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Sample records for diabetes management system

  1. DEMS - a second generation diabetes electronic management system.

    PubMed

    Gorman, C A; Zimmerman, B R; Smith, S A; Dinneen, S F; Knudsen, J B; Holm, D; Jorgensen, B; Bjornsen, S; Planet, K; Hanson, P; Rizza, R A

    2000-06-01

    Diabetes electronic management system (DEMS) is a component-based client/server application, written in Visual C++ and Visual Basic, with the database server running Sybase System 11. DEMS is built entirely with a combination of dynamic link libraries (DLLs) and ActiveX components - the only exception is the DEMS.exe. DEMS is a chronic disease management system for patients with diabetes. It is used at the point of care by all members of the diabetes team including physicians, nurses, dieticians, clinical assistants and educators. The system is designed for maximum clinical efficiency and facilitates appropriately supervised delegation of care. Dispersed clinical sites may be supervised from a central location. The system is designed for ease of navigation; immediate provision of many types of automatically generated reports; quality audits; aids to compliance with good care guidelines; and alerts, advisories, prompts, and warnings that guide the care provider. The system now contains data on over 34000 patients and is in daily use at multiple sites.

  2. An integrated model for cognitive behavioural therapy for mobile diabetes self-management system.

    PubMed

    Alanzi, T M; Istepanian, R S H; Philip, N

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing clinical evidence that behavioural change theories can help diabetic patients with their diabetic management in providing better education and a healthy lifestyle. In recent years, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has been increasingly used as a key psychological method for studies of behavioural changes for diabetes patients. However, to date, there is no extensive study that addresses the challenges and opportunities on applying CBT models within the mobile diabetes management cycle of care. In this paper, we present a review of the current status of CBT in diabetes management and propose a model for the implementation of CBT Therapy into a mobile diabetes management system by using smart mobile phone technologies.

  3. Complication Reducing Effect of the Information Technology-Based Diabetes Management System on Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Jin-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Ah; Kang, Mi-Ja; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Chang, Sang-Ah; Cha, Bong-Yun; Son, Ho-Young; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Objective We introduced a new information technology-based diabetes management system, called the Internet-based glucose monitoring system (IBGMS), and demonstrated its short-term and long-term favorable effects. However, there has been no report on clinical effects of such a new diabetes management system on the development of diabetic complications so far. This study was used to simulate the complication reducing effect of the IBGMS, given in addition to existing treatments in patients with type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods The CORE Diabetes Model, a peer-reviewed, published, validated computer simulation model, was used to project long-term clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients receiving the IBGMS in addition to their existing treatment. The model combined standard Markov submodels to simulate the incidence and progression of diabetes-related complications. Results The addition of IBGMS was associated with improvements in reducing diabetic complications, mainly microangiopathic complications, including diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and diabetic foot ulcer. The IBGMS also delayed the development of all diabetic complications for more than 1 year. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the simulated IBGMS, compared to existing treatment, was associated with a reduction of diabetic complications. As a result, it provides valuable evidence for practical application to the public in the world. PMID:19885180

  4. Lessons from implementing a combined workflow-informatics system for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Zai, Adrian H; Grant, Richard W; Estey, Greg; Lester, William T; Andrews, Carl T; Yee, Ronnie; Mort, Elizabeth; Chueh, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    Shortcomings surrounding the care of patients with diabetes have been attributed largely to a fragmented, disorganized, and duplicative health care system that focuses more on acute conditions and complications than on managing chronic disease. To address these shortcomings, we developed a diabetes registry population management application to change the way our staff manages patients with diabetes. Use of this new application has helped us coordinate the responsibilities for intervening and monitoring patients in the registry among different users. Our experiences using this combined workflow-informatics intervention system suggest that integrating a chronic disease registry into clinical workflow for the treatment of chronic conditions creates a useful and efficient tool for managing disease.

  5. New trends in diabetes management: mobile telemedicine closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M Elena; Gómez, Enrique J; Gili, Antonio; Gómez, Mónica; García, Gema; del Pozo, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    The rapid growth and development of information technologies over recent years, in the areas of mobile and wireless technologies is shaping a new technological scenario of telemedicine in diabetes. This telemedicine scenario can play an important role for further acceptance by diabetic patients of the existing continuous glucose monitoring systems and insulin pumps with the final goal of improving current therapeutic procedures. This paper describes a Personal Smart Assistant integrated in a multi-access telemedicine architecture for the implementation of a mobile telemedicine closed-loop system for diabetes management. The system is being evaluated within the European Union project named INCA ("Intelligent Control Assistant for Diabetes").

  6. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training (CST) as a part of routine diabetes management. Its aim is to improve diabetic teens' coping and communication skills, healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to ...

  7. Design and Usability Evaluation of Social Mobile Diabetes Management System in the Gulf Region

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes in the Gulf States is one of the highest globally. It is estimated that 20% of the population in the region has been diagnosed with diabetes and according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), five of the IDF’s “top 10” countries for diabetes prevalence in 2011 and projected for 2030 are in this region. In recent years, there have been an increasing number of clinical studies advocating the use of mobile phone technology for diabetes self-management with improved clinical outcomes. However, there are few studies to date addressing the application of mobile diabetes management in the Gulf region, particularly in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), where there is exponential increase in mobile phone usage and access to social networking. Objective The objective of this paper is to present the design and development of a new mobile health system for social behavioral change and management tailored for Saudi patients with diabetes called Saudi Arabia Networking for Aiding Diabetes (SANAD). A usability study for the SANAD system is presented to validate the acceptability of using mobile technologies among patients with diabetes in the KSA and the Gulf region. Methods The SANAD system was developed using mobile phone technology with diabetes management and social networking modules. For the usability study the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction was used to evaluate the usability aspect of the SANAD system. A total of 33 users with type 2 diabetes participated in the study. Results The key modules of the SANAD system consist of (1) a mobile diabetes management module; (2) a social networking module; and (3) a cognitive behavioral therapy module for behavioral change issues. The preliminary results of the usability study indicated general acceptance of the patients in using the system with higher usability rating in patients with type 2 diabetes. Conclusions We found that the acceptability of the system was

  8. Diabetes update: population management.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Deborah R; Slawson, David C; Shaughnessy, Allen

    2013-05-01

    To optimally care for diabetes patients, physicians must adopt a systematic approach to managing the entire panel. At the heart of excellent care is a multidisciplinary health care team working in a patient-centered environment. Options to supplement traditional office visits include shared medical appointments (ie, group visits), patient self-management education, and social media for patient support and education. Educating patients about diabetes is associated with more frequent recommended screening, improved objective measures, cost savings, and improved short-term quality of life, especially when behavioral goal setting is incorporated. Participation in a nurse-led diabetes management program or an outreach program is associated with reduced health care costs and increased receipt of recommended screening and testing for patients with diabetes; implementation of an electronic database or registry system also is associated with these benefits. Some studies show that these interventions are associated with improvements in A1c; however, outcomes data are limited. Formats for group visits vary. Evidence suggests that patients with diabetes who participate in a group education program have lower A1c levels, improved lipid profiles, higher quality of life scores, and improved knowledge about diabetes and problem-solving ability.

  9. Postpartum management of diabetes pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Nazli

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus has assumed the role of an epidemic. Previously considered a disease of affluent developed countries, it has become more common in developing countries. Pakistan is included among the countries with a high prevalence of diabetes. In this scenario, postpartum management of a woman with diabetes mellitus becomes more important as in this period counseling and educating a woman is essential. Counselling includes life style modifications to prevent future risks involving all the systems of the body. This review article discusses management of diabetes mellitus in postpartum period, guidelines for postpartum screening of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, risks involved in future life and stresses upon the need of local population based studies. Primary care providers and gynaecologists must realize the importance of postpartum screening for diabetes mellitus and provide relevant information to women as well. PMID:27582163

  10. Ubiquitous Diabetes Management System via Interactive Communication Based on Information Technologies: Clinical Effects and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Hun-Sung; Han, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Ah; Choi, Yoon-Hee

    2010-01-01

    New diabetes management systems based on interactive communication have been introduced recently, accompanying rapid advances in information technology; these systems are referred to as "ubiquitous diabetes management systems." In such ubiquitous systems, patients and medical teams can communicate via Internet or telecommunications, with patients uploading their glucose data and personal information, and medical teams sending optimal feedback. Clinical evidence from both long-term and short-term trials has been reported by some researchers. Such systems appear to be effective not only in reducing the levels of HbA1c but also in stabilizing glucose control. However, most notably, evidence for the cost-effectiveness of such a system should be demonstrated before it can be propagated out to the general population in actual clinical practice. To establish a cost-effective model, various types of clinical decision supporting software designed to reduce the labor time of physicians must first be developed. A number of sensors and devices for monitoring patients' data are expected to be available in the near future; thus, methods for automatic interconnections between devices and web charts were also developed. Further investigations to demonstrate the clinical outcomes of such a system should be conducted, hopefully leading to a new paradigm of diabetes management. PMID:21076573

  11. The Limits of Self-Management: Community and Health Care System Barriers Among Latinos With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Jurkowski, Janine

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous studies examine diabetes self-care, few regard ecological framework correlates such as community and institutional level factors as fundamental for understanding diabetes management for Latinos. This article addresses the dearth of research that exists regarding social contextual forces and diabetes management for Latinos. Given the scarcity of research on this topic, studies of non-Latino groups were reviewed to illustrate the importance of community and institutional influences on diabetes care. Consideration of fundamental correlates within the ecological framework may better discern the underlying rationale for inadequate diabetes self-management for individuals who live in impoverished communities. PMID:21686047

  12. An ICT-Based Diabetes Management System Tested for Health Care Delivery in the African Context

    PubMed Central

    Takenga, Claude; Berndt, Rolf-Dietrich; Musongya, Olivier; Kitero, Joël; Katoke, Remi; Molo, Kakule; Kazingufu, Basile; Meni, Malikwisha; Vikandy, Mambo; Takenga, Henri

    2014-01-01

    The demand for new healthcare services is growing rapidly. Improving accessibility of the African population to diabetes care seems to be a big challenge in most countries where the number of care centers and medical staff is reduced. Information and communication technologies (ICT) have great potential to address some of these challenges faced by several countries in providing accessible, cost-effective, and high-quality health care services. This paper presents the Mobil Diab system which is a telemedical approach proposed for the management of long-term diseases. The system applies modern mobile and web technologies which overcome geographical barriers, and increase access to health care services. The idea of the system is to involve patients in the therapy process and motivate them for an active participation. For validation of the system in African context, a trial was conducted in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 40 Subjects with diabetes divided randomly into control and intervention groups were included in the test. Results show that Mobil Diab is suitable for African countries and presents a number of benefits for the population and public health care system. It improves clinical management and delivery of diabetes care services by enhancing access, quality, motivation, reassurance, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:25136358

  13. Diabetes Device Interoperability for Improved Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Silk, Alain D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific and technological advancements have led to the increasing availability and use of sophisticated devices for diabetes management, with corresponding improvements in public health. These devices are often capable of sharing data with a few other specific devices but are generally not broadly interoperable; they cannot work together with a wide variety of other devices. As a result of limited interoperability, benefits of modern diabetes devices and potential for development of innovative new diabetes technologies are not being fully realized. Here we discuss diabetes device interoperability in general, then focus on 4 examples that show how diabetes management could benefit from enhanced interoperability: remote monitoring and data sharing, integrating data from multiple devices to better inform diabetes management strategies, device consolidation, and artificial pancreas development. PMID:26178738

  14. Improving the Quality of Outpatient Diabetes Care Using an Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Joerg; Mueller, Angelika; Messinger, Diethelm; Parkin, Christopher G.; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of information management system (IMS) use with individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were treated in outpatient settings. Methods: In this 7-month, prospective, observational study, 965 adults with diabetes, mean (SD) baseline HbA1c 8.61(1.2)% (70.6[13.1] mmol/mol), were recruited from 132 outpatient care centers in Germany and Denmark. HbA1c was measured at baseline, month 4, and month 7. IMS reports were generated from uploaded self-monitored blood glucose data and therapy adjustments were documented at months 1 and 4. Hypoglycemic events were documented. Results: Mean (SD) HbA1c decreased from baseline in type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at month 4 (–0.61[1.03]% (–6.7[11.3] mmol/mol), n = 213; –0.88[1.22]% (–9.6[13.3] mmol/mol), n = 589, respectively) and month 7 (–0.64[1.02]% (–7.0[11.1] mmol/mol), n = 219; –0.93[1.27]% (–10.2[13.9] mmol/mol), n = 594, respectively), all P < .0001, with no increase in hypoglycemic events. Therapy was adjusted in 106(42.7)% type 1 and 349(52.4)% type 2 diabetes patients at months 1 and 105(42.3)% type 1 and 282(42.3)% type 2 diabetes patients at month 4. Physicians used IMS reports to make therapy adjustments in 90% of patients at month 1 and 86% of patients at month 4. Conclusions: Integration of the IMS into outpatient care facilitates significant improvements in glycemic control. PMID:26224760

  15. Support systems for and barriers to diabetes management in South Asians and Whites in the UK: qualitative study of patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harsimran; Cinnirella, Marco; Bradley, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore experiences of UK-based South Asian and White patients with diabetes in relation to their support systems for and barriers to diabetes management. Design Qualitative study (semistructured interviews analysed using a form of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis). Participants 20 outpatients with diabetes (12 British South Asians and 8 British Whites) with either good or poor glycaemic control. Setting Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, UK. Results Qualitative analysis revealed distinct themes for the two ethnic groups. For the South Asian participants, challenges surrounding diet management and social stigma attached to having diabetes were the two predominant barriers to effective diabetes management. Support from immediate family members was commonly reported as a strong support system for optimising diabetes management by the South Asian sample in addition to the perceived positive impact of religion (healing power of prayer), the valuable informational support from their diabetes-care team, patient leaflets and diabetes magazines. Similar to the South Asians, adhering to dietary recommendations was the most difficult aspect of diabetes management for the White participants followed by the inconveniences surrounding injecting insulin. The hospital diabetes-care team was considered as the most effective support system for diabetes management by the White sample and interestingly, this was the only dominant theme in their reported sources of support. Conclusions Both South Asian and White participants emphasised adherence to dietary recommendations as the most difficult aspect of living with diabetes. In addition, social stigma attached to diabetes was a prominent concern among South Asian participants that seemed to have a significant negative impact on their diabetes control and overall management. Given South Asian patients’ reliance on their family for the management of their condition, interventions targeting improved diabetes outcomes

  16. Diabetes mellitus disease management in a safety net hospital system: translating evidence into practice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael K; Kaiser, Michael; Johnson, Jolene; Besse, Jay; Horswell, Ronald

    2010-12-01

    The Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division system assessed the effectiveness of implementing a multisite disease management program targeting diabetes mellitus in an indigent patient population. A population-based disease management program centered on evidence-based clinical care guidelines was applied from the system level. Specific clinic modifications and models were used, as well as ancillary services such as medication assistance and equipment subsidies. Marked improvement in process goals led to improved clinical outcomes. From 2001 to 2008, the percentage of patients with a hemoglobin A1c < 7.0 increased from 45% to 55% on the system level, with some sites experiencing a more dramatic shift. Results were similar across sites, which included both small provider groups and academic health centers. In order to achieve these results, the clinical environment changed to promote those evidence-based interventions. Even in complex environments such as academic health centers with several provider levels, or those environments with limited care resources, disease management programs can be successfully implemented and achieve statistically significant results.

  17. Strategies for reducing morbidity and mortality from diabetes through health-care system interventions and diabetes self-management education in community settings. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    PubMed

    2001-09-28

    Reducing morbidity and mortality and improving quality of life for persons with diabetes is an ongoing challenge for health-care providers and organizations and public health practitioners. Interventions are available that focus on persons with diabetes, health-care systems, families, and public policies. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of seven population-oriented interventions that can be implemented by health-care organizations and communities. Two of these interventions focus on health-care systems (disease and case management), and five focus on persons with diabetes (diabetes self-management education delivered in community settings). On the basis of these reviews, the Task Force has made recommendations regarding use of these seven interventions. The Task Force strongly recommends disease and case management in health-care systems for persons with diabetes. Diabetes self-management education is recommended in community gathering places (e.g., community centers or faith institutions) for adults and in the home for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Evidence was insufficient to recommend diabetes self-management education interventions in other settings (i.e., schools, work sites, and recreational camps) or in the home for adults with type 2 diabetes. This report provides additional information regarding these recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides sources of full reviews of interventions and information to assist in applying the interventions locally, and describes additional diabetes-related work in progress.

  18. [Dietary management of diabetic pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Shimron-Nachmias, Limor; Frishman, Sigal; Hod, Moshe

    2006-10-01

    During pregnancy, several metabolic changes are observed which aim to provide optimum substrate, energy and other nutritional requirements to both the mother and the fetus. Maternal nutrition is the only source for most nutrients, influencing neonatal and placenta development, mother's physiological adjustment and also playing a major role in the destiny of the offspring. Over-nutrition or malnutrition are both linked with increased risk of diabetes mellitus in the offspring. Diabetes in pregnancy is the most common and important metabolic dysfunction in pregnancy. This is divided into two types and it is very important to distinguish between them, as each has different nutritional requirements and a different impact on the course of the pregnancy and the development of the fetus. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the main type of diabetes in pregnancy, it usually appears in the second half of pregnancy and mainly influences fetal growth rate and can slow systemic development. Most women with GDM are treated with nutritional management alone. Pre-existing diabetes mellitus is present before pregnancy and it's effects begin at fertilization and implantation, and continue throughout pregnancy and thereafter. It involves high risk of early abortion, severe congenital defects and disrupted organogenesis. Although the treatment of pre-existing diabetes is usually a pharmacological one (insulin or oral pharmacological agents), nutritional management is still very important in normalization of glucose levels before and throughout the pregnancy. Fetal morbidity is lower in women with diabetes in pregnancy when optimal glucose control is maintained. Normalization of glucose levels during pregnancy is agreed to be the main factor in preventing poor outcomes in pregnancy. Dietary advice throughout pregnancy include frequent small meals which contain carbohydrates that are not highly processed, rich with slowly absorbed starches and non-soluble polysaccharides and with a

  19. Psychosocial Predictors of Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Mary T.; Rollison, Julia; Camporese, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a perception of responsibility for disease onset and self-blame might influence disease management in people with diabetes. Methods: Our survey assessed perceived responsibility for disease onset, self-blame, anger, social support, and disease management in a sample of 46 individuals with diabetes. Results: As…

  20. The critical path from pump to pancreas: the impact of FDA regulation on the development of a closed-loop diabetes management system.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    Breakthrough medical tools and technologies are rapidly becoming available in countries across the world, but cannot be purchased in the United States, where these innovative products still await FDA approval. The artificial pancreas is a prime example of such medical technologies, as one of these device systems has been available in over 40 countries outside of the United States for more than 3 years. The term "artificial pancreas" refers to any one of a group of closed-loop device systems designed to protect type 1 diabetics against dangerous diabetes episodes, while also reducing the risk of diabetes-related complications by enabling tighter glycemic control. The following paper will provide an overview of diabetes, a brief history of diabetes management, the technological challenges of creating a fully functional closed-loop diabetes management system, and the role of FDA in the development of the artificial pancreas.

  1. The endocannabinoid system: a promising target for the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2009-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is closely related to abdominal obesity and is generally associated with other cardiometabolic risk factors, resulting in a high incidence of cardiovascular complications. Several animal and human observations suggest that the endocannabinoid (EC) system is overactivated in presence of abdominal obesity and/or diabetes, and contributes to disturbances of energy balance and metabolism. Not only it regulates the intake of nutrients through central mechanisms located within the hypothalamus and limbic area, but it also intervenes in transport, metabolism and deposit of the nutrients in the digestive tract, liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and possibly pancreas. Activation of both central and peripheral CB1 receptors promotes weight gain and associated metabolic changes. Conversely, rimonabant, the first selective CB(1) receptor antagonist in clinical use, has been shown to reduce body weight, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood pressure, insulin resistance and C-reactive protein levels, and to increase HDL cholesterol and adiponectin concentrations in both non-diabetic and diabetic overweight/obese patients. In addition, a 0.5-0.7% reduction in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was observed in metformin- or sulfonylurea-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and in drug-naive or insulin-treated diabetic patients. Almost half of metabolic changes occurred beyond weight loss, in agreement with direct peripheral effects. Rimonabant was generally well-tolerated, but with a slightly higher incidence of depressed mood disorders, anxiety, nausea and dizziness compared to placebo. New trials are supposed to confirm the potential role of rimonabant (and other CB1 neutral antagonists or inverse agonists) in overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes and high risk cardiovascular disease.

  2. Electrochemistry in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Heller, Adam; Feldman, Ben

    2010-07-20

    Diabetes devastates lives and burdens society. Hypoglycemic (low glucose) episodes cause blackouts, and severe ones are life-threatening. Periods of hyperglycemia (high glucose) cause circulatory disease, stroke, amputations, blindness, kidney failure and nerve degeneration. In this Account, we describe the founding of TheraSense, now a major part of Abbott Diabetes Care, and the development of two products that have improved the lives of people with diabetes. The first, a virtually painless microcoulometer (300 nL volume), the FreeStyle blood glucose monitoring system, was approved by the FDA and became available in 2000. In 2009, this system was used in more than one billion blood assays. The second, the enzyme-wiring based, subcutaneously-implanted FreeStyle Navigator continuous glucose monitoring system, was approved by the FDA and became available in the United States in 2008. The strips of the FreeStyle blood glucose monitoring system comprise a printed parallel plate coulometer, with a 50 microm gap between two facing printed electrodes, a carbon electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The volume of blood between the facing plates is accurately controlled. The glucose is electrooxidized through catalysis by a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and an Os(2+/3+) redox mediator, which is reduced by the glucose-reduced enzyme and is electrooxidized on the carbon electrode. Initially the system used pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent GDH but now uses flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent GDH. Because the facing electrodes are separated by such a small distance, shuttling of electrons by the redox couple could interfere with the coulometric assay. However, the Os(2+/3+) redox mediator is selected to have a substantially negative formal potential, between 0.0 and -0.2 V, versus that of the facing Ag/AgCl electrode. This makes the flow of a shuttling current between the two electrodes virtually impossible because the oxidized Os(3+) complex cannot be appreciably

  3. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  5. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs. PMID:27601927

  6. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs. PMID:27601927

  7. Management of pancreatogenic diabetes: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Makuc, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatogenic diabetes is an underdiagnosed form of secondary diabetes that is lacking official management guidelines. This paper reviews the recommended management strategies with additional data on the promising novel drugs.

  8. Optimizing diabetes management: managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, E Albert

    2013-06-01

    Both the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated costs have been rising over time and are projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, type 2 DM (T2DM) management costs represent a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system unless substantial, systemic changes are made. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are uniquely positioned to attempt to make the changes necessary to reduce the burdens associated with T2DM by developing policies that align with evidence-based DM management guidelines and other resources. For example, MCOs can encourage members to implement healthy lifestyle choices, which have been shown to reduce DM-associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, MCOs are exploring the strengths and weaknesses of several different benefit plan designs. Value-based insurance designs, sometimes referred to as value-based benefit designs, use both direct and indirect data to invest in incentives that change behaviors through health information technologies, communications, and services to improve health, productivity, quality, and financial trends. Provider incentive programs, sometimes referred to as "pay for performance," represent a payment/delivery paradigm that places emphasis on rewarding value instead of volume to align financial incentives and quality of care. Accountable care organizations emphasize an alignment between reimbursement and implementation of best practices through the use of disease management and/ or clinical pathways and health information technologies. Consumer-directed health plans, or high-deductible health plans, combine lower premiums with high annual deductibles to encourage members to seek better value for health expenditures. Studies conducted to date on these different designs have produced mixed results.

  9. Common crossroads in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Valitutto, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Data suggest that effective management can reduce the risk for both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In treating patients with diabetes, physicians must be prepared not only to tailor the initial treatment to the individual and his or her disease severity but also to advance treatment as necessary and in step with disease progression. The majority of patients with diabetes are not at goal for glycated hemoglobin A1C, fasting plasma glucose, or postprandial plasma glucose levels. Although lifestyle changes based on improved diet and exercise practices are basic elements of therapy at every stage, pharmacologic therapy is usually necessary to achieve and maintain glycemic control. Oral antidiabetic agents may be effective early in the disease but, eventually, they are unable to compensate as the disease progresses. For patients unable to achieve glycemic control on 2 oral agents, current guidelines strongly urge clinicians to consider the initiation of insulin as opposed to adding a third oral agent. Recent research suggests that earlier initiation of insulin is more physiologic and may be more effective in preventing complications of diabetes. Newer, longer-lasting insulin analogs and the use of simplified treatment plans may overcome psychological resistance to insulin on the part of physicians and patients. This article summarizes the risks associated with uncontrolled fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, briefly reviews the various treatment options currently available for type 2 diabetes, presents case vignettes to illustrate crossroads encountered when advancing treatment, and offers guidance to the osteopathic physician on the selection of appropriate treatments for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:18279520

  10. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support

    PubMed Central

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients’ self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists’ toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation. PMID:26657618

  11. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support.

    PubMed

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-02-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients' self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists' toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation. PMID:26657618

  12. Diabetic gastroparesis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Rayner, Christopher K; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael

    2009-05-29

    Gastric emptying is frequently abnormal in patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms commonly associated with disordered gastric emptying include nausea, vomiting, bloating and epigastric pain, while patients are also at risk of malnutrition, weight loss, impaired drug absorption, disordered glycaemic control and poor quality of life. Although often attributed to the presence of irreversible autonomic neuropathy, acute hyperglycaemia represents a potentially reversible cause of gastric dysfunction in diabetes. Scintigraphy represents the gold standard for measuring gastric emptying. The management of diabetic gastroparesis is less than optimal, partly because the pathogenesis has not been clearly defined. Treatment approaches include dietary modification and optimization of glycaemia, and the use of prokinetic drugs, while novel therapies such as gastric electrical stimulation are the subject of ongoing investigation. PMID:19496627

  13. Diabetes benefit management: evolving strategies for payers.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert L

    2011-11-01

    Over the next quarter century, the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is expected to at least double. Currently, 1 in every 10 healthcare dollars is spent on diabetes management; by 2050, it has been projected that the annual costs of managing T2DM will rise to $336 billion. Without substantial, systemic changes, T2DM management costs will lead to a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system. However, the appropriate management of diabetes can reduce associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, adequate glycemic control can improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce diabetes-related complications. This article provides an overview of key concepts associated with a value-based insurance design (VBID) approach to T2DM coverage. By promoting the use of services or treatments that provide high benefits relative to cost, and by alternatively discouraging patients from utilizing services whose benefits do not justify their cost, VBID improves the quality of healthcare while simultaneously reining in spending. VBID initiatives tend to focus on chronic disease management and generally target prescription drug use. However, some programs have expanded their scope by incorporating services traditionally offered by wellness and disease management programs. The concept of VBID is growing, and it is increasingly being implemented by a diverse and growing number of public and private entities, including pharmacy benefit managers, health plans, and employers. This article provides key background on VBID strategies, with a focus on T2DM management. It also provides a road map for health plans seeking to implement VBID as part of their programs.

  14. Staged diabetes management. Toward an integrated model of diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Mazze, R S; Etzwiler, D D; Strock, E; Peterson, K; McClave, C R; Meszaros, J F; Leigh, C; Owens, L W; Deeb, L C; Peterson, A

    1994-06-01

    This paper introduces a new and innovative approach to diabetes management in the primary-care setting. Staged diabetes management (SDM) represents a four-year effort to develop and test a data-based approach to diabetes management that could be easily adapted to a variety of health-care settings in which diabetes management is principally under the direction of primary-care physicians was limited access to specialists. After testing under controlled circumstances at the International Diabetes Center (Minneapolis, MN), SDM was subjected to substantial field trials under conditions that represent the scope and variety of primary-care practices in diabetes. The following represents the work of several investigators who independently undertook a review of SDM.

  15. Transdermal innovations in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rekha; Mahant, Sheefali; Chhabra, Lovely; Nanda, Sanju

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, an endocrine disorder affecting glucose metabolism, has been crippling mankind for the past two centuries. Despite the advancements in the understanding pertaining to its pathogenesis and treatment, the currently available therapeutic options are far from satisfactory. The growing diabetic population increases the gravity of the situation. The shortcomings of the conventional drug delivery systems necessitate the need to delve into other routes. On account of its merits over other routes, the transdermal approach has drawn the interest of the researchers around the world. The transdermal drug delivery systems are aimed to achieve therapeutic concentrations of the drug through skin. These systems are designed so that the drug can be delivered at a pre-determined and controlled rate. This makes it particularly conducive to treat chronic disorders like diabetes. Correspondingly, the adverse effects and inconvenience concomitant with oral and parentral route are circumvented. This article attempts to outline the development of transdermal drug delivery systems to optimize diabetes pharmacotherapy. It not only covers the transdermal approaches adopted to fine-tune insulin delivery, but also, discusses various transdermal drug delivery systems fabricated to improve the therapeutic performance of oral hypoglycaemic agents. Such formulations include the advanced drug delivery systems, namely, transferosomal gels, microemulsions, self-dissolving micropiles, nanoparticles, insulin pumps, biphasic lipid systems, calcium carbonate nanoparticles, lecithin nanoparticles; physical techniques such as iontophoresis and microneedles and, drugs formulated as transdermal patches. In addition to this, the authors have also shed light on the future prospects and patented and commercial formulations of antidiabetic agents.

  16. Management of diabetes mellitus in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Muili

    Diabetes is a global health problem, with a challenging epidemiology. It is one of the major health problems affecting countries around the world, particularly the UK (World Health Organization [WHO], 2006; Department of Health [DH], 2006b). It is also a growing public health threat in the US (Mokdad et al, 2001). As a result, diabetes has become an important public health issue, prompting the WHO and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) to adopt the theme 'Diabetes for Everyone' for World Diabetes Day 2006. In 2007, on World Diabetes Day, the United Nations also launched its 'Living with Diabetes at School' campaign, in response to the growing diabetes 'epidemics' (Diabetes UK, 2007). This article provides an overview of diabetes mellitus and its acute- and long-term management, including definition, aetiology, pathophysiology, classification, signs, symptoms and complications. The role of the nurse in providing patient-centred care for people with diabetes is emphasized.

  17. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care: integrating disease management competencies into primary care to improve composite diabetes quality measures.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Joe; DaSilva, Karen; Marshall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses in the United States requires a fundamental redesign of the primary care delivery system's structure and processes in order to meet the changing needs and expectations of patients. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care are 3 potential processes that can be integrated into primary care and are compatible with the Chronic Care Model. In 2003, Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty ambulatory physician group practice based in Boston, Massachusetts, began implementing all 3 processes across its primary care practices. From 2004 to 2006, the overall diabetes composite quality measures improved from 51% to 58% for screening (HgA1c x 2, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure in 12 months) and from 13% to 17% for intermediate outcomes (HgA1c system integrated these disease management functions into the front lines of primary care and the positive impact of those changes on overall diabetes quality of care.

  18. The diabetic foot management - recent advance.

    PubMed

    Sinwar, Prabhu Dayal

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic ulceration of the foot represents a major global medical, social and economic problem. It is the commonest major end-point of diabetic complications. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in foot ulceration and may act alone, together, or in combination with other factors such as microvascular disease, biomechanical abnormalities, limited joint mobility and increased susceptibility to infection. In the diabetic foot, distal sensory polyneuropathy is seen most commonly. The advent of insulin overcame the acute problems of ketoacidosis and infection, but could not prevent the vascular and neurological complications. Management of diabetic neuropathic ulcer by appropriate and timely removal of callus, control of infection and reduction of weight bearing forces. Management of diabetic ischaemic foot are medical management, surgical management and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of stenosed and occluded lower extremity arteries. Foot ulceration in persons with diabetes is the most frequent precursor to amputation. PMID:25638739

  19. Transdermal innovations in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rekha; Mahant, Sheefali; Chhabra, Lovely; Nanda, Sanju

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, an endocrine disorder affecting glucose metabolism, has been crippling mankind for the past two centuries. Despite the advancements in the understanding pertaining to its pathogenesis and treatment, the currently available therapeutic options are far from satisfactory. The growing diabetic population increases the gravity of the situation. The shortcomings of the conventional drug delivery systems necessitate the need to delve into other routes. On account of its merits over other routes, the transdermal approach has drawn the interest of the researchers around the world. The transdermal drug delivery systems are aimed to achieve therapeutic concentrations of the drug through skin. These systems are designed so that the drug can be delivered at a pre-determined and controlled rate. This makes it particularly conducive to treat chronic disorders like diabetes. Correspondingly, the adverse effects and inconvenience concomitant with oral and parentral route are circumvented. This article attempts to outline the development of transdermal drug delivery systems to optimize diabetes pharmacotherapy. It not only covers the transdermal approaches adopted to fine-tune insulin delivery, but also, discusses various transdermal drug delivery systems fabricated to improve the therapeutic performance of oral hypoglycaemic agents. Such formulations include the advanced drug delivery systems, namely, transferosomal gels, microemulsions, self-dissolving micropiles, nanoparticles, insulin pumps, biphasic lipid systems, calcium carbonate nanoparticles, lecithin nanoparticles; physical techniques such as iontophoresis and microneedles and, drugs formulated as transdermal patches. In addition to this, the authors have also shed light on the future prospects and patented and commercial formulations of antidiabetic agents. PMID:25418713

  20. Parent Perspectives of Diabetes Management in Schools

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Farrah; Stout, Stacey; Alvarez-Salvat, Rose; Fernandez, Michelle; Villa, Manuela; Sanchez, Janine; Eidson, Margaret; Nemery, Robin; Delamater, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate parent reports of the diabetes care support their children receive in school, their concerns about diabetes management in school, and their knowledge of federal laws that protect children with diabetes. In addition, the study explores ethnic and socioeconomic status differences in diabetes management in school. Methods An ethnically heterogeneous sample of 309 parents of children with diabetes was recruited from a community-based and a university-based diabetes outpatient clinic. Parents completed a survey assessing supports their child's school provides for diabetes care, worries about diabetes care in school, and awareness of federal laws that pertain to children with diabetes. Results Many children did not have a written care plan or a nurse at school, but significantly more white children had these supports than Hispanic or black children. Most children were not allowed to check blood glucose levels or administer insulin in class. Most parents were worried about hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in school, and most were not at all or only a little confident in the school's ability to care for diabetes. Most parents were not aware of federal laws, but high-income and white parents were more likely to be aware. Conclusions According to parents in the current study, children receive inadequate diabetes management support in schools. Minority children are less likely to receive supports than white children. Parents are worried about diabetes management in school, but most do not have the knowledge of federal laws necessary to protect their children. PMID:19075081

  1. Recent advances in managing and understanding diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sydney C.W.; Chan, Gary C.W.; Lai, Kar Neng

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the commonest cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed economies. Current standard of care for diabetic nephropathy embraces stringent blood pressure control via blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and glycemia control. Recent understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy has led to the development of novel therapeutic options. This review article focuses on available data from landmark studies on the main therapeutic approaches and highlights some novel management strategies. PMID:27303648

  2. Managing type 2 diabetes in Black patients.

    PubMed

    Akindana, Adeola; Ogunedo, Chioma

    2015-09-13

    Despite many novel treatments available for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, Black patients continue to disproportionately suffer complications associated with poor glycemic control. This article describes a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes mellitus in these patients while addressing cultural nuances that may be barriers to positive outcomes. PMID:26259037

  3. [Management of diabetes in elderly cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Raccah, D

    2006-11-01

    In 1998, data from the Assurance Maladie (national health insurance) showed that 11.2% of people over 65 years old, and thus corresponding to the World Health Organisation's definition of being elderly, were diabetic. More recently the Entred trial, a national sample representative of diabetics, clarified the characteristics, the state of health and the medical management of diabetes in patients aged over 65 years. Among the randomly selected 10,000 adults in this study, 5350 subjects (54% of the Entred population) were over 65 years old. Other studies indicate that more than a million subjects aged over 65 years are diabetic and that 25% of diabetics are aged over 75 years. The growing proportion of elderly people in the French population, plus the improvement in the detection and the better management of diabetes are bound to contribute to a further increase in the prevalence of diabetes in elderly subjects.

  4. Long-Term Engagement With a Mobile Self-Management System for People With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Årsand, Eirik; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Background In a growing number of intervention studies, mobile phones are used to support self-management of people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is difficult to establish knowledge about factors associated with intervention effects, due to considerable differences in research designs and outcome measures as well as a lack of detailed information about participants’ engagement with the intervention tool. Objective To contribute toward accumulating knowledge about factors associated with usage and usability of a mobile self-management application over time through a thorough analysis of multiple types of investigation on each participant’s engagement. Methods The Few Touch application is a mobile-phone–based self-management tool for patients with T2DM. Twelve patients with T2DM who have been actively involved in the system design used the Few Touch application in a real-life setting from September 2008 until October 2009. During this period, questionnaires and semistructured interviews were conducted. Recorded data were analyzed to investigate usage trends and patterns. Transcripts from interviews were thematically analyzed, and the results were further analyzed in relation to the questionnaire answers and the usage trends and patterns. Results The Few Touch application served as a flexible learning tool for the participants, responsive to their spontaneous needs, as well as supporting regular self-monitoring. A significantly decreasing (P<.05) usage trend was observed among 10 out of the 12 participants, though the magnitude of the decrease varied widely. Having achieved a sense of mastery over diabetes and experiences of problems were identified as reasons for declining motivation to continue using the application. Some of the problems stemmed from difficulties in integrating the use of the application into each participant’s everyday life and needs, although the design concepts were developed in the process where the participants were

  5. Weight management in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siram, Amulya T; Yanagisawa, Robert; Skamagas, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a well known risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at risk for weight gain as a result of multiple influences, including sedentary lifestyle, high-calorie diet, diabetes medications, sociocultural factors, chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, and a dysregulated enteroendocrine axis. Because both diabetes mellitus and obesity predispose patients to abnormal cardiometabolic profiles and increased cardiovascular disease, management of diabetes mellitus should focus on weight management and optimizing cardiometabolic parameters, concomitant with glycemic control. Lifestyle modification incorporating healthy, calorie-appropriate diets and increased physical activity, in addition to metformin, are central components to diabetes management and weight management. These interventions have been shown to improve body weight, glycemic control, and overall cardiometabolic profile. The weight-neutral and weight-losing diabetes medications include metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and amylin analogs. It is essential that providers understand the metabolic and weight effects of diabetes medications in order to develop strategies for managing diabetes mellitus while helping patients maintain or lose weight in order to improve their overall health outcomes. PMID:20960555

  6. National recommendations: Psychosocial management of diabetes in India

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Sridhar, G. R.; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Sahay, Rakesh Kumar; Bantwal, Ganapathy; Baruah, Manash P.; John, Mathew; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Madhu, K.; Verma, Komal; Sreedevi, Aswathy; Shukla, Rishi; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Although several evidence-based guidelines for managing diabetes are available, few, if any, focus on the psychosocial aspects of this challenging condition. It is increasingly evident that psychosocial treatment is integral to a holistic approach of managing diabetes; it forms the key to realizing appropriate biomedical outcomes. Dearth of attention is as much due to lack of awareness as due to lack of guidelines. This lacuna results in diversity among the standards of clinical practice, which, in India, is also due to the size and complexity of psychosocial care itself. This article aims to highlight evidence- and experience-based Indian guidelines for the psychosocial management of diabetes. A systemic literature was conducted for peer-reviewed studies and publications covering psychosocial aspects in diabetes. Recommendations are classified into three domains: General, psychological and social, and graded by the weight they should have in clinical practice and by the degree of support from the literature. Ninety-four recommendations of varying strength are made to help professionals identify the psychosocial interventions needed to support patients and their families and explore their role in devising support strategies. They also aid in developing core skills needed for effective diabetes management. These recommendations provide practical guidelines to fulfill unmet needs in diabetes management, and help achieve a qualitative improvement in the way physicians manage patients. The guidelines, while maintaining an India-specific character, have global relevance, which is bound to grow as the diabetes pandemic throws up new challenges. PMID:23869293

  7. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of <140/90 mmHg, which is a similar target to that proposed for individuals without diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data.

  8. The Management of Diabetic Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Many diabetics go through life without ocular examination until complications begin. Ophthalmological consultation should be annual, and ocular complications are best prevented by tight control of blood sugar, best achieved at present with the insulin pump. This article describes diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy according to type of diabetes. It also describes indications for pars plana vitrectomy, cataract removal and lens implant. Close cooperation between family physician and ophthalmologist ensures prompt intervention to preserve vision. PMID:21274023

  9. Everyday Expertise in Self-Management of Diabetes in the Dominican Republic: Implications for Learning and Performance Support Systems Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes Paulino, Lisette G.

    2012-01-01

    An epidemic such as diabetes is an extremely complex public health, economic and social problem that is difficult to solve through medical expertise alone. Evidence-based models for improving healthcare delivery systems advocate educating patients to become more active participants in their own care. This shift demands preparing chronically ill…

  10. Improving diabetes management with mobile health technology.

    PubMed

    Sieverdes, John C; Treiber, Frank; Jenkins, Carolyn

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes affects 25.8 million persons in the United States, and these persons make more than 35 million ambulatory care visits annually. Yet, less than half of persons with diabetes meet the recommended levels of A1C, blood pressure and lipid control. One innovative approach is to use mobile health technologies to help patients better manage their diabetes and related conditions, and 85% to 90% of patients have access to mobile health technology. A brief review of the guidelines for diabetes care and mobile health technology that can support the guidelines are reported related to (1) glycemic control and self-monitoring of blood glucose, (2) pharmacological approaches and medication management, (3) medical nutrition therapy, (4) physical activity and resistance training, (5) weight loss, (6) diabetes self-management education and (7) blood pressure control and hypertension. The patient and provider are encouraged to explore possibilities for mobile health technologies that can support behavior change.

  11. Mobile phone text messaging in the management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Roca, O; Cárdenas, A; Diaz-Cardama, A; Pulido, P

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a trial of mobile phone text messaging (short message service; SMS) for diabetes management. In an eight-month period, 23 diabetic patients used the service. Patients used SMS to transmit data such as blood glucose levels and body weight to a server. The server automatically answered with an SMS acknowledgement message. A monthly calculated glycosylated haemoglobin result was also automatically sent to the patient by SMS. During the trial the patients sent an average of 33 messages per month. Although users showed good acceptance of the SMS diabetes system, they expressed various concerns, such as the inability to enter data from previous days. Nonetheless, the trial results suggest that SMS may provide a simple, fast and efficient adjunct to the management of diabetes. It was particularly useful for elderly persons and teenagers, age groups that are known to have difficulty in controlling their diabetes.

  12. Designing mobile dietary management support technologies for people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arsand, Eirik; Tufano, James T; Ralston, James D; Hjortdahl, Per

    2008-01-01

    We performed two cycles of laboratory-based usability testing of three food registration prototypes for people with diabetes. The design concepts were a commercial web application, various smartphones and a mobile phone photo blogging approach. Six adults with Type 1 diabetes and three adults with Type 2 diabetes participated in the usability tests. The results provided five distinct implications for devices for the future dietary management support of people with diabetes. Study participants valued many of the features offered by the three systems that were tested, although the usability tests also revealed several opportunities to enhance their design. Our findings suggest that further development is justified of mobile dietary and nutritional support for individuals living with diabetes. Applications that support healthy eating habits should be integrated with applications for managing blood glucose data and physical activity data, and potentially medication data as well.

  13. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  14. Does audit improve diabetes care in a primary care setting? A management tool to address health system gaps

    PubMed Central

    Pruthu, T. K.; Majella, Marie Gilbert; Nair, Divya; Ramaswamy, Gomathi; Palanivel, C.; Subitha, L.; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is one of the emerging epidemics. Regular clinical and biochemical monitoring of patients, adherence to treatment and counseling are cornerstones for prevention of complications. Clinical audits as a process of improving quality of patient care and outcomes by reviewing care against specific criteria and then reviewing the change can help in optimizing care. Objective: We aimed to audit the process of diabetes care using patient records and also to assess the effect of audit on process of care indicators among patients availing diabetes care from a rural health and training center in Puducherry, South India. Materials and Methods: A record based study was conducted to audit diabetes care among patients attending noncommunicable disease clinic in a rural health center of South India. Monitoring of blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function test were considered for auditing in accordance with standard guidelines. Clinical audit cycle (CAC), a simple management tool was applied and re-audit was done after 1-year. Results: We reviewed 156 and 180 patients records during year-1 and year-2, respectively. In the audit year-1, out of 156 patients, 78 (50%), 70 (44.9%), 49 (31.4%) and 19 (12.2%) had got their BP, blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function tests done. Monitoring of blood glucose, BP, lipid profile and renal function improved significantly by 35%, 20.7%, 36.4% and 56.1% over 1-year. Conclusion: CAC improves process of diabetes care in a primary care setting with existing resources. PMID:26604621

  15. Anxiety and diabetes: Innovative approaches to management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Bickett, Allison; Tapp, Hazel

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chief concern for patients, healthcare providers, and health care systems in America, and around the globe. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit clinical and subclinical symptoms of anxiety more frequently than people without diabetes. Anxiety is traditionally associated with poor metabolic outcomes and increased medical complications among those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Collaborative care models have been utilized in the multidisciplinary treatment of mental health problems and chronic disease, and have demonstrated success in managing the pathology of depression which often accompanies diabetes. However, no specific treatment model has been published that links the treatment of anxiety to the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the success of collaborative care models in treating depression associated with diabetes, and anxiety unrelated to chronic disease, it is possible that the collaborative care treatment of primary care patients who suffer from both anxiety and diabetes could be met with the same success. The key issue is determining how to implement and sustain these models in practice. This review summarizes the proposed link between anxiety and diabetes, and offers an innovative and evidence-based collaborative care model for anxiety and diabetes in primary care. PMID:27390262

  16. Therapeutic management of posttransplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mannon, Roslyn B

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus continues to be a common metabolic complication after solid organ transplantation. The etiology is multifactorial and includes both modifiable and nonmodifiable factors. Immunosuppression may play a critical role in its development. Targets of treatment include oral hypoglycemics as well as insulin. More recently, several novel agents have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of type 2 diabetes. There is limited experience with these agents in transplant recipients. Use of oral and subcutaneous therapies as well as insulin will be reviewed. As diabetes has a negative impact on patient and graft outcome, the transplant practitioner must be vigilant in screening and managing diabetes after transplantation.

