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  1. Ficus insipida subsp. insipida (Moraceae) reveals the role of ecology in the phylogeography of widespread Neotropical rain forest tree species

    PubMed Central

    Honorio Coronado, Eurídice N; Dexter, Kyle G; Poelchau, Monica F; Hollingsworth, Peter M; Phillips, Oliver L; Pennington, R Toby; Carine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine the phylogeography of Ficus insipida subsp. insipida in order to investigate patterns of spatial genetic structure across the Neotropics and within Amazonia. Location Neotropics. Methods Plastid DNA (trnH–psbA; 410 individuals from 54 populations) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS; 85 individuals from 27 populations) sequences were sampled from Mexico to Bolivia, representing the full extent of the taxon's distribution. Divergence of plastid lineages was dated using a Bayesian coalescent approach. Genetic diversity was assessed with indices of haplotype and nucleotide diversities, and genetic structure was examined using spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA) and haplotype networks. Population expansion within Amazonia was tested using neutrality and mismatch distribution tests. Results trnH–psbA sequences yielded 19 haplotypes restricted to either Mesoamerica or Amazonia; six haplotypes were found among ITS sequences. Diversification of the plastid DNA haplotypes began c. 14.6 Ma. Haplotype diversity for trnH–psbA was higher in Amazonia. Seven genetically differentiated SAMOVA groups were described for trnH–psbA, of which two were also supported by the presence of unique ITS sequences. Population expansion was suggested for both markers for the SAMOVA group that contains most Amazonian populations. Main conclusions Our results show marked population genetic structure in F. insipida between Mesoamerica and Amazonia, implying that the Andes and seasonally dry areas of northern South America are eco-climatic barriers to its migration. This pattern is shared with other widespread pioneer species affiliated to wet habitats, indicating that the ecological characteristics of species may impact upon large-scale phylogeography. Ficus insipida also shows genetic structure in north-western Amazonia potentially related to pre-Pleistocene historical events. In contrast, evident population expansion elsewhere in Amazonia, in

  2. An aquatic microhymenopterous egg-parasitoid of Argia insipida Hagen in Selys (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) and biological observations in the Central Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Querino, Ranyse B; Hamada, Neusa

    2009-01-01

    The tritrophic interaction Argia insipida Hagen in Selys, the Trichogrammatidae egg parasitoid Pseudoligosita longifrangiata (Viggiani) and the host plant Tonina fluviatilis (Eriocaulacea), which is a substrate for egg deposition of A.insipid, was investigated. The study locality was a stream with rapids where macrophytes such as T. fluviatilis grow. Information on aquatic egg parasitoids is scarce. This is the first record of egg parasitism of A. insipida by P. longifrangiata in Brazil, and the first record of occurrence of P. longifrangiata in the country. Parasitized and unparasitized eggs of A. insipida were observed only on leaves 0-5 cm below the water surface. The maximum number of pairs of A. insipida laying eggs in the study area was observed between 13:00 h and 14:00 h. Leaves of T. fluviatilis become yellowish and dry out when large numbers of eggs of A. insipida are laid on them.

  3. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratio of plant biomass versus soil solution in a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida

    PubMed Central

    Garrish, Valerie; Cernusak, Lucas A.; Winter, Klaus; Turner, Benjamin L.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio of a terrestrial plant reflects the relative availability of N and P in the soil in which the plant grows. Here, this was assessed for a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida. Seedlings were grown in sand and irrigated with nutrient solutions containing N:P ratios ranging from <1 to >100. The experimental design further allowed investigation of physiological responses to N and P availability. Homeostatic control over N:P ratios was stronger in leaves than in stems or roots, suggesting that N:P ratios of stems and roots are more sensitive indicators of the relative availability of N and P at a site than N:P ratios of leaves. The leaf N:P ratio at which the largest plant dry mass and highest photosynthetic rates were achieved was ∼11, whereas the corresponding whole-plant N:P ratio was ∼6. Plant P concentration varied as a function of transpiration rate at constant nutrient solution P concentration, possibly due to transpiration-induced variation in the mass flow of P to root surfaces. The transpiration rate varied in response to nutrient solution N concentration, but not to nutrient solution P concentration, demonstrating nutritional control over transpiration by N but not P. Water-use efficiency varied as a function of N availability, but not as a function of P availability. PMID:20591897

  4. Thermal tolerance, net CO2 exchange and growth of a tropical tree species, Ficus insipida, cultivated at elevated daytime and nighttime temperatures.

    PubMed

    Krause, G Heinrich; Cheesman, Alexander W; Winter, Klaus; Krause, Barbara; Virgo, Aurelio

    2013-06-15

    Global warming and associated increases in the frequency and amplitude of extreme weather events, such as heat waves, may adversely affect tropical rainforest plants via significantly increased tissue temperatures. In this study, the response to two temperature regimes was assessed in seedlings of the neotropical pioneer tree species, Ficus insipida. Plants were cultivated in growth chambers at strongly elevated daytime temperature (39°C), combined with either close to natural (22°C) or elevated (32°C) nighttime temperatures. Under both growth regimes, the critical temperature for irreversible leaf damage, determined by changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence, was approximately 51°C. This is comparable to values found in F. insipida growing under natural ambient conditions and indicates a limited potential for heat tolerance acclimation of this tropical forest tree species. Yet, under high nighttime temperature, growth was strongly enhanced, accompanied by increased rates of net photosynthetic CO2 uptake and diminished temperature dependence of leaf-level dark respiration, consistent with thermal acclimation of these key physiological parameters.

  5. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  6. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... improved with weight-loss surgery. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Treating either type 1 diabetes or type 2 ... a life-long disease and there is no cure. Tight control of blood ... diabetes complications. But these problems can occur, even in ...

  7. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications. PMID:25227362

  8. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

  9. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  10. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  11. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Foundation MedlinePlus Alternate Language URL Diabetes Insipidus Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that ...

  12. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are listed ...

  13. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Abreu, Angel A Méndez; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Marín, Maria Isabel Martínez; Fernández, Elia Pérez

    2015-07-09

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features.

  14. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  15. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  16. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  17. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Types of Diabetes Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of ... to take care of your diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes is when your blood glucose, also called ...

  18. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  19. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  20. Diabetes - tests and checkups

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - eye care Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping active Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke ...

  1. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... special diet. In general, when you have gestational diabetes your diet should: Be moderate in fat and protein Provide ... drinks, fruit juices, and pastries If managing your diet does not ... diabetes medicine by mouth or insulin therapy. Most women ...

  2. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness.

  3. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  4. Diabetes Complications

    MedlinePlus

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  5. Diabetic Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high ...

  6. Diabetes network.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes UK has launched a network of information and support for commissioning and improvement in diabetes care. The network is free to join and offers monthly updates on good practice from around the UK, a forum for sharing ideas and learning, and access to Diabetes UK resources. PMID:27369708

  7. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    MedlinePlus

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  8. Genetics of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  9. Cardiogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Villafranca, Arnaldo; Morrison, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    It has been well established since the Framingham studies that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for heart failure. Several recent reports suggested that the reverse is also true, and heart failure may also predispose to diabetes. We reviewed the literature and summarized the evidence of a higher incidence of new-onset diabetes in heart failure. Because a high rate of insulin resistance in heart failure is a known phenomenon, a higher incidence of diabetes in heart failure is intuitive. Although the facts confirming such connection is surprisingly scarce, we felt it was important to collect, analyze, and summarize the evidence. PMID:24174218

  10. Paediatric diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes does not spare any section of society, and its prevalence in the paediatric and adolescent age group is rising. This review highlights the etiological and clinical features of childhood diabetes, including secular changes in epidemiology. It discusses the aspects of non pharmacological and pharmacological therapy which are unique to the paediatric age group, and explores current use of novel therapeutic modalities. The article calls for modulation of the psychological environment of the child with diabetes, to help improve his or her quality of life, and sensitizes physicians to take proactive, affirmative action to address the special needs of children with type1 diabetes. PMID:24601207

  11. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved. Complex interrelated pathophysiological mechanisms triggered by hyperglycaemia underlie the development of DR. These mechanisms include genetic and epigenetic factors, increased production of free radicals, advanced glycosylation end products, inflammatory factors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser photocoagulation prevents severe vision loss in eyes with proliferative DR. These measures, together with increasing public awareness and access to regular screening for DR with retinal photography, and the development of new treatments to address early disease stages, will lead to better outcomes and prevent blindness for patients with DR. PMID:27159554

  12. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  13. Diabetic Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... made by a veterinarian. Because older dogs and cats are more likely to develop age-related diseases ... cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur include hind leg ...

  14. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  15. Travelling diabetics.

    PubMed

    Chełmińska, Katarzyna; Jaremin, Bogdan

    2002-01-01

    During the past several decades, the number of both business and tourist travels has greatly increased. Among them are persons suffering from chronic diseases, including diabetics for whom travels pose the additional health-hazard. Irrespective of better education, self-control and constantly improving quality of specialistic equipment available, diabetics still are the group of patients requiring particular attention. In the case of travelling diabetics, problems may occur concerning the transport and storage of insulin, as well as control of glycaemia, all caused by irregularity of meals, variable diet, physical activity, stress, kinetosis (sea voyages), and the change of time zones. The travel may as well evoke ailments caused by the change of climate and concomitant diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea, malaria, etc. Apart from avoiding glycaemia fluctuations, important for retaining health of diabetics is the prevention of other diseases and carrying the necessary drugs.

  16. [Diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The disease may result from the insufficient production of vasopressin, its increased degradation, an impaired response of kidneys to vasopressin, or may be secondary to excessive water intake. Patients with severe and uncompensated symptoms may develop marked dehydration, neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy, and therefore diabetes insipidus can be a life-threatening condition if not properly diagnosed and managed. Patients with diabetes insipidus require treatment with desmopressin or drugs increasing sensitivity of the distal nephron to vasopressin, but this treatment may be confusing because of the disorder's variable pathophysiology and side-effects of pharmacotherapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on different aspects of the pathophysiology, classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. The reader is also provided with some practical recommendations on dealing with patients suffering from this disease.

  17. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Types of Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes or ...

  18. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  20. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  1. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Page Content On this page: ... increased risk of developing diabetes. [ Top ] Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disorder ...

  2. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  3. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems How can diabetes affect my feet? Too much glucose, also called ... you have any of these signs. How can diabetes change the shape of my feet? Nerve damage ...

  4. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 33. Kim PJ, Steinberg JS. Complications of the diabetic foot. Endocrinol Metab Clin N Am. 2013;42:833-847. PMID: 24286952 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286952 . Read More Diabetes Diabetes and nerve damage Leg or foot amputation Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Diabetes and ...

  5. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    Tips for Teens with Diabetes What is Diabetes? National Diabetes Education Program Learn about diabetes and how to manage it. styaoyfuyodarooiatumdrbaTecebadhhtlkeoieoecsoaii… cncdlteehams, gyr, ealauwbkncoeeedofishgayceeohch. attue, ...

  6. Diabetes Technology.

    PubMed

    Pfützner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes technology is an evolving field. The research started with the development of blood glucose meters for patient self-testing and the introduction of insulin pen injection devices. Modern devices employ new technological features, such as the use of computer simulations and mathematical algorithms, connectivity and signal transfer, and the use of modern (space research-derived) materials. With these innovations, the goal to develop an artificial pancreas by closing the loop between a continuous glucose sensor and a continuous insulin-delivering device via insulin delivery algorithms is coming closer to reality. As a consequence, interim achievements on this way result in the commercialization of innovative new diabetes technology devices, which help to facilitate the daily life of the affected people with diabetes. PMID:26824436

  7. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lozano, M; Salinas, P

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the importance of diabetic retinopathy in the loss of visual function. We exposed the most important risk factors, such as diabetes duration, poor metabolic control, pregnancy, puberty, hypertension, poor control of blood lipids, renal disease, and sleep apnea syndrome. We describe the pathogenesis of the disease, small retinal vessel microangiopathies which produce extravasation, edema and ischemia phenomena. We put special emphasis on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its pathogenic importance. They are also described the main clinical symptoms as microaneurysms, intraretinal hemorrhages, hard and soft exudates, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities (IRMA), venous disorders, formation of new vessels and diabetic macular edema (the latter being the most common cause of vision loss). Finally we describe the latest diagnostic techniques and eye treatment, with special emphasis on obesity surgery importance as more important preventive factor to eliminate the predisposing and precipitating disease symptoms.

  8. American Diabetes Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2383) Give by Mail Close November is American Diabetes Month® Share your personal diabetes story and show ... Next » « Previous Our Mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people ...

  9. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  10. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training (CST) as a part of routine diabetes management. Its aim is to improve diabetic teens' coping and communication skills, healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to ...

  11. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  12. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Kidney Disease What are my kidneys and ... urine until releasing it through urination. How can diabetes affect my kidneys? Too much glucose , also called ...

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  14. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  15. Bronze diabetes.

    PubMed

    L N, Akshatha; Shenoy, Mamatha T; Yadav, Charu; M S, Rukmini; Kamath, Nutan

    2015-04-01

    Thalassemia is a group of disorders characterized by deficient production of the β-globin sub unit of hemoglobin. The mandatory blood transfusions in patients with thalassemia to maintain adequate erythrocyte levels, leads to iron overload. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with thalassemia varies from 6 to 14%. We here by present a known case of thalassemia major in an 18 year old boy. He was diagnosed with thalassemia before the age of one year and is on regular blood transfusion every two weeks since then. The repeated blood transfusion is one of the common causes for haemochromatosis. Iron overload initially leads to glucose abnormalities such as insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, which is followed by impaired secretion of insulin. Diagnosed as a case of bronze diabetes, this patient is on insulin therapy for the last two years. Currently the patient is on iron chelation therapy at Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. PMID:26023548

  16. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  17. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Weight and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight and Diabetes Print A ... or type 2 diabetes. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes Undiagnosed or untreated, type 1 diabetes can make ...

  18. Diabetes Update

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Clayton; Hunt, John

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes the new classification of diabetes mellitus (and other categories of glucose intolerance) and presents some clinically important aspects of the new insulins. The new classification promises to bring to the field considerable uniformity, previously lacking. The five clinical classes are: Type I (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, IDDM), Type II (non-insulin-dependent, NIDDM), “other types”, gestational diabetes (GDM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The two statistical risk classes are: previous abnormality of glucose tolerance (Prev AGT) and potential abnormality of glucose tolerance (Pot AGT). These are mutually exclusive classes. Criteria recommended for use by clinicians and researchers are presented in detail, as well as information on the oral glucose test and normal glucose tolerance. Particular attention is drawn to the differences in glucose metabolism (tolerance) characteristics in non-pregnant adults, children and pregnant females. The new insulins are so called because of increased purity achieved by new purification methods. They are not new formulations or types of insulin. Contamination of insulin preparations by other hormones or compounds (e.g. glucagon, pro-insulin, pancreatic polypeptide) is now at a very low level. PMID:21289788

  19. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY The most common forms of ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  20. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  1. Preventing diabetes in women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Feig, Denice

    2012-05-01

    The immediate consequences of gestational diabetes on pregnancy are well known but the complications decades later for the mother and child are just now emerging. This trio of papers discuss the long-term consequences of gestational diabetes, the importance of screening this high risk group of women for type 2 diabetes, and the evidence for lifestyle, medications and breastfeeding for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in these women.

  2. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes education has gained a critical role in diabetes care. The empowerment of patients aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification. Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations.

  3. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nentwich, Martin M; Ulbig, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population. In the next 15 years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected to increase significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 million people in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to be suffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence 7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people with diabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts for an increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e., exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema. PMID:25897358

  4. Strong diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, James; Anwar, Aresh

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 36-year-old male professional bodybuilder is reported. He presented to the accident and emergency department with right upper quadrant pain. This was on the background of a 15-year history of anabolic steroid and growth hormone misuse. Examination revealed mild hepatomegaly and a random blood sugar of 30.2 mmol/l. There was no evidence of ketonuria or acidosis. Biochemical evidence of hepatitis was found, and the patient was in acute renal failure. He was given a sliding scale of insulin and an intravenous infusion of crystalloid. The hepatitis and hyperglycaemia settled with conservative treatment. It is believed that this is the first reported case of frank diabetes precipitated by supraphysiological recreational growth hormone misuse. PMID:21686671

  5. Strong diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, James; Anwar, Aresh

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 36‐year‐old male professional bodybuilder is reported. He presented to the accident and emergency department with right upper quadrant pain. This was on the background of a 15‐year history of anabolic steroid and growth hormone misuse. Examination revealed mild hepatomegaly and a random blood sugar of 30.2 mmol/l. There was no evidence of ketonuria or acidosis. Biochemical evidence of hepatitis was found, and the patient was in acute renal failure. He was given a sliding scale of insulin and an intravenous infusion of crystalloid. The hepatitis and hyperglycaemia settled with conservative treatment. It is believed that this is the first reported case of frank diabetes precipitated by supraphysiological recreational growth hormone misuse. PMID:17324962

  6. Contraception and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Afsana, Faria

    2016-09-01

    Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus is an important issue mainly as the pregnancy outcome depends on glycaemic control before conception among women with diabetes. Type of diabetes as type 1 or type 2 Diabetes, women with history of gestational diabetes and breast feeding diabetic mothers may be a consideration in selecting a contraceptive .On the other hand presence of diabetic complications is a significant determinant. Different methods of contraception as oral, injectable, implant, intrauterine devices are available. Patient\\'s choice and health issues both should be considered while prescribing a contraceptive to a woman with diabetes. Emergency contraception is sometimes required in situations where there is chance of contraceptive failure. This review article highlights different contraceptive methods, their use and limitations and will guide to make a rational choice for a woman with diabetes. PMID:27582166

  7. Monogenic diabetes and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Rinki

    2015-09-01

    Monogenic diabetes is frequently mistakenly diagnosed as either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, yet accounts for approximately 1-2% of diabetes. Identifying monogenic forms of diabetes has practical implications for specific therapy, screening of family members and genetic counselling. The most common forms of monogenic diabetes are due to glucokinase (GCK), hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1A and HNF-4A, HNF-1B, m.3243A>G gene defects. Practical aspects of their recognition, diagnosis and management are outlined, particularly as they relate to pregnancy. This knowledge is important for all physicians managing diabetes in pregnancy, given this is a time when previously unrecognised monogenic diabetes may be uncovered with careful attention to atypical features of diabetes misclassified as type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. PMID:27512465

  8. [Diabetic eye disease].

    PubMed

    Henriques, José; Vaz-Pereira, Sara; Nascimento, João; Rosa, Paulo Caldeira

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by sustained hyperglycemia leading to macro and microvascular complications. The eye is one of the main organs affected by this disease, being diabetic retinopathy the most well-known microvascular complication and the leading cause of blindness in the working age population. However, diabetic ocular disease is not only characterized by diabetic retinopathy. Other important ocular manifestations of diabetes mellitus include cataract, glaucoma, ischemic optic neuropathy, cranial nerve palsies and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome. Here, we emphasize diabetic retinopathy as the most important and characteristic complication of diabetes mellitus, but also review less well-known complications with the aim to alert and sensitize non-ophthalmologist clinicians that treat diabetic individuals, in order to promote an early diagnosis and treatment of the sight-threatening complications of diabetes.

  9. Flaxseed and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Dhar, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Flaxseed contains 32% to 45% of its mass as oil of which 51% to 55% is α-linolenic acid. Flax lignan complex and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) have been isolated from flaxseed. Flaxseed and its components have antioxidant, hypolipidemic and hypoglycemic effects. These are mostly due to the SDG content. Oxidative stress has been implicated in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Flaxseed, flaxseed oil and flax lignan complex have not been investigated as to whether they reduce the incidence of diabetes and/or delay the development of diabetes. However, their effects on serum glucose have been studied. Flaxseed and flax lignan complex improve glycemic control. Animal models of type I diabetes involving streptozotocin administration or utilizing Bio-Breed diabetic (BBdp) prone rats are associated with oxidative stress. SDG treatment reduced the incidence of diabetes using serum glucose levels by 75% in the streptozotocin model of diabetes and by 72% in the BBdp rat model of diabetes. These reductions in development of diabetes were associated with decreases in oxidative stress measured by serum and pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA). SDG delays the development of diabetes in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes and this effect was associated with a reduction in serum MDA and glycated haemoglobin A1C. The data suggest that SDG may have a great potential for reducing the incidence of type 1 diabetes and delaying the development of type 2 diabetes in humans.

  10. Flaxseed and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Dhar, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Flaxseed contains 32% to 45% of its mass as oil of which 51% to 55% is α-linolenic acid. Flax lignan complex and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) have been isolated from flaxseed. Flaxseed and its components have antioxidant, hypolipidemic and hypoglycemic effects. These are mostly due to the SDG content. Oxidative stress has been implicated in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Flaxseed, flaxseed oil and flax lignan complex have not been investigated as to whether they reduce the incidence of diabetes and/or delay the development of diabetes. However, their effects on serum glucose have been studied. Flaxseed and flax lignan complex improve glycemic control. Animal models of type I diabetes involving streptozotocin administration or utilizing Bio-Breed diabetic (BBdp) prone rats are associated with oxidative stress. SDG treatment reduced the incidence of diabetes using serum glucose levels by 75% in the streptozotocin model of diabetes and by 72% in the BBdp rat model of diabetes. These reductions in development of diabetes were associated with decreases in oxidative stress measured by serum and pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA). SDG delays the development of diabetes in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes and this effect was associated with a reduction in serum MDA and glycated haemoglobin A1C. The data suggest that SDG may have a great potential for reducing the incidence of type 1 diabetes and delaying the development of type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:26561065

  11. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  12. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  13. Diabetes in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But ... children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin ...

  14. Diabetes Device Interoperability for Improved Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Silk, Alain D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific and technological advancements have led to the increasing availability and use of sophisticated devices for diabetes management, with corresponding improvements in public health. These devices are often capable of sharing data with a few other specific devices but are generally not broadly interoperable; they cannot work together with a wide variety of other devices. As a result of limited interoperability, benefits of modern diabetes devices and potential for development of innovative new diabetes technologies are not being fully realized. Here we discuss diabetes device interoperability in general, then focus on 4 examples that show how diabetes management could benefit from enhanced interoperability: remote monitoring and data sharing, integrating data from multiple devices to better inform diabetes management strategies, device consolidation, and artificial pancreas development. PMID:26178738

  15. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  16. [Diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Iván

    2016-09-01

    Worldwide, the cases of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2) has doubled in the last two decades. In the same period, obesity rates have triplicated, mainly because of the increase in the caloric intake and physical inactivity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 6 billion people consume cow´s milk and dairy products. By far, this amount exceeds the number o patients suffering from DM2. The increased consumption of highly caloric beverages including whole cow´s milk has incited several countries to publish recommendations on and encourage the intake of low fat milk and non-fat or reduced fat dairy products intake. Because of the multifactorial basis of DM2 and the controversial evidence regarding the relationship between cow's milk consumption and DM2 development, it is difficult to establish an optimal amount of milk per day for a good health, with no side effects. It is necessary to inform the general population on the nutritional value and health benefits of cow's milk. PMID:27603888

  17. Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of type 2 diabetes. Culturally sensitive strategies, structured disease management protocols, and the assistance of nurses, diabetic educators, and other health care professionals are effective in improving the outcome of diabetes in the African American community. PMID:16344294

  18. Diabetes and exercise (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... function throughout the day. By maintaining a healthy diet and sufficient exercise, a person with type 2 diabetes may be able to keep their blood sugar in the normal non-diabetic range without medicine.

  19. Type 1 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... your diabetes. But, you are the most important person in managing your diabetes. You should know the basic steps ... to your doctor before starting any exercise program. People with type 1 ... MANAGING YOUR BLOOD SUGAR Checking your blood sugar level ...

  20. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Eva; Winkler, Gábor

    2011-10-01

    Metabolic characteristics of physiological and diabetic pregnancies are discussed. The basic factor of these changes is the increasing insulin resistance throughout pregnancy, which in case of diabetes may result in hyperglycemia with undesirable clinical consequences and complications for both the mother and the fetus. Prevention of these complications by maintaining physiological metabolic state of diabetic pregnant women is possible, which is similar to that of healthy women. The aim of treatment of pregnant diabetics is to achieve normoglycemic state during the whole gestation that is possible by early diagnosis in case of gestational diabetes and by adequate preconception care in case of pregestational diabetes. To obtain desirable glycemic conditions insulin treatment is necessary in most of the cases together with adequate, quantitative nutrition therapy, while oral antidiabetic drugs during pregnancy and lactation are to be avoided. For adequate care of the cases with diabetes and pregnancy interdisciplinary diabetes centers with well-trained experts are required.

  1. A Better Diabetes Test?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have," said Zonszein, director of clinical diabetes at Albert Einstein College of Medicine's University Hospital in New York ... Diabetes Center, University Hospital, and professor, clinical medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City; Oct. 5, ...

  2. Diabetes - eye care

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic retinopathy - care ... until the problem is very bad. Your health care provider can catch problems early if you get ... doctor (ophthalmologist). Choose an eye doctor who takes care of people with diabetes. Your eye exam may ...

  3. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  4. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child's age. Causes of High Blood Sugar Levels A major goal in controlling diabetes is to ... be unusually tired. Checking for High Blood Sugar Levels As part of the diabetes management plan, you' ...

  5. Causes of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... rise, leading to prediabetes or diabetes. Abnormal Glucose Production by the Liver In some people with diabetes, an abnormal increase in glucose production by the liver also contributes to high blood ...

  6. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Boykin has diabetes. She has suffered from heart disease and required bypass surgery because she was unaware of the link between diabetes and heart disease. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: What most people don' ...

  7. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie ...

  8. Tight Diabetes Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

  9. Diabetes and bone health.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Marianna; Bahtiyar, Gül; Banerji, Mary Ann; Sacerdote, Alan S

    2013-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes especially type 2 diabetes worldwide is indisputable. Diabetics suffer increased morbidity and mortality, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, not only because of vascular complications, but also because of an increased fracture incidence. Both types 1 and 2 diabetes and some medications used to treat it are associated with osteoporotic fractures. The responsible mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. In this review, we evaluate the role of glycemic control in bone health, and the effect of anti-diabetic medications such as thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, DPP-4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 agonists. In addition, we examine the possible role of insulin and metformin as anabolic agents for bone. Lastly, we identify the current and future screening tools that help evaluate bone health in diabetics and their limitations. In this way we can offer individualized treatment, to the at-risk diabetic population. PMID:23628280

  10. Medicines for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the day and night. Another way kids keep blood sugar under control is by following their doctor's advice on eating ... Team When Blood Sugar Is Too High When Blood Sugar Is Too Low Meal Plans: What Kids With Diabetes Need to Know Diabetes Control: Why It's Important Diabetes: What's True and False? ...

  11. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  12. [Insulin therapy of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Roden, Michael; Weitgasser, Raimund; Ludvik, Bernhard; Fasching, Peter; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schernthaner, Guntram; Prager, Rudolf; Wascher, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Thus, reaching treatment targets with regard to control of glycemia is a central goal in the therapy of diabetic patients. The present article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the practical use of insulin according to current scientific evidence and clinical studies. PMID:27052221

  13. Diabetes Type 2

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  14. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  15. Diabetic gustatory sweating.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, T W

    1991-10-01

    Gustatory sweating is an unusual entity that may occur as an idiosyncratic reaction to certain foods, as a localized reaction to trauma or infection, or as the result of diabetic neuropathy. This report deals with a severe case of diabetic gustatory sweating, discusses the various types of gustatory sweating, and reviews the English literature dealing with the diabetic form. PMID:1928048

  16. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feet Footwear & Products Products by Company Products by Type Foot Health Awareness Diabetes Awareness What is a Podiatrist? Today's Podiatrist Print Share RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? ...

  17. Gestational Diabetes and Future Risk of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Subash Chander; Vinnamala, Sudheer; Jenkins, David

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study of women with gestational diabetes we attempted to (a) Determine the magnitude of the long term risk of progression to diabetes and (b) Identify factors that predict the development of diabetes. Methods All women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK from 1995 to 2003 were included in this observational cohort study and followed up till 2009. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, random/two-hour glucose following 75 gram oral glucose test (OGTT) ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Results The risk of developing diabetes was 6.9% at five years and 21.1% at ten years following the initial diagnosis of GDM. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels in the oral glucose tolerance test during pregnancy were associated with future risk of diabetes. There was no association with age, gestational age at diagnosis of GDM, numbers of previous and subsequent pregnancies. Conclusion Risk of progression to diabetes in a UK based cohort of women with GDM is estimated. Women with fasting antenatal glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and/or an antenatal two-hour glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L are at higher risk and need close follow up. PMID:23519363

  18. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  19. Vascular Complications of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Joshua A; Creager, Mark A

    2016-05-27

    Over the last several decades, the global incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus has increased significantly. The raised incidence rate is projected to continue as greater numbers of persons adopt a Western lifestyle and diet. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at heightened risk of both adverse microvascular and cardiovascular events. Moreover, once cardiovascular disease develops, diabetes mellitus exacerbates progression and worsens outcomes. The medical management of patients with diabetes mellitus mandates comprehensive risk factor modification and antiplatelet therapy. Recent clinical trials of new medical therapies continue to inform the care of patients with diabetes mellitus to reduce both cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:27230641

  20. Diabetes care during Hajj.

    PubMed

    Alsafadi, Hala; Goodwin, Wendy; Syed, Ateeq

    2011-06-01

    Keeping well during Hajj is a challenge for people with diabetes. However, with proactive planning and education, it may prove to be an excellent opportunity for reviewing management and enhancing diabetes education to reduce diabetes-related short- and long-term problems. People with diabetes should have enough time to consider a management plan. It is important that healthcare professionals are well informed regarding the effects of Hajj on diabetes and are able to offer advice, guidance and change of medications as required during pre-Hajj counselling to enable patients to stay healthy.

  1. Epigenetic changes in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Rami; Karnib, Nabil; Assaad, Rawad Abi; Bilen, Yara; Emmanuel, Nancy; Ghanem, Anthony; Younes, Joe; Zibara, Victor; Stephan, Joseph S; Sleiman, Sama F

    2016-06-20

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide. Diabetes is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of death. Diabetes is a genetic disease; however, the environment plays critical roles in its development and progression. Epigenetic changes often translate environmental stimuli to changes in gene expression. Changes in epigenetic marks and differential regulation of epigenetic modulators have been observed in different models of diabetes and its associated complications. In this minireview, we will focus DNA methylation, Histone acetylation and methylation and their roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:27130819

  2. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia.

  3. Diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  4. Diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  5. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27525681

  6. Teleophthalmology in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been rapid strides in progress in the fields of telecommunication and medical imaging. There is growing evidence regarding use of teleophthalmology for screening of diabetic retinopathy. This article highlights some pertinent questions regarding use of telescreening for diabetic retinopathy. It deals with evidence regarding accuracy of diagnosis, patients satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. The American Telemedicine Association have given certain guidelines for teleheath practices for diabetic retinopathy. The article discusses regarding these guidelines. Finally, a working model for diabetic retinopathy screening through teleophthalmology has been described. Telescreening for diabetic retinopathy seems to be a cost-effective, accurate, and reliable method for screening for diabetic retinopathy. The American Telemedicine Association has set up guidelines for telescreening that should be adhered to provide quality screening services to people with diabetes. PMID:24876576

  7. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  8. What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that ... 8747 and request a copy. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when your body can't ...

  9. Pancreas transplant for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Hannah R; Hatipoglu, Betul; Krishnamurthi, Venkatesh

    2015-11-01

    Pancreas transplant is an option for patients with type 1 diabetes and for some patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced diabetic kidney disease. The procedure has a high success rate, and performing it earlier in the course of diabetes could help prevent or reverse the long-term complications of diabetes.

