocardial m-AChR density observed in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:10398822

  17. Motivation to physical activity among adults with high risk of type 2 diabetes who participated in the Oulu substudy of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Korkiakangas, Eveliina; Taanila, Anja M; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by lifestyle changes such as sufficient level of physical activity. The number of persons at high risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is increasing all over the world. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes and develop exercise counselling, more studies on motivators and barriers to physical activity are needed. Thus, the aim of this qualitative study was to describe the motivators and barriers to physical activity among individuals with high risk of type 2 diabetes who participated in a substudy of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study in Oulu and to consider whether the motivators or barriers changed during the follow-up from 2003 to 2008. Questionnaires with open-ended questions were conducted twice: in the first follow-up in 2003 altogether 63 participants answered the questionnaire (n = 93), and in the second follow-up in 2008 altogether 71 participants answered the questionnaire (n = 82). Thus, response rate was 68% in 2003 and 87% in 2008. The study was conducted in the city of Oulu in Finland. Qualitative data were analysed by inductive content analysis using the QSR NVivo 8 software. The results of this study showed that motivators to physical activity included weight management, feelings of physical and mental well being. In addition, social relationships associated with exercise were also motivators. In conclusion, we present that regular counselling is important in order to promote exercise among older people, and that motivators to exercise are strengthened by positive experiences of exercise as one grows older.

  18. Influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position on the transition to type II diabetes in older Mexican Americans: the Sacramento Area Longitudinal Study on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Lorena; Lee, Anne; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Neuhaus, John M; Aiello, Allison; Elfassy, Tali; Haan, Mary N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position (NSEP) on development of diabetes over time. Design A longitudinal cohort study. Setting The data reported were from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, a longitudinal study of the health of 1789 older Latinos. Participants Community-dwelling older Mexican Americans residing in the Sacramento Metropolitan Statistical Area. Main outcome Multistate Markov regression were used to model transitions through four possible states over time: 1=normal; 2=pre-diabetic; 3=diabetic; and 4=death without diabetes. Results At baseline, nearly 50% were non-diabetic, 17.5% were pre-diabetic and nearly 33% were diabetic. At the end of follow-up, there were a total of 824 people with type 2 diabetes. In a fully adjusted MSM regression model, among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was not associated with a transition to pre-diabetes. Among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (HR=1.66, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.42) and decreased risk of death without diabetes (HR: 0.56, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.96). Among pre-diabetics, higher NSEP was significantly associated with a transition to non-diabetic status (HR: 1.22, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.50). Adjusting for BMI, age, education, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, medical insurance and nativity did not affect this relationship. Conclusions Our findings show that high NSEP poses higher risk of progression from normal to diabetes compared with a lower risk of death without diabetes. This work presents a possibility that these associations are modified by nativity or culture. PMID:27515749

  19. Nonlinear Reduction in Risk for Type 2 Diabetes by Magnesium Intake: An Updated Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian; Chen, Guo Chong; Zhai, Lin; Ke, Kai Fu

    2015-07-01

    Observational studies between magnesium int- ake and risk of type 2 diabetes yielded inconsistent results. We conducted a system literature search of PubMed database through March 2015 for prospective cohort studies of magnesium intake and type 2 diabetes risk. Study-specific results were pooled in a random-effects model. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis were performed to assess the potential sources of heterogeneity and the robustness of the pooled estimation. Generalized least squares trend estimation was used to investigate the dose-response relationship. A total of 15 papers with 19 analyses were identified with 539,735 participants and 25,252 incident diabetes cases. Magnesium intake was associated with a significant lower risk of type 2 diabetes (RR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.71-0.82) for the highest compared with lowest category. This association was not significantly modified by the pre-specified study characteristics. In the dose-response analysis, a magnesium intake increment of 100 mg/day was associated with a 16% reduction in type 2 diabetes risk (RR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.80-0.88). A nonlinear relationship existed between magnesium intake and type 2 diabetes (P-nonlinearity=0.003). This meta-analysis further verified a protective effect of magnesium intake on type 2 diabetes in a nonlinear dose-response manner.