  17. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers.

  18. Antenatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Masood, Shabeen Naz; Masood, Yasir; Naim, Uzma; Razzak, Safina Abdul

    2016-09-01

    The prevalance of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. It is estimated that 21 million women develop gestational diabetes out of which 1 in 7 births are affected. Women who have been previously diagnosed as GDM are at higher risk of developing diabetes in subsequent pregnancies and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) later in life. Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes also have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in their teens or early adulthood. Instead of risk stratification universal screening is essential in all pregnant women. Tight glycaemic targets are required for optimal maternal and foetal outcome. This article outlines the importance of pre-pregnancy counseling, antenatal management, screening and treatment of Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy (HIP). PMID:27582158

  19. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers. PMID:27582162

  20. UTOPIA: a consultation system for visit-by-visit diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, T; Roudsari, A V; Leicester, H J; Theodorou, T; Carson, E R; Sönksen, P H

    1996-01-01

    UTOPIA (UTilities for OPtimizing Insulin Adjustment) is a prototype computer system proposed to support home data analysis and therapy recommendations for the individual patient. The paper describes methods of analysis and their incorporation into an overall system design that matches the iterative practices at the physician-patient consultation from visit to visit. Four modules support home data display and comparison with clinical measurements; extraction of blood glucose trends and daily cycles using time series analysis, learning relationships between insulin adjustments and changes in time series patterns via a parametric, linear systems model; and advice generation by solving the linear equation for candidate insulin adjustments. Concepts and methods are placed in context, with a discussion of comparable and related research.

  1. Perioperative management of the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stewart A

    2007-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a significant global public health problem and is a major source of morbidity and mortality in the world today. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the predominant form of diabetes worldwide and represents approximately 90% of all cases. There is an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the world today in both developed and developing countries. Globally, it is expected that the number of people with diabetes will increase from the current 150 million to 220 million by the year 2010 and to 300 million by the year 2025. In addition, there has been an alarming increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents. It is therefore increasingly likely that diabetic patients will appear for dental and oral maxillofacial surgical treatment in both the office and ambulatory surgery clinic setting. Surgical stress often produces hyperglycemia in the perioperative period. Hyperglycemia has been shown to cause a significant increase in perioperative morbidity and mortality. It is the general consensus that strict glycemic control is beneficial and should be achieved for diabetic patients in the perioperative period. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management protocols for improved perioperative glycemic control of both type 1 and type 2 diabetics are presented.

  2. Engaging faith-based resources to initiate and support diabetes self-management among African Americans: a collaboration of informal and formal systems of care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Patria; Thorman Hartig, Margaret; Frazier, Renee; Clayton, Mae; Oliver, Georgia; Nelson, Belinda W; Williams-Cleaves, Beverly J

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes for Life (DFL), a project of Memphis Healthy Churches (MHC) and Common Table Health Alliance (CTHA; formerly Healthy Memphis Common Table [HMCT]), is a self-management program aimed at reducing health disparities among African Americans with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee. This program is one of five national projects that constitute The Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes, a 5-year grant-funded initiative of The Merck Foundation. Our purpose is to describe the faith-based strategies supporting DFL made possible by linking with an established informal health system, MHC, created by Baptist Memorial Health Care. The MHC network engaged volunteer Church Health Representatives as educators and recruiters for DFL. The components of the DFL project and the effect on chronic disease management for the participants will be described. The stages of DFL recruitment and implementation from an open-access to a closed model involving six primary care practices created a formal health system. The involvement of CTHA, a regional health collaborative, created the opportunity for DFL to expand the pool of health care providers and then recognize the core of providers most engaged with DFL patients. This collaboration between MHC and HMCT led to the organization of the formal health network.

  3. Approach to managing diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, John A. A.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Of an estimated 1.7 to 2 million Canadians with diabetes, approximately 10% will present each year to their family doctors with plantar ulcers. Nearly 3500 will require major lower extremity amputations. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Most of the recommendations outlined in this paper are based on level I evidence from excellent bench research and epidemiologic studies. MAIN MESSAGE: Both insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetics develop foot infections. These patients are on average 60 years old and have had diabetes for more than 10 years. Physicians who insist on excellent blood sugar control, provide ongoing patient education on diabetic foot care, prescribe appropriate shoes, and practise an aggressive multidisciplinary approach to wound care can reduce the rate of lower extremity amputations by more than 50%. CONCLUSION: Foot problems remain one of the main challenges associated with diabetes, but family physicians can manage them successfully. PMID:15116801

  4. [Perioperative management of diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Carles, Michel; Raucoules-Aimé, Marc

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising and diabetics may soon represent more than 5% of the world population. The type 2 diabetes is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. The screening for silent myocardial ischemia (IMS) must be systematic. The autonomic dysfunction and the cardiac microcirculatory disorders are at risk of hypotension and hypothermia during anesthesia. After 10 years of diabetes duration the incidence of perioperative complications and of difficult intubation are increased. The neurological deficits related to anesthesia are associated with general anesthesia in 85% of cases. Particular care will be provided during the surgical procedure to avoid skin, muscular and neurologic cuts. In most cases, the regional anesthesia will be preferred to general anesthesia. To avoid hypoglycemia, blood glucose concentration less than 11 mmol.L(-1)(2g.L(-1)) seems a reasonable target during and after surgery.

  5. Spices in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xinyan; Lim, Joseph; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health care problem worldwide both in developing and developed countries. Many factors, including age, obesity, sex, and diet, are involved in the etiology of DM. Nowadays, drug and dietetic therapies are the two major approaches used for prevention and control of DM. Compared to drug therapy, a resurgence of interest in using diet to manage and treat DM has emerged in recent years. Conventional dietary methods to treat DM include the use of culinary herbs and/or spices. Spices have long been known for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic properties. This review explores the anti-diabetic properties of commonly used spices, such as cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, and cumin, and the use of these spices for prevention and management of diabetes and associated complications.

  6. Spices in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xinyan; Lim, Joseph; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health care problem worldwide both in developing and developed countries. Many factors, including age, obesity, sex, and diet, are involved in the etiology of DM. Nowadays, drug and dietetic therapies are the two major approaches used for prevention and control of DM. Compared to drug therapy, a resurgence of interest in using diet to manage and treat DM has emerged in recent years. Conventional dietary methods to treat DM include the use of culinary herbs and/or spices. Spices have long been known for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic properties. This review explores the anti-diabetic properties of commonly used spices, such as cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, and cumin, and the use of these spices for prevention and management of diabetes and associated complications. PMID:27664636

  7. Developmental issues in managing children with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savinetti-Rose, B

    1994-01-01

    Children who are newly diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are expected to learn a substantial amount of new information within a few hospital days. It is important for nurses who design lesson plans for the child with IDDM to assess the child's developmental capabilities in relation to the necessary skills required of diabetes management and understand the family influence on the child's ability to perform self-care. PMID:8159478

  8. Clinical management of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, K; Jardine, A G

    1999-11-01

    From the viewpoint of nephrologists dealing with diabetic patients with ESRD and the associated complications and devastating prognosis, the need to reduce the incidence, and delay the rate of progression of diabetic nephropathy is obvious. Studies published within the last year have provided support for views that seem intuitively obvious; that improved glycaemic control and reduced blood pressure are associated with delayed onset and delayed progression of diabetic nephropathy. These reports have also demonstrated the difficulty of achieving ideal blood pressure targets and glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Thus, even with available therapy it is likely that improved compliance and achieving targets will have a major impact on disease outcome. There is evidence in several subgroups that ACEi are beneficial over other agents and the favourable side-effect and efficacy profile of these agents makes it reasonable to suggest that they should be used 'first line' in all patients with diabetes unless specifically contra-indicated. However, the failure to readily achieve blood pressure targets and the need for polypharmacy suggest that novel agents are required. We believe that statin therapy will have a major impact on CVD in diabetic patients and is also likely to delay progression; studies assessing the combined affect of anti-hypertensive and statin therapy specifically on the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy will be necessary before evidence-based recommendations can be made. The role for newer agents and targeting high risk groups using genetic markers remains uncertain but we await there development with interest. The future can only get better for patients with DN.

  9. A neural network approach in diabetes management by insulin administration.

    PubMed

    Gogou, G; Maglaveras, N; Ambrosiadou, B V; Goulis, D; Pappas, C

    2001-04-01

    Diabetes management by insulin administration is based on medical experts' experience, intuition, and expertise. As there is very little information in medical literature concerning practical aspects of this issue, medical experts adopt their own rules for insulin regimen specification and dose adjustment. This paper investigates the application of a neural network approach for the development of a prototype system for knowledge classification in this domain. The system will further facilitate decision making for diabetic patient management by insulin administration. In particular, a generating algorithm for learning arbitrary classification is employed. The factors participating in the decision making were among other diabetes type, patient age, current treatment, glucose profile, physical activity, food intake, and desirable blood glucose control. The resulting system was trained with 100 cases and tested on 100 patient cases. The system proved to be applicable to this particular problem, classifying correctly 92% of the testing cases.

  10. [Central diabetes insipidus: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Ballan, B Köhler; Hernandez, A; Rodriguez, E Gonzalez; Meyer, P

    2012-11-14

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is caused by deficient secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) due to different conditions that can affect the hypothalamic neurons. It results in an inability to retain normal quantities of free water, which leads to polyuria, including at night, and polydipsia. In adults, it is mostly due to the "idiopathic" form or present after pituitary surgery or a traumatic brain injury. In rare cases, an underlying systemic disease is found. The diagnosis of CDI is based on the water deprivation test. Pituitary MRI and specific clinical and biological work-up are recommended to precise etiology. Treatment of choice is desmopressin, a synthetic analogue of the endogenous ADH hormone. A multidisciplinary team generally provides management and monitoring of CDI.

  11. Acceptability and user satisfaction of a smartphone-based, interactive blood glucose management system in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Jane E; Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Kevat, Dev A; Bartlett, Katy; Gibson, Oliver; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is challenging maternity services. We have developed an interactive, smartphone-based, remote blood glucose (BG) monitoring system, GDm-health. The objective was to determine women's satisfaction with using the GDm-health system and their attitudes toward their diabetes care. In a service development program involving 52 pregnant women (September 2012 to June 2013), BG was monitored using GDm-health from diagnosis until delivery. Following birth, women completed a structured questionnaire assessing (1) general satisfaction, (2) equipment issues, and (3) relationship with the diabetes care team. Responses were scored on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were assessed using statistical methods. Of 52 women, 49 completed the questionnaire; 32 had glucose tolerance test confirmed GDM (gestation at recruitment 29 ± 4 weeks (mean ± SD), and 17 women previous GDM recommended for BG monitoring (18 ± 6 weeks). In all, 45 of 49 women agreed their care was satisfactory and the best for them, 47 of 49 and 43 of 49 agreed the equipment was convenient and reliable respectively, 42 of 49 agreed GDm-health fitted into their lifestyle, and 46 of 49 agreed they had a good relationship with their care team. Written comments supported these findings, with very positive reactions from the majority of women. Cronbach's alpha was .89 with factor analysis corresponding with question thematic trends. This pilot demonstrates that GDm-health is acceptable and convenient for a large proportion of women. Effects on clinical and economic outcomes are currently under investigation in a randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01916694).

  12. Acceptability and User Satisfaction of a Smartphone-Based, Interactive Blood Glucose Management System in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Kevat, Dev A.; Bartlett, Katy; Gibson, Oliver; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C.; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is challenging maternity services. We have developed an interactive, smartphone-based, remote blood glucose (BG) monitoring system, GDm-health. Aims: The objective was to determine women’s satisfaction with using the GDm-health system and their attitudes toward their diabetes care. Methods: In a service development program involving 52 pregnant women (September 2012 to June 2013), BG was monitored using GDm-health from diagnosis until delivery. Following birth, women completed a structured questionnaire assessing (1) general satisfaction, (2) equipment issues, and (3) relationship with the diabetes care team. Responses were scored on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were assessed using statistical methods. Results: Of 52 women, 49 completed the questionnaire; 32 had glucose tolerance test confirmed GDM (gestation at recruitment 29 ± 4 weeks (mean ± SD), and 17 women previous GDM recommended for BG monitoring (18 ± 6 weeks). In all, 45 of 49 women agreed their care was satisfactory and the best for them, 47 of 49 and 43 of 49 agreed the equipment was convenient and reliable respectively, 42 of 49 agreed GDm-health fitted into their lifestyle, and 46 of 49 agreed they had a good relationship with their care team. Written comments supported these findings, with very positive reactions from the majority of women. Cronbach’s alpha was .89 with factor analysis corresponding with question thematic trends. Conclusions: This pilot demonstrates that GDm-health is acceptable and convenient for a large proportion of women. Effects on clinical and economic outcomes are currently under investigation in a randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01916694). PMID:25361643

  13. Interactive Multimedia Tailored to Improve Diabetes Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Alley, Elizabeth; Baer, Spencer; Johnson, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    A pilot program was initiated to improve self-management of type 2 diabetes by rural adults. Using an iOS-based, individually tailored pre-/postintervention to improve diabetes self-management, undergraduate students developed a native mobile application to help participants effectively manage their diabetes. Brief quizzes assessed diabetes knowledge. A diabetes dictionary and physical activity assessment provided additional support to users of the app. On completion of the pilot, data analysis indicated increased diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and ease of use of the technology. Native app technology permits ready access to important information for those living with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26333610

  14. Interactive Multimedia Tailored to Improve Diabetes Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Alley, Elizabeth; Baer, Spencer; Johnson, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    A pilot program was initiated to improve self-management of type 2 diabetes by rural adults. Using an iOS-based, individually tailored pre-/postintervention to improve diabetes self-management, undergraduate students developed a native mobile application to help participants effectively manage their diabetes. Brief quizzes assessed diabetes knowledge. A diabetes dictionary and physical activity assessment provided additional support to users of the app. On completion of the pilot, data analysis indicated increased diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and ease of use of the technology. Native app technology permits ready access to important information for those living with type 2 diabetes.

  15. The management of lipohypertrophy in diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Hambridge, Kevin

    Lipohypertrophy has been a recognized complication of insulin therapy for many years, yet research shows that its prevalence in insulin-injecting patients with diabetes remains high. The problem for the patient is that the injection of insulin into a site of lipohypertrophy, although painless, may lead to erratic absorption of the insulin, with the potential for poor glycaemic control and unpredictable hypoglycaemia. Despite the important implications of this for diabetes control in insulin-injecting patients, there is a dearth of information and completed research into the condition. This article raises awareness of lipohypertrophy by reviewing the available literature on the prevention, identification and management of the condition from a nursing perspective. Recommendations for medical and nursing practice in diabetes care to improve prevention and management of lipohypertrophy are made.

  16. Controlling diabetes, controlling diabetics: moral language in the management of diabetes type 2.

    PubMed

    Broom, Dorothy; Whittaker, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Contemporary management of diabetes places heavy emphasis on control, particularly control of blood sugars and of food consumption. Interviews with people living with diabetes type 2 show how identity and social relationships are negotiated through what is often a contradictory language of control, surveillance, discipline and responsibility. People frequently discuss diabetes-related behaviour in terms that position themselves or others as disobedient children, or as wicked or foolish adults. These references occur alongside appraisals of the physical and social complexity of "compliance" with diabetic regimes and in some instances the difficulty of achieving effective control over blood sugar levels. Efforts to protect themselves from the stigmatising potential of diabetes may inadvertently undermine the agency of people who are already coping with a demanding discipline and a potentially disabling or life-threatening disease.

  17. Approach to diabetes management in patients with CVD.

    PubMed

    Lathief, Sanam; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have established a clear association between diabetes and macrovascular disease. Vascular dysfunction caused by metabolic abnormalities in patients with diabetes is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Patients with diabetes are at two to four fold higher CV risk as compared to non-diabetic individuals, and CVD remains the leading cause of mortality in patients with this condition. One strategy to reduce CVD burden in patients with diabetes has been to focus on controlling the major metabolic abnormality in this condition, namely hyperglycemia. However, this has not been unequivocally demonstrated to reduced CV events, in contrast to controlling other CVD risk factors linked to hyperglycemia, such as blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and platelet dysfunction. However, In contradistinction, accrued data from a number of large, randomized clinical trials in both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) over the past 3 decades have proven that more intensive glycemic control retards the onset and progression of microvascular disease. In this review, we will summarize the key glucose-lowering CV outcomes trials in diabetes, provide an overview of the different drugs and their impact on the CV system, and describe our approach to management of the frequently encountered patient with T2DM and coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or heart failure (HF).

  18. The management of the infected diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Caravaggi, Carlo; Sganzaroli, Adriana; Galenda, Paolo; Bassetti, Matteo; Ferraresi, Roberto; Gabrielli, Livio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease with a worldwide increasing trend. Foot complications, closely related to neuropathy and obstructive peripheral vascular disease, are responsible for more than 1 million of leg amputations every year. Foot infection can dramatically increase the risk of amputation. Although many ulcer classification systems have been proposed to stratify the severity of the infectious process, the definition of a specific therapeutic approach still remains an unsolved problem. A Diabetic Foot Triage and an Integrated Surgical Protocol are proposed to identify a diagnostic flowchart and a step-by-step surgical protocol that can be applied in the treatment of diabetic foot infection. Considering the rapid climbing of multidrug resistant strains it is very important to rationalize the use of antibiotics utilizing them only for the treatment of true infected ulcers. PAD is widely considered the most important factor conditioning the outcome of a diabetic foot ulcer. Currently no randomized control trials are reported in the international literature directly comparing open versus endovascular revascularisation in diabetic patients with CLI. Insufficient data are available to demonstrate whether open bypass surgery or endovascular interventions are more effective in these patients. A decisional flow chart in choosing the best revascularization strategy in diabetic patients with CLI is proposed. Goals and technical aspects of emergency and elective surgical procedures in diabetic foot are analysed to evaluate critical aspects and to suggest proper surgical choices.

  19. Telecare for diabetes mellitus: case managers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Chou, Chun-Chen; Mills, Mary Etta

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that, if not treated promptly and appropriately, can cause complex health complications and mortality. Changes in societal structure have fostered an increase in the incidence of diabetes and made the traditional hospital visit model less efficient for meeting the care needs of these patients. The care models that apply technology, such as telecare or so-called telehealth, may be useful in working with diabetes patients. The current study applied qualitative research methodology through interviews with nine diabetes case managers involved in telecare services. To identify the participants' acceptance and perceived effectiveness of telecare services, content analysis of the interview data was used. The following four major themes were identified in the study results: (1) improved case management, (2) setting appropriate expectations for care outcome, (3) acknowledging patients' sense of losing privacy, and (4) disease prevention and interdisciplinary cooperation. The study findings may serve as an indicator of the need for further promotion, appraisal, and validation of the telecare services model, to enhance the comprehensiveness of diabetes care.

  20. Management of feline diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rand, J S; Martin, G J

    2001-09-01

    Up to one quarter of diabetic cats can be well controlled with oral hypoglycemic drugs, although at least 75% require insulin therapy. Most available insulins provide good clinical control but only moderate glycemic control. Because mild to moderate hyperglycemia is well tolerated by cats receiving insulin but hypoglycemia can be life threatening, conservative insulin dosing is recommended. Clinical signs and water intake indicate whether a dose adjustment is required, but serial blood glucose measurements are usually needed to determine the direction of the adjustment. Starting doses of 0.3 to 0.5 IU/kg administered twice daily (rounded down to the nearest whole unit) are usually safe. Dose adjustments should not exceed 1 IU per cat every 2 to 4 weeks unless clinical hypoglycemia has occurred. Cats with clinical hypoglycemia need to be reassessed to see if they are in remission. If not, a 50% to 75% reduction in dose is advised. Approximately 30% of cats go into diabetic remission 1 to 4 months after an adequate treatment protocol is instituted. PMID:11570131

  1. Pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis: an outpatient perspective on evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Bonadio, William

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common, serious acute complication in children with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic ketoacidosis can accompany new-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus or it can occur with established type 1 diabetes mellitus during the increased demands of an acute illness or with decreased insulin delivery due to omitted doses or insulin pump failure. Additionally, diabetic ketoacidosis episodes in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus are being reported with greater frequency. Although the diagnosis is usually straightforward in a known diabetes patient with expected findings, a fair proportion of patients with new-onset diabetes present in diabetic ketoacidosis. The initial management of children with diabetic ketoacidosis frequently occurs in an emergency department. Physicians must be aware that diabetic ketoacidosis is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of pediatric metabolic acidosis. This review will acquaint emergency medicine clinicians with the pathophysiology, treatment, and potential complications of this disorder.

  2. Socioeconomic factors relating to diabetes and its management in India.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Usha; Misra, Anoop; Gupta, Rajeev; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is an escalating problem in India and has major socioeconomic dimensions. Rapid dietary changes coupled with decreased levels of physical activity have resulted in increases in obesity and diabetes in rural and semi-urban areas, as well as in urban-based people living in resettlement colonies. Increasing risk has also been recorded in those who suffered from poor childhood nutrition and in rural-to-urban migrants. Social inequity manifests in disparities in socioeconomic status (SES), place of residence, education, gender, and level of awareness and affects prevention, care, and management. All these population subsets have major socioeconomic challenges: low levels of awareness regarding diabetes and prevention, inadequate resources, insufficient allotment of healthcare budgets, and lack of medical reimbursement. Unawareness and delays in seeking medical help lead to complications, resulting in many-fold increased costs in diabetes care. These costs plunge individuals and households into a vicious cycle of further economic hardship, inadequate management, and premature mortality, resulting in more economic losses. At the societal level, these are massive losses to national productivity and the exchequer. Overall, there is an immediate need to strengthen the healthcare delivery system to generate awareness and for the prevention, early detection, cost-effective management, and rehabilitation of patients with diabetes, with a focus on people belonging to the lower SES and women (with a particular focus on nutrition before and during pregnancy). Because of an enhanced awareness campaign spearheaded through the National Program on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, Diabetes and Stroke (NCPCDS) initiated by Government of India, it is likely that the level of awareness and early detection of diabetes may increase.

  3. Home-Based Diabetes Symptom Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated…

  4. Management of insulin therapy in urban diabetes patients is facilitated by use of an intelligent dosing system.

    PubMed

    Cook, Curtiss B; Mann, Linda J; King, Esther C; New, Katina M; Vaughn, Pamela S; Dames, Faye D; Dunbar, Virginia G; Caudle, Jane M; Tsui, Circe; George, Christopher D; McMichael, John P

    2004-06-01

    The Intelligent Dosing System (IDS, Dimensional Dosing Systems, Inc., Wexford, PA) is a software suite that incorporates patient-specific, dose-response data in a mathematical model, and then calculates the new dose of agent needed to achieve the next desired therapeutic goal. We evaluated use of the IDS for titrating insulin therapy. The IDS was placed on handheld platforms and provided to practitioners to use in adjusting total daily insulin dose. Fasting glucose, random glucose, and hemoglobin A1c were used as markers against which insulin could be adjusted. Values of markers expected at the next follow-up visit, as predicted by the model, were compared with levels actually observed. For 264 patients, 334 paired visits were analyzed. Average age was 54 years, diabetes' duration was 10 years, and body mass index was 33.2 kg/m(2); 57% were female, 88% were African American, and 92% had type 2 diabetes. The correlation between IDS suggested and actual prescribed total daily dose was high (r = 0.99), suggesting good acceptability of the IDS by practitioners. Significant decreases in fasting glucose, random glucose, and hemoglobin A1c levels were seen (all P < 0.0001). No significant difference between average expected and observed follow-up fasting glucose values was found (145 vs. 149 mg/dL, P = 0.42), and correlation was high (r = 0.79). Mean observed random glucose value at follow-up was comparable to the IDS predicted level (167 vs. 168 mg/dL, P = 0.97), and correlation was high (r = 0.73). Observed follow-up hemoglobin A1c was higher than the value expected (7.9% vs. 7.4%, P < 0.0055), but correlation was good (r = 0.70). These analyses suggest the IDS is a useful adjunct for decisions regarding insulin therapy even when using a variety of markers of glucose control, and can be used by practitioners to assist in attainment of glycemic goals.

  5. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Non-insulin management.

    PubMed

    Magon, Navneet; Seshiah, V

    2011-10-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a substantial number of pregnancies. There is consensus that in patients of GDM, excellent blood glucose control, with diet and, when necessary, oral hypoglycemics and insulin results in improved perinatal outcomes, and appreciably reduces the probability of serious neonatal morbidity compared with routine prenatal care. Goals of metabolic management of a pregnancy complicated with GDM have to balance the needs of a healthy pregnancy with the requirements to control glucose level. Medical nutrition therapy is the cornerstone of therapy for women with GDM. Surveillance with daily self-monitoring of blood glucose has been found to help guide management in a much better way than blood glucose checking in labs and clinics, which tends to be less frequent. Historically, insulin has been the therapeutic agent of choice for controlling hyperglycemia in pregnant women. However, difficulty in medication administration with multiple daily injections, potential for hypoglycemia, and increase in appetite and weight make this therapeutic option cumbersome for many pregnant patients. Use of oral hypogycemic agents (OHAs) in pregnancy has opened new vistas for GDM management. At present, there is a growing acceptance of glyburide (glibenclamide) use as the primary therapy for GDM. Glyburide and metformin have been found to be safe, effective and economical for the treatment of gestational diabetes. Insulin, however, still has an important role to play in GDM. GDM is a window of opportunity, which needs to be seized, for prevention of diabetes in future life. Goal of our educational programs should be not only to improve pregnancy outcomes but also to promote healthy lifestyle changes for the mother that will last long after delivery. Team effort on part of obstetricians and endocrinologists is required to make "the diabetes capital of the world" into "the diabetes care capital of the world".

  6. Current management of diabetes mellitus and future directions in care.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    The last 90 years have seen considerable advances in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prof MacLean of Guy's Hospital wrote in the Postgraduate Medical Journal in 1926 about the numerous challenges that faced patients and their healthcare professionals in delivering safe and effective diabetes care at that time. The discovery of insulin in 1922 heralded a new age in enabling long-term glycaemic control, which reduced morbidity and mortality. Thirty years later, the first oral agents for diabetes, the biguanides and sulfonylureas, appeared and freed type 2 patients from having to inject insulin following diagnosis. Improvements in insulin formulations over the decades, including rapid-acting and long-acting insulin analogues that more closely mimic physiological insulin secretion, have increased the flexibility and efficacy of type 1 diabetes management. The last two decades have seen major advances in technology, which has manifested in more accurate glucose monitoring systems and insulin delivery devices ('insulin pump'). Increased understanding of the pathophysiological deficits underlying type 2 diabetes has led to the development of targeted therapeutic approaches such as on the small intestine (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor analogues and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitors) and kidneys (sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). A patient-centred approach delivered by a multidisciplinary team is now advocated. Glycaemic targets are set according to individual circumstances, taking into account factors such as weight, hypoglycaemia risk and patient preference. Stepwise treatment guidelines devised by international diabetes organisations standardise and rationalise management. Structured education programmes and psychological support are now well-established as essential for improving patient motivation and self-empowerment. Large multicentre randomised trials have confirmed the effectiveness of intensive glycaemic control on microvascular

  7. Current management of diabetes mellitus and future directions in care.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    The last 90 years have seen considerable advances in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prof MacLean of Guy's Hospital wrote in the Postgraduate Medical Journal in 1926 about the numerous challenges that faced patients and their healthcare professionals in delivering safe and effective diabetes care at that time. The discovery of insulin in 1922 heralded a new age in enabling long-term glycaemic control, which reduced morbidity and mortality. Thirty years later, the first oral agents for diabetes, the biguanides and sulfonylureas, appeared and freed type 2 patients from having to inject insulin following diagnosis. Improvements in insulin formulations over the decades, including rapid-acting and long-acting insulin analogues that more closely mimic physiological insulin secretion, have increased the flexibility and efficacy of type 1 diabetes management. The last two decades have seen major advances in technology, which has manifested in more accurate glucose monitoring systems and insulin delivery devices ('insulin pump'). Increased understanding of the pathophysiological deficits underlying type 2 diabetes has led to the development of targeted therapeutic approaches such as on the small intestine (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor analogues and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitors) and kidneys (sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). A patient-centred approach delivered by a multidisciplinary team is now advocated. Glycaemic targets are set according to individual circumstances, taking into account factors such as weight, hypoglycaemia risk and patient preference. Stepwise treatment guidelines devised by international diabetes organisations standardise and rationalise management. Structured education programmes and psychological support are now well-established as essential for improving patient motivation and self-empowerment. Large multicentre randomised trials have confirmed the effectiveness of intensive glycaemic control on microvascular

  8. Trial protocol to compare the efficacy of a smartphone-based blood glucose management system with standard clinic care in the gestational diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Mackillop, Lucy H; Bartlett, Katy; Birks, Jacqueline; Farmer, Andrew J; Gibson, Oliver J; Kevat, Dev A; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C; Loerup, Lise; Tarassenko, Lionel; Velardo, Carmelo; Hirst, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is rising in the UK. Good glycaemic control improves maternal and neonatal outcomes. Frequent clinical review of patients with GDM by healthcare professionals is required owing to the rapidly changing physiology of pregnancy and its unpredictable course. Novel technologies that allow home blood glucose (BG) monitoring with results transmitted in real time to a healthcare professional have the potential to deliver good-quality healthcare to women more conveniently and at a lower cost to the patient and the healthcare provider compared to the conventional face-to-face or telephone-based consultation. We have developed an integrated GDm-health management system and aim to test the impact of using this system on maternal glycaemic control, costs, patient satisfaction and maternal and neonatal outcomes compared to standard clinic care in a single large publicly funded (National Health Service (NHS)) maternity unit. Methods and analysis Women with confirmed gestational diabetes in a current pregnancy are individually randomised to either the GDm-health system and half the normal clinic visits or normal clinic care. Primary outcome is mean BG in each group from recruitment to delivery calculated, with adjustments made for number of BG measurements, proportion of preprandial and postprandial readings and length of time in study, and compared between the groups. The secondary objective will be to compare the two groups for compliance to the allocated BG monitoring regime, maternal and neonatal outcomes, glycaemic control using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and other BG metrics, and patient attitudes to care assessed using a questionnaire and resource use. Ethics and dissemination Thresholds for treatment, dietary advice and clinical management are the same in both groups. The results of the study will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated electronically and in print. Trial registration

  9. Management of diabetic nephropathy: Recent progress and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) affecting ∼20-30% diabetics, is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. The progression of kidney disease in patients with diabetes can take many years. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Hyperglycaemia, hypertension, and genetic pre-disposition are the main risk factors besides elevated serum lipids, smoking habits, and the amount of dietary proteins. Interventions such as glycaemic control, blood pressure control and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been shown to slow this progression. Despite the implementation of these strategies, the number of patients with diabetes that ultimately develop end-stage renal disease remains high. The treatment of DN, therefore, has posed a formidable challenge besides optimization of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade in patients with DN; additional investigation has focused on the potential of novel therapies that target various pathways upregulated by hyperglycaemia or other targets believed to promote the progression of DN such as oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelin system and vitamin D receptors. This review article addresses the pathogenesis and some of the well established principles regarding the progression and accepted management of DN, and also includes the perspectives of novel anti-DN agents and the future directions for the prevention of DN.

  10. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  11. Clinical management of concurrent diabetes and tuberculosis and the implications for patient services

    PubMed Central

    Riza, Anca Lelia; Pearson, Fiona; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van de Vijver, Steven; Panduru, Nicolae M; Hill, Philip C; Ruslami, Rovina; Moore, David; Aarnoutse, Rob; Critchley, Julia A; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes triples the risk for active tuberculosis, thus the increasing burden of type 2 diabetes will help to sustain the present tuberculosis epidemic. Recommendations have been made for bidirectional screening, but evidence is scarce about the performance of specific tuberculosis tests in individuals with diabetes, specific diabetes tests in patients with tuberculosis, and screening and preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infections in individuals with diabetes. Clinical management of patients with both diseases can be difficult. Tuberculosis patients with diabetes have a lower concentration of tuberculosis drugs and a higher risk of drug toxicity than tuberculosis patients without diabetes. Good glycaemic control, which reduces long-term diabetes complications and could also improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes, is hampered by chronic inflammation, drug-drug interactions, suboptimum adherence to drug treatments, and other factors. Besides drug treatments for tuberculosis and diabetes, other interventions, such as education, intensive monitoring, and lifestyle interventions, might be needed, especially for patients with newly diagnosed diabetes or those who need insulin. From a health systems point of view, delivery of optimum care and integration of services for tuberculosis and diabetes is a huge challenge in many countries. Experience from the combined tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS epidemic could serve as an example, but more studies are needed that include economic assessments of recommended screening and systems to manage concurrent tuberculosis and diabetes. PMID:25194887

  12. Managing diabetes in the home: a model approach.

    PubMed

    Strock, E; Jacobson, J; Reader, D; Hollander, P

    1988-02-01

    The Diabetes Home Care Program has been an effective means of providing diabetes management and education to homebound, usually elderly, persons with diabetes. The program appears to be cost effective, the average cost per patient is less than one day of hospitalization. Reimbursement of the program has been good as patients have qualified for reimbursement under Medicare guidelines. Improved diabetes control has been demonstrated following the home care intervention. Since elderly persons with diabetes are frequently referred for home care, it would be appropriate for home care agencies to provide specialized care for persons with diabetes. The Diabetes Home Care Program can serve as a model of diabetes management and education for homebound persons with diabetes.

  13. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting patient engagement in diabetes self-management: perspectives of a certified diabetes educator.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kellie M

    2013-02-01

    Patients with diabetes are responsible for the vast majority of management requirements of their condition. However, their ability and motivation to engage in required self-management behaviors may be mitigated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic barriers include attitudes and health beliefs, limited diabetes knowledge and technical skill, reduced functional health literacy, and inadequate self-efficacy to promote positive behavior change. Extrinsic barriers include financial considerations, inadequate family and community support systems, ineffective clinical relationships, and limited access to effective diabetes health care delivery. Diabetes providers have opportunities for enhancing patient engagement with clinical recommendations and diabetes self-management through effective communication, including efforts to contextually assess patients' perceptions of diabetes and how the condition fits within the context of their changing lives. This article provides a conceptual framework for establishing and building an effective clinical alliance with patients with the goal of empowering them to take more control of their diabetes and reduce their risks for poor diabetes outcomes. PMID:23411000

  14. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cogen, Fran R.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies. PMID:26472948

  15. Diabetic foot complications: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Giurini, John M; Lyons, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    Foot complications in patients with diabetes mellitus are a challenge to the health care industry. A great deal of expenditure is due to the management of diabetic foot complications. This places a great burden on the health care industry. It also places a great burden on those diabetic patients with foot complications and their families. Therefore, their effective management in an efficient manner is crucial to our patients. To deal with these problems, a dedicated, knowledgeable, and experienced multidisciplinary team is key. Intervention at the earliest possible time yields the best outcome. Prevention is the focus for those with no ulcerations. For those with ulcerations, prompt recognition and treatment is key. The importance of classifying ulcerations according to size, depth, presence or absence of infection, and vascular status can not be overstated. Proper offloading is vital for those with neuropathic lesions. Recognition of patients with a component of ischemia and vascular intervention to increase perfusion will aid in wound healing. Of course deep infection requires immediate drainage. All efforts of those in the multidisciplinary team are directed at the restoration and maintenance of an ulcer-free foot which is important in enabling our patients to maintain their ambulatory status.

  16. Epidemiology, mechanisms, and management of diabetic gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence of the significant impact of gastroparesis on morbidity and mortality mandates optimized management of this condition. Gastroparesis affects nutritional state, and in diabetics it has deleterious effects on glycemic control and secondary effects on organs that increase mortality. First-line treatments include restoration of nutrition and medications (prokinetic and antiemetic). We review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, impact, natural history, time trends, and treatment of gastroparesis, focusing on diabetic gastroparesis. We discuss pros and cons of current treatment options, including metoclopramide. Second-line therapeutic approaches include surgery, venting gastrostomy or jejunostomy, and gastric electrical stimulation; most of these were developed based on results from open-label trials. New therapeutic strategies for gastroparesis include drugs that target the underlying defects, prokinetic agents such as 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists that do not appear to have cardiac or vascular effects, ghrelin agonists, approaches to pace the stomach, and stem cell therapies.

  17. Understanding "masculinity" and the challenges of managing type-2 diabetes among African-American men.

    PubMed Central

    Liburd, Leandris C.; Namageyo-Funa, Apophia; Jack, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    African-American men bear a greater burden of type-2 diabetes and its associated complications. The purpose of this analysis was to explore in greater depth themes that emerged in illness narratives of a small sample of African-American men living with type-2 diabetes. The primary theme that is the focus of this article is the lived experience of black manhood and masculinity and its intersection with the challenges of diabetes self-management. In-depth interviews with 16 African-American men who had established type-2 diabetes yielded thematic analyses of four questions: (1) What do you fear most about having diabetes? (2) In what ways have people in your life treated you differently after learning you have diabetes? (3) In what ways has knowing you have diabetes affected the way you see yourself? and (4) What are some reactions when you tell people you have diabetes? This preliminary study suggests that the requirements of diabetes self-management often run counter to the traditional sex roles and learned behaviors of African-American men, and this can contribute to nonadherence to medications and poor glycemic control. Gender identity is a key cultural factor that influences health-related behaviors, including how men with type-2 diabetes engage with the healthcare system and manage their diabetes. Understanding African-American men's gender identity is an important component of cultural competency for physicians and can be consequential in patient outcomes. PMID:17534013

  18. Management of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boinpally, Tara; Jovanovic, Lois

    2009-06-01

    Although previously thought to be predominantly transient gestational diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy can be attributed more and more to type 2 diabetes today. Although all types of diabetes in pregnancy pose a threat to the health and future well-being of both the mother and child affected, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes can be significantly more devastating in complications because of effects starting from conception. This rise of type 2 diabetes thus imparts a great sense of urgency to uncover undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy and to take active measures in establishing tight glucose control. From preconception care before pregnancy to medical treatment postpartum, it is essential that immediate care be taken to help mediate the effects of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:19421970

  19. Diabetes Information Technology: Designing Informatics Systems to Catalyze Change in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lester, William T.; Zai, Adrian H.; Chueh, Henry C.; Grant, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Current computerized reminder and decision support systems intended to improve diabetes care have had a limited effect on clinical outcomes. Increasing pressures on health care networks to meet standards of diabetes care have created an environment where information technology systems for diabetes management are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems, and poorly integrated into the existing workflow. After defining the components of diabetes disease management, the authors present an eight-step conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective diabetes information technology systems for translating clinical information into clinical action. PMID:19885355

  20. Effects of Physical Activity on Diabetes Management and Lowering Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Connie L.; Soros, Arlette; Sothern, Melinda S.; Vargas, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is a proven form of diabetes management and is considered a cornerstone in the prevention of diabetes. In children with diabetes, physical activity may improve insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Aerobic-based physical activity lasting 40-60 minutes daily for a minimum of four months is shown to enhance…

  1. Position statement on efficiency of technologies for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vaquero, Pilar; Martínez-Brocca, María Asunción; García-López, José Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Di@bet.es study results are impressive, showing that diabetes affects 13.8% of the Spanish population. Not only the statistical facts are alarming, but the increasing incidence of this disease is a major problem, as pandemic proportions of type 2 diabetes are expected. Thus, the study of diabetes represents a challenge not only for health services, but also for the Ministries of Health and Finance. Technology has become an essential tool in the quality are of patients with diabetes, as it helps in the healthcare processes to obtain an optimum metabolic balance and prevent possible complications. Insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring nd self-monitoring blood glucose have all proved their efficiency, and telemedicine it is making good progress. The indirect costs of diabetes in Spain are much higher than the directones, showing the importance of inverting the paradox. The optimization of resources depends not only on the ability of the physicians, but also the administration, to implant and sustain technological innovations in our system, and with that make it effective in terms of benefits. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis are needed to prioritize and allow health management services to make the correct choices for approaching this prevalent chronic disease.

  2. Position statement on efficiency of technologies for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vaquero, Pilar; Martínez-Brocca, María Asunción; García-López, José Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Di@bet.es study results are impressive, showing that diabetes affects 13.8% of the Spanish population. Not only the statistical facts are alarming, but the increasing incidence of this disease is a major problem, as pandemic proportions of type 2 diabetes are expected. Thus, the study of diabetes represents a challenge not only for health services, but also for the Ministries of Health and Finance. Technology has become an essential tool in the quality are of patients with diabetes, as it helps in the healthcare processes to obtain an optimum metabolic balance and prevent possible complications. Insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring nd self-monitoring blood glucose have all proved their efficiency, and telemedicine it is making good progress. The indirect costs of diabetes in Spain are much higher than the directones, showing the importance of inverting the paradox. The optimization of resources depends not only on the ability of the physicians, but also the administration, to implant and sustain technological innovations in our system, and with that make it effective in terms of benefits. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis are needed to prioritize and allow health management services to make the correct choices for approaching this prevalent chronic disease. PMID:25453400

  3. Technology-facilitated depression care management among predominantly Latino diabetes patients within a public safety net care system: comparative effectiveness trial design.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shinyi; Ell, Kathleen; Gross-Schulman, Sandra G; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Katon, Wayne J; Nezu, Art M; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Vidyanti, Irene; Chou, Chih-Ping; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Health disparities in minority populations are well recognized. Hispanics and Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States; a significant proportion receives their care via a safety net. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression is high among this group, but the uptake of evidence-based collaborative depression care management has been suboptimal. The study design and baseline characteristics of the enrolled sample in the Diabetes-Depression Care-management Adoption Trial (DCAT) establishes a quasi-experimental comparative effectiveness research clinical trial aimed at accelerating the adoption of collaborative depression care in safety net clinics. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services at eight county-operated clinics. DCAT has enrolled 1406 low-income, predominantly Hispanic/Latino patients with diabetes to test a translational model of depression care management. This three-group study compares usual care with a collaborative care team support model and a technology-facilitated depression care model that provides automated telephonic depression screening and monitoring tailored to patient conditions and preferences. Call results are integrated into a diabetes disease management registry that delivers provider notifications, generates tasks, and issues critical alerts. All subjects receive comprehensive assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months by independent English-Spanish bilingual interviewers. Study outcomes include depression outcomes, treatment adherence, satisfaction, acceptance of assessment and monitoring technology, social and economic stress reduction, diabetes self-care management, health care utilization, and care management model cost and cost-effectiveness comparisons. DCAT's goal is to optimize depression screening, treatment, follow-up, outcomes, and cost savings to reduce health disparities.

  4. [Sick day management in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    A bad cold, the flu or a serious illness can make blood glucose too high in elderly person with diabetes. Gastrointestinal illnesses may cause hypoglycemia for individuals treated with insulin, sulfonylureas or glitinides. When the persons with diabetes discontinue insulin or diabetes medications because of appetite loss and reduced food intake, they may fall into diabetic crises, such as ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The elderly patients need to take extra precautions on sick days to avoid diabetic crises or hypoglycemia. Key principles of sick day management are (1) maintaining hydration and carbohydrate intake, (2) monitoring blood glucose and ketone levels, (3) adjusting diabetes medications according to carbohydrate intake, blood glucose and ketone levels. In Japan, the numbers of frail elderly diabetic patients is markedly increased, effective and efficient sick day management for frail elderly diabetic patients is requested.