  10. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations. PMID:27294922

  11. Diabetes and Depression

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and depression occur together approximately twice as frequently as would be predicted by chance alone. Comorbid diabetes and depression are a major clinical challenge as the outcomes of both conditions are worsened by the other. Although the psychological burden of diabetes may contribute to depression, this explanation does not fully explain the relationship between these 2 conditions. Both conditions may be driven by shared underlying biological and behavioral mechanisms, such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, inflammation, sleep disturbance, inactive lifestyle, poor dietary habits, and environmental and cultural risk factors. Depression is frequently missed in people with diabetes despite effective screening tools being available. Both psychological interventions and antidepressants are effective in treating depressive symptoms in people with diabetes but have mixed effects on glycemic control. Clear care pathways involving a multidisciplinary team are needed to obtain optimal medical and psychiatric outcomes for people with comorbid diabetes and depression. PMID:24743941

  12. Preeclampsia and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weissgerber, Tracey L.; Mudd, Lanay M.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is diagnosed in women presenting with new onset hypertension accompanied by proteinuria or other signs of severe organ dysfunction in the second half of pregnancy. Preeclampsia risk is increased two to four-fold among women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The limited number of pregnant women with preexisting diabetes and difficulties associated with diagnosing preeclampsia in women with proteinuria prior to pregnancy are significant barriers to research in this high-risk population. GDM also increases preeclampsia risk, although it is unclear whether these two conditions share a common pathophysiological pathway. Non-diabetic women who have had preeclampsia are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Among women with type 1 diabetes, a history of preeclampsia is associated with an increased risk of retinopathy and nephropathy. More research examining pathophysiology, treatment and the long-term health implications of preeclampsia among women with preexisting and gestational diabetes is needed. PMID:25644816

  13. [Diabetes mellitus and exercise].

    PubMed

    Yoh, Kousei

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important life-style related diseases. As for the type 2 diabetes mellitus in particular, lack of exercise has a large influence on the onset and disease progress. We can improve glucose tolerance by exercising. Exercise is the most important fundamental treatment in diabetes mellitus. Continuation and safety become important to let exercise therapy succeed. It is important with a diabetic that a lot of patients without exercise habit should start to gain exercise habit. When we expect an exercise effect, we should take consideration of intensity and volume in exercise for performing. We should consider each contraindication matter even if we put it to have many complications with a diabetic when we perform exercise therapy. A case-by-case exercise treatment in diabetic patient is required.

  14. Introduction to diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Kirti; Tarr, Joanna M; Ahmad, Shamim I; Kohner, Eva M; Chibber, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    The chronic metabolic disorder diabetes mellitus is a fast-growing global problem with huge social, health, and economic consequences. It is estimated that in 2010 there were globally 285 million people (approximately 6.4% of the adult population) suffering from this disease. This number is estimated to increase to 430 million in the absence of better control or cure. An ageing population and obesity are two main reasons for the increase. Furthermore it has been shown that almost 50% of the putative diabetics are not diagnosed until 10 years after onset of the disease, hence the real prevalence of global diabetes must be astronomically high. This chapter introduces the types of diabetes and diabetic complications such as impairment of immune system, periodontal disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, somatic and autonomic neuropathy, cardiovascular diseases and diabetic foot. Also included are the current management and treatments, and emerging therapies.

  15. Introduction to diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Kirti; Tarr, Joanna M; Ahmad, Shamim I; Kohner, Eva M; Chibber, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    The chronic metabolic disorder diabetes mellitus is a fast-growing global problem with huge social, health, and economic consequences. It is estimated that in 2010 there were globally 285 million people (approximately 6.4% of the adult population) suffering from this disease. This number is estimated to increase to 430 million in the absence of better control or cure. An ageing population and obesity are two main reasons for the increase. Furthermore it has been shown that almost 50% of the putative diabetics are not diagnosed until 10 years after onset of the disease, hence the real prevalence of global diabetes must be astronomically high. This chapter introduces the types of diabetes and diabetic complications such as impairment of immune system, periodontal disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, somatic and autonomic neuropathy, cardiovascular diseases and diabetic foot. Also included are the current management and treatments, and emerging therapies. PMID:23393665

  16. Update on diabetes classification.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celeste C; Philipson, Louis H

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the difficulties in creating a definitive classification of diabetes mellitus in the absence of a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of the major forms. This brief review shows the evolving nature of the classification of diabetes mellitus. No classification scheme is ideal, and all have some overlap and inconsistencies. The only diabetes in which it is possible to accurately diagnose by DNA sequencing, monogenic diabetes, remains undiagnosed in more than 90% of the individuals who have diabetes caused by one of the known gene mutations. The point of classification, or taxonomy, of disease, should be to give insight into both pathogenesis and treatment. It remains a source of frustration that all schemes of diabetes mellitus continue to fall short of this goal.

  17. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  18. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  19. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus. PMID:26913870

  20. Pupil size in diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Karavanaki, K; Davies, A G; Hunt, L P; Morgan, M H; Baum, J D

    1994-01-01

    Sympathetic function was studied in 101 diabetic children and 102 age and sex matched control children, as part of a longitudinal study of the evolution of microvascular disease in the population of diabetic children and adolescents in Avon County. The median (range) age of the diabetic population was 13.5 (6.0-17.2) years, the duration of diabetes was 4.0 (0.4-13.9) years, and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1) was 10.9 (7.0-18.1)%. Pupillary adaptation in darkness, as an index of sympathetic neuropathy, was measured using a Polaroid portable pupillometer. Diabetic children had a significantly smaller median pupillary diameter, measured as the pupil/iris ratio and expressed as a percentage, than control children (median (range) 62.9 (50.3-72.1) v 65.9 (52.2-73.8)). Pupillary diameter was significantly related to diabetes duration (r = -0.22), HbA1 (r = -0.34), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.25), diastolic blood pressure (r = -0.49), and mean albumin/creatinine ratio on random urine samples (r = -0.26). Pupillary diameter was not related to age (r = -0.1). Eight (7.9%) diabetic and four (3.9%) control children were identified as having abnormal pupillary dilation in darkness. In comparison with the rest of the diabetic population, these diabetic children had longer diabetes duration and poorer glycaemic control. Polaroid pupillometry has demonstrated subclinical autonomic neuropathy in a population of diabetic children and adolescents. These abnormalities were related to poor metabolic control, long diabetes duration, and also to other indices of microvascular disease. PMID:7726610

  1. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence. PMID:27524548

  2. Diabetes and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Goebel-Fabbri, Ann E

    2008-05-01

    The problem of insulin restriction is an important women's health issue in type 1 diabetes. This behavior is associated with increased rates of diabetes complications and decreased quality of life. Clinical and technological research is greatly needed to improve treatment tools and strategies for this problem. In this commentary, the author describes the scope of the problem of eating disorders and diabetes, as well as offers ideas about ways technology may be applied to help solve this complex problem.

  3. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  4. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  5. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  6. Women and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Homko, Carol J; Trout, Kimberly

    2006-12-01

    Women with diabetes face unique health challenges throughout their life cycle. Health concerns begin at puberty and continue throughout the reproductive years and later stages of life. Diabetes can have a significant impact on puberty, menstruation, reproduction, and cardiovascular and bone health. All women with diabetes require an individualized reproductive health plan that addresses contraception, the importance of planning pregnancies, and life-style changes. Anticipatory guidance and education in each phase of development can help the woman with diabetes avoid health care problems, reduce her risk of complications, and achieve a health outcome.

  7. Diabetes Mellitus Review.

    PubMed

    Blair, Meg

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of physiological dysfunctions characterized by hyperglycemia resulting directly from insulin resistance, inadequate insulin secretion, or excessive glucagon secretion. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder leading to the destruction of pancreatic beta-cells. Type 2 diabetes (T2D), which is much more common, is primarily a problem of progressively impaired glucose regulation due to a combination of dysfunctional pancreatic beta cells and insulin resistance. The purpose of this article is to review the basic science of type 2 diabetes and its complications, and to discuss the most recent treatment guidelines.

  8. [Diabetes and sleeping habits].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinsuke; Inaba, Masaaki

    2012-07-01

    Number of diabetic patients has continued to increase in the world, disturbance of sleep habits have been pointed out as one of the factor recently. Sleep habits are categorized into quantity and quality of sleep. Inappropriate sleep duration and decline in quality of sleep have caused the exacerbation and onset of diabetes. On the other hand, it is known that many patients with diabetes have already suffered from sleep disorders. Here, we will give an outline of the relationship between sleep habits and diabetes.

  9. The Heart in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kereiakes, Dean J.; Naughton, James L.; Brundage, Bruce; Schiller, Nelson B.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of insulin, heart disease has become a major impediment to survival in persons with diabetes mellitus. Coronary disease has increased severity and accelerated development in diabetic persons compared with an age- and sex-matched nondiabetic population. A peculiar vulnerability of women to the influence of diabetes with loss of premenopausal coronary disease protection has been found. The symptomatology of coronary events may differ and coronary care data show a higher incidence of sudden death in diabetic patients who have a myocardial infarction than in their non-diabetic counterparts. Insulin may play a role in the myocardial adjustment to an ischemic insult by enhancing glucose intake and suppressing lipolysis and ketogenesis. Carbohydrate intolerance in dogs, rhesus monkeys and humans appears associated with similar histologic and compositional changes in the myocardium. Abnormalities in diastolic ventricular function not attributable to large- or small-vessel coronary disease have been found in the diabetic subjects of each species. Studies in humans who have diabetes have assessed single pressure-volume relationships and more exacting measures of ventricular compliance are needed. Abnormalities of myocardial function in patients with diabetes have been found using echo and radionuclide techniques. Many of these findings need to be correlated with invasive data or confirmed in larger populations. Autonomic dysfunction is common in diabetic persons and may imply an associated poor prognosis. Reflex abnormalities in parasympathetic function are most prevalent and occur before sympathetic dysfunction. PMID:6372249

  10. Worldwide burden of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Jaikrit; Bhutani, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic of major public health importance cannot be disputed. While the IDF data does emphasis the importance of diabetes as a global public health problem, it does not place in perspective the ranking of diabetes as compared to other diseases and illnesses. The GBD data highlight this fact in multiple ways. The disease and its complications or comorbid conditions rank high in the list of risk factors, and causes of death. This communication describes the global burden of diabetes especially south-east Asia and the statistical sequelae of the disease. PMID:25364686

  11. Winter depression and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Christine R

    2012-12-01

    Depression is a common and often harmful disorder, which is frequently associated with the winter season. Research has shown a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus and depression. Furthermore, diabetics with depression have a higher rate of adverse outcomes. Little has been published regarding the seasonality of depression in diabetics. The case report described in this article concerns a 65-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes and a history of winter depression. Current evidence-based management options are reviewed. PMID:23089656

  12. Microalbuminuria and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Konen, J C; Shihabi, Z K

    1993-12-01

    Small concentrations of albumin detected in the urine predict renal dysfunction and reflect vascular abnormalities such as atherosclerosis, retinopathy and, probably, neuropathy. Although microalbuminuria is not specific for diabetic complications, it has been most extensively studied in diabetics. The rate of urinary albumin excretion can also be used to determine therapeutic response to pharmacologic and lifestyle interventions such as diet, smoking cessation and physical activity. The pathophysiology of microalbuminuria and its clinical significance in diabetes is presented, along with a discussion of measurement issues and implications for clinical management. An algorithm for the evaluation of diabetic patients is included. PMID:8249773

  13. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  14. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  15. Cognitive impairment and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to provide a brief review of the link between diabetes mellitus with cognitive impairment, the possible pathophysiology linking the two, and some possible therapeutic interventions for the treatment of this condition. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, so also dementia increases in later life. As the population ages, type 2 diabetes and AD are increasing. Both diseases are chronic and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies showed that older people with type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of cognitive decline. The precise mechanism linking the two remains to be found out. Several hypothetical mechanisms have been postulated. Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for AD and vascular dementia. The association between diabetes and AD is particularly strong among carriers of the APOE ε4. Several studies have linked dementia to diabetes. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance have also been associated with poor cognitive performance and at risk of developing cognitive impairment. Studies have suggested that metabolic syndrome may be linked to vascular dementia, while contrasting findings showed the role of metabolic syndrome to AD. In this review, how diabetes and cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease are mutually linked, possible mechanism linking the two and some possible therapeutic interventions with some patents that seem to be good therapeutic targets in future are discussed.

  16. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... fruit drinks Sweets and desserts If you have diabetes, you should: Get 60 minutes of physical activity every day Get 20 minutes of physical activity ... Nuts and avocado Butter You can get enough physical activity by just: Watching TV ... with diabetes should not eat at fast food restaurants. True ...

  17. Diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Gemechu, Fassil W; Seemant, Fnu; Curley, Catherine A

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic foot infection, defined as soft tissue or bone infection below the malleoli, is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus leading to hospitalization and the most frequent cause of nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Diabetic foot infections are diagnosed clinically based on the presence of at least two classic findings of inflammation or purulence. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial. The most common pathogens are aerobic gram-positive cocci, mainly Staphylococcus species. Osteomyelitis is a serious complication of diabetic foot infection that increases the likelihood of surgical intervention. Treatment is based on the extent and severity of the infection and comorbid conditions. Mild infections are treated with oral antibiotics, wound care, and pressure off-loading in the outpatient setting. Selected patients with moderate infections and all patients with severe infections should be hospitalized, given intravenous antibiotics, and evaluated for possible surgical intervention. Peripheral arterial disease is present in up to 40% of patients with diabetic foot infections, making evaluation of the vascular supply critical. All patients with diabetes should undergo a systematic foot examination at least once a year, and more frequently if risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers exist. Preventive measures include patient education on proper foot care, glycemic and blood pressure control, smoking cessation, use of prescription footwear, intensive care from a podiatrist, and evaluation for surgical interventions as indicated.

  18. Diabetes mellitus prevention.

    PubMed

    Allende-Vigo, Myriam Zaydee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review lifestyle modification interventions and pharmacological clinical studies designed to prevent diabetes and provide evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of Diabetes Mellitus. A review of relevant literature compiled via a literature search (PUBMED) of English-language publications between 1997 and 2010 was conducted. It is found that people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus can halt the development of the disease. Lifestyle modification intervention with reduction of 5%-10% of excess body weight and increase in moderate physical activity by 150 min/wk has consistently proven to reduce the appearance of diabetes in different at-risk populations. Pharmacologic interventions have also demonstrated the prevention of the appearance of diabetes in persons at risk. Bariatric surgery has decreased the appearance of diabetes patients in a select group of individuals. The progression from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus can be prevented. Lifestyle modification intervention changes with weight loss and increased physical activity are currently recommended for the prevention of diabetes.

  19. Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Shelly; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Eight experts in visual impairment respond briefly to reports that intensive monitoring of blood glucose levels by persons with diabetes can lead to a 70% reduction in the progression of detectable diabetic retinopathy. Comments are generally optimistic, though some cautions are raised. (DB)

  20. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes Print A A A Text Size ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  1. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  2. Diabetes insipidus in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Paulose, K P; Padmakumar, N

    2002-09-01

    The association of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and Diabetes Insipidus (DI) without any congenital defects is very rare and we report here a case of type 2 diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) whose blood sugar was controlled by insulin, developing central diabetes insipidus 2 years later, which could be successively controlled by synthetic vasopressin.

  3. Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identified. However, despite broad organisational, intellectual, and fiscal investments, no means for preventing or curing type 1 diabetes exists, and, globally, the quality of diabetes management remains uneven. This Seminar discusses current progress in epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes, and prospects for an improved future for individuals with this disease. PMID:23890997

  4. [Diabetes and travel].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Mayaudon, H; Ducorps, M; Belmejdoub, G; Thiolet, C; Pellan, M; Cosson, E

    1997-01-01

    With the continuing expansion in international air travel, increasing numbers of diabetic patients consult physicians for advice before going abroad. Careful planning is required taking into account climatic and medical conditions at the destination. Diabetic travelers should pack an appropriate treatment kit and contract special insurance coverage for medical evacuation. Precautions are necessary to limit the effects of motion sickness and time differences on diabetes control and especially the risk of hypoglycemia. Special attention is needed to avoid digestive problems and prevent foot injuries which can lead to serious complications in diabetic patients. Diabetic patients cannot forget their health problem during vacation and must be especially cautious when traveling. However with proper training, the risks of foreign travel can be reduced to acceptable levels.

  5. Built environment and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, ‘the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution.’ Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. PMID:20535308

  6. Diabetes and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Suvisaari, Jaana; Keinänen, Jaakko; Eskelinen, Saana; Mantere, Outi

    2016-02-01

    People with schizophrenia have 2- to 5-fold higher risk of type 2 diabetes than the general population. The traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes, especially obesity, poor diet, and sedentary lifestyle, are common in people with schizophrenia already early in the course of illness. People with schizophrenia also often have low socioeconomic status and income, which affects their possibilities to make healthy lifestyle choices. Antipsychotic medications increase the risk of type 2 diabetes both directly by affecting insulin sensitivity and indirectly by causing weight gain. Lifestyle modification interventions for prevention of diabetes should be an integral part of treatment of patients with schizophrenia. In the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with schizophrenia, communication and collaboration between medical care and psychiatric treatment providers are essential.

  7. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-González, S A

    1998-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy could result in severe or fatal complications to mother or the unborn product, like polyhydramnios, preeclampsia, abortion, neonatal asphyxia, macrosomia, stillbirth, and others, therefore is very important the early detection and treatment of diabetes. Gestacional Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity first recognized during pregnancy. The screening test consist of 50 g of oral glucose and a plasma glucose measurement at one hour, regardless of the time of the last meal, and this may do in all pregnancies between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. If plasma glucose level above 140 mg/dl results, a oral glucose tolerance test with 100 g must be done. This is the GDM diagnostic test. The risk factors for gestacional diabetes (older than 30 years of age, obesity, arterial hypertension, glucosury, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, family history of macrosomia) identify only 50% of pregnancies with gestacional diabetes, therefore, is necessary to screen all pregnancies who become pregnant, a strict control before pregnant is indispensable, with aim to slow congenital malformations probability and another complications. Gestacional diabetes prevalence in hispanic women in the U.S.A. is 12.3 percent. Diabetes mellitus prevalence in Mexico is about 2-6 percent. The goal of management of diabetes during pregnancy is the maintainance of fasting plasma glucose 105 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl two hours after meals. Treatment consist in diabetes education, diet with caloric needs calculation, exercise, and occasionally insulin. Is necessary the prenatal monitoring, the supervision of delivery or cesarean metabolic changes, and the postnatal monitoring of the mother and product.

  8. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  9. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call toll-free 1-888-693-NDEP (6337). The ""Control Your ...

  10. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  11. [Diabetes mellitus and dementia].

    PubMed

    Kopf, D

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, particularly type 2 diabetes, is a risk factor for dementia and this holds true for incident vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrovascular complications of diabetes and chronic mild inflammation in insulin resistant states partly account for this increased risk. In addition, cellular resistance to the trophic effects of insulin on neurons and glial cells favor the accumulation of toxic metabolic products, such as amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau). Weight loss frequently precedes overt cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This results in an increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes in stable diabetic patients who are on suitably adjusted doses of oral insulin or insulinotropic antidiabetic drugs. In turn, hypoglycemic episodes may induce further damage in the vulnerable brains of type 2 diabetes patients. Patients with unexplained weight loss, hypoglycemic episodes and subjective memory complaints must be screened for dementia. Once dementia has been diagnosed the goals of diabetes management must be reevaluated as prevention of hypoglycemia becomes more important than tight metabolic control. As weight loss accelerates the rate of cognitive decline, nutritional goals must aim at stabilizing body weight. There is no available evidence on whether drug treatment of diabetes in middle-aged persons can help to prevent dementia; however, physical exercise, mental activity and higher education have preventive effects on the risk of dementia in later life. In addition, nutritional recommendations that are effective in preventing cardiovascular events have also been shown to reduce the risk of dementia.

  12. [Hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Janka, H U

    1993-03-01

    Numerous surveys have shown that in industrial countries diabetic subjects develop hypertension more frequently than non-diabetic persons. In fact, three typical hypertension forms in these patients can be discerned: essential, renal, and isolated systolic hypertension. In type 2-diabetes (NIDDM) hypertension can be seen in close association with obesity, glucose intolerance, lipid changes, and insulin resistance within the framework of the metabolic syndrome. The increased incidence of hypertension in type 1-diabetes (IDDM) is a result of development of diabetic nephropathy. In the elderly type 2-diabetics particularly frequently isolated systolic hypertension is present which reflects increased arterial stiffness and loss of vascular distensibility. In hypertension progression of both macrovascular disease and microangiopathy is increased whereby interaction of hyperglycemia and hypertension seems to be the main risk factor. In most hypertensive diabetic patients drugs will be necessary to lower blood pressure in a therapeutical range. There are several effective substances available which should be prescribed individually according to the needs and accompanying conditions in these patients. PMID:8475640

  13. Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally, particularly in Asia. According to the 2013 Diabetes Atlas, an estimated 366 million people are affected by diabetes worldwide; 36% of those affected live in the Western Pacific region, with a significant proportion in East Asia. The reasons for this marked increase in the prevalence of diabetes can be extrapolated from several distinct features of the Asian region. First, the two most populated countries, China and India, are located in Asia. Second, Asians have experienced extremely rapid economic growth, including rapid changes in dietary patterns, during the past decades. As a result, Asians tend to have more visceral fat within the same body mass index range compared with Westerners. In addition, increased insulin resistance relative to reduced insulin secretory function is another important feature of Asian individuals with diabetes. Young age of disease onset is also a distinctive characteristic of these patients. Moreover, changing dietary patterns, such as increased consumption of white rice and processed red meat, contributes to the deteriorated lifestyle of this region. Recent studies suggest a distinctive responsiveness to novel anti-diabetic agents in Asia; however, further research and efforts to reverse the increasing prevalence of diabetes are needed worldwide. PMID:26435131

  14. Diabetes Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E.; Cargill, Algernon; Huang, Elbert S.

    2008-01-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of the diabetes epidemic; they have higher prevalence rates, worse diabetes control, and higher rates of complications. This article reviews the effectiveness of health care interventions at improving health outcomes and/or reducing diabetes health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities with diabetes. Forty-two studies met inclusion criteria. On average, these health care interventions improved the quality of care for racial/ethnic minorities, improved health outcomes (such as diabetes control and reduced diabetes complications), and possibly reduced health disparities in quality of care. There is evidence supporting the use of interventions that target patients (primarily through culturally tailored programs), providers (especially through one-on-one feedback and education), and health systems (particularly with nurse case managers and nurse clinicians). More research is needed in the areas of racial/ethnic minorities other than African Americans and Latinos, health disparity reductions, long-term diabetes-related outcomes, and the sustainability of health care interventions over time. PMID:17881626

  15. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-07-30

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic.

  16. Predictive factors of diabetic complications: a possible link between family history of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was assessment of predictive factors of diabetic retinopathy. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed by recruiting 1228 type 2 diabetic patients from a diabetes referral clinic over a six-month period (from July to December, 2012). Diabetes risk factors, complications, laboratory results have been recorded. Results Of the 1228 diabetic patients (54% women, mean age 58.48 ± 9.94 years), prevalence of diabetes retinopathy was 26.6%. There were significant associations between retinopathy and family history of diabetes (p = 0.04), hypertension (p = 0.0001), diabetic duration (p = 0.0001), poor glycemic control (p = 0.0001) and age of onset of diabetes (p = 0.0001). However, no significant associations were found between retinopathy with dyslipidemia and obesity. In logistic regression model, poor glycemic control (p = 0.014), hypertension (p = 0.0001), duration of diabetes (p = 0.0001) and family history of diabetes (p = 0.012) independently predicted retinopathy after adjustment for age and sex. Conclusions Diabetic complications are resulting from an interaction from genes and environmental factors. A family history of diabetes is pointing toward a possible genetic and epigenetic basis for diabetic retinopathy. Our findings suggest the role of epigenetic modifications and metabolic memory in diabetic retinopathy in subjects with family history of diabetes. PMID:24860795

  17. [Hypertension and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Navalesi, R; Rizzo, L; Nannipieri, M; Rapuano, A; Bandinelli, S; Pucci, L; Bertacca, A; Penno, G

    1995-10-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in diabetes is significantly higher than in non-diabetics, perhaps twice as common. The excess is related to diabetic nephropathy, mainly in type 1 diabetes, to obesity, mainly in type 2 diabetes, but also to increased sympathetic activity. Furthermore, the increased prevalence of hypertension may relate to insulin resistance and its sequelae. Insulin resistance leads to hyperinsulinemia, relates to increased LDL and reduced HDL levels, causes the development of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes and might also be causally related to the onset of hypertension. Syndrome X has relevant therapeutic implications in the management of hypertension. Hypertension is a major risk factor for large vessel disease in diabetics and also a risk factor for microangiopathy, particularly nephropathy. The incidence of atherosclerotic disease is dramatically increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics and is the major cause of morbidity and premature death mainly in patients with raised urinary albumin excretion. Thus, diabetics show a two-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease, 2-6 fold increased risk of stroke and a several-fold increased risk of peripheral vessel disease. Some evidence suggests that hypertension may be a risk factor for retinopathy, particularly its progression, but surely hypertension is a significant risk factor for nephropathy, accelerating its progression and perhaps even causing the onset of the glomerulopathy. The mechanisms by which hypertension might contribute to the evolution of both large vessel as well as small vessel disease is still unknown, although increased capillary leakage and vascular endothelium alterations might be important factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562258

  18. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  19. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  20. [Inflammation and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Löbner, K; Füchtenbusch, M

    2004-09-01

    The focus of current diabetes research is the clarification of the pathogenetic relationships between subclinical inflammation, diabetes and arteriosclerosis. Even minimal disturbances in glucose tolerance are associated with a chronic, generalized inflammatory reaction that links components of the metabolic syndrome and contributes to the development of diabetic complications as well as to the development and progression of arteriosclerosis. The most important mediators and markers of this inflammation cascade are NF-kappaB, TNF-alpha, IL-6, CRP and PAI-1. For the treatment of subclinical inflammation, substances with anti-inflammatory properties such as statins or ACE inhibitors are of increasing importance.

  1. Obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Riobó Serván, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and relative impairment in insulin secretion and its possible long term complications. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, but both genetic and environmental factors, such as obesity and aging, play a key role. "Diabesity" is a new term which refers to diabetes occurring in the context of obesity. In this article, we will discuss the epidemiology and impact of diabetes and obesity and will also outline the components of the metabolic syndrome and the studies that demonstrate that screening and prevention are possible in an attempt to control this epidemic.

  2. [Multifocal diabetic myonecrosis].

    PubMed

    Uhoda, R; Heuschling, A; Sattari, A; Hastir, D; Soyfoo, S; Tant, L; Gangji, V

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare and often unrecognized complication of diabetes. It typically occurs in patients with poorly controlled and multi-complicated diabetes. Typical clinical presentation is an indurate muscle pain, mainly localized in the lower limb with an acute onset. In most cases, diabetes myonecrosis is focal and sometimes can be recurrent. Diagnosis is clinical but can used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Muscle biopsy is sometimes necessary in cases of doubt or to confirm the imaging diagnosis. Elevation of muscle enzymes (CPK) is present in half of cases. Management is conservative and the clinical and imaging evolution is usually favourable. We report the case of a patient presenting a subacute hyperalgesic lomboradiculopathy. PMID:23373126

  3. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifestyle changes also help. These include a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, and quitting smoking. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  4. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exercise Regularly Exercise is another way to keep blood sugar under control. It helps to balance food intake. After checking ... it as directed in order to help keep blood sugar under control. Get Tested for Diabetes after Pregnancy Get tested ...

  5. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the biggest health problem for people with diabetes. LDL cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is known as the bad cholesterol because it ... you often eat foods that are high in LDL cholesterol high cholesterol runs in your family HDL cholesterol. ...

  6. [Diabetes, sport and exercise].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Hermann

    2011-05-01

    Physical activity is an essential element in the therapy of type 2 Diabetes mellitus. For physicians and therapists, it is of vital importance to motivate each patient to include exercise into routine daily life. Individual therapy plans are, thus, required.

  7. Diabetic Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It ... light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly. ...

  8. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes are at risk for mouth infections, especially periodontal (gum) disease. Periodontal disease can damage the gum and bone that ... people with serious gum disease lose their teeth. Periodontal disease may also make it hard to control ...

  9. Living With Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... NDEP's 15th Anniversary Diabetes HealthSense Expand Promotional Tools Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... Loved One Health Care Professionals Submit a Resource​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  10. Infant of diabetic mother

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 39. Moore TR, Hauguel-De Mouzon S, Catalano P. Diabetes in ... Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, Lockwood CJ, Moore TR, Greene MF, eds. Creasy and Resnik's Maternal- ...

  11. Cardiotocography and diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jb; Goyal, Manu

    2016-09-01

    Foetal monitoring in antenatal period and during labour is done to detect foetal distress and to take necessary action timely in order to improve perinatal outcome. Maternal awareness of foetal movement is routinely recommended in all pregnancies after 28 weeks gestation. In high risk pregnancies like diabetes, foetal growth restriction, macrosomia, additional means of foetal surveillance should be used like antenatal cardiotocography, non stress test, biophysical profile or Doppler studies. Diabetic mothers are at increased risk for sudden intrauterine foetal demise, thereby mandating the need of cardiotocography and ultrasound biophysical profile testing weekly or twice weekly in such patients. Foetal surveillance in diabetic patients in low resource settings demands for frequent antenatal visits and non stress test if possible. During labour also, there should be continuous electronic foetal monitoring in diabetic mothers in both first and second stages of labour for early detection of foetal hypoxic stre s and timely intervention. PMID:27582148

  12. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes under control every day. My Blood Glucose Levels Daily Blood Glucose Levels before Pregnancy If you are thinking about getting ... after eating 100 to 155 Daily Blood Glucose Levels during Pregnancy During your pregnancy, you'll check ...

  13. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    ... Once you have eye disease caused by diabetes, you need to see an ophthalmologist. ... feel stinging when the drops are first placed. You may have a ... using a bright light. The doctor can then see areas that may ...

  14. Diabetic Eye Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic retinopathy also have a problem called macular edema. Macular edema, or swelling, can happen in any stage of ... fluid from the retina’s damaged blood vessels. Macular edema is the most common cause of vision loss ...

  15. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for $10 through these programs. To get these prices, you do not need prescription drug insurance coverage. ... diabetes/ index. htm How to Get the Best Price for Your Medicines  Ask for a generic: Tell ...

  16. Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  17. Screening for Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for gestational diabetes: (1) All women ... not enough evidence to judge the benefits and harms of screening women before 24 weeks of pregnancy. ...

  18. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is the ... stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored ...

  19. Teen Diabetes Quiz Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Answer: B Diabetes causes your blood glucose to be too high. Glucose comes from the food you eat and is needed to fuel our bodies. Glucose is also stored in our liver and muscles. ...

  20. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 diabetes . It involves extremely high blood sugar (glucose) level without the presence of ketones. ... is a condition of: Extremely high blood sugar (glucose) level Extreme lack of water ( dehydration ) Decreased alertness ...

  1. Diabetes Interactive Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kirtland, Karen A; Burrows, Nilka R; Geiss, Linda S

    2014-02-06

    The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is a recently released Web-based collection of maps that allows users to view geographic patterns and examine trends in diabetes and its risk factors over time across the United States and within states. The atlas provides maps, tables, graphs, and motion charts that depict national, state, and county data. Large amounts of data can be viewed in various ways simultaneously. In this article, we describe the design and technical issues for developing the atlas and provide an overview of the atlas' maps and graphs. The Diabetes Interactive Atlas improves visualization of geographic patterns, highlights observation of trends, and demonstrates the concomitant geographic and temporal growth of diabetes and obesity.

  2. Diabetes Interactive Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Nilka R.; Geiss, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is a recently released Web-based collection of maps that allows users to view geographic patterns and examine trends in diabetes and its risk factors over time across the United States and within states. The atlas provides maps, tables, graphs, and motion charts that depict national, state, and county data. Large amounts of data can be viewed in various ways simultaneously. In this article, we describe the design and technical issues for developing the atlas and provide an overview of the atlas’ maps and graphs. The Diabetes Interactive Atlas improves visualization of geographic patterns, highlights observation of trends, and demonstrates the concomitant geographic and temporal growth of diabetes and obesity. PMID:24503340

  3. [Hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Araki, Shin-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The goal of diabetes treatment is to maintain a quality of life. Hypertension is a common diabetes comorbidity and is a risk factor for mortality. Epidemiological studies show that blood pressure (BP) lowering is associated with improving prognosis in this population. However, recent clinical trials and meta-analyses report no benefit of an intensive BP lowering of < 130/80 mmHg on mortality and cardiovascular complications, except stroke. Furthermore, the excess BP lowering should be avoided not to increase the risk of adverse effects such as hypotension, especially in elderly patients or those with adverse vascular complications. In Japanese diabetes guidelines, a BP target of < 130/80 mmHg is still recommended in diabetic patients with hypertension because of the high incidence of stroke in Japanese.