  20. Quantitative estimation of sodium, potassium and total protein in saliva of diabetic smokers and nonsmokers: A novel study

    PubMed Central

    Kallapur, Basavaraj; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Bastian; Mujib, Ahmed; Sarkar, Amitabha; Sethuraman, Sathya

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the difference in sodium, potassium, total protein in whole saliva in diabetic smokers, diabetic nonsmokers and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Nonstimulated saliva samples were collected from a group of diabetic smokers, diabetic nonsmokers, and controls. Supernatant after centrifugation was used to determine the levels of sodium, potassium, and total protein by using semiautomatic analyzer. Results: There exists a statistical difference in the levels of potassium and total protein between diabetic smokers, nondiabetic smokers, and controls. Difference in the levels of sodium is only significant with nondiabetic smokers and controls. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus is known to alter the composition of saliva. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the levels of salivary potassium, sodium, and total protein in smoker diabetic patients and nondiabetic smokers and controls, and to explore potential of salivary electrolytes [Na+, K+] and total proteins as markers. The estimated values of salivary constituents add to the data already recorded in Indian population. However, further studies using large samples are required to evaluate the findings in our study. PMID:24082729

  1. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on peripheral blood circulation in people with diabetes: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiahui; Kwan, Rachel Lai-Chu; Zheng, Yongping; Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous blood flow provides nourishment that plays an essential role in maintaining skin health. We examined the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on cutaneous circulation of dorsal feet. Twenty-two patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 21 healthy control subjects were randomly allocated to receive either PEMFs or sham PEMFs (0.5 mT, 12 Hz, 30 min). Blood flow velocity and diameter of the small vein were examined by using ultrasound biomicroscopy; also, microcirculation at skin over the base of the 1st metatarsal bone (Flux1) and distal 1st phalange (Flux2) was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry before and after intervention. Results indicated that PEMFs produced significantly greater changes in blood flow velocity of the smallest observable vein than did sham PEMFs (both P < 0.05) in both types of subjects. However, no significant difference was found in changes of vein diameter, nor in Flux1 and Flux2, between PEMFs and sham PEMFs groups in subjects with or without DM. We hypothesized that PEMFs would increase blood flow velocity of the smallest observable vein in people with or without DM. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:290-297, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Evaluation of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Colombian population: A longitudinal observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Arbelaez, Diego; Alvarado-Jurado, Laura; Ayala-Castillo, Miguel; Forero-Naranjo, Leonardo; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire for detecting and predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in a Colombian population. METHODS: This is a longitudinal observational study conducted in Floridablanca, Colombia. Adult subjects (age ≥ 35 years) without known diabetes, were included. A modified version of FINDRISC was completed, and the glycemia values from all the subjects were collected from the hospital’s database. Firstly, a cross-sectional analysis was performed and then, the subsample of prediabetic participants was followed for diabetes incidence. RESULTS: A total of 772 subjects were suitable for the study. The overall prevalence of undiagnosed DM2 was 2.59%, and the incidence of DM2 among the prediabetic participants was 7.5 per 100 person-years after a total of 265257 person-years follow-up. The FINDRISC at baseline was significantly associated with undiagnosed and incident DM2. The area under receiver operating characteristics curve of the FINDRISC score for detecting undiagnosed DM2 in both men and women was 0.7477 and 0.7175, respectively; and for predicting the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics was 71.99% in men and 67.74% in women. CONCLUSION: The FINDRISC questionnaire is a useful screening tool to identify cross-sectionally unknown DM2 and to predict the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics in the Colombian population. PMID:26675051

  3. Prevention of Diabetes Through the Lifestyle Intervention: Lessons Learned from the Diabetes Prevention Program and Outcomes Study and its Translation to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Mary A.; Bray, George A.; Hattaway, Kathy; Khare-Ranade, Prajakta A.; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Semler, Linda N.; Weinzierl, Valarie A.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2014-01-01

    A number of strategies have been used to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in high-risk adults. Among them were diet, exercise, medications and surgery. This report focuses on the nutritional lessons learned from implementation of the Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) in the DPP and its follow-up DPPOS that looked at weight loss through modification of diet and exercise. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a large clinical trial, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, designed to look at several strategies to prevent conversion to type 2 diabetes (T2D) by adults with prediabetes (IGT/IFG) including an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI). The ∼3800 ethnically diverse participants (46% reported non-white race) were overweight, had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Treatments were assigned randomly. The Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS) is a follow up study evaluating the long-term outcomes of the clinical trial. PMID:25383256