  5. Managing psychosocial issues in a family with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Judith M; Murphy, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Managing diabetes in a child or teen requires constant attention and adjustment of insulin, carbohydrate intake, and activity level. Intensive diabetes management has the potential to improve diabetes outcomes; however, negotiating the many lifestyle accommodations essential to optimal diabetes control can place a significant burden on some children and families. Parenting a child with diabetes also involves a complex process of helping the child to achieve age-appropriate independence while assuring the child's safety in managing his or her diabetes. Each developmental stage brings new challenges to achieving the delicate balance between optimal diabetes control and age-appropriate independence in self-care management. Despite the laborious and intensive nature of diabetes treatment, an overarching goal of parenting a child with diabetes is to ensure that the family's quality of life is maintained and the child is able to participate in all academic and social activities that their peers enjoy. Although many families adapt and thrive, others struggle to make these adjustments. Working with families who are overwhelmed, encouraging them to identify and develop networks involving schools, extended family, community, and church groups can help them to increase available support. Helping families to access treatment when they are struggling can relieve further pain and improve management adherence and diabetes outcomes. Nurses are in a key position to evaluate the family's adaptive and coping skills and assist them to negotiate the psychosocial challenges that living with diabetes entails. PMID:21164317

  6. Potential Bioactive Compounds from Seaweed for Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Sharifuddin, Yusrizam; Chin, Yao-Xian; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi

    2015-08-21

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders of the endocrine system characterised by hyperglycaemia. Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) constitutes the majority of diabetes cases around the world and are due to unhealthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, as well as rise of obesity in the population, which warrants the search for new preventive and treatment strategies. Improved comprehension of T2DM pathophysiology provided various new agents and approaches against T2DM including via nutritional and lifestyle interventions. Seaweeds are rich in dietary fibres, unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenolic compounds. Many of these seaweed compositions have been reported to be beneficial to human health including in managing diabetes. In this review, we discussed the diversity of seaweed composition and bioactive compounds which are potentially useful in preventing or managing T2DM by targeting various pharmacologically relevant routes including inhibition of enzymes such as α-glucosidase, α-amylase, lipase, aldose reductase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Other mechanisms of action identified, such as anti-inflammatory, induction of hepatic antioxidant enzymes' activities, stimulation of glucose transport and incretin hormones release, as well as β-cell cytoprotection, were also discussed by taking into consideration numerous in vitro, in vivo, and human studies involving seaweed and seaweed-derived agents.

  7. Potential Bioactive Compounds from Seaweed for Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Sharifuddin, Yusrizam; Chin, Yao-Xian; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders of the endocrine system characterised by hyperglycaemia. Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) constitutes the majority of diabetes cases around the world and are due to unhealthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, as well as rise of obesity in the population, which warrants the search for new preventive and treatment strategies. Improved comprehension of T2DM pathophysiology provided various new agents and approaches against T2DM including via nutritional and lifestyle interventions. Seaweeds are rich in dietary fibres, unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenolic compounds. Many of these seaweed compositions have been reported to be beneficial to human health including in managing diabetes. In this review, we discussed the diversity of seaweed composition and bioactive compounds which are potentially useful in preventing or managing T2DM by targeting various pharmacologically relevant routes including inhibition of enzymes such as α-glucosidase, α-amylase, lipase, aldose reductase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Other mechanisms of action identified, such as anti-inflammatory, induction of hepatic antioxidant enzymes’ activities, stimulation of glucose transport and incretin hormones release, as well as β-cell cytoprotection, were also discussed by taking into consideration numerous in vitro, in vivo, and human studies involving seaweed and seaweed-derived agents. PMID:26308010

  8. Diabetes foot disease: the Cinderella of Australian diabetes management?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the greatest public health challenges to face Australia. It is already Australia’s leading cause of kidney failure, blindness (in those under 60 years) and lower limb amputation, and causes significant cardiovascular disease. Australia’s diabetes amputation rate is one of the worst in the developed world, and appears to have significantly increased in the last decade, whereas some other diabetes complication rates appear to have decreased. This paper aims to compare the national burden of disease for the four major diabetes-related complications and the availability of government funding to combat these complications, in order to determine where diabetes foot disease ranks in Australia. Our review of relevant national literature indicates foot disease ranks second overall in burden of disease and last in evidenced-based government funding to combat these diabetes complications. This suggests public funding to address foot disease in Australia is disproportionately low when compared to funding dedicated to other diabetes complications. There is ample evidence that appropriate government funding of evidence-based care improves all diabetes complication outcomes and reduces overall costs. Numerous diverse Australian peak bodies have now recommended similar diabetes foot evidence-based strategies that have reduced diabetes amputation rates and associated costs in other developed nations. It would seem intuitive that “it’s time” to fund these evidence-based strategies for diabetes foot disease in Australia as well. PMID:23021818

  9. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  10. The scope of cell phones in diabetes management in developing country health care settings.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Vamadevan S; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes has emerged as a major public health concern in developing nations. Health systems in most developing countries are yet to integrate effective prevention and control programs for diabetes into routine health care services. Given the inadequate human resources and underfunctioning health systems, we need novel and innovative approaches to combat diabetes in developing-country settings. In this regard, the tremendous advances in telecommunication technology, particularly cell phones, can be harnessed to improve diabetes care. Cell phones could serve as a tool for collecting information on surveillance, service delivery, evidence-based care, management, and supply systems pertaining to diabetes from primary care settings in addition to providing health messages as part of diabetes education. As a screening/diagnostic tool for diabetes, cell phones can aid the health workers in undertaking screening and diagnostic and follow-up care for diabetes in the community. Cell phones are also capable of acting as a vehicle for continuing medical education; a decision support system for evidence-based management; and a tool for patient education, self-management, and compliance. However, for widespread use, we need robust evaluations of cell phone applications in existing practices and appropriate interventions in diabetes.

  11. The Scope of Cell Phones in Diabetes Management in Developing Country Health Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ajay, Vamadevan S; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes has emerged as a major public health concern in developing nations. Health systems in most developing countries are yet to integrate effective prevention and control programs for diabetes into routine health care services. Given the inadequate human resources and underfunctioning health systems, we need novel and innovative approaches to combat diabetes in developing-country settings. In this regard, the tremendous advances in telecommunication technology, particularly cell phones, can be harnessed to improve diabetes care. Cell phones could serve as a tool for collecting information on surveillance, service delivery, evidence-based care, management, and supply systems pertaining to diabetes from primary care settings in addition to providing health messages as part of diabetes education. As a screening/diagnostic tool for diabetes, cell phones can aid the health workers in undertaking screening and diagnostic and follow-up care for diabetes in the community. Cell phones are also capable of acting as a vehicle for continuing medical education; a decision support system for evidence-based management; and a tool for patient education, self-management, and compliance. However, for widespread use, we need robust evaluations of cell phone applications in existing practices and appropriate interventions in diabetes. PMID:21722593

  12. Management of the diabetic foot ulcer: exercising control.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Jenny; Foster, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing and therefore patients with diabetic foot ulcers will become increasingly common in the community. The NHS model of Health and Social Care (Department of Health (DH), 2005) places a high emphasis on self care and disease management, and, as a long-term condition, diabetes mellitus requires efficient and effective management. The supervision and organization of the care of diabetic patients is multi-factorial and for this reason, a multi-disciplinary approach is essential for effective care, without which patients with diabetic foot ulcers are at high risk of complications. Diabetic wounds present differently to other chronic wounds; unless these are adequately assessed and treated, there may be devastating consequences for the patient--the most serious being major amputation and/or death. In the first article, accurate assessment was discussed; in this second article, the management of diabetic foot ulcers is explored.

  13. Microsurgical management of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Christian; Schwabegger, Anton H; Meirer, Romed; Perkmann, Reinhold; Ninkovic, Marina; Ninkovic, Milomir

    2003-11-01

    Allthough there has been dramatic progress in limb salvage in recent decades, management of nonhealing wounds in diabetic patients continues to present a dilemma for the reconstructive surgeon. However, the acceptance of free-flap resurfacing of diabetic foot ulcers has increased in recent years. This study reviews 10 microvascular free muscle flaps in nine patients over a mean follow-up period of 44 months. Five patients had evidence of peripheral vascular disease. There was one flap loss, and nine flaps were transferred successfully. No perioperative mortality was encountered. The operations required a long, costly hospitalization (average hospital stay was 40 days). Seven of eight patients whose flaps survived had complications related to the free-flap recipient site. These seven patients underwent 20 secondary surgical procedures due to arterial and venous thrombosis, partial necrosis of the skin grafts, minor local infections, and gangrene or necrosis of the remaining toes. In three patients, progressive ischemic necrosis of the remaining toes, with total survival of the flap, was attributed to a microvascular steal phenomenon. However, all eight patients whose flaps survived subsequently ambulated on their flaps. The study demonstrates that microvascular surgery may result in functional lower-extremity salvage in diabetic patients with foot wounds that are not treatable by local flaps or skin grafts, and are destined for amputation.

  14. Managing dyslipidaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Szalat, Auryan; Durst, Ronen; Leitersdorf, Eran

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-control has a modest beneficial effect on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thus, managing other atherogenic risk factors including hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol and moderately elevated LDL-cholesterol levels with increased small dense LDL-cholesterol fraction, is crucial. Insulin resistance is a key pathophysiologic factor in this population. Treatment starts with lifestyle modifications, but current best programmes have not translated into positive cardiovascular outcomes. Lowering LDL-cholesterol with statins is currently the main treatment strategy, but significant residual risk remains. Attempts to elevate HDL-cholesterol and to reduce triglycerides levels, with niacin or fibrates have not improved cardiovascular prognosis, but addition of ezetimibe, or fibrates in specific patients subgroups, have shown modest benefit. Some glucose-lowering medications and bariatric surgery may also improve diabetic dyslipidemia. Results of three major cardiovascular outcome trials evaluating the effect of lowering LDL-cholesterol with PCSK9 inhibitors in large cohorts that include thousands of diabetic patients are pending. PMID:27432076

  15. Troubled interventions: public policy, vectors of disease, and the rhetoric of diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jeffrey A

    2013-03-01

    This essay examines the debate surrounding New York City's controversial diabetes registry program. Exploring the tensions between public health officials and privacy advocates, the article explores how diabetes is imagined in the public sphere. Although rhetorics underscoring privacy may seem the more progressive discourse, I argue New York City's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has the more forward-looking plan, attempting to reconstitute diabetes not as a chronic condition necessitating individual management but as a disease that requires systemic intervention.

  16. Central nervous system involvement in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Dinesh; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2006-12-01

    Diabetic complications result in much morbidity and mortality and considerable consumption of scarce medical resources. Thus, elucidation of the risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying diabetic complications is important. The effects of diabetes on the central nervous system (CNS) result in cognitive dysfunction and cerebrovascular disease. Treatment-related hypoglycemia also has CNS consequences. Advances in neuroimaging now provide greater insights into the structural and functional impact of diabetes on the CNS. Greater understanding of CNS involvement could lead to new strategies to prevent or reverse the damage caused by diabetes mellitus.

  17. The HLA system and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cudworth, A G; Woodrow, J C

    1977-06-01

    There is a significant positive association between insulin dependent diabetes, irrespective of age of onset, and the HLA system, whereas there is no association of HLA antigens with non-insulin dependent diabetes. There is a significant concordance value for HLA antigen frequencies in insulin dependent diabetics from three different centres, indicating that the genes (s) conferring susceptibility to this type of diabetes is possibly present in all "juvenile-onset" diabetics and is in linkage disequilibrium with all the B locus alleles. PMID:892129

  18. Perioperative management of diabetes insipidus in children.

    PubMed

    Wise-Faberowski, Lisa; Soriano, Sulpicio G; Ferrari, Lynne; McManus, Michael L; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Majzoub, Joseph; Scott, R Michael; Truog, Robert; Rockoff, Mark A

    2004-07-01

    Managing children with diabetes insipidus (DI) in the perioperative period is complicated and frequently associated with electrolyte imbalance compounded by over- or underhydration. In this study the authors developed and prospectively evaluated a multidisciplinary approach to the perioperative management of DI with a comparison to 19 historical control children. Eighteen children either with preoperative DI or undergoing neurosurgical operations associated with a high risk for developing postoperative DI were identified and managed using a standardized protocol. In all patients in whom DI occurred during or after surgery, a continuous intravenous infusion of aqueous vasopressin was initiated and titrated until antidiuresis was established. Intravenous fluids were given as normal saline and restricted to two thirds of the estimated maintenance rate plus amounts necessary to replace blood losses and maintain hemodynamic stability. In all children managed in this fashion, perioperative serum sodium concentrations were generally maintained between 130 and 150 mEq/L, and no adverse consequences of this therapy developed. In the 24-hour period evaluated, the mean change in serum sodium concentrations between the historical controls was 17.6 +/- 9.2 mEq/L versus 8.36 +/- 6.43 mEq/L in those children managed by the protocol. Hyponatremia occurred less frequently in the children managed with this protocol compared with historical controls.

  19. Epidemiology, Mechanisms and Management of Diabetic Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence of the significant impact of gastroparesis on morbidity and mortality mandates optimized management of this condition. Gastroparesis affects nutritional state and, in diabetics, it also has deleterious effects on glycemic control and secondary effects on organs that lead to increased mortality. First-line treatment includes restoration of nutrition and medications (prokinetic and antiemetic). Aim To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, impact, natural history, time trends and treatment of gastroparesis with particular focus on diabetic gastroparesis. Methods The pros and cons of current treatment options including metoclopramide are discussed. Second-line approaches include surgery, venting gastrostomy or jejunostomy, and gastric electrical stimulation; most of these treatments are based on open-label treatment trials. Results/Conclusions In the future, drugs that target the underlying defects and new prokinetics such as newer 5-HT4 agonists (which appear to be devoid of cardiac or vascular effects), ghrelin agonists, new approaches to pacing the stomach, and stem cell therapies may bring more effective treatments to ameliorate the management of patients with gastroparesis. PMID:20951838

  20. Diabetes disease management in Medicaid managed care: a program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patric, Kenneth; Stickles, Joyce D; Turpin, Robin S; Simmons, Jeffrey B; Jackson, James; Bridges, Elizabeth; Shah, Manan

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a diabetes disease management initiative among TennCare's Medicaid Population. A quasi-experimental group design was conducted using a control group and a diabetes disease management intervention group. Primary outcomes measures were rates for three key recommended tests (ie, microalbuminuria, lipids, and hemoglobin A1c). Secondary performance measures --patient satisfaction and program evaluation issues -- also were assessed. The study was performed among TennCare beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus. It utilized a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design, with 993 intervention participants in Knoxville and 1167 control group members in Chattanooga. Variables analyzed included testing rates for hemoglobin A1c, lipids, microalbuminuria, and demographics. A logistic regression model using baseline covariates was constructed to analyze the differences between the intervention and the control groups. Intracluster correlations were accounted for by generalized estimating equations. Statistical process control detected process changes in testing rates over time. There were meaningful changes in the rate of ordering recommended tests. The odds of an individual in the intervention group having at least one microalbuminuria test were 196% more (confidence interval [CI] = 1.50, 5.82; p = 0.002); the odds of having at least one lipid profile were 43% more (CI = 1.01, 2.02; p = 0.042); and the odds of having two or more hemoglobin A1c tests were 39% more (CI = 0.87, 2.23; p = 0.165) than the odds of an individual in the control group. The analysis also showed a high rate of satisfaction among patients in the intervention group. The program was successful in meeting its stated goals of providing effective disease management for TennCare patients with diabetes.

  1. Management of diabetic foot ulcers: evaluation of case studies.

    PubMed

    Torkington-Stokes, Rachel; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-11

    This article explores local barriers to diabetic foot ulcer healing, and describes the use of a dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm (AQUACEL® Ag+ dressing (AQAg+)) on recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers. The authors consider four case studies that demonstrate how managing local barriers to wound healing with antimicrobial and anti-biofilm dressings in protocols of care can improve outcomes for patients.

  2. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels.

  3. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels. PMID:25337960

  4. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of < 7.0%, 72.8% achieved a blood pressure of < 140/85 mmHg, and 58.0% achieved a low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of < 100 mg/dL. Only 19.7% of patients with diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes. PMID:27604796

  5. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of < 7.0%, 72.8% achieved a blood pressure of < 140/85 mmHg, and 58.0% achieved a low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of < 100 mg/dL. Only 19.7% of patients with diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes. PMID:27604796

  6. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of < 7.0%, 72.8% achieved a blood pressure of < 140/85 mmHg, and 58.0% achieved a low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of < 100 mg/dL. Only 19.7% of patients with diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes.

  7. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyenihi, Ayodeji Babatunde; Ayeleso, Ademola Olabode; Masola, Bubuya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood) resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage) is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants. PMID:25821809

  8. Dietary fiber in the management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, F Q

    1993-04-01

    It generally is accepted that a diet high in fiber, particularly soluble fiber, is useful in the management of the plasma glucose concentration in individuals with diabetes. This is one of the reasons several national diabetes associations have recommended that diabetic individuals ingest a diet high in fiber-containing foods. However, more recent data obtained in carefully controlled studies with more definitive end points, indicate this may not be the case. It has been shown clearly that addition of water-soluble, gel-forming fiber in the form of guar gum and perhaps gum tragacanth to an ingested glucose solution or to a mixed meal will reduce the expected rise in glucose concentration. This has been demonstrated in both normal subjects and subjects with IDDM and NIDDM. However, it is only observed when large amounts of fiber are added. The fiber also must be mixed with the administered glucose or food. Other less viscous soluble fiber sources such as the pectins and psyllium powder are not effective. In long-term, well-controlled trials, guar gum, pectin, beet fiber, or cereal bran fiber ingested with meals has been of little or no value in controlling the plasma glucose concentration in individuals with NIDDM. Several studies have been conducted in which a high-carbohydrate diet has been reported to reduce the plasma glucose concentration. In these diets, foods with a high fiber content have been emphasized. In general, they were not well controlled, and several confounding variables such as weight loss, decreased food energy intake, different food sources with potential for differences in starch digestibility, and decreased dietary fat content were present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Reference frameworks for the health management of measles, breast cancer and diabetes (type II).

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut; Schröder, Peter; Davies, John K; Escamilla, Ixhel; Hall, Caroline; Hickey, Kieran; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Mechtler, Reli; Yared, Wendy Tse; Volf, Jaroslav; Weihrauch, Birgit

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents reference frameworks which order effective and feasible policies and interventions for the health management of measles, breast cancer and diabetes (type II). These reference frameworks can be used to rapidly appraise regional health policy documents and existing health management systems. Furthermore, the reference frameworks can serve health policy makers for the planning of health management measures.

  10. Misconceptions About Diabetes and Its Management Among Low-Income Minorities With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Devin M.; Ponieman, Diego; Leventhal, Howard; Halm, Ethan A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine diabetic patients' knowledge and beliefs about the disease and medications that could hinder optimal disease management. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A cross-sectional survey of 151 type 2 diabetic patients characterizing diabetes knowledge and beliefs about the disease and medications was conducted. RESULTS Mean diabetes duration was 13 years. Over half of the patients (56%) believed that normal glucose is ≤200 mg/dl, 54% reported being able to feel when blood glucose levels are high, 36% thought that they will not always have diabetes, 29% thought that their doctor will cure them of diabetes, one in four (23%) said there is no need to take diabetes medications when glucose levels are normal, and 12% believed they have diabetes only when glucose levels are high. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes knowledge and beliefs inconsistent with a chronic disease model of diabetes were prevalent in this sample. Suboptimal knowledge and beliefs are potentially modifiable and are logical targets for educational interventions to improve diabetes self-management. PMID:19131457

  11. Management of diabetes in South Asian communities in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jillian

    This article discusses some of the specific challenges related to the management of diabetes in patients of South Asian origin. Communicating information that considers cultural, religious and language differences is important to promote effective self-management. The South Asian population in the UK is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and cultural practices such as fasting if not managed properly can lead to deterioration in their condition. The use of appropriate information and educators with Asian language skills and an understanding of the local population's culture are important to improve self-management of diabetes in these patients. PMID:16536399

  12. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis: programmatic management issues.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Kumar, A M V; Satyanarayana, S; Lin, Y; Zachariah, R; Lönnroth, K; Kapur, A

    2015-08-01

    In August 2011, the World Health Organization and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched the Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to guide policy makers and implementers in combatting the epidemics of both diseases. Progress has been made, and includes identifying how best to undertake bidirectional screening for both diseases, how to provide optimal treatment and care for patients with dual disease and the most suitable framework for monitoring and evaluation. Key programmatic challenges include the following: whether screening should be directed at all patients or targeted at those with high-risk characteristics; the most suitable technologies for diagnosing TB and diabetes in routine settings; the best time to screen TB patients for DM; how to provide an integrated, coordinated approach to case management; and finally, how to persuade non-communicable disease programmes to adopt a cohort analysis approach, preferably using electronic medical records, for monitoring and evaluation. The link between DM and TB and the implementation of the collaborative framework for care and control have the potential to stimulate and strengthen the scale-up of non-communicable disease care and prevention programmes, which may help in reducing not only the global burden of DM but also the global burden of TB.

  13. Self-management experiences among men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to better understand differences in diabetes self-management, specifically needs, barriers and challenges among men and women living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods 35 participants were recruited from a diabetes education center (DEC) in Toronto, Canada. Five focus groups and nine individual interviews were conducted to explore men and women's diabetes self-management experiences. Results The average age of participants was 57 years and just over half (51.4%) were female. Analyses revealed five themes: disclosure and identity as a person living with diabetes; self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG); diet struggles across varying contexts; utilization of diabetes resources; and social support. Women disclosed their diabetes more readily and integrated management into their daily lives, whereas men were more reluctant to tell friends and family about their diabetes and were less observant of self-management practices in social settings. Men focused on practical aspects of SMBG and experimented with various aspects of management to reduce reliance on medications whereas women focused on affective components of SMBG. Women restricted foods from their diets perceived as prohibited whereas many men moderated their intake of perceived unhealthy foods, except in social situations. Women used socially interactive resources, like education classes and support groups whereas men relied more on self-directed learning but also described wanting more guidance to help navigate the healthcare system. Finally, men and women reported wanting physician support for both affective and practical aspects of self-management. Conclusions Our findings highlight the differences in needs and challenges of diabetes self-management among men and women, which may inform gender-sensitive diabetes, care, counseling and support. PMID:23249410

  14. Diabetes management in Thailand: a literature review of the burden, costs, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deerochanawong, Chaicharn; Ferrario, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Management of diabetes represents an enormous challenge for health systems at every level of development. The latter are tested for their ability to continuously deliver high quality care to patients from the day they are diagnosed throughout their life. In this study, we review the status of diabetes management in Thailand and try to identify the key challenges the country needs to address to reduce the current (and future) medical and economic burden caused by the disease.We conducted a literature review on the burden, costs, and outcomes of diabetes in Thailand. This information was complemented by personal communication with senior officials in the Thai Ministry of Health.We identified the following priorities for the future management of diabetes in Thailand. First, increasing screening of diabetes in high risk population and promoting annual screening of diabetes complications in all diabetic patients. Second, identifying and addressing factors affecting poor treatment outcomes. Third, policy should specify clear targets and provide and use a monitoring framework to track progress. Fourth, efforts are needed to further improve data availability. Up-to-date data on the medical and economic burden of diabetes representative at the national level and at least the regional level are essential to identify needs and monitor progress towards established targets. Fifth, promotion of a healthy lifestyle for prevention of diabetes through education and quality information delivered to the public. PMID:23497447

  15. Diabetes management in Thailand: a literature review of the burden, costs, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Management of diabetes represents an enormous challenge for health systems at every level of development. The latter are tested for their ability to continuously deliver high quality care to patients from the day they are diagnosed throughout their life. In this study, we review the status of diabetes management in Thailand and try to identify the key challenges the country needs to address to reduce the current (and future) medical and economic burden caused by the disease. We conducted a literature review on the burden, costs, and outcomes of diabetes in Thailand. This information was complemented by personal communication with senior officials in the Thai Ministry of Health. We identified the following priorities for the future management of diabetes in Thailand. First, increasing screening of diabetes in high risk population and promoting annual screening of diabetes complications in all diabetic patients. Second, identifying and addressing factors affecting poor treatment outcomes. Third, policy should specify clear targets and provide and use a monitoring framework to track progress. Fourth, efforts are needed to further improve data availability. Up-to-date data on the medical and economic burden of diabetes representative at the national level and at least the regional level are essential to identify needs and monitor progress towards established targets. Fifth, promotion of a healthy lifestyle for prevention of diabetes through education and quality information delivered to the public. PMID:23497447

  16. Prevalence and Management of Diabetic Nephropathy in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) often results in end-stage renal disease, and this is the most common reason for initiation of dialysis in the United States. Complications of diabetes, particularly renal disease, substantially increase the risk of subsequent severe illness and death. The prevalence of DN is still rising dramatically, with concomitant increases in associated mortality and cardiovascular complications. Summary Renal involvement in type 1 and type 2 diabetes reflects a complex pathogenesis. Various genetic and environmental factors determine the susceptibility and progression to advanced stages of the disease. DN should be considered in patients who have had type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years with microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. The glomerular characteristic features include mesangial expansion, thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. The optimal therapy of DN continues to evolve. For all diabetic patients, practical management including blood glucose and blood pressure control with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering the dietary protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Key Message DN is a complex disease linking hemodynamic and metabolic pathways with oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. We summarize the current evidence of epidemiology, clinical diagnosis, and the current management of DN in Western countries. Facts from East and West The prevalence of DN is increasing in Asia and Western countries alike. The deletion (D) allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene is associated with progression to end-stage renal disease in Asian patients with DN, but this association is

  17. Care Utilization Patterns and Diabetes Self-Management Education Duration

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer; Churilla, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Previous studies have shown that receiving diabetes self-management education (DSME) is associated with increased care utilization. However, the relationship between DSME duration and care utilization patterns remains largely unexamined. Our purpose is to characterize DSME duration and examine the relationship between DSME duration and clinical- and self-care utilization patterns. Methods. The study sample included 1,446 adults who were ≥18 years of age, had diabetes, and had participated in the 2008 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Clinical- and self-care outcomes were derived using responses to the survey’s diabetes module and were based on minimum standards of care established by the American Diabetes Association. The outcomes examined included self-monitoring of blood glucose at least once per day; receiving at least one eye exam, one foot exam, A1C tests, and an influenza vaccination in the past year; and ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination. DSME duration was categorized as no DSME, >0 to <4 hours, 4–10 hours, and >10 hours. Results. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, compared to those who did not receive DSME, those who had 4–10 or 10+ hours of DSME were more likely to receive two A1C tests (odds ratio [95% CI] 2.69 [1.30–5.58] and 2.63 [1.10–6.31], respectively) and have a pneumococcal vaccination (1.98 [1.03–3.80] and 1.92 [1.01–3.64], respectively). Those receiving 10+ hours of DSME were 2.2 times (95% CI 1.18–4.09) as likely to have an influenza vaccination. Conclusion. These data reveal a positive relationship between DSME duration and utilization of some diabetes clinical care services. PMID:26300613

  18. Pleiotropic effects of type 2 diabetes management strategies on renal risk factors.

    PubMed

    Muskiet, Marcel H A; Tonneijck, Lennart; Smits, Mark M; Kramer, Mark H H; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; van Raalte, Daniël H

    2015-05-01

    In parallel with the type 2 diabetes pandemic, diabetic kidney disease has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As established in landmark randomised trials and recommended in clinical guidelines, prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease focuses on control of the two main renal risk factors, hyperglycaemia and systemic hypertension. Treatment of systemic hypertension with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers is advocated because these drugs seem to exert specific renoprotective effects beyond blood pressure lowering. Emerging evidence shows that obesity, glomerular hyperfiltration, albuminuria, and dyslipidaemia might also adversely affect the kidney in diabetes. Control of these risk factors could have additional benefits on renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, despite multifactorial treatment approaches, residual risk for the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes remains, and novel strategies or therapies to treat the disease are urgently needed. Several drugs used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes are associated with pleiotropic effects that could favourably or unfavourably change patients' renal risk profile. We review the risk factors and treatment of diabetic kidney disease, and describe the pleiotropic effects of widely used drugs in type 2 diabetes management on renal outcomes, with special emphasis on antihyperglycaemic drugs.

  19. Alphabet Strategy for diabetes care: A multi-professional, evidence-based, outcome-directed approach to management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James D; Saravanan, Ponnusamy; Patel, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    With the rising global prevalence in diabetes, healthcare systems are facing a growing challenge to provide efficient and effective diabetes care management in the face of spiralling treatment costs. Diabetes is a major cause of premature mortality and associated with devastating complications especially if managed poorly. Although diabetes care is improving in England and Wales, recent audit data suggests care remains imperfect with wide geographical variations in quality. Diabetes care is expensive with a sizeable amount of available expenditure used for treating the complications of diabetes. A target driven, long-term, multifactorial intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes has been shown to reduce mortality and morbidity. The alphabet strategy is a novel approach to effective diabetes care provision, aiming to address patient education and empowerment, provide consistent comprehensive care delivered in a timely fashion, and allowing multidisciplinary team work. PMID:26131328

  20. Alphabet Strategy for diabetes care: A multi-professional, evidence-based, outcome-directed approach to management.

    PubMed

    Lee, James D; Saravanan, Ponnusamy; Patel, Vinod

    2015-06-25

    With the rising global prevalence in diabetes, healthcare systems are facing a growing challenge to provide efficient and effective diabetes care management in the face of spiralling treatment costs. Diabetes is a major cause of premature mortality and associated with devastating complications especially if managed poorly. Although diabetes care is improving in England and Wales, recent audit data suggests care remains imperfect with wide geographical variations in quality. Diabetes care is expensive with a sizeable amount of available expenditure used for treating the complications of diabetes. A target driven, long-term, multifactorial intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes has been shown to reduce mortality and morbidity. The alphabet strategy is a novel approach to effective diabetes care provision, aiming to address patient education and empowerment, provide consistent comprehensive care delivered in a timely fashion, and allowing multidisciplinary team work.

  1. Diabetic patients' willingness to use tele-technology to manage their disease – A descriptive study.

    PubMed Central

    Saddik, Basema; Al-Dulaijan, Norah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern worldwide. TeleHealth technology may be an effective tool for empowering patients in the self-management of diabetes mellitus. However despite the great impact of diabetes on healthcare in Saudi Arabia, no research has investigated diabetic patients' willingness to use this technology. This study investigates diabetic patients' willingness to use tele-technology as a tool to monitor their disease. Methods: Data were collected from diabetic patients attending the diabetes education clinic at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs (MNGHA) in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia over a three month period. A survey was developed which measured patients' willingness to use tele-technology in the self-management of their diabetes as well as their perceived expectations from the technology. Results: The study found that the majority of patients were willing to use tele-technology to self- monitor their diabetes. However, a minority (11.3%) indicated willingness to use the system daily and only half indicated preference to use it once a week (53.8%). Patients who were younger, had higher education levels, were employed, had internet access and had Type II diabetes were significantly more likely to report willingness to use the technology. Conclusions: Diabetic patients could be ready to play a more active role in their care if given the opportunity. Results from this study could serve as a baseline for future studies to develop targeted interventions by trialing tele-technology on a sample of the diabetic population. Patients with diabetes need to be in charge of their own care in order to improve health outcomes across the country. PMID:26284148

  2. Changing trends in management of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Poomalar, Gunasekaran Kala

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is on the rise globally. In view of the increasing prevalence of GDM and fetal and neonatal complications associated with it, there is a splurge of research in this field and management of GDM is undergoing a sea change. Trends are changing in prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and future follow up. There is emerging evidence regarding use of moderate exercise, probiotics and vitamin D in the prevention of GDM. Regarding treatment, newer insulin analogs like aspart, lispro and detemir are associated with better glycemic control than older insulins. Continuous glucose monitoring systems and continuous subcutaneous insulin systems may play a role in those who require higher doses of insulin for sugar control. Evidence exists that favors metformin as a safer alternative to insulin in view of good glycemic control and better perinatal outcomes. As the risk of developing GDM in subsequent pregnancies and also the risk of overt diabetes in later life is high, regular assessment of these women is required in future. Lifestyle interventions or metformin should be offered to women with a history of GDM who develop pre-diabetes. Further studies are required in the field of prevention of GDM for optimizing obstetric outcome. PMID:25789109

  3. Diabetes insipidus: Differential diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Gary L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a syndrome characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of dilute urine. It can be caused by any of 4 fundamentally different defects that must be distinguished for safe and effective management. They are: (1) pituitary DI, due to inadequate production and secretion of antidiuretic hormone, arginine-vasopressin (AVP); (2) gestational DI due to degradation of AVP by an enzyme made in placenta; (3) primary polydipsia, due to suppression of AVP secretion by excessive fluid intake; and (4) nephrogenic DI due to renal insensitivity to the antidiuretic effect of AVP. This review describes several methods of differential diagnosis, indicates the advantages and disadvantages of each and presents a new approach that is simpler and less costly but just as reliable as the best of the older methods. The various treatments for the different types of DI and recent findings on the genetic basis of the familial forms of DI are also discussed with emphasis on their contributions to improved diagnosis and management.

  4. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  5. Pharmacological Management of Bipolar Disorder in a Youth with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelBello, Melissa P.; Correll, Christoph U.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Carlson, Harold E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, four clinicians respond to the following case vignette: A 12-year-old girl with insulin-dependent diabetes presents for treatment of her newly diagnosed bipolar disorder. How would you address the bipolar disorder pharmacologically, and how would the presence of diabetes affect your selection of medication and clinical management?

  6. Are patients with diabetes mellitus satisfied with technologies used to assist with diabetes management and coping?: A structured review.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Samantha; Stadler, Marietta; Ismail, Khalida; Amiel, Stephanie; Herrmann-Werner, Anne

    2014-11-01

    Modern technological devices supporting coping and management for patients with diabetes are increasingly popular and could be important healthcare tools. This review aimed to evaluate patient satisfaction and perceptions regarding these devices, examples of which include short message service reminder systems, online educational programs, and clinician-patient electronic communication. Therapy devices such as continuous glucose monitors and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps are not included in this review. Embase, Psychinfo, Medline, CINAHL, and gray literature databases were searched for "diabetes mellitus," "technical device," "patient satisfaction," and their synonyms. This review was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. The search produced 1,902 studies, 26 of which were included in the review: type 1 diabetes mellitus (eight studies), type 2 diabetes mellitus (nine studies), and both (nine studies). High satisfaction was seen with almost all devices and correlated strongly with ease of use and improved diabetes management. Satisfaction was not affected by participant age, and the effect of diabetes type was not assessed. Web devices were reported as easiest to use. Increased support was valued and resulted from devices facilitating interaction with healthcare professionals (HCPs) or peers. Technical difficulties were barriers to both use and satisfaction. Overall, patients enjoyed supplementing their usual therapy with these devices. Perceived support from HCPs or peers formed an important aspect of patient satisfaction and should be considered for future interventions.

  7. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  8. Management of type 2 diabetes in youth: an update.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kevin; Silverstein, Janet; Kaufman, Francine; Warren-Boulton, Elizabeth

    2007-09-01

    Although type 1 diabetes historically has been more common in patients eight to 19 years of age, type 2 diabetes is emerging as an important disease in this group. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 8 to 45 percent of new childhood diabetes. This article is an update from the National Diabetes Education Program on the management of type 2 diabetes in youth. High-risk youths older than 10 years have a body mass index greater than the 85th percentile for age and sex plus two additional risk factors (i.e., family history, high-risk ethnicity, acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, or dyslipidemia). Reducing overweight and impaired glucose tolerance with increased physical activity and healthier eating habits may help prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk youths. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend population-based screening of high-risk youths; however, physicians should closely monitor these patients because early diagnosis may be beneficial. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening high-risk youths every two years with a fasting plasma glucose test. Patients diagnosed with diabetes should receive self-management education, behavior interventions to promote healthy eating and physical activity, appropriate therapy for hyperglycemia (usually metformin and insulin), and treatment of comorbidities.

  9. Diabetes management at school: application of the healthy learner model.

    PubMed

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-06-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed approach to diabetes management at school, replacing it with a consistent, evidence-based approach. A diabetes resource nurse was a key component, providing support for the school nurse and collaboration between the school, community, family, and health care providers. Funded by a cooperative agreement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) chose five sites from across the country to implement this program-a project titled Managing and Preventing Diabetes and Weight Gain (MAP). This article describes the experience of two sites.

  10. The need for additional training for nutritional management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carney, Trish; Stein, Susan E; Quinlan, Jennifer J

    The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' and nursing students'knowledge and perceived role in assisting patients with the nutritional management of diabetes. Three focus groups were conducted and the results were used to modify a previously developed survey regarding the nutritional management of diabetes. The survey was administered via an online survey tool and completed by 231 nurses and students. Over 70% of respondents agreed that nurses have an important role in reinforcing patient nutritional education. Results indicated,however, that knowledge gaps in the nutritional management of diabetes exist among nurses, including not knowing the carbohydrate content of 120ml of orange juice, a common treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%), not knowing where to locate carbohydrate content on a food label (60%), and not identifying the correct treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%). These results indicate that there may be a need to improve the nutritional education of nurses with respect to diabetes management.

  11. Big Data Technologies: New Opportunities for Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, Riccardo; Dagliati, Arianna; Sacchi, Lucia; Segagni, Daniele

    2015-04-24

    The so-called big data revolution provides substantial opportunities to diabetes management. At least 3 important directions are currently of great interest. First, the integration of different sources of information, from primary and secondary care to administrative information, may allow depicting a novel view of patient's care processes and of single patient's behaviors, taking into account the multifaceted nature of chronic care. Second, the availability of novel diabetes technologies, able to gather large amounts of real-time data, requires the implementation of distributed platforms for data analysis and decision support. Finally, the inclusion of geographical and environmental information into such complex IT systems may further increase the capability of interpreting the data gathered and extract new knowledge from them. This article reviews the main concepts and definitions related to big data, it presents some efforts in health care, and discusses the potential role of big data in diabetes care. Finally, as an example, it describes the research efforts carried on in the MOSAIC project, funded by the European Commission.

  12. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Ali; Sinclair, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl), Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline), and Psychological Information (PsychInfo) databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by repeat testing or by the effects of an intervention, neither were the majority of studies designed to give a view or conclusion on the clinical

  13. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people.

    PubMed

    Tomlin, Ali; Sinclair, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl), Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline), and Psychological Information (PsychInfo) databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by repeat testing or by the effects of an intervention, neither were the majority of studies designed to give a view or conclusion on the clinical

  14. [Specifically adapted management of diabetics after myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Passa, P

    1998-06-13

    Approximately 20% of all patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction have diabetes. The percentage has been increasing constantly and mortality is significantly higher in these patients. The highest rate is observed in women. Despite continuing progress in patient management there has been no reduction in the overmortality after myocardial infarction in diabetic patients. The majority of these deaths are unwarranted and could be avoided if diabetic patients were given specifically adapted treatment after myocardial infarction. Unfortunately, as shown by the EURASPIRE study, there is a gap between intensive care unit discharge prescriptions and follow-up care. With the explosive "epidemic" of noninsulin-diabetes and population aging the number of patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes will rise in the future. Wouldn't it be reasonable to establish special cardiodiabetic units where such patients could benefit from close, and daily, cooperation between diabetologists and cardiologists? Such facilities could be expected to significantly reduce the overmortality in diabetic patients after myocardial infarction.

  15. Type 2 diabetes in Brazil: epidemiology and management

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Pititto, Bianca; Dias, Monike Lourenço; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco; Ferreira, Sandra RG; Franco, Denise Reis; Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important epidemic diseases in the world this century, and accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes globally. Brazil is one of the most important examples of the alarming picture of T2DM in emergent societies, being the country with the fourth largest number of people with diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on diabetes in Brazil, specifically looking at the epidemiology and management of T2DM. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and LILACS to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government, World Health Organization, and International Diabetes Federation were also reviewed. PMID:25609989

  16. Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Katcher, Heather I; Jenkins, David J A; Cohen, Joshua; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2009-05-01

    Vegetarian and vegan diets offer significant benefits for diabetes management. In observational studies, individuals following vegetarian diets are about half as likely to develop diabetes, compared with non-vegetarians. In clinical trials in individuals with type 2 diabetes, low-fat vegan diets improve glycemic control to a greater extent than conventional diabetes diets. Although this effect is primarily attributable to greater weight loss, evidence also suggests that reduced intake of saturated fats and high-glycemic-index foods, increased intake of dietary fiber and vegetable protein, reduced intramyocellular lipid concentrations, and decreased iron stores mediate the influence of plant-based diets on glycemia. Vegetarian and vegan diets also improve plasma lipid concentrations and have been shown to reverse atherosclerosis progression. In clinical studies, the reported acceptability of vegetarian and vegan diets is comparable to other therapeutic regimens. The presently available literature indicates that vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages for the management of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Assessing diabetes practices in clinical settings: precursor to building community partnerships around disease management.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, John D; Mier, Nelda; Bolin, Jane N; Hora, Kerrie L; Clark, Heather R; Ory, Marcia G

    2009-12-01

    Many recommended best practices exist for clinical and community diabetes management and prevention. However, in many cases, these recommendations are not being fully utilized. It is useful to gain a sense of currently utilized and needed practices when beginning a partnership building effort to ameliorate such practice problems. The purpose of this study was to assess current practices in clinical settings within the Brazos Valley in preparation for beginning a community-based participatory research project on improving diabetes prevention and management in this region. Fifty-seven physicians with admission privileges to a regional health system were faxed a survey related to current diabetes patient loads, knowledge and implementation of diabetes-related best practices, and related topics. Both qualitative and quantitative examination of the data was conducted. Fifteen percent of responding providers indicated they implemented diabetes prevention best practices, with significant differences between primary-care physicians and specialists. Respondents indicated a need for educational and counseling resources, as well as an increased health-care workforce in the region. The utilization of a faxed-based survey proved an effective means for assessing baseline data as well as serving as a catalyst for further discussion around coalition development. Results indicated a strong need for both clinical and community-based services regarding diabetes prevention and management, and provided information and insight to begin focused community dialogue around diabetes prevention and management needs across the region. Other sites seeking to begin similar projects may benefit from a similar process.

  18. Expansion of electronic health record-based screening, prevention, and management of diabetes in New York City.

    PubMed

    Albu, Jeanine; Sohler, Nancy; Matti-Orozco, Brenda; Sill, Jordan; Baxter, Daniel; Burke, Gary; Young, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    To address the increasing burden of diabetes in New York City, we designed 2 electronic health records (EHRs)-facilitated diabetes management systems to be implemented in 6 primary care practices on the West Side of Manhattan, a standard system and an enhanced system. The standard system includes screening for diabetes. The enhanced system includes screening and ensures close patient follow-up; it applies principles of the chronic care model, including community-clinic linkages, to the management of patients newly diagnosed with diabetes and prediabetes through screening. We will stagger implementation of the enhanced system across the 6 clinics allowing comparison, through a quasi-experimental design (pre-post difference with a control group), of patients treated in the enhanced system with similar patients treated in the standard system. The findings could inform health system practices at multiple levels and influence the integration of community resources into routine diabetes care.

  19. An Audit of Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Van den Broucke, Stephan; Dhoore, William; Kalweit, Kerry; Housiaux, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a significant contributor to the burden of disease worldwide. Since its treatment requires extensive self-care, self-management education is widely recommended, particularly in resource limited settings. This study aimed to review the current state of policies and implementation of diabetes self-management education (DSME) in South Africa, with a specific focus on cultural appropriateness. Design and Methods: The audit involved a review of policy documents and semi-structured questionnaires with providers and experts in public and private health services. Forty-four respondents were interviewed. Documents were analysed with reference to the International Standards for Diabetes Education from the International Diabetes Federation. Data were entered and analysed in excel to give a description of the DSME programs and ad hoc interventions. Results: Three guidelines for Type 2 diabetes and two for chronic diseases were retrieved, but none were specifically dedicated to DSME. Five structured programs and 22 ad-hoc interventions were identified. DSME is mostly provided by doctors, nurses and dieticians and not consistently linked to other initiatives such as support groups. Health education materials are mainly in English with limited availability. Conclusions: DSME in South Africa is limited in scope, content and consistency, especially in the public services. A National curricula and materials for diabetes education need to be developed and adapted to the socio-economic context, culture and literacy levels of the target populations. It is recommended that DSME would be addressed in national policies and guidelines to guide the development and implementation of standardised programs. Significance for public health Diabetes significantly contributes to the global burden of disease. This burden is especially felt in developing countries, where resources are limited and the health system simultaneously has to deal with communicable and non

  20. Diabetes mellitus and burns. Part I-basic science and implications for management

    PubMed Central

    Goutos, Ioannis; Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Pandya, Atisha A; Ghosh, Sudip J

    2015-01-01

    The number of diabetic patients presenting to burn services is predicted to increase significantly over the next decades. Diabetes mellitus represents an independent risk factor for sustaining burn injuries and mediates alterations to key physiological systems including the vascular, renal, nervous, gastrointestinal and immune system. The effects of the pathophysiological permutations need to be carefully considered during both the acute as well as the long-term rehabilitation phase of injury. The purpose of the first part of this review is to outline the metabolic permutations observed in diabetes mellitus pertinent to the clinical presentation and management of burn patients. PMID:26064797

  1. The detection and management of diabetes distress in people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sturt, Jackie; Dennick, Kathryn; Due-Christensen, Mette; McCarthy, Kate

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes distress (DD) represents a significant clinical burden in which levels of DD are related to both glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and some self-management behaviours. DD is related to, but different from, depression. Differences in DD experienced in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been observed. Commonly measured using the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) and the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS), rates of elevated DD in research study participants range from 20 to 30 %. Risk factors for elevated DD in type 1 diabetes are longer duration of diabetes, severe hypoglycaemia, younger age and being female. A systematic review of intervention studies assessing DD identified eight randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and nine pre-post design studies. Only three studies targeted DD with the intervention. Intervention types were diabetes self-management education (DSME), psychologically informed self-management and devices. DSME pre-post studies, namely the Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme, produced more consistent improvements in DD and HbA1c at follow-up. Psychologically informed self-management was more heterogeneous, but several RCTs were effective in reducing DD. Group interventions offered the greatest benefits across intervention designs. PMID:26411924

  2. The detection and management of diabetes distress in people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sturt, Jackie; Dennick, Kathryn; Due-Christensen, Mette; McCarthy, Kate

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes distress (DD) represents a significant clinical burden in which levels of DD are related to both glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and some self-management behaviours. DD is related to, but different from, depression. Differences in DD experienced in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been observed. Commonly measured using the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) and the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS), rates of elevated DD in research study participants range from 20 to 30 %. Risk factors for elevated DD in type 1 diabetes are longer duration of diabetes, severe hypoglycaemia, younger age and being female. A systematic review of intervention studies assessing DD identified eight randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and nine pre-post design studies. Only three studies targeted DD with the intervention. Intervention types were diabetes self-management education (DSME), psychologically informed self-management and devices. DSME pre-post studies, namely the Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme, produced more consistent improvements in DD and HbA1c at follow-up. Psychologically informed self-management was more heterogeneous, but several RCTs were effective in reducing DD. Group interventions offered the greatest benefits across intervention designs.