  4. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes and kidney problems Smoke Are African American, Mexican American, or Native American ... controlling your blood sugar level through: Eating healthy foods Getting regular exercise Taking medicine or insulin as ...

  5. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria, a relentless decline in GFR, raised arterial blood pressure, and increased relative mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure. The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is multifactorial, with contributions from metabolic abnormalities, hemodynamic alterations, and various growth factors and genetic factors. Epidemiologic and family studies have demonstrated that only a subset of the patients develop this complication that family clustering of nephropathy is present, and that ethnicity plays an important role in the risk of developing this kidney disease. Short stature and low birth weight are both associated with increased risk of developing diabetic nephropathy, supporting the hypothesis that genetic predisposition or factors operating in utero, in early childhood, or both contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Studies elucidating phenotypic markers such as parenteral hypertension and systemic blood pressure elevation have yielded conflicting results. The contribution from elevated blood pressure only plays a minor role in the majority of the patients developing diabetic nephropathy. The majority of the studies have demonstrated increased sodium/lithium countertransport activity in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with nephropathy, whereas studies of this phenotypic marker in parents of patients with and without nephropathy have yielded conflicting results. Recently, studies of genetic markers involved in the regulation of blood pressure and levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been conducted. Several studies have demonstrated that the deletion polymorphism in the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme acts as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. However, a meta-analysis does not support the suggestion that this factor plays any role for the initiation of diabetic

  6. Breastfeeding for diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Resham Raj; Shrestha, Dina

    2016-09-01

    Breastfeeding has been consistently observed to improve metabolism in mothers and their offspring. Apart from mother child bonding and nutritional benefits; it is associated with a decreased risk of acquiring metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in mothers, obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in their children. Early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding should therefore be highly encouraged and strongly supported. PMID:27582164

  7. Vanadium and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Poucheret, P; Verma, S; Grynpas, M D; McNeill, J H

    1998-11-01

    We demonstrated in 1985 that vanadium administered in the drinking water to streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats restored elevated blood glucose to normal. Subsequent studies have shown that vanadyl sulfate can lower elevated blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides in a variety of diabetic models including the STZ diabetic rat, the Zucker fatty rat and the Zucker diabetic fatty rat. Long-term studies of up to one year did not show toxicity in control or STZ rats administered vanadyl sulfate in doses that lowered elevated blood glucose. In the BB diabetic rat, a model of insulin-dependent diabetes, vanadyl sulfate lowered the insulin requirement by up to 75%. Vanadyl sulfate is effective orally when administered by either single dose or chronic doses. It is also effective by the intraperitoneal route. We have also been able to demonstrate marked long-term effects of vanadyl sulfate in diabetic animals following treatment and withdrawal of vanadyl sulfate. Because vanadyl sulfate is not well absorbed we have synthesized and tested a number of organic vanadium compounds. One of these, bismaltolato-oxovanadium IV (BMOV), has shown promise as a therapeutic agent. BMOV is 2-3x more potent than vanadyl sulfate and has shown less toxicity. Recent studies from our laboratory have shown that the effects of vanadium are not due to a decrease in food intake and that while vanadium is deposited in bone it does not appear to affect bone strength or architecture. The mechanism of action of vanadium is currently under investigation. Several studies indicate that vanadium is a phosphatase inhibitor and that vanadium can activate serine/threonine kinases distal to the insulin receptor presumably by preventing dephosphorylation due to inhibition of phosphatases Short-term clinical trials using inorganic vanadium compounds in diabetic patients have been promising.

  8. Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Craig A; Nakhla, Meranda; Derraik, José G B; Gunn, Alistair J; Daneman, Denis; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This article examines the factors associated with DKA in children with T1DM, both at first presentation and in recurrent cases. The challenge for future research is to find effective ways to improve primary care physician and general community awareness of T1DM to reduce DKA at presentation and develop practical, cost-effective programs to reduce recurrent DKA.

  9. Diabetes Screening Among Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Creatore, Maria I.; Booth, Gillian L.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Moineddin, Rahim; Glazier, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine diabetes screening, predictors of screening, and the burden of undiagnosed diabetes in the immigrant population and whether these estimates differ by ethnicity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A population-based retrospective cohort linking administrative health data to immigration files was used to follow the entire diabetes-free population aged 40 years and up in Ontario, Canada (N = 3,484,222) for 3 years (2004–2007) to determine whether individuals were screened for diabetes. Multivariate regression was used to determine predictors of having a diabetes test. RESULTS Screening rates were slightly higher in the immigrant versus the general population (76.0 and 74.4%, respectively; P < 0.001), with the highest rates in people born in South Asia, Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Immigrant seniors (age ≥65 years) were screened less than nonimmigrant seniors. Percent yield of new diabetes subjects among those screened was high for certain countries of birth (South Asia, 13.0%; Mexico and Latin America, 12.1%; Caribbean, 9.5%) and low among others (Europe, Central Asia, U.S., 5.1–5.2%). The number of physician visits was the single most important predictor of screening, and many high-risk ethnic groups required numerous visits before a test was administered. The proportion of diabetes that remained undiagnosed was estimated to be 9.7% in the general population and 9.0% in immigrants. CONCLUSIONS Overall diabetes-screening rates are high in Canada’s universal health care setting, including among high-risk ethnic groups. Despite this finding, disparities in screening rates between immigrant subgroups persist and multiple physician visits are often required to achieve recommended screening levels. PMID:22357181

  10. Personalized Medicine: Monogenic Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goulden, Peter A; Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent

    2015-09-01

    Personalized medicine in diabetes is a topic which has gained significant momentum in recent years (Raz et al. 2013). A rapid rise in the number and combinations of diabetes therapies coupled with an unprecedented rise in diabetes prevalence rates has necessitated diabetes guidelines which emphasize the need for personalized patient-centered care (ADA 2014). There are many questions regarding the role genetics may be able to play in guiding therapy. Recent pharmacogenetic research has revealed polymorphisms that may impact patient response to metformin (Dong et al 2011) and glucagon-like-polypeptide-1 therapies (Smushkin et al. 2012). This may hold promise for helping identify patients who will better respond to specific agents and in the longer-term may help ensure a smooth journey along the therapeutic pathway. Monogenic or "single-gene" diabetes comprises nearly 2% of all cases of type 2 diabetes and provides a model for individualizing care. This review will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  11. Zinc and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao; Sun, Weixia; Miao, Lining; Fu, Yaowen; Wang, Yonggang; Su, Guanfang; Liu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an important nutrient that is involved in various physiological metabolisms. Zn dyshomeostasis is often associated with various pathogeneses of chronic diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and related complications. Zn is present in ocular tissue in high concentrations, particularly in the retina and choroid. Zn deficiencies have been shown to affect ocular development, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and even diabetic retinopathy. However, the mechanism by which Zn deficiency increases the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy remains unclear. In addition, due to the negative effect of Zn deficiency on the eye, Zn supplementation should prevent diabetic retinopathy; however, limited available data do not always support this notion. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to summarize these pieces of available information regarding Zn prevention of diabetic retinopathy. Current theories and possible mechanisms underlying the role of Zn in the eye-related diseases are discussed. The possible factors that affect the preventive effect of Zn supplementation on diabetic retinopathy were also discussed. PMID:23671870

  12. Personalized Medicine: Monogenic Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goulden, Peter A; Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent

    2015-09-01

    Personalized medicine in diabetes is a topic which has gained significant momentum in recent years (Raz et al. 2013). A rapid rise in the number and combinations of diabetes therapies coupled with an unprecedented rise in diabetes prevalence rates has necessitated diabetes guidelines which emphasize the need for personalized patient-centered care (ADA 2014). There are many questions regarding the role genetics may be able to play in guiding therapy. Recent pharmacogenetic research has revealed polymorphisms that may impact patient response to metformin (Dong et al 2011) and glucagon-like-polypeptide-1 therapies (Smushkin et al. 2012). This may hold promise for helping identify patients who will better respond to specific agents and in the longer-term may help ensure a smooth journey along the therapeutic pathway. Monogenic or "single-gene" diabetes comprises nearly 2% of all cases of type 2 diabetes and provides a model for individualizing care. This review will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. PMID:26390534

  13. Diabetes and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Holden, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are common conditions, affecting 384 million and 33 million people worldwide, respectively. Therefore, there is great potential for overlap, with people with diabetes also developing cancer and vice versa. However, people with diabetes may be at increased risk of developing cancer when compared with the general population. This is due to both shared risk factors associated with the two diseases and the metabolic derangements associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and oxidative stress. Glucose-lowering therapies may influence the risk of cancer in people with type 2 diabetes due to these therapies' effects on risk factors that are common to both conditions, including hyperglycaemia and obesity, as well as effects that are specific to the class of drug or drugs. Drugs that reduce circulating insulin levels, such as metformin, may reduce cancer risk, and drugs that increase circulating insulin levels, including exogenous insulin and insulin secretagogues, may increase cancer risk. The influence of glucose-lowering therapies on cancer risk may become an important consideration when selecting glucose-lowering therapies to treat people with type 2 diabetes and a high risk of cancer occurrence or recurrence.

  14. [Osteoporosis in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kumeda, Yasuro

    2008-05-01

    The diabetes is at great risk of the osteoporosis, and the bone fragility unrelated to bone density forms the pathological conditions peculiar to diabetes. The factor participating in diabetic osteoporosis has a state of insulin action deficiency, a hyperglycemic state, diabetic complications, and so on. An osteoblastic cell function is deteriorated and the number of that is decreased by the absolute and relative insulin deficiency, and sustained hyperglycemia also decreases an osteoblastic cell function still more. Furthermore, the osteoclast-related bone resorption is also promoted through sorbitol accumulation in the cell by the hyperglycemia state. The expression of transcription factors regulating osteoblastic cell differentiation is restrained, and the apoptosis of those cells is promoted. As a result, osteoplasty is obstructed. In the bone, AGEs (advanced glycation endproducts) is produced in excess, and bone fragility is promoted by the ratio of the AGEs bridging with the collagen rising. The complications of diabetes, such as visual disorder and the neuropathy, raise the risk of the fall in the diabetic osteoporosis patient, therefore, they will have more chance of fractures. PMID:18445876

  15. Acatalasemia and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz

    2012-09-15

    The enzyme catalase catalyzes the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. It is the main regulator of hydrogen peroxide metabolism. Hydrogen peroxide is a highly reactive small molecule formed as a natural byproducts of energy metabolism. Excessive concentrations may cause significant damages to protein, DNA, RNA and lipids. Low levels in muscle cells, facilitate insulin signaling. Acatalasemia is a result of the homozygous mutations in the catalase gene, has a worldwide distribution with 12 known mutations. Increased hydrogen peroxide, due to catalase deficiency, plays a role in the pathogenesis of several diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a disorder caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Examination of Hungarian diabetic and acatalasemic patients showed that an increased frequency of catalase gene mutations exists among diabetes patients. Inherited catalase deficiency may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, especially for females. Early onset of type 2 diabetes occurs with inherited catalase deficiency. Low levels of SOD and glutathione peroxidase could contribute to complications caused by increased oxidative stress. PMID:22365890

  16. Diabetes update: population management.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Deborah R; Slawson, David C; Shaughnessy, Allen

    2013-05-01

    To optimally care for diabetes patients, physicians must adopt a systematic approach to managing the entire panel. At the heart of excellent care is a multidisciplinary health care team working in a patient-centered environment. Options to supplement traditional office visits include shared medical appointments (ie, group visits), patient self-management education, and social media for patient support and education. Educating patients about diabetes is associated with more frequent recommended screening, improved objective measures, cost savings, and improved short-term quality of life, especially when behavioral goal setting is incorporated. Participation in a nurse-led diabetes management program or an outreach program is associated with reduced health care costs and increased receipt of recommended screening and testing for patients with diabetes; implementation of an electronic database or registry system also is associated with these benefits. Some studies show that these interventions are associated with improvements in A1c; however, outcomes data are limited. Formats for group visits vary. Evidence suggests that patients with diabetes who participate in a group education program have lower A1c levels, improved lipid profiles, higher quality of life scores, and improved knowledge about diabetes and problem-solving ability.

  17. Neuropeptides and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gábriel, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops in 75% of patients with type 1 and 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, progressing to legal blindness in about 5%. In the recent years, considerable efforts have been put into finding treatments for this condition. It has been discovered that peptidergic mechanisms (neuropeptides and their analogues, activating a diverse array of signal transduction pathways through their multiple receptors) are potentially important for consideration in drug development strategies. A considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last three decades on human retinal neuropeptides and those elements in the pathomechanisms of diabetic retinopathy which might be related to peptidergic signal transduction. Here, human retinal neuropeptides and their receptors are reviewed, along with the theories relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy both in humans and in experimental models. By collating this information, the curative potential of certain neupeptides and their analogues/antagonists can also be discussed, along with the existing clinical treatments of diabetic retinopathy. The most promising peptidergic pathways for which treatment strategies may be developed at present are stimulation of the somatostatin-related pathway and the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide-related pathway or inhibition of angiotensinergic mechanisms. These approaches may result in the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production and neuronal apoptosis; therefore, both the optical quality of the image and the processing capability of the neural circuit in the retina may be saved. PMID:23043302

  18. Diabetic patients: Psychological aspects.

    PubMed

    Adili, Fatemeh; Larijani, Bagher; Haghighatpanah, Mohammadreza

    2006-11-01

    This study was undertaken to consider the psychological aspect of diabetes with regard to improving clinical outcomes. The review was limited to literature reports on the causes, solutions, and treatments of some common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management. A literature search was undertaken using Pub-Med, CINAHL, Proquest, Elsevier, Blackwell Synergy, Ovid, Ebsco, Rose net, and Google websites, including studies published in English journals between 1995 and 2006. Therefore about 88 articles were selected based on the inclusion criteria. In earlier studies, relatively little empirical research was found to substantiate the effect of psychological counseling in complicated diabetes. The greatest deficits were seen in areas of mental health, self-esteem parent impact, and family cohesion. There were some different factors, which influence the psychological aspect of diabetic patients, such as age, gender, place of living, familial and social support, motivation, energy, life satisfaction, and lifestyle. There are various types of solutions for coping with the psychological problems in diabetic clients. The most essential solution lies in educating the patients and healthcare providers on the subject. Before initiating each educational intervention, a thorough assessment would be crucial. Treatment plans may benefit from cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior family therapy, improving family communication, problem-solving skills, and providing motivation for diabetic patients. Moreover, it seems that the close collaboration between diabetologists and psychologists would be fruitful.

  19. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  20. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Mar. 03, 2014 How does non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy affect your vision? Nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, also known as background retinopathy, ...

  1. Diabetes - taking care of your feet

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes - foot care - self-care; Diabetic foot ulcer - foot care; Diabetic neuropathy - foot care ... Diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels in your feet. This damage can cause numbness and ...

  2. Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Fall ... your loved ones. Photos: AP The Faces of Diabetes Diabetes strikes millions of Americans, young and old, ...

  3. Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients Updated:Dec 3,2015 If you have ... angiograms . This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters • Understand Your ...

  4. Determinants of diabetes knowledge in a cohort of Nigerian diabetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the generational paradigm shift of lifestyle from the traditional African model to a more "western" standard is a replacement of communicable diseases by non-communicable or life style related diseases like diabetes. To address this trend, diabetes education along with continuous assessment of diabetes related knowledge has been advocated. Since most of the Nigerian studies assessing knowledge of diabetes were hospital-based, we decided to evaluate the diabetes related knowledge and its sociodemographic determinants in a general population of diabetics. Methods Diabetics (n = 184) attending the 2012 world diabetes day celebration in a Nigerian community were surveyed using a two part questionnaire. Section A elicited information on their demographics characteristics and participation in update courses, and exercise, while section B assessed knowledge of diabetes using the 14 item Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Centre's Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results We found that Nigerian diabetics had poor knowledge of diabetes, with pervasive fallacies. Majority did not have knowledge of "diabetes diet", "fatty food", "free food", effect of unsweetened fruit juice on blood glucose, treatment of hypoglycaemia, and the average duration glycosylated haemoglobin (haemoglobin A1) test measures blood glucose. Attaining tertiary education, falling under the 51-60 years age group, frequent attendance at seminars/updates and satisfaction with education received, being employed by or formerly working for the government, and claiming an intermediate, or wealthy income status was associated with better knowledge of diabetes. Conclusion Nigerian diabetics' knowledge of diabetes was poor and related to age, level of education, satisfaction with education received, employment status and household wealth. PMID:24593904

  5. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  6. Diabetic cardiomyopathy, causes and effects

    PubMed Central

    Boudina, Sihem

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased incidence of heart failure even after controlling for coronary artery disease and hypertension. Thus, as diabetic cardiomyopathy has become an increasingly recognized entity among clinicians, a better understanding of its pathophysiology is necessary for early diagnosis and the development of treatment strategies for diabetes-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. We will review recent basic and clinical research into the manifestations and the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The discussion will be focused on the structural, functional and metabolic changes that occur in the myocardium in diabetes and how these changes may contribute to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy in affected humans and relevant animal models. PMID:20180026

  7. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-15

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  8. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  9. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  10. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-15

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  11. Management of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boinpally, Tara; Jovanovic, Lois

    2009-06-01

    Although previously thought to be predominantly transient gestational diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy can be attributed more and more to type 2 diabetes today. Although all types of diabetes in pregnancy pose a threat to the health and future well-being of both the mother and child affected, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes can be significantly more devastating in complications because of effects starting from conception. This rise of type 2 diabetes thus imparts a great sense of urgency to uncover undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy and to take active measures in establishing tight glucose control. From preconception care before pregnancy to medical treatment postpartum, it is essential that immediate care be taken to help mediate the effects of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:19421970

  12. Prognosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Parving, H. H.; Hommel, E.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of long term antihypertensive treatment on prognosis in diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN--Prospective study of all insulin dependent diabetic patients aged under 50 with onset of diabetes before the age of 31 who developed diabetic nephropathy between 1974 and 1978 at Steno Memorial Hospital. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--Forty five patients (20 women) with a mean age of 30 (SD 7) years and a mean duration of diabetes of 18 (7) years at onset of persistent proteinuria were followed until death or for at least 10 years. INTERVENTIONS--Antihypertensive treatment was started a median of three (0-13) years after onset of nephropathy. Four patients (9%) received no treatment, and 9 (20%), 13 (29%), and 19 (42%) were treated with one, two, or three drugs, respectively. The median follow up was 12 (4-15) years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Arterial blood pressure and death. RESULTS--Mean blood pressure at start of antihypertensive treatment was 148/95 (15/50) mm Hg. Systolic blood pressure remained almost unchanged (slope -0.01 (95% confidence interval -0.39 to 0.37) mm Hg a year) while diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly (0.87 (0.65 to 1.10) mm Hg a year) during antihypertensive treatment. The cumulative death rate was 18% (8 to 32%) 10 years after onset of nephropathy, in contrast to previous reports of 50% to 77% 10 years after onset of nephropathy. As in previous studies, uraemia was the main cause of death (9 patients; 64%). CONCLUSIONS--The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy has improved during the past decade largely because of effective antihypertensive treatment. PMID:2504376

  13. Diabetic parturient - Anaesthetic implications

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Nibedita; Mishra, Shakti Bedanta; Rath, Shovan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy induces progressive changes in maternal carbohydrate metabolism. As pregnancy advances insulin resistance and diabetogenic stress due to placental hormones necessitate compensatory increase in insulin secretion. When this compensation is inadequate gestational diabetes develops. ‘Gestational diabetes mellitus’ (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance with onset or recognition during pregnancy. Women diagnosed to have GDM are at increased risk of future diabetes predominantly type 2 DM as are their children. Thus GDM offers an important opportunity for the development, testing and implementation of clinical strategies for diabetes prevention. Timely action taken now in screening all pregnant women for glucose intolerance, achieving euglycaemia in them and ensuring adequate nutrition may prevent in all probability, the vicious cycle of transmitting glucose intolerance from one generation to another. Given that diabetic mothers have proportionately larger babies it is likely that vaginal delivery will be more difficult than in the normal population, with a higher rate of instrumentally assisted delivery, episiotomy and conversion to urgent caesarean section. So an indwelling epidural catheter is a better choice for labour analgesia as well to use, should a caesarean delivery become necessary. Diabetes in pregnancy has potential serious adverse effects for both the mother and the neonate. Standardized multidisciplinary care including anaesthetists should be carried out obsessively throughout pregnancy. Diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder of pregnancy. In pregnancy, it has considerable cost and care demands and is associated with increased risks to the health of the mother and the outcome of the pregnancy. However, with careful and appropriate screening, multidisciplinary management and a motivated patient these risks can be minimized. PMID:21189875

  14. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization. PMID:25410225

  15. Comparing knowledge of diabetes mellitus among rural and urban diabetics.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Ahmad Ayaz; Qayyum, Muhammad Ahad; Saigol, Naif Usman; Zafar, Khurram; Aslam, Fawad

    2007-07-01

    A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the awareness of diabetes mellitus among rural and urban diabetics. After analyzing the awareness level of both populations, the urban diabetics were found to be more educated about diabetes. A 25-question survey was used to judge the awareness level of diabetes mellitus. A total of 240 diabetics were surveyed, 120 each from rural and urban areas. The mean awareness among the rural population was 13 (SD+/-2) correct answers out of a possible 25. Similarly, in the case of the urban diabetics the mean awareness was 18 (SD+/-2) correct answers. The survey was conducted on randomly chosen diabetics belonging to Lahore and Faisalabad, (urban areas), as well as Habibabad, Haveli Koranga and Baba Kanwal (rural areas). The results emphasize the interrelation between demography and awareness of diabetes mellitus. The rural diabetics are far less knowledgeable about diabetes mellitus, its management and its complications. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve the awareness level of diabetes mellitus in rural areas. Doing so will give rise to a healthier workforce and a lessened economic burden on Pakistan.

  16. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... with type 2 diabetes. Defining Safe Blood Glucose Levels for Pregnancy Many studies have shown that gestational ... of Gestational Diabetes” for blood glucose levels. OGTT Levels for Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Time of Sample ...

  17. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  18. Diabetes and Your Eyesight (Glaucoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... without the eye disease. Neovascular glaucoma, a rare type of glaucoma, is always associated with other abnormalities, diabetes being the most common. In some cases of diabetic retinopathy, blood vessels on the retina are damaged. ...

  19. Diabetes and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Peirce, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    Exercise is frequently recommended in the management of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus and can improve glucose uptake by increasing insulin sensitivity and lowering body adiposity. Both alone and when combined with diet and drug therapy, physical activity can result in improvements in glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. In addition, exercise can also help to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes, in particular in those at higher risk, and has an important role in reducing the significant worldwide burden of this type of diabetes. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the acute and long term physiological benefits of physical activity, although the precise duration, intensity, and type of exercise have yet to be fully elucidated. However, in type 1 diabetes, the expected improvements in glycaemic control with exercise have not been clearly established. Instead significant physical and psychological benefits of exercise can be achieved while careful education, screening, and planning allow the metabolic, microvascular, and macrovascular risks to be predicted and diminished. 


 PMID:10378067

  20. Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Joanna M.; Kaul, Kirti; Chopra, Mohit; Kohner, Eva M.; Chibber, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is now regarded as an epidemic, with the population of patients expected to rise to 380 million by 2025. Tragically, this will lead to approximately 4 million people around the world losing their sight from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in patients aged 20 to 74 years. The risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is closely associated with the type and duration of diabetes, blood glucose, blood pressure, and possibly lipids. Although landmark cross-sectional studies have confirmed the strong relationship between chronic hyperglycaemia and the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, the underlying mechanism of how hyperglycaemia causes retinal microvascular damage remains unclear. Continued research worldwide has focussed on understanding the pathogenic mechanisms with the ultimate goal to prevent DR. The aim of this paper is to introduce the multiple interconnecting biochemical pathways that have been proposed and tested as key contributors in the development of DR, namely, increased polyol pathway, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), haemodynamic changes, accelerated formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), oxidative stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and subclinical inflammation and capillary occlusion. New pharmacological therapies based on some of these underlying pathogenic mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:24563789

  1. Treating the obese diabetic.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, Julia; Tan, Tricia; Bloom, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes and obesity are intimately linked; reduction of bodyweight improves glycemic control, mortality and morbidity. Treating obesity in the diabetic is hampered as some diabetic treatments lead to weight gain. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective antiobesity treatment and causes long-term remission of diabetes in many patients. However, surgery has a high cost and is associated with a significant risk of complications, and in practical terms only limited numbers can undergo this therapy. The choice of pharmacological agents suitable for treatment of diabetes and obesity is currently limited. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists improve glycemia and induce a modest weight loss, but there are doubts over their long-term safety. New drugs such as lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate are being approved for obesity and have modest, salutary effects on glycemia, but again long-term safety is unclear. This article will also examine some future avenues for development, including gut hormone analogues that promise to combine powerful weight reduction with beneficial effects on glucose metabolism. PMID:23473594

  2. Hypoxia in Diabetic Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Yumi; Haneda, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is now a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In addition, DN accounts for the increased mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and then patients without DN achieve long-term survival compatible with general population. Hypoxia represents an early event in the development and progression of DN, and hypoxia-inducible factor- (HIF-) 1 mediates the metabolic responses to renal hypoxia. Diabetes induces the “fraternal twins” of hypoxia, that is, pseudohypoxia and hypoxia. The kidneys are susceptible to hyperoxia because they accept 20% of the cardiac output. Therefore, the kidneys have specific vasculature to avoid hyperoxia, that is, AV oxygen shunting. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) sirtuins are seven mammalian proteins, SIRTs 1–7, which are known to modulate longevity and metabolism. Recent studies demonstrated that some isoforms of sirtuins inhibit the activation of HIF by deacetylation or noncatalyzing effects. The kidneys, which have a vascular system that protects them against hyperoxia, unfortunately experience extraordinary hypernutrition today. Then, an unexpected overload of glucose augments the oxygen consumption, which ironically results in hypoxia. This review highlights the primary role of HIF in diabetic kidneys for the metabolic adaptation to diabetes-induced hypoxia. PMID:25054148

  3. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  4. Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars; Francis, Carolee Dodge

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes is a prevalent disease in the United States. The emergence of Type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents within the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities brings increased public health and quality of life concerns. In this article, the authors describe an initiative titled "Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools K-12…

  5. Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Mirella; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have found that diabetes and thyroid disorders tend to coexist in patients. Both conditions involve a dysfunction of the endocrine system. Thyroid disorders can have a major impact on glucose control, and untreated thyroid disorders affect the management of diabetes in patients. Consequently, a systematic approach to thyroid testing in patients with diabetes is recommended. PMID:21785689

  6. Diabetes and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Rajkumar; Gokulanathan, Subramanium; Shanmugasundaram, Natarajan; Lakshmigandhan, Mahalingam; Kavin, Thangavelu

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host response, systemic background, and genetic makeup of the host. Amongst them, diabetes mellitus tops the list. Diabetes and periodontitis influence the clinical outcome of each other and control of both influences the clinical improvement of each. PMID:23066270

  7. [Nutrition for diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Schindler, Karin; Brix, Johanna; Dämon, Sabine; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kruschitz, Renate; Toplak, Hermann; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Evidence demonstrates that medical diabetes treatment has to be accompanied by lifestyle modifications. Structured nutrition interventions and increased physical activity will help patients to normalise, respectively maintain their body weight. The main target of a diabetes therapy is aimed at achieving normal or nearly normal blood glucose levels. Reaching this goal may be facilitated by the following nutritional patterns: Using mainly carbohydrates from vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, Restriction of mono- and disaccharides are often important factors in normalising body weight and blood glucose, Reduction of dietary fat could be indicated. However, the primary goal is the limitation of saturated fatty acids which to high percentage are consumed with animal products. There is not sufficient evidence to recommend a dietary protein consumption of more than 20% of energy intake. Individuals with diabetes should be aware of the importance of acquiring daily vitamin and mineral requirements. Natural food sources should be preferred. PMID:27052240

  8. [Coffee and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kempf, Kerstin; Martin, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    Lack of physical activity and high caloric diet are main causes for increasing diabetes prevalence. Thus, it is possible to influence blood glucose levels by lifestyle modifications. Coffee is an important lifestyle factor in Germany with a mean consumption of about 150 litres per inhabitant. It is important to know that coffee cannot be equated with caffeine. Scientific investigations have shown that caffeine can temporarily have a negative impact on cardiovascular risk factors but does not promote development of cardiovascular events. On the other hand, several international prospective studies demonstrate a protective effect of coffee on the development of type 2 diabetes as coffee consumption can reduce glucose uptake. Coffee components, e.g. chlorogenic acid, play a central role, as they can inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation in addition. In the context of lifestyle tasks coffee consumption therefore is an additional option for modifying diabetes risk.

  9. Vanadium and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K H

    1999-01-01

    Vanadium is an ultratrace element, widely distributed in nature, yet with no presently known specific physiological function in mammals. The apparent role of vanadium in regulation of intracellular signaling, as a cofactor of enzymes essential in energy metabolism, and as a possible therapeutic agent in diabetes is of increasing interest as more and more research reports present evidence of vanadium's potentially unique biological function. In this mini-review, the author summarizes current knowledge of the bioinorganic chemistry of vanadium, the basic features of diabetes mellitus and its metabolic sequelae, and the in vitro and in vivo effects of both inorganic and organically-chelated vanadium compounds. Results of clinical trials to date, as well as kinetic studies of tissue uptake are covered. Examples of ways to enhance the positive effects of vanadium as an oral therapeutic adjunct in diabetic control, while minimizing potential toxicity, are compared with regard to desirable features and possible drawbacks.

  10. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okpara, TC; Ezeala-Adikaibe, BA; Omire, O; Nwonye, E; Maluze, J

    2015-01-01

    Any adult with diabetes in the tropics with hand cellulitis, infection and gangrene qualifies for tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS). We reviewed a 39-year-old woman with a 3-week history of swelling of the left index finger following an insect bite. The swelling progressively increased in size, was very painful, and extended to the palm. There was no history or symptoms suggestive of chronic complications of diabetes. Random blood sugar on presentation was above 600 mg/dl using a glucometer. Examination revealed an edematous left palm draining pus from multiple sinuses, necrotic and gangrenous left index finger extending down to just above the thenar eminence. A diagnosis of TDHS in a patient with hyperosmolar state was made. She was managed accordingly and subsequently underwent aggressive debridement and desloughing. Two fingers were amputated and the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. PMID:27057390

  11. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okpara, T C; Ezeala-Adikaibe, B A; Omire, O; Nwonye, E; Maluze, J

    2015-01-01

    Any adult with diabetes in the tropics with hand cellulitis, infection and gangrene qualifies for tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS). We reviewed a 39-year-old woman with a 3-week history of swelling of the left index finger following an insect bite. The swelling progressively increased in size, was very painful, and extended to the palm. There was no history or symptoms suggestive of chronic complications of diabetes. Random blood sugar on presentation was above 600 mg/dl using a glucometer. Examination revealed an edematous left palm draining pus from multiple sinuses, necrotic and gangrenous left index finger extending down to just above the thenar eminence. A diagnosis of TDHS in a patient with hyperosmolar state was made. She was managed accordingly and subsequently underwent aggressive debridement and desloughing. Two fingers were amputated and the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. PMID:27057390

  12. [Diabetes in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    García-Compeán, Diego; Jáquez-Quintana, Joel O; González-González, José A; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) in liver cirrhosis is about 30%. However, DM or impaired glucose tolerance can be observed in 90% after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with normal fasting plasma glucose. Type 2 DM may produce cirrhosis, whereas DM may be a complication of cirrhosis. The latter is known as «hepatogenous diabetes». Overt and subclinical DM is associated with liver complications and death in cirrhotic patients. Treating diabetes is difficult in cirrhotic patients because of the metabolic impairments due to liver disease and because the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment has not been defined. It is also unknown if glycemic control with hypoglycemic agents has any impact on the course of the liver disease. PMID:23628170

  13. [Diabetes in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    García-Compeán, Diego; Jáquez-Quintana, Joel O; González-González, José A; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) in liver cirrhosis is about 30%. However, DM or impaired glucose tolerance can be observed in 90% after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with normal fasting plasma glucose. Type 2 DM may produce cirrhosis, whereas DM may be a complication of cirrhosis. The latter is known as «hepatogenous diabetes». Overt and subclinical DM is associated with liver complications and death in cirrhotic patients. Treating diabetes is difficult in cirrhotic patients because of the metabolic impairments due to liver disease and because the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment has not been defined. It is also unknown if glycemic control with hypoglycemic agents has any impact on the course of the liver disease.