  4. Rationale, design, and method of the Diabetes & Women's Health study--a study of long-term health implications of glucose intolerance in pregnancy and their determinants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Hu, Frank B; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Vaag, Allan; Gore-Langton, Robert; Chavarro, Jorge E; Bao, Wei; Yeung, Edwina; Bowers, Katherine; Grunnet, Louise G; Sherman, Seth; Kiely, Michele; Strøm, Marin; Hansen, Susanne; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James; Fan, Ruzong

    2014-11-01

    Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy are at substantially increased risk for type 2 diabetes and comorbidities after pregnancy. Little is known about the role of genetic factors and their interactions with environmental factors in determining the transition from gestational diabetes mellitus to overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. These critical data gaps served as the impetus for this Diabetes & Women's Health study with the overall goal of investigating genetic factors and their interactions with risk factors amenable to clinical or public health interventions in relation to the transition of gestational diabetes mellitus to type 2 diabetes mellitus. To achieve the goal efficiently, we are applying a hybrid design enrolling and collecting data longitudinally from approximately 4000 women with a medical history of gestational diabetes mellitus in two existing prospective cohorts, the Nurses' Health Study II and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Women who had a medical history of gestational diabetes mellitus in one or more of their pregnancies are eligible for the present study. After enrollment, we follow study participants for an additional 2 years to collect updated information on major clinical and environmental factors that may predict type 2 diabetes mellitus risk as well as with biospecimens to measure genetic and biochemical markers implicated in glucose metabolism. Newly collected data will be appended to the relevant existing data for the creation of a new database inclusive of genetic, epigenetic and environmental data. Findings from the study are critical for the development of targeted and more effective strategies to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications in this high-risk population.

  5. A study of perioperative hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes having colon, spine, and joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, D Kristin; Bowen, James; Bucher, Linda; Hawkins, Teresa; Jurkovitz, Claudine; Reed, James; Volk, Susan

    2009-12-01

    Patients with diabetes often have impaired wound healing and an increased rate of postoperative complications with surgery. Most research has focused on the effect of hyperglycemia in the postoperative period, but there is limited evidence to guide blood glucose (bG) control throughout the perioperative period. This retrospective study explored the effect of hyperglycemia in the PACU on postoperative complications, length of stay (LOS), and in-hospital mortality in patients with diabetes undergoing spine, colon, or joint surgery. Findings revealed that the total LOS for patients with a PACU bG >200 mg/dL was significantly longer than for patients with a maximum bG of 140 to 200 mg/dL. Further, the rate of total complications increased significantly as bG levels increased. More prospective, controlled studies on the management of perioperative hyperglycemia are recommended for consideration.

  6. Incidence and Predictors of Hospitalization for Bacterial Infection in Community-Based Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Emma J.; Martin, Natalie; Makepeace, Ashley; Sillars, Brett A.; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The few studies that have examined the relationship between diabetes and bacterial infections have utilized administrative databases and/or have had limited/incomplete data including recognized infection risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and associates of bacterial infection severe enough to require hospitalization in well-characterized community-based patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings We studied a cohort of 1,294 patients (mean±SD age 64.1±11.3 years) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) and 5,156 age-, gender- and zip-code-matched non-diabetic controls. The main outcome measure was incident hospitalization for bacterial infection as principal diagnosis between 1993 and 2010. We also examined differences in statin use in 52 FDS1 pairs hospitalized with pneumonia (cases) or a contemporaneous non-infection-related cause (controls). During 12.0±5.4 years of follow-up, 251 (19.4%) patients were hospitalized on 368 occasions for infection (23.7/1,000 patient-years). This was more than double the rate in matched controls (incident rate ratio (IRR) (95% CI), 2.13 (1.88–2.42), P<0.001). IRRs for pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia were 1.86 (1.55–2.21), 2.45 (1.92–3.12), and 2.08 (1.41–3.04), respectively (P<0.001). Among the diabetic patients, older age, male sex, prior recent infection-related hospitalization, obesity, albuminuria, retinopathy and Aboriginal ethnicity were baseline variables independently associated with risk of first hospitalization with any infection (P≤0.005). After adjustment for these variables, baseline statin treatment was not significant (hazard ratio (95% CI), 0.70 (0.39–1.25), P = 0.22). Statin use at hospitalization for pneumonia among the case-control pairs was similar (23.1% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.27). Conclusions The risk of severe infection is increased among type 2 diabetic patients and is not reduced by