  3. Management of Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Medha N; Florez, Hermes; Huang, Elbert S; Kalyani, Rita R; Mupanomunda, Maria; Pandya, Naushira; Swift, Carrie S; Taveira, Tracey H; Haas, Linda B

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tailored based on comorbidities, delineates key issues to consider when using glucose-lowering agents in this population, and provides recommendations on how to replace SSI in LTC facilities. As these patients transition from one setting to another, or from one provider to another, their risk for adverse events increases. Strategies are presented to reduce these risks and ensure safe transitions. This article addresses diabetes management at end of life and in those receiving palliative and hospice care. The integration of diabetes management into LTC facilities is important and requires an interprofessional team approach. To facilitate this approach, acceptance by administrative personnel is needed, as are protocols and possibly system changes. It is important for clinicians to understand the characteristics, challenges, and barriers related to the older population living in LTC facilities as well as the proper functioning of the facilities themselves. Once these challenges are identified, individualized approaches can be designed to improve diabetes management while lowering the risk of hypoglycemia and ultimately improving quality of life. PMID:26798150

  4. Management of Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Medha N; Florez, Hermes; Huang, Elbert S; Kalyani, Rita R; Mupanomunda, Maria; Pandya, Naushira; Swift, Carrie S; Taveira, Tracey H; Haas, Linda B

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tailored based on comorbidities, delineates key issues to consider when using glucose-lowering agents in this population, and provides recommendations on how to replace SSI in LTC facilities. As these patients transition from one setting to another, or from one provider to another, their risk for adverse events increases. Strategies are presented to reduce these risks and ensure safe transitions. This article addresses diabetes management at end of life and in those receiving palliative and hospice care. The integration of diabetes management into LTC facilities is important and requires an interprofessional team approach. To facilitate this approach, acceptance by administrative personnel is needed, as are protocols and possibly system changes. It is important for clinicians to understand the characteristics, challenges, and barriers related to the older population living in LTC facilities as well as the proper functioning of the facilities themselves. Once these challenges are identified, individualized approaches can be designed to improve diabetes management while lowering the risk of hypoglycemia and ultimately improving quality of life.

  5. Nuts for diabetes prevention and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an important preventable disease and a growing public health problem. Epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that healthy eating, physical activity, and body weight control are the main driving forces to reduce diabetes risk. Owing to their low available carbohydrate ...

  6. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  7. Diabetic foot ulcer: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Saraogi, Ravi Kant

    2008-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a rising health problem with rising prevalence of diabetes. It is the most important cause of non-traumatic foot amputations. Diabetic foot ulcers are primarily due to neuropathy and/or ischaemia, and are frequently complicated by infection. Up to 85% of all diabetic foot related problems are preventable through a combination of good foot care and appropriate education for patients and healthcare providers. The holistic care of diabetic foot ulcer patients requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Apart from blood sugar control, treatment of ulcer involves debridement, offloading, appropriate dressings, vascular maintenance and infection control. Use of adjunctive treatments such as various growth factors, skin replacement dressings and vacuum assisted closure will accelerate healing in selected cases.

  8. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.

  9. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of

  10. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  11. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  12. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  13. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  14. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  15. Can wireless technology enable new diabetes management tools?

    PubMed

    Hedtke, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Mobile computing and communications technology embodied in the modern cell phone device can be employed to improve the lives of diabetes patients by giving them better tools for self-management. Several companies are working on the development of diabetes management tools that leverage the ubiquitous cell phone to bring self-management tools to the hand of the diabetes patient. Integration of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) technology with the cell phone platform adds a level of convenience for the person with diabetes, but, more importantly, allows BGM data to be automatically captured, logged, and processed in near real time in order to provide the diabetes patient with assistance in managing their blood glucose levels. Other automatic measurements can estimate physical activity, and information regarding medication events and food intake can be captured and analyzed in order to provide the diabetes patient with continual assistance in managing their therapy and behaviors in order to improve glycemic control. The path to realization of such solutions is not, however, without obstacles.

  16. Chronic Disease Management: A Residency-Led Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Angela N.; Pettit, Ryan C.; Sorscher, Jonathan; Stephens, Lorraine; Drake, Betsy; Welling, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Background When quality improvement processes are integrated into resident education, many opportunities are created for improved outcomes in patient care. For Bethesda Family Medicine (BFM), integrating quality improvement into resident education is paramount in fulfilling the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Practice-Based Learning and Improvement core competency requirements. Methods A resident-developed diabetes management treatment protocol that targeted 11 evidence-based measures recommended for successful diabetes management was implemented within the BFM residency and all physician practices under its parent healthcare system. This study compares diabetes management at BFM and at 2 other family medicine practices at timepoints before and after protocol implementation. We measured hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in adult diabetics and compared patient outcomes for these measures for the first and third quarters of 2009 and 2010. Results In BFM patients, HbA1c, LDL, and SBP levels decreased, but only HbA1c improvement persisted long term. For the comparison groups, in general levels were lower than those of BFM patients but not significantly so after the first measurement period. Conclusions A resident-led treatment protocol can improve HbA1c outcomes among residents' diabetic patients. Periodic educational interventions can enhance residents' focus on diabetes management. Residents in graduate medical education can initiate treatment protocols to improve patient care in a large healthcare system. PMID:23267258

  17. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management.

  18. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications. PMID:25227362

  19. Peer support for self-management of diabetes improved outcomes in international settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Boothroyd, Renée I; Coufal, Muchieh Maggy; Baumann, Linda C; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Sanguanprasit, Boosaba; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2012-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is essential to reducing the risks of associated disabilities. But effective self-management is often short-lived. Peers can provide the kind of ongoing support that is needed for sustained self-management of diabetes. In this context, peers are nonprofessionals who have diabetes or close familiarity with its management. Key functions of effective peer support include assistance in daily management, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and ongoing availability of support. Using these four functions as a template of peer support, project teams in Cameroon, South Africa, Thailand, and Uganda developed and then evaluated peer support interventions for adults with diabetes. Our initial assessment found improvements in symptom management, diet, blood pressure, body mass index, and blood sugar levels for many of those taking part in the programs. For policy makers, the broader message is that by emphasizing the four key peer support functions, diabetes management programs can be successfully introduced across varied cultural settings and within diverse health systems.

  20. Peer Support For Self-Management Of Diabetes Improved Outcomes In International Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edwin B.; Boothroyd, Renée I.; Coufal, Maggy Muchieh; Baumann, Linda; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Sanguanprasit, Boosaba; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2014-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is essential to reducing the risks of associated disabilities. But effective self-management is often short-lived. Peers can provide the kind of ongoing support that is needed for sustained self-management of diabetes. In this context, peers are nonprofessionals who have diabetes or close familiarity with its management. Key functions of effective peer support include assistance in daily management, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and ongoing availability of support. Using these four functions as a template of peer support, project teams in Cameroon, South Africa, Thailand, and Uganda developed and then evaluated peer support interventions for adults with diabetes. Our initial assessment found improvements in symptom management, diet, blood pressure, body mass index, and blood sugar levels for many of those taking part in the programs. For policy makers, the broader message is that by emphasizing the four key peer support functions, diabetes management programs can be successfully introduced across varied cultural settings and within diverse health systems. PMID:22232103

  1. Management of diabetes mellitus in infants.

    PubMed

    Karges, Beate; Meissner, Thomas; Icks, Andrea; Kapellen, Thomas; Holl, Reinhard W

    2011-11-29

    Diabetes mellitus diagnosed during the first 2 years of life differs from the disease in older children regarding its causes, clinical characteristics, treatment options and needs in terms of education and psychosocial support. Over the past decade, new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes mellitus have been elucidated, including monogenic β-cell defects and chromosome 6q24 abnormalities. In patients with KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutations and diabetes mellitus, oral sulfonylurea offers an easy and effective treatment option. Type 1 diabetes mellitus in infants is characterized by a more rapid disease onset, poorer residual β-cell function and lower rate of partial remission than in older children. Insulin therapy in infants with type 1 diabetes mellitus or other monogenic causes of diabetes mellitus is a challenge, and novel data highlight the value of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in this very young patient population. Infants are entirely dependent on caregivers for insulin therapy, nutrition and glucose monitoring, which emphasizes the need for appropriate education and psychosocial support of parents. To achieve optimal long-term metabolic control with low rates of acute and chronic complications, continuous and structured diabetes care should be provided by a multidisciplinary health-care team.

  2. Diabetes and the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, B; Srinivasan, S

    2007-12-01

    Diabetes is associated with several changes in gastrointestinal (GI) motility and associated symptoms such as nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhoea and constipation. The pathogenesis of altered GI functions in diabetes is multifactorial and the role of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in this respect has gained significant importance. In this review, we summarize the research carried out on diabetes-related changes in the ENS. Changes in the inhibitory and excitatory enteric neurons are described highlighting the role of loss of inhibitory neurons in early diabetic enteric neuropathy. The functional consequences of these neuronal changes result in altered gastric emptying, diarrhoea or constipation. Diabetes can also affect GI motility through changes in intestinal smooth muscle or alterations in extrinsic neuronal control. Hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress play an important role in the pathophysiology of these ENS changes. Antioxidants to prevent or treat diabetic GI motility problems have therapeutic potential. Recent research on the nerve-immune interactions demonstrates inflammation-associated neurodegeneration which can lead to motility related problems in diabetes. PMID:17971027

  3. Conceptualizing type 2 diabetes and its management.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Wu, Jianhong; An, Aijun; Wong, Hannah J; An, Xiandong; Mei, Zhen; Hains, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing worldwide due to population growth, increased rates of obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Risk assessment methods can effectively evaluate the risk of diabetes, and a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce risk or prevent complications of type 2 diabetes. However, risk assessment alone has not significantly improved poor adherence to recommended medical interventions and lifestyle changes. This paper focuses on the challenge of nonadherence and posits that improving adherence requires tailoring interventions that explicitly consider the social determinants of health. PMID:27099510

  4. Well-Being and Diabetes Management in Early Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Karolina; Sparud-Lundin, Carina; Adolfsson, Annsofie; Berg, Marie

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores well-being and diabetes management in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) in early pregnancy and investigates associations among perceived well-being, diabetes management, and maternal characteristics. Questionnaires were answered by 168 Swedish women. Correlation analyses were conducted with Spearman’s correlation coefficient (rs). The women reported relatively high scores of self-efficacy in diabetes management (SWE-DES-10: 3.91 (0.51)) and self-perceived health (excellent (6.5%), very good (42.3%), good (38.7%), fair (11.3%) and poor (1.2%)). Moderate scores were reported for general well-being (WBQ-12: 22.6 (5.7)) and sense of coherence (SOC-13: 68.9 (9.7), moderate/low scores for hypoglycemia fear (SWE-HFS 26.6 (11.8)) and low scores of diabetes-distress (SWE-PAID-20 27.1 (15.9)). A higher capability of self-efficacy in diabetes management showed positive correlations with self-perceived health (rs = −0.41, p < 0.0001) and well-being (rs = 0.34, p < 0.0001) as well as negative correlations with diabetes distress (rs = −0.51, p < 0.0001) and hypoglycemia worries (rs = −0.27, p = 0.0009). Women with HbA1c levels of ≤48 mmL/mol scored higher in the subscales “goal achievement” in SWE-DES (p = 0.0028) and “comprehensibility” in SOC (p = 0.016). Well-being and diabetes management could be supported by strengthening the women’s capability to achieve glycemic goals and their comprehensibility in relation to the treatment. Further studies are needed to test this. PMID:27556476

  5. Well-Being and Diabetes Management in Early Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Linden, Karolina; Sparud-Lundin, Carina; Adolfsson, Annsofie; Berg, Marie

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores well-being and diabetes management in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) in early pregnancy and investigates associations among perceived well-being, diabetes management, and maternal characteristics. Questionnaires were answered by 168 Swedish women. Correlation analyses were conducted with Spearman's correlation coefficient (rs). The women reported relatively high scores of self-efficacy in diabetes management (SWE-DES-10: 3.91 (0.51)) and self-perceived health (excellent (6.5%), very good (42.3%), good (38.7%), fair (11.3%) and poor (1.2%)). Moderate scores were reported for general well-being (WBQ-12: 22.6 (5.7)) and sense of coherence (SOC-13: 68.9 (9.7), moderate/low scores for hypoglycemia fear (SWE-HFS 26.6 (11.8)) and low scores of diabetes-distress (SWE-PAID-20 27.1 (15.9)). A higher capability of self-efficacy in diabetes management showed positive correlations with self-perceived health (rs = -0.41, p < 0.0001) and well-being (rs = 0.34, p < 0.0001) as well as negative correlations with diabetes distress (rs = -0.51, p < 0.0001) and hypoglycemia worries (rs = -0.27, p = 0.0009). Women with HbA1c levels of ≤48 mmL/mol scored higher in the subscales "goal achievement" in SWE-DES (p = 0.0028) and "comprehensibility" in SOC (p = 0.016). Well-being and diabetes management could be supported by strengthening the women's capability to achieve glycemic goals and their comprehensibility in relation to the treatment. Further studies are needed to test this. PMID:27556476

  6. Diabetes management. Analysis of the American Diabetes Association's clinical practice recommendations.

    PubMed

    Strano-Paul, L; Phanumas, D

    2000-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes generally develops in persons older than age 45 and comprises more than 90% of the estimated 15 million diabetes cases identified in the United States. Due to the burgeoning population of older Americans and the increased prevalence of obesity and sedentariness, type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions. Tight glycemic control combined with good diet and regular exercise can reduce the incidence of complications associated with unchecked disease. To help physicians and patients achieve such objectives, the American Diabetes Association publishes clinical practice recommendations that propose the most effective methods for screening, diagnosis, and disease management. The position statements presenting the standard of care for treatment of diabetes are reviewed and critiqued from an evidence-based medicine perspective.

  7. Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable Past Issues / ... t have to knock yourself out to prevent diabetes. The key is: small steps that lead to ...

  8. Diabetic foot ulcer management: the podiatrist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Turns, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot complications result from two broad pathologies-neuropathic and neuro-ischaemic feet. It is important for diabetic patients to have at least a yearly review of foot ulcer risk factors, and they should have a corresponding risk classification agreed based on this assessment. Diabetic foot ulcer assessment should include a wound classification tool, which can give an indication of wounds at greater risk of non-healing or amputation. The treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should be part of a comprehensive care plan that should also include treatment of infection, frequent debridement (if deemed appropriate by a skilled specialist clinician), biomechanical offloading, blood glucose control and treatment of comorbidities. Clinicians should base dressing selection on the wound's location, size and depth, amount of exudate, presence of infection or necrosis and the condition of the surrounding tissue.

  9. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  10. Diabetes insipidus--diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Di Iorgi, Natascia; Napoli, Flavia; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Olivieri, Irene; Bertelli, Enrica; Gallizia, Annalisa; Rossi, Andrea; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is the end result of a number of conditions that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal system. The known causes include germinoma/craniopharyngioma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), local inflammatory, autoimmune or vascular diseases, trauma resulting from surgery or an accident, sarcoidosis, metastases and midline cerebral and cranial malformations. In rare cases, the underlying cause can be genetic defects in vasopressin synthesis that are inherited as autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive traits. The diagnosis of the underlying condition is challenging and raises several concerns for patients and parents as it requires long-term follow-up. Proper etiological diagnosis can be achieved via a series of steps that start with clinical observations and then progress to more sophisticated tools. Specifically, MRI identification of pituitary hyperintensity in the posterior part of the sella, now considered a clear marker of neurohypophyseal functional integrity, together with the careful analysis of pituitary stalk shape and size, have provided the most striking findings contributing to the diagnosis and understanding of some forms of 'idiopathic' CDI. MRI STIR (short-inversion-time inversion recovery sequencing) is a promising technology for the early identification of LCH-dependent CDI.

  11. Diabetic dyslipidaemia: effective management reduces cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Lawrence A

    2005-05-01

    Patients with diabetes are at significantly increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD); even those patients without a history of a previous myocardial infarction (MI) have as high a risk of a fatal or nonfatal MI as nondiabetic patients with a history of previous MI. As a result it is now generally recommended that cardiovascular risk factors be treated as aggressively in patients with diabetes as in nondiabetic patients with a history of CHD. Results from the recently published Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS) and meta-analysis of primary and secondary interventions trials confirm that there is a uniform relative risk reduction across a wide range of high-risk patients including diabetes patients without established CHD. A highly significant 22-24% reduction in risk of future vascular events is evident when patients with diabetes are treated with statins in trials. Current guidelines, including the recently updated National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines, endorse aggressive, early intervention in very-high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes plus cardiovascular disease (CVD), regardless of baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level in order to achieve an LDL-C goal of 70 mg/dL (1.8 mmol/L). However, despite increasing evidence and knowledge of the value of lipid lowering, a recent survey of diabetes specialists indicates that many patients with diabetes remain untreated or undertreated. The availability of more effective statins should help to close this "action gap", in concert with other measures such as initiatives to improve patient compliance.

  12. Spousal undermining of older diabetic patients' disease management.

    PubMed

    Henry, Shayna L; Rook, Karen S; Stephens, Mary A P; Franks, Melissa M

    2013-12-01

    Marriage can enhance health for individuals with a chronic disease, yet spouses may also undermine disease management. The current study investigated spousal undermining of dietary regimen in 129 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 40 patients reported that their spouses tempted them with forbidden foods, and 15 reported that their spouses conveyed disregard for their diabetic diet. Spousal tempting was associated with worse dietary adherence, and spousal disregard with worse nondietary adherence. Spousal undermining is relatively rare but is associated with patients' disease management and warrants further investigation to better understand how spouses influence partners' day-to-day management of chronic diseases.

  13. Contrasting patient and practitioner perspectives in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L M; Arar, N H; Larme, A C

    1998-12-01

    Studies of self-care behaviors in the management of type 2 diabetes often focus on patient knowledge and motivation, without considering the role of practitioner orientations. Using an exploratory descriptive design, we conducted open-ended interviews with 51 type 2 diabetes patients and 35 practitioners from clinics in San Antonio and Laredo, Texas. We found critical differences between patient and practitioner goals, evaluations, and strategies in diabetes management, especially regarding such key concepts as "control" and "taking care of self". Practitioners' perspectives are rooted in a clinical context, emphasizing technical considerations, whereas patients' perspectives exist within a life-world context and foreground practical and experiential considerations. These result in very different approaches to treatment. Practitioners, presuming failed treatment indicates uncooperativeness, try to inform and motivate patients. The patients we interviewed, however, understood and were committed to type 2 diabetes self-care, but lacked full access to behavioral options due to their poverty and limited social power. PMID:9842286

  14. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  15. Guidelines for Perioperative Management of the Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R.

    2015-01-01

    Management of glycemic levels in the perioperative setting is critical, especially in diabetic patients. The effects of surgical stress and anesthesia have unique effects on blood glucose levels, which should be taken into consideration to maintain optimum glycemic control. Each stage of surgery presents unique challenges in keeping glucose levels within target range. Additionally, there are special operative conditions that require distinctive glucose management protocols. Interestingly, the literature still does not report a consensus perioperative glucose management strategy for diabetic patients. We hope to outline the most important factors required in formulating a perioperative diabetic regimen, while still allowing for specific adjustments using prudent clinical judgment. Overall, through careful glycemic management in perioperative patients, we may reduce morbidity and mortality and improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26078998

  16. Public health program planning logic model for community engaged type 2 diabetes management and prevention.

    PubMed

    West, Joseph F

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes remains a growing epidemic with widening health inequity gaps in disease management, self-management knowledge, access to care and outcomes. Yet there is a paucity of evaluation tools for community engaged interventions aimed at closing the gaps and improving health. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (the Community Guide) developed by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two healthcare system level interventions, case management interventions and disease management programs, to improve glycemic control. However, as a public health resource guide for diabetes interventions a model for community engagement is a glaringly absent component of the Community Guide recommendations. In large part there are few evidence-based interventions featuring community engagement as a practice and system-level focus of chronic disease and Type 2 diabetes management. The central argument presented in this paper is that the absence of these types of interventions is due to the lack of tools for modeling and evaluating such interventions, especially among disparate and poor populations. A conceptual model emphasizing action-oriented micro-level community engagement is needed to complement the Community Guide and serve as the basis for testing and evaluation of these kinds of interventions. A unique logic model advancing the Community Guide diabetes recommendations toward measureable and sustainable community engagement for improved Type 2 diabetes outcomes is presented.

  17. Diabetes in Algeria and challenges for health policy: a literature review of prevalence, cost, management and outcomes of diabetes and its complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes has become an increasingly prevalent and severe public health issue in Algeria. This article investigates the prevalence, the cost and the management of this disease. Its first objective is to better understand the burden (both from an epidemiological and economic perspective) and management of diabetes. The second objective is to understand the health policy strategy adopted by Algeria in order to respond to the disease. Methods We conducted a literature review of prevalence, costs, management and outcomes of diabetes and its complications. This was complemented by data compilations and results of expert consultations. Results The epidemiology of diabetes is continually evolving and is becoming more problematic. The national evidence suggests that the prevalence of diabetes in Algeria has increased from 6.8% in 1990 to 12.29% in 2005, but is quite higher among certain groups and areas of the country. This disease affects all population groups, especially 35–70 year olds, who constitute a large segment of the working population. There are very few estimates of the cost of diabetes. These include a 1998 study on the total cost of type 1 diabetes (USD 11.6 million, which, inflated to 2013 value, totals to USD 16.6 million), a study on the cost of complications in 2010 (at 2013 value, ranging from USD 141 for first-year treatment of peripheral vascular disease to USD 30,441 for first-year cost of renal transplantation) and the 2013 IDF estimates of total cost of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (USD 513 million). Conclusions As the prevalence of diabetes continues to increase, the financial burden will increasingly weigh heavily on social security resources and the government budget. Future priorities must focus on empowering general practitioners in treating type 2 diabetes, improving screening of diabetes and its complications, tackling the growing obesity epidemic, strengthening health information systems and implementing the national diabetes

  18. Diabetes Management at School: Application of the Healthy Learner Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-01-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed…

  19. Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD): diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Naing, Aye; Kenchaiah, Manohar; Krishnan, Binu; Mir, Farheen; Charnley, Amanda; Egan, Catherine; Bano, Gul

    2014-01-01

    Maternally inherited diabetes with deafness is rare diabetes caused by a mitochondrial DNA defect. 85% of cases are associated with m.3243A>G mutation. It is important to diagnose this form of diabetes because of the unique management issues and associated comorbidities. A very strong family history of diabetes, deafness and presence of retinal dystrophy should prompt an investigation for MIDD. Microvascular complications out of keeping with duration of diabetes are another clue to the diagnosis. Retinal and renal manifestations of mitochondrial disease may be confused for diabetic complications. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody negativity in a nonobese diabetic is another clue. Cardiac conduction defects and GDM may also raise suspicion as to the diagnosis. Recognizing this etiology of DM should promote family screening, genetic counseling, screening of associated comorbidities, avoidance of metformin, and cautious use of statins. We report a 77 years old lady with MIDD who was being followed up as insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. We then identified 5 more patients with MIDD in the same clinic. They all had A3243 mutation with characteristic clinical presentation. The pharmacological approaches discussed in the paper are unlikely to work in these patients as they were diagnosed late.

  20. Experiences of self-management support from GPs among Australian ethnically diverse diabetes patients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rose, Vanessa K; Harris, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Ethnically diverse diabetes patients face significant challenges in diabetes self-management ranging from cultural expectations to inequalities in health care provision. This study explored the experiences of ethnically diverse patients with diabetes attending group diabetes education in receiving self-management support from GPs. An approach based on phenomenology was used to analyse participants' experiences in self-management support across three group interviews comprising 28 Australian ethnically diverse diabetes patients: Arabic-speaking group (n = 11), English-speaking group (n = 9) and Vietnamese-speaking group (n = 8). Two themes emerged related to the poor quality of information to support self-management and challenges in negotiating traditional consultation styles. In particular, participants believed they knew more about diabetes self-management than their GPs but felt unable to influence consultation style and communicate their changing needs in self-management support. The health care and information needs of ethnically diverse patients continue to be marginalised within health systems. This small exploratory study highlights the need for further research to illuminate interactions between ethnically diverse diabetes patients and GPs in supporting long-term diabetes self-management.

  1. The Role of Pulses in the Dietary Management of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ramdath, Dan; Renwick, Simone; Duncan, Alison M

    2016-08-01

    Pulses are highly nutritious foods that are included as part of Canada's Food Guide to promote healthful eating, and they have established health benefits that can contribute to the dietary management of diabetes. A review of studies that have examined the effects of pulse consumption on health outcomes, integral to the management of diabetes, provides credible evidence for improvements in glycemic control, reduction of blood lipids and regulation of body weight. Results from acute feeding trials suggest that postprandial blood glucose response is significantly attenuated by a single pulse serving of between three-quarters and 1 cup. At lower doses, pulses attenuate postprandial blood glucose response more than similar amounts of starchy foods. Long-term pulse consumption of 5 cups per week appears to result consistently in improvements in glycemic control. There is high-quality evidence that supports a role for pulse consumption in the reduction of risk for cardiovascular disease; this provides a sound rationale for the regular incorporation of pulses at about two-thirds of a cup daily in the management of hyperlipidemia in persons with type 2 diabetes. Pulse consumption can contribute to improving satiety, reducing food intake and regulating body weight, which can reduce obesity risk and, in turn, improve diabetes management. Collectively, available evidence provides very good support for a role of regular pulse consumption in the prevention and management of diabetes. PMID:27497151

  2. Older Adult Self-Efficacy Study of Mobile Phone Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charlene C; Khokhar, Bilal; Weed, Kelly; Barr, Erik; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participant self-efficacy and use of a mobile phone diabetes health intervention for older adults during a 4-week period. Participants included seven adults (mean age, 70.3 years) with type 2 diabetes cared for by community-based primary care physicians. Participants entered blood glucose data into a mobile phone and personalized patient Internet Web portal. Based on blood glucose values, participants received automatic messages and educational information to self-manage their diabetes. Study measures included prior mobile phone/Internet use, the Stanford Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale, the Stanford Energy/Fatigue Scale, the Short Form-36, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (depression), the Patient Reported Diabetes Symptom Scale, the Diabetes Stages of Change measure, and a summary of mobile system use. Participants had high self-efficacy and high readiness and confidence in their ability to monitor changes to control their diabetes. Participants demonstrated ability to use the mobile intervention and communicate with diabetes educators.

  3. Managing diabetes with nanomedicine: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Omid; Tang, Benjamin C.; Whitehead, Kathryn A.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based approaches hold substantial potential for improving the care of patients with diabetes. Nanoparticles are being developed as imaging contrast agents to assist in the early diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Glucose nanosensors are being incorporated in implantable devices that enable more accurate and patient-friendly real-time tracking of blood glucose levels, and are also providing the basis for glucose-responsive nanoparticles that better mimic the body’s physiological needs for insulin. Finally, nanotechnology is being used in non-invasive approaches to insulin delivery and to engineer more effective vaccine, cell and gene therapies for type 1 diabetes. Here, we analyse the current state of these approaches and discuss key issues for their translation to clinical practice. PMID:25430866

  4. Traditional Indian Medicines Used for the Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Neetu

    2013-01-01

    Plants have always been a source of drugs for humans since time immemorial. The Indian traditional system of medicine is replete with the use of plants for the management of diabetic conditions. According to the World Health Organization, up to 90% of population in developing countries use plants and its products as traditional medicine for primary health care. There are about 800 plants which have been reported to show antidiabetic potential. The present review is aimed at providing in-depth information about the antidiabetic potential and bioactive compounds present in Ficus religiosa, Pterocarpus marsupium, Gymnema sylvestre, Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, and Trigonella foenum-graecum. The review provides a starting point for future studies aimed at isolation, purification, and characterization of bioactive antidiabetic compounds present in these plants. PMID:23841105

  5. Toward Automation of Insulin Delivery - Management Solutions for Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nimri, Revital; Phillip, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the field of type 1 diabetes was characterized by the efforts to integrate technology into the daily management of diabetes. Automated insulin delivery systems have emerged followed by the improvements in technology of pumps and sensors and automated close-loop systems that were developed around the world for overnight as well as for day and night use. Initially, these closed-loop systems were tested clinically in research centers, then at diabetes camps or hotels, and recently at patients' homes. The systems were tested in a wide range of populations of patients with type 1 diabetes: children, adolescents, adults, newly diagnosed, well and suboptimally controlled patients, the critically ill and pregnant women. The extensive clinical evaluation found these close-loop systems to be safe and efficient in controlling blood glucose levels. Now is the time to take these systems from research to industry and to get a regulatory approval of convenient devices for the use at home. Automated insulin delivery systems have the potential to change the way diabetes is treated and managed for the benefit of patients. This chapter summarizes the recent advances in this field. PMID:26682752

  6. Toward Automation of Insulin Delivery - Management Solutions for Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nimri, Revital; Phillip, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the field of type 1 diabetes was characterized by the efforts to integrate technology into the daily management of diabetes. Automated insulin delivery systems have emerged followed by the improvements in technology of pumps and sensors and automated close-loop systems that were developed around the world for overnight as well as for day and night use. Initially, these closed-loop systems were tested clinically in research centers, then at diabetes camps or hotels, and recently at patients' homes. The systems were tested in a wide range of populations of patients with type 1 diabetes: children, adolescents, adults, newly diagnosed, well and suboptimally controlled patients, the critically ill and pregnant women. The extensive clinical evaluation found these close-loop systems to be safe and efficient in controlling blood glucose levels. Now is the time to take these systems from research to industry and to get a regulatory approval of convenient devices for the use at home. Automated insulin delivery systems have the potential to change the way diabetes is treated and managed for the benefit of patients. This chapter summarizes the recent advances in this field.

  7. The endocrine system in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alrefai, Hisham; Allababidi, Hisham; Levy, Shiri; Levy, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus is complex and not fully understood. However, it emerges as an abnormal metabolic condition associated with a systemic damage to the vascular bed. Cumulative evidence also reveals that the endocrine system is not intact in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is not clear whether the changes observed in the endocrine system represent a primary defect or reflect the effects of the impaired insulin action and abnormal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism on the hormonal milieu. Review of the literature reveals that the function of the entire endocrine system including the functions of hormones from the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, the vitamin D system, the gonads, and the endocrine function of the adipose tissue, is impaired. Good metabolic control and insulin treatment may reverse some of these abnormalities. It remains unanswered as to what extent these changes in the endocrine system contribute to the vascular pathologies observed in individuals affected by diabetes mellitus and whether part of the abnormalities observed in the endocrine system reflect a basic cellular defect in the diabetic syndrome.

  8. Management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus by cardiovascular and endocrine physicians: a China registry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Li-Hua; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Li-Nong; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated hypertension and diabetes mellitus in two management settings, namely cardiology and endocrinology, and their associations with albuminuria while accounting for the management of these two diseases. Methods: Our multicentre registry included patients (≥20 years) seen for hypertension in cardiology or for diabetes mellitus in endocrinology. We administered a questionnaire and measured blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and albuminuria. Results: Presence of both hypertension and diabetes was observed in 32.9% of hypertensive patients in cardiology (n = 1291) and 58.9% of diabetic patients in endocrinology (n = 1168). When both diseases were present, the use of combination antihypertensive therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.31, P < 0.0001] and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (OR 0.66, P = 0.0009) was less frequent in endocrinology than cardiology, and the use of combination antidiabetic therapy (OR 0.16, P < 0.0001) was less frequent in cardiology than endocrinology. The control of hypertension and diabetes, however, was not different between the two management settings (P ≥ 0.21), regardless of the therapeutic target (SBP/DBP < 140/90 or 130/80 mmHg and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c <7.0 or 6.5%). The prevalence of albuminuria was higher (P ≤ 0.02) in the presence of both diseases (23.3%) than those with either hypertension (12.6%) or diabetes alone (15.9%). Conclusion: Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were often jointly present, especially in the setting of endocrinology. The management was insufficient on the use of combination antihypertensive therapy and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system in endocrinology and for combination antidiabetic therapy in cardiology, indicating a need for more intensive management and better control of both clinical conditions. PMID:27270188

  9. Diabetes: Christian Worldview, Medical Distrust & Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbuah, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To inform development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N=44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical mistrust, and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African American community to improve health outcomes. PMID:25735754

  10. Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

    PubMed Central

    El-Gayar, Omar; Timsina, Prem; Nawar, Nevine; Eid, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Background Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions. Methods The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period from January 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor. Results Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records. Conclusions Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs. PMID:23439183

  11. [Guidelines for the management of diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Mediavilla Bravo, José Javier

    2014-09-01

    In the last few years, the publication of new studies in diabetes, together with the development of new classes of blood glucose-lowering medications, have led to updates of the most prestigious clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of diabetes. Thus, a consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes on the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes was published in April 2012. An update of one of the evidence-based guidelines issued by the Canadian Diabetes Association appeared in 2013 and this year, 2014, saw the publication of the consensus document of the redGDPS, whose guidelines are those most closely followed by primary care physicians in Spain. The three guidelines highlight the need for an individualized approach to type 2 diabetes mellitus, outlining both target glycemic goals and distinct treatment regimens based on patient characteristics, disease stage and the presence of comorbidities or complications. In the treatment of the disease, the three guidelines also stress the importance of considering patients' opinions and of recommending lifestyle modifications to achieve good disease control. Metformin is identified as the first-line drug, with the addition of other glucose-lowering agents if necessary. PMID:25595348

  12. [Guidelines for the management of diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Mediavilla Bravo, José Javier

    2014-09-01

    In the last few years, the publication of new studies in diabetes, together with the development of new classes of blood glucose-lowering medications, have led to updates of the most prestigious clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of diabetes. Thus, a consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes on the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes was published in April 2012. An update of one of the evidence-based guidelines issued by the Canadian Diabetes Association appeared in 2013 and this year, 2014, saw the publication of the consensus document of the redGDPS, whose guidelines are those most closely followed by primary care physicians in Spain. The three guidelines highlight the need for an individualized approach to type 2 diabetes mellitus, outlining both target glycemic goals and distinct treatment regimens based on patient characteristics, disease stage and the presence of comorbidities or complications. In the treatment of the disease, the three guidelines also stress the importance of considering patients' opinions and of recommending lifestyle modifications to achieve good disease control. Metformin is identified as the first-line drug, with the addition of other glucose-lowering agents if necessary.

  13. Examining economic improvements in managing diabetes in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, S; Stone, D; Elliott-Bynum, S

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, two-thirds of the medical cost of diabetes was borne by the elderly and nursing home care attributable to diabetes accounted for a third of that financial burden. The development of the Insulin Delivery Pen system can provide cost efficiency, and concurrently reduce the potential for contamination, free up nursing time, improve the administration process, and maintain dosing accuracy. The insulin pen delivery system (vs. the traditional vial and syringe method) is an attractive and cost effective option in the treatment of diabetes mellitus for residents in nursing facilities.

  14. [Managing the pain linked to diabetes].

    PubMed

    Leridon, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain due to insulin injections and the self-monitoring of blood glucose is a daily reality for children and adolescents with diabetes. Support groups are organised by the nurse who gives personalised advice to young patients and their parents, in order to relieve the pain and overcome any difficulties. PMID:26776689

  15. ANALYSIS: mobile phones integrated into diabetes management: a logical progression.

    PubMed

    Malasanos, Toree

    2008-01-01

    In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, the intervention described by D. Katz, "Novel Interactive Cell-Phone Technology for Health Enhancement," uses cell phones to provide the rapid communication necessary for the support of intensive management of diabetes. Mobile technology is widely accepted in today's society and can be an effective tool for this cause. There have been numerous interventions using various communication tools, including cell phones, to manage chronic disease, which all propose that improved communication and feedback to patients would improve health status. Dr. Katz has taken the next step by giving semiautomated, real-time, immediate feedback on each data point all transmitted by cell phone.

  16. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  17. The Sioux Lookout Diabetes Program: diabetes prevention and management in northwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Morrison, N; Dooley, J

    1998-01-01

    Clinically, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in the First Nations population of the Sioux Lookout Zone (SLZ), Northwestern Ontario, represents a very different entity than that found in the general Canadian population. Here, its prevalence reaches upwards of 17% (over the age of 10) and children as young as five years of age have been diagnosed. Diabetic ketoacidosis is frequently found, and clients with blood glucose levels of 50 mmol/L or more have remained asymptomatic. Prevention and management of NIDDM in the SLZ must reflect this reality, as well as those of geographic remoteness; community-specific needs; and cultural, in addition to personal, relevance. Over the past five years, the Sioux Lookout Diabetes Program has been developing innovative services and resources to address these needs. Traveling foot-care and diabetes education programs, Community Health Representative training programs, a youth camp, school programs, grocery store labeling programs, and culturally relevant education manuals are a few such initiatives. Visions for the future include the development of a network of community-based diabetes workers to address more completely prevention and management needs on an ongoing basis and the development of stress management workshops for First Nations clients. With our current programming, these new initiatives, and an aggressive early screening program, we hope to stem the imminent onslaught of amputations, heart attacks, renal failure, and blindness.

  18. Home-based diabetes symptom self-management education for Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated measures randomized controlled trial was conducted with 72 Mexican Americans aged 25–75 years with type 2 diabetes. Experimental condition participants received eight weekly, in-home, one-on-one educational and behavior modification sessions with a registered nurse focusing on symptom awareness, glucose self-testing and appropriate treatments, followed by eight biweekly support telephone sessions. Wait-listed control condition participants served as comparisons at three time points. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention between- and within groups on psychosocial, behavioral and clinical outcomes. Participants were predominantly female, middle-aged, moderately acculturated and in poor glycemic control. Experimental group participants (n = 39) significantly improved glycemic control, blood pressure, symptoms, knowledge, self-efficacy, empowerment and quality of life. Post intervention focus groups reported satisfaction with the symptom focus. Addressing symptoms led to clinical and psychosocial improvements. Symptoms seem to be an important motivator and a useful prompt to engage patients in diabetes self-management behaviors to relieve symptoms and prevent complications. PMID:25953971

  19. Dynamic Task Optimization in Remote Diabetes Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Myung-kyung; Woodbridge, Jonathan; Moin, Tannaz; Lan, Mars; Alshurafa, Nabil; Samy, Lauren; Mortazavi, Bobak; Ghasemzadeh, Hassan; Bui, Alex; Ahmadi, Sheila; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, but careful symptom monitoring can prevent adverse events. A real-time patient monitoring and feedback system is one of the solutions to help patients with diabetes and their healthcare professionals monitor health-related measurements and provide dynamic feedback. However, data-driven methods to dynamically prioritize and generate tasks are not well investigated in the domain of remote health monitoring. This paper presents a wireless health project (WANDA) that leverages sensor technology and wireless communication to monitor the health status of patients with diabetes. The WANDA dynamic task management function applies data analytics in real-time to discretize continuous features, applying data clustering and association rule mining techniques to manage a sliding window size dynamically and to prioritize required user tasks. The developed algorithm minimizes the number of daily action items required by patients with diabetes using association rules that satisfy a minimum support, confidence and conditional probability thresholds. Each of these tasks maximizes information gain, thereby improving the overall level of patient adherence and satisfaction. Experimental results from applying EM-based clustering and Apriori algorithms show that the developed algorithm can predict further events with higher confidence levels and reduce the number of user tasks by up to 76.19 %.

  20. Improving the detection and management of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes affects around 370,000 adults in the UK, about 10% of all those diagnosed with diabetes. In type 1 diabetes there is a lack of beta cell insulin secretion as a result of autoimmune destruction of the beta cells. However, patients are not affected by insulin resistance, and so do not routinely experience the features of metabolic syndrome that occur in type 2 diabetes. NICE recommends considering further investigation with autoantibody testing or measurement of C-peptide when: type 1 diabetes is suspected but the presentation includes atypical features (e.g. age ≥50, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, slow evolution of hyperglycaemia or long prodrome); type 1 diabetes has been diagnosed and treatment started but there is a clinical suspicion that the patient may have a monogenic form of diabetes, and C-peptide and/or autoantibody testing may guide the use of genetic testing; classification is uncertain, and confirming type 1 diabetes would have implications for therapy. Structured education is the cornerstone of care providing tools to allow effective self-management. Following a new diagnosis of type 1 diabetes structured education should be offered within 12 months. Newly diagnosed patients should be offered a regimen including a basal (long-acting) insulin with bolus (rapid-acting) insulin given at mealtimes. The optimal regimen, which should be offered from diagnosis, is a combination of twice daily insulin detemir and a rapid-acting analogue given at mealtimes. However, where glycaemic control is already optimised on an alternative insulin regimen this should not be discontinued. PMID:27180499

  1. The Empirical Evidence for the Telemedicine Intervention in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Woodward, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The research presented here assesses the scientific evidence for the telemedicine intervention in the management of diabetes (telediabetes), gestational diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy. The impetus derives from the confluence of high prevalence of these diseases, increasing incidence, and rising costs, while telemedicine promises to ameliorate, if not prevent, type 2 diabetes and its complications. Materials and Methods: A purposeful review of the literature identified relevant publications from January 2005 to December 2013. These were culled to retain only credible research articles for detailed review and analysis. The search yielded approximately 17,000 articles with no date constraints. Of these, 770 appeared to be research articles within our time frame. A review of the abstracts yielded 73 articles that met the criteria for inclusion in the final analysis. Evidence is organized by research findings regarding feasibility/acceptance, intermediate outcomes (e.g., use of service, and screening compliance), and health outcomes (control of glycemic level, lipids, body weight, and physical activity.) Results: Definitions of telediabetes varied from study to study vis-à-vis diabetes subtype, setting, technology, staffing, duration, frequency, and target population. Outcome measures also varied. Despite these vagaries, sufficient evidence was obtained from a wide variety of research studies, consistently pointing to positive effects of telemonitoring and telescreening in terms of glycemic control, reduced body weight, and increased physical exercise. The major contributions point to telemedicine's potential for changing behaviors important to diabetes control and prevention, especially type 2 and gestational diabetes. Similarly, screening and monitoring for retinopathy can detect symptoms early that may be controlled or treated. Conclusions: Overall, there is strong and consistent evidence of improved glycemic control among persons with type 2

  2. Managing benefits for diabetes: changing payer strategies for changing times.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Just as there are many ways to treat a condition such as diabetes, there are also many ways for payers to manage the diabetes benefit. Although none of these methods is specifically right or wrong, they are grounded in a payer's philosophy and created in response to the needs of the time. Yet, just as in any other business, new ideas and, for diabetes, new scientific discoveries will surely mandate new strategies to achieve goals. As payers find themselves adapting to new political realities and new partnerships, one cannot be sure if their new strategies will succeed or not. But, in actuality, this becomes moot as the 1 point we can be sure of is that benefit management will continue to evolve.

  3. Managing benefits for diabetes: changing payer strategies for changing times.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Just as there are many ways to treat a condition such as diabetes, there are also many ways for payers to manage the diabetes benefit. Although none of these methods is specifically right or wrong, they are grounded in a payer's philosophy and created in response to the needs of the time. Yet, just as in any other business, new ideas and, for diabetes, new scientific discoveries will surely mandate new strategies to achieve goals. As payers find themselves adapting to new political realities and new partnerships, one cannot be sure if their new strategies will succeed or not. But, in actuality, this becomes moot as the 1 point we can be sure of is that benefit management will continue to evolve. PMID:23725238

  4. Managing diabetes in people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joe; Carson, Amanda; Waugh, Anna; Park, Douglas

    Diabetes and dementia may manifest simultaneously: one is potentially life threatening, the other causes severe, progressive loss of memory and cognitive function. Where they coexist, they present nurses with challenges such as administering life-saving interventions to patients who are unable to give informed consent. This article offers guidance on the clinical and ethical challenges involved in blood glucose monitoring and medicines administration in patients with dementia.