  14. Genetics of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Heeyoon

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a polygenic disorder. Twin studies and familial aggregation studies have documented clear familial clustering. Heritability has been estimated to be as high as 27% for any DR and 52% for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced form of the disease. Linkage analyses, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) performed to date have not identified any widely reproducible risk loci for DR. Combined analysis of the data from multiple GWAS is emerging as an important next step to explain the unaccounted heritability. Key factors to future discovery of the genetic underpinnings of DR are precise DR ascertainment, a focus on the more heritable disease forms such as PDR, stringent selection of control participants with regards to duration of diabetes, and methods that allow combination of existing datasets from different ethnicities to achieve sufficient sample sizes to detect variants with modest effect sizes. PMID:24952107

  15. Diabetes Education and Support: A Must for Students With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Siminerio, Linda M

    2015-11-01

    Ongoing diabetes self-management education and support is critical to helping youth with diabetes and their families learn about the disease, make and sustain behavioral changes, and cope with the reality of a chronic illness. Diabetes self-management education and support is best provided by a multidisciplinary team. School nurses are an important part of the student's diabetes health care team. This article highlights information and resources that school nurses can use to help support students with diabetes, their families, and other school personnel. PMID:26515567

  16. The Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The Diabetes Prevention Program is a randomized clinical trial testing strategies to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals with elevated fasting plasma glucose concentrations and impaired glucose tolerance. The 27 clinical centers in the U.S. are recruiting at least 3,000 participants of both sexes, ~50% of whom are minority patients and 20% of whom are ≥65 years old, to be assigned at random to one of three intervention groups: an intensive lifestyle intervention focusing on a healthy diet and exercise and two masked medication treatment groups—metformin or placebo—combined with standard diet and exercise recommendations. Participants are being recruited during a 2 2/3-year period, and all will be followed for an additional 3 1/3 to 5 years after the close of recruitment to a common closing date in 2002. The primary outcome is the development of diabetes, diagnosed by fasting or post-challenge plasma glucose concentrations meeting the 1997 American Diabetes Association criteria. The 3,000 participants will provide 90% power to detect a 33% reduction in an expected diabetes incidence rate of at least 6.5% per year in the placebo group. Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular disease and its risk factors; changes in glycemia, β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, obesity, diet, physical activity, and health-related quality of life; and occurrence of adverse events. A fourth treatment group—troglilazone combined with standard diet and exercise recommendations—was included initially but discontinued because of the liver toxicity of the drug. This randomized clinical trial will test the possibility of preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in individuals at high risk. PMID:10189543

  17. Diabetes foot disease: the Cinderella of Australian diabetes management?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the greatest public health challenges to face Australia. It is already Australia’s leading cause of kidney failure, blindness (in those under 60 years) and lower limb amputation, and causes significant cardiovascular disease. Australia’s diabetes amputation rate is one of the worst in the developed world, and appears to have significantly increased in the last decade, whereas some other diabetes complication rates appear to have decreased. This paper aims to compare the national burden of disease for the four major diabetes-related complications and the availability of government funding to combat these complications, in order to determine where diabetes foot disease ranks in Australia. Our review of relevant national literature indicates foot disease ranks second overall in burden of disease and last in evidenced-based government funding to combat these diabetes complications. This suggests public funding to address foot disease in Australia is disproportionately low when compared to funding dedicated to other diabetes complications. There is ample evidence that appropriate government funding of evidence-based care improves all diabetes complication outcomes and reduces overall costs. Numerous diverse Australian peak bodies have now recommended similar diabetes foot evidence-based strategies that have reduced diabetes amputation rates and associated costs in other developed nations. It would seem intuitive that “it’s time” to fund these evidence-based strategies for diabetes foot disease in Australia as well. PMID:23021818

  18. Are diabetes camps effective?

    PubMed

    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Vivolo, Marco Antonio; Madden, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    In the present article data about Diabetes Camps (DC) from all continents were reviewed in order to answer the title question "are diabetes camps effective?". Articles from peer reviewed journals and abstracts published in international conferences proceedings were raised. The effectiveness was considered in terms of knowledge acquisition, and psychosocial and physiological changes. Even though expected improvements were not found in all studies, in a deeper and wider analysis the aspects that influence the most toward gains are identified. Among them are: number of participations in a DC, post-camp educational opportunities, staff training, and program oriented toward campers' autonomy. To conclude, practical recommendations are addressed intending to amplify DC's potential.

  19. Diabetic and endocrine emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, T; Dang, C

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine emergencies constitute only a small percentage of the emergency workload of general doctors, comprising about 1.5% of all hospital admission in England in 2004–5. Most of these are diabetes related with the remaining conditions totalling a few hundred cases at most. Hence any individual doctor might not have sufficient exposure to be confident in their management. This review discusses the management of diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state, hypoglycaemia, hypercalcaemia, thyroid storm, myxoedema coma, acute adrenal insufficiency, phaeochromocytoma hypertensive crisis and pituitary apoplexy in the adult population. PMID:17308209

  20. Early Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Rewers, Marian; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of mortality in type 1 diabetes. Reduced insulin sensitivity is a well-documented component of type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that baseline insulin sensitivity would predict development of DN over 6 years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed the relationship between insulin sensitivity at baseline and development of early phenotypes of DN—microalbuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio [ACR] ≥30 mg/g) and rapid renal function decline (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] loss >3 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year)—with three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations over 6 years. Subjects with diabetes (n = 449) and without diabetes (n = 565) in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study had an estimated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) at baseline and 6-year follow-up. RESULTS The ISI was lower in subjects with diabetes than in those without diabetes (P < 0.0001). A higher ISI at baseline predicted a lower odds of developing an ACR ≥30 mg/g (odds ratio 0.65 [95% CI 0.49–0.85], P = 0.003) univariately and after adjusting for HbA1c (0.69 [0.51–0.93], P = 0.01). A higher ISI at baseline conferred protection from a rapid decline of GFR as assessed by CKD-EPI cystatin C (0.77 [0.64–0.92], P = 0.004) and remained significant after adjusting for HbA1c and age (0.80 [0.67–0.97], P = 0.02). We found no relation between ISI and rapid GFR decline estimated by CKD-EPI creatinine (P = 0.38) or CKD-EPI combined cystatin C and creatinine (P = 0.50). CONCLUSIONS Over 6 years, a higher ISI independently predicts a lower odds of developing microalbuminuria and rapid GFR decline as estimated with cystatin C, suggesting a relationship between insulin sensitivity and early phenotypes of DN. PMID:24026551

  1. Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Craig A; Nakhla, Meranda; Derraik, José G B; Gunn, Alistair J; Daneman, Denis; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This article examines the factors associated with DKA in children with T1DM, both at first presentation and in recurrent cases. The challenge for future research is to find effective ways to improve primary care physician and general community awareness of T1DM to reduce DKA at presentation and develop practical, cost-effective programs to reduce recurrent DKA. PMID:26210621

  2. Rheumatic manifestations in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Serban, AL; Udrea, GF

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. For most of these affections, pathophysiologic correlations are not well established. Some of them, such as diabetic cheiroarthropathy, neuropathic arthritis, diabetic amyotrophy, diabetic muscle infraction, are considered intrinsic complications of DM. For others, like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, DM is considered a predisposing condition. In most cases, these affections cause pain and disability, affecting the quality of life of diabetic patients, but once correctly diagnosed, they often respond to the treatment, that generally requires a multidisciplinary team. This article reviews some epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these conditions. PMID:23049626

  3. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-01-01

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic. PMID:871863

  4. Diabetes mellitus and oral health.

    PubMed

    Kudiyirickal, Marina George; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2015-05-01

    The oral health is influenced by systemic health, and one of the most common chronic diseases encountered in dental practice is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes can worsen oral infections and vice versa. In the literature, periodontitis and diabetes in the young to middle-aged adults have been the most widely researched area. Understanding the patho-physiology, clinical manifestations and management of different types of orofacial diseases in diabetic patients are important to the diabetologist and the dentist for the optimal care of patients with these diseases. This review explores the inter-link between diabetes and oral health. PMID:25487035

  5. Diabetes Mellitus Standards of Care.

    PubMed

    Mays, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic with a high cost regarding consumption of health care resources and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. The complex nature of diabetes requires the use of evidence-based guidelines regarding diabetes management. These evidence-based guidelines are lengthy and do not readily translate into nursing care. As an integral component of the interprofessional team, the nurse must provide a thorough assessment of patients with diabetes and work to achieve individual patient treatment goals. Evaluation of patient progress toward treatment goals with regular/frequent follow-up is necessary to promote effective self-management of diabetes.

  6. Diabetic mastopathy. A clinicopathologic review.

    PubMed

    Ely, K A; Tse, G; Simpson, J F; Clarfeld, R; Page, D L

    2000-04-01

    Diabetic mastopathy, an uncommon form of lymphocytic mastitis and stromal fibrosis, typically occurs in longstanding type 1 diabetes. Nineteen cases meeting predetermined histopathologic criteria for diabetic mastopathy were correlated as to clinical history and disease recurrence. Physical examination revealed palpable discrete masses or diffuse nodularity, both predominantly in the subareolar region. One nonpalpable lesion was detected incidentally during reduction mammoplasty. All cases contained lymphocytic ductitis and lobulitis with varying degrees of keloidal fibrosis, vasculitis, epithelioid fibroblasts, and lymphoid nodule formation. Single mammary lesions were found in 11 patients with type 1 diabetes, 1 with type 2 diabetes, and 3 without diabetes. Four cases were bilateral (3 patients with type 1 and 1 patient with type 2 diabetes). Six of 19 cases recurred (3 ipsilateral, 2 contralateral, and 1 bilateral). We confirm the histopathologic constellation for diabetic mastopathy. However, we question the specificity of these features because of identical findings in patients with type 2 diabetes and nondiabetic patients. We found diabetic mastopathy in men and women, as a solitary mass or bilateral disease, and recurrence in either breast, sometimes multiple. Recognition of potential recurrence is important because it might spare patients with documented diabetic mastopathy from repeated breast biopsies.

  7. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  8. 77 FR 43096 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Diabetes Mellitus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... meeting will focus on ``Diabetes, Dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease.'' Any member of the public interested... Diseases; Notice of Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee Meeting SUMMARY: The Diabetes... Coordinating Committee, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 31 Center...

  9. 76 FR 20358 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee; Notice of Workshop The Diabetes Mellitus... opportunities for type 1 diabetes research supported by the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1... Dr. Sanford Garfield, Executive Secretary of the Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating...

  10. National Diabetes Education Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Organizations​ ​​ HealthSense Alternate Language URL National Diabetes Education Program Page Content Now Available ​ Updated School Guide! ... For Health Care Professionals​​ Clinical Practice Tools Patient Education Resources Practice Transformation for Physicians and Health Care ...

  11. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  12. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  13. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity and metabolic syndrome —interact to cause harmful physical changes to the heart. Third, diabetes raises the risk ... outlook. The good news is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, physical activity can lower your blood pressure, help control ...

  14. Games and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lazem, Shaimaa; Webster, Mary; Holmes, Wayne; Wolf, Motje

    2015-01-01

    Here we review 18 articles that describe the design and evaluation of 1 or more games for diabetes from technical, methodological, and theoretical perspectives. We undertook searches covering the period 2010 to May 2015 in the ACM, IEEE, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, and Google Scholar online databases using the keywords “children,” “computer games,” “diabetes,” “games,” “type 1,” and “type 2” in various Boolean combinations. The review sets out to establish, for future research, an understanding of the current landscape of digital games designed for children with diabetes. We briefly explored the use and impact of well-established learning theories in such games. The most frequently mentioned theoretical frameworks were social cognitive theory and social constructivism. Due to the limitations of the reported evaluation methodologies, little evidence was found to support the strong promise of games for diabetes. Furthermore, we could not establish a relation between design features and the game outcomes. We argue that an in-depth discussion about the extent to which learning theories could and should be manifested in the design decisions is required. PMID:26337753

  15. Diabetes mellitus in elderly.

    PubMed

    Chentli, Farida; Azzoug, Said; Mahgoun, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) frequency is a growing problem worldwide, because of long life expectancy and life style modifications. In old age (≥60-65 years old), DM is becoming an alarming public health problem in developed and even in developing countries as for some authors one from two old persons are diabetic or prediabetic and for others 8 from 10 old persons have some dysglycemia. DM complications and co-morbidities are more frequent in old diabetics compared to their young counterparts. The most frequent are cardiovascular diseases due to old age and to precocious atherosclerosis specific to DM and the most bothersome are visual and cognitive impairments, especially Alzheimer disease and other kind of dementia. Alzheimer disease seems to share the same risk factors as DM, which means insulin resistance due to lack of physical activity and eating disorders. Visual and physical handicaps, depression, and memory troubles are a barrier to care for DM treatment. For this, old diabetics are now classified into two main categories as fit and independent old people able to take any available medication, exactly as their young or middle age counterparts, and fragile or frail persons for whom physical activity, healthy diet, and medical treatment should be individualized according to the presence or lack of cognitive impairment and other co-morbidities. In the last category, the fundamental rule is "go slowly and individualize" to avoid interaction with poly medicated elder persons and fatal iatrogenic hypoglycemias in those treated with sulfonylureas or insulin. PMID:26693423

  16. Diabetes and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surwit, Richard S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that the problem of effective care of diabetes mellitus presents an opportunity for the emerging field of health psychology. Discusses behavioral interventions that aid in treatment of this disease by reducing its energy mobilizing effects on the nervous system. (Author/AOS)

  17. Adjusting to Childhood Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    Insulin dependent diabetes is an incurable disease requiring complex management by the patient and/or his family. Previous research has found that there is no specific personality type associated with this or other diseases, nor do chronically ill persons exhibit characteristic behavioral or emotional problems. An attempt to identify the…

  18. Diabetes mellitus in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Azzoug, Said; Mahgoun, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) frequency is a growing problem worldwide, because of long life expectancy and life style modifications. In old age (≥60–65 years old), DM is becoming an alarming public health problem in developed and even in developing countries as for some authors one from two old persons are diabetic or prediabetic and for others 8 from 10 old persons have some dysglycemia. DM complications and co-morbidities are more frequent in old diabetics compared to their young counterparts. The most frequent are cardiovascular diseases due to old age and to precocious atherosclerosis specific to DM and the most bothersome are visual and cognitive impairments, especially Alzheimer disease and other kind of dementia. Alzheimer disease seems to share the same risk factors as DM, which means insulin resistance due to lack of physical activity and eating disorders. Visual and physical handicaps, depression, and memory troubles are a barrier to care for DM treatment. For this, old diabetics are now classified into two main categories as fit and independent old people able to take any available medication, exactly as their young or middle age counterparts, and fragile or frail persons for whom physical activity, healthy diet, and medical treatment should be individualized according to the presence or lack of cognitive impairment and other co-morbidities. In the last category, the fundamental rule is “go slowly and individualize” to avoid interaction with poly medicated elder persons and fatal iatrogenic hypoglycemias in those treated with sulfonylureas or insulin. PMID:26693423

  19. From obesity to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keller, U

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing dramatically in the last decades in the whole world, not only in industrialized countries but also in developing areas. A major complication of obesity is insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is also rapidly increasing world-wide--reaching a prevalence in adults of approx. 5-6% in Central Europe and in the US, and more than 50% in specific, genetically prone populations. This article reviews pathogenetic mechanisms linking obesity and type 2 diabetes. Emphasis is placed on the observation that excessive amounts of adipocytes are associated with an impairment of insulin sensitivity, a key feature of the "metabolic syndrome". This is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia; all of them are enhanced by the presence of visceral (abdominal) obesity and all contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk observed in these patients. Besides release of free fatty acids, adipocytes secrete substances that contribute to peripheral insulin resistance, including adiponectin, resistin, TNF-alpha and interleukin 6. Increased turnover of free fatty acids interferes with intracellular metabolism of glucose in the muscle, and they exert lipotoxic effect on pancreatic beta-cells. The pre-receptor metabolism of cortisol is enhanced in visceral adipose tissue by activation of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. A new class of anti-diabetic drugs (thiazolidinediones, or glitazones) bind to peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-gamma) and lower thereby plasma free fatty acids and cytokine production in adipocytes, in addition to a decrease of resistin and an increase in adiponectin observed in animals, resulting in an overall increase in insulin sensitivity and in an improvement of glucose homeostasis. However, the first step to avoid insulin resistance and prevent the development of diabetes should be a reduction in body weight in overweight subjects, and an

  20. Exercise and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chipkin, S R; Klugh, S A; Chasan-Taber, L

    2001-08-01

    As rates of diabetes mellitus and obesity continue to increase, physical activity continues to be a fundamental form of therapy. Exercise influences several aspects of diabetes, including blood glucose concentrations, insulin action and cardiovascular risk factors. Blood glucose concentrations reflect the balance between skeletal muscle uptake and ambient concentrations of both insulin and counterinsulin hormones. Difficulties in predicting the relative impact of these factors can result in either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Despite the variable impact of exercise on blood glucose, exercise consistently improves insulin action and several cardiovascular risk factors. Beyond the acute impact of physical activity, long-term exercise behaviors have been repeatedly associated with decreased rates of type 2 diabetes. While exercise produces many benefits, it is not without risks for patients with diabetes mellitus. In addition to hyperglycemia, from increased hepatic glucose production, insufficient insulin levels can foster ketogenesis from excess concentrations of fatty acids. At the opposite end of the glucose spectrum, hypoglycemia can result from excess glucose uptake due to either increased insulin concentrations, enhanced insulin action or impaired carbohydrate absorption. To decrease the risk for hypoglycemia, insulin doses should be reduced prior to exercise, although some insulin is typically still needed. Although precise risks of exercise on existing diabetic complications have not been well studied, it seems prudent to consider the potential to worsen nephropathy or retinopathy, or to precipitate musculoskeletal injuries. There is more substantive evidence that autonomic neuropathy may predispose patients to arrhythmias. Of clear concern, increased physical activity can precipitate a cardiac event in those with underlying CAD. Recognizing these risks can prompt actions to minimize their impact. Positive actions that are part of exercise programs for

  1. Diabetes and the stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, M. B.; McCallum, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Abnormalities in the function of the stomach in patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus, usually insulin-dependent, may provide difficult management problems. There is a reduced frequency of peptic ulcer disease in diabetics. Gastric atrophy, often with parietal cell antibodies, is common and the frequency of pernicious anemia with its expected intrinsic factor antibodies is increased. Gastric analysis results have been conflicting but generally suggest that long-standing diabetics have lower acid levels than normals, possibly secondary to vagal neuropathy. Gastric atony occurring in a small but significant number of patients with longstanding insulin-dependent diabetes, usually with a clinically apparent peripheral neuropathy, has been associated with upper abdominal discomfort, vomiting, and a clinical picture of gastric outlet obstruction. Various degrees of subclinical delays in gastric emptying are probably present in many asymptomatic patients and, indeed, are underemphasized contributors to poor control of blood sugar levels. Studies utilizing radioactive-labeled physiological meals have demonstrated abnormalities in the gastric emptying of solids, in particular, and sometimes liquids in the latter stages of the disease. Metoclopramide, a dopamine antagonist, which stimulates upper gastrointestinal smooth musculature, results in accelerated gastric emptying; clinical trials have shown that it is capable of alleviating symptoms related to diabetic gastroparesis and with its recent approval and release in this country, it promises improved management of this entity. Another agent, domperidone, a selective peripheral dopamine antagonist with no appreciable side effects, is in this country an investigational drug which has shown clinical efficacy in Europe in improving gastric stasis syndromes. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6659560

  2. Diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Baha M; Viteri, Oscar A

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancies complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis are associated with increased rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required, because diabetic ketoacidosis onset in pregnancy can be insidious, usually at lower glucose levels, and often progresses more rapidly as compared with nonpregnancy. Morbidity and mortality can be reduced with early detection of precipitating factors (ie, infection, intractable vomiting, inadequate insulin management or inappropriate insulin cessation, β-sympathomimetic use, steroid administration for fetal lung maturation), prompt hospitalization, and targeted therapy with intensive monitoring. A multidisciplinary approach including a maternal-fetal medicine physician, medical endocrinology specialists familiar with the physiologic changes in pregnancy, an obstetric anesthesiologist, and skilled nursing is paramount. Management principles include aggressive volume replacement, initiation of intravenous insulin therapy, correction of acidosis, correction of electrolyte abnormalities and management of precipitating factors, as well as monitoring of maternal-fetal response to treatment. When diabetic ketoacidosis occurs after 24 weeks of gestation, fetal status should be continuously monitored given associated fetal hypoxemia and acidosis. The decision for delivery can be challenging and must be based on gestational age as well as maternal-fetal responses to therapy. The natural inclination is to proceed with emergent delivery for nonreassuring fetal status that is frequently present during the acute episode, but it is imperative to correct the maternal metabolic abnormalities first, because both maternal and fetal conditions will likewise improve. Prevention strategies should include education of diabetic pregnant women about the risks of diabetic ketoacidosis, precipitating factors, and the importance of reporting signs and symptoms in a timely fashion.

  3. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy among inpatients with diabetes: the diabetic retinopathy inpatient study (DRIPS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Jessica J; Eller, Andrew W; Willard, Lauren A; Ding, Jiaxi; Johnston, Jann M; Waxman, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient diabetic population in the USA and to determine the barriers to ophthalmic examinations and treatment among this population. Research design and methods A cross-sectional analysis of 113 inpatients with diabetes mellitus admitted to an inner city community teaching hospital in Pittsburgh. Digital fundus photographs of the posterior pole were taken of each eye after pharmacological dilation. Presence, absence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema were graded on the basis of internationally accepted criteria. An investigator-administered questionnaire and review of the medical record were used to obtain data about patient demographics, clinical characteristics and barriers to ophthalmic care. The association between these data and the presence of diabetic retinopathy was tested. Results The estimated prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population was 44% (95% CI 34% to 53%). The prevalence of previously undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy was 25% (95% CI 17% to 33%) and 19% (95% CI 11% to 26%), respectively. Renal disease was independently associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (OR, 3.86; 95% CI 1.22 to 12.27), as well as a longer duration of diabetes (OR, 1.08 per year; 95% CI 1.014 to 1.147). Diabetic retinopathy was seen in 15 of 17 patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers or osteomyelitis. Frequently reported barriers to ophthalmic examinations included lack of transportation and physical disability. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population is likely significantly higher than in the general diabetic population in the USA. These patients have barriers to care that need to be addressed to make standard of care ophthalmic examinations and treatment possible in this population. PMID:26925238

  4. [Screening and prevention of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, P E H

    2015-10-01

    A valid and efficient screening for individual diabetes risk is a highly welcomed tool in primary care and specialist medical practice. It is needed to detect early stages of diabetes risk and prediabetes and to start interventions that have the aim to prevent diabetes and also other chronic diseases from developing. The oral glucose tolerance test is the gold standard, but it is difficult to perform in an evidence-based manner in primary care. Furthermore, measuring fasting and 2-h postprandial glucose values detects only late stages of the pathophysiological development of type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, the 1-h glucose value is highly predictive of future diabetes risk, but is rarely used in primary care. Therefore, risk scores are commonly used to evaluate diabetes risk, but unfortunately, they generally do not mirror the relevance of increased risk due to the person's own lifestyle. Measuring waist circumference is another possibility, because the waist is directly associated with the amount of visceral fat, which again directly correlates with the pathophysiology of diabetes development. A further possibility is the EZSCAN™ technology. The EZSCAN™ is based on reverse iontophoresis, a new technology to detect very early forms of peripheral neuropathies, which are commonly associated with early diabetes risk stages. It is important to perform diabetes screening in a targeted manner, in both medical and paramedical environments, and it is mandatory to add targeted interventions, based on the screening evaluated diabetes risk. PMID:26428521

  5. Subclinical Inflammation and Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Christian; Lankisch, Mark; Ziegler, Dan; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Thorand, Barbara; Holle, Rolf; Giani, Guido; Martin, Stephan; Meisinger, Christa

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Subclinical inflammation represents a risk factor of type 2 diabetes and several diabetes complications, but data on diabetic neuropathies are scarce. Therefore, we investigated whether circulating concentrations of acute-phase proteins, cytokines, and chemokines differ among diabetic patients with or without diabetic polyneuropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured 10 markers of subclinical inflammation in 227 type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic polyneuropathy who participated in the population-based MONICA/KORA Survey F3 (2004–2005; Augsburg, Germany). Diabetic polyneuropathy was diagnosed using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). RESULTS After adjustment for multiple confounders, high levels of C-reactive protein and interleukin (IL)-6 were most consistently associated with diabetic polyneuropathy, high MNSI score, and specific neuropathic deficits, whereas some inverse associations were seen for IL-18. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that subclinical inflammation is associated with diabetic polyneuropathy and neuropathic impairments. This association appears rather specific because only certain immune mediators and impairments are involved. PMID:19131463

  6. [Diabetic encephalopathy: an underexposed complication of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Brands, A M A; Henselmans, J M L; de Haan, E H F; Biessels, G J

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus seems to be associated with gradually developing end-organ damage to the central nervous system. This relatively unknown complication of both diabetes type 1 and type 2 can be referred to as 'diabetic encephalopathy'. Measurable manifestations are electrophysiological and structural changes and limitations in the cognitive functioning. The mechanisms responsible for this diabetic encephalopathy are only partially known. Chronic metabolic and vascular changes seem to play an important role. The effects of diabetes on the brain are most distinct in the elderly. This may be the consequence of interactions between the mechanisms that underlie the ageing of the brain, dementia and the origin of diabetic complications. At present there are few leads for the targeted diagnostics and treatment of individual patients.

  7. Atypical diabetes in children: ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vaibhav, Atul; Mathai, Mathew; Gorman, Shaun

    2013-01-08

    Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus also known as atypical or flatbush diabetes is being increasingly recognised worldwide. These patients are typically obese, middle-aged men with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. The aetiology and pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear but some initial research suggests that patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes have a unique predisposition to glucose desensitisation. These patients have negative autoantibodies typically associated with type 1 diabetes but have shown to have human leucocyte antigen (HLA) positivity. At initial presentation, there is an impairment of both insulin secretion and action. β Cell function and insulin sensitivity can be markedly improved by initiating aggressive diabetes management to allow for discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment. These patients can be maintained on oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin therapy can be safely discontinued after few months depending on their β cell function.

  8. Staged diabetes management. Toward an integrated model of diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Mazze, R S; Etzwiler, D D; Strock, E; Peterson, K; McClave, C R; Meszaros, J F; Leigh, C; Owens, L W; Deeb, L C; Peterson, A

    1994-06-01

    This paper introduces a new and innovative approach to diabetes management in the primary-care setting. Staged diabetes management (SDM) represents a four-year effort to develop and test a data-based approach to diabetes management that could be easily adapted to a variety of health-care settings in which diabetes management is principally under the direction of primary-care physicians was limited access to specialists. After testing under controlled circumstances at the International Diabetes Center (Minneapolis, MN), SDM was subjected to substantial field trials under conditions that represent the scope and variety of primary-care practices in diabetes. The following represents the work of several investigators who independently undertook a review of SDM.

  9. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  10. Non-Proteinuric Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Nicolas Roberto; Villa, Juan; Hernandez Gallego, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy patients traditionally show significant macroalbuminuria prior to the development of renal impairment. However, this clinical paradigm has recently been questioned. Epidemiological surveys confirm that chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosed by a low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is more common in diabetic patients than in the non-diabetic population but a low number of patients had levels of proteinuria above that which traditionally defines overt diabetic nephropathy (>500 mg/g). The large number of patients with low levels of proteinuria suggests that the traditional clinical paradigm of overt diabetic nephropathy is changing since it does not seem to be the underlying renal lesion in most of diabetic subjects with CKD. PMID:26371050

  11. Surgery for Diabetic Eye Complications.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María H; Acaba, Luis A; Acaba, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    New modalities for the treatment of diabetic eye complications have emerged in the past decade. Nevertheless, many severe diabetic retinopathy complications can only be treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Technological advances in pars plana vitrectomy have expanded the gamut of pathologies that can be successfully treated with surgery. The most common pathologies managed surgically include vitreous opacities and traction retinal detachment. The indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincisional surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic tractional retinal detachment will be discussed. With the availability of new microincisional vitrectomy technology, wide angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Maternal diabetes and oocyte quality

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal diabetes has been demonstrated to adversely affect preimplantation embryo development and pregnancy outcomes. Emerging evidence has implicated that these effects are associated with compromised oocyte competence. Several developmental defects during oocyte maturation in diabetic mice have been reported over past decades. Most recently, we further identified the structural, spatial and metabolic dysfunction of mitochondria in oocytes from diabetic mice, suggesting the impaired oocyte quality. These defects in the oocyte may be maternally transmitted to the embryo and then manifested later as developmental abnormalities in preimplantation embryo, congenital malformations, and even metabolic disease in the offspring. In this paper, we briefly review the effects of maternal diabetes on oocyte quality, with a particular emphasis on the mitochondrial dysfunction. The possible connection between dysfunctional oocyte mitochondria and reproductive failure of diabetic females, and the mechanism(s) by which maternal diabetes exerts its effects on the oocyte are also discussed. PMID:20226883

  13. Bed occupancy by diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, P; Fowler, J; Eather, G

    1979-03-24

    The Royal Newcastle Hospital Diabetic Education and Stabilization Centre was instituted primarily to improve diabetics' understanding of their disease and its everyday management. Simultaneously with a five-day education course, stabilization if insulin-dependent diabetics was undertaken on an outpatient basis. In order to disseminate diabetic education as widely as possible, trained nurses from near and far were included in each course. It is believed that these nurses will be able to offer good advice to diabetics who have no other source of reliable information. By actively attempting to reduce hospital bed occupancy by diabetics there has been a reduction of 1400 bed days per year. It is recommended that similar centres be instituted throughout Australia.

  14. Postpartum management of diabetes pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Nazli

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus has assumed the role of an epidemic. Previously considered a disease of affluent developed countries, it has become more common in developing countries. Pakistan is included among the countries with a high prevalence of diabetes. In this scenario, postpartum management of a woman with diabetes mellitus becomes more important as in this period counseling and educating a woman is essential. Counselling includes life style modifications to prevent future risks involving all the systems of the body. This review article discusses management of diabetes mellitus in postpartum period, guidelines for postpartum screening of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, risks involved in future life and stresses upon the need of local population based studies. Primary care providers and gynaecologists must realize the importance of postpartum screening for diabetes mellitus and provide relevant information to women as well. PMID:27582163

  15. Surgery for Diabetic Eye Complications.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María H; Acaba, Luis A; Acaba, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    New modalities for the treatment of diabetic eye complications have emerged in the past decade. Nevertheless, many severe diabetic retinopathy complications can only be treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Technological advances in pars plana vitrectomy have expanded the gamut of pathologies that can be successfully treated with surgery. The most common pathologies managed surgically include vitreous opacities and traction retinal detachment. The indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincisional surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic tractional retinal detachment will be discussed. With the availability of new microincisional vitrectomy technology, wide angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from proliferative diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27612846

  16. A Relentless Illness—Fighting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues A Relentless Illness— Fighting Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... the fight to control and cure type 1 diabetes. As international chairman of the Juvenile Diabetes Research ...