  7. Clinical Characteristics for the Relationship between Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cognitive Impairment: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Fang, Rong; Liu, Li-Hua; Chen, Sheng-Di; Tang, Hui-Dong

    2015-08-01

    We explored the potential differences in cognitive status, lipid and glucose metabolism, ApoEε4 alleles and imaging between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. 83 subjects with normal cognitive function and 114 mild cognitive impaired patients were divided into four groups by history of diabetes. General demographics was collected from all participants followed by MRI scan, biochemical examinations and a series of neuropsychological tests. Student's t test, multiple regressions and one-way ANOVA were applied to investigate the differences between groups. Comparing diabetic patients with non-diabetic subjects in the mild cognitive impaired group, we found several decreased items in recall of three words in MMSE (p=0.020), AVLT and SCWT (p<0.050). The multiple linear regression revealed that two-hour glucose level (B= -0.255, p<0.001) and fasting C-peptide (B= -0.466, p=0.001) had negative effects on the score of MMSE. In addition, diabetic patients treated with insulin and other diabetes medication performed better in part of the AVLT (p<0.050) compared to patients with insulin treatment or oral antidiabetic medication only. Patients with metformin medication had a better memory outcome compared to patients with sulphonylurea medication in the AVLT long delay free recall (p =0.010). These findings show that patients of mild cognitive impairment with diabetes mellitus have a worse outcome in attention, information processing speed and memory compared to non-diabetic patients. Higher two-hour glucose level and C-peptide level may be risk factors for severe cognitive impairment in type-2 diabetes mellitus patients. The results of this study also suggest that medication may have effects on cognitive function.

  8. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Beverly T.; Vangaveti, Venkat N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98–65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity. PMID:27446962

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Beverly T; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98-65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity. PMID:27446962

  10. Feasibility of a Patient-Centered, Smartphone-Based, Diabetes Care System: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ky; Kwak, Soo Heon; Baek, Seungsu; Lee, Seung Lyeol; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background We developed a patient-centered, smartphone-based, diabetes care system (PSDCS). This study aims to test the feasibility of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction with the PSDCS. Methods This study was a single-arm pilot study. The participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus were instructed to use the PSDCS, which integrates a Bluetooth-connected glucometer, digital food diary, and wearable physical activity monitoring device. The primary end point was the change in HbA1c from baseline after a 12-week intervention. Results Twenty-nine patients aged 53.9±9.1 years completed the study. HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels decreased significantly from baseline (7.7%±0.7% to 7.1%±0.6%, P<0.0001; 140.9±39.1 to 120.1±31.0 mg/dL, P=0.0088, respectively). The frequency of glucose monitoring correlated with the magnitude of HbA1c reduction (r=–0.57, P=0.0013). The components of the diabetes self-care activities, including diet, exercise, and glucose monitoring, were significantly improved, particularly in the upper tertile of HbA1c reduction. There were no severe adverse events during the intervention. Conclusion A 12-week application of the PSDCS to patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes resulted in a significant HbA1c reduction with tolerable safety profiles; these findings require confirmation in a future randomized controlled trial. PMID:27098508

  11. A study of surgical management of diabetic limb complications among rural population.

    PubMed

    Madan, M; Naveen, T K; Balachandra, M

    2012-04-01

    Surgical complication of diabetes mellitus has been a common clinical problem among the rural population because of illiteracy and poor health education. The present study was undertaken to evaluate patients with respect to age, sex, presentation and to do other specific investigations. The patients were treated by conservative or surgical methods, and the outcome was monitored. The majority of the patients were males with peak age group in the sixth decade. Septic lesions were more than the neuropathic or the ischaemic lesions.

  12. Testosterone Concentrations and Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Men with Type 1 Diabetes in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (EDIC)

    PubMed Central

    M.P.H., Catherine Kim M.D.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ph.D., M.D.; Ph.D., Barbara Braffett; Cleary M.S., Patricia A.; Ph.D., Ionut Bebu; M.D., Hunter Wessells; Orchard, Trevor; M.Med.Sci., M.D.; Sarma, Aruna V.; Group, Ph.D.for the DCCT/EDIC Research

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have reported that lower testosterone concentrations are associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, no studies have examined this relationship in men with type 1 diabetes