  5. Joint British Diabetes Societies guideline for the management of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, M W; Dhatariya, K K; Kilvert, A; Rayman, G; Rees, J A E; Courtney, C H; Hilton, L; Dyer, P H; Hamersley, M S

    2011-05-01

    The Joint British Diabetes Societies guidelines for the management of diabetic ketoacidosis (these do not cover Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic Syndrome) are available in full at: (i) http://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/Our_Views/Care_recommendations/The-Management-of-Diabetic-Ketoacidosis-in-Adults; (ii)  http://www.diabetes.nhs.uk/publications_and_resources/reports_and_guidance; (iii) http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS_DKA_Management.pdf. This article summarizes the main changes from previous guidelines and discusses the rationale for the new recommendations. The key points are: Monitoring of the response to treatment (i) The method of choice for monitoring the response to treatment is bedside measurement of capillary blood ketones using a ketone meter. (ii) If blood ketone measurement is not available, venous pH and bicarbonate should be used in conjunction with bedside blood glucose monitoring to assess treatment response. (iii) Venous blood should be used rather than arterial (unless respiratory problems dictate otherwise) in blood gas analysers. (iv) Intermittent laboratory confirmation of pH, bicarbonate and electrolytes only. Insulin administration (i) Insulin should be infused intravenously at a weight-based fixed rate until the ketosis has resolved. (ii) When the blood glucose falls below 14 mmol/l, 10% glucose should be added to allow the fixed-rate insulin to be continued. (iii) If already taking, long-acting insulin analogues such as insulin glargine (Lantus(®), Sanofi Aventis, Guildford, Surry, UK) or insulin detemir (Levemir(®), Novo Nordisk, Crawley, West Sussex, UK.) should be continued in usual doses. Delivery of care (i) The diabetes specialist team should be involved as soon as possible. (ii) Patients should be nursed in areas where staff are experienced in the management of ketoacidosis.

  6. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  7. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  8. Children's Roles in Parents’ Diabetes Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Laroche, Helena H.; Davis, Matthew M.; Forman, Jane; Palmisano, Gloria; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Tannas, Cheryl; Spencer, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Family support is important in diabetes self-management. However, children as providers of support have received little attention. This study examines the role of children in their parents’ diabetes self-management, diet, and exercise. Methods This research used community-based participatory research principles. Researchers conducted semi-structured parallel interviews of 24 Latino and African-American adults with diabetes and with a child (age 10–17 years) in their home (2004–06). Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes (2004–07). Results Adults and children perceived that children play many roles related to adults’ diabetes self-management. Parents described children as monitoring parents’ dietary intake and reminding them what they should not be eating. Some children helped with shopping and meal preparation. Families described children reminding parents to exercise and exercising with their parent. Children reminded parents about medications and assisted with tasks such as checking blood sugar. Parents and children perceived that children played a role in tempting parents to stray from their diabetes diet, because children's diets included food that parents desired but tried to avoid. Conclusion Children and parents perceived that children have many roles in both supporting and undermining adults’ diabetes self-management. There is more to learn about the bidirectional relationships between adults and children in this setting and the most beneficial roles children can play. Health-care providers should encourage family lifestyle change, strengthen social support for families and direct children toward roles that are beneficial for both parent and child and do not place an unreasonable level of responsibility on the child. PMID:19896027

  9. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  10. Pathways in the diagnosis and management of diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Michelle; Vinik, Aaron; Simpson, David M

    2015-06-01

    Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSPN), the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, has a complex pathophysiology and can be a major source of physical and psychologic disability. The management of DSPN can be frustrating for both patient and physician. This article provides a general overview of typical patient pathways in DSPN, and highlights variations in diagnosis, management, and referral patterns among different providers. DSPN is managed in several settings by primary care physicians (PCPs), specialists, and nurse practitioners. The initial clinical management of the patient is often dependent on the presenting complaint, the referral pattern of the provider, level of comfort of the PCP in managing diabetic complications, and geographic access to specialists. The primary treatment of DSPN focuses mainly on glycemic control and adjustment of modifiable risk factors, but other causes of neuropathy should also be investigated. Several pharmacologic agents are recommended by treatment guidelines, and as DSPN typically exists with comorbid conditions, a multimodal therapeutic approach should be considered. Barriers to effective management include failure to recognize DSPN, and misdiagnosis. Patient education also remains important. Referral patterns vary widely according to geographic location, access to services, provider preferences, and comfort in managing complex aspects of the disease. The variability in patient pathways affects patient education, satisfaction, and outcomes. Standardized screening tools, a multidisciplinary team approach, and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy should improve future care. To improve patient outcomes, DSPN needs to be diagnosed sooner and interventions made before significant nerve damage occurs.

  11. Sleep in Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: Associations with Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Jaser, Sarah S.; Ellis, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe sleep in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes and explore the association between sleep disturbances, diabetes management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents with type 1 diabetes (n = 159, mean age = 16.4, 43% female, 69% white, mean A1C = 9.3%) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to assess sleep quantity and quality and sleep disturbances. Frequency of blood glucose monitoring (meter downloads) was used as a measure of diabetes management. Results Average sleep duration was 7.4 hours, below the recommended duration for this age. Adolescents using insulin pumps reported fewer sleep disturbances and longer sleep duration than those on injections, and older adolescents reported less sleep than younger adolescents. Poorer sleep duration was related to poorer diabetes management and better self-reported sleep quality was associated with better glycemic control for males but not for females. Conclusions Assessing for and treating sleep disturbances in adolescents may improve diabetes management. PMID:27081578

  12. Routine management and special problems of diabetic children.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, M J

    1983-12-01

    Guidelines for the prescription, initiation, and adjustment of insulin plans in diabetic children are outlined, with an emphasis on patient education and active participation in the treatment regimen. The management of special situations--sick days, surgery, noncompliance, and travel--is also discussed. PMID:6371862

  13. Diabetes insipidus uncovered during conservative management of complicated acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Anita; Odom, Stephen R; Butler, Kathryn L

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) arises from impaired function of antidiuretic hormone, characterized by hypovolemia, hypernatremia, polyuria, and polydipsia. This case is a reminder of the rare but challenging obstacle that undiagnosed DI poses in fasting surgical patients, requiring prompt recognition and vigilant management of marked homeostatic imbalances.

  14. Current concepts in the management of diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Dan

    2011-05-01

    Approximately one in three people with diabetes is affected by diabetic distal symmetric sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN), which represents a major health problem as it may present with excruciating neuropathic pain and is responsible for substantial morbidity, increased mortality and impaired quality of life. Neuropathic pain causes considerable interference with sleep, daily activities, and enjoyment of life. Treatment is based on four cornerstones: (1) intensive diabetes therapy and multifactorial risk intervention; (2) treatment based on pathogenetic mechanisms; (3) symptomatic treatment; and (4) avoidance of risk factors and complications. Recent experimental studies suggest a multifactorial pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. From the clinical point of view, it is important to note that, based on these pathogenetic mechanisms, therapeutic approaches could be derived, some of which are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Management of chronic painful DSPN remains a challenge for the physician and should consider the following practical rules: the appropriate and effective drug has to be tried and identified in each patient by carefully titrating the dosage based on efficacy and side effects; lack of efficacy should be judged only after 2-4 weeks of treatment using an adequate dosage. Analgesic combination therapy may be useful, and potential drug interactions have to be considered given the frequent polypharmacy in people with diabetes. Not only increased alcohol consumption but also the traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as visceral obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking have a role in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy and hence need to be prevented or treated. PMID:21534920

  15. [Management pattern of diabetes mellitus and prevention and control of diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Hui, Yan-nian

    2010-02-01

    The Bureau of Disease Prevention and Control, National Ministry of Health, recently released a project for the management of diabetes mellitus along with a technical operational manual. This is a landmark event in the prevention and management of ocular fundus diseases in China. This project will be carried out through collaboration of general hospitals, community health service units, and disease prevention and control organizations. It provides an excellent platform for the prevention and control of diabetic retinopathy. In order to prevent and control this disease, we should follow the patient-centered principle, which includes establishing individual health files, providing consultation for patients, performing screening of diabetic retinopathy, and providing lifelong regular examinations, follow-up and prompt treatments. We should also insist on the combination of prevention, treatment and scientific study to take advantage of a wide array of population resources for studying the pathogenesis and risk factors involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy, and making new contributions in the prevention of blindness due to diabetes.

  16. Missing Elements Revisited: Information Engineering for Managing Quality of Care for Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Matthew J; Connor, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Advances in information technology offer new avenues for assembling data about diet and care regimens of diabetes patients “in the field.” This creates a challenge for their doctors and the diabetes care community—how to organize and use new data to produce better long-term outcomes for diabetes patients. Methods iAbetics approaches the challenge as a quality management problem, drawing on total quality concepts, which in turn are grounded in application of the scientific method. We frame the diabetes patient's quality-of-care problem as an ongoing scientific investigation aimed at quantifying and predicting relationships between specific care-management actions and their outcomes for individual patients in their ordinary course of life. Results Framing diabetes quality-of-care management as a scientific investigation leads to a seven-step model termed “adaptive empirical iteration.” Adaptive empirical iteration is a deliberate process to perfect the patient's choices, decisions, and actions in routine situations that make up most day-to-day life and to systematically adapt across differences in individual patients and/or changes in their physiology, diet, or environment. The architecture incorporates care-protocol management and version control, structured formats for data collection using mobile smart phones, statistical analysis on secure Web sites, tools for comparing alternative protocols, choice architecture technology to improve patient decisions, and information sharing for doctor review. Conclusions Adaptive empirical iteration is a foundation for information architecture designed to systematically improve quality-of-care provided to diabetes patients who act as their own day-to-day care provider under supervision and with support from their doctor. The approach defines “must-have” capabilities for systems using new information technology to improve long-term outcomes for diabetes patients. PMID:20920451

  17. Reappraisal of the management of cholelithiasis in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Guraya, Salman Y

    2005-11-01

    Recently, dramatic advances in research have elucidated the prognosis of gallstone disease and have permitted a more selective choice of persons for treatment based on symptom status and projected prognosis. Ultrasound- detected-incidental gallstones are infrequently clinically significant, but this finding has prompted the surgeons to have a liberal attitude towards the operative indications for cholelithiasis particularly after the advent of laparoscopy. At the same time, the management of gallstones in the diabetics still remains controversial. Early retrospective studies reported an alarmingly high incidence of gallstones in diabetics as compared with the general population and in view of profound morbidity and mortality rates observed in the diabetics, prophylactic cholecystectomy was generally recommended. However, recent evidence-based studies challenged this approach and concluded that prophylactic cholecystectomy is not justified in diabetic patients with asymptomatic gallstones. It is inferred that, as in the general population, asymptomatic cholelithiasis in diabetics should be managed expectantly and preemptive surgery should not be routinely performed. However, early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is preferred in cases of symptomatic cholelithiasis.

  18. Health Technologies for Monitoring and Managing Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Russell-Minda, Elizabeth; Jutai, Jeffrey; Speechley, Mark; Bradley, Kaitlin; Chudyk, Anna; Petrella, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this review was to determine the strength of evidence for the effectiveness of self-monitoring devices and technologies for individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) based on specific health-related outcome measures. Self-monitoring devices included those that assist patients with managing diabetes and preventing cardiovascular complications (CVCs). A secondary objective was to explore issues of feasibility, usability, and compliance among patients and providers. Methods Study criteria included individuals ≥14 years and youth (7–14 years) with T1DM or T2DM, intervention with a self-monitoring device, assessment of clinical outcomes with the device, literature in English, and ≥10 participants. Relevant published literature was searched from 1985 to 2008. Randomized controlled trials and observational studies were included. Data were extracted for clinical outcomes, feasibility and compliance methods, and results. Selected studies were independently evaluated with a validated instrument for assessing methodological quality. Results Eighteen trials were selected. Predominant types of device interventions included self-monitoring of blood glucose, pedometers, and cell phone or wireless technologies. Feasibility and compliance were measured in the majority of studies. Conclusions Self-monitoring of blood glucose continues to be an effective tool for the management of diabetes. Wireless technologies can improve diabetes self-care, and pedometers are effective lifestyle modification tools. The results of this review indicate a need for additional controlled trial research on existing and novel technologies for diabetes self-monitoring, on health outcomes associated with diabetes and CVCs, and device feasibility and compliance. PMID:20144402

  19. [Prevention of diabetes mellitus complications and improvement of early diagnosis at a population level, through the implementation of integrated disease management in the Modena region].

    PubMed

    Caroli, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Angela; Fattori, Giuseppe; Daghio, Maria Monica; Guidetti, Patrizia; Borsari, Silvana; Guerzoni, Andrea; Petropulacos, Kyriakoula; Daya, Ghassan; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of diabetes mellitus disease management, implemented in Modena province since ten years, on the prevention of complications and early diagnoses at a population level. Time trends show that diabetic patients had significantly decreasing values over time of age, diabetes duration, and glycated haemoglobin; and increasing percentage over time of new-onset diabetes and optimal glycaemic control. That indicates an improved ability of early diagnosis and care of diabetes mellitus. It indicates at a population level that the Local Health Unit, as health system, promoted diabetes prevention and its complications.

  20. Diabetes Self-Management Education in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Joanah; Stern, Marianne; Butkiewicz, Elise; Wegner, Elfie; Reinisch, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes self-management education and home visits have been found to improve clinical outcomes in individuals living with diabetes. The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting self-management education in patients' homes. Methods Baseline biometric data was collected from a cohort of adult patients with diabetes. Home visits to 19 patients were conducted by doctoral students from Rutgers University School of Nursing. The visits included knowledge assessment, review of foods in the home, diabetes self-management education, and teaching the proper use of monitoring tools such as the glucometer and blood pressure monitor. Biomarkers were obtained post-intervention and were compared to baseline biomarkers. Descriptive lifestyle data was collected and opportunities for customized patient education were provided. Results The biomarkers improved overall during the four months after the education intervention. The mean A1C reduced 12% (p=0.0107), the mean glucose reduced 12% (p=0.0994), the mean BMI reduced 2% (p=0.1490), the systolic pressure reduced 1% (p=0.4196), and the diastolic pressure remained stable. Specific goal setting further increased the improvement in the area the individual planned to address.  Conclusions This project supports prior studies that found that in-home educational programs can improve the self-management of diabetes and lead to improvement in health indicators. The benefits of the study included personal attention in ensuring the correct use of home health monitoring devices, building self-management confidence, and identifying treatment barriers that may not be easily discerned in a clinic setting. PMID:27588231

  1. Impact of chronic disease self-management programs on type 2 diabetes management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Forjuoh, Samuel N; Ory, Marcia G; Jiang, Luohua; Vuong, Ann M; Bolin, Jane N

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) on glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and selected self-reported measures. METHODS: We compared patients who received a diabetes self-care behavioral intervention, the CDSMP developed at the Stanford University, with controls who received usual care on their HbA1c and selected self-reported measures, including diabetes self-care activities, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), pain and fatigue. The subjects were a subset of participants enrolled in a randomized controlled trial that took place at seven regional clinics of a university-affiliated integrated healthcare system of a multi-specialty group practice between January 2009 and June 2011. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from randomization to 12 mo. Data were analyzed using multilevel statistical models and linear mixed models to provide unbiased estimates of intervention effects. RESULTS: Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics were generally comparable between the two groups. The average baseline HbA1c values in the CDSMP and control groups were 9.4% and 9.2%, respectively. Significant reductions in HbA1c were seen at 12 mo for the two groups, with adjusted changes around 0.6% (P < 0.0001), but the reductions did not differ significantly between the two groups (P = 0.885). Few significant differences were observed in participants’ diabetes self-care activities. No significant differences were observed in the participants’ HRQOL, pain, or fatigue measures. CONCLUSION: The CDSMP intervention may not lower HbA1c any better than good routine care in an integrated healthcare system. More research is needed to understand the benefits of self-management programs in primary care in different settings and populations. PMID:24936263

  2. Management of progressive type 2 diabetes: role of insulin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chemitiganti, Ramachandra Rahul V; Spellman, Craig W

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is an effective treatment for achieving tight glycemic control and improving clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes. While insulin therapy is required from the onset of diagnosis in type 1 disease, its role in type 2 diabetes requires consideration as to when to initiate and advance therapy. In this article, we review a case study that unfolds over 5 years and discuss the therapeutic decision points, initiation and advancement of insulin regimens, and analyze new data regarding the advantages and disadvantages of tight management of glucose levels. PMID:19573240

  3. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  4. Parenting goals: predictors of parent involvement in disease management of children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Elizabeth M; Iannotti, Ronald J; Schneider, Stefan; Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Sobel, Douglas O

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of diabetes-specific parenting goals for parents of children with type 1 diabetes and to examine whether parenting goals predict a change in parenting involvement in disease management. An independent sample of primary caretakers of 87 children aged 10 to 16 years with type 1 diabetes completed the measure of parenting goals (diabetes-specific and general goals); both parent and child completed measures of parent responsibility for diabetes management at baseline and 6 months. Parents ranked diabetes-specific parenting goals as more important than general parenting goals, and rankings were moderately stable over time. Parenting goals were related to parent responsibility for diabetes management. The relative ranking of diabetes-specific parenting goals predicted changes in parent involvement over 6 months, with baseline ranking of goals predicting more parental involvement at follow-up. Parenting goals may play an important role in family management of type 1 diabetes.

  5. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-30

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  6. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  7. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no “best-practice method” for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T

  8. Telehealth--an effective delivery method for diabetes self-management education?

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Moss, Gail

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that is often comorbid with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and neuropathy. Its management is complex, requiring ongoing clinical management, lifestyle changes, and self-care. This article examines recent literature on telehealth and emerging technological tools for supporting self-management of diabetes and identifies best practices. The authors conducted a PubMed search (January 2008-2012) that was supplemented by review of meeting materials and a scan of the Internet to identify emerging technologies. Fifty-eight papers were reviewed; 12 were selected for greater analysis. This review supports earlier findings that the delivery of diabetes self-management and training (DSME/T) via telehealth is useful, appropriate, and acceptable to patients and providers. Best practices are emerging; not all technology is appropriate for all populations--interactive technology needs to be appropriate to the patient's age, abilities, and sensitivities. Telehealth is scalable and sustainable provided that it adds value, does not add to the provider's workload, and is fairly reimbursed. However, there are multiple barriers (patient, provider, health system) to remotely provided DSME/T. DSME/T delivered via telehealth offers effective, efficient, and affordable ways to reach and support underserved minorities and other people with diabetes and related comorbidities. The new generation of smartphones, apps, and other technologies increase access, and the newest interventions are designed to meet patient needs, do not increase workloads, are highly appropriate, enhance self-management, and are desired by patients.

  9. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  10. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function.

  11. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function. PMID:27621191

  12. Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Leila; Nasiri, Morteza; Adarvishi, Sara

    2015-02-15

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. Based on National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence strategies, early effective management of DFU can reduce the severity of complications such as preventable amputations and possible mortality, and also can improve overall quality of life. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases. Also, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin and growth factors could be used as adjunct therapies for rapid healing of DFU. So, it's suggested that with appropriate patient education encourages them to regular foot care in order to prevent DFU and its complications.

  13. Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Leila; Nasiri, Morteza; Adarvishi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. Based on National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence strategies, early effective management of DFU can reduce the severity of complications such as preventable amputations and possible mortality, and also can improve overall quality of life. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases. Also, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin and growth factors could be used as adjunct therapies for rapid healing of DFU. So, it’s suggested that with appropriate patient education encourages them to regular foot care in order to prevent DFU and its complications. PMID:25685277

  14. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Menakshi; Pouliot, Mylène; Couture, Réjean; Vaucher, Elvire

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major microvascular complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Current treatment strategies for DR are mostly limited to laser therapies, steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, which are often associated with unwanted side effects leading to further complications. Recent evidence suggests that kinins play a primary role in the development of DR through enhanced vascular permeability, leukocytes infiltration, and other inflammatory mechanisms. These deleterious effects are mediated by kinin B1 and B2 receptors, which are expressed in diabetic human and rodent retina. Importantly, kinin B1 receptor is virtually absent in sane tissue, yet it is induced and upregulated in diabetic retina. These peptides belong to the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS), which contains two separate and independent pathways of regulated serine proteases, namely plasma kallikrein (PK) and tissue kallikrein (TK) that are involved in the biosynthesis of bradykinin (BK) and kallidin (Lys-BK), respectively. Hence, ocular inhibition of kallikreins or antagonism of kinin receptors offers new therapeutic avenues in the treatment and management of DR. Herein, we present an overview of the principal features and known inflammatory mechanisms associated with DR along with the current therapeutic approaches and put special emphasis on the KKS as a new and promising therapeutic target due to its link with key pathways directly associated with the development of DR. PMID:25130041

  15. Practical management of diabetic ketoacidosis in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Silink, M

    1998-10-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis results from insulin deficiency and insulin resistance and is marked by hyperglycaemia, ketoacidosis, dehydration and electrolyte losses. Management includes correction of shock, dehydration, electrolyte deficits, hyperglycaemia, acidosis and sepsis (if present). Warning signs include severe dehydration, shock, pH < 7.0, hypokalaemia, hypernatraemia, hyperosmolality, hyperlipidaemia, deterioration in consciousness and diabetic ketoacidosis in very young patients. The principles of treatment include (i) admission to a unit with paediatric experience, (ii) treatment of shock, (iii) rehydration over 24-36 h, or longer if the osmolality is >360 mmoll(-1), (iv) normal saline for rehydration unless the patient is hypernatraemic, (v) avoidance of bicarbonate unless acidosis is interfering with myocardial contractility, (vi) insulin infusion to achieve a fall in blood glucose levels of 5 mmol h(-1), (vi) potassium, (vii) use of 5% glucose when the blood glucose level falls <12mmoll(-1), (ix) treatment of any complications and (x) change to subcutaneous insulin when diabetic ketoacidosis is controlled.

  16. Technology to Optimize Pediatric Diabetes Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kara R.; Laffel, Lori M. B.

    2013-01-01

    Technology for diabetes management is rapidly developing and changing. With each new development, there are numerous factors to consider, including medical benefits, impact on quality of life, ease of use, and barriers to use. It is also important to consider the interaction between developmental stage and technology. This review considers a number of newer diabetes-related technologies and explores issues related to their use in the pediatric diabetes population (including young adults), with a focus on psychosocial factors. Areas include trend technology in blood glucose monitoring, continuous glucose monitoring, sensor-augmented insulin pumps and low glucose suspend functions, internet applications including videoconferencing, mobile applications (apps), including text messaging, and online gaming. PMID:24046146

  17. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Gunggu, Azylina; Thon, Chang Ching; Whye Lian, Cheah

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  18. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  19. Changes in management and outcomes for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes over the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the 50 years from 1964 to 2014, outcomes for children with type 1 diabetes have improved significantly, because of both technological advancements and changes in management philosophy. For the child with type 1 diabetes in 2014, intensive management with multiple daily injections or insulin pump therapy and the support of a specialist multidisciplinary team is now standard care. The main treatment goal is no longer the avoidance of hypoglycaemia, but the minimisation of hyperglycaemia and glucose variability, thereby reducing the risk of microvascular complications. However, the inherent burden of care and diligence required by patients and families, if they are to maintain optimal diabetes control, have not changed and may even have increased. While the long sought-after cure for diabetes remains elusive, artificial pancreas or closed-loop systems hold the most promise for improving the burden of care in the near term for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25529223

  20. [Management of type 2 diabetes: from guidelines to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Rupa; Vora, Jiten

    2010-09-01

    The current era is seeing an unprecedented rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes, related to increasing adiposity levels. In addition, the complex nature of the disease with a much younger patient group than before makes prescribing a challenging task for physicians today. The advent of incretin based agents makes therapeutics exciting but warrants judicious use given the higher prescription costs and limited safety data. At the same time, mounting evidence not only supports a "treat early" approach but also cautions against achieving tight glycaemic control too quickly in certain patient groups particularly those of long disease duration and evidence of cardiovascular disease. In this conundrum, guidelines help to bring the best clinical evidence closer to practise. In this chapter, we discuss the latest clinical guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes based on recommendations from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (UK). At the same time we highlight the limitations of guidelines as they are unable to provide options for all "real life" scenarios. Though guidelines are instrumental in bringing evidence closer to practise, it is ultimately up to the clinician to rationalise therapy as per the needs of the individual patient. At the same time, it is also crucial to achieve meaningful outcomes in patients' lives especially in the current "pay for performance" culture in health care with the aim of providing world class care to each and every patient with diabetes. PMID:21420532

  1. Epidemiology, management, complications and costs associated with type 2 diabetes in Brazil: a comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With an estimated 74% of all deaths attributable to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in 2010, NCDs have become a major health priority in Brazil. The objective of the study was to conduct a comprehensive literature review on diabetes in Brazil; specifically: the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes, the availability of national and regional sources of data (particularly in terms of direct and indirect costs) and health policies for the management of diabetes and its complications. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government and the World Health Organization, as well as other grey literature and official government websites were also reviewed. Results From 2006 to 2010, an approximate 20% increase in the prevalence of self-reported diabetes was observed. In 2010, it was estimated that 6.3% of Brazilians aged 18 years or over had diabetes. Diabetes was estimated to be responsible for 278,778 years of potential life lost for every 100,000 people. In 2013, it is estimated that about 7% of patients with diabetes has had one or more of the following complications: diabetic foot ulcers, amputation, kidney disease, and fundus changes. The estimated annual direct cost of diabetes was USD $3.952 billion in 2000; the estimated annual indirect cost was USD $18.6 billion. The two main sources of data on diabetes are the information systems of the Ministry of Health and surveys. In the last few years, the Brazilian Ministry of Health has invested considerably in improving surveillance systems for NCDs as well as implementing specific programmes to improve diagnosis and access to treatment. Conclusions Brazil has the capacity to address and respond to NCDs due to the leadership of the Ministry of Health in NCD prevention activities, including an integrated programme currently in place for diabetes. Strengthening the surveillance of NCDs is a

  2. Diabetes in pregnancy--dietary management.

    PubMed

    Serci, Iolanda

    2008-06-01

    The provision of adequate energy and nutrients in the woman with DM is essential for normal fetal growth. However, dietary modifications including exercise are essential to normalise blood glycaemic levels and prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the evidence surrounding the nutritional management in GDM has been controversial. Dornhorst and Frost (2002) state that not only are there conflicting guidelines on nutritional management but disagreement as to the effectiveness of this on pregnancy outcomes. NICE (2008) has issued guidelines on the management of DM before, during and after pregnancy. Dietary prescriptions should include personal preference, body weight and type and level of exercise, blood glucose levels, ketone levels and any medications taken for the DM. Midwives must empower women to manage their condition through making appropriate and acceptable choices for their health and that of their baby. PMID:18564524

  3. Diabetes in pregnancy--dietary management.

    PubMed

    Serci, Iolanda

    2008-06-01

    The provision of adequate energy and nutrients in the woman with DM is essential for normal fetal growth. However, dietary modifications including exercise are essential to normalise blood glycaemic levels and prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the evidence surrounding the nutritional management in GDM has been controversial. Dornhorst and Frost (2002) state that not only are there conflicting guidelines on nutritional management but disagreement as to the effectiveness of this on pregnancy outcomes. NICE (2008) has issued guidelines on the management of DM before, during and after pregnancy. Dietary prescriptions should include personal preference, body weight and type and level of exercise, blood glucose levels, ketone levels and any medications taken for the DM. Midwives must empower women to manage their condition through making appropriate and acceptable choices for their health and that of their baby.

  4. Behavioural Change in Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Valerie L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the communication process between diabetes health professionals and people intensively self-managing their type 1 diabetes influenced behavioural change. Design: Telephone interviews to provide insight into the communication process and its influence on diabetes intensive self-management behaviour. Setting:…

  5. Self-Management Abilities of Diabetes in People with an Intellectual Disability Living in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Leigh A.; Trip, Henrietta T.; Whitehead, Lisa; Conder, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is encouraged; however, it is not an easy task and requires a good understanding of the disease. To determine how to improve the self-management abilities of diabetes in people with an intellectual disability (ID), this study explored the knowledge and understanding of diabetes held by a select group of adults with…

  6. Improving Diabetes Self-Management through Acceptance, Mindfulness, and Values: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Jennifer A.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Hayes, Steven C.; Glenn-Lawson, June L.

    2007-01-01

    Patients in a low-income community health center with Type 2 diabetes (N = 81) taking a one-day education workshop as part of their diabetes medical management were randomly assigned either to education alone or to a combination of education and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Both groups were taught how to manage their diabetes, but…

  7. Consultation and Collaboration on Health Self-Management for People Who Are Visually Impaired from Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Margaret E.

    1993-01-01

    The expertise of rehabilitation teachers and diabetes nurse educators can complement each other in components of diabetes management for people who have become visually impaired. The role of each professional involves education; integration of diabetes self-management into a comprehensive rehabilitation program; nutrition; exercise; medication,…

  8. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  9. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  10. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  11. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2) by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups) were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours); interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer) about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined) by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment) and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources). Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints) was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial) and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them. Conclusion Self-management

  12. Contemporary Evaluation and Management of the Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Sumpio, Bauer E.

    2012-01-01

    Foot problems in patients with diabetes remain a major public health issue and are the commonest reason for hospitalization of patients with diabetes with prevalence as high as 25%. Ulcers are breaks in the dermal barrier with subsequent erosion of underlying subcutaneous tissue that may extend to muscle and bone, and superimposed infection is a frequent and costly complication. The pathophysiology of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and includes neuropathy, infection, ischemia, and abnormal foot structure and biomechanics. Early recognition of the etiology of these foot lesions is essential for good functional outcome. Managing the diabetic foot is a complex clinical problem requiring a multidisciplinary collaboration of health care workers to achieve limb salvage. Adequate off-loading, frequent debridement, moist wound care, treatment of infection, and revascularization of ischemic limbs are the mainstays of therapy. Even when properly managed, some of the foot ulcers do not heal and are arrested in a state of chronic inflammation. These wounds can frequently benefit from various adjuvants, such as aggressive debridement, growth factors, bioactive skin equivalents, and negative pressure wound therapy. While these, increasingly expensive, therapies have shown promising results in clinical trials, the results have yet to be translated into widespread clinical practice leaving a huge scope for further research in this field. PMID:24278695

  13. Managing hybrid marketing systems.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, R T; Moran, U

    1990-01-01

    As competition increases and costs become critical, companies that once went to market only one way are adding new channels and using new methods - creating hybrid marketing systems. These hybrid marketing systems hold the promise of greater coverage and reduced costs. But they are also hard to manage; they inevitably raise questions of conflict and control: conflict because marketing units compete for customers; control because new indirect channels are less subject to management authority. Hard as they are to manage, however, hybrid marketing systems promise to become the dominant design, replacing the "purebred" channel strategy in all kinds of businesses. The trick to managing the hybrid is to analyze tasks and channels within and across a marketing system. A map - the hybrid grid - can help managers make sense of their hybrid system. What the chart reveals is that channels are not the basic building blocks of a marketing system; marketing tasks are. The hybrid grid forces managers to consider various combinations of channels and tasks that will optimize both cost and coverage. Managing conflict is also an important element of a successful hybrid system. Managers should first acknowledge the inevitability of conflict. Then they should move to bound it by creating guidelines that spell out which customers to serve through which methods. Finally, a marketing and sales productivity (MSP) system, consisting of a central marketing database, can act as the central nervous system of a hybrid marketing system, helping managers create customized channels and service for specific customer segments.

  14. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2011-01-01

    Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  15. African Americans' Culturally Specific Approaches to the Management of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, Ida J.; Magwood, Gayenell S.; Nemeth, Lynne S.; Williams, Tiffany H.

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality is an important multidimensional cultural resource and coping strategy used by many African Americans for managing chronic diseases such as diabetes. Yet, few studies examine meaning and interpretation of colloquial terms frequently used for coping within the context of a community culture. We designed an interpretive qualitative study to gain a deeper understanding of a colloquial phrase, “I ain't claiming it,” used among Project SuGar research participants when discussing diabetes. Thematic analysis revealed two major themes, Acknowledgment and Denial, as coping mechanisms through an active or passive relationship with God. Sub-theme of acknowledgment was presented as front seat driver and sub-theme for denial of the disease presented as back seat driver. These meanings encompass a range of culturally specific coping strategies for self-management that health providers should consider and implement as part of providing patient-centered care to enhance better outcome strategies. PMID:27175439

  16. Diabetes Patients' Experiences With the Implementation of Insulin Therapy and Their Perceptions of Computer-Assisted Self-Management Systems for Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Wouter T; Holleman, Frits; Hoekstra, Joost BL; Peek, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Background Computer-assisted decision support is an emerging modality to assist patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in insulin self-titration (ie, self-adjusting insulin dose according to daily blood glucose levels). Computer-assisted insulin self-titration systems mainly focus on helping patients overcome barriers related to the cognitive components of insulin titration. Yet other (eg, psychological or physical) barriers could still impede effective use of such systems. Objective Our primary aim was to identify experiences with and barriers to self-monitoring of blood glucose, insulin injection, and insulin titration among patients with T2DM. Our research team developed a computer-assisted insulin self-titration system, called PANDIT. The secondary aim of this study was to evaluate patients’ perceptions of computer-assisted insulin self-titration. We included patients who used PANDIT in a 4-week pilot study as well as patients who had never used such a system. Methods In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with patients on insulin therapy who were randomly recruited from a university hospital and surrounding general practices in the Netherlands. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed qualitatively. To classify the textual remarks, we created a codebook during the analysis, in a bottom-up and iterative fashion. To support examination of the final coded data, we used three theories from the field of health psychology and the integrated model of user satisfaction and technology acceptance by Wixom and Todd. Results When starting insulin therapy, some patients feared a lifelong commitment to insulin therapy and disease progression. Also, many barriers arose when implementing insulin therapy (eg, some patients were embarrassed to inject insulin in public). Furthermore, patients had difficulties increasing the insulin dose because they fear hypoglycemia, they associate higher insulin doses with disease progression

  17. MyDiabetesMyWay: An Evolving National Data Driven Diabetes Self-Management Platform.

    PubMed

    Wake, Deborah J; He, Jinzhang; Czesak, Anna Maria; Mughal, Fezan; Cunningham, Scott G

    2016-09-01

    MyDiabetesMyWay (MDMW) is an award-wining national electronic personal health record and self-management platform for diabetes patients in Scotland. This platform links multiple national institutional and patient-recorded data sources to provide a unique resource for patient care and self-management. This review considers the current evidence for online interventions in diabetes and discusses these in the context of current and ongoing developments for MDMW. Evaluation of MDMW through patient reported outcomes demonstrates a positive impact on self-management. User feedback has highlighted barriers to uptake and has guided platform evolution from an education resource website to an electronic personal health record now encompassing remote monitoring, communication tools and personalized education links. Challenges in delivering digital interventions for long-term conditions include integration of data between institutional and personal recorded sources to perform big data analytics and facilitating technology use in those with disabilities, low digital literacy, low socioeconomic status and in minority groups. The potential for technology supported health improvement is great, but awareness and adoption by health workers and patients remains a significant barrier.

  18. MyDiabetesMyWay: An Evolving National Data Driven Diabetes Self-Management Platform.

    PubMed

    Wake, Deborah J; He, Jinzhang; Czesak, Anna Maria; Mughal, Fezan; Cunningham, Scott G

    2016-09-01

    MyDiabetesMyWay (MDMW) is an award-wining national electronic personal health record and self-management platform for diabetes patients in Scotland. This platform links multiple national institutional and patient-recorded data sources to provide a unique resource for patient care and self-management. This review considers the current evidence for online interventions in diabetes and discusses these in the context of current and ongoing developments for MDMW. Evaluation of MDMW through patient reported outcomes demonstrates a positive impact on self-management. User feedback has highlighted barriers to uptake and has guided platform evolution from an education resource website to an electronic personal health record now encompassing remote monitoring, communication tools and personalized education links. Challenges in delivering digital interventions for long-term conditions include integration of data between institutional and personal recorded sources to perform big data analytics and facilitating technology use in those with disabilities, low digital literacy, low socioeconomic status and in minority groups. The potential for technology supported health improvement is great, but awareness and adoption by health workers and patients remains a significant barrier. PMID:27162192

  19. Management of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vandana

    2014-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is estimated to have a prevalence of approximately 1 in 5000 among Indian children. Living with T1D is a challenge for the child and the family because of the significant burden of treatment in terms of regular injections and monitoring of blood sugar, and risk of acute and long term complications that this condition imposes. Optimal glycemic control in T1D requires a meticulous balance of insulin therapy with diet and exercise. With the earlier insulin regimens this required lot of discipline in the eating and activity pattern, which led to significant curtailment of the lifestyle. Now, with availability of better insulins, delivery and monitoring devices, greater flexibility in lifestyle has become possible. The ultimate breakthrough in terms of therapy of T1D shall be easy availability of accurate and affordable closed loop systems, and 'cure' through islet or stem cell transplant. A review of the ambulatory management of T1D in children and adolescents and the upcoming therapeutic advances is being presented in this paper.

  20. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Anna Z; Brown, Florence M

    2016-08-01

    Women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) have unique needs during the preconception, pregnancy, and postpartum periods. Preconception counseling is essential for women with T1DM to minimize pregnancy risks. The goals of preconception care should be tight glycemic control with a hemoglobin A1c (A1C) < 7 % and as close to 6 % as possible, without significant hypoglycemia. This will lower risks of congenital malformations, preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The safety of medications should be assessed prior to conception. Optimal control of retinopathy, hypertension, and nephropathy should be achieved. During pregnancy, the goal A1C is near-normal at <6 %, without excessive hypoglycemia. There is no clear evidence that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI) is superior in achieving the desired tight glycemic control of T1DM during pregnancy. Data regarding continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in pregnant women with T1DM is conflicting regarding improved glycemic control. However, a recent CGM study does provide some distinct patterns of glucose levels associated with large for gestational age infants. Frequent eye exams during pregnancy are essential due to risk of progression of retinopathy during pregnancy. Chronic hypertension treatment goals are systolic blood pressure 110-129 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure 65-79 mmHg. Labor and delivery target plasma glucose levels are 80-110 mg/dl, and an insulin drip is recommended to achieve these targets during active labor. Postpartum, insulin doses must be reduced and glucoses closely monitored in women with T1DM because of the enhanced insulin sensitivity after delivery. Breastfeeding is recommended and should be highly encouraged due to maternal benefits including increased insulin sensitivity and weight loss and infant and childhood benefits including reduced prevalence of overweight. In this article, we discuss the care of pregnant patients with T1DM. PMID

  1. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2013-01-01

    Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  2. Computer-aided system for diabetes care in Berlin, G.D.R.

    PubMed

    Thoelke, H; Meusel, K; Ratzmann, K P

    1990-01-01

    In the Centre of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders of Berlin, G.D.R., a computer-aided care system has been used since 1974, aiming at relieving physicians and medical staff from routine tasks and rendering possible epidemiological research on an unselected diabetes population of a defined area. The basis of the system is the data bank on diabetics (DB), where at present data from approximately 55,000 patients are stored. DB is used as a diabetes register of Berlin. On the basis of standardised criteria of diagnosis and therapy of diabetes mellitus in our dispensary care system, DB facilitates representative epidemiological analyses of the diabetic population, e.g. prevalence, incidence, duration of diabetes, and modes of treatment. The availability of general data on the population or the selection of specified groups of patients serves the management of the care system. Also, it supports the computer-aided recall of type II diabetics, treated either with diet alone or with diet and oral drugs. In this way, the standardised evaluation of treatment strategies in large populations of diabetics is possible on the basis of uniform metabolic criteria (blood glucose plus urinary glucose). The system consists of a main computer in the data processing unit and of personal computers in the diabetes centre which can be used either individually or as terminals to the main computer. During 14 years of experience, the computer-aided out-patient care of type II diabetics has proved efficient in a big-city area with a large population.

  3. Managing type 2 diabetes in men.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The growing epidemic of T2DM requires intervention to assist patients who have been diagnosed to better manage the disease, to reduce the risk of developing the disease in those who have not yet been diagnosed, and to manage the associated complications. In addition to individualizing interventions based on a patient's needs, concerns, and capabilities, taking gender into account is necessary. In otherwise healthy people, several independent factors appear to pose a higher risk of T2DM in men relative to women, including systolic hypertension, regular smoking, and alcohol intake ≥ 40 g/d. At the same time, men achieve greater risk reduction from moderate daily alcohol intake and a diet high in fish and seafood, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, and magnesium. Once diagnosed with T2DM, men generally fare better than women regarding the risk for CVD; they also have a better prognosis after MI and a lower risk of death overall from CVD. Possible independent risk factors for CVD in men with T2DM that are especially important may include hypertension, poor glycemic control, and low HDL-C levels. Psychosocial complications, such as depression, are less likely in men with T2DM. However, men expend less effort coping, are less likely to utilize healthcare services, and are less informed about treatment options. Although men have a lower expectation of the benefit of self-management, they find support from family and friends more helpful than do women, but they are fearful of losing control of their disease. Taking these gender differences into account should prove helpful as family care physicians work with men to reduce their risk of developing T2DM and in helping men diagnosed with T2DM to better self-manage their disease. PMID:22670243

  4. Why do young adults with Type 1 diabetes find it difficult to manage diabetes in the workplace?

    PubMed

    Balfe, Myles; Brugha, Ruairi; Smith, Diarmuid; Sreenan, Seamus; Doyle, Frank; Conroy, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    This article explores how and why workplace environments impact diabetes management for adults people with Type 1 diabetes, 23-30 years of age. Interviews were conducted with 35 young adults, 29 women and 6 men. The majority of these interviewees worked in sectors such as banking, technology and administration. Young adults found it difficult to manage diabetes in the workplace for two main reasons: work-related time pressures and the non-routine nature of interviewees' work and working environment. Young adults also found it difficult to get the time to exercise both inside and outside of work. Young adults with Type 1 diabetes need to be provided with the tools and technologies that they need to manage diabetes in modern flexible workplaces.

  5. Metadata management staging system

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    Django application providing a user-interface for building a file and metadata management system. An evolution of our Node.js and CouchDb metadata management system. This one focuses on server functionality and uses a well-documented, rational and REST-ful API for data access.

  6. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  7. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crump, Kelvin

    An Australian university architect studying management information systems programs at academic institutions in the United States visited 26 universities and colleges and nine educational and professional associations, including extended visits at the University of Wisconsin and the National Center of Higher Education Management Systems. During…

  8. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  9. Optimizing combination treatment in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Sibilla, Salvadeo

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining the suggested glycemic control is the most important achievement in order to prevent cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Monotherapy often fails after a period of treatment, so that multiple drugs are needed to achieve effective glycemic control. A number of oral glucose lowering drugs is now available such as metformin, sulfonylureas, non-sulfonylureas secretagogues (metiglinides derivatives), alpha-glucosidases inhibitors, and the newest agent: thiazolidinediones (TZD). The possible associations of oral glucose lowering drugs for optimal treatment of type 2 diabetes are briefly reviewed. In particular, the effects of different classes of drugs on cardiovascular risk factors (and particular hypertension and dyslipidemia) and well recognized cardiovascular disease markers in type 2 diabetes are analyzed: in this context TZD appear the more innovative drugs and have been shown to play a key role in the management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and endothelial disfunction in diabetic patients. The possible adverse effects derived from the association of different drug classes are also considered. PMID:18078018

  10. The role of vanadium in the management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brichard, S M; Henquin, J C

    1995-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin secretion and a resistance of target tissues to the action of insulin, in proportions that vary with the type of the disease. The shortage of insulin can be corrected by administration of exogenous insulin or stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells with sulphonylureas. However, insulin resistance remains a major therapeutic problem. Here, Sonia Brichard and Jean-Claude Henquin review the recent discoveries that indicate a possible role for vanadium in management of the disease. In vitro, vanadium salts mimic most effects of insulin on the main target tissues of the hormone, and in vivo they induce a sustained fall in blood glucose levels in insulin-deficient diabetic rats, and improve glucose homeostasis in obese, insulin-resistant diabetic rodents. Recent short-term clinical trials with vanadium salts also seem promising in type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients in whom liver and peripheral insulin resistance was attenuated, indicating the therapeutic potential of vanadium salts, pending demonstration of their long-term innocuity.

  11. Diabetes in Argentina: cost and management of diabetes and its complications and challenges for health policy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes is an expensive disease in Argentina as well as worldwide, and its prevalence is continuously rising affecting the quality of life of people with the disease and their life expectancy. It also imposes a heavy burden to the national health care budget and on the economy in the form of productivity losses. Aims To review and discuss a) the reported evidence on diabetes prevalence, the degree of control, the cost of care and outcomes, b) available strategies to decrease the health and economic disease burden, and c) how the disease fits in the Argentinian health care system and policy. Finally, to propose evidence-based policy options to reduce the burden of diabetes, both from an epidemiological as well as an economic perspective, on the Argentinian society. The evidence presented is expected to help the local authorities to develop and implement effective diabetes care programmes. Methodology A comprehensive literature review was performed using databases such as MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences). Literature published from 1980 to 2011 was included. This information was complemented with grey literature, including data from national and provincial official sources, personal communications and contacts with health authorities and diabetes experts in Argentina. Results Overall diabetes prevalence increased from 8.4% in 2005 to 9.6% 2009 at national level. In 2009, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death with a mortality rate of 19.2 per 100,000 inhabitants, and it accounted for 1,328,802 DALYs lost in the adult population, mainly affecting women aged over fifty. The per capita hospitalisation cost for people with diabetes was significantly higher than for people without the disease, US$ 1,628 vs. US$ 833 in 2004. Evidence shows that implementation of combined educative interventions improved quality of care and outcomes, decreased treatment costs and optimised the use of economic resources

  12. Management of a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Megan Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common problem among known and newly diagnosed diabetic children and adolescents for which they will often seek care in the emergency department (ED). Technological advances are leading to changes in outpatient management of diabetes. The ED physician needs to be aware of the new technologies in the care of diabetic children and comfortable managing patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions. This article reviews the ED management of diabetic ketoacidosis and its associated complications, as well as the specific recommendations in caring for patients using the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, serum ketone monitoring, and continuous glucose monitoring.