  17. Research updates on type 2 diabetes children.

    PubMed

    Linder, Barbara; Imperatore, Giuseppina

    2013-05-01

    Major research trials have provided insight into the scope of type 2 diabetes in youth. The National Diabetes Education Program offers resources to help school nurses support children with or at risk for type 2 diabetes.

  18. Diabetes and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiles > Asian American > Diabetes Diabetes and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian Americans are 20 percent less likely ... Diagnosed with Diabetes Ratio vs. General Population Asians/Pacific Islanders 7.8 1.1 U.S. General Public ...

  19. Be Active When You Have Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Have Diabetes Be Active When You Have Diabetes Being physically active is one of the most ... level. For Patients Be Active When You Have Diabetes This booklet explains the types of physical activity ...

  20. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 1 ... in learning to live with the disease. About Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  1. Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions Why are women with diabetes ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  2. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes There are several ways ... mg/dl – 199 mg/dl Preventing Type 2 Diabetes You will not develop type 2 diabetes automatically ...

  3. Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems Troublesome bladder symptoms ... early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with ...

  4. How Is Diabetes Treated in Children?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Is Diabetes Treated in Children? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... worse over time. back to top Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in ...

  5. For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Living Well with Diabetes. Simpler Diabetes Care: Estimated Average Glucose (eAG) The American Diabetes Association has ... levels over time. It is called "eAG," for estimated average glucose. Like the standard A1C blood test ...

  6. [Nonpharmacological diabetes therapy].

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephan

    2006-12-15

    Insulin resistance caused by obesity and lack of physical activity plays a major role for the development of type 2 diabetes. If the reduced insulin action cannot be compensated by overproduction of insulin, glucose regulation disorder is developing. In addition, other trigger factors such as television viewing, sleep, alcohol or smoking are discussed. During the past years an intensification of pharmacological therapy was believed to be the major goal for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, now the value of nonpharmacological treatment improves. While in the past only nutrition was in the view of lifestyle research, recently a number of studies on the value of physical activity were published. In this paper an overview of recent studies showing the therapeutic potential of nonpharmacological therapies will be given. It will also be shown that these measures will not only optimize hyperglycaemia but also all other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:17171321

  7. [Hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; Desideri, Giovambattista; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in association with several condition predisposing to cardiovascular events such as arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This has led researchers to investigate possible pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association. Several experimental studies and some indirect clinical evidence support a causal link between mild hyperuricemia and the developement of hypertension as well as new onset diabetes. At the tissue level, chronic exposure to increased uric acid has been shown to promote vascular changes leading to renal ischemia as well as stimulation of the renin angiotensin system. Furthermore, uric acid has been shown to promote the development of insulin resistance, hypertrglyceridemia and haepatic steatosis through pro-oxidative mechanisms. These experimental pathophysiological changes may be partly preventable by hypouricemic treatments. Whether clinical implications of these findings are confirmed by solid clinical intervention trials, mild hyperuricemia may soon change its status from risk predictor to treatment target for patients at high cardiovascular and renal risk.

  8. Metalloproteinase Changes in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Bento João; de Brito Vieira, Wouber Hérickson

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a group of over 20 structurally-related proteins which include a Zn(++) ion binding site that is essential for their proteolytic activities. These enzymes play important role in extracellular matrix turnover in order to maintain a proper balance in its synthesis and degradation. MMPs are associated to several physiological and pathophysiological processes, including diabetes mellitus (DM). The mechanisms of DM and its complications is subject of intense research and evidence suggests that MMPs are implicated with the development and progression of diabetic microvascular complications such as nephropathy, cardiomyopathy, retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy. Recent data has associated DM to changes in the tendon structure, including abnormalities in fiber structure and organization, increased tendon thickness, volume and disorganization obtained by image and a tendency of impairing biomechanical properties. Although not fully elucidated, it is believed that DM-induced MMP dysregulation may contribute to structural and biomechanical alterations and impaired process of tendon healing. PMID:27535260

  9. Are diabetes camps effective?

    PubMed

    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Vivolo, Marco Antonio; Madden, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    In the present article data about Diabetes Camps (DC) from all continents were reviewed in order to answer the title question "are diabetes camps effective?". Articles from peer reviewed journals and abstracts published in international conferences proceedings were raised. The effectiveness was considered in terms of knowledge acquisition, and psychosocial and physiological changes. Even though expected improvements were not found in all studies, in a deeper and wider analysis the aspects that influence the most toward gains are identified. Among them are: number of participations in a DC, post-camp educational opportunities, staff training, and program oriented toward campers' autonomy. To conclude, practical recommendations are addressed intending to amplify DC's potential. PMID:27103364

  10. Dietary carbohydrates for diabetics.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Angela A; Giacco, Rosalba; Costabile, Giuseppina

    2012-12-01

    The literature on the impact of dietary carbohydrates in the regulation of blood glucose levels and other metabolic abnormalities in diabetic patients over the last 3 years is reviewed. We try to differentiate the metabolic effects due to the amount of carbohydrates from those due to their different types. The review comprises a part dealing with the effects of diets having low or high carbohydrate content on body weight reduction, and a part in which the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are discussed in relation to isoenergetic diets. Overall, the data accumulated in the period considered seem to confirm that the decrease in energy intake is more important than the qualitative composition of the diet to reduce body weight, but that both the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are important in modulating blood glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors in both the fasting and the postprandial phases in diabetic individuals. PMID:22847773

  11. [Diabetic kidney disease - Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Sourij, Harald; Edlinger, Roland; Prischl, Friedrich; Auinger, Martin; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Säemann, Marcus D; Prager, Rudolf; Clodi, Martin; Schernthaner, Guntram; Mayer, Gert; Oberbauer, Rainer; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Recent epidemiological evaluations have shown that approximately 5% of all Austrians suffer from diabetes including renal involvement, i. e. 400.000 people in Austria are affected. The risk of start and progression of this disease can be ameliorated by lifestyle interventions as well as optimization of blood pressure and glucose levels. The present article represents the joint recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association and the Austrian Society for Nephrology for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27052231

  12. Hypoglycemia, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Wadwa, R Paul

    2012-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

  13. The Emerging Diabetes Online Community

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Sparling, Kerri M.; Hitchcock, Jeff; Oser, Tamara K.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management is complex and demanding, and isolation and burnout are common experiences. The Internet provides opportunities for people with diabetes to connect with one another to address these challenges. The aims of this paper are to introduce readers to the platforms on which Diabetes Online Community (DOC) participants interact, to discuss reasons for and risks associated with diabetes-related online activity, and to review research related to the potential impact of DOC participation on diabetes outcomes. Methods Research and online content related to diabetes online activity is reviewed, and DOC writing excerpts are used to illustrate key themes. Guidelines for meaningful participation in DOC activities for people with diabetes, families, health care providers, and industry are provided. Results Common themes around DOC participation include peer support, advocacy, self-expression, seeking and sharing diabetes information, improving approaches to diabetes data management, and humor. Potential risks include access to misinformation and threats to individuals’ privacy, though there are limited data on negative outcomes resulting from such activities. Likewise, few data are available regarding the impact of DOC involvement on glycemic outcomes, but initial research suggests a positive impact on emotional experiences, attitudes toward diabetes, and engagement in diabetes management behaviors. Conclusion The range of DOC participants, activities, and platforms is growing rapidly. The Internet provides opportunities to strengthen communication and support among individuals with diabetes, their families, health care providers, the health care industry, policy makers, and the general public. Research is needed to investigate the impact of DOC participation on self-management, quality of life, and glycemic control, and to design and evaluate strategies to maximize its positive impact. PMID:25901500

  14. Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wadwa, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

  15. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  16. The status of diabetic embryopathy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Ulf J.; Wentzel, Parri

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic embryopathy is a theoretical enigma and a clinical challenge. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic pregnancy carry a significant risk for fetal maldevelopment, and the precise reasons for the diabetes-induced teratogenicity are not clearly identified. The experimental work in this field has revealed a partial, however complex, answer to the teratological question, and we will review some of the latest suggestions. PMID:27117607

  17. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    PubMed

    Maioli, M; Puddu, L; Pes, G M

    2006-01-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder with onset after age 30, insulin independence for at least 6 months after diagnosis, and the presence of circulating pancreatic islet autoantibodies. The prevalence of LADA varies substantially across ethnic groups and ranges approximately from 1% to 10% among patients with type 2 diabetes. In this review we discuss the nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, immunologic and genetic markers, metabolic alterations and therapy of this form of diabetes.

  18. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-08-15

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  19. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  20. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear.

  1. Anti-diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The hyperglycaemia continues to be a major health problem in India and other developing countries. This imbalance of blood glucose causes serious health problems such as damages to the blood vessel, poor healing of wounds, retinal damage, renal damage--kidney failure. The in vitro enzyme models and evaluation of hypoglycaemic effect of sample on normal and glucose-loaded rats has been used as a prediction experiment in this chapter before going for anti-diabetic experiment using animal models. PMID:26939280

  2. Diabetes insipidus in children.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vandana; Ravindranath, Aathira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is one of the common disorders affecting sodium and water homeostasis, and results when ADH is either inadequately produced, or unable to negotiate its actions on the renal collecting tubules through aquaporins. The diagnostic algorithm starts with exclusion of other causes of polyuria and establishing low urine osmolality in the presence of high serum osmolality. In this paper, we have reviewed the diagnosis, etiology and management of DI in children, with special emphasis on recent advances in the field.

  3. Heparanase and Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Ziolkowski, Andrew F.; Wu, Zuopeng; Choong, Fui Jiun; Freeman, Craig; Parish, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Heparanase (Hpse) is the only known mammalian endo-β-d-glucuronidase that degrades the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), found attached to the core proteins of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Hpse plays a homeostatic role in regulating the turnover of cell-associated HS and also degrades extracellular HS in basement membranes (BMs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM), where HSPGs function as a barrier to cell migration. Secreted Hpse is harnessed by leukocytes to facilitate their migration from the blood to sites of inflammation. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD) model of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes (T1D), Hpse is also used by insulitis leukocytes to solubilize the islet BM to enable intra-islet entry of leukocytes and to degrade intracellular HS, an essential component for the survival of insulin-producing islet beta cells. Treatment of pre-diabetic adult NOD mice with the Hpse inhibitor PI-88 significantly reduced the incidence of T1D by ~50% and preserved islet HS. Hpse therefore acts as a novel immune effector mechanism in T1D. Our studies have identified T1D as a Hpse-dependent disease and Hpse inhibitors as novel therapeutics for preventing T1D progression and possibly the development of T1D vascular complications. PMID:24421779

  4. Sleep habits and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Larcher, S; Benhamou, P-Y; Pépin, J-L; Borel, A-L

    2015-09-01

    Sleep duration has been constantly decreasing over the past 50 years. Short sleep duration, sleep quality and, recently, long sleep duration have all been linked to poor health outcomes, increasing the risk of developing metabolic diseases and cardiovascular events. Beyond the duration of sleep, the timing of sleep may also have consequences. Having a tendency to go early to bed (early chronotype) compared with the habit of going to bed later (late chronotype) can interfere considerably with social schedules (school, work). Eventually, a misalignment arises in sleep timing between work days and free days that has been described as 'social jet lag'. The present review looks at how different sleep habits can interfere with diabetes, excluding sleep breathing disorders, and successively looks at the effects of sleep duration, chronotype and social jet lag on the risk of developing diabetes as well as on the metabolic control of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Finally, this review addresses the current state of knowledge of physiological mechanisms that could be linking sleep habits and metabolic health.

  5. Diabetes and driving.

    PubMed

    Inkster, B; Frier, B M

    2013-09-01

    The principal safety concern for driving for people treated with insulin or insulin secretagogues is hypoglycaemia, which impairs driving performance. Other complications, such as those causing visual impairment and peripheral neuropathy, are also relevant to medical fitness to drive. Case control studies have suggested that drivers with diabetes pose a modestly increased but acceptable and measurable risk of motor vehicle accidents compared to non-diabetic drivers, but many studies are limited and of poor quality. Factors which have been shown to increase driving risk include previous episodes of severe hypoglycaemia, previous hypoglycaemia while driving, strict glycaemic control (lower HbA1c) and absence of blood glucose monitoring before driving. Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia may be counteracted by frequent blood glucose testing. The European Union Third directive on driving (2006) has necessitated changes in statutory regulations for driving licences for people with diabetes in all European States, including the UK. Stricter criteria have been introduced for Group 1 vehicle licences while those for Group 2 licences have been relaxed. Insulin-treated drivers can now apply to drive Group 2 vehicles, but in the UK must meet very strict criteria and be assessed by an independent specialist to be issued with a 1-year licence. PMID:23350766

  6. Autoimmunity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, A; Maclaren, N K

    1999-12-01

    The face of immune-mediated (type 1) diabetes is changing. No longer considered a disease confined to childhood, the incidence rate in Western countries is clearly rising and affecting younger children. Such a secular trend can only be explained on the basis of increased contacts with adverse environmental factors acting on a background of complex genetics. Multiple defects in immunological tolerance to "self' predispose to immune-mediated (type 1) diabetes. Initiation of immune responses involves the cytokine rich natural killer T cells. Such cells appear deficient in both humans and the rodent models of the disease. Furthermore, the regulatory abilities of T cells in general seem to be compromised. Effector mechanisms probably are dominated by cell-mediated beta cell destruction through apoptosis induction. Surprisingly, the essential antigen-presenting cells in the autoimmune processes involved appear to be B lymphocytes. The improved understanding of the beta cell autoantigens involved has led to better disease prediction. The long prodromal phase now readily identifiable through autoantibodies is spawning hopes of disease prevention, notably through antigen-based interventions or diabetes "vaccines."

  7. [Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Cruz, Oswaldo; Careaga Benítez, Ricardo

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon pathology; its incidence varies from two to six cases in 100,000 pregnancies. It has multiple etiologies and it is classified in central and neurogenic. Patients with diabetes insipidus generally show intense thirst, polyuria, neurologic symptoms and hypernatremia. It does not seem to alter the patient's fertility. Diabetes insipidus is usually associated with pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and fatty liver disease of pregnancy. This is a report of a case seen at the Hospital General de Cholula, in Puebla, Mexico. A 19 year-old female, with 37.2 weeks of pregnancy, had a history of Langerhans cell histiocytosis since she was four years. Patient was treated with intranasal desmopressin until 2005. She went to an obstetric evaluation; laboratory and cabinet studies were obtained. A healthy 1900 g female was obtained through vaginal delivery, with a 7/9 Apgar score. We should be familiarized with this uncommon pathology because of its association with several obstetric emergencies.

  8. Diabetes and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Zilliox, Lindsay A; Chadrasekaran, Krish; Kwan, Justin Y; Russell, James W

    2016-09-01

    Both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with reduced performance on multiple domains of cognitive function and with evidence of abnormal structural and functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cognitive deficits may occur at the very earliest stages of diabetes and are further exacerbated by the metabolic syndrome. The duration of diabetes and glycemic control may have an impact on the type and severity of cognitive impairment, but as yet we cannot predict who is at greatest risk of developing cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of cognitive impairment is multifactorial, although dysfunction in each interconnecting pathway ultimately leads to discordance in metabolic signaling. The pathophysiology includes defects in insulin signaling, autonomic function, neuroinflammatory pathways, mitochondrial (Mt) metabolism, the sirtuin-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1α (SIRT-PGC-1α) axis, and Tau signaling. Several promising therapies have been identified in pre-clinical studies, but remain to be validated in clinical trials. PMID:27491830

  9. Body temperature regulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Sigal, Ronald J; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness.

  10. The Charcot Foot in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Frykberg, Robert G.; Armstrong, David G.; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Edmonds, Michael; Van, Georges Ha; Hartemann, Agnes; Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Jirkovska, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Morbach, Stephan; Morrison, William B.; Pinzur, Michael; Pitocco, Dario; Sanders, Lee; Wukich, Dane K.; Uccioli, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint disorganization secondary to underlying neuropathy, trauma, and perturbations of bone metabolism. An international task force of experts was convened by the American Diabetes Association and the American Podiatric Medical Association in January 2011 to summarize available evidence on the pathophysiology, natural history, presentations, and treatment recommendations for this entity. PMID:21868781

  11. [Other specific types of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Gessl, Alois W; Riedl, Michaela; Luger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Numerous endocrine diseases are associated with impaired glucose metabolism and can induce diabetes mellitus. With the exception of hyperthyroidism, where this is uncommon, these diseases are rare. Acromegaly and Cushing syndrome are frequently associated with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In contrast, this is a rare finding in pheochromocytoma and Conn syndrome. Among the many drugs that can induce diabetes this can be observed most frequently with hormones, atypic antipsychotic drugs and immunosuppressives. In addition, diseases of the pancreas such as pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, cystic fibrosis and hemochromatosis can cause diabetes as well as Down syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome and Prader Willi syndrome and rare immunmediated or genetic syndromes. PMID:27056389

  12. Body temperature regulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Glen P.; Sigal, Ronald J.; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  13. [Diabetes mellitus and vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yasuhisa; Sato, Kyoko

    2002-08-01

    Two types of arterial calcification are well recognized:intimal (atherosclerotic) and medial (Monckeberg type). These two calcifications are considered different in pathogenesis. Arterial calcification has recently been reported to be an organized, regulated process similar to bone formation. The relation of calcification to diabetes mellitus remains still unclear. EBCT can noninvasively and accurately detect coronary artery calcification. Diabetic patients seem to have increased prevalence of coronary calcification when compared with non-diabetic patients. Medial artery calcification is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in diabetic patients. PMID:15775402

  14. Body temperature regulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Sigal, Ronald J; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  15. Gallbladder function in diabetic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shreiner, D.P.; Sarva, R.P.; Van Thiel, D.; Yingvorapant, N.

    1986-03-01

    Gallbladder emptying and filling was studied in eight diabetic and six normal control patients. None of the patients had gallstones. Cholescintigraphy was performed using (/sup 99m/Tc)disofenin, and gallbladder emptying was studied using a 45-min i.v. infusion of the octapeptide of cholecystokinin (OP-CCK) 20 ng/kg X hr. The peak filling rate was greater in diabetic than in normal subjects; however, emptying of the gallbladder in response to OP-CCK was significantly less in the diabetic subjects (51.6 +/- 10.4% compared with 77.2 +/- 4.9%). When the diabetic group was subdivided into obese and nonobese diabetics, the obese diabetics had a much lower percentage of emptying than the nonobese diabetics (30.0 +/- 10.4% compared with 73.1 +/- 9.3%). These findings suggest that obese diabetics may have impaired emptying of the gallbladder even in the absence of gallstones. The more rapid rate of gallbladder filling in obesity may indicate hypotonicity of the gallbladder. The combination of these abnormalities may predispose the obese diabetic to the development of gallstones.

  16. The Diabetes Pearl: Diabetes biobanking in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geographical areas in the Netherlands. The aim of the study is to create a research infrastructure that will allow the study of risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic determinants for severe diabetes complications. Methods/design Baseline examinations began November 2009 and will continue through 2012. By the end of 2012, it is expected that 7000 patients with type 2 diabetes will be included in the Diabetes Pearl cohort. To ensure quality of the data collected, standard operation procedures were developed and used in all 8 recruitment centers. From all patients who provide informed consent, the following information is collected: personal information, medication use, physical examination (antropometry, blood pressure, electrocardiography (ECG), retina photographs, ankle-brachial index, peripheral vibration perception), self-report questionnaire (socio-economic status, lifestyle, (family) history of disease, and psychosocial well-being), laboratory measurements (glucose, A1c, lipid profile, kidney function), biobank material (storage of urine and blood samples and isolated DNA). All gathered clinical data and biobank information is uploaded to a database for storage on a national level. Biobanks are maintained locally at all recruitment centers. Discussion The Diabetes Pearl is large-scale cohort of type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands aiming to study risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic markers, for disease deterioration and the development of severe diabetes complications. As a result of the well-designed research design and the national coverage, the Diabetes Pearl data can be of great value to national and international researchers with an interest in diabetes

  17. Knowledge of diabetes mellitus among diabetic and non-diabetic patients in Klinik Kesihatan Seremban.

    PubMed

    Ding, C H; Teng, C L; Koh, C N

    2006-10-01

    The Malaysian Ministry of Health has undertaken various campaigns on healthy lifestyle and health promotion over the years. The impact of these campaigns has been mixed and not well documented. This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge level of patients with and without diabetes in a large urban polyclinic using a 41-item questionnaire. One hundred and forty-nine adults (83 with diabetes, 66 without diabetes) participated in this study. Patients with diabetes had higher overall knowledge scores than those without diabetes (81.8% vs 64.0%, p < 0.001). While the overall knowledge of patients without diabetes appeared to be acceptable, several areas of knowledge deficiency were identified in this group--areas that should be filled by the on-going health promotion activities. PMID:17243515

  18. Have Diabetes? Get Tips for Safe Travels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Healthy On-the-Go with Diabetes Video Transportation Security Administration instructions for passengers with diabetes Transportation Security Administration instructions for travelers with disabilities and ...

  19. [Diabetes and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Sanz París, A

    2000-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most frequent metabolic syndromes found in our hospitals, occurring at around 10%. There are basically two types: the most common is Type 2, associated with obesity in almost 80% of cases and family groupings, and then, far behind, comes Type 1 which requires insulin administration for life. Furthermore, there is a condition known as "stress hyperglycaemia" in which a patient without a prior history of diabetes mellitus responds to stress with a syndrome comprising hypermetabolism, hyperglycaemia, hyperlactacidaemia and protein catabolism. The desirable pre-prandial levels of glycaemia in an outpatient are between 80 and 120 mg/dl (under 100 mg/dl is normal) and between 100 and 140 mg/dl before retiring (levels of 110 mg/dl are normal). In patients with artificial nutrition, whether parenteral or enteral, the control of glycaemia is not so strict and the recommendation is for a level of around 150-200 mg/dl in the acute stress phases, falling to 100-150 mg/dl in stable patients. The ideal enteral formula for diabetic patients has been a bone of contention for years and has still not been satisfactorily resolved. The discussion centres on the replacement of saturated fatty acids by mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) or by carbohydrates. The studies of patients undergoing prolonged treatments with MUFA-rich enteral diets have shown a greater control of glycaemia with these diets than with those rich in carbohydrates, so Type 2 diabetics and in stress hyperglycaemia with enteral nutrition, there is an ever stronger proposal to use MUFA rich formulas, whereas in Type 1 diabetics and in Type 2 patients with high prior requirements of insulin, it would be more recommendable to use diets with a more intermediate composition. With regard to parenteral nutrition, there is a consensus on increasing the amount of fatty acids to the detriment of carbohydrates, but the use of carbohydrates other than glucose is not so clear. The use of fast

  20. Diabetes: Treatment of gestational diabetes reduces obstetric morbidity.

    PubMed

    Zera, Chloe A; Seely, Ellen W

    2010-02-01

    Should women with gestational diabetes mellitus be treated to minimize both fetal and maternal complications? Although unanswered questions remain about the long-term benefits, the findings of a large, multicenter,randomized controlled trial suggest that treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus decreases perinatal complications. PMID:20098447

  1. [Prevention of atherosclerosis in diabetics].

    PubMed

    Válek, J

    1997-09-10

    The high prevalence of atherosclerotic (macrovascular) complications in diabetes (1.5-6x higher than in non-diabetics) stimulated evaluation of new pathogenetic findings which could have an impact on prevention. In type 1 diabetics the development of nephropathy is a factor hastening the development of macroangiopathy. In type 2 diabetics on whom attention is concentrated at the moment interaction of various metabolic deviations is involved which include changes of lipoproteins (drop of HDL, changes in the size and composition of LDL), insulin resistance and glycosylation of proteins. There is an enhanced tendency to lipoprotein oxidation (LDL) which promote the development of cholesterol rich plaques in the arterial walls. Their rupture may cause occlusion and ensuing risks for life. Possibilities of prevention are not adequately made use of. This is due to a tendency to underrate the serious character of type 2 diabetes and also the high percentage of diabetics where the disease was diagnosed late. The metabolic syndrome which develops as a result of insulin resistance precedes for years manifestations of diabetes. Its detection makes it possible to screen subjects at risk, some of whom develop diabetes. At the same time it is also a pathogenetic factor of macrovascular complications. It leads to the cumulation of a number of risk conditions. More effective prevention can be implemented by intervention of all associated risk factors (smoking, hypertension), in the application of lifestyle provisions of energy reduction by promoting physical activity and by a rational diet (diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia). The justification of pharmacotherapy for the high risk groups of diabetics with hyperlipidaemia is supported by results of recently published investigations where statins were used. For the sub-population of subjects at risk the perspective should be screening of risk factors, early diagnosis of diabetes, education, continuous primary care, comprehensive

  2. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  3. Management of diabetes mellitus in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Muili

    Diabetes is a global health problem, with a challenging epidemiology. It is one of the major health problems affecting countries around the world, particularly the UK (World Health Organization [WHO], 2006; Department of Health [DH], 2006b). It is also a growing public health threat in the US (Mokdad et al, 2001). As a result, diabetes has become an important public health issue, prompting the WHO and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) to adopt the theme 'Diabetes for Everyone' for World Diabetes Day 2006. In 2007, on World Diabetes Day, the United Nations also launched its 'Living with Diabetes at School' campaign, in response to the growing diabetes 'epidemics' (Diabetes UK, 2007). This article provides an overview of diabetes mellitus and its acute- and long-term management, including definition, aetiology, pathophysiology, classification, signs, symptoms and complications. The role of the nurse in providing patient-centred care for people with diabetes is emphasized.

  4. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration.

  5. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  6. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  7. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  8. Juvenile Diabetes and Rehabilitation Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, J. Blair; Gregg, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    Severe complications of diabetes are more likely to occur with the juvenile diabetic and problems of psychosocial adjustment are recurring and difficult. Implications for the rehabilitation counselor are discussed in terms of employment considerations, the effects of complications, genetic counseling, and cooperation with other professionals.…

  9. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  10. Psychosocial Predictors of Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Mary T.; Rollison, Julia; Camporese, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a perception of responsibility for disease onset and self-blame might influence disease management in people with diabetes. Methods: Our survey assessed perceived responsibility for disease onset, self-blame, anger, social support, and disease management in a sample of 46 individuals with diabetes. Results: As…

  11. Diabetes and stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment.

  12. Calcium signaling in diabetic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Laetitia; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Rueda, Angélica; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques; Benitah, Jean-Pierre; Gómez, Ana María

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common medical conditions. It is associated to medical complications in numerous organs and tissues, of which the heart is one of the most important and most prevalent organs affected by this disease. In fact, cardiovascular complications are the most common cause of death among diabetic patients. At the end of the 19th century, the weakness of the heart in diabetes was noted as part of the general muscular weakness that exists in that disease. However, it was only in the eighties that diabetic cardiomyopathy was recognized, which comprises structural and functional abnormalities in the myocardium in diabetic patients even in the absence of coronary artery disease or hypertension. This disorder has been associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and is characterized by early-onset diastolic dysfunction and late-onset systolic dysfunction, in which alteration in Ca(2+) signaling is of major importance, since it controls not only contraction, but also excitability (and therefore is involved in rhythmic disorder), enzymatic activity, and gene transcription. Here we attempt to give a brief overview of Ca(2+) fluxes alteration reported on diabetes, and provide some new data on differential modulation of Ca(2+) handling alteration in males and females type 2 diabetic mice to promote further research. Due to space limitations, we apologize for those authors whose important work is not cited.

  13. Shoes and Orthotics for Diabetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... come in a wide variety. Depending on the type, severity and location of the condition, some braces need to be custom made for the patient and may require a couple visits to get the best fit. Resources Diabetic Foot Overview How to Care for Your Diabetic ...

  14. Gestational diabetes insipidus. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ejmocka-Ambroziak, Anna; Grzechocińska, Barbara; Jastrzebska, Helena; Kochman, Magdalena; Cyganek, Anna; Wielgoś, Mirosław; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a very rare complication. However, undiagnosed and untreated may lead to serious complications in both mother and fetus. In this study, a case of 34-year-old female patient with diabetes insipidus associated with pregnancy was reported. We discussed process of diagnosis and treatment with particular emphasis on the monitoring of water-electrolyte imbalance during labor.

  15. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  16. Type 1 diabetes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, E; Matsuura, N; Eguchi, K

    2006-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a multifactorial disease which results from a T-cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells in genetically predisposed individuals. The risk for individuals of developing type 1 diabetes varies remarkably according to country of residence and race. Japan has one of the lowest incidence rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, and recognises at least three subtypes of the condition: acute-onset ('classical'), slow-onset, and fulminant type 1 diabetes. The incidence rate of type 1 diabetes in children aged 0-14 years in Japan increased over the period from 1973-1992, but remained constant over the last decade, averaging 2.37 cases per 100,000 persons per year; the incidence does not appear to have increased in older age groups. Although there are few reports regarding the incidence and prevalence of type 1 diabetes in adult-onset patients, it appears that the prevalence of type 1 diabetes in adults is more than twice that in childhood-onset patients and that two-thirds of them have a slow-onset form of type 1 diabetes. Differences and similarities in the association of MHC and non-MHC genes with type 1 diabetes are observed in Japan and in countries with Caucasoid populations. Highly susceptible class II HLA haplotypes identified in patients of Caucasoid origin are rarely seen in Japanese patients, whereas protective haplotypes are universal. Non-MHC genes associated with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in both Japanese and Caucasoid patients include polymorphisms in the insulin gene, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) gene, the interleukin-18 (IL18) gene and the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) gene. Fulminant type 1 diabetes is a unique subtype of type 1 diabetes that accounts for about 20% of acute-onset type 1 diabetes, and is seen mainly in adults. The challenge for the future is to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of beta cell destruction, including the genetic or

  17. [Apollinaire Bouchardat and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Chast, François; Slama, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Apollinaire Bouchardat (1806-1886) begins its hospital formation by the pharmacy internship and then starts his medical studies. He becomes chief pharmacist of the Hôtel-Dieu in 1835 and during 20 years, he devotes his life to the study of diabetes. Through observations and experiments, he builds new concepts allowing to establish the bases of clinical diabetology due to a solid competence in fundamental sciences and his intelligence in semiologic observations. He studied urine glucose as a reflect of the clinical state of the patients and, in order to carry out its exact measurement, he recommended the use of the polarimeter. He engaged himself in many studies concerning well as the patients diet as to their way of life. Thus he recommended a large decrease in starchy foods and sugars, he encouraged physical exercise and considered that, since the assumption of responsibility of the diabetic was serious, it could foresee the remission of disease. Due to encouraging results, he developed self-monitoring by the patients by the means of simple chemical reagents, convinced that making patients responsible, despite difficulties of the diet, could modify their attitude. Precursor of the modern diabetology, one can consider that he founded it as a true medical discipline. Its major work: De la Glycosurie ou diabète sucré, son traitement hygénigue is pro-bably the first textbook on diabetes, associating clinical observations, experimental steps and proposals for a treatment based on the patients' way of life: mainly diet and exercise: still preached steps, a hundred and fifty years later.

  18. [Apollinaire Bouchardat and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Chast, François; Slama, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Apollinaire Bouchardat (1806-1886) begins its hospital formation by the pharmacy internship and then starts his medical studies. He becomes chief pharmacist of the Hôtel-Dieu in 1835 and during 20 years, he devotes his life to the study of diabetes. Through observations and experiments, he builds new concepts allowing to establish the bases of clinical diabetology due to a solid competence in fundamental sciences and his intelligence in semiologic observations. He studied urine glucose as a reflect of the clinical state of the patients and, in order to carry out its exact measurement, he recommended the use of the polarimeter. He engaged himself in many studies concerning well as the patients diet as to their way of life. Thus he recommended a large decrease in starchy foods and sugars, he encouraged physical exercise and considered that, since the assumption of responsibility of the diabetic was serious, it could foresee the remission of disease. Due to encouraging results, he developed self-monitoring by the patients by the means of simple chemical reagents, convinced that making patients responsible, despite difficulties of the diet, could modify their attitude. Precursor of the modern diabetology, one can consider that he founded it as a true medical discipline. Its major work: De la Glycosurie ou diabète sucré, son traitement hygénigue is pro-bably the first textbook on diabetes, associating clinical observations, experimental steps and proposals for a treatment based on the patients' way of life: mainly diet and exercise: still preached steps, a hundred and fifty years later. PMID:18348493

  19. DPP4 in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Röhrborn, Diana; Wronkowitz, Nina; Eckel, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a glycoprotein of 110 kDa, which is ubiquitously expressed on the surface of a variety of cells. This exopeptidase selectively cleaves N-terminal dipeptides from a variety of substrates, including cytokines, growth factors, neuropeptides, and the incretin hormones. Expression of DPP4 is substantially dysregulated in a variety of disease states including inflammation, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Since the incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), are major regulators of post-prandial insulin secretion, inhibition of DPP4 by the gliptin family of drugs has gained considerable interest for the therapy of type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the DPP4–incretin axis and evaluate most recent findings on DPP4 inhibitors. Furthermore, DPP4 as a type II transmembrane protein is also known to be cleaved from the cell membrane involving different metalloproteases in a cell-type-specific manner. Circulating, soluble DPP4 has been identified as a new adipokine, which exerts both para- and endocrine effects. Recently, a novel receptor for soluble DPP4 has been identified, and data are accumulating that the adipokine-related effects of DPP4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, circulating DPP4 is augmented in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects, and it may represent a molecular link between obesity and vascular dysfunction. A critical evaluation of the impact of circulating DPP4 is presented, and the potential role of DPP4 inhibition at this level is also discussed. PMID:26284071

  20. Diabetes in pregnancy 1985.

    PubMed

    Hadden, D R

    1986-01-01

    The art of obstetrics is not a subject which is often discussed in the pages of Diabetologia. However, as the care of the diabetic mother and her offspring is rightly an interdisciplinary responsibility between obstetrician, diabetologist and neonatologist, it is important that each has a close understanding of the various problems. Dr. M.I. Drury (Dublin), speaking as an internist, raises a question on the optimum time and method of delivery of the baby; this has more than purely obstetrical implications. Drs. L. Mølsted-Pedersen (Copenhagen) and C. Kühl (Copenhagen and Klampenborg), obstetrician and internist from the longest-established joint obstetric/diabetic service in the world, present a Scandinavian view on the management of pregnancy. Both centres have distinguished records in the management of diabetic pregnancy. The different viewpoints in Denmark and in Ireland are clear - in Copenhagen, therapeutic abortion is practiced in a pregnancy at risk of severe congenital malformation; in Dublin it is not. Dr. Drury quotes a perinatal loss of 13 of 285 pregnancies (4.5%) in the past 5 years, but does not include the recognised spontaneous abortions which, on his overall figures, are about 10% of conceptions. Dr. Mølsted-Pedersen reports a perinatal loss of 3 of 201 infants (1.5%), excluding 17 spontaneous and 9 induced abortions. If these 9 aborted pregnancies, which were performed due to a risk of severe congenital malformation, were included as fatalities, the Copenhagen figure would be 12 of 210 (5.5%). Of course, we do not know if all those 9 fetuses were affected. The spontaneous abortion rate was 17 of 223 (8.0%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3514340

  1. DPP4 in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Röhrborn, Diana; Wronkowitz, Nina; Eckel, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a glycoprotein of 110 kDa, which is ubiquitously expressed on the surface of a variety of cells. This exopeptidase selectively cleaves N-terminal dipeptides from a variety of substrates, including cytokines, growth factors, neuropeptides, and the incretin hormones. Expression of DPP4 is substantially dysregulated in a variety of disease states including inflammation, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Since the incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), are major regulators of post-prandial insulin secretion, inhibition of DPP4 by the gliptin family of drugs has gained considerable interest for the therapy of type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the DPP4-incretin axis and evaluate most recent findings on DPP4 inhibitors. Furthermore, DPP4 as a type II transmembrane protein is also known to be cleaved from the cell membrane involving different metalloproteases in a cell-type-specific manner. Circulating, soluble DPP4 has been identified as a new adipokine, which exerts both para- and endocrine effects. Recently, a novel receptor for soluble DPP4 has been identified, and data are accumulating that the adipokine-related effects of DPP4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, circulating DPP4 is augmented in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects, and it may represent a molecular link between obesity and vascular dysfunction. A critical evaluation of the impact of circulating DPP4 is presented, and the potential role of DPP4 inhibition at this level is also discussed. PMID:26284071

  2. [Mental disorders and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Rießland-Seifert, Angelika; Fasching, Peter; Ebenbichler, Christoph; Hofmann, Peter; Toplak, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric disorders and psychological problems are common in patients with diabetes mellitus. There is a twofold increase in depression which is associated with suboptimal glycemic control and increased morbidity and mortality. Other psychiatric disorders with a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus are cognitive impairment, dementia, disturbed eating behaviour, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and borderline personality disorder. The coincidence of mental disorders and diabetes mellitus has unfavourable influences on metabolic control and micro- and macroangiopathic late complications. Improvement of therapeutic outcome is a challenge in the modern health care system. The intentions behind this position paper are to rise awareness of this special set of problems, to intensify cooperation between involved health care providers and to reduce incidence of diabetes mellitus as well as morbidity and mortality from diabetes in this patient group. PMID:27052238

  3. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure.

  4. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  5. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  6. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  7. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  8. Diabetes mellitus and electrolyte disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liamis, George; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic patients frequently develop a constellation of electrolyte disorders. These disturbances are particularly common in decompensated diabetics, especially in the context of diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. These patients are markedly potassium-, magnesium- and phosphate-depleted. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is linked to both hypo- and hyper-natremia reflecting the coexistence of hyperglycemia-related mechanisms, which tend to change serum sodium to opposite directions. The most important causal factor of chronic hyperkalemia in diabetic individuals is the syndrome of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism. Impaired renal function, potassium-sparing drugs, hypertonicity and insulin deficiency are also involved in the development of hyperkalemia. This article provides an overview of the electrolyte disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. This insight should pave the way for pathophysiology-directed therapy, thus contributing to the avoidance of the several deleterious effects associated with electrolyte disorders and their treatment. PMID:25325058

  9. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  10. Dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a cluster of lipid abnormalities:elevated plasma triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smaller and denser low-density lipoproteins,which have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance may contribute to dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes by increasing hepatic secretion of large,triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoprotein particles and by impairing the clearance of lipoprotein particles from plasma. Lifestyle interventions may be effective in improving the diabetic dyslipidemia syndrome. For patients who do not respond to lifestyle changes, pharmacologic therapies (lipid-lowering medications and anti-diabetic agents) are available. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of such pharmaceutics to treat diabetic dyslipidemia concomitantly reduces the risk of coronary artery disease.

  11. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  12. [Obliterating diabetic microangiopathy of the diabetic foot--reality or false conclusion?].

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E

    1993-08-01

    Occlusive diabetic microangiopathy like diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy has not been confirmed unequivocally in the diabetic foot. Non-occlusive disturbances, such as impaired vasomotion due to diabetic neuropathy, have been documented in the diabetic foot. Their clinical relevance, however, remains to be established. Recent reports have shown that the histopathological picture of diabetic gangrene is associated with septic vasculitis rather than diabetic microangiopathy. The assumption that diabetic gangrene in the presence of palpable foot pulses is due to occlusive microangiopathy and thus can be treated only by major amputation, appears to be unfounded.

  13. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  14. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  15. Anti diabetic effect of cherries in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lachin, Tahsini; Reza, Heydari

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder in the endocrine system resulting from a defect in insulin secretion, insulin action or both of them. Adverse side effects of chemical drugs for treatment of diabetes persuaded the using of medical plants. Cherry as a traditionally used plant for treatment of diabetes, is packed with powerful plant pigments called anthocyanins. They give cherries their dark red color and are one of the richest antioxidant sources which lower the blood sugar and bear other beneficial health effects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of cherry fruit on alloxan induced diabetic rats. In this study 36 Male Wistar rats, body weight of 150-200gr were divided into 6 groups. Diabetes was induced by intra peritoneal injection of 120 mg/kg Alloxan. The duration of the cherries treatment was 30 days in which single dose of extracts (200mg/kg) were oral administered to diabetic rats. Blood glucose levels were estimated with glucometer before treatment, 2h and 1- 4 weeks after administration of extracts. Treatment with extracts of the cherries resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose and urinary microalbumin and an increase in the creatinine secretion level in urea. Extract of this plant is useful in controlling the blood glucose level. Cherries appear to aid in diabetes control and diminution of the complications of the disease. Some relevant patents are also outlined in this article. PMID:22280223

  16. Effects of aspartame on diabetic rats and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, H; Yoshida, T; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Kano, Y; Nishioka, H; Kajiyama, S; Kitagawa, Y; Kanatsuna, T; Kondo, M

    1985-10-01

    The effects of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) on plasma glucose and insulin levels were investigated in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The oral administration of 0.45 mg aspartame per 100g body weight, which is equivalent to 150 mg of glucose in sweetness, to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats had no effect on the plasma glucose or insulin levels. Also, 225 mg oral aspartame loading, which is equivalent to 75 g of glucose in sweetness, to patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus did not increase plasma glucose or insulin levels, although 75 g of oral glucose loading increased plasma glucose and insulin levels in diabetic patients as expected. Aspartame ingestion for three days at a dose of 24-48 mg per day and the intake of snacks flavored with 240 mg of aspartame also did not increase fasting plasma glucose levels. These results suggest that acute administration of aspartame has no influence on plasma glucose or insulin levels in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  17. What the Teacher Should Know About Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Harriet, Ed.; Rolloff, Charlene, Ed.

    This short manual is designed to provide the practicing teacher with basic information on diabetes, and the role (s)he plays in providing health supervision and care for the diabetic child in his/her classroom. The document consists of four pages, describing (1) components of diabetes management and symptoms of diabetes; (2) emergency diabetic…

  18. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 173-199. 3 Dabelea D, Crume T. Maternal environment and the transgenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes Care , 2011;60:1849-1855. 4 Kitzmiller JL, Dang-Kilduff L, Taslimi MM. Gestational diabetes after delivery: short-term management and long-term risks. Diabetes Care. 2007;30: ...

  19. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  20. Snapshot: Diabetes in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    A SNAPSHOT DIABETES IN THE UNITED STATES DIABETES 29.1 MILLION 29.1 million people have diabetes That's about 1 out of every 11 people 1 4 ... estimates of diabetes and its burden in the United States, 2014. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health ...

  1. Controlling diabetes, controlling diabetics: moral language in the management of diabetes type 2.

    PubMed

    Broom, Dorothy; Whittaker, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Contemporary management of diabetes places heavy emphasis on control, particularly control of blood sugars and of food consumption. Interviews with people living with diabetes type 2 show how identity and social relationships are negotiated through what is often a contradictory language of control, surveillance, discipline and responsibility. People frequently discuss diabetes-related behaviour in terms that position themselves or others as disobedient children, or as wicked or foolish adults. These references occur alongside appraisals of the physical and social complexity of "compliance" with diabetic regimes and in some instances the difficulty of achieving effective control over blood sugar levels. Efforts to protect themselves from the stigmatising potential of diabetes may inadvertently undermine the agency of people who are already coping with a demanding discipline and a potentially disabling or life-threatening disease.

  2. Neurodegeneration in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is recognized as a group of heterogeneous disorders with the common elements of hyperglycaemia and glucose intolerance due to insulin deficiency, impaired effectiveness of insulin action, or both. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases with age and dementia also increases its incidence in later life. Recent studies have revealed that T2DM is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia, especially those related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin resistance, which is often associated with T2DM, may induce a deficiency of insulin effects in the central nervous system (CNS). Insulin may have a neuroprotective role and may have some impact on acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. Hyperinsulinemia, induced by insulin resistance occurring in T2DM, may be associated with insulin deficiency caused by reduced insulin transport via the blood brain barrier (BBB). Insulin has multiple important functions in the brain. Some basic research, however, suggests that insulin accelerates Alzheimer-related pathology through its effects on the amyloid beta (Aβ) metabolism and tau phosphorylation.Asymptomatic ischemic lesions in T2DM subjects may lower the threshold for the development of dementia and this may explain the inconsistency between the basic research and clinicopathological studies.More research to elucidate the mechanism of neurodegeneration associated with T2DM is warranted.

  3. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, B F; Ewing, D J; Campbell, I W

    1979-10-01

    This review attempts to outline the present understanding of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The clinical features have been increasinly recognised but knowledge of the localization and morphology of the lesions and their pathogenesis remains fragmentary. A metabolic causation as postulated in somatic nerves accords best with clinical observations. Most bodily systems, particularly the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital, are involved with added disturbances of thermoregulatory function and pupillary reflexes. Possible effects on neuroendocrine and peptidergic secretion and respiratory control await definition. Current interest centres around the development of a new generation of tests of autonomic nerve function that are simple, non-invasive, reproducible and allow precision in diagnosis and accurate quantitation. Most are based on cardiovascular reflexes and abnormality in them is assumed to reflect autonomic damage elsewhere. Probably no single test suffices and a battery of tests reflecting both parasympathetic and sympathetic function is preferable. Little is known of the natural history. The prevalence may be greater than previously suspected and although symptoms are mild in the majority, a few develop florid features. The relation of control and duration of diabetes to the onset and progression of autonomic neuropathy is not clearly established. Once tests of autonomic function become abnormal they usually remain abnormal. Symptomatic autonomic neuropathy carries a greatly increased mortality rate possibly due to indirect mechanisms such as renal failure and direct mechanisms such as cardio-resiratory arrest. Improved treatment of some of the more disabling symptoms has been possible in recent years. PMID:387501

  4. Atherosclerosis, diabetes and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-07-01

    The enormous burden of vascular disease is likely to expand rapidly as sedentary obesity and diabetes increase. Although cholesterol plays a major role in atherosclerosis and LDL is the major carrier of cholesterol in the blood, the importance of the postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis is gaining recognition. The role of HDL-cholesterol is also receiving more attention. These changes have been forced upon us by the realization that statins, which primarily lower LDL-cholesterol, only reduce the risk of atherosclerosis by 30%, suggesting that 70% of the risk still has to be explained and treated. In diabetes, abnormality in the metabolism of the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and the inter-relationship with HDL-cholesterol appears to be of primary importance in atherosclerotic risk. Postprandial studies are difficult to carry out, which is one reason why large studies have not so far been performed. The important new findings in chylomicron metabolism suggest new treatments for the future.

  5. Diabetic gastroparesis: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Alam, Uazman; Asghar, Omar; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Gastroparesis is a condition characterized by delayed gastric emptying and the most common known underlying cause is diabetes mellitus. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness, and early satiety, which impact to varying degrees on the patient's quality of life. Symptoms and deficits do not necessarily relate to each other, hence despite significant abnormalities in gastric emptying, some individuals have only minimal symptoms and, conversely, severe symptoms do not always relate to measures of gastric emptying. Prokinetic agents such as metoclopramide, domperidone, and erythromycin enhance gastric motility and have remained the mainstay of treatment for several decades, despite unwanted side effects and numerous drug interactions. Mechanical therapies such as endoscopic pyloric botulinum toxin injection, gastric electrical stimulation, and gastrostomy or jejunostomy are used in intractable diabetic gastroparesis (DG), refractory to prokinetic therapies. Mitemcinal and TZP-101 are novel investigational motilin receptor and ghrelin agonists, respectively, and show promise in the treatment of DG. The aim of this review is to provide an update on prokinetic and mechanical therapies in the treatment of DG. PMID:22127672

  6. [Therapeutic use of acetylsalicylic acid in diabetics].

    PubMed

    Zácková, V

    2003-12-01

    Aterosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetics. Macrovascular diseases--myocardial infarction, cerebral vascular accident, ischemic lower extremities--start in persons with diabetes earlier and in a bigger scope then in non-diabetics. Development of these changes is determined by diabetic vasculopathy which is connected with endothelial dysfunction, hypercoagulation state, and platelet abnormalities. Treatment of a patient with diabetes is based on compensation of diabetes and management of hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Drugs that inhibit platelets constitute an important part of prevention of cardiovascular disabilities in diabetics.

  7. Diabetes Training for Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background A 2.5-month diabetes education training for community health workers (CHWs) was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Methods Training methods used included case studies, role-playing, and lectures. Exams were used throughout the training for its evaluation. Teaching was delivered by different ways: a one day American Diabetes Association (ADA) course; a five day Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP); Conversation Maps; and a series of seven National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) diabetes education booklets. Results Qualitative and quantitative evaluative methods were used during and after the training. The CHWs’ diabetes knowledge was evaluated by a pre- and post-test Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ). The post-test was conducted one week after completing the training. The findings showed that the diabetes knowledge of the CHWs increased. Conclusions Diabetes competencies and evaluative tools need to be developed specific for CHWs as a way to standardize all CHW diabetes trainings. PMID:27110434

  8. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept. PMID:27052246

  9. Pomegranate and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem; Swedan, Samer; Alguraan, Ziyad

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade, various studies have linked pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn), a fruit native to the Middle East, with type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. This review focuses on current laboratory and clinical research related to the effects of pomegranate fractions (peels, flowers, and seeds) and some of their active components on biochemical and metabolic variables associated with the pathologic markers of type 2 diabetes. This review systematically presents findings from cell culture and animal studies as well as clinical human research. One key mechanism by which pomegranate fractions affect the type 2 diabetic condition is by reducing oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. This reduction may occur by directly neutralizing the generated reactive oxygen species, increasing certain antioxidant enzyme activities, inducing metal chelation activity, reducing resistin formation, and inhibiting or activating certain transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased significantly by punicic acid, methanolic seed extract, and pomegranate peel extract. Known compounds in pomegranate, such as punicalagin and ellagic, gallic, oleanolic, ursolic, and uallic acids, have been identified as having anti-diabetic actions. Furthermore, the juice sugar fraction was found to have unique antioxidant polyphenols (tannins and anthocyanins), which could be beneficial to control conditions in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide evidence for the anti-diabetic activity of pomegranate fruit; however, before pomegranate or any of its extracts can be medically recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, controlled, clinical studies, are needed. PMID:23684435

  10. Diabetic polyneuropathy. Axonal or demyelinating?

    PubMed

    Valls-Canals, J; Povedano, M; Montero, J; Pradas, J

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy is the most common subgroup of diabetic neuropathy, but its nature is controversial as it might be demyelinating and/or axonal. We have tried to determine whether diabetic polyneuropathy is electrophysiologically axonal, demyelinating, or both. We have studied the sural and peroneal nerves and the electromyographies of leg muscles in 50 healthy subjects (average age 67.2 years, range 45 to 84 years), in 50 diabetic patients (average age 66.34 years, range 44 to 82 years) showing no symptoms and/or signs of polyneuropathy (DP1), and in 50 diabetic patients (average age 67.10 years, range 49 to 87 years) showing symptoms and/or signs of polyneuropathy (DP2). The amplitude (AMP) of sural and peroneal nerves in healthy and DP1 subjects was similar. Conduction velocity (CV) of sural and peroneal nerves was slower in DP1 subjects than in healthy subjects. DP2 subjects showed AMP and CV values significantly lower than those in DP1 subjects, and signs of acute and chronic denervation/reinervation were found in the leg muscles. We believe that this result indicates that diabetic patients have two types of polyneuropathies: a demyelinating disease that could appear in diabetic patients with and without symptoms of polyneuropathy, and an axonal loss that is responsible for most of the symptoms.

  11. Neutrophils in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Aimin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. It occurs as the consequence of destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells triggered by genetic and environmental factors. The initiation and progression of the disease involves a complicated interaction between β-cells and immune cells of both innate and adaptive systems. Immune cells, such as T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, have been well documented to play crucial roles in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. However, the particular actions of neutrophils, which are the most plentiful immune cell type and the first immune cells responding to inflammation, in the etiology of this disease might indeed be unfairly ignored. Progress over the past decades shows that neutrophils might have essential effects on the onset and perpetuation of type 1 diabetes. Neutrophil-derived cytotoxic substances, including degranulation products, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and extracellular traps that are released during the process of neutrophil maturation or activation, could cause destruction to islet cells. In addition, these cells can initiate diabetogenic T cell response and promote type 1 diabetes development through cell-cell interactions with other immune and non-immune cells. Furthermore, relevant antineutrophil therapies have been shown to delay and dampen the progression of insulitis and autoimmune diabetes. Here, we discuss the relationship between neutrophils and autoimmune type 1 diabetes from the aforementioned aspects to better understand the roles of these cells in the initiation and development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27181374

  12. [Atypical neuropathies associated with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lozeron, P

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of neuropathy worldwide and, due to the epidemic progression of the affection, prevalence of diabetic neuropathies will increase in the near future. Beside the typical diabetic neuropathy pattern and the common entrapment neuropathies, several unusual clinical forms have been described with either a symmetrical or an asymmetrical pattern. Treatment-induced neuropathy is an acute sensory affection most commonly related to acute glycemic control. Pain is debilitating and associated with vegetative dysfunction. Prevention is important, as resolution is often incomplete. Several patterns or asymmetrical neuropathies of inflammatory and ischemic origin were described long ago in the lower limb. They are debilitating, most often painful and require steroid treatment. Other patterns affecting the thoracolumbar region or the upper limbs or involving a painless motor deficit must be identified as specific treatments are sometimes needed. An association between diabetes and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has not been demonstrated but diagnosis may be suggested due to the misleading low conduction velocities seen in classical diabetic neuropathy. Like any other patient, the diabetic patient may present a neuropathy unrelated to diabetes. To facilitate patient care, neurologists should be aware of such clinical entities. PMID:25459114

  13. [Quality of life in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Catalano, D; Martines, G F; Spadaro, D; Di Corrado, D; Crispi, V; Di Nuovo, S; Trovato, G M

    2004-05-01

    Different clinical features of diabetic patients and type of complications are certainly a critical components of the global individual perception of quality of life (qol); but also personal socio-cultural characteristics interfere concurrently. Qol in diabetes was assessed considering disease grade, complications and level of instruction in a population of 100 diabetic patients (30 m, 70 f), aged 66.99 +/- 13.68 years. Two questionnaires were administered to all patients; Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and Functional Living Index (FLI). SIP is an index of psycho-social, physical and motor functionality; FLI derives from a scale devised for cancer patients and adapted to diabetic patients. Both were analysed by Spearman correlation test, and assayed vs. sociocultural profile and clinical symptoms. Neuro-muscular ailments were more prevalent in women; men experience severe limitations of working capacities an relational possibilities, with severe discomfort. In the whole, higher scores of SIP (greater disability p: ns) and lower score for FLI (scant well-being perception r = 0.29: p<0.01) are related with lower school instruction level. Global QOL score is related as well with degree of instruction (r = 0.22: p<0.03). So QOL is altered during chronic diseases: however, in diabetes, qol impairment does not seem related with severity, treatment features and complications of diabetes. Socio-cultural elements, and particularly instruction level quantified as school grades achieved, interfere with the manner of living diabetic disease.

  14. Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep; Kumar, Arun

    2016-09-01

    Prevention of Gestational diabetes mellitus holds the key to prevention of the diabetes and metabolic syndrome epidemic sweeping the world. This review discusses prevention of gestational diabetes and provides a scientific framework for the study of this topic. It classifies prevention in various ways, and suggests strategies which fit the different levels of prevention of gestational diabetes. The review also cites recent evidence and best practices to support the feasibility of prevention of gestational diabetes. PMID:27582141

  15. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  16. Risk taking among diabetic clients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H; Schwartz-Barcott, D; Patterson, B

    1992-01-01

    Diabetic clients must make daily decisions about their health care needs. Observational and anecdotal evidence suggests that vast differences exist between the kinds of choices diabetic clients make and the kinds of chances they are willing to take. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a diabetic risk-assessment tool. This instrument, which is based on subjective expected utility theory, measures risk-prone and risk-averse behavior. Initial findings from a pilot study of 18 women clients who are on insulin indicate that patterns of risk behavior exist in the areas of exercise, skin care, and diet. PMID:1729123

  17. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J; Rhodes, J M; Kølendorf, K

    1982-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from the healthy individuals. Phagocytosis of Candida albicans was decreased in the monocytes from the patients, whereas pinocytosis of acridine and phagocytosis of latex and sheep red blood cells were normal. The chemotactic response towards casein was enhanced. The possible consequences of these findings for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed.

  18. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors. The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  19. Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication of pregnancy. It is usually transient, being due to increased placental production of vasopressinase that inactivates circulating vasopressin. Gestational, transient DI occurs late in pregnancy and disappears few days after delivery. Acquired central DI can also occur during pregnancy, for example in a patient with hypophysitis or neuroinfundibulitis during late pregnancy or postpartum. Finally, pre-existing central or nephrogenic DI may occasionally be unmasked by pregnancy. Treatment with dDAVP (desmopressin, Minirin(®)) is very effective on transient DI of pregnancy and also on pre-existing or acquired central DI. Contrary to vasopressin, dDAVP is not degraded by vasopressinase. Nephrogenic DI is insensitive to dDAVP and is therefore more difficult to treat during pregnancy if fluid intake needs to be restricted. PMID:27172867

  20. Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication of pregnancy. It is usually transient, being due to increased placental production of vasopressinase that inactivates circulating vasopressin. Gestational, transient DI occurs late in pregnancy and disappears few days after delivery. Acquired central DI can also occur during pregnancy, for example in a patient with hypophysitis or neuroinfundibulitis during late pregnancy or postpartum. Finally, pre-existing central or nephrogenic DI may occasionally be unmasked by pregnancy. Treatment with dDAVP (desmopressin, Minirin(®)) is very effective on transient DI of pregnancy and also on pre-existing or acquired central DI. Contrary to vasopressin, dDAVP is not degraded by vasopressinase. Nephrogenic DI is insensitive to dDAVP and is therefore more difficult to treat during pregnancy if fluid intake needs to be restricted.

  1. Visceral obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P; Rosmond, R

    1999-01-01

    Visceral obesity is a strong predictor of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes and is associated with insulin resistance. In addition, research has indicated that the accumulation of visceral fat is regulated by endocrine mechanisms. Data suggest that progressive malfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with elevation of levels of cortisol and reductions in levels of sex steroids and growth hormone, is associated with visceral accumulation of fat that contributes to circulating levels of free fatty acids, and that these factors are implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, failure of central feedback control of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid receptors (GR) appears to be correlated with polymorphisms near the first exons of the GR gene. The HPA axis disturbances are similar to those seen after prolonged exposure to environmental stress. Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors, alcohol, depressive traits and anxiety are linked to HPA axis abnormalities.

  2. Diabetes insipidus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) in pregnancy is a heterogeneous syndrome, most classically presenting with polyuria and polydipsia that can complicate approximately 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. The presentation can involve exacerbation of central or nephrogenic DI during pregnancy, which may have been either overt or subclinical prior to pregnancy. Women without preexisting DI can also be affected by the actions of placental vasopressinase which increases in activity between the 4th and 38th weeks of gestation, leading to accelerated metabolism of AVP and causing a transient form of DI of pregnancy. This type of DI may be associated with certain complications during pregnancy and delivery, such as preeclampsia. Management of DI of pregnancy depends on the pathophysiology of the disease; forms of DI that lack AVP can be treated with desmopressin (DDAVP), while forms of DI that involve resistance to AVP require evaluation of the underlying causes.

  3. A look inside the diabetic brain: Contributors to diabetes-induced brain aging.

    PubMed

    Wrighten, Shayna A; Piroli, Gerardo G; Grillo, Claudia A; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2009-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from diabetes is a problem that is gaining more acceptance and attention. Recent evidence suggests morphological, electrophysiological and cognitive changes, often observed in the hippocampus, in diabetic individuals. Many of the CNS changes observed in diabetic patients and animal models of diabetes are reminiscent of the changes seen in normal aging. The central commonalities between diabetes-induced and age-related CNS changes have led to the theory of advanced brain aging in diabetic patients. This review summarizes the findings of the literature as they relate to the relationship between diabetes and dementia and discusses some of the potential contributors to diabetes-induced CNS impairments.

  4. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. PMID:27598916

  5. [Diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Salacz, Pál; Csibri, Eva

    2011-03-27

    The incidence of Alzheimer's disease and diabetes is increasing with age. Thus, in light of demographic change and aging societies, they are becoming a growing issue for public health. Further, there are linkages between the two diseases. In particular, risk assessment studies suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor of Alzheimer's disease. Hence, even though Alzheimer's disease can only be influenced to a limited extent, optimal treatment of diabetes mellitus may have also a positive effect on Alzheimer's disease. While the relationship between the two diseases is not yet completely clear, in addition to the known vascular effects of diabetes mellitus recent results shed light on central nervous system effects directly influencing the neurodegenerative process. Treatment of central insulin resistance, a phenomenon explored in recent years, may be a promising avenue, not only in addressing metabolic disorder, but also Alzheimer's disease.

  6. [Surgery for diabetes type 2?].

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus K; Nocito, A; Schiesser, M

    2010-02-17

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence in western society. Obesity represents a well established risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. Several studies on surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity have shown a postoperative reduction of obesity-related co-morbidities. Thus, diabetes mellitus type 2 was shown to resolve or improve in more than 75% of morbidly obese patients (BMI >35) after bariatric surgery. These insights paved the way for the advent of metabolic surgery - a novel field with the goal to improve glucose metabolism in patients with a BMI of less than 35. Encouraging results from mostly observational studies have sparked the interest in the surgical management of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  7. [Perioperative management of diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Carles, Michel; Raucoules-Aimé, Marc

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising and diabetics may soon represent more than 5% of the world population. The type 2 diabetes is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. The screening for silent myocardial ischemia (IMS) must be systematic. The autonomic dysfunction and the cardiac microcirculatory disorders are at risk of hypotension and hypothermia during anesthesia. After 10 years of diabetes duration the incidence of perioperative complications and of difficult intubation are increased. The neurological deficits related to anesthesia are associated with general anesthesia in 85% of cases. Particular care will be provided during the surgical procedure to avoid skin, muscular and neurologic cuts. In most cases, the regional anesthesia will be preferred to general anesthesia. To avoid hypoglycemia, blood glucose concentration less than 11 mmol.L(-1)(2g.L(-1)) seems a reasonable target during and after surgery.

  8. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  9. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your ... you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to ...

  10. Diabetes and obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David

    2011-02-01

    An epidemic of obesity is affecting growing numbers of women in their childbearing years increasing their risk of obstetric complications including diabetes, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, some malformations, macrosomia and the need for obstetric intervention. There is growing evidence that maternal obesity may increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in the offspring. Obesity and diabetes in pregnancy have independent and additive effects on obstetric complications, and both require management during pregnancy. Management of obesity including weight loss and physical activity prior to pregnancy is likely to be beneficial for mother and baby, although the benefits of bariatric surgery remain unclear at this time. Limiting gestational weight gain to 5-9 kg among pregnant obese women is likely to improve obstetric outcomes, but how to achieve this remains an active area of research. If gestational diabetes develops, there is good evidence that clinical management reduces the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration. PMID:27302713

  12. Living With Diabetes: Foot Care

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  13. Chromatin modifications associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keating, Samuel T; El-Osta, Assam

    2012-08-01

    Accelerated rates of vascular complications are associated with diabetes mellitus. Environmental factors including hyperglycaemia contribute to the progression of diabetic complications. Epidemiological and experimental animal studies identified poor glycaemic control as a major contributor to the development of complications. These studies suggest that early exposure to hyperglycaemia can instigate the development of complications that present later in the progression of the disease, despite improved glycaemic control. Recent experiments reveal a striking commonality associated with gene-activating hyperglycaemic events and chromatin modification. The best characterised to date are associated with the chemical changes of amino-terminal tails of histone H3. Enzymes that write specified histone tail modifications are not well understood in models of hyperglycaemia and metabolic memory as well as human diabetes. The best-characterised enzyme is the lysine specific Set7 methyltransferase. The contribution of Set7 to the aetiology of diabetic complications may extend to other transcriptional events through methylation of non-histone substrates. PMID:22639343

  14. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  15. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  16. [Infection complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to be suspected to be immunocompromized hosts. Many reports have pointed out that diabetic patients are susceptible to certain infections such as surgical site infections, malignant otitis externa, mucormycosis, and necrotizing fasciitis. But their etiology seems to be non-uniform, heterogenous and individualized. Above all, obesity-related infections are also increasing accompanied with the recent rising incidence of obesity. Further studies should be addressed about the relationships between infections and diabetes which include the factors of body mass index, life style, degree of diabetes complications, and poor glycemic control duration. They could live a normal life the same as healthy subjects if good glycemic control is achieved without hypoglycemia. PMID:26666157

  17. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... of diabetes management is reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high lipid levels, and tobacco use. Patient education and self-care practices also are important aspects ...