  13. Problem solving in diabetes self-management: a model of chronic illness self-management behavior.

    PubMed

    Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2003-01-01

    Management of chronic illnesses is a significant public health concern that is made more challenging by problems of regimen adherence. Effective self-management of chronic illnesses such as diabetes requires not only technical skill to perform regimen behaviors but also problem-solving skills to manage daily barriers to regimen adherence and to make appropriate adjustments to the self-care regimen. A review of the empirical literature on the relation between problem solving and disease self-management in diabetes, a chronic illness exemplar, illuminates methodological limitations that indicate a need for a theoretical framework for problem solving applied to chronic disease self-management. A problem-solving model of chronic disease self-management is proposed, derived from theories of problem solving in cognitive psychology, educational/learning theory, and social problem solving. Four essential components of problem solving in disease self-management are identified: (a). problem-solving skill, (b). problem-solving orientation, (c). disease-specific knowledge, and (d). transfer of past experience. The model is illustrated, and empirical support for this problem-solving model in the diabetes literature is discussed. The model has utility in driving testable hypotheses regarding the relation of disease-specific problem solving to chronic illness management, in developing problem-solving assessment instruments relevant to disease self-management, and in guiding disease self-management training and interventions.

  14. METABO: a new paradigm towards diabetes disease management. An innovative business model.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Alejandra; Colás, Javier; Fico, Giuseppe; Guillén, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Dealing with a chronic disease and, more specifically, with Diabetes Mellitus and other metabolic disorders, represents a great challenge for care givers, patients and the healthcare systems as their treatment requires continuous medical care and patient self management. The engagement of patients in the adoption of healthy lifestyles with a positive impact in the progression of their diseases is fundamental to avoid the appearance of chronic complications or co-morbidities. This paper presents the externalization of the health management of diabetic patients as an alternative to the current models of care for these patients that can help improve the quality of follow up and care delivery and contribute to the sustainability of the healthcare systems.

  15. Definition of Information Technology Architectures for Continuous Data Management and Medical Device Integration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H.; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2008-01-01

    The growing availability of continuous data from medical devices in diabetes management makes it crucial to define novel information technology architectures for efficient data storage, data transmission, and data visualization. The new paradigm of care demands the sharing of information in interoperable systems as the only way to support patient care in a continuum of care scenario. The technological platforms should support all the services required by the actors involved in the care process, located in different scenarios and managing diverse information for different purposes. This article presents basic criteria for defining flexible and adaptive architectures that are capable of interoperating with external systems, and integrating medical devices and decision support tools to extract all the relevant knowledge to support diabetes care. PMID:19885276

  16. Definition of information technology architectures for continuous data management and medical device integration in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M Elena; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Gómez, Enrique J

    2008-09-01

    The growing availability of continuous data from medical devices in diabetes management makes it crucial to define novel information technology architectures for efficient data storage, data transmission, and data visualization. The new paradigm of care demands the sharing of information in interoperable systems as the only way to support patient care in a continuum of care scenario. The technological platforms should support all the services required by the actors involved in the care process, located in different scenarios and managing diverse information for different purposes. This article presents basic criteria for defining flexible and adaptive architectures that are capable of interoperating with external systems, and integrating medical devices and decision support tools to extract all the relevant knowledge to support diabetes care.

  17. Engaging and empowering patients to manage their type 2 diabetes, Part II: Initiatives for success.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Stephan; Serrano-Gil, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has reached pandemic proportions. The impact of it and its long-term sequelae represent a significant burden for many healthcare systems around the world, and a significant number of patients struggle to achieve the internationally recommended targets for the modifiable risk factors that optimize healthy outcomes. In the first part of this two-part review, the scene was set showing that there seems to be a knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) gap hindering successful management of T2D. Although theoretical knowledge about how T2D should be managed exists, the attitude of patients and healthcare professionals seems to influence the practicalities of implementing life-enhancing changes for patients living with diabetes. Following the chronic care model, macro-level initiatives such as Finland's national diabetes program, "The Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes" (DEHKO), encourage a coordinated, supportive policy and financial environment for healthcare system change, and are advocated by the International Diabetes Federation. Over a 10-year period, the DEHKO program aims to demonstrate that a top-down population approach to prevention, focusing on reducing obesity, increasing physical activity, and encouraging healthier eating habits, may improve the overall health of the nation. However, the patient is the focus of day-to-day management of T2D, and innovative strategies that use a community (meso-level) approach to encourage self-management, or that embrace new technologies to access diabetes self-management education or support networks, are likely to be the way forward. Such measures may close the apparent KAP gap and bring about real and measurable benefits in quality of life and life expectancy. The second part of this review describes some of the many and varied initiatives designed to engage and empower patients to self-manage their T2D, with the aim of increasing the proportion of patients reaching health

  18. Community-based primary care: improving and assessing diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Meghan; Qaseem, Amir; Snow, Vincenza

    2010-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes make it a prime target for quality improvement research. Quality gaps and racial/gender disparities persist throughout this population of patients necessitating a sustainable improvement in the clinical management of diabetes. The authors of this study sought (1) to provide a population perspective on diabetes management, and (2) to reinforce evidence-based clinical guidelines through a Web-based educational module.The project also aimed to gain insight into working remotely with a community of rural physicians. This longitudinal pre-post intervention study involved 18 internal medicine physicians and included 3 points of medical record data abstraction over 24 months. A Web-based educational module was introduced after the baseline data abstraction. This module contained chapters on clinical education, practice tools, and self-assessment. The results showed a sustained improvement in most clinical outcomes and demonstrated the effectiveness of using Web-based mediums to reinforce clinical guidelines and change physician behavior.

  19. Nutritional therapy for the management of diabetic gastroparesis: clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Sadiya, Amena

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP), or slow emptying of the stomach, is a well-established complication of diabetes mellitus and is typically considered to occur in individuals with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical consequences of DGP include induction of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (early satiety, abdominal distension, reflux, stomach spasm, postprandial nausea, vomiting), alteration in drug absorption, and destabilization of glycemic control (due to mismatched postprandial glycemic and insulin peaks). Effective nutritional management not only helps in alleviating the symptoms, but also in facilitating better glycemic control. Although there have been no evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the nutrition care process of the DGP, the current dietary recommendations are based on expert opinions or observational studies. The dietary management of gastroparesis needs to be tailored according to the severity of malnutrition and kind of upper GI symptom by changing the volume, consistency, frequency, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates in the meal. Small frequent meals, using more liquid calories, reducing high fat or high fiber, consuming bezoar forming foods, and adjusting meal carbohydrates based on medications or insulin helps in improving the upper GI symptoms and glycemic control. Enteral nutrition can be an option for patients who fail to stabilize their weight loss, or for those who cannot gain weight with oral feedings, while total parenteral nutrition is rarely necessary for the patient with gastroparesis. PMID:23055757

  20. Nutritional therapy for the management of diabetic gastroparesis: clinical review.

    PubMed

    Sadiya, Amena

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP), or slow emptying of the stomach, is a well-established complication of diabetes mellitus and is typically considered to occur in individuals with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical consequences of DGP include induction of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (early satiety, abdominal distension, reflux, stomach spasm, postprandial nausea, vomiting), alteration in drug absorption, and destabilization of glycemic control (due to mismatched postprandial glycemic and insulin peaks). Effective nutritional management not only helps in alleviating the symptoms, but also in facilitating better glycemic control. Although there have been no evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the nutrition care process of the DGP, the current dietary recommendations are based on expert opinions or observational studies. The dietary management of gastroparesis needs to be tailored according to the severity of malnutrition and kind of upper GI symptom by changing the volume, consistency, frequency, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates in the meal. Small frequent meals, using more liquid calories, reducing high fat or high fiber, consuming bezoar forming foods, and adjusting meal carbohydrates based on medications or insulin helps in improving the upper GI symptoms and glycemic control. Enteral nutrition can be an option for patients who fail to stabilize their weight loss, or for those who cannot gain weight with oral feedings, while total parenteral nutrition is rarely necessary for the patient with gastroparesis.

  1. Operations management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

  2. A Web-Based Interactive Diabetes Registry for Health Care Management and Planning in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Amira M; Subhani, Shazia N; Ahmad, Najlaa A; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H; Ibrahim, Heba M

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, eHealth is a rapidly growing technology. It provides good quality health services at lower cost and increased availability. Diabetes has reached an epidemic stage in Saudi Arabia and has a medical and economic impact at a countrywide level. Data are greatly needed to better understand and plan to prevent and manage this medical problem. Objective The Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) is an electronic medical file supported by clinical, investigational, and management data. It functions as a monitoring tool for medical, social, and cultural bases for primary and secondary prevention programs. Economic impact, in the form of direct or indirect cost, is part of the registry’s scope. The registry’s geographic information system (GIS) produces a variety of maps for diabetes and associated diseases. In addition to availability and distribution of health facilities in the Kingdom, GIS data provide health planners with the necessary information to make informed decisions. The electronic data bank serves as a research tool to help researchers for both prospective and retrospective studies. Methods A Web-based interactive GIS system was designed to serve as an electronic medical file for diabetic patients retrieving data from medical files by trained registrars. Data was audited and cleaned before it was archived in the electronic filing system. It was then used to produce epidemiologic, economic, and geographic reports. A total of 84,942 patients were registered from 2000 to 2012, growing by 10% annually. Results The SNDR reporting system for epidemiology data gives better understanding of the disease pattern, types, and gender characteristics. Part of the reporting system is to assess quality of health care using different parameters, such as HbA1c, that gives an impression of good diabetes control for each institute. Economic reports give accurate cost estimation of different services given to diabetic patients, such as the annual insulin

  3. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omar; Banerjee, Swati; Kelly, Daniel F; Lee, Phillip D K

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary gigantism, a condition of endogenous growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion prior to epiphyseal closure, is a rare condition. In the adult condition of GH excess, acromegaly, the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported, with resolution following normalization of GH levels. We report the case of a 16-year-old male with pituitary gigantism due to a large invasive suprasellar adenoma who presented with T2DM and DKA. Despite surgical de-bulking, radiotherapy and medical treatment with cabergoline and pegvisomant, GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels remained elevated. However, the T2DM and recurrent DKA were successfully managed with metformin and low-dose glargine insulin, respectively. We review the pathophysiology of T2DM and DKA in growth hormone excess and available treatment options. PMID:17629784

  4. Plants Used in the Management of Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dodda, D.; Ciddi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease, which has assumed vital public health importance because of the complications associated with it. Various mechanisms including polyol pathway along with a complex integrating paradigm have been implicated in glucose-mediated complications. Though polyol pathway was established as a major mechanism, precise pathogenesis of these complications is not yet completely elucidated. Thus research focus was shifted towards key enzyme, aldose reductase in the pathway. Even though various compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity were synthesised, a very few compounds are under clinical use. However, studies on these compounds were always under conflicting results and an attempt has been made to review various natural substances with aldose reductase inhibitory activity and their role in management of diabetic complications. PMID:24843182

  5. Cardiovascular risk stratification and management in pre-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Færch, Kristine; Vistisen, Dorte; Johansen, Nanna Borup; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2014-06-01

    Prediabetes, covering individuals with impaired fasting glycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, or high-risk HbA1c levels, is associated with a ∼20 % increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with normoglycemic individuals. It is well-known that lifestyle or pharmacologic interventions can prevent diabetes in prediabetic people; however, the evidence is less clear regarding prevention of CVD. Most diabetes prevention trials have failed to show beneficial effects on CVD morbidity and mortality despite significant improvements of CVD risk factors in individuals with prediabetes. Another challenge is how to estimate CVD risk in prediabetic people. In general, prediction models for CVD do not take glucose levels or prediabetes status into account, thereby underestimating CVD risk in these high-risk individuals. More evidence within risk stratification and management of CVD risk in prediabetes is needed in order to recommend useful and effective strategies for early prevention of CVD.

  6. South Asian women with diabetes: Psychosocial challenges and management: Consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Sarita; Jawad, Fatema; Islam, Najmul; Mahtab, Hajera; Bhattarai, Jyoti; Shrestha, Dina; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Muthukuda, Dimuthu T; Widanage, Niranjala Weegoda; Aye, Than Than; Aung, Moe Wint; Kalra, Bharti; Anjana, R M; Sreedevi, Aswathy; Verma, Komal

    2013-07-01

    in women attending diabetes clinics across South Asia. Guidelines for counselling in female sexual dysfunction, written in culturally appropriate manner for South Asia, are needed. Diabetes affects women more severely because of their unique biological, cultural and socioeconomic circumstances. Women have limited access to health care facilities because of illiteracy, ignorance and negative social customs. Transcending the gender hierarchy and inequality is a formidable challenge. Sensitising men, empowering women on self care and providing peer support maybe the answer to this challenge. It is essential for health care providers to use appropriate coping mechanism such as building psychological contact with the patient, including family and friends as part of social support and empower patient with complete process of managing diabetes. Increasing awareness through the media, seminars, posters, group discussions and education, regular monitoring and consulting the doctor, support group for women and facilities for aerobic exercises are recommended. The health care systems should consider custom-designed prevention and control programs tailored for women based on local and regional attitudes on health care, cultural beliefs, and available social support systems. Policies that empower adolescent girls and young women to take control of their metabolic management must be encouraged. Provision of gender specific diabetes education with a holistic life-cycle approach is recommended. PMID:23961469

  7. South Asian women with diabetes: Psychosocial challenges and management: Consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Sarita; Jawad, Fatema; Islam, Najmul; Mahtab, Hajera; Bhattarai, Jyoti; Shrestha, Dina; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Muthukuda, Dimuthu T; Widanage, Niranjala Weegoda; Aye, Than Than; Aung, Moe Wint; Kalra, Bharti; Anjana, R M; Sreedevi, Aswathy; Verma, Komal

    2013-07-01

    in women attending diabetes clinics across South Asia. Guidelines for counselling in female sexual dysfunction, written in culturally appropriate manner for South Asia, are needed. Diabetes affects women more severely because of their unique biological, cultural and socioeconomic circumstances. Women have limited access to health care facilities because of illiteracy, ignorance and negative social customs. Transcending the gender hierarchy and inequality is a formidable challenge. Sensitising men, empowering women on self care and providing peer support maybe the answer to this challenge. It is essential for health care providers to use appropriate coping mechanism such as building psychological contact with the patient, including family and friends as part of social support and empower patient with complete process of managing diabetes. Increasing awareness through the media, seminars, posters, group discussions and education, regular monitoring and consulting the doctor, support group for women and facilities for aerobic exercises are recommended. The health care systems should consider custom-designed prevention and control programs tailored for women based on local and regional attitudes on health care, cultural beliefs, and available social support systems. Policies that empower adolescent girls and young women to take control of their metabolic management must be encouraged. Provision of gender specific diabetes education with a holistic life-cycle approach is recommended.

  8. South Asian women with diabetes: Psychosocial challenges and management: Consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sarita; Jawad, Fatema; Islam, Najmul; Mahtab, Hajera; Bhattarai, Jyoti; Shrestha, Dina; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Muthukuda, Dimuthu T.; Widanage, Niranjala Weegoda; Aye, Than Than; Aung, Moe Wint; Kalra, Bharti; Anjana, R. M.; Sreedevi, Aswathy; Verma, Komal

    2013-01-01

    in women attending diabetes clinics across South Asia. Guidelines for counselling in female sexual dysfunction, written in culturally appropriate manner for South Asia, are needed. Diabetes affects women more severely because of their unique biological, cultural and socioeconomic circumstances. Women have limited access to health care facilities because of illiteracy, ignorance and negative social customs. Transcending the gender hierarchy and inequality is a formidable challenge. Sensitising men, empowering women on self care and providing peer support maybe the answer to this challenge. It is essential for health care providers to use appropriate coping mechanism such as building psychological contact with the patient, including family and friends as part of social support and empower patient with complete process of managing diabetes. Increasing awareness through the media, seminars, posters, group discussions and education, regular monitoring and consulting the doctor, support group for women and facilities for aerobic exercises are recommended. The health care systems should consider custom-designed prevention and control programs tailored for women based on local and regional attitudes on health care, cultural beliefs, and available social support systems. Policies that empower adolescent girls and young women to take control of their metabolic management must be encouraged. Provision of gender specific diabetes education with a holistic life-cycle approach is recommended. PMID:23961469

  9. Combined team management of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ng, C S; Lim, L S; Chng, K P; Lim, P; Cheah, J S; Yeo, P P; Gwee, H M; Tan, K L; Joseph, R; Yong, Y M

    1985-04-01

    225 women with diabetes in pregnancy were managed by a team of obstetricians, physicians (endocrinologists) and paediatricians from the National University of Singapore. A protocol of management was formulated and followed. The incidence of 1.1% or 1 in 90 pregnancies was found, with significantly higher incidence in Indians and lower in Malays. There were 37 established diabetics and 188 diagnosed during pregnancy. Of these (188), 74 were gestational diabetics. All the women were treated with Insulin and Diet or Diet alone. 177 (79%) were treated with Insulin and Diet. Blood sugar profiles were done for monitoring diabetic control. 72.8% of the women were between para 0 and 1 and 85.2% between the ages of 20 and 34. 72.5% of the women delivered at 38 weeks gestation or later. 48.9% went into spontaneous labour, 32.4% were induced and 18.7% had elective caesarean section. 62.2% of the women had labour of less than 12 hours. The overall caesarean section rate was 41.7%. There were 3 stillbirths and 2 neonatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate was 2.2%. Thirteen babies had congenital malformations (5.8%). 77.8% of the babies had Apgar score of 7 or more at 5 minutes after delivery. 79.1% of the babies weighed between 2.5 kgm and 3.9 kgm. Pre-eclamptic toxaemia was the commonest complication in pregnancy followed by Urinary Tract Infection and Polyhydramnios. Postpartum complications in the mother were confined to 14 women (6.2%), and wound infection or breakdown was the commonest cause.

  10. Systems engineering management plans.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tamara S.

    2009-10-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

  11. Blood Glucose Pattern Management in Diabetes: Creating Order from Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, John C.; Genovese, Stefano; Reach, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is the most accessible way to assess glycemic patterns, and interpretation of these patterns can provide reasons for poor glycemic control and suggest management strategies. Furthermore, diabetes management based on blood glucose (BG) patterns is associated with improved patient outcomes. The aim of this review is therefore to evaluate the impact of pattern management in clinical practice. Methods We included a review of available literature, a discussion of obstacles to implementation of SMBG and pattern management, and suggestions on how clinicians and patients might work together to optimize this management feature. Results The literature review revealed eight publications specifically describing structured approaches to SMBG and pattern management. Specific information on how SMBG might be structured to detect BG patterns, however, remains limited. Barriers to pattern management include not just practical reasons, but emotional and psychological reasons as well. Conclusions Patterns are not always easy to detect or interpret, but on-meter and web-based tools can support both patients and clinicians. Ultimately, successful pattern management requires education and mutual commitment from the clinician and patient—ongoing collaboration is needed to obtain, review, and interpret SMBG values and to make changes based on the patterns. PMID:24351184

  12. The OnTrack Diabetes Web-Based Program for Type 2 Diabetes and Dysphoria Self-Management: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anthony Carl; Scuffham, Paul A; Parham, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising with the majority of patients practicing inadequate disease self-management. Depression, anxiety, and diabetes-specific distress present motivational challenges to adequate self-care. Health systems globally struggle to deliver routine services that are accessible to the entire population, in particular in rural areas. Web-based diabetes self-management interventions can provide frequent, accessible support regardless of time and location Objective This paper describes the protocol of an Australian national randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the OnTrack Diabetes program, an automated, interactive, self-guided Web program aimed to improve glycemic control, diabetes self-care, and dysphoria symptoms in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods A small pilot trial is conducted that primarily tests program functionality, efficacy, and user acceptability and satisfaction. This is followed by the main RCT, which compares 3 treatments: (1) delayed program access: usual diabetes care for 3 months postbaseline followed by access to the full OnTrack Diabetes program; (2) immediate program: full access to the self-guided program from baseline onward; and (3) immediate program plus therapist support via Functional Imagery Training (FIT). Measures are administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postbaseline. Primary outcomes are diabetes self-care behaviors (physical activity participation, diet, medication adherence, and blood glucose monitoring), glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, and diabetes-specific distress. Secondary outcomes are depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and adherence, and quality of life. Exposure data in terms of program uptake, use, time on each page, and program completion, as well as implementation feasibility will be conducted. Results This trial is currently underway with funding support from the Wesley Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia. Conclusions This is the first known trial of an

  13. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Use of Health Care Services for Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Raeven Faye; Monnat, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Research demonstrates consistent racial/ethnic disparities in access to and use of health care services for a variety of chronic conditions. Yet we know little about whether these disparities exist for use of health care services for diabetes management. Racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately suffer from diabetes, complications from diabetes,…

  14. A Collaborative Approach to Diabetes Management: The Choice Made for Colorado Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school…

  15. People with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability Talking about Their Diabetes and How They Manage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardol, M.; Rijken, M.; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of diabetes is relatively high in people with intellectual disability (ID). However, little is known about how people with ID experience having diabetes and how they manage the condition. Method: Seventeen people with mild to moderate ID who have diabetes were interviewed. A framework on illness perceptions having an…

  16. The interdisciplinary approach to the implementation of a diabetes home care disease management program.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mary Ann; Lapides, Shawn; Hayden, Corrine; Santangelo, Roxanne

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes is a national epidemic and a leading cause of hospitalizations in the United States. Home care agencies need to be able to provide effective Diabetes Disease Management to help prevent avoidable hospitalizations and assist patients to live a good quality of life. This article describes one organization's journey toward providing patients with better diabetes care resulting in an improved quality of life.

  17. Safety Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fido, A. T.; Wood, D. O.

    This document discusses the issues that need to be considered by the education and training system as it responds to the changing needs of industry in Great Britain. Following a general introduction, the development of quality management ideas is traced. The underlying principles of safety and risk management are clarified and the implications of…

  18. Constraints faced by urban poor in managing diabetes care: patients’ perspectives from South India

    PubMed Central

    Bhojani, Upendra; Mishra, Arima; Amruthavalli, Subramani; Devadasan, Narayanan; Kolsteren, Patrick; De Henauw, Stefaan; Criel, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background Four out of five adults with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). India has the second highest number of diabetes patients in the world. Despite a huge burden, diabetes care remains suboptimal. While patients (and families) play an important role in managing chronic conditions, there is a dearth of studies in LMIC and virtually none in India capturing perspectives and experiences of patients in regard to diabetes care. Objective The objective of this study was to better understand constraints faced by patients from urban slums in managing care for type 2 diabetes in India. Design We conducted in-depth interviews, using a phenomenological approach, with 16 type 2- diabetes patients from a poor urban neighbourhood in South India. These patients were selected with the help of four community health workers (CHWs) and were interviewed by two trained researchers exploring patients’ experiences of living with and seeking care for diabetes. The sampling followed the principle of saturation. Data were initially coded using the NVivo software. Emerging themes were periodically discussed among the researchers and were refined over time through an iterative process using a mind-mapping tool. Results Despite an abundance of healthcare facilities in the vicinity, diabetes patients faced several constraints in accessing healthcare such as financial hardship, negative attitudes and inadequate communication by healthcare providers and a fragmented healthcare service system offering inadequate care. Strongly defined gender-based family roles disadvantaged women by restricting their mobility and autonomy to access healthcare. The prevailing nuclear family structure and inter-generational conflicts limited support and care for elderly adults. Conclusions There is a need to strengthen primary care services with a special focus on improving the availability and integration of health services for diabetes at the community level, enhancing patient

  19. Intranet Document Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

    1998-01-01

    Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

  20. Central diabetes insipidus in newborns: unique challenges in management.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Harish; Bhakhri, Bhanu Kiran; Datta, Vikram

    2011-09-01

    Central diabetes insidus (CDI) neonatal age can be a result of intracranial insult, either congenital or acquired. The management CDI in this age group poses special set of problems owing to obligate high water intake in milk-based feeds. Due to the risk of hyponatremia on long term anti diuretic hormone (ADH), these babies should be managed on high volume of feeds with low content of renal solute load (RSL). Addition of thiazides may decrease the fluid requirements in these babies. We report the challenges in management of CDI in a male newborn with underlying semilobar holoprosencephaly. The water and solute balance in such babies on different type of feeding options is discussed.

  1. Impact of a diabetes disease management program on diabetes control and patient quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rasekaba, Tshepo Mokuedi; Graco, Marnie; Risteski, Chrissie; Jasper, Andrea; Berlowitz, David J; Hawthorne, Graeme; Hutchinson, Anastasia

    2012-02-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes is projected to be 5.4% of the adult population by the year 2025. Diabetes is associated with multiple medical complications that both decrease health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and contribute to earlier mortality. There is growing evidence for the effectiveness of multidisciplinary disease management programs that incorporate self-management principles in improving patients' long-term outcomes. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in improving: (1) glycemic control measured by HbA1c, and (2) HR-QOL measured by the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQOL), at enrollment and at 12-months follow-up. Between 2004 and 2008, a total of 967 patients were enrolled in the program; 545 (56%) of these patients had HbA1c data available at baseline and at 12 months. Mean HbA1c at enrollment was 8.6% (SD 1.9) versus 7.3% (SD 1.2) at 12 months (P<0.001). Overall, 68% of patients experienced improvements in HbA1c. At enrollment, patients reported "fair" HR-QOL, which was significantly lower than age-adjusted population norms who reported "good" HR-QOL. At 12 months, 251 (64%) patients had improved HR-QOL, 27 (7%) had no change, and 114 (29%) deteriorated. Mean utility scores improved by 0.11 (P<0.001), which is almost twice the minimum clinically important difference for the AQOL. This study confirms that a multidisciplinary disease management program for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes can improve both glycemic control and HR-QOL.

  2. Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and diabetes mellitus: Pathophysiology assumptions, clinical aspects and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Sousa, André Gustavo P; Cabral, João Victor de Sousa; El-Feghaly, William Batah; de Sousa, Luísa Silva; Nunes, Adriana Bezerra

    2016-03-10

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) frequently develop electrolyte disorders, including hyperkalemia. The most important causal factor of chronic hyperkalemia in patients with diabetes is the syndrome of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism (HH), but other conditions may also contribute. Moreover, as hyperkalemia is related to the blockage of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and HH is most common among patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency due to diabetic nephropathy (DN), the proper evaluation and management of these patients is quite complex. Despite its obvious relationship with diabetic nephropathy, HH is also related to other microvascular complications, such as DN, particularly the autonomic type. To confirm the diagnosis, plasma aldosterone concentration and the levels of renin and cortisol are measured when the RAAS is activated. In addition, synthetic mineralocorticoid and/or diuretics are used for the treatment of this syndrome. However, few studies on the implications of HH in the treatment of patients with DM have been conducted in recent years, and therefore little, if any, progress has been made. This comprehensive review highlights the findings regarding the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management recommendations for HH in patients with DM to clarify the diagnosis of this clinical condition, which is often neglected, and to assist in the improvement of patient care.

  3. Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and diabetes mellitus: Pathophysiology assumptions, clinical aspects and implications for management

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, André Gustavo P; Cabral, João Victor de Sousa; El-Feghaly, William Batah; de Sousa, Luísa Silva; Nunes, Adriana Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) frequently develop electrolyte disorders, including hyperkalemia. The most important causal factor of chronic hyperkalemia in patients with diabetes is the syndrome of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism (HH), but other conditions may also contribute. Moreover, as hyperkalemia is related to the blockage of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and HH is most common among patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency due to diabetic nephropathy (DN), the proper evaluation and management of these patients is quite complex. Despite its obvious relationship with diabetic nephropathy, HH is also related to other microvascular complications, such as DN, particularly the autonomic type. To confirm the diagnosis, plasma aldosterone concentration and the levels of renin and cortisol are measured when the RAAS is activated. In addition, synthetic mineralocorticoid and/or diuretics are used for the treatment of this syndrome. However, few studies on the implications of HH in the treatment of patients with DM have been conducted in recent years, and therefore little, if any, progress has been made. This comprehensive review highlights the findings regarding the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management recommendations for HH in patients with DM to clarify the diagnosis of this clinical condition, which is often neglected, and to assist in the improvement of patient care. PMID:26981183

  4. Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Maurizio; Merante, Valentina; Medaglia, Valeria; Irace, Concetta; Gnasso, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM has a huge and growing burden on public health, whereas new care models are not implemented into clinical practice; in fact the purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a program of integrated care for T2DM, compared with ordinary diligence. Methods "Progetto Diabete Calabria" is a new organizational model for the management of patients with diabetes mellitus, based on General Practitioners (GPs) empowerment and the use of a web-based electronic health record, shared in remote consultations among GPs and Hospital Consultants. One-year change in glucose and main cardiovascular risk factors control in 104 patients (Cases) following this integrated care program has been evaluated and compared with that of 208 control patients (Controls) matched for age, gender, and cardiometabolic profile, and followed in an ordinary outpatient medical management by the Consultants only. Both patient groups had Day Hospitals before and after the study period. Results The mean number of accesses to the Consultants during the study was 0.6±0.9 for Cases, and 1.3±1.5 for Controls (p<0.0001). At follow-up, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) significantly decreased from 58±6 to 54±8 mmol/mol in Cases only (p=0.01); LDL cholesterol decreased in both groups; body mass index decreased in Cases only, from 31.0±4.8 to 30.5±4.6 kg/m2 (p=0.03). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that a health care program based on GPs empowerment and taking care plus remote consultation with Consultants is at least as effective as standard outpatient management, in order to improve the control of T2DM. PMID:25974092

  5. Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Game, Frances L

    2013-09-01

    Although osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetes remains common in specialist foot clinics across the world, the quality of published work to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management is generally poor. Diagnosis should be based primarily on clinical signs supported by results of pathologic and radiologic investigations. Although the gold standard comes from the histologic and microbiological examination of bone, clinicians should be aware of the problems of sampling error. This lack of standardization of diagnostic criteria and of consensus on the choice of outcome measures poses further difficulties when seeking evidence to support management decisions. Experts have traditionally recommended surgical removal of infected bone but available evidence suggests that in many cases (excepting those in whom immediate surgery is required to save life or limb) a nonsurgical approach to management of osteomyelitis may be effective for many, if not most, patients with osteomyelitis of the diabetic foot. The benefits and limitations of both approaches need, however, to be established in prospective trials so that appropriate therapy can be offered to appropriate patients at the appropriate time, with the patients' views taken fully into account.

  6. The current role of thiazolidinediones in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Christos V; Kei, Anastazia; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-08-01

    Among the epidemics of modern time, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the main contributors to overall morbidity as well as mortality. A number of different treatment options are available for the management of diabetes. Among them thiazolidinediones (TZDs) is an interesting drug class since it does not target the result of T2DM, i.e., hyperglycemia but rather some of the core mechanisms of the disease. Indeed, glitazones increase insulin sensitivity by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, which plays an important role in regulating various metabolic parameters. Although TZDs have an established efficacy in T2DM treatment, their usage during the past years was questioned following the emergence of some alarming data regarding their safety and especially the cardiovascular safety of rosiglitazone. As a result, there is often some skepticism about the current role of TZDs in T2DM management. This mainly affects rosiglitazone even leading to its withdrawal from several markets in contrast to pioglitazone, which has shown a beneficial cardiovascular profile. A comprehensive assessment of the benefit-to-risk ratio of TZDs is required in order to better understand the place of these drugs in T2DM management.

  7. Database Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

  8. Dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes: prevalence, pathophysiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Joe M; Gladysz, Margaret; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2013-03-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the key risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in diabetes mellitus. Despite the mounting clinical trial data, the management of dyslipidemia other than lowering the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) continues to be controversial. The characteristic features of diabetic dyslipidemia are high plasma triglyceride concentration, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) concentration, and increased concentration of small dense LDL particles. These changes are caused by increased free fatty acid flux secondary to insulin resistance and aggravated by increased inflammatory adipokines. The availability of several lipid-lowering drugs and nutritional supplements offers novel and effective options for achieving target lipid levels in people with diabetes. While initiation of drug therapy based on differences in the lipid profile is an option, most practice guidelines recommend statins as first-line therapy. Although the evidence for clinical utility of combination of statins with fibrates or nicotinic acid in reducing cardiovascular events remains inconclusive, the preponderance of evidence suggests that a subgroup who have high triglycerides and low HDL-c levels may benefit from combination therapy of statins and fibrates. The goal of therapy is to achieve at least 30-40 % reduction in LDL-c levels. Preferably the LDL-c should be less than 100 mg/dL in low-risk people and less than 70 mg/dL in those at high risk, including people with established CVD.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and renal failure: Prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are considered as the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In this paper, other than presenting the role of DM in ESRD, glucose metabolism and the management of hyperglycemia in these patients are reviewed. Although in several large studies there was no significant relationship found between tight glycemic control and the survival of ESRD patients, it is recommended that glycemic control be considered as the main therapeutic goal in the treatment of these patients to prevent damage to other organs. Glycemic control is perfect when fasting blood sugar is less than 140 mg/dL, 1-h postprandial blood glucose is less than 200 mg/dL, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is 6-7 in patients with type 1 diabetes and 7-8 in patients with type 2 diabetes. Administration of metformin should be avoided in chronic renal failure (CRF) because of lactic acidosis, the potentially fatal complication of metformin, but glipizide and repaglinide seem to be good choices. PMID:26941817

  10. Nutritional Management of the overweight child with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Yauckoes, Kattia M; Higgins, Laurie A

    2005-09-01

    In light of the strong association between excess weight and type 2 diabetes, the nutritional management of the child with type 2 diabetes often focuses on changing dietary and physical activity habits to normalize weight, instill long-term healthy habits, and provide glycemic control. A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of childhood obesity should include the child's family and caregivers to be most effective. Weight goals in children should be based on the age of the child, the extent of overweight, and the presence of complications. Likewise, physical activity is an important component of treatment and should be titrated to the child's age, ability and overweight status. Efforts to avoid the development of obesity, and potentially type 2 diabetes, should be started early in the child's life. Education and fostering a healthy lifestyle during childhood is the best defense to slow down or reverse the obesity epidemic in our society that is now affecting even the youngest of children, setting them up for potentially life-threatening diseases in the future.

  11. Oil field management system

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  12. Integrated work management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Edward J., Jr.; Henry, Karen Lynne

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories develops technologies to: (1) sustain, modernize, and protect our nuclear arsenal (2) Prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; (3) Provide new capabilities to our armed forces; (4) Protect our national infrastructure; (5) Ensure the stability of our nation's energy and water supplies; and (6) Defend our nation against terrorist threats. We identified the need for a single overarching Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) that would enable us to focus on customer missions and improve FMOC processes. Our team selected highly configurable commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software with out-of-the-box workflow processes that integrate strategic planning, project management, facility assessments, and space management, and can interface with existing systems, such as Oracle, PeopleSoft, Maximo, Bentley, and FileNet. We selected the Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) from Tririga, Inc. Facility Management System (FMS) Benefits are: (1) Create a single reliable source for facility data; (2) Improve transparency with oversight organizations; (3) Streamline FMOC business processes with a single, integrated facility-management tool; (4) Give customers simple tools and real-time information; (5) Reduce indirect costs; (6) Replace approximately 30 FMOC systems and 60 homegrown tools (such as Microsoft Access databases); and (7) Integrate with FIMS.

  13. Perioperative management of diabetes insipidus in children [corrected].

    PubMed

    Wise-Faberowski, Lisa; Soriano, Sulpicio G; Ferrari, Lynne; McManus, Michael L; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Majzoub, Joseph; Scott, R Michael; Truog, Robert; Rockoff, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    Managing children with diabetes insipidus (DI) in the perioperative period is complicated and frequently associated with electrolyte imbalance compounded by over- or underhydration. In this study the authors developed and prospectively evaluated a multidisciplinary approach to the perioperative management of DI with a comparison to 19 historical control children. Eighteen children either with preoperative DI or undergoing neurosurgical operations associated with a high risk for developing postoperative DI were identified and managed using a standardized protocol. In all patients in whom DI occurred during or after surgery, a continuous intravenous infusion of aqueous vasopressin was initiated and titrated until antidiuresis was established. Intravenous fluids were given as normal saline and restricted to two thirds of the estimated maintenance rate plus amounts necessary to replace blood losses and maintain hemodynamic stability. In all children managed in this fashion, perioperative serum sodium concentrations were generally maintained between 130 and 150 mEq/L, and no adverse consequences of this therapy developed. In the 24-hour period evaluated, the mean change in serum sodium concentrations between the historical controls was 17.6 +/- 9.2 mEq/L versus 8.36 +/- 6.43 mEq/L in those children managed by the protocol. Hyponatremia occurred less frequently in the children managed with this protocol compared with historical controls.

  14. Barriers and Facilitators for Type-2 Diabetes Management in South Asians: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Tanveer; Sohal, Parmjit; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Khan, Nadia A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although South Asian populations have among the highest burden of type 2 diabetes in the world, their diabetes management remains poor. We systematically reviewed studies on South Asian patient’s perspectives on the barriers and facilitators to diabetes management. Methods We conducted a literature search using OVID, CINHAL and EMBASE (January, 1990 –February, 2014) evaluating the core components of diabetes management: interactions with health care providers, diet, exercise, and medication adherence. South Asian patients were self-reported as Indian, Pakistani, Malaysian-Indian or Bangladeshi origin. From 208 abstracts reviewed, 20 studies were included (19 qualitative including mixed methods studies, 1 questionnaire). Barriers and facilitators were extracted and combined using qualitative synthesis. Results All studies included barriers and few facilitators were identified. Language and communication discordance with the healthcare provider was a significant barrier to receiving and understanding diabetes education. There was inconsistent willingness to partake in self-management with preference for following their physician’s guidance. Barriers to adopting a diabetic diet were lack of specific details on South Asian tailored diabetic diet; social responsibilities to continue with a traditional diet, and misconceptions on the components of the diabetic diet. For exercise, South Asian patients were concerned with lack of gender specific exercise facilities and fear of injury or worsening health with exercise. Patients reported a lack of understanding about diabetes medication management, preference for folk and phytotherapy, and concerns about the long-term safety of diabetes medications. Facilitators included trust in care providers, use of culturally appropriate exercise and dietary advice and increasing family involvement. Overall themes for the barriers included lack of knowledge and misperceptions as well as lack of cultural adaptation to

  15. Development and validation of a diabetes self-management instrument for older African-Americans.

    PubMed

    McCaskill, Gina M; Bolland, Kathleen A; Burgio, Kathryn L; Leeper, James

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new diabetes self-management instrument for older African-Americans 65 years of age and older. The Self-Care Utility Geriatric African-American Rating (SUGAAR) was developed using the American Diabetes Association's standards for the management of type 2 diabetes in older adults and cognitive interviews with older African-Americans. The instrument underwent extensive review by a panel of experts, two rounds of cognitive interviews, and a pilot test before it was administered in an interview format to 125 community-dwelling older African-Americans. The instrument demonstrated content validity and significant, but modest, convergent validity with items from an established diabetes self-management instrument. Social workers and health care professionals can use the SUGARR to assess diabetes self-management and to identify areas for education and support for older African-Americans with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  17. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Williams, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  18. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  19. Sick Day Management in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Abha

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) has high morbidity and mortality and can be prevented. It is extremely important to give clear guidance to patients and families on how to manage diabetes during intercurrent illnesses to avoid complications of ketoacidosis, dehydration,uncontrolled or symptomatic hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. This descriptive review of clinical cases and management guidelines for sick days in children and adolescents with diabetes is provided as a resource for physicians who may take calls from parents of sick children with diabetes or manage these children in a clinic, emergency room or hospital setting. PMID:27434984

  20. Computer memory management system

    DOEpatents

    Kirk, III, Whitson John

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  1. Consensus evidence-based guidelines for management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India.

    PubMed

    Seshiah, V; Banerjee, Samar; Balaji, V; Muruganathan, A; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus represents both a clear pathological condition of glycaemic dysregulation and a factor aggravating the risk of future diabetes in both the mother and child. Thus it is of paramount importance to control and manage pregnancy complicated by diabetes to improve the health and well-being of the mother and avert the risk of diabetes across generations. Currently, a wide variety of national and international guidelines address clinical questions pertinent to diabetes management during pregnancy. Of them, the pioneering Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group India (DIPSI) guideline for the management of diabetes during pregnancy has previously set new standards for quality diabetes care in India and around the world. The advent of insulin analogues, pen delivery devices and insulin pumps, has enriched our armamentarium to manage diabetes and thus warrants our due attention. The current guideline is an attempt to present an overview of current knowledge relating to the management of diabetes in pregnancy and to update available guidelines in view of advances in insulin therapy. These guidelines represent the amalgamation of updated clinical evidence with expert inputs in the context of Indian clinical practice.

  2. Improving diabetes care and outcomes: the secondary benefits of a public health-managed care research collaboration.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Solberg, Leif; Clark, Cynthia; Reger, Laurel; Pearson, Teresa; Bishop, Don; Roberts, Martha; Sniegowski, Russ; O'Connor, Patrick

    2003-11-01

    The project improving Diabetes Care through Empowerment, Active Collaboration and Leadership (IDEAL) is a collaborative translational research project of the Minnesota Diabetes Program (MDP) at the Minnesota Department of Health and HealthPartners (HP), a large managed care organization. The research was designed to test a quality improvement model to improve diabetes care delivery and outcomes in primary care clinics, but the collaboration was structured from the beginning to maximize potential secondary effects. The MDP and HP participated jointly in every aspect of the project. Personnel from other health care systems and academic and quality improvement organizations also participated in IDEAL. Secondary effects included heightened priority for diabetes care improvement at HP and within its medical group, along with an increased emphasis on a population approach for both of these organizations. Simultaneously, the MDP developed a better understanding of the issues and potential for improving care in primary care clinics, medical groups, and managed care organizations. These benefits resulted in further collaboration between the MDP, HP, and other managed care, health care, and quality improvement organizations in Minnesota. Thus, Project IDEAL has been a successful collaboration of public health and managed care whose contribution to improved diabetes care in Minnesota health systems extends far beyond the original scope of the project.

  3. Advances in management of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aathira, Ravindranath; Jain, Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus has always posed a challenge to balance hyperglycemia control with hypoglycemia episodes. The quest for newer therapies is continuing and this review attempts to outline the recent developments. The insulin molecule itself has got moulded into different analogues by minor changes in its structure to ensure well controlled delivery, stable half-lives and lesser side effects. Insulin delivery systems have also consistently undergone advances from subcutaneous injections to continuous infusion to trials of inhalational delivery. Continuous glucose monitoring systems are also becoming more accurate and user friendly. Smartphones have also made their entry into therapy of diabetes by integrating blood glucose levels and food intake with calculated adequate insulin required. Artificial pancreas has enabled to a certain extent to close the loop between blood glucose level and insulin delivery with devices armed with meal and exercise announcements, dual hormone delivery and pramlintide infusion. Islet, pancreas-kidney and stem cells transplants are also being attempted though complete success is still a far way off. Incorporating insulin gene and secretary apparatus is another ambitious leap to achieve insulin independence though the search for the ideal vector and target cell is still continuing. Finally to stand up to the statement, prevention is better than cure, immunological methods are being investigated to be used as vaccine to prevent the onset of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25317246

  4. Advances in management of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aathira, Ravindranath; Jain, Vandana

    2014-10-15

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus has always posed a challenge to balance hyperglycemia control with hypoglycemia episodes. The quest for newer therapies is continuing and this review attempts to outline the recent developments. The insulin molecule itself has got moulded into different analogues by minor changes in its structure to ensure well controlled delivery, stable half-lives and lesser side effects. Insulin delivery systems have also consistently undergone advances from subcutaneous injections to continuous infusion to trials of inhalational delivery. Continuous glucose monitoring systems are also becoming more accurate and user friendly. Smartphones have also made their entry into therapy of diabetes by integrating blood glucose levels and food intake with calculated adequate insulin required. Artificial pancreas has enabled to a certain extent to close the loop between blood glucose level and insulin delivery with devices armed with meal and exercise announcements, dual hormone delivery and pramlintide infusion. Islet, pancreas-kidney and stem cells transplants are also being attempted though complete success is still a far way off. Incorporating insulin gene and secretary apparatus is another ambitious leap to achieve insulin independence though the search for the ideal vector and target cell is still continuing. Finally to stand up to the statement, prevention is better than cure, immunological methods are being investigated to be used as vaccine to prevent the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  5. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  6. Patient credentialing as a population health management strategy: a diabetes case study.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lindsay L; Bluml, Benjamin M; Skoufalos, Alexandria

    2015-06-01

    When given the opportunity to become actively involved in the decision-making process, patients can positively impact their health outcomes. Understanding how to empower patients to become informed consumers of health care services is an important strategy for addressing disparities and variability in care. Patient credentialing identifies people who have a certain diagnosis and have achieved certain levels of competency in understanding and managing their disease. Patient credentialing was developed to meet 3 core purposes: (1) enhance patient engagement by increasing personal accountability for health outcomes, (2) create a mass customization strategy for providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered collaborative care, and (3) provide payers with a foundation for properly aligning health benefit incentives. The Patient Self-Management Credential for Diabetes, a first-of-its-kind, psychometrically validated tool, has been deployed within 3 practice-based research initiatives as a component of innovative diabetes care. Results from these projects show improved clinical outcomes, reduced health care costs, and a relationship between credential achievement levels and clinical markers of diabetes. Implementing patient credentialing as part of collaborative care delivered within various settings across the health care system may be an effective way to reduce disparities, improve access to care and appropriate treatments, incentivize patient engagement in managing their health, and expend time and resources in a customized way to meet individual needs.