  18. Cognitive Interventions for Older Diabetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sheila; Scogin, Forrest

    1998-01-01

    Older diabetic adults should receive memory training to improve their compliance with medication taking. The intervention should include comprehensible medical instructions, assistance with remembering the nutritional values of food, and higher order skills for disease management. (SK)

  19. Multifocal electroretinogram in diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkader, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To identify local retinal abnormalities and evaluate the nature and extent of retinal dysfunction in diabetics using full field electroretinogram (ERG) and multifocal ERG (MF-ERG) and to determine the correlation between features of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and MF-ERG. Methods Twenty-eight normal subjects (Control Group; 56 eyes) and 37 patients (72 eyes) with diabetes mellitus (DM Group) were evaluated. In the DM Group, 17 eyes had no retinopathy (grade 1), 18 eyes had early non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) (grade 3), 16 eyes had late NPDR (grade 4), 21 eyes had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (grade 5). Full field ERG and MF-ERG, were used to assess the effects of diabetic retinopathy on retinal function. OCT and fluorescein angiography were used to assess and compare morphological changes with functional changes in diabetes mellitus. Results In diabetic patients without retinopathy (17 eyes), the amplitudes of the second order component of MF-ERG were reduced and implicit times were delayed, while only implicit times of first order component of MF-ERG were delayed but the amplitudes of first order component were normal. In diabetic patients with retinopathy (55 eyes), the overall amplitudes were reduced and peak implicit time increased in the first order component and second order component. OCT of the DM Group showed the fovea of eyes with edema were thicker than the Normal Group. The fovea of eyes with cystoid macular edema (CME) were significantly thicker than the fovea of eyes with diffuse swelling. The implicit times of MF-ERG were directly correlated with foveal thickness. Conclusion MF-ERG reveals local retinal dysfunction in diabetic patients. MF-ERG offers the advantage of topographic mapping of retinal dysfunction. The magnitude of delay of MF-ERG implicit time reflects the degree of local clinical abnormalities in eyes with retinopathy. Local response delays found in eyes without retinopathy detects subclinical

  20. [Diabetes mellitus and cognitive decline].

    PubMed

    Iglseder, Bernhard

    2011-11-01

    From large epidemiological studies, it has been demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for cognitive decline: Compared to healthy controls, patients with diabetes perform worse on cognitive tests, they experience a pronounced cognitive decline over time and have a higher incidence of dementia. Mechanisms contributing to cognitive decline include vascular damage, negative consequences of hypo- and hyperglycemia, and various dysfunctions in insulin action, summarized as insulin resistance. Possible targets for prevention and treatment of cognitive decline have attracted scientific attention.

  1. Stem cell applications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and the World Health Organization (WHO) expects that the number of diabetic patients will increase to 300 million by the year 2025. Patients with diabetes experience decreased insulin secretion that is linked to a significant reduction in the number of islet cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology that, in addition to β cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β cell de-differentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. The success achieved over the last few years with islet transplantation suggests that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient β cells. These observations are proof of the concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes or other diseases not only by cell transplantation but also by stem cells. An increasing body of evidence indicates that, in addition to embryonic stem cells, several potential adult stem/progenitor cells derived from the pancreas, liver, spleen, and bone marrow could differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro or in vivo. However, significant controversy currently exists in this field. Pharmacological approaches aimed at stimulating the in vivo/ex vivo regeneration of β cells have been proposed as a way of augmenting islet cell mass. Overexpression of embryonic transcription factors in stem cells could efficiently induce their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. A new technology, known as protein transduction, facilitates the differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Recent progress in the search for new sources of β cells has opened up several possibilities for the development of new treatments for diabetes.

  2. [Living with diabetes during adolescence].

    PubMed

    Jacquin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Teenagers undergo a period of rapid transformations, on a physical, psychological and social level. Diabetes, at this age, risks undermining these processes due to the constraints of the treatment and the teenagers' increased dependence, notably on their parents. The nursing teams need to be vigilant in helping the teenager and their parents overcome these obstacles, while preserving their future through proper control of the diabetes. PMID:26776693

  3. Sarcopenia, Frailty, and Diabetes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Populations are aging and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing tremendously. The number of older people with diabetes is increasing unexpectedly. Aging and diabetes are both risk factors for functional disability. Thus, increasing numbers of frail or disabled older patients with diabetes will increase both direct and indirect health-related costs. Diabetes has been reported as an important risk factor of developing physical disability in older adults. Older people with diabetes have lower muscle mass and weaker muscle strength. In addition, muscle quality is poorer in diabetic patients. Sarcopenia and frailty have a common soil and may share a similar pathway for multiple pathologic processes in older people. Sarcopenia is thought to be an intermediate step in the development of frailty in patients with diabetes. Thus, early detection of sarcopenia and frailty in older adults with diabetes should be routine clinical practice to prevent frailty or to intervene earlier in frail patients. PMID:27098509

  4. Associations and Risk Factors of Diabetic Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Islam, M M; Ali, M; Naher, Z U; Akhanda, A H; Motaleb, M A; Uddin, M S; Islam, M R

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic maculopathy is characterised by increased capillary leakage in the main retinal vessels and by alterations in the microcirculation of the macula. Maculopathy occurs frequently in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Prevalence is higher in type 2 than in type 1 diabetic patients. Factors associated with the development of maculopathy are mostly unknown. As maculopathy is the main cause of vision deprivation in diabetic patients it is essential to know the associations and risk factors of diabetic maculopathy so that appropriate measures can be taken to prevent as well as treat diabetic maculopathy. We started the research work to find out the relation between diabetic maculopathy and various associated factors and risk factors for patients with diabetic retinopathy with maculopathy. This cross-sectional observational study done at the Department of Ophthalmology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka & National Institute of Ophthalmology & Hospital (NIO & H), Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2006 to June 2006. In this study out of 50 patients, diabetes was controlled in 20(40%) patients and uncontrolled in 30(60%). A significant percentage of patients (40%) had elevated blood pressure. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 24% cases and polyneuropathy was observed in 36% cases. It is evident that diabetic maculopathy has association with dyslipidaemia, abnormal renal function due to nephropathy. This study lighted on the association of diabetic maculopathy with diabetic nephropathy, cardiac abnormalities and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27277354

  5. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  6. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  7. The endothelium in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Advani, Andrew; Gilbert, Richard E

    2012-03-01

    The long-term complications of diabetes are characterized by pathologic changes in both the microvasculature and conduit vessels. Although the fenestrated glomerular endothelium classically has been viewed as providing little in the way of an impediment to macromolecular flow, increasing evidence illustrates that this is not the case. Rather, hyperglycemia-mediated endothelial injury may predispose to albuminuria in diabetes both through direct effects and through bidirectional communication with neighboring podocytes. Although neo-angiogenesis of the glomerular capillaries may be a feature of early diabetes, particularly in the experimental setting, loss of capillaries in the glomerulus and in the interstitium are key events that each correlate closely with declining glomerular filtration rate in patients with diabetic nephropathy. The hypoxic milieu that follows the microvascular rarefaction provides a potent stimulus for fibrogenesis, leading to the glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis that characterize advanced diabetic kidney disease. Given the pivotal role the endothelium plays in both the development and the progression of diabetic nephropathy we need effective strategies that prevent its loss or accelerate its regeneration. Such advances likely will lead not only to improved tissue oxygenation and reduced fibrosis, but also to improved long-term renal function. PMID:22617769

  8. The hypertension-diabetes continuum.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Bernard M Y

    2010-04-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes are both common chronic conditions that affect a major proportion of the general population. They tend to occur in the same individual, suggesting common predisposing factors, which can be genetic or environmental. Although the genes causing hypertension or diabetes await elucidation, the environmental causes of these diseases are well known. Obesity and physical activity are the 2 leading factors that predispose to both diseases. Individuals with abdominal obesity are likely to develop lipid abnormalities and elevation of blood pressure and glucose. In time, hypertension and diabetes ensue. Because of the shared etiology, there is substantial overlap between hypertension and diabetes. In the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study, 40% of the subjects in the community had either raised blood pressure or raised blood glucose. Only 42% of people with diabetes had normal blood pressure and only 56% of people with hypertension had normal glucose tolerance. The presence of hypertension or diabetes should alert the clinician to the possibility of the other condition. Obesity, lipid abnormalities, raised blood pressure, and glucose are all components of the metabolic syndrome. The syndrome therefore implies a pathologic process, which is potentially reversible in the early stages. Previous efforts targeting smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia have started to bear fruit. However, obesity is on the increase in developed and developing countries. It is now time to focus on obesity and the metabolic syndrome, which require more a public health than a pharmacologic approach. PMID:20422737

  9. [Therapy of diabetes mellitus today].

    PubMed

    Seige, K; Ulrich, E

    1975-05-01

    The therapy of diabetes mellitus is always connected with the observation of an adapted diet, the aim of which is the obtaining of the optimal weight. Still more intensive concentric educational measures for patients and persons endangered by diabetes are necessary, in which cases muscular action is of increasing importance. Sulfonylureas furthering the secretion of insulin are to be used only as far as necessary. Peripherally acting anti-diabetics, such as biguanides have an indication in diabetes mellitus which is exactly defined and to be observed. Also with regard to the combat against adiposity their influence on the lipometabolism needs further clarification. Metabolic and immunologic insulin resistance are complications of the insulin therapy. The extensive technical preparation of the human synthetic insulin may contribute to the improvement of the prognosis of diabetes. At present the introduction of artifical beta-cell-systems is a problem of the diminishing of the apparatuses. The genetic consultation for diabetics is important and in many cases possible.

  10. Pancreas transplantation in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Pozza, G; Di Carlo, V

    1989-01-01

    After a brief historical background on pancreas transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, this review deals with the major surgical, pharmacological and functional aspects of this approach. In the Authors' opinion pancreas transplantation should be proposed only when the end-stage renal failure (ESRF), due to diabetic nephropathy, needs kidney transplantation. By using injection of polymers (mainly neoprene) into the pancreatic ducts, or urinary diversion of pancreatic juice and appropriate immunosuppressive therapy (cyclosporin, corticosteroids and azathioprine), dramatic advantages have been achieved in the last years, so that a satisfactory segmental or total pancreas graft survival on one hand, and the early graft rejection recognition on the other have been presently obtained. A prompt and good functional activity of pancreas graft has also been demonstrated by the Authors in successfully transplanted patients. As far as chronic diabetic complications are concerned, no conclusive results have been reported up to now; it is noteworthy, however, that pancreas transplantation may preserve the transplanted kidney from a relapse of diabetic nephropathy. The combined pancreas-kidney transplantation may actually be considered as a correct solution to the problem of diabetic patients with ESRF. Moreover, careful selection of patients, appropriate surgical technique and experienced immunosuppressive treatment are the major prerequisites to achieve a satisfactory improvement of diabetic status in addition to that of renal failure.

  11. [Caries status in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, M; Bánóczy, J; Dinya, E; Tamás, G

    1991-09-01

    Clinical dental examination of 1600 diabetics (815 type 1 insulin dependent and 761 type 2 non-insulin dependent patients) has been performed according to the WHD criteria. According to examination results higher DMF mean value, less uncared of teeth with caries (D) and, in the age group of 19 years and above 30 years, more edentulousness has been found than with healthy individuals. The number of filled and crowded teeth (F) below the age of 35 years in diabetics (p 0.0001), above 45 years in the control group (p 0.0001) was higher. Concerning cared of teeth there was no deviation in the number of filled teeth between diabetic and healthy individuals whereas the number of crown covered teeth was higher with diabetics. (p 0.01). As to the distribution of individuals with healthy teeth and toothless ones it was found characteristic that while among diabetic individuals but 1%, in the control 1.4% possessed retained healthy teeth. The number of completely toothless individuals was higher (11.83%) with diabetics than with healthy individuals (2.25%).

  12. FDA OKs New Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Type 2 Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Type 2 About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  13. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  14. [Diabetes mellitus in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Górska, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes increase in the elderly. Ageing is one of the most important factors contributing to development of glucose intolerance (insuline resistance). NHANES II data showed that in the poppulation over 65 years 18.7% has got overt diabetes and 22.8% glucose intolerance. Similar data were obtained among ageing inhabitants of the city of Bialystok (downtown). The criteria of diagnosis of diabetes in the elderly are the same like in the younger population. However, in the elderly the clinical symptoms are not characteristic and scanty (limited). The period without symptoms is long. Very often, the diabetes is diagnosed for the first time in patient with the heart infarct, brain stroke, diabetic foot or even hyperosmolar coma. There may occur two critical situations in the elderly diabetic persons, namely non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycameia. The non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma is a result of a considerable elevation in the blood concentration of glucose, sodium and urea. This, in turn, is a consequence of osmotic diuresis which is non balanced by elevation in the volume of water intake. Factors facilitating development of the coma include: nontreated diabetes, infirmity, inadequate care, diuretics, stroke, hyperthermia. Hypoglycaemia in the elderly is a very serious problem. It can cause arrhythmia, a rise in the blood pressure, unconsciousness, falls and injuries. The most often reason of hypoglycaemia in the elderly are: long-acting derivatives of sulphonylurea, treatment with insulin and irregular meals. The major aims of treatment of diabetes in the elderly are: reduction of hyperglycaemia, reduction in the development of complications and minimizing of the risk of hypoglycaemia. An elderly patient with diabetes should have each year a check-up which would include examination of the eyes, kidneys, feet. The elderly patient with diabetes is often crippled, indolent and lives often alone. Therefore, such a patient should be taken care of

  15. Electrochemistry in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Heller, Adam; Feldman, Ben

    2010-07-20

    Diabetes devastates lives and burdens society. Hypoglycemic (low glucose) episodes cause blackouts, and severe ones are life-threatening. Periods of hyperglycemia (high glucose) cause circulatory disease, stroke, amputations, blindness, kidney failure and nerve degeneration. In this Account, we describe the founding of TheraSense, now a major part of Abbott Diabetes Care, and the development of two products that have improved the lives of people with diabetes. The first, a virtually painless microcoulometer (300 nL volume), the FreeStyle blood glucose monitoring system, was approved by the FDA and became available in 2000. In 2009, this system was used in more than one billion blood assays. The second, the enzyme-wiring based, subcutaneously-implanted FreeStyle Navigator continuous glucose monitoring system, was approved by the FDA and became available in the United States in 2008. The strips of the FreeStyle blood glucose monitoring system comprise a printed parallel plate coulometer, with a 50 microm gap between two facing printed electrodes, a carbon electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The volume of blood between the facing plates is accurately controlled. The glucose is electrooxidized through catalysis by a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and an Os(2+/3+) redox mediator, which is reduced by the glucose-reduced enzyme and is electrooxidized on the carbon electrode. Initially the system used pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent GDH but now uses flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent GDH. Because the facing electrodes are separated by such a small distance, shuttling of electrons by the redox couple could interfere with the coulometric assay. However, the Os(2+/3+) redox mediator is selected to have a substantially negative formal potential, between 0.0 and -0.2 V, versus that of the facing Ag/AgCl electrode. This makes the flow of a shuttling current between the two electrodes virtually impossible because the oxidized Os(3+) complex cannot be appreciably

  16. Silent diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Galdo, Patricia Peña; Stanescu, Ramona; Parejo, Leticia; Guerrero, Carmen; Pérez-Fernández, Elia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the risk of renal events in patients with biopsy-proven diabetic nephropathy (DN) and its possible associated factors. METHODS: Clinical and histological data of 60 patients diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy were retrospectively collected. Patients with evidence or suspicion of other nephropathies were excluded from the study. The final event was defined as renal replacement therapy (RRT) initiation or progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to the KDIGO 2012 definition of a decrease in CKD category and a decrease in GFR of 25% or more. RESULTS: A total of 45 patients with a follow-up of at least 3 mo were included. Most of the patients presented type 2 DM, with a mean age of 58.3 years old. The time of evolution of DM was 9.6 ± 7.8 years, although in 13 patients, it was less than 5 years. A total of 62% of patients reached the final event in a median period of 3.4 years (95%CI: 2.1-4.7), with 21 of them requiring dialysis. The factors that were independently associated with renal survival were estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the time of biopsy, cardiovascular disease (CVD) history and HbA1c less than 7%. Therefore, for each 10 mL/min per 1.73 m2 reduction in eGFR, we obtained a DN progression risk of HR = 2 (1.3-3.0) (P = 0.001); patients with CVD were at greater risk for DN progression (HR = 2.8, 1.1-7.1, P = 0.032), and CKD patients with HbA1c < 7% demonstrated greater renal risk than patients with HbA1c ≥ 7%, with an HR of 2.9 (1.0-8.4) (P = 0.054). CONCLUSION: A past history of CVD is a risk factor for DN progression. Levels of HbA1c less than 7% could favor an eGFR decrease in these patients. PMID:24527402

  17. Diabetes - what to ask your doctor - type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 31. Read More Blood sugar test - blood Diabetes and eye disease Diabetes and kidney disease Diabetes and nerve damage Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol ... active Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke ...

  18. You Have Diabetes. How Can You Avoid Serious Eye Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 2030? If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes you’re at risk for developing diabetic retinopathy and other serious eye diseases like glaucoma ... manage your diabetes Are you at risk for type 2 diabetes? Get the facts about diabetes and diabetic eye disease Share Lighthouse Guild Lighthouse Guild 800- ...

  19. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NEGRATO, Carlos Antonio; TARZIA, Olinda; JOVANOVIČ, Lois; CHINELLATO, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. Objective: The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the english and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. Methods: This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in english and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. Results: This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Conclusions: The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes

  20. Common crossroads in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Valitutto, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Data suggest that effective management can reduce the risk for both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In treating patients with diabetes, physicians must be prepared not only to tailor the initial treatment to the individual and his or her disease severity but also to advance treatment as necessary and in step with disease progression. The majority of patients with diabetes are not at goal for glycated hemoglobin A1C, fasting plasma glucose, or postprandial plasma glucose levels. Although lifestyle changes based on improved diet and exercise practices are basic elements of therapy at every stage, pharmacologic therapy is usually necessary to achieve and maintain glycemic control. Oral antidiabetic agents may be effective early in the disease but, eventually, they are unable to compensate as the disease progresses. For patients unable to achieve glycemic control on 2 oral agents, current guidelines strongly urge clinicians to consider the initiation of insulin as opposed to adding a third oral agent. Recent research suggests that earlier initiation of insulin is more physiologic and may be more effective in preventing complications of diabetes. Newer, longer-lasting insulin analogs and the use of simplified treatment plans may overcome psychological resistance to insulin on the part of physicians and patients. This article summarizes the risks associated with uncontrolled fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, briefly reviews the various treatment options currently available for type 2 diabetes, presents case vignettes to illustrate crossroads encountered when advancing treatment, and offers guidance to the osteopathic physician on the selection of appropriate treatments for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:18279520

  1. The diabetic foot: a review.

    PubMed

    Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical findings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach.

  2. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  3. Clinical management of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, K; Jardine, A G

    1999-11-01

    From the viewpoint of nephrologists dealing with diabetic patients with ESRD and the associated complications and devastating prognosis, the need to reduce the incidence, and delay the rate of progression of diabetic nephropathy is obvious. Studies published within the last year have provided support for views that seem intuitively obvious; that improved glycaemic control and reduced blood pressure are associated with delayed onset and delayed progression of diabetic nephropathy. These reports have also demonstrated the difficulty of achieving ideal blood pressure targets and glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Thus, even with available therapy it is likely that improved compliance and achieving targets will have a major impact on disease outcome. There is evidence in several subgroups that ACEi are beneficial over other agents and the favourable side-effect and efficacy profile of these agents makes it reasonable to suggest that they should be used 'first line' in all patients with diabetes unless specifically contra-indicated. However, the failure to readily achieve blood pressure targets and the need for polypharmacy suggest that novel agents are required. We believe that statin therapy will have a major impact on CVD in diabetic patients and is also likely to delay progression; studies assessing the combined affect of anti-hypertensive and statin therapy specifically on the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy will be necessary before evidence-based recommendations can be made. The role for newer agents and targeting high risk groups using genetic markers remains uncertain but we await there development with interest. The future can only get better for patients with DN.

  4. The diabetic foot: a review.

    PubMed

    Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical findings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24126512

  5. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National…

  6. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against diabetes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Anti-diabetic effects of RHSE were evaluated in both the rat insulinoma-1 cell line (INS-1) and diabetic ICR mice induced by inraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. ...

  7. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. A Fact Sheet from the National Diabetes Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes in U.S. children and adolescents may be increasing and many more new cases of type 2 diabetes are being reported in young people. Standards of care for managing children with diabetes issued by the American Diabetes Association in January 2005 provide more guidance than previously given. To update primary care providers and their…

  8. Materials for Diabetes Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; York, Roger L.; Invernale, Michael A.; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the materials and methods used to fabricate closed-loop systems for type 1 diabetes therapy. Herein, we give a brief overview of current methods used for patient care and discuss two types of possible treatments and the materials used for these therapies–(i) artificial pancreases, comprised of insulin producing cells embedded in a polymeric biomaterial, and (ii) totally synthetic pancreases formulated by integrating continuous glucose monitors with controlled insulin release through degradable polymers and glucose-responsive polymer systems. Both the artificial and the completely synthetic pancreas have two major design requirements: the device must be both biocompatible and be permeable to small molecules and proteins, such as insulin. Several polymers and fabrication methods of artificial pancreases are discussed: microencapsulation, conformal coatings, and planar sheets. We also review the two components of a completely synthetic pancreas. Several types of glucose sensing systems (including materials used for electrochemical, optical, and chemical sensing platforms) are discussed, in addition to various polymer-based release systems (including ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyanhydrides, and phenylboronic acid containing hydrogels). PMID:23184741

  9. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-10-25

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder.

  10. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder. PMID:26516410

  11. Immunology of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Maclaren, N

    1992-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes is an autoimmune disease that may be becoming more prevalent. It has a polygenic mode of inheritance with a major gene being present in the HLA DQ locus on chromosome 6. Inferential data suggest that environmental factors may be important to genetic penetrance albeit we still lack proof for involvement of often maligned viruses. Patients with IDD and their families are predisposed to organ-specific autoimmunities which should be routinely screened for. Autoantibodies to insulin, to a beta cell cytoplasmic lipid containing moiety and to a beta cell protein of 64KDa, which is believed to be the GABA forming enzyme GAD, can be used to predict IDD among relatives and probably the general population as well. Immunosuppressive therapy can modify the course of IDD after diagnosis and should be able to delay the clinical onset if given before diagnosis. Rigorous insulin therapy should also be given as needed to control hyperglycemia and avoid glucose toxicity to the islets. Such trials are now underway.

  12. The neuropathic diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, and result in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are likely to be of neuropathic origin and, therefore, are eminently preventable. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identification of causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with nonremovable casts, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patient's adherence to the strategy used for pressure relief.

  13. The diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, resulting in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are more likely to be of neuropathic origin, and therefore eminently preventable. People at greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of the feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identifying the causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with irremovable casting, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patients' adherence to the effectiveness of pressure relief.

  14. Diabetic Mario: Designing and Evaluating Mobile Games for Diabetes Education.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Nandigam, David; Casey, John; Direito, Artur; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, diabetes education has relied on written materials, with limited resources available for children with diabetes. Mobile games can be effective and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed at educating children with diabetes. In this article, we apply our game design to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). We also introduce four heuristics that are specifically designed for evaluating the mobile game, by adapting traditional usability heuristics. Results of a pilot study (n = 12) to evaluate gameplay over 1-week showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle.

  15. Diabetic Mario: Designing and Evaluating Mobile Games for Diabetes Education.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Nandigam, David; Casey, John; Direito, Artur; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, diabetes education has relied on written materials, with limited resources available for children with diabetes. Mobile games can be effective and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed at educating children with diabetes. In this article, we apply our game design to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). We also introduce four heuristics that are specifically designed for evaluating the mobile game, by adapting traditional usability heuristics. Results of a pilot study (n = 12) to evaluate gameplay over 1-week showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle. PMID:27304882

  16. Diabetic Diet - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Diet URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Diet - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  17. We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes: My Future and Theirs We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes "I know everyone can do ... Juaneño Band of California Indians We have the power to help our people and the generations to ...

  18. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Foot URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes and dietary supplements. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Lipids: Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes ... report from the AHRQ focuses on omega-3 fatty acids. Consumer Advisory: Vitamin E Supplements This report from ...

  20. Diabetes and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Pacific Islander > Diabetes Diabetes and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Asian Americans, in general, have the same ... However, there are differences within the Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander population. From a national survey, Native Hawaiians/ ...

  1. Pedal Away from Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... biking late in life, Danish researchers said. "Because cycling can be included in everyday activities, it may ... diabetes. And, the more time the participants spent cycling, the lower their risk for type 2 diabetes, ...

  2. [Proliferative diabetic retinopathy -- therapeutic approach (clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Burcea, M; Muşat, Ovidiu; Mahdi, Labib; Gheorghe, Andreea; Spulbar, F; Gobej, I

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 54 year old pacient diagnosed with neglected insulin dependent diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Surgery was recommended and we practiced posterior vitrectomy, endolaser and heavy silicone oil endotamponade. Post-operative evolution was favorable.

  3. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs. PMID:27601927

  4. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs. PMID:27601927

  5. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... called metabolic syndrome. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes. ... 95th percentile, a person is considered overweight; and obesity occurs when BMI is greater than the 95th ...

  6. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs.

  7. Do statins really cause diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Alaa J.; ElMallah, Ahmed I.; Poushuju, Rita J.; Itani, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate and establish the relationship between the use of statin therapy and the risk of development of diabetes. Methods: PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was searched for randomized controlled end-point trials of statins, with more than 1000 subjects and a minimum of one-year follow-up period, published until August 2015. The odds ratio (OR) of diabetes incidence with overall statin therapy as well as with different statins in question was calculated through random effect meta-analysis model. Results: Fourteen studies were included in the analysis with a total of 94,943 participants. Of these, 2392 subjects developed incident diabetes in the statin and 2167 in the placebo groups during a 4-year follow-up. The OR of diabetes incidence with statin therapy was significantly higher as compared with the placebo group (OR=1.11; 95% confidence interval = 1.0 to 1.2; p=0.007). There was an insignificant level of heterogeneity between the included trials (Cochran Q= 19.463, p=0.109, I2=33.20). Subgroup analysis showed that only 2 statins namely, atorvastatin (OR= 1.29; p=0.042) and rosuvastatin (OR = 1.17; px=0.01) were significantly associated. Conclusion: Statin therapy can slightly increase risk of incident diabetes in subjects with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27652354

  8. [Nutritional therapy in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Toeller, M

    1993-03-01

    Most aspects of the nutritional therapy of diabetes mellitus apply equally to IDDM and NIDDM patients and are also appropriate for people with high risk of cardiovascular diseases. A restriction of energy, a reduction of saturated fatty acids as well as of alcoholic drinks and simple sugars are the most important measures. This modification of nutritional intake together with increased fibre consumption is not only appropriate to avoid hyperglycaemia in diabetic patients but has also its benefits in patients presenting with the metabolic syndrome (possible reduction of hyperinsulinaemia, hypertension and hyperlipoproteinaemia). Diabetic patients should have regular screening for microalbuminuria. At first signs of an early stage of nephropathy patients should be advised to restrict their protein intake. About 50% of daily energy intake should be derived from carbohydrates and fat intake should be no more than 35% of total energy (saturated fatty acids less than 10% of energy). Carbohydrate exchange units are usually not necessary in NIDDM patients. In addition diabetes specialty foods are not an essential part of the nutritional therapy. The success of the nutritional therapy in diabetic patients is substantially dependent upon qualified counselling and education of the patients by the physician (as far as possible with the assistance of a dietitian).

  9. Diabetes and Alpha Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complications. Lipoic acid quenches reactive oxygen species, chelates metal ions, and reduces the oxidized forms of other antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione. It also boosts antioxidant defense system through Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant gene expression and by modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors-regulated genes. ALA inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates AMPK in skeletal muscles, which in turn have a plethora of metabolic consequences. These diverse actions suggest that lipoic acid acts by multiple mechanisms, many of which have only been uncovered recently. In this review we briefly summarize the known biochemical properties of lipoic acid and then discussed the oxidative mechanisms implicated in diabetic complications and the mechanisms by which lipoic acid may ameliorate these reactions. The findings of some of the clinical trials in which lipoic acid administration has been tested in diabetic patients during the last 10 years are summarized. It appears that the clearest benefit of lipoic acid supplementation is in patients with diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22125537

  10. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  11. [Novel biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Araki, Shin-ichi

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. An early clinical sign of this complication is an increase of urinary albumin excretion, called microalbuminuria, which is not only a predictor of the progression of nephropathy, but also an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although microalbuminuria is clinically important to assess the prognosis of diabetic patients, it may be insufficient as an early and specific biomarker of diabetic nephropathy because of a large day-to-day variation and lack of a good correlation of microalbuminuria with renal dysfunction and pathohistological changes. Thus, more sensitive and specific biomarkers are needed to improve the diagnostic capability of identifying patients at high risk. The factors involved in renal tubulo-interstitial damage, the production and degradation of extracellular matrix, microinflammation, etc., are investigated as candidate molecules. Despite numerous efforts so far, the assessment of these biomarkers is still a subject of ongoing investigations. Recently, a variety of omics and quantitative techniques in systems biology are rapidly emerging in the field of biomarker discovery, including proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics, and they have been applied to search for novel putative biomarkers of diabetic nephropathy. Novel biomarkers or their combination with microalbuminuria provide a better diagnostic accuracy than microalbuminuria alone, and may be useful for establishing personal medicine. Furthermore, the identification of novel biomarkers may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  12. The new biology of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pajvani, Utpal B.; Accili, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, type 2 diabetes was seen as a disease caused by an impaired ability of insulin to promote the uptake and utilisation of glucose. Work on forkhead box protein O (FOXO) transcription factors revealed new aspects of insulin action that have led us to articulate a liver- and beta cell-centric narrative of diabetes pathophysiology and treatment. FOXO integrate a surprisingly diverse subset of biological functions to promote metabolic flexibility. In the liver, they controls the glucokinase/glucose-6-phosphatase switch and bile acid pool composition, directing carbons to glucose or lipid utilisation, thus providing a unifying mechanism for the two abnormalities of the diabetic liver: excessive glucose production and increased lipid synthesis and secretion. Moreover, FOXO are necessary to maintain beta cell differentiation, and diabetes development is associated with a gradual loss of FOXO function that brings about beta cell dedifferentiation. We proposed that dedifferentiation is the main cause of beta cell failure and conversion into non-beta endocrine cells, and that treatment should restore beta cell differentiation. Our studies investigating these proposals have revealed new dimensions to the pathophysiology of diabetes that can be leveraged to design new therapies. PMID:26248647

  13. Gut microbiota, probiotics and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic β cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes. PMID:24939063

  14. Mathematical models of diabetes progression.

    PubMed

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Hardy, Thomas; Beck, Benoit; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bue-Valleskey, Juliana; Pørksen, Niels

    2008-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to model mathematically the progression of type 2 diabetes. A realistic representation of the long-term physiological adaptation to developing insulin resistance is necessary for effectively designing clinical trials and evaluating diabetes prevention or disease modification therapies. Writing a good model for diabetes progression is difficult because the long time span of the disease makes experimental verification of modeling hypotheses extremely awkward. In this context, it is of primary importance that the assumptions underlying the model equations properly reflect established physiology and that the mathematical formulation of the model give rise only to physically plausible behavior of the solutions. In the present work, a model of the pancreatic islet compensation is formulated, its physiological assumptions are presented, some fundamental qualitative characteristics of its solutions are established, the numerical values assigned to its parameters are extensively discussed (also with reference to available cross-sectional epidemiologic data), and its performance over the span of a lifetime is simulated under various conditions, including worsening insulin resistance and primary replication defects. The differences with respect to two previously proposed models of diabetes progression are highlighted, and therefore, the model is proposed as a realistic, robust description of the evolution of the compensation of the glucose-insulin system in healthy and diabetic individuals. Model simulations can be run from the authors' web page.