  7. Effectiveness of a Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management Program for Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Angela C.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Saw, Anne; Chan, Joanne L.; Cheng, Joyce W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to test the feasibility and efficacy of a diabetes self-management and education program for Chinese Americans in a support group format. The rationale for the study was to create culturally appropriate diabetes education and management programs in response to the growing diabetes prevalence among Chinese Americans. The investigators hypothesized that participants will have improved diabetes knowledge and practices, hemoglobin A1C, and social support. The study objectives were at least: 50% will have significant improvements in diabetes knowledge and practice activities, 30% of participants will have significant improvements in A1C, and 50% will report a gain in emotional support. Methods The program consisted of 12 90-minute diabetes education and support group sessions offered in a medical office setting. The sample included 23 Chinese Americans with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Using a single-group, pre-post test design, A1C and diabetes knowledge were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Data were collected through clinical assessments and written questionnaires. Results The results indicated high attendance and statistically significant increases in glycemic control and diabetes knowledge. Statistically insignificant differences were shown in diabetes management practices. Secondary outcomes assessed participants’ perceived diabetes management and emotional and social support. Conclusions Diabetes Self-Management: A Cultural Approach (DSMCA) support group model demonstrates that a culturally tailored support group utilizing a community-based participatory research approach is an effective format to improve diabetes self-management skills among Chinese Americans. The program can be adapted for other ethnic populations. The efficacy of the intervention can be further tested in larger randomized trials. PMID:22722610

  8. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes.

  9. Mobile phone health apps for diabetes management: current evidence and future developments.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S; Cafazzo, J A

    2013-12-01

    Can an app help manage diabetes? We discuss how the advent of mobile health apps in connecting patients to providers is creating new opportunities for the management of diabetes. Although there are promising outcomes, there is still much to be learned about how such technology could be fully exploited.

  10. Mobile phone health apps for diabetes management: current evidence and future developments.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S; Cafazzo, J A

    2013-12-01

    Can an app help manage diabetes? We discuss how the advent of mobile health apps in connecting patients to providers is creating new opportunities for the management of diabetes. Although there are promising outcomes, there is still much to be learned about how such technology could be fully exploited. PMID:24106313

  11. The management of type 1 diabetes in primary school: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marks, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Crisp, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in childhood. The introduction of intensive insulin therapy and the rising prevalence of diabetes in younger children has increased the need for involvement of diabetes educators and school personnel in school diabetes care. School encompasses a significant proportion of a child's day, therefore diabetes treatment at school needs to be optimal or the child will have poor metabolic control. The aim of this literature review is to examine diabetes management in the early primary school setting. The main areas of diabetes management explored are: type, provision, and location of treatment, the impact on the child, and the role of the credentialed diabetes educator. The review identifies that the majority of children are not receiving intensive diabetes treatment at school. Younger children require more assistance with care and may be disadvantaged due to lack of appropriate school staff support. Most schools do not have nurses to assist with diabetes care, therefore teaching and administration staff are utilized. The use of insulin pump therapy may increase access to insulin at school, as children and teaching staff appear more confident with this method of delivery than injections. Treatment is frequently performed away from the classroom and can impact on class attendance, metabolic control, and emergencies. Diabetes educators need to work in collaboration with children, parents, and school personnel to ensure diabetes care is fully integrated into the school day. PMID:23597278

  12. Climate data management system

    SciTech Connect

    Drach, R

    1999-07-13

    The Climate Data Management System is an object-oriented data management system, specialized for organizing multidimensional, gridded data used in climate analysis and simulation. The building blocks of CDMS are variables, container classes, structural classes, and links. All gridded data stored in CDMS is associated with variables. The container objects group variables and structural objects. Variables are defined in terms of structural objects. Most CDMS objects can have attributes, which are scalar or one-dimensional metadata items. Attributes which are stored in the database, that is are persistent, are called external attributes. Some attributes are internal; they are associated with an object but do not appear explicitly in the database.

  13. Understanding diabetes self-management behaviors among Hispanics in New York City.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Judith; Campos-Dominguez, Giselle; Jaramillo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern disproportionately affecting Hispanics. Because Hispanics are greatly affected by a high prevalence of diabetes, a qualitative study was conducted, which explored how Hispanics understand, perceive, and experience behavioral change and how they maintain such change while managing their diabetes. Twenty Caribbean (Dominican and Puerto Rican) Hispanic adults with diabetes, who were either English- or Spanish-speaking, participated in the study. Twenty individual interviews were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed and translated. Structured questions were used in the interviews which covered the meaning of certain terms (e.g., healthy eating, exercise), motivators and barriers to changing behaviors related to diabetes management, and a question to explore ways nurses can assist them in changing behaviors. Content analysis was used to analyze the text of the interviews. Three themes (diabetes management, behavior change, and nurse's role) emerged from the data, including apparent gaps in the participants' perception of adapting their cultural foods into healthier dietary habits. PMID:25741930

  14. Understanding diabetes self-management behaviors among Hispanics in New York City.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Judith; Campos-Dominguez, Giselle; Jaramillo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern disproportionately affecting Hispanics. Because Hispanics are greatly affected by a high prevalence of diabetes, a qualitative study was conducted, which explored how Hispanics understand, perceive, and experience behavioral change and how they maintain such change while managing their diabetes. Twenty Caribbean (Dominican and Puerto Rican) Hispanic adults with diabetes, who were either English- or Spanish-speaking, participated in the study. Twenty individual interviews were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed and translated. Structured questions were used in the interviews which covered the meaning of certain terms (e.g., healthy eating, exercise), motivators and barriers to changing behaviors related to diabetes management, and a question to explore ways nurses can assist them in changing behaviors. Content analysis was used to analyze the text of the interviews. Three themes (diabetes management, behavior change, and nurse's role) emerged from the data, including apparent gaps in the participants' perception of adapting their cultural foods into healthier dietary habits.

  15. Building a Virtual Environment for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Constance; Feenan, Kevin; Setliff, Glenn; Pereira, Katherine; Hassell, Nancy; Beresford, Henry F.; Epps, Shelly; Nicollerat, Janet; Tatum, William; Feinglos, Mark; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The authors developed an immersive diabetes community to provide diabetes self-management education and support for adults with type 2 diabetes. In this article the authors describe the procedures used to develop this virtual environment (VE). Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education & Self-Management (SLIDES), the VE for our diabetes community was built in Second Life. Social Cognitive Theory, behavioral principles and key aspects of virtual environments related to usability were applied in the development in this VE. Collaboration between researchers, clinicians and information technology (IT) specialists occurred throughout the development process. An interactive community was successfully built and utilized to provide diabetes self-management education and support. VEs for health applications may be innovative and enticing, yet it must be kept in mind that there are substantial effort, expertise, and usability factors that must be considered in the development of these environments for health care consumers. PMID:25699133

  16. Management of hyperglycemia in geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus: South Asian consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Manash P; Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Somasundaram, Noel; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Shrestha, Dina; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Sahay, Rakesh; Latt, Tint Swe; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-04-01

    Asia is home to four of the world's five largest diabetic populations, two of them being South Asian nations, namely, India and Pakistan. This problem is compounded by a substantial rise in the elderly population in Asian countries. On the other hand, the heterogeneous health condition and multiple co-morbidities make the care of chronic disease in the elderly a challenging task. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population. Current Guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. No evidence grading was done for the purpose of this manuscript. The clinical questions of the guidelines, the methodology of literature search, and medical writing strategy were finalized by consultations in person and through mail. The South Asian Consensus guideline emphasizes tailoring of glycemic goals for patients based on age, co-morbid conditions especially that of cardiovascular system, risk of hypoglycemia, and life expectancy. It also recommends cautious use of available pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients with diabetes. The primary principle of diabetes therapy should be to achieve euglycemia, without causing hypoglycemia. Appropriate use of modern insulins and oral drugs, including incretin mimetics will help physicians achieve this aim.

  17. Management control system description

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Management of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scott, A R

    2015-06-01

    Hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is a medical emergency, which differs from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and requires a different approach. The present article summarizes the recent guidance on HHS that has been produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care, available in full at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_HHS_Adults.pdf. HHS has a higher mortality rate than DKA and may be complicated by myocardial infarction, stroke, seizures, cerebral oedema and central pontine myelinolysis and there is some evidence that rapid changes in osmolality during treatment may be the precipitant of central pontine myelinolysis. Whilst DKA presents within hours of onset, HHS comes on over many days, and the dehydration and metabolic disturbances are more extreme. The key points in these HHS guidelines include: (1) monitoring of the response to treatment: (i) measure or calculate the serum osmolality regularly to monitor the response to treatment and (ii) aim to reduce osmolality by 3-8 mOsm/kg/h; (2) fluid and insulin administration: (i) use i.v. 0.9% sodium chloride solution as the principal fluid to restore circulating volume and reverse dehydration, (ii) fluid replacement alone will cause a fall in blood glucose (BG) level, (iii) withhold insulin until the BG level is no longer falling with i.v. fluids alone (unless ketonaemic), (iv) an initial rise in sodium level is expected and is not itself an indication for hypotonic fluids and (v) early use of insulin (before fluids) may be detrimental; and (3) delivery of care: (i) The diabetes specialist team should be involved as soon as possible and (ii) patients should be nursed in areas where staff are experienced in the management of HHS.

  19. Management of the hospitalized patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Carlos E; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have minimal to absent pancreatic β-cell function and rely on the exogenous delivery of insulin to obtain adequate and life-sustaining glucose homeostasis. Maintaining glycemic control is challenging in hospitalized patients with T1DM, as insulin requirements are influenced by the presence of acute medical or surgical conditions, as well as altered nutritional intake. The risks of hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability are increased in hospitalized patients with T1DM. Diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypoglycemia are the 2 most common emergency conditions that account for the majority of hospital admissions in patients with T1DM. The association between hyperglycemia and increased risk of complications and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is well established; however, the impact of glycemic control on clinical outcomes has not been determined in patients with T1DM who present without ketoacidosis. To decrease complications associated with insulin therapy, health care professionals must be well versed in the use of insulin because it is a common source of medication error. For non-critically ill, hospitalized patients, subcutaneous insulin given to cover basal and prandial needs instead of sliding scale is the preferred method of insulin dosing. Protocols are available for initiating and titrating insulin doses, as well as for transitioning from an insulin infusion to a subcutaneous regimen. In our review, we identify and discuss special considerations related to inpatient glycemic control of non-ketotic patients with T1DM. Additionally, point differences and similarities associated with the management of patients with T2DM are discussed.

  20. Software Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A software management system, originally developed for Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by Century Computing, Inc. has evolved from a menu and command oriented system to a state-of-the art user interface development system supporting high resolution graphics workstations. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) was initially distributed through COSMIC and backed by a TAE support office at GSFC. In 1993, Century Computing assumed the support and distribution functions and began marketing TAE Plus, the system's latest version. The software is easy to use and does not require programming experience.

  1. Listening to patients' voices: linguistic indicators related to diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ulla; Anton, Marta; Goering, Elizabeth; Lauten, Kathryn; Hayat, Amir; Roach, Paris; Balunda, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of research in health care has examined a wide range of variables to better understand the degree to which patients follow the advice of medical professionals in managing their health, known as adherence. This paper explains the development of the linguistic systems to describe and evaluate two psychosocial constructs (i.e. control orientation and agency) that have been found to be related to adherence in previous research for subjects with diabetes (Trento et al. 2007; Wangberg 2007; O'Hea et al. 2009). The present data came from 43 semi-structured in-depth interviews of subjects with Type 2 diabetes. One-on-one interviews with open-ended questions elicited subjects' 'stories' about living with diabetes, and the transcribed interviews were analyzed to develop the linguistic systems of control orientation and agency. The resultant systems were applied to the 43 interviews by raters with high inter-rater reliability. The results showed demarcations of clearly identified codings of patient types. The paper presents the linguistic coding systems developed in the study, the results of their application to the patient interview data, and recommendations for improved communication with patients.

  2. Advanced Distribution Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  3. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  4. Prescribing physical activity to prevent and manage gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R; Castorino, Kristin; Jovanovič, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most prevalent metabolic disorder during pregnancy. Women diagnosed with GDM have a substantially greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 5-10 years after delivery, and the risk is increased by excess body weight. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia during pregnancy is potentially harmful to both mother and fetus, resulting in a greater need for Caesarian-section deliveries, delivery of larger infants with more excess body fat, a greater risk of infant death and stillbirth, and an elevated risk of infant hypoglycemia immediately after birth. Fortunately, engaging in physical activity prior to and during pregnancy may lower the risk of developing GDM. Pregnant women should also be advised how to safely increase their physical activity during pregnancy and the postpartum period. An initial approach to becoming more physically active can simply be to encourage women to incorporate more unstructured physical activity into daily living, both before and during pregnancy. Giving women an appropriate exercise prescription can encourage them to participate in physical activity safely and effectively throughout pregnancy to prevent and/or manage GDM. Engaging in 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week has been adopted as a recommendation for all pregnant women. PMID:24379915

  5. Design and development of a web-based application for diabetes patient data management.

    PubMed

    Deo, S S; Deobagkar, D N; Deobagkar, Deepti D

    2005-01-01

    A web-based database management system developed for collecting, managing and analysing information of diabetes patients is described here. It is a searchable, client-server, relational database application, developed on the Windows platform using Oracle, Active Server Pages (ASP), Visual Basic Script (VB Script) and Java Script. The software is menu-driven and allows authorized healthcare providers to access, enter, update and analyse patient information. Graphical representation of data can be generated by the system using bar charts and pie charts. An interactive web interface allows users to query the database and generate reports. Alpha- and beta-testing of the system was carried out and the system at present holds records of 500 diabetes patients and is found useful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition to providing patient data on a continuous basis in a simple format, the system is used in population and comparative analysis. It has proved to be of significant advantage to the healthcare provider as compared to the paper-based system.

  6. A qualitative case study of telehealth for in-home monitoring to support the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Karen; Warren, Robin

    2013-10-01

    The present study formed part of a randomised controlled trial of telehealth for in-home monitoring to support people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. We explored the experiences of patients and healthcare practitioners, and their perceptions of the telehealth model of care used in the trial. In addition to their usual diabetes care, participants receive diabetes care from a diabetes educator nurse via an in-home broadband communication device. On average, each patient participated in 14 videoconferences with a diabetes care coordinator during the 12-month trial period. Qualitative data was collected from two general practices and included semi-structured interviews and document review of patient clinical notes. A total of 12 people were interviewed: 8 health practitioners and 4 patients. Patients and health practitioners expressed a high level of satisfaction with the model of care provided. Patients also reported positive health and social outcomes as a result of being involved in the trial and indicated that in the main they had achieved their goals and were happy with their progress over the 12-month period. Analysis of interviews revealed three broad elements associated with the implementation of telehealth: interpersonal factors, operational problems and the wider health system context within which the general practices and trial team were operating. The findings suggest that adopting telehealth in the management of type 2 diabetes can lead to improved diabetes control, but more support is required to ensure sustainability and widespread implementation.

  7. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Shane; Nigbor, Mike; Hillman, Daniel

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  8. Analytical Services Management System

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standardmore » chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.« less

  9. Aloesin as a medical food ingredient for systemic oxidative stress of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that requires a long term management where oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in disease progression and intensifying secondary complications. In spite of all the research on diabetes and recent advances in diabetes treatments, the reality is that there is no cure for diabetes and its devastating complications. While currently available anti-diabetic therapies are effective in reducing blood glucose level, they are not without associated side effects when they are used for a long term applications. As a result, physicians and patients are inclining more towards to a safer therapy with less serious side effects in the form of medicinal foods and botanical alternatives that are suitable for chronic usage. Aloesin, an Aloe chromone, has previously been formulated with an aloe polysaccharide to give a composition called Loesyn, where it showed significant impact in reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, fructosamine and plasma insulin level in humans. Radical scavenging activities of chromones and polysaccharides from Aloe have also been reported. Here we rationalize the relevance of use of Aloesin alone or in a standardized blend with Aloe polysaccharides, as a potential medical food to manage systemic oxidative stress and/or high blood glucose of diabetes. PMID:26265996

  10. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Use of Health Care Services for Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Raeven Faye; Monnat, Shannon M

    2015-12-01

    Research demonstrates consistent racial/ethnic disparities in access to and use of health care services for a variety of chronic conditions. Yet we know little about whether these disparities exist for use of health care services for diabetes management. Racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately suffer from diabetes, complications from diabetes, and diabetes-related mortality. Proper diabetes management can reduce the risk of complications and premature mortality. Using a large national data set (N = 37,705) of White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American U.S. adults aged 65 years and older who have been diagnosed with diabetes, we examine three specific types of health care provider (HCP) use for diabetes management: number of times seen by a health care professional for diabetes, number of times feet have been checked by a health care professional, and number of visits for a glycosylated hemoglobin check. We found that net of controls for a variety of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, Blacks and Hispanics had significantly more visits to a HCP for their diabetes and significantly more glycosylated hemoglobin checks than Whites, and Blacks and Native Americans had significantly more HCP feet checks than Whites. Our results suggest that the reduced access to health care services traditionally found among racial/ethnic minorities does not hold for access to health care services for diabetes management, where racial/ethnic minority diabetics are actually more likely to use care than are White diabetics. Future research should examine whether higher use of health care services for diabetes among racial/ethnic minorities is due to greater disease severity among racial/ethnic minorities than among non-Hispanic Whites. PMID:25842386

  11. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Use of Health Care Services for Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Raeven Faye; Monnat, Shannon M

    2015-12-01

    Research demonstrates consistent racial/ethnic disparities in access to and use of health care services for a variety of chronic conditions. Yet we know little about whether these disparities exist for use of health care services for diabetes management. Racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately suffer from diabetes, complications from diabetes, and diabetes-related mortality. Proper diabetes management can reduce the risk of complications and premature mortality. Using a large national data set (N = 37,705) of White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American U.S. adults aged 65 years and older who have been diagnosed with diabetes, we examine three specific types of health care provider (HCP) use for diabetes management: number of times seen by a health care professional for diabetes, number of times feet have been checked by a health care professional, and number of visits for a glycosylated hemoglobin check. We found that net of controls for a variety of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, Blacks and Hispanics had significantly more visits to a HCP for their diabetes and significantly more glycosylated hemoglobin checks than Whites, and Blacks and Native Americans had significantly more HCP feet checks than Whites. Our results suggest that the reduced access to health care services traditionally found among racial/ethnic minorities does not hold for access to health care services for diabetes management, where racial/ethnic minority diabetics are actually more likely to use care than are White diabetics. Future research should examine whether higher use of health care services for diabetes among racial/ethnic minorities is due to greater disease severity among racial/ethnic minorities than among non-Hispanic Whites.

  12. An ontological case base engineering methodology for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    El-Sappagh, Shaker H; El-Masri, Samir; Elmogy, Mohammed; Riad, A M; Saddik, Basema

    2014-08-01

    Ontology engineering covers issues related to ontology development and use. In Case Based Reasoning (CBR) system, ontology plays two main roles; the first as case base and the second as domain ontology. However, the ontology engineering literature does not provide adequate guidance on how to build, evaluate, and maintain ontologies. This paper proposes an ontology engineering methodology to generate case bases in the medical domain. It mainly focuses on the research of case representation in the form of ontology to support the case semantic retrieval and enhance all knowledge intensive CBR processes. A case study on diabetes diagnosis case base will be provided to evaluate the proposed methodology.

  13. Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilemon, David L.

    1973-01-01

    As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

  14. Developing a Manualized Occupational Therapy Diabetes Management Intervention: Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carandang, Kristine; Davis, Shain

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a manualized occupational therapy intervention for diabetes management. An initial theoretical framework and core content areas for a Stage 1 intervention manual were developed based on an in-depth needs assessment and review of existing literature. After evaluation by a panel of experts and completion of a feasibility study, the intervention was revised into a Stage 2 manual in preparation for a randomized study evaluating the intervention’s efficacy. In developing the initial manual, we delineated core theoretical principles to allow for flexible application and tailoring of the intervention’s content areas. Expert panel feedback and feasibility study results led to changes to the intervention structure and content as we developed the Stage 2 manual. Through describing this process, we illustrate the dynamic evolution of intervention manuals, which undergo revisions due to both theoretical and practical considerations at each stage of the research-to-clinical practice pipeline. PMID:26594741

  15. Developing a Manualized Occupational Therapy Diabetes Management Intervention: Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carandang, Kristine; Davis, Shain

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a manualized occupational therapy intervention for diabetes management. An initial theoretical framework and core content areas for a Stage I intervention manual were developed based on an in-depth needs assessment and review of existing literature. After evaluation by a panel of experts and completion of a feasibility study, the intervention was revised into a Stage 2 manual in preparation for a randomized study evaluating the intervention's efficacy. In developing the initial manual, we delineated core theoretical principles to allow for flexible application and tailoring of the intervention's content areas. Expert panel feedback and feasibility study results led to changes to the intervention structure and content as we developed the Stage 2 manual. Through describing this process, we illustrate the dynamic evolution of intervention manuals, which undergo revisions due to both theoretical and practical considerations at each stage of the research-to-clinical practice pipeline. PMID:26594741

  16. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  17. Smart energy management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

    2010-04-01

    Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

  18. Treating Diabetes and Prediabetes by Focusing on Obesity Management

    PubMed Central

    Khaodhiar, Lalita; Cummings, Sue; Apovian, Caroline M.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In obesity, the adipose cell releases non-esterified free fatty acids, hormones, adipocytokines, and other substances that are involved in insulin resistance. Under normal conditions, the pancreatic islet β cells increase production of insulin sufficiently to maintain normal blood glucose concentrations despite insulin resistance. However, in genetically predisposed patients, the β cells eventually become dysfunctional and T2DM develops. The development of T2DM can be delayed or sometimes prevented in individuals with obesity who are able to lose weight. Weight loss can be achieved medically with behavioral therapies that combine diet and exercise treatment or with behavioral therapies combined with weight-loss medications or weight-loss surgery. In this article, we summarize the evidence of obesity management in treating T2DM and prediabetes. PMID:19793504

  19. Treating diabetes and prediabetes by focusing on obesity management.

    PubMed

    Khaodhiar, Lalita; Cummings, Sue; Apovian, Caroline M

    2009-10-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In obesity, the adipose cell releases nonesterified free fatty acids, hormones, adipocytokines, and other substances that are involved in insulin resistance. Under normal conditions, the pancreatic islet beta cells increase production of insulin sufficiently to maintain normal blood glucose concentrations despite insulin resistance. However, in genetically predisposed patients, the beta cells eventually become dysfunctional and T2DM develops. The development of T2DM can be delayed or sometimes prevented in individuals with obesity who are able to lose weight. Weight loss can be achieved medically with behavioral therapies that combine diet and exercise treatment or with behavioral therapies combined with weight-loss medications or weight-loss surgery. In this article, we summarize the evidence of obesity management in treating T2DM and prediabetes.

  20. PSECMAC intelligent insulin schedule for diabetic blood glucose management under nonmeal announcement.

    PubMed

    Teddy, S D; Quek, C; Lai, E M-K; Cinar, A

    2010-03-01

    Therapeutically, the closed-loop blood glucose-insulin regulation paradigm via a controllable insulin pump offers a potential solution to the management of diabetes. However, the development of such a closed-loop regulatory system to date has been hampered by two main issues: 1) the limited knowledge on the complex human physiological process of glucose-insulin metabolism that prevents a precise modeling of the biological blood glucose control loop; and 2) the vast metabolic biodiversity of the diabetic population due to varying exogneous and endogenous disturbances such as food intake, exercise, stress, and hormonal factors, etc. In addition, current attempts of closed-loop glucose regulatory techniques generally require some form of prior meal announcement and this constitutes a severe limitation to the applicability of such systems. In this paper, we present a novel intelligent insulin schedule based on the pseudo self-evolving cerebellar model articulation controller (PSECMAC) associative learning memory model that emulates the healthy human insulin response to food ingestion. The proposed PSECMAC intelligent insulin schedule requires no prior meal announcement and delivers the necessary insulin dosage based only on the observed blood glucose fluctuations. Using a simulated healthy subject, the proposed PSECMAC insulin schedule is demonstrated to be able to accurately capture the complex human glucose-insulin dynamics and robustly addresses the intraperson metabolic variability. Subsequently, the PSECMAC intelligent insulin schedule is employed on a group of type-1 diabetic patients to regulate their impaired blood glucose levels. Preliminary simulation results are highly encouraging. The work reported in this paper represents a major paradigm shift in the management of diabetes where patient compliance is poor and the need for prior meal announcement under current treatment regimes poses a significant challenge to an active lifestyle.

  1. Power management system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  2. Diabetes Self-Management Education Patterns in a US Population-based Cohort of Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Lawrence, Jean M.; Saydah, Sharon; Yi-Frazier, Joyce; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe: 1) the receipt of diabetes self-management education (DSME) in a large, diverse cohort of US youth with type 1 diabetes (T1DM); 2) the segregation of self-reported DSME variables into domains; and 3) the demographic and clinical characteristics of youth who receive DSME. Methods Data are from the US population-based cohort, SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth. A cross-sectional analysis was employed using data from 1273 youth < 20 years of age at time of diagnosis of T1DM. Clusters of 19 self-reported DSME variables were derived using factor analysis and their associations with demographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated using polytomous logistic regression. Results Nearly all participants reported receiving DSME content consistent with ‘survival skills’ (e.g., target blood glucose and what to do for low or high blood glucose), yet gaps in continuing education were identified [e.g., fewer than half of participants reported receiving specific medical nutrition therapy (MNT) recommendations]. Five DSME clusters were explored: Receipt of Specific MNT Recommendations, Receipt of Diabetes Information Resources, Receipt of Clinic Visit Information, Receipt of Specific Diabetes Information, and Met with Educator or Nutritionist. Factor scores were significantly associated with demographic and clinical characteristics, including race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and diabetes self-management practices. Conclusions Health care providers should work together to address reported gaps in DSME in order to improve patient care. PMID:24248833

  3. Metabolic surgery: A paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Viswanath, Ananth K

    2015-07-25

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major public health issues globally over the past few decades. Despite dietary interventions, lifestyle modifications and the availability of several pharmaceutical agents, management of T2DM with obesity is a major challenge to clinicians. Metabolic surgery is emerging as a promising treatment option for the management of T2DM in the obese population in recent years. Several observational studies and a few randomised controlled trials have shown clear benefits of various bariatric procedures in obese individuals in terms of improvement or remission of T2DM and multiple other health benefits such as improvement of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoarthritis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Uncertainties about the long-term implications of metabolic surgery such as relapse of T2DM after initial remission, nutritional and psychosocial complications and the optimal body mass index for different ethnic groups exist. The article discusses the major paradigm shift in recent years in the management of T2DM after the introduction of metabolic surgery. PMID:26240695

  4. Metabolic surgery: A paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Viswanath, Ananth K

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major public health issues globally over the past few decades. Despite dietary interventions, lifestyle modifications and the availability of several pharmaceutical agents, management of T2DM with obesity is a major challenge to clinicians. Metabolic surgery is emerging as a promising treatment option for the management of T2DM in the obese population in recent years. Several observational studies and a few randomised controlled trials have shown clear benefits of various bariatric procedures in obese individuals in terms of improvement or remission of T2DM and multiple other health benefits such as improvement of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoarthritis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Uncertainties about the long-term implications of metabolic surgery such as relapse of T2DM after initial remission, nutritional and psychosocial complications and the optimal body mass index for different ethnic groups exist. The article discusses the major paradigm shift in recent years in the management of T2DM after the introduction of metabolic surgery. PMID:26240695

  5. Mastering the management system.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Companies have always found it hard to balance pressing operational concerns with long-term strategic priorities. The tension is critical: World-class processes won't lead to success without the right strategic direction, and the best strategy in the world will get nowhere without strong operations to execute it. In this article, Kaplan, of Harvard Business School, and Norton, founder and director of the Palladium Group, explain how to effectively manage both strategy and operations by linking them tightly in a closed-loop management system. The system comprises five stages, beginning with strategy development, which springs from a company's mission, vision, and value statements, and from an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses, and competitive environment. In the next stage, managers translate the strategy into objectives and initiatives with strategy maps, which organize objectives by themes, and balanced scorecards, which link objectives to performance metrics. Stage three involves creating an operational plan to accomplish the objectives and initiatives; it includes targeting process improvements and preparing sales, resource, and capacity plans and dynamic budgets. Managers then put plans into action, monitoring their effectiveness in stage four. They review operational, environmental, and competitive data; assess progress; and identify barriers to execution. In the final stage, they test the strategy, analyzing cost, profitability, and correlations between strategy and performance. If their underlying assumptions appear faulty, they update the strategy, beginning another loop. The authors present not only a comprehensive blueprint for successful strategy execution but also a managerial tool kit, illustrated with examples from HSBC Rail, Cigna Property and Casualty, and Store 24. The kit incorporates leading management experts' frameworks, outlining where they fit into the management cycle.

  6. Mastering the management system.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Companies have always found it hard to balance pressing operational concerns with long-term strategic priorities. The tension is critical: World-class processes won't lead to success without the right strategic direction, and the best strategy in the world will get nowhere without strong operations to execute it. In this article, Kaplan, of Harvard Business School, and Norton, founder and director of the Palladium Group, explain how to effectively manage both strategy and operations by linking them tightly in a closed-loop management system. The system comprises five stages, beginning with strategy development, which springs from a company's mission, vision, and value statements, and from an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses, and competitive environment. In the next stage, managers translate the strategy into objectives and initiatives with strategy maps, which organize objectives by themes, and balanced scorecards, which link objectives to performance metrics. Stage three involves creating an operational plan to accomplish the objectives and initiatives; it includes targeting process improvements and preparing sales, resource, and capacity plans and dynamic budgets. Managers then put plans into action, monitoring their effectiveness in stage four. They review operational, environmental, and competitive data; assess progress; and identify barriers to execution. In the final stage, they test the strategy, analyzing cost, profitability, and correlations between strategy and performance. If their underlying assumptions appear faulty, they update the strategy, beginning another loop. The authors present not only a comprehensive blueprint for successful strategy execution but also a managerial tool kit, illustrated with examples from HSBC Rail, Cigna Property and Casualty, and Store 24. The kit incorporates leading management experts' frameworks, outlining where they fit into the management cycle. PMID:18271319

  7. Outpatient management of diabetes mellitus in five Arizona Medicare managed care plans.

    PubMed

    Marshall, C L; Bluestein, M; Chapin, C; Davis, T; Gersten, J; Harris, C; Hodgin, A; Larsen, W; Rigberg, H; Krishnaswami, V; Darling, B

    1996-01-01

    We report findings on the outpatient management of diabetes mellitus in Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in five Arizona Medicare-managed care plans. These findings are the baseline of an ongoing collaboration between the Health Services Advisory Group, Inc., Arizona's Peer Review Organization (PRO), and the five plans whose object is improved care of diabetes patients. The purpose of the study was to determine congruity between quality indicators identified by the five plans and the care actually received by diabetes patients enrolled in the five plans. The five plans agreed on a common set of quality indicators, including 10 services and 10 measures of patient status. Each plan has identified its diabetic population, 75 of whom are randomly selected each quarter by the PRO for chart review and inclusion in the study. The findings in this report cover two quarters of data. Data from chart review were examined to determine the extent to which actual practice reflected the indicators. The mean patient age was 71.8, and for most patients onset occurred between 55 and 69 years of age. About 25% had a positive family history, and we estimate the annual incidence of diabetes in this population to be about 1.1%. Mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was 8.9 +/- 2.1%; 46% were hypertensive; 42% continued to smoke cigarettes; 36% had retinopathy; 20% had proteinuria; and only 22% were on some kind of exercise program. Thirty-two percent were hospitalized during the 1-year baseline period, and the average number of outpatient visits per patient was 11.1 +/- 7.4. When care provided to diabetes patients enrolled in the plans was compared with the 10 quality standards identified by the plans themselves, only two of these standards was attained in more than 60% of patients: blood pressure, 98.7%; and foot examination, 62.7%. Two standards were achieved less than one-third of the time: urine dipstick, 10.4%, and appropriate use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, 31.25%. The

  8. Building a novel inpatient diabetes management mentor program: a blueprint for success.

    PubMed

    Modic, Mary Beth; Sauvey, Rebecca; Canfield, Christina; Kukla, Aniko; Kaser, Nancy; Modic, Joselyn; Yager, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this project was to create a formalized educational program for bedside nurses responsible for inpatient diabetes management. Bedside nurses are recruited to serve as diabetes management mentors. The mentors receive advanced education concerning teaching and learning principles, the AADE7™ Self-Care Behaviors, and diabetes management strategies. They teach their peers, advocate for patients, and facilitate referrals for outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) programs. The focus of these ongoing educational activities is to foster the development of diabetes management mentors and to create teaching tools that mentors can use with peers to address practice gaps or skill deficiencies. The diabetes management mentor is integral in enhancing the care of patients with diabetes in the hospital. The empowerment of bedside nurses as mentors for their peers and their patients is an invaluable asset that helps nurses take ownership of their practice. This role could be applied to other complex disease entities, helping nurses to develop specific management skills to improve patient outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction.

  9. SESAM-DIABETE, an expert system for insulin-requiring diabetic patient education.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Ferrand, P; Chirat, V

    1989-10-01

    SESAM-DIABETE is an interactive educational expert system that provides personalized advice and therapeutic recommendations for insulin-requiring diabetic patients. Because of its sophisticated explanation facilities, this system is intended to complete the more traditional educational tools for diabetic patients. It has been developed using an original essential expert system, namely SESAM, itself implemented in an upper-layer of Lisp, MBX. Its control structure uses a top-down strategy to solve a problem; i.e., it decomposes the current problem into subproblems easier to solve, this method being recursively applied to each subproblem. All information about patients is kept in a Patient Medical Record, which allows their follow-up. This system is currently available from their home for selected patients through the French telematic network TELETEL and is under clinical evaluation.

  10. SESAM-DIABETE, an expert system for insulin-requiring diabetic patient education.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Ferrand, P; Chirat, V

    1989-10-01

    SESAM-DIABETE is an interactive educational expert system that provides personalized advice and therapeutic recommendations for insulin-requiring diabetic patients. Because of its sophisticated explanation facilities, this system is intended to complete the more traditional educational tools for diabetic patients. It has been developed using an original essential expert system, namely SESAM, itself implemented in an upper-layer of Lisp, MBX. Its control structure uses a top-down strategy to solve a problem; i.e., it decomposes the current problem into subproblems easier to solve, this method being recursively applied to each subproblem. All information about patients is kept in a Patient Medical Record, which allows their follow-up. This system is currently available from their home for selected patients through the French telematic network TELETEL and is under clinical evaluation. PMID:2776447

  11. Food Insecurity is Associated with Hypoglycemia and Poor Diabetes Self-Management in a Low-Income Sample with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Davis, Terry C.; Schillinger, Dean; Wolf, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    More than 14% of the American population is food insecure, or at risk of going hungry because of an inability to afford food. Food-insecure (FI) adults often reduce food intake or substitute inexpensive, energy-dense carbohydrates for healthier foods. We hypothesized these behaviors would predispose FI adults with diabetes to impaired diabetes self-management and hypoglycemia. We therefore assessed whether food insecurity was associated with multiple indicators of diabetes self-management (self-efficacy, medication- and glucose-monitoring adherence, hypoglycemia, or glycemic control) among 40 low-income adults with diabetes. Mean self-efficacy score was lower among FI than food-secure (FS) participants (34.4 vs. 41.2, p=.02). Food-insecure participants reported poorer adherence to blood glucose monitoring (RR=3.5, p=.008) and more hypoglycemia-related emergency department visits (RR=2.2, p=.007). Mean hemoglobin A1c was 9.2% among FI and 7.7% among FS participants (p=.08). Food insecurity is a barrier to diabetes self-management and a risk factor for clinically significant hypoglycemia. PMID:21099074

  12. Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CENTRA 2000 Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Auto-trol technology, obtained permission to use software originally developed at Johnson Space Center for the Space Shuttle and early Space Station projects. To support their enormous information-handling needs, a product data management, electronic document management and work-flow system was designed. Initially, just 33 database tables comprised the original software, which was later expanded to about 100 tables. This system, now called CENTRA 2000, is designed for quick implementation and supports the engineering process from preliminary design through release-to-production. CENTRA 2000 can also handle audit histories and provides a means to ensure new information is distributed. The product has 30 production sites worldwide.

  13. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Schools: Whose Responsibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandali, Swarna L.; Gordon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) reports that approximately 0.2% of all persons under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This represents 186,300 children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been a disease of children and adolescents. Although type 2 diabetes has in the past…

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors: a molecular level legitimate approach for the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Thareja, Suresh; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Bhardwaj, T R; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease responsible for morbidity in the western world and is gradually becoming prevalent in developing countries too. The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly increasing in industrialized countries and type 2 diabetes accounts for 90% of the disease. Insulin resistance is a major pathophysiological factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, occurring mainly in muscle, adipose tissues, and liver leading to reduced glucose uptake and utilization and increased glucose production. The prevalence and rising incidence of diabetes emphasized the need to explore new molecular targets and strategies to develop novel antihyperglycemic agents. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) has recently emerged as a promising molecular level legitimate therapeutic target in the effective management of type 2 diabetes. PTP 1B, a cytosolic nonreceptor PTPase, has been implicated as a negative regulator of insulin signal transduction. Therefore, PTP 1B inhibitors would increase insulin sensitivity by blocking the PTP 1B-mediated negative insulin signaling pathway and might be an attractive target for type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. With X-ray crystallography and NMR-based fragment screening, the binding interactions of several classes of inhibitors have been elucidated, which could help the design of future PTP 1B inhibitors. The drug discovery research in PTP 1B is a challenging area to work with and many pharmaceutical organizations and academic research laboratories are focusing their research toward the development of potential PTP 1B inhibitors which would prove to be a milestone for the management of diabetes.

  15. Chemical Management System

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  16. Management systems research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, A. V.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a Monte Carlo simulation of procurement activities at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. Data cover: simulation of the procurement cycle, construction of a performance evaluation model, examination of employee development, procedures and review of evaluation criteria for divisional and individual performance evaluation. Determination of the influences and apparent impact of contract type and structure and development of a management control system for planning and controlling manpower requirements.

  17. Management of Pregnant Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and the Consequences of Fetal Programming in Their Offspring.

    PubMed

    Berry, Diane C; Boggess, Kim; Johnson, Quinetta B

    2016-05-01

    The obesity epidemic has fueled an epidemic of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus in women of childbearing age. This paper examines the state of the science on preconception and pregnancy management of women with type 2 diabetes to optimize outcomes for the women and their infants. In addition, the consequence of fetal programming as a result of suboptimal maternal glycemic control is discussed. The paper focuses on type 2 diabetes, not type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes. Management of women with type 2 diabetes includes preconception counseling, preconception weight management and weight loss, proper weight gain during pregnancy, self-monitoring of blood glucose levels, medication, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise.

  18. Resources Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Delta Data Systems, Inc. was originally formed by NASA and industry engineers to produce a line of products that evolved from ELAS, a NASA-developed computer program. The company has built on that experience, using ELAS as the basis for other remote sensing products. One of these is AGIS, a computer package for geographic and land information systems. AGIS simultaneously processes remotely sensed and map data. The software is designed to operate on a low cost microcomputer, putting resource management tools within reach of small operators.

  19. Negative-pressure wound therapy for management of diabetic foot wounds: a review of the mechanism of action, clinical applications, and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammed Y.; Teo, Rachel; Nather, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) plays an important role in the treatment of complex wounds. Its effect on limb salvage in the management of the diabetic foot is well described in the literature. However, a successful outcome in this subgroup of diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary approach with careful patient selection, appropriate surgical debridement, targeted antibiotic therapy, and optimization of healing markers. Evolving NPWT technology including instillation therapy, nanocrystalline adjuncts, and portable systems can further improve results if used with correct indications. This review article summarizes current knowledge about the role of NPWT in the management of the diabetic foot and its mode of action, clinical applications, and recent developments. PMID:26140663

  20. Sensor Monitoring of Physical Activity to Improve Glucose Management in Diabetic Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Sandrine; Schumacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic individuals need to tightly control their blood glucose concentration. Several methods have been developed for this purpose, such as the finger-prick or continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMs). However, these methods present the disadvantage of being invasive. Moreover, CGMs have limited accuracy, notably to detect hypoglycemia. It is also known that physical exercise, and even daily activity, disrupt glucose dynamics and can generate problems with blood glucose regulation during and after exercise. In order to deal with these challenges, devices for monitoring patients’ physical activity are currently under development. This review focuses on non-invasive sensors using physiological parameters related to physical exercise that were used to improve glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) patients. These devices are promising for diabetes management. Indeed they permit to estimate glucose concentration either based solely on physical activity parameters or in conjunction with CGM or non-invasive CGM (NI-CGM) systems. In these last cases, the vital signals are used to modulate glucose estimations provided by the CGM and NI-CGM devices. Finally, this review indicates possible limitations of these new biosensors and outlines directions for future technologic developments. PMID:27120602

  1. Use of Gaming in Self-Management of Diabetes in Teens.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Ellen; El-Zein, Ashley; Deyo, Patricia; Sweenie, Rachel; Streisand, Randi

    2016-07-01

    With the growing prevalence of diabetes in teens and frequent concomitant problems with adherence, adolescents are a frequent target for diabetes self-management support and education. Due to widespread use of technology among teens in general, the use of serious games, games used for purposes beyond entertainment with the intention to educate and support health behavior for teens with diabetes self-management, is an emerging and promising practice. This report explores games intended for teens with diabetes, how the use of games may enhance clinical practice, and provides suggestions for future research and better utilization of these technologies. Current research on the use of gaming for promoting diabetes management in teens is fairly limited, with some initial support for improvements in both behavioral and clinical outcomes among teens. More research is clearly needed in order to further determine how gaming can best be utilized to impact health outcomes in these teens, as well as potential mechanisms of change.