  15. Viruses in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hyöty, Heikki

    2016-07-01

    Environmental factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and can determine if a genetically susceptible individual develops the disease. Increasing evidence suggest that among other exogenous agents certain virus infections can contribute to the beta-cell damaging process. Possible viral etiology of type 1 diabetes has been explored extensively but the final proof for causality is still lacking. Currently, the group of enteroviruses (EVs) is considered as the strongest candidate. These viruses have been found in the pancreas of type 1 diabetic patients, and epidemiological studies have shown more EV infections in diabetic patients than in controls. Prospective studies, such as the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study in Finland, are of fundamental importance in the evaluation viral effects as they can cover all stages of the beta-cell damaging process, including those preceding the initiation of the process. DIPP study has carried out the most comprehensive virological analyses ever done in prospective cohorts. This article summarizes the findings from these analyses and discuss them in the context of the existing other knowledge and the prospects for intervention studies with EV vaccines or antiviral drugs. PMID:27411438

  16. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR). Presenting visual impairment (VI) was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1%) English-speaking and 885 (27.9%) Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p < 0.001) and, among those with diabetes, higher prevalence of DR (36.0 vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001), VTDR (11.0 vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001), and VI (32.4 vs. 14.6%) than English speaking Indians. Oaxaca decomposition analyses showed that the language-related discrepancies (defined as the difference in prevalence between persons speaking different languages) in T2DM, DR, and VTDR could not be fully explained by socioeconomic measures. Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations. PMID:22974298

  17. Polymeric Gene Delivery for Diabetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several polymers were used to delivery genes to diabetic animals. Polyaminobutyl glycolic acid was utilized to deliver IL-10 plasmid DNA to prevent autoimmune insulitis of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. Polyethylene glycol grafted polylysine was combined with antisense glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) MRNA to represent GAD autoantigene expression. GLP1 and TSTA (SP-EX4) were delivered by bioreducible polymer to stop diabetic progression. Fas siRNA delivery was carried out to treat diabetic NOD mice animal. PMID:21977450

  18. Movement disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jagota, Priya; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Lang, Anthony E

    2012-03-15

    Movement disorders are not infrequent in patients with diabetes mellitus. These may occur on the basis of both central and peripheral nervous system dysfunction and can be secondary to severe hyperglycemia, complications of diabetes or its treatment and less often to diseases in which both diabetes and a movement disorder are primary manifestations of the same underlying disease. We present a typical case of a severe movement disorder complicating diabetes as a springboard to review the spectrum of disorders associated with this condition.

  19. Mechanisms by which diabetes increases cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleissner, Christian A.; Galkina, Elena; Nadler, Jerry L.; Ley, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease which is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Increasing prevalence of diabetes and diabetic atherosclerosis makes identification of molecular mechanisms by which diabetes promotes atherogenesis an important task. Targeting common pathways may ameliorate both diseases. This review focuses on well known as well as newly discovered mechanisms which may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:18695749

  20. The diabetic pregnancy: An ultrasonographic perspective.

    PubMed

    Bano, Shahina; Chaudhary, Vikas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of congenital foetal anomalies and perinatal mortality in diabetic pregnancy is much higher than that in the normal pregnancy. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the role of ultrasound in the management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes. The ultrasound has been found to be very useful for foetal surveillance, assessment of diabetes related foetal complications, image guided interventions and in the obstetric management of the pregnancies complicated by diabetes. PMID:27582146

  1. Diabetes care tool puts kids in control.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-07-01

    The nursing team in the children’s diabetes service at Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust has developed an app and website to help children and young people with type 1 diabetes manage the condition. The initiative focuses on using social media to increase peer support. The team were runners up in the 2015 Nursing Standard Excellence in Diabetes Specialist Nursing Award, sponsored by Sanofi Diabetes. PMID:26153945

  2. Nonobese diabetic mice and the genetics of diabetes susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Edward H

    2005-04-01

    The nonobese diabetic mouse spontaneously develops an autoimmune, T-cell-mediated type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common and rare alleles both within a diabetogenic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and multiple non-MHC genes combine to impair normal communication between the innate and acquired immune system, leading to loss of immune tolerance. An understanding of how variable collections of genes interact with each other and with environmental cues offers important insights as to the complexities of T1D inheritance in humans.

  3. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, and optic atrophy. An autosomal recessive syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, F C; Gunn, T

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-one families were selected from the published reports in which the propositus had the triad of juvenile diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, and optic atrophy. The data were consistent with the hypothesis of an autosomal gene which, in the homozygote, causes juvenile diabetes mellitus and one or more of diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and nerve deafness. Heterozygotes appear to have an increased probability of developing juvenile diabetes mellitus. PMID:881709

  4. [The "diabetic foot" syndrome. An overview].

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E

    1999-01-01

    Amputation has been used most frequently to treat the diabetic foot syndrome, occlusive microangiopathy being suspected as the underlying cause. This paradigm is obsolete: most diabetic foot lesions are due to traumatic painless (neuropathic) infections. Evidence is presented for alternative treatment strategies to effectively reduce exorbitant amputation rates in diabetic patients.

  5. STRESS AND ADJUSTMENT IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Sabiha; Singh, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    Stress and adjustment in diabetics is studied in order to know the influence of maladjustment and stress in the causation of the disease. The sample of study consists of 100 diabetics patients, 100 nonpsychosomatic and 100 normal person. Results obtained are discussed in detail. It is concluded that maladjustment and stress are important contributing factors in′ diabetes mellitus. PMID:21455356

  6. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  7. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  8. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Francine R.; Gallivan, Joanne M.; Warren-Boulton, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect about 186,000 youth under age 20. Previously considered an adult disease, type 2 diabetes is becoming increasingly common in overweight minority youth over 10 years of age. Criteria help to identify young people at risk for type 2 diabetes as well as those with the disease. Prevention or delay of type 2 requires…

  9. Parent Perspectives of Diabetes Management in Schools

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Farrah; Stout, Stacey; Alvarez-Salvat, Rose; Fernandez, Michelle; Villa, Manuela; Sanchez, Janine; Eidson, Margaret; Nemery, Robin; Delamater, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate parent reports of the diabetes care support their children receive in school, their concerns about diabetes management in school, and their knowledge of federal laws that protect children with diabetes. In addition, the study explores ethnic and socioeconomic status differences in diabetes management in school. Methods An ethnically heterogeneous sample of 309 parents of children with diabetes was recruited from a community-based and a university-based diabetes outpatient clinic. Parents completed a survey assessing supports their child's school provides for diabetes care, worries about diabetes care in school, and awareness of federal laws that pertain to children with diabetes. Results Many children did not have a written care plan or a nurse at school, but significantly more white children had these supports than Hispanic or black children. Most children were not allowed to check blood glucose levels or administer insulin in class. Most parents were worried about hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in school, and most were not at all or only a little confident in the school's ability to care for diabetes. Most parents were not aware of federal laws, but high-income and white parents were more likely to be aware. Conclusions According to parents in the current study, children receive inadequate diabetes management support in schools. Minority children are less likely to receive supports than white children. Parents are worried about diabetes management in school, but most do not have the knowledge of federal laws necessary to protect their children. PMID:19075081

  10. Exploring diabetes type 1-related stigma

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Samereh; Abazari, Parvaneh; Mardanian, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Background: Empowerment of people with diabetes means integrating diabetes with identity. However, others’ stigmatization can influence it. Although diabetes is so prevalent among Iranians, there is little knowledge about diabetes-related stigma in Iran. The present study explored diabetes-related stigma in people living with type 1 diabetes in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: A conventional content analysis was used with in-depth interview with 26 people with and without diabetes from November 2011 to July 2012. Results: A person with type 1 diabetes was stigmatized as a miserable human (always sick and unable, death reminder, and intolerable burden), rejected marriage candidate (busy spouse, high-risk pregnant), and deprived of a normal life [prisoner of (to must), deprived of pleasure]. Although, young adults with diabetes undergo all aspects of the social diabetes-related stigma; in their opinion they were just deprived of a normal life Conclusion: It seems that in Isfahan, diabetes-related stigma is of great importance. In this way, conducting an appropriate intervention is necessary to improve the empowerment process in people with type 1 diabetes in order to reduce the stigma in the context. PMID:23983731

  11. Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Roberto; Trevisani, Alessio; Tezza, Sara; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Gatti, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Farina, Antonio; Fiorina, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy. PMID:22536216

  12. Canagliflozin-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica; Begum, Tahmina; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are relatively new antihyperglycemic agents that lower renal glucose reabsorption. They are used as adjunctive therapy to standard diabetes treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and sudden-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Use of canagliflozin, a SGLT-2 inhibitor, was determined to be the cause of the DKA. The patient ultimately recovered after 5 days in the intensive care unit. She was changed to long- and short-acting insulins and instructed to avoid canagliflozin. Conclusion: Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective at lowering a patient’s hemoglobin A1C, physicians must be aware of the rare but dangerous potential adverse effect of inducing DKA. This article reports an illustrative case and presents a review of the literature.

  13. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  14. Diabetic gastroparesis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Rayner, Christopher K; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael

    2009-05-29

    Gastric emptying is frequently abnormal in patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms commonly associated with disordered gastric emptying include nausea, vomiting, bloating and epigastric pain, while patients are also at risk of malnutrition, weight loss, impaired drug absorption, disordered glycaemic control and poor quality of life. Although often attributed to the presence of irreversible autonomic neuropathy, acute hyperglycaemia represents a potentially reversible cause of gastric dysfunction in diabetes. Scintigraphy represents the gold standard for measuring gastric emptying. The management of diabetic gastroparesis is less than optimal, partly because the pathogenesis has not been clearly defined. Treatment approaches include dietary modification and optimization of glycaemia, and the use of prokinetic drugs, while novel therapies such as gastric electrical stimulation are the subject of ongoing investigation. PMID:19496627

  15. Canagliflozin-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica; Begum, Tahmina; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are relatively new antihyperglycemic agents that lower renal glucose reabsorption. They are used as adjunctive therapy to standard diabetes treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and sudden-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Use of canagliflozin, a SGLT-2 inhibitor, was determined to be the cause of the DKA. The patient ultimately recovered after 5 days in the intensive care unit. She was changed to long- and short-acting insulins and instructed to avoid canagliflozin. Conclusion: Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective at lowering a patient’s hemoglobin A1C, physicians must be aware of the rare but dangerous potential adverse effect of inducing DKA. This article reports an illustrative case and presents a review of the literature. PMID:27635409

  16. Treatment of diabetes in children

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YI-QING; GAO, MIN; XUE, YING

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus are on the increase in children and adolescents. An increase in T2D is linked to the increasing rates of obesity in children. Usually, in both children and adults, T1D is treated with insulin while T2D is treated with metformin. There are other classes of drugs that are under assessment for their safety and efficacy in relation to pediatric patients. Most of these new drugs, however, have not been studied in children. Thus, the repertoire of drugs that are available to treat diabetes in children is limited. In this review, we outline the current pathology and treatment and future therapies of T1D mellitus and T2D mellitus in children. PMID:27073417

  17. [Cerebral complications of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Aszalós, Zsuzsa

    2007-12-16

    According to WHO data more than 180 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus worldwide and this number could double within 15 years. Normal function of the brain is dependent on continuous supply of glucose. In hypoglycemia, production of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol) increases, the sympathetic system becomes stimulated, and features of neuroglycopenia appear in order to save the homeostasis. Hypoglycemia is an alarming, actually life threatening condition, but the exposure to chronic hyperglycemia has a more detrimental effect on the brain than recurrent exposure to severe hypoglycemia. The active neural response to hyperglycemia induces changes in gene expression and function. The first steps against hyperosmolality are initially adaptive, but later hyperactivation of the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells leads to their structural damage. Changes in hippocampal gene transcription are partially implicated in the deterioration of declarative memory. Neurologically passive shunting of excess glucose through alternative cellular metabolic pathways induces atherogenic, vascular lesions, free radicals, leukoencephalopathy and atrophy of the brain and thus leading to cognitive deficits. In physiological conditions insulin has neuroprotective effect. However, insulin resistance in the central nervous system correlates with insulin resistance in the periphery. Loss of responsiveness to insulin could render neurons more susceptible to neurotoxic insults, the protective effect of insulin diminishes, and apoptosis, neurodegeneration and the resultant cognitive decline are all increased in insulin-resistant patients. Some unclear relations appear between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. Diabetic patients with APOE-4 gene have an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. Prevalence of depression is higher in patients with diabetes mellitus and in turn, depression is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus

  18. Evolution from obesity to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Golay, A; Felber, J P

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus is so closely related that it is worth questioning the possibility of obesity being more than just one diabetes risk factor among others but a factor which participates causally to the development of Type 2 Diabetes on a genetic background. In this review, the evolution of normal glucose tolerance towards impaired glucose tolerance corresponds to the development of compensatory metabolic changes. These compensatory mechanisms are hyperinsulinaemia and postprandial hyperglycaemia which prevents a defect in glucose uptake and especially glucose storage. These compensatory responses are overcome with time and diabetes develops in spite of the hyperinsulinaemia and the hyperglycaemia. The capacity for glucose storage is decreased and cannot be overcome at this stage by increases of both glucose and insulinemic responses. Inhibition of glycogen synthase activity by an increased muscle glycogen concentration is probably more powerful than its stimulation by insulin and glucose and the capacity for glucose storage remains decreased. Finally with time insulin secretion gradually decreases as a consequence of chronic hyperglycaemia and results in full pancreatic decompensation. At this stage hepatic glucose production is increased. The most important factor in the evolution from obesity to diabetes reside in the permanence of the increase in lipid oxidation and mainly in the duration of obesity. An important consequence of permanently high lipid oxidation is the chronic resistance to glucose uptake, initially compensated for by increased plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. A vicious circle starts after insulin resistance to glucose uptake appears, followed by hyperglycaemia blocking the glucose storage system and by the lack of storing capacity leading to a rise in glycaemia. In conclusion, all these metabolic phenomena are appearing in a sequential way, progressively adapting to the deteriorating

  19. [Treatment of elderly diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Rušavý, Zdeněk; Žourek, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes has become a pandemic disease over the past 50 years. Its incidence increases the most rapidly in the senior population, i.e. among people older than 65. In a number of countries 1/4 of the people with diabetes are now older than 65 years. Geriatrics now examines numerous differences regarding the senior patients, which often lead to somewhat different therapeutic procedures as compared to the treatment of other adult patients. This paper aims to show some different aspects of the treatment of an elderly patient with diabetes. The intensity of diabetes treatment in the elderly is mainly defined by the incidence of symptoms caused by diabetic decompensation which negatively affect quality of life and are likely to increase mortality. The treatment goals expressed by HbA1c, fasting and post-prandial glycemia, should be set individually based on age, initial HbA1c, present comorbidities and the level of frailty of an elderly patient. An effort to reduce weight regarding people at an older age is probably inappropriate and maybe even harmful, while physical activity reduces mortality and slows muscle catabolism at every age. Ideal is normal walking for 20-30 minutes a day. Except for "very fit elders" without renal insufficiency, the sulfonylurea treatment is unsuitable and perhaps even harmful. It significantly increases the incidence of different types of hypoglycemia and very likely overall mortality as well. The basis of diabetes treatment for the elderly is the effort to perform any regular exercise. In regard to medication treatment it is recommended to choose metformin or gliptin following the rule "start low, go slow", i.e. start with low medication doses and increase them at a slow pace. The main goal of the treatment is to maintain the good quality of life as long as possible, without symptoms associated with hyperglycemia with minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia development. PMID:25894262

  20. [Intelligent footwear for diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Pataky, Zoltan; Grivon, Daniel; Civet, Yoan; Perriard, Yves

    2016-01-20

    The incidence of diabetic foot ulcerations and lower extremity amputations remains very high and inacceptable. The high risk of ulceration and consequent amputation is strongly related to difficulties to obtain foot off-loading, particularly on long term. Due to the complexity of their utilization, the available foot off-loading devices are underused both by health care providers and patients with very low therapeutic adherence. This article summarizes the foot off-loading in diabetic patients and describes the concept of intelligent footwear we developed, based on continuous measurements and permanent and automatic adaptations of the shoe insole's rigidity.

  1. [Schizophrenia, diabetes mellitus and antipsychotics].

    PubMed

    Gury, C

    2004-01-01

    During the last years, a contribution of antipsychotic drugs in the increase of diabetes prevalence in schizophrenic population has been repetitively suggested. The debate focused mainly on the second-generation antipsychotics. The analysis of the scientific literature indicates however that this discussion is not recent and an increase of diabetes prevalence in schizophrenic populations was already described before the introduction of neuroleptics. Then, after the introduction of the first neuroleptics in the 1950s, an increase of diabetes prevalence was reported among treated patients and the same alarms occurred in the 1990s after the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics. These treatments were related to an increase of glucose tolerance impairment, type II diabetes and diabetic acidoketosis. Recent epidemiological studies have confirmed the increase prevalence of diabetes in schizophrenic patients, particularly in schizophrenic patients before any antipsychotic treatment. Among the suggested mechanisms, there are sedentary life (due to hospitalisation and sedative effects of neuroleptics), food imbalance, shared genetic factors for diabetes and schizophrenia. Moreover, the frequency of the metabolic syndrome is increased in schizophrenic populations. This syndrome associates blood glucose increase, lipid metabolism disorders and android obesity. This could explain--via an increase of the cortisol production--the increase of mortality due to cardiovascular diseases observed in schizoprhenic patients. Thus, it seems well established that schizophrenia is associated with an increased risk for diabetes. It is however more difficult to evaluate the role of antipsychotic treatment as a causative factor of diabetes. Indeed, there are many published case reports or diabetes or diabetic acidoketosis after an antipsychotic treatment, but the level of evidence in controlled trials is low. Many studies were performed on large databases, but were retrospective

  2. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  3. Diabetic Myonecrosis: An Atypical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José Hernán; Torres, Oberto; Mangual García, Michelle M.; Palermo, Coromoto; Miranda, María de Lourdes; González, Eva; Espinoza, Ignacio Chinea; Laboy, Ivan; Miranda, Mirelis; Dávila, Kyrmarie; Tirado, Rafael; Padilla, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic myonecrosis is a frequently unrecognized complication of longstanding and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. The clinical presentation is swelling, pain, and tenderness of the involved muscle, most commonly the thigh muscles. Management consists of conservative measures including analgesia and rest. Short-term prognosis is good, but long-term prognosis is poor with most patients dying within 5 years. Failure to properly identify this condition will expose the patient to aggressive measures that could result in increased morbidity. To our knowledge this is the first case reported in which there was involvement of multiple muscle groups including upper and lower limbs. PMID:23862080

  4. Pituitary gigantism causing diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Alvi, N S; Kirk, J M

    1999-01-01

    Although growth hormone excess (acromegaly) in association with glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus is well documented in adult medicine, it is much less common in the paediatric age group. We report the case of a 13 year-old boy who presented with tall stature secondary to a large growth hormone secreting adenoma of the pituitary gland. Random growth hormone was 630 mIU/l and did not suppress during an oral glucose tolerance test. Following debulking of the tumour, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis requiring insulin treatment, but after further surgery glucose handling returned to normal. He has been started on testosterone to arrest further increase in height. PMID:10614552

  5. Type 1 Diabetes: Current Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kozhakhmetova, Aizhan; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes, resulting from the autoimmune destruction of insulin producing islet beta cells is caused by genetic and environmental determinants. Recent studies agree that counterintuitively, the major genetic susceptibility factors are decreasing in frequency as the incidence of the condition increases. This suggests a growing role for environmental determinants but these have been difficult to identify and our understanding of gene/environment effects are limited. Individuals "at risk" can be identified accurately through the presence of multiple islet autoantibodies and current efforts in type 1 diabetes research focus on improved biomarkers and strategies to prevent or reverse the condition through immunotherapy. PMID:26659804

  6. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot.

  7. A Boon for the Diabetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Diabetics are no longer concerned with scheduling activities around peaking insulin levels since the use of an external pump from Pacesetter Systems, Inc. used to deliver insulin continuously at a preprogrammed individually adjusted rate. The pump wearer can lead a more normal existence, even participate in sports or travel, and there is an even greater benefit. Research indicates that infusion of "short acting" insulin in tiny amounts over a long period - instead of "long- acting" insulin has helped many diabetics achieve better control of blood sugar levels, thereby minimizing the possibility of complications and, in some cases, even halting the progression of complications.

  8. Diabetes in children. Adjusting to normal life as a diabetic.

    PubMed

    Williams, Georgina; Paul, Siba Prosad; Hicks, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes is a chronic childhood condition, presenting with raised blood sugar. The classic signs and symptoms may not be evident early on, especially in younger children, so it is important that health professionals maintain a high level of suspicion about diabetes when presented with non-specific symptoms eg. abdominal pain, lethargy, delayed wound healing, etc. When a child is first diagnosed, not only does the young person and their family have to cope with the emotional impact of diagnosis, but they also need to understand the huge amounts of information given to them. Health care practitioners provide essential support in helping them come to terms with, as well as manage, this condition. In this article we explain how diabetes is diagnosed and some of the common issues that arise in the ongoing care of the young person, with a particular emphasis on managing daily challenges. Community practitioners play a vital role in detecting symptoms early and making a referral, as well as supporting children with diabetes post-diagnosis in the community.

  9. Central nervous system involvement in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Dinesh; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2006-12-01

    Diabetic complications result in much morbidity and mortality and considerable consumption of scarce medical resources. Thus, elucidation of the risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying diabetic complications is important. The effects of diabetes on the central nervous system (CNS) result in cognitive dysfunction and cerebrovascular disease. Treatment-related hypoglycemia also has CNS consequences. Advances in neuroimaging now provide greater insights into the structural and functional impact of diabetes on the CNS. Greater understanding of CNS involvement could lead to new strategies to prevent or reverse the damage caused by diabetes mellitus.

  10. Electrophysiological changes in juvenile diabetics without retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Juen, S; Kieselbach, G F

    1990-03-01

    Several components of the electroretinogram were studied in 31 juvenile diabetics and 15 age-matched normal controls. The diabetic group consisted of 18 patients without retinopathy and 13 with mild background retinopathy. Oscillatory potentials were measured at low-stimulation energies. Significantly reduced amplitudes and component-specific delayed peak implicit times were found in both diabetic groups compared with the data from the controls. Similar results were obtained in the photopic and scotopic electroretinogram. From these findings, we suggest that retinal dysfunction is already present in juvenile diabetics without photographic evidence of retinopathy after a mean duration of diabetes of 7 years. PMID:2310337

  11. The HLA system and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cudworth, A G; Woodrow, J C

    1977-06-01

    There is a significant positive association between insulin dependent diabetes, irrespective of age of onset, and the HLA system, whereas there is no association of HLA antigens with non-insulin dependent diabetes. There is a significant concordance value for HLA antigen frequencies in insulin dependent diabetics from three different centres, indicating that the genes (s) conferring susceptibility to this type of diabetes is possibly present in all "juvenile-onset" diabetics and is in linkage disequilibrium with all the B locus alleles. PMID:892129

  12. Psychosocial Factors in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that is increasing in prevalence globally. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in diabetes, and lifestyle and clinical risk factors do not fully account for the link between the conditions. This article provides an overview of the evidence concerning the role of psychosocial stress factors in diabetes risk, as well as in cardiovascular complications in people with existing diabetes. Several types of psychosocial factors are discussed including depression, other types of emotional distress, exposure to stressful conditions, and personality traits. The potential behavioral and biological pathways linking psychosocial factors to diabetes are presented and implications for patient care are highlighted. PMID:27566328

  13. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Wang, Zhao V.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in our society. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease, a process termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. This disorder is a complex diabetes-associated process characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Here, we review recently derived insights into mechanisms and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21274425

  14. Measurement of β-hydroxybutyrate in cats with nonketotic diabetes mellitus, diabetic ketosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Weingart, Christiane; Lotz, Fabian; Kohn, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). The standard method of detection of ketone bodies is the dipstick method, which detects semiquantitatively acetoacetate, but not β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). The objectives of the current study were to assess the diagnostic utility of β-HB to diagnose diabetic ketosis (DK) and DKA in cats and to establish a cut-off value for the diagnosis of DKA. Sixty-two cats were included in the study. Eleven cats were healthy (group 1); in the remainder of cats (51), a diagnosis of DM was based on hyperglycemia, glucosuria, and increased fructosamine concentrations. Nineteen of 51 cats suffered from nonketotic diabetes mellitus (group 2). In 11 cats, plasma ketone bodies were detected with the dipstick method (diabetic ketosis, group 3). In 21 cats, plasma ketone bodies and metabolic acidosis were present (DKA, group 4). Plasma β-HB was measured in all cats by an enzymatic method (spectrophotometry). A cut-off value for the diagnosis of DKA was calculated based on the receiver operating characteristic curve. In healthy cats, the β-HB concentration ranged from 0 to 0.1 mmol/l; in cats of group 2, from 0 to 0.9 mmol/l (median: 0.1 mmol/l); in cats of group 3, from 0.6 to 6.8 mmol/l (median: 1.7 mmol/l); and in cats of group 4, from 3.8 to 12.2 mmol/l (median: 7.9 mmol/l). A cut-off value of 2.4 mmol/l revealed 100% sensitivity and 87% specificity to diagnose DKA. Beta-hydroxybutyrate is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of diabetic ketosis and DKA in cats.

  15. Diabetes mellitus: The epidemic of the century

    PubMed Central

    Kharroubi, Akram T; Darwish, Hisham M

    2015-01-01

    The epidemic nature of diabetes mellitus in different regions is reviewed. The Middle East and North Africa region has the highest prevalence of diabetes in adults (10.9%) whereas, the Western Pacific region has the highest number of adults diagnosed with diabetes and has countries with the highest prevalence of diabetes (37.5%). Different classes of diabetes mellitus, type 1, type 2, gestational diabetes and other types of diabetes mellitus are compared in terms of diagnostic criteria, etiology and genetics. The molecular genetics of diabetes received extensive attention in recent years by many prominent investigators and research groups in the biomedical field. A large array of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that play a role in the various steps and pathways involved in glucose metabolism and the development, control and function of pancreatic cells at various levels are reviewed. The major advances in the molecular understanding of diabetes in relation to the different types of diabetes in comparison to the previous understanding in this field are briefly reviewed here. Despite the accumulation of extensive data at the molecular and cellular levels, the mechanism of diabetes development and complications are still not fully understood. Definitely, more extensive research is needed in this field that will eventually reflect on the ultimate objective to improve diagnoses, therapy and minimize the chance of chronic complications development. PMID:26131326

  16. DAPD: A Knowledgebase for Diabetes Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Krishnasamy; Jayakumararaj, Ramaraj; Karthikeyan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomics and proteomics provide a solid foundation for understanding the pathogenesis of diabetes. Proteomics of diabetes associated pathways help to identify the most potent target for the management of diabetes. The relevant datasets are scattered in various prominent sources which takes much time to select the therapeutic target for the clinical management of diabetes. However, additional information about target proteins is needed for validation. This lacuna may be resolved by linking diabetes associated genes, pathways and proteins and it will provide a strong base for the treatment and planning management strategies of diabetes. Thus, a web source "Diabetes Associated Proteins Database (DAPD)" has been developed to link the diabetes associated genes, pathways and proteins using PHP, MySQL. The current version of DAPD has been built with proteins associated with different types of diabetes. In addition, DAPD has been linked to external sources to gain the access to more participatory proteins and their pathway network. DAPD will reduce the time and it is expected to pave the way for the discovery of novel anti-diabetic leads using computational drug designing for diabetes management. DAPD is open accessed via following url www.mkarthikeyan.bioinfoau.org/dapd. PMID:26357271

  17. Diabetes mellitus: The epidemic of the century.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Akram T; Darwish, Hisham M

    2015-06-25

    The epidemic nature of diabetes mellitus in different regions is reviewed. The Middle East and North Africa region has the highest prevalence of diabetes in adults (10.9%) whereas, the Western Pacific region has the highest number of adults diagnosed with diabetes and has countries with the highest prevalence of diabetes (37.5%). Different classes of diabetes mellitus, type 1, type 2, gestational diabetes and other types of diabetes mellitus are compared in terms of diagnostic criteria, etiology and genetics. The molecular genetics of diabetes received extensive attention in recent years by many prominent investigators and research groups in the biomedical field. A large array of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that play a role in the various steps and pathways involved in glucose metabolism and the development, control and function of pancreatic cells at various levels are reviewed. The major advances in the molecular understanding of diabetes in relation to the different types of diabetes in comparison to the previous understanding in this field are briefly reviewed here. Despite the accumulation of extensive data at the molecular and cellular levels, the mechanism of diabetes development and complications are still not fully understood. Definitely, more extensive research is needed in this field that will eventually reflect on the ultimate objective to improve diagnoses, therapy and minimize the chance of chronic complications development. PMID:26131326

  18. [Interdisciplinary interaction in vascular diseases of the eye, diabetes and diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Kleophas, W; Dellanna, F

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 is greatly increasing worldwide. An early therapy with intensified control of diabetes and blood pressure is especially important to avoid delayed complications. In addition to diabetic foot syndrome, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy still represent commonly occurring problems. Despite improvements in the quality of care, the targets of the St. Vincent Declaration have still not yet been achieved. Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy show parallels in the course of the disease and in the pathological anatomical alterations which have led to the inauguration of a diabetic renal-retinal syndrome. The ophthalmological assessment of the retina was previously considered to be a diagnostic aid for assessment of diabetic nephropathy; however, nowadays a simple estimation of the glomerular filtration rate using the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formula and determination of microalbuminuria can in contrast give ophthalmologists an early indication of the possible presence of microangiopathic alterations.

  19. Rheumatic pains of previously undiagnosed diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Q; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S; Rajala, U; Uusimäki, A; Kivelä, S L

    1995-01-01

    To identify the early diabetic musculoskeletal symptoms of previously undiagnosed diabetic subjects, a case-control study was carried out. The cases and controls were recruited from a population aged 55 years. Questions concerning the symptoms were asked before the 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). The results show that pain in the right hand was the most prominent symptom among the diabetic women. Pains in the left hand and the shoulders in the diabetic women and pains in the right knee and the right hip joint in the diabetic men tended to be more prevalent than the corresponding symptoms in the controls. The highest prevalence of most musculoskeletal pains occurred in the highest tertile of 2-h OGTT values among women. The conclusion is that the hand pain is closely associated with the development of diabetes and may give clues to an early diagnosis of diabetes in a middle-aged population. PMID:7481588

  20. The diabetic foot management - recent advance.

    PubMed

    Sinwar, Prabhu Dayal

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic ulceration of the foot represents a major global medical, social and economic problem. It is the commonest major end-point of diabetic complications. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in foot ulceration and may act alone, together, or in combination with other factors such as microvascular disease, biomechanical abnormalities, limited joint mobility and increased susceptibility to infection. In the diabetic foot, distal sensory polyneuropathy is seen most commonly. The advent of insulin overcame the acute problems of ketoacidosis and infection, but could not prevent the vascular and neurological complications. Management of diabetic neuropathic ulcer by appropriate and timely removal of callus, control of infection and reduction of weight bearing forces. Management of diabetic ischaemic foot are medical management, surgical management and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of stenosed and occluded lower extremity arteries. Foot ulceration in persons with diabetes is the most frequent precursor to amputation. PMID:25638739