  2. Nurse-patient communication in primary care diabetes management: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a major health issue for individuals and for health services. There is a considerable literature on the management of diabetes and also on communication in primary care consultations. However, few studies combine these two topics and specifically in relation to nurse communication. This paper describes the nature of nurse-patient communication in diabetes management. Methods Thirty-five primary health care consultations involving 18 patients and 10 nurses were video-recorded as part of a larger multi-site study tracking health care interactions between health professionals and patients who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Patients and nurses were interviewed separately at the end of the 6-month study period and asked to describe their experience of managing diabetes. The analysis used ethnography and interaction analysis. In addition to analysis of the recorded consultations and interviews, the number of consultations for each patient and total time spent with nurses and other health professionals were quantified and compared. Results This study showed that initial consultations with nurses often incorporated completion of extensive checklists, physical examination, referral to other health professionals and distribution of written material, and were typically longer than consultations with other health professionals. The consultations were driven more by the nurses’ clinical agenda than by what the patient already knew or wanted to know. Interactional analysis showed that protocols and checklists both help and hinder the communication process. This contradictory outcome was also evident at a health systems level: although organisational targets may have been met, the patient did not always feel that their priorities were attended to. Both nurses and patients reported a sense of being overwhelmed arising from the sheer volume of information exchanged along with a mismatch in expectations. Conclusions Conscientious nursing work was

  3. Is it possible to predict improved diabetes outcomes following diabetes self-management education: a mixed-methods longitudinal design

    PubMed Central

    Huxley, Caroline; Sturt, Jackie; Dale, Jeremy; Walker, Rosie; Caramlau, Isabela; O'Hare, Joseph P; Griffiths, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Objective To predict the diabetes-related outcomes of people undertaking a type 2 Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) programme from their baseline data. Design A mixed-methods longitudinal experimental study. 6 practice nurses and 2 clinical academics undertook blind assessments of all baseline and process data to predict clinical, behavioural and psychological outcomes at 6 months post-DSME programme. Setting Primary care. Participants –31 people with type 2 diabetes who had not previously undertaken DSME. Intervention All participants undertook the Diabetes Manual 1:1 self-directed learning 12-week DSME programme supported by practice nurses trained as Diabetes Manual facilitators. Outcome variables Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), diabetes knowledge, physical activity, waist circumference, self-efficacy, diabetes distress, anxiety, depression, demographics, change talk and treatment satisfaction. These variables were chosen because they are known to influence self-management behaviour or to have been influenced by a DSME programme in empirical evidence. Results Baseline and 6-month follow-up data were available for 27 participants of which 13 (48%) were male, 22 (82%) white British, mean age 59 years and mean duration of type 2 diabetes 9.1 years. Significant reductions were found in HbA1c t(26)=2.35, p=0.03, and diabetes distress t(26)=2.30, p=0.03, and a significant increase in knowledge t(26)=−2.06, p=0.05 between baseline and 6 months. No significant changes were found in waist circumference, physical activity, anxiety, depression or self-efficacy. Accuracy of predictions varied little between clinical academics and practice nurses but greatly between outcome (0–100%). The median and mode accuracy of predicted outcome was 66.67%. Accuracy of prediction for the key outcome of HbA1c was 44.44%. Diabetes distress had the highest prediction accuracy (81.48%). Conclusions Clinicians in this small study were unable to identify individuals likely

  4. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Sanford, Ryan B.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Although the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have a beneficial effect on diabetic nephropathy independently of their effects on blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II levels. This suggests that the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is also involved in the disease. To study the role of the KKS in diabetic nephropathy, mice lacking either the bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) or the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) have been commonly used. However, because absence of either receptor causes enhanced expression of the other, it is difficult to determine the precise functions of each receptor. This difficulty has recently been overcome by comparing mice lacking both receptors with mice lacking each receptor. Deletion of both B1R and B2R reduces nitric oxide (NO) production and aggravates renal diabetic phenotypes, relevant to either lack of B1R or B2R, demonstrating that both B1R and B2R exert protective effects on diabetic nephropathy presumably via NO. Here, we review previous epidemiological and experimental studies, and discuss novel insights regarding the therapeutic implications of the importance of the KKS in averting diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22318421

  5. Teneligliptin in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Panneerselvam, A; Singh, KP; Parmar, Girish; Gadge, Pradeep; Swami, Onkar C

    2016-01-01

    Teneligliptin is a recently developed oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor indicated for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults along with diet and exercise. Teneligliptin has been recently available in Japan (Teneria®), Argentina (Teneglucon®), and India (Tenepure; Teneza) at relatively affordable price. This is a positive step toward the management of T2DM in developing countries, where the cost of medicine is out-of-pocket expenditure and is a limiting factor for health care. This review evaluates the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in the management of T2DM. Teneligliptin has been systematically evaluated in T2DM as monotherapy with diet and exercise and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin in short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) studies. These studies have reported a reduction in HbA1c of 0.8%–0.9% within 12 weeks of therapy. Two 52-week studies reported sustained improvement in glycemic control with teneligliptin. Teneligliptin has been found to be well tolerated, and the safety profile is similar to other dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and constipation are the main adverse events. Teneligliptin can be administered safely to patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease without dose adjustment. Similarly, it can be used in patients with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Teneligliptin is effective and well tolerated and may have an important role in the management of T2DM. PMID:27574456

  6. Teneligliptin in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Panneerselvam, A; Singh, K P; Parmar, Girish; Gadge, Pradeep; Swami, Onkar C

    2016-01-01

    Teneligliptin is a recently developed oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor indicated for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults along with diet and exercise. Teneligliptin has been recently available in Japan (Teneria(®)), Argentina (Teneglucon(®)), and India (Tenepure; Teneza) at relatively affordable price. This is a positive step toward the management of T2DM in developing countries, where the cost of medicine is out-of-pocket expenditure and is a limiting factor for health care. This review evaluates the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in the management of T2DM. Teneligliptin has been systematically evaluated in T2DM as monotherapy with diet and exercise and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin in short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) studies. These studies have reported a reduction in HbA1c of 0.8%-0.9% within 12 weeks of therapy. Two 52-week studies reported sustained improvement in glycemic control with teneligliptin. Teneligliptin has been found to be well tolerated, and the safety profile is similar to other dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and constipation are the main adverse events. Teneligliptin can be administered safely to patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease without dose adjustment. Similarly, it can be used in patients with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Teneligliptin is effective and well tolerated and may have an important role in the management of T2DM. PMID:27574456

  7. Could Metformin Manage Gestational Diabetes Mellitus instead of Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Walid A.; Mowafy, Hala E.; Abd ElHameid, Azza A.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a significant number of pregnancies. Blood glucose control improves perinatal outcomes. Medical nutrition therapy is the foundation in management. Aim of This Study. To evaluate efficacy of metformin in comparison to insulin for managing GDM. Methods. In prospective randomized comparative study, 150 antenatal women whose pregnancies had been complicated by GDM and did not respond to diet alone were recruited from antenatal clinics at Obstetrics Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from November 2012 to December 2014. They were divided randomly into two groups, 75 patients in each, and were subjected to either insulin or metformin medication. Outcomes were comparing the effects of both medications on maternal glycemic control, antenatal complications, and neonatal outcome. Results. No significant difference in controlling high blood sugar in GDM with the use of metformin or insulin (P = 0.95, 0.15). Maternal complications in both groups had no significant difference and fetal outcomes were as well similar except the fact that the hypoglycemia occurred more in insulin group with P value 0.01. Conclusion. Glycaemic control in GDM can be achieved by using metformin orally without increasing risk of maternal hypoglycemia with satisfying neonatal outcome.

  8. Could Metformin Manage Gestational Diabetes Mellitus instead of Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Walid A.; Mowafy, Hala E.; Abd ElHameid, Azza A.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a significant number of pregnancies. Blood glucose control improves perinatal outcomes. Medical nutrition therapy is the foundation in management. Aim of This Study. To evaluate efficacy of metformin in comparison to insulin for managing GDM. Methods. In prospective randomized comparative study, 150 antenatal women whose pregnancies had been complicated by GDM and did not respond to diet alone were recruited from antenatal clinics at Obstetrics Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from November 2012 to December 2014. They were divided randomly into two groups, 75 patients in each, and were subjected to either insulin or metformin medication. Outcomes were comparing the effects of both medications on maternal glycemic control, antenatal complications, and neonatal outcome. Results. No significant difference in controlling high blood sugar in GDM with the use of metformin or insulin (P = 0.95, 0.15). Maternal complications in both groups had no significant difference and fetal outcomes were as well similar except the fact that the hypoglycemia occurred more in insulin group with P value 0.01. Conclusion. Glycaemic control in GDM can be achieved by using metformin orally without increasing risk of maternal hypoglycemia with satisfying neonatal outcome. PMID:27597988

  9. Self-Care Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in East Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daoud, Nihaya; Osman, Amira; Hart, Trevor A.; Berry, Elliott M.; Adler, Bella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Little research exists on diabetes self-care management (DSCM) in Arab populations. We examined the contribution of health belief constructs, socioeconomic position (SEP) and clinical factors (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1C] level, type of diabetes treatments, and receiving professional guidance) to DSCM among Arab patients in East…

  10. Field of Dreams Program Evaluation: Empowering the Latino Population in Type2 Diabetes Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urteaga, Edie

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset, type2 diabetes affects Latino families at a higher rate than other ethnicities and negatively impacting their quality of life, ability to financially succeed, and ultimately impacting our overall economy. Multiple resources are available in the country to help people learn how to prevent, control, and manage diabetes. However, the…

  11. Multidisciplinary Teaming To Promote Effective Management of Type 1 Diabetes for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper

    2001-01-01

    By facilitating active participation in treatment, coordinating services, and maximizing community resources, schools can help adolescents build a strong foundation for lifelong diabetes management. This paper presents an overview of intensive diabetes therapy, psychosocial implications of chronic illness in adolescence, the effects of chronic…

  12. Best practices for the management of foot ulcers in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Botros, Mariam; Kuhnke, Janet; Evans, Robyn; Alavi, Afsaneh

    2013-11-01

    Care of people with diabetic foot ulcers requires a systematic approach following the wound bed preparation paradigm and the existing best practice recommendations. The purpose of this article is to summarize key evidence and recommendations regarding prevention and management of diabetic foot ulcers that can be translated into practice.

  13. Evaluation of Online Education about Diabetes Management in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jean A.; Hsueh, Kuei-Hsiang

    2008-01-01

    There are a variety of initiatives to provide education to improve the quality of care for children with diabetes in the school setting. This study piloted and evaluated an online continuing education program for school nurses about diabetes management for children in schools using current practice principles. The evaluation determined if…

  14. Diabetes Self-Management Education Enhanced by the Low Vision Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol-McKay, Debra A.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes currently affects 20.8 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in people between the ages of 20 and 74 years. The author uses a fictional but typical example to explain the ways in which low vision specialists can improve the diabetes self-management program of a person with low vision and demonstrates…

  15. Using Behavioral Interventions to Assist Children with Type 1 Diabetes Manage Blood Glucose Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasecki, Kim; Olympia, Daniel; Clark, Elaine; Jenson, William; Heathfield, Lora Tuesday

    2008-01-01

    Treatment and management of chronic disease processes on children occurs across multiple settings, placing demands for consultation and expertise on school personnel, including school psychologists. One such chronic condition in children is type I diabetes. Children with type I insulin dependent diabetes mellitus exhibit high rates of…

  16. An analysis of data management tools for diabetes self-management: can smart phone technology keep up?

    PubMed

    Ciemins, Elizabeth; Coon, Patricia; Sorli, Christopher

    2010-07-01

    In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Rao and colleagues present a comparison of three iPhone diabetes data management applications: the Diamedic Diabetes Logbook, Blood Sugar Diabetes Control, and WaveSense Diabetes Manager. These applications provide patients the ability to enter blood glucose readings manually, view graphs and simple statistics, and email data to health care providers. While these applications show promise, they are limited in their current forms. All require manual data entry and none convert insulin-to-carbohydrate ratios to insulin dose. Future development of these types of technology should consider integration with blood glucose meters and expanded calculation capabilities, as well as monitoring of other risk factors, e.g., blood pressure and lipids, and tracking of preventive examinations, e.g., eye, foot, and renal.

  17. A hybrid knowledge based system for therapy adjustment in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. E.; Gómez, E. J.; Corcoy, R.; del Pozo, F.; Arredondo, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    This poster describes a system to analyze self-monitoring data of gestational diabetic patients, for obtaining an assessment of their metabolic control with the final goal of supporting decision-making in therapy adjustment. The system is able to manage incomplete data and to make temporal reasoning under uncertainty, the two most important constraints when analyzing ambulatory monitoring data. Two different formalism have been used to represent and manage the knowledge: a dynamic Bayesian network and a production system based on rules. The outcomes provided by the whole system are: information on possible patient transgressions of the prescribed treatment and recommendations of treatment adjustments. PMID:7950077

  18. Alternative therapies useful in the management of diabetes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Awanish; Tripathi, Poonam; Pandey, Rishabh; Srivatava, Rashmi; Goswami, Shambaditya

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in the endocrine system. This dreadful disease is found in all parts of the world and becoming a serious threat of mankind health. There are lots of chemical agents available to control and to treat diabetic patients, but total recovery from diabetes has not been reported up to this date. In addition to adverse effects, drug treatments are not always satisfactory in maintaining euglycemia and avoiding late stage diabetic complications. Alternative to these synthetic agents, plants provided a potential source of hypoglycemic drugs and are widely used in several traditional systems of medicine to prevent diabetes. Several medicinal plants have been investigated for their beneficial effect in different type of diabetes. Other alternative therapies such as dietary supplements, acupuncture, hydrotherapy, and yoga therapies less likely to have the side effects of conventional approaches for diabetes. PMID:22219583

  19. Impact of diabetes on vasculature: focus on nervous system.

    PubMed

    Skljarevski, Vladimir; Veves, Aristidis

    2005-08-01

    Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality among those affected and have an enormous impact on society as a whole. Although these complications manifest as a number of clinically distinct syndromes, the pathology underlying them may be very similar, if not identical. Endothelial dysfunction leading to microcirculatory insufficiency and functional ischemia of tissues are proposed to play a pivotal role in the process of their development and progression. Diabetic complications affecting the nervous system occur not infrequently and may have disastrous consequences. This article reviews diabetic complications affecting central and peripheral nervous systems, focusing on similarities in their underlying microvascular pathology and discussing aspects of potentially successful therapeutic interventions. In addition, the article draws a parallel between microvascular dysfunction observed in persons with overt diabetes and those at risk for it.

  20. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-09-10

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population.

  1. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population. PMID:26378555

  2. Automatic messaging for improving patients engagement in diabetes management: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Alessio; Fico, Giuseppe; Salvi, Dario; García-Betances, Rebeca I; Arredondo, Maria Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Mobile health systems aiming to promote adherence may cost-effectively improve the self-management of chronic diseases like diabetes, enhancing the compliance to the medical prescription, encouraging and stimulating patients to adopt healthy life styles and promoting empowerment. This paper presents a strategy for m-health applications in diabetes self-management that is based on automatic generation of feedback messages. A feedback assistant, representing the core of architecture, delivers dynamic and automatically updated text messages set up on clinical guideline and patient's lifestyle. Based on this strategy, an m-health adherence system was designed, developed and tested in a small-scale exploratory study with T1DM and T2DM patients. The results indicate that the system could be feasible and well accepted and that its usage increased along with adherence to prescriptions during the 4 weeks of the study. A more extensive research is pending to corroborate these outcomes and to establish a clear benefit of the proposed solution.

  3. Automatic messaging for improving patients engagement in diabetes management: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Alessio; Fico, Giuseppe; Salvi, Dario; García-Betances, Rebeca I; Arredondo, Maria Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Mobile health systems aiming to promote adherence may cost-effectively improve the self-management of chronic diseases like diabetes, enhancing the compliance to the medical prescription, encouraging and stimulating patients to adopt healthy life styles and promoting empowerment. This paper presents a strategy for m-health applications in diabetes self-management that is based on automatic generation of feedback messages. A feedback assistant, representing the core of architecture, delivers dynamic and automatically updated text messages set up on clinical guideline and patient's lifestyle. Based on this strategy, an m-health adherence system was designed, developed and tested in a small-scale exploratory study with T1DM and T2DM patients. The results indicate that the system could be feasible and well accepted and that its usage increased along with adherence to prescriptions during the 4 weeks of the study. A more extensive research is pending to corroborate these outcomes and to establish a clear benefit of the proposed solution. PMID:25564181

  4. Protocol and baseline data from The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service evaluation study: a health services intervention study for diabetes care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most disabling chronic conditions worldwide, resulting in significant human, social and economic costs and placing huge demands on health care systems. The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service aims to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of care for patients with type 2 diabetes who have been referred by their general practitioner to a specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Care is provided by a multidisciplinary, integrated team consisting of an endocrinologist, diabetes nurse educators, General Practitioner Clinical Fellows (general practitioners who have undertaken focussed post-graduate training in complex diabetes care), and allied health personnel (a dietitian, podiatrist and psychologist). Methods/Design Using a geographical control, this evaluation study tests the impact of this model of diabetes care provided by the service on patient outcomes compared to usual care provided at the specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Data collection at baseline, 6 and 12-months will compare the primary outcome (glycaemic control) and secondary outcomes (serum lipid profile, blood pressure, physical activity, smoking status, quality of life, diabetes self-efficacy and cost-effectiveness). Discussion This model of diabetes care combines the patient focus and holistic care valued by the primary care sector with the specialised knowledge and skills of hospital diabetes care. Our study will provide empirical evidence about the clinical effectiveness of this model of care. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000010392. PMID:20492731

  5. Obesity and diabetes in an aging population: time to rethink definitions and management?

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Amy E; Halter, Jeffrey B

    2015-02-01

    Regardless of pathophysiology and diagnostic criteria, the population of older adults with diabetes is highly heterogeneous. As adults with type 2 diabetes age and develop multiple comorbid health conditions, they may experience many challenges to good diabetes care and self-management. Age of diagnosis and duration of diabetes largely determine the likelihood for comorbidity. Treating such a diverse elderly population may result in inadequate glycemic control either because of overtreatment, leading to hypoglycemia, or because of other complications and preexisting comorbidities. It is imperative that treatment decisions are based on patient preferences, unique and likely evolving health status, and longevity.

  6. Plasma kallikrein-kinin system and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Feener, Edward P

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) occurs, to some extent, in most people with at least 20 years' duration of diabetes mellitus. The progression of DR to its sight-threatening stages is usually associated with the worsening of underlying retinal vascular dysfunction and disease. The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is activated during vascular injury, where it mediates important functions in innate inflammation, blood flow, and coagulation. Recent findings from human vitreous proteomics and experimental studies on diabetic animal models have implicated the KKS in contributing to DR. Vitreous fluid from people with advanced stages of DR contains increased levels of plasma KKS components, including plasma kallikrein (PK), coagulation factor XII, and high-molecular-weight kininogen. Both bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor isoforms (B1R and B2R, respectively) are expressed in human retina, and retinal B1R levels are increased in diabetic rodents. The activation of the intraocular KKS induces retinal vascular permeability, vasodilation, and retinal thickening, and these responses are exacerbated in diabetic rats. Preclinical studies have shown that the administration of PK inhibitors and B1R antagonists to diabetic rats ameliorates retinal vascular hyperpermeability and inflammation. These findings suggest that components of plasma KKS are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic macular edema. PMID:23362193

  7. Associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-management behavior in adults with diabetes: results of a dutch cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Rademakers, Jany; Struijs, Jeroen N; Schuit, A Jantine; Baan, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have examined the association between health literacy and self-management behavior, but few have explored ways through which this occurs. The present study examines to what extent health literacy is associated with diabetes self-management behavior and to what extent diabetes knowledge is a mechanism in this association. The study was based on cross-sectional data retrieved from patient registrations and questionnaires completed in 2010. The sample included 1,714 predominantly type 2 diabetes patients, with a mean age of 67 years. Diabetes self-management was indicated by HbA1c level, glucose self-control and self-reported monitoring of glucose levels, physical activity, and smoking. Multilevel analyses were applied based on multiple imputed data. Lower health literacy was significantly associated with less diabetes knowledge, higher HbA1c level, less self-control of glucose level, and less physical activity. Participants with more diabetes knowledge were less likely to smoke and more likely to control glucose levels. Diabetes knowledge was a mediator in the association between health literacy and glucose self-control and between health literacy and smoking. This study indicates that higher health literacy may contribute to participation in certain self-management activities, in some cases through diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge and health literacy skills may be important targets for interventions promoting diabetes self-management.

  8. The role of patient education in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: an overview.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Adriana; Sasso, Loredana; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Giustina, Andrea; Gazzaruso, Carmine

    2016-07-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus includes ability and empowerment of the patient to change lifestyle, maintain an adequate diet and physical activity, manage the disease, and follow a specific program of periodic medical checks and education sessions. In addition, the patient should be able to correctly identify and adequately solve problems related to the disease and actively collaborate with the healthcare system. To obtain these goals, therapeutic patient education (TPE) is now considered a crucial element not only in the treatment but also in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Several trials showed that TPE is able to improve clinical, lifestyle, and psycho-social outcomes. Nevertheless, studies have not clarified the ideal characteristics of a comprehensive patient education program in clinical practice. Other work is needed to answer open questions regarding the type of PTE (individual or group education), themes, frequency and number of education sessions, contact time between educator and patient, background of educators, use of new technologies, and barriers to self-management. The present review discusses these points on the basis of the most recent data of the literature.

  9. Novel therapies in the management of type I diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, J

    2012-12-01

    Development of insulin pumps and glucose sensors together with sophisticated algoritms and connections leading to closed loop systems will probably soon improve and facilitate treatment for many patients with Type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the burden for patients will not disappear completely, and such therapy will still require both competence and motivation of patients. Therefore the final goal should be either to cure the disease via replacement therapy (transplantions) or stop the destructive process, preserve residual insulin secretion or even improve via beta cell regeneration. This will give a milder disease, a more stable metabolism, simpler treatment and perhaps even cure. It is neither necessary nor even plausible that Type 1 diabetes has one single cause or pathogenesis. Infections may be one causal factor, and vaccinations will then turn the increasing incidence downwards. We will also soon know whether it is possible to prevent some cases of T1D by avoiding cow's milk in the early nutrition. It is possible that probiotics can influence the gut flora so that the gut permeability is normlized and maturation of the immune system is improved which may also contribute to less incidence of Type 1 diabetes. However, for those who already have got the disease we need interventions to preserve exisiting beta cell function and facilitate regeneration of beta-cells. Broader immunosuppressive therapies have been disappointing. Phase III studies using monocloncal antiCD3 antibodies have recently failed, but one dose regimen showed promising effect in patients aged 8-20 years. Therefore furthers studies are needed. Autoantigen treatment is a promising concept, and has the great advantage of being easy, practical with no adverse events. Diapep277 has shown some positive results in adults with good C-peptide, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-alum has given quite impressive results in children aged 10-20 years, even though the results from studies differ. It is

  10. Benefits of modest weight loss on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lau, David C W; Teoh, Hwee

    2013-04-01

    The epidemic of overweight and obesity is a major driver of the growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus globally. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases exponentially as body mass index rises above 25 kg/m(2). Obesity currently costs the Canadian economy approximately $7.1 billion annually whereas per capita health care cost for individuals with diabetes are 3 to 4 times that for persons without the disease. Each kilogram of weight lost through health behaviour changes in people with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a relative diabetes risk reduction of 16%. As 80% to 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and adiposity worsens the metabolic and physiologic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes, weight loss is recommended as the cornerstone management measure. A modest weight loss of 5% to 10% is an achievable and realistic goal for preventing type 2 diabetes in susceptible individuals and improving glycemic and metabolic control in people with type 2 diabetes. When health behaviour modification fails to achieve glycemic and metabolic goal targets, priority should be given to antihyperglycemic agents that are associated with weight loss or weight neutrality. Every pound of body fat loss matters and every kilogram counts in the management of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Sarah E; Cummings, Elizabeth A; Pacaud, Danièle; Lynk, Andrew; Metzger, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes requiring insulin is increasingly common and likely to impact students in most, if not all, schools. Diabetes and its complications have major personal, social and economic impact, and improved diabetes control reduces the risk of both short- and long-term complications. Evidence shows that more intensive management of diabetes - through frequent blood glucose monitoring, insulin administration with injections and/or insulin pumps, and careful attention to diet and exercise - leads to better control. Since children spend 30 to 35 hours per week at school, effectively managing their diabetes while there is integral to their short- and long-term health. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group recommend that minimum standards for supervision and care be established across Canada to support children and youth with type 1 diabetes in schools. These recommendations are derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, with input from diabetes care providers from across Canada, and are consistent with the Canadian Diabetes Association's Guidelines for the Care of Students Living with Diabetes at School.

  12. Environmental management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System (EMS) is identification of environmental consequences from SNL/NM activities, products, and/or services to develop objectives and measurable targets for mitigation of any potential impacts to the environment. This Source Document discusses the annual EMS process for analysis of environmental aspects and impacts and also provides the fiscal year (FY) 2010 analysis. Further information on the EMS structure, processes, and procedures are described within the programmatic EMS Manual (PG470222).

  13. Therapeutic Targets for Management of Periodontitis and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Corneliu; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis (CP) worldwide imposes a rethinking of individualized therapy for patients with both conditions. Central to bidirectional links between DM and CP is deregulated systemic inflammation and dysfunctional immune responses to altered-self and non-self. Control of blood glucose levels and metabolic imbalances associated with hyperglycemia in DM, and disruption of pathogenic subgingival biofilms in CP are currently the main therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Mounting evidence suggests the need to integrate immune modulatory therapeutics in treatment regimens that address the unresolved inflammation associated with DM and CP. The current review discusses the pathogenesis of DM and CP with emphasis on deregulated inflammation, current therapeutic approaches and the novel pro-resolution lipid mediators derived from n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26881443

  14. Management of diabetes insipidus and adipsia in the child.

    PubMed

    Di Iorgi, Natascia; Morana, Giovanni; Napoli, Flavia; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Rossi, Andrea; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2015-06-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal network and water balance. A recent national surveillance in Denmark showed a prevalence rate of twenty-three CDI patients per 100,000 inhabitants in five years. The differential diagnosis between several presenting conditions with polyuria and polydipsia is puzzling, and the etiological diagnosis of CDI remains a challenge before the identification of an underlying cause. For clinical practice, a timely diagnosis for initiating specific treatment in order to avoid central nervous system damage, additional pituitary defects and the risk of dissemination of germ cell tumor is advisable. Proper etiological diagnosis can be achieved via a series of steps that start with careful clinical observation of several signs and endocrine symptoms and then progress to more sophisticated imaging tools. This review summarizes the best practice and approach for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with CDI.

  15. Long-Term Engagement with Health-Management Technology: a Dynamic Process in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Klasnja, Predrag; Kendall, Logan; Pratt, Wanda; Blondon, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes management is a complex, dynamic process that is largely incumbent on patient choices and behavior. We explore how health-management needs—and the needs for technological support—change over time for individuals with diabetes. Through interviews and a focus group, we found that after initial diagnosis, individuals face acute information needs and chiefly turn to mobile applications and Internet resources to help understand the diabetes-specific factors that affect their health. Over time their focus shifts from highly regimented routines to more flexible ones that enable them to maintain a quality of life. Our results suggest that long-term engagement with health technology does not necessarily require continuous, sustained use: routine disease management could lead to a decrease in use, until a new event occurs. Our findings point to a need for tools that help patients with diabetes to effectively manage their health as their bodies, treatment and circumstances change over time. PMID:26958211

  16. Long-Term Engagement with Health-Management Technology: a Dynamic Process in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Klasnja, Predrag; Kendall, Logan; Pratt, Wanda; Blondon, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes management is a complex, dynamic process that is largely incumbent on patient choices and behavior. We explore how health-management needs-and the needs for technological support-change over time for individuals with diabetes. Through interviews and a focus group, we found that after initial diagnosis, individuals face acute information needs and chiefly turn to mobile applications and Internet resources to help understand the diabetes-specific factors that affect their health. Over time their focus shifts from highly regimented routines to more flexible ones that enable them to maintain a quality of life. Our results suggest that long-term engagement with health technology does not necessarily require continuous, sustained use: routine disease management could lead to a decrease in use, until a new event occurs. Our findings point to a need for tools that help patients with diabetes to effectively manage their health as their bodies, treatment and circumstances change over time.

  17. Adherence challenges in the management of type 1 diabetes in adolescents: prevention and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Borus, Joshua S.; Laffel, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the availability of effective therapies, adolescents with type 1 diabetes demonstrate poorer adherence to treatment regimens compared with other pediatric age groups. Nonadherence is tightly linked to suboptimal glycemic control, increasing morbidity, and risk for premature mortality. This article will review barriers to adherence and discuss interventions that have shown promise in improving outcomes for this population. Recent findings Adolescents face numerous obstacles to adherence, including developmental behaviors, flux in family dynamics, and perceived social pressures, which compound the relative insulin resistance brought on by pubertal physiology. Some successful interventions have relied on encouraging nonjudgmental family support in the daily tasks of blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration. Other interventions overcome these barriers through the use of motivational interviewing and problem-solving techniques, flexibility in dietary recommendations, and extending provider outreach and support with technology. Summary Effective interventions build on teens' internal and external supports (family, technology, and internal motivation) in order to simplify their management of diabetes and provide opportunities for the teens to share the burdens of care. Although such strategies help to minimize the demands placed upon teens with diabetes, suboptimal glycemic control will likely persist for the majority of adolescents until technological breakthroughs allow for automated insulin delivery in closed loop systems. PMID:20489639

  18. Veterans Affairs Research on Health Information Technologies for Diabetes Self-Management Support

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D.; Kerr, Eve; Richardson, Caroline; Heisler, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Background Like many patients with diabetes, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients frequently fall short of self-management goals and experience multiple barriers to self-care. Health information technologies (HITs) may provide the tools that patients need to manage their illness under the direction of their primary care team. Methods We describe several ongoing projects focused on HIT resources for self-management in VA. VA researchers are developing HITs that seek to bolster a variety of potential avenues for self-management support, including patients′ relationships with other patients, connections with their informal care networks, and communication with their health care teams. Results Veterans Affairs HIT research projects are developing services that can address the needs of patients with multiple challenges to disease self-care, including multimorbidity, health literacy deficits, and limited treatment access. These services include patient-to-patient interactive voice response (IVR) calling systems, IVR assessments with feedback to informal caregivers, novel information supports for clinical pharmacists based on medication refill data, and enhanced pedometers. Conclusion Large health care systems such as the VA can play a critical role in developing HITs for diabetes self-care. To be truly effective, these efforts should include a continuum of studies: observational research to identify barriers to self-management, developmental studies (e.g., usability testing), efficacy trials, and implementation studies to evaluate utility in real-world settings. VA HIT researchers partner with operations to promote the dissemination of efficacious services, and such relationships will be critical to move HIT innovations into practice. PMID:19885173

  19. The effectiveness of adding cognitive behavioural therapy aimed at changing lifestyle to managed diabetes care for patients with type 2 diabetes: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Welschen, Laura MC; van Oppen, Patricia; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Bouter, Lex M; Stalman, Wim AB; Nijpels, Giel

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with type 2 diabetes, the risk for cardiovascular disease is substantial. To achieve a more favourable risk profile, lifestyle changes on diet, physical activity and smoking status are needed. This will involve changes in behaviour, which is difficult to achieve. Cognitive behavioural therapies focussing on self-management have been shown to be effective. We have developed an intervention combining techniques of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Problem Solving Treatment (PST). The aim of our study is to investigate if adding a combined behavioural intervention to managed care, is effective in achieving changes in lifestyle and cardiovascular risk profile. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes will be selected from general practices (n = 13), who are participating in a managed diabetes care system. Patients will be randomised into an intervention group receiving cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in addition to managed care, and a control group that will receive managed care only. The CBT consists of three to six individual sessions of 30 minutes to increase the patient's motivation, by using principles of MI, and ability to change their lifestyle, by using PST. The first session will start with a risk assessment of diabetes complications that will be used to focus the intervention. The primary outcome measure is the difference between intervention and control group in change in cardiovascular risk score. For this purpose blood pressure, HbA1c, total and HDL-cholesterol and smoking status will be assessed. Secondary outcome measures are quality of life, patient satisfaction, physical activity, eating behaviour, smoking status, depression and determinants of behaviour change. Differences between changes in the two groups will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle, with 95% confidence intervals. The power calculation is based on the risk for cardiovascular disease and we calculated that 97 patients should be included in

  20. An Internet-Based Diabetes Management Platform Improves Team Care and Outcomes in an Urban Latino Population

    PubMed Central

    Zagarins, Sofija E.; Santiago-Kelly, Paula; Rodriguez, Zoraida; Bursell, Sven-Erik; Rosal, Milagros C.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare usual diabetes care (UDC) to a comprehensive diabetes care intervention condition (IC) involving an Internet-based “diabetes dashboard” management tool used by clinicians. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used a parallel-group randomized design. Diabetes nurses, diabetes dietitians, and providers used the diabetes dashboard as a clinical decision support system to deliver a five-visit, 6-month intervention to 199 poorly controlled (HbA1c >7.5% [58 mmol/mol]) Latino type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients (mean age 55 years, 60% female) at urban community health centers. We compared this intervention to an established, in-house UDC program (n = 200) for its impact on blood glucose control and psychosocial outcomes. RESULTS Recruitment and retention rates were 79.0 and 88.5%, respectively. Compared with UDC, more IC patients reached HbA1c targets of <7% (53 mmol/mol; 15.8 vs. 7.0%, respectively, P < 0.01) and <8% (64 mmol/mol; 45.2 vs. 25.3%, respectively, P < 0.001). In multiple linear regression adjusting for baseline HbA1c, adjusted mean ± SE HbA1c at follow-up was significantly lower in the IC compared with the UDC group (P < 0.001; IC 8.4 ± 0.10%; UDC 9.2 ± 0.10%). The results showed lower diabetes distress at follow-up for IC patients (40.4 ± 2.1) as compared with UDC patients (48.3 ± 2.0) (P < 0.01), and also lower social distress (32.2 ± 1.3 vs. 27.2 ± 1.4, P < 0.01). There was a similar, statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement for both groups in the proportion of patients moving from depressed status at baseline to nondepressed at follow-up (41.8 vs. 40%; no significance between groups). CONCLUSIONS The diabetes dashboard intervention significantly improved diabetes-related outcomes among Latinos with poorly controlled T2D compared with a similar diabetes team condition without access to the diabetes dashboard. PMID:25633661

  1. Nutritional overview on the management of type 2 diabetes and the prevention of its complications.

    PubMed

    Pegklidou, Kyriaki; Nicolaou, Ioannis; Demopoulos, Vassilis J

    2010-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing world health problem; particularly the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has assumed epidemic dimensions in Western industrialized societies. It is mainly the environmental, dietary and lifestyle behavioral factors that are the control keys in the progress of this disease. Several epidemiological studies have linked over nutrition and lack of physical activity with type 2 diabetes. Indeed, the excessive consumption of energy dense foods as source of carbohydrates and fats along with ineffective medical management has negative impact on controlling blood glucose levels and on insulin response. This usually leads to a hyperglycemic state, which is associated with the development of the devastating secondary complications. Dietary guidelines have always been important for people with diabetes mellitus. Nutrition management aims to improve health quality maintaining blood glucose levels in normal range so as to reduce the risk for diabetes complications. A well-balanced diet that provides the essential macro- and micro-nutrients is always an impaired need for a patient with diabetes. In this article nutrition recommendations will be displayed for the management of diabetes type 2 and the prevention of its complications. Particular emphasis will be given to the important role of micronutrients such as trace elements and vitamins as well as to the potentiality of some dietary agents to inhibit aldose reductase enzyme, implicated in the etiology of diabetes complications.

  2. The Impact of Technology on Current Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Katharine; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I

    2015-08-01

    Technological innovations have revolutionized the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Although technological advances can potentially improve diabetes outcomes, maintenance of target glycemic control, at the present time, remains largely dependent on patient and family motivation, competence, and adherence to daily diabetes care requirements. Trials of closed loop or "artificial pancreas" technology show great promise to automate insulin delivery and achieve near normal glucose control and reduced hypoglycemia with minimal patient intervention. PMID:26210622

  3. Integrative gaming: a framework for sustainable game-based diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Kahol, Kanav

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and diabetes have reached epidemic proportions in both developing and developed nations. While doctors and caregivers stress the importance of physical exercise in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, many people have difficulty subscribing to a healthy lifestyle. Virtual reality games offer a potentially exciting aid in accelerating and sustaining behavior change. However, care needs to be taken to develop sustainable models of employing games for the management of diabetes and obesity. In this article, we propose an integrative gaming paradigm designed to combine multiple activities involving physical exercises and cognitive skills through a game-based storyline. The persuasive story acts as a motivational binder that enables a user to perform multiple activities such as running, cycling, and problem solving. These activities guide a virtual character through different stages of the game. While performing the activities in the games, users wear sensors that can measure movement (accelerometers, gyrometers, magnetometers) and sense physiological measures (heart rate, pulse oximeter oxygen saturation). These measures drive the game and are stored and analyzed on a cloud computing platform. A prototype integrative gaming system is described and design considerations are discussed. The system is highly configurable and allows researchers to build games for the system with ease and drive the games with different types of activities. The capabilities of the system allow for engaging and motivating the user in the long term. Clinicians can employ the system to collect clinically relevant data in a seamless manner. PMID:21527096

  4. Integrative Gaming: A Framework for Sustainable Game-Based Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Kahol, Kanav

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes have reached epidemic proportions in both developing and developed nations. While doctors and caregivers stress the importance of physical exercise in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, many people have difficulty subscribing to a healthy lifestyle. Virtual reality games offer a potentially exciting aid in accelerating and sustaining behavior change. However, care needs to be taken to develop sustainable models of employing games for the management of diabetes and obesity. In this article, we propose an integrative gaming paradigm designed to combine multiple activities involving physical exercises and cognitive skills through a game-based storyline. The persuasive story acts as a motivational binder that enables a user to perform multiple activities such as running, cycling, and problem solving. These activities guide a virtual character through different stages of the game. While performing the activities in the games, users wear sensors that can measure movement (accelerometers, gyrometers, magnetometers) and sense physiological measures (heart rate, pulse oximeter oxygen saturation). These measures drive the game and are stored and analyzed on a cloud computing platform. A prototype integrative gaming system is described and design considerations are discussed. The system is highly configurable and allows researchers to build games for the system with ease and drive the games with different types of activities. The capabilities of the system allow for engaging and motivating the user in the long term. Clinicians can employ the system to collect clinically relevant data in a seamless manner. PMID:21527096

  5. New concept in natural history and management of diabetes mellitus in thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ratna; Bajoria, Rekha

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a major endocrinopathy, which occurs due transfusional haemosiderosis and is found in 20-30% of adult patients with beta-thalassaemia worldwide, accounting for significant morbidity. It is multifactorial with iron loading being the dominant cause and its management poses a clinical challenge. Diabetes in thalassaemia patients is distinct from type 2 diabetes. It is peculiar in many aspects including its pathophysiology and occurs due to insulin resistance as well as islet cell insufficiency. This article reviews the natural history of diabetes in this presentation with emphasis on prevention monitoring and management. Use of MRI techniques may be useful for future monitoring as well as biochemical monitoring to prevent complications of diabetes. Early intervention with intensified chelation may reverse pancreatic function and structural changes as evident from MRI.

  6. A Worksite Occupational Health Clinic-Based Diabetes Mellitus Management Program.

    PubMed

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; Erickson, Denise; McCluskey, Maureen; Schultz, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    This study is an analysis of a workplace diabetes management program offered to employees of a Fortune 100 financial services corporation located in the United States. The 12-month worksite-based educational program was for employees who were at risk for diabetes, had prediabetes, or were diagnosed with diabetes. This employed population, with health benefits, generally had acceptable control of their diabetes at the start of the program. They statistically improved most self-efficacy measures, but improvement in biometric tests at 6 and 12 months were not significantly different from baseline. Mean hemoglobin A1c at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months was 7.2%, 7.2%, and 7.3%, respectively. At 12 months, about 40% of preprogram survey participants completed all screenings and the post-program questionnaire. Disease management programs at the workplace can be an important component in helping employees enhance their knowledge of diabetes and maintain and improve their health. PMID:26091060

  7. A Worksite Occupational Health Clinic-Based Diabetes Mellitus Management Program.

    PubMed

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; Erickson, Denise; McCluskey, Maureen; Schultz, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    This study is an analysis of a workplace diabetes management program offered to employees of a Fortune 100 financial services corporation located in the United States. The 12-month worksite-based educational program was for employees who were at risk for diabetes, had prediabetes, or were diagnosed with diabetes. This employed population, with health benefits, generally had acceptable control of their diabetes at the start of the program. They statistically improved most self-efficacy measures, but improvement in biometric tests at 6 and 12 months were not significantly different from baseline. Mean hemoglobin A1c at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months was 7.2%, 7.2%, and 7.3%, respectively. At 12 months, about 40% of preprogram survey participants completed all screenings and the post-program questionnaire. Disease management programs at the workplace can be an important component in helping employees enhance their knowledge of diabetes and maintain and improve their health.

  8. Effectiveness of disease management programs on improving diabetes care for individuals in health-disparate areas.

    PubMed

    Coberley, Carter R; Puckrein, Gary A; Dobbs, Angela C; McGinnis, Matthew A; Coberley, Sadie S; Shurney, Dexter W

    2007-06-01

    In addition to race and ethnicity, specific geographic regions are associated with poorer outcomes of care. Individuals with diabetes experiencing health disparities typically have worse long-term outcomes, such as increased diabetes complications and mortality. Zip code mapping, or geocoding, was utilized in this study to identify regions of the United States with high diabetes prevalence rates and to identify areas with high densities of minority populations. Use of this methodology to examine the effect of disease management on a large, diverse diabetes population revealed greater improvement in clinical testing rates in health disparity zones compared with members living outside of these areas. In particular, significant improvement was achieved by members living in minority zip codes and by members aged 65 years or older. These findings demonstrate that members living in areas of health disparity obtain even greater benefit from diabetes disease management program participation, helping to reduce gaps in care.

  9. Diagnosis and management of infection in the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Peters, Edgar J G; Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2013-09-01

    Foot infections are common in persons with diabetes mellitus. Most diabetic foot infections occur in a foot ulcer, which serves as a point of entry for pathogens. Unchecked, infection can spread contiguously to involve underlying tissues, including bone. A diabetic foot infection is often the pivotal event leading to lower extremity amputation, which account for about 60% of all amputations in developed countries. Given the crucial role infections play in the cascade toward amputation, all clinicians who see diabetic patients should have at least a basic understanding of how to diagnose and treat this problem.

  10. Effects of Diabetic Case Management on Knowledge, Self-Management Abilities, Health Behaviors, and Health Service Utilization for Diabetes in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon Ae; Lee, Kunsei; Lin, Vivian; Liu, George; Shin, Eunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a case management program for diabetics, using a pre-post comparison design. Materials and Methods The study population comprised 6007 diabetics who received case management intervention in 2006 and were sampled nationwide in Korea. Before and after the intervention, the study population answered questions regarding their knowledge of diabetes, self-management ability, and health behaviors. Body mass index (BMI) was also calculated. Healthcare service utilization for diabetes was extracted from health insurance claim data from 2005 to 2007. Results The case management program significantly improved the study population's knowledge of diabetes and ability to self-manage nutrition, blood glucose monitoring, foot and oral care, and medications. This program also significantly changed the study population's health behaviors regarding smoking, alcohol drinking, and exercise, and BMI was positively affected. In the over-serviced subgroup, there was a significant decrease in the number of consultations (mean=7.0; SD=19.5) after intervention. Conversely, in the under-serviced subgroup, there was a significant increase in the number of consultations (mean=3.2; SD=7.9) and the days of prescribed medication (mean=66.4; SD=120.3) after intervention. Conclusion This study showed that the case management program led the study population to improve their knowledge, self-management ability, health behaviors, and utilization of health care. It is necessary in future studies to evaluate the appropriateness of healthcare usage and clinical outcome by using a control group to determine the direct effectiveness of this case management program. PMID:25510771

  11. DiabCare survey of diabetes management and complications in the Gulf countries

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Muhamed Shahed; Khudada, Khaled; Safarini, Saher; Mehanna, Sherif; Nafach, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To describe the status of diabetes control and complications, and the quality of diabetes management in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates, and to obtain an insight into the relationship between these factors. Methods: Patients with diabetes for>12 months were enrolled from specialist clinics and general hospitals. All available data from the patients’ medical files including patient demographics; glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure status; diabetes-related complications; and diabetes management were recorded in data collection forms and analyzed. Results: Overall, 1290 patients with diabetes were enrolled with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 49.4 ± 12.3 years and duration of diabetes of 8.7 ± 5.9 years. Glycemic control was poor: Mean glycated hemoglobin A1c of 8.3 ± 2.0%, fasting and postprandial plasma glucose levels of 155.9 ± 57.1 mg/dL (8.7 ± 3.2 mmol/L), and 218.2 ± 87.4 mg/dL (12.1 ± 4.9 mmol/L), respectively. Diabetes-related complications such as neuropathy (34.9% of patients), background retinopathy (29.9%), and cataract (14.1%) were common. Cardiovascular complications were reported in <10% of patients, and microalbuminuria was detected in 34.4% of patients. Oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) monotherapy (43.3%) was the most common treatment, followed by insulin + OADs (39.3%) and insulin monotherapy (17.6%). Conclusion: The status of diabetes care was found to be suboptimal. Further improvements in diabetes management are necessary to prevent or delay the development of diabetes-related complications. PMID:27042419

  12. The kallikrein-kinin system in early state of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vila, S B; Peluffo, V A; Alvarado, C; Cresto, J C; Zuccollo, A; Catanzaro, O L

    1992-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system was studied in 9 normals, healthy subjects (6 men, 3 women, age range 1 to 14 years) and 15 diabetic patients (9 men, 6 women age range 2 to 14 years) with an evolution of the disease between 1 to 14 years. Diabetic patients with low microalbuminuria (6.62 +/- 0.97 mg/24 h) show increased total and pre-kallikrein respect to control (3 and 2 fold respectively). On the other hand patients with high microalbuminuria (44.7 +/- 13.2 mg/24 h) show a total and pre-kallikrein of more than 4 and 8 fold increased respectively, compare with the control. According with these results we can concluded: 1) The total kallikrein and pre-kallikrein is increased in the diabetic state. 2) When microalbuminuria is high, the total and pre-kallikrein correlates with those increasing. 3) These changes could modified the renal hemodynamic in diabetes.

  13. Discrepancy Reporting Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tonja M.; Lin, James C.; Chatillon, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Discrepancy Reporting Management System (DRMS) is a computer program designed for use in the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to help establish the operational history of equipment items; acquire data on the quality of service provided to DSN customers; enable measurement of service performance; provide early insight into the need to improve processes, procedures, and interfaces; and enable the tracing of a data outage to a change in software or hardware. DRMS is a Web-based software system designed to include a distributed database and replication feature to achieve location-specific autonomy while maintaining a consistent high quality of data. DRMS incorporates commercial Web and database software. DRMS collects, processes, replicates, communicates, and manages information on spacecraft data discrepancies, equipment resets, and physical equipment status, and maintains an internal station log. All discrepancy reports (DRs), Master discrepancy reports (MDRs), and Reset data are replicated to a master server at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Master DR data are replicated to all the DSN sites; and Station Logs are internal to each of the DSN sites and are not replicated. Data are validated according to several logical mathematical criteria. Queries can be performed on any combination of data.

  14. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... improved with weight-loss surgery. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Treating either type 1 diabetes or type 2 ... a life-long disease and there is no cure. Tight control of blood ... diabetes complications. But these problems can occur, even in ...

  15. A Middle-Range Theory for Diabetes Self-management Mastery.

    PubMed

    Fearon-Lynch, Jennifer A; Stover, Caitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the seventh leading cause of death in America and affects 382 million people worldwide. Individuals with diabetes must manage the complexity of the disease, its treatment, and complications to avert deleterious consequences associated with the illness. However, not all patients with diabetes successfully gain mastery to positively impact self-management. A new middle-range theory is proposed that merges 2 extant theories, theory of mastery and organismic integration theory, to better understand this human response. The theories' philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual perspectives were examined and relational properties synthesized to provide a conceptual representation of the phenomenon of interest. PMID:26322469

  16. A Middle-Range Theory for Diabetes Self-management Mastery.

    PubMed

    Fearon-Lynch, Jennifer A; Stover, Caitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the seventh leading cause of death in America and affects 382 million people worldwide. Individuals with diabetes must manage the complexity of the disease, its treatment, and complications to avert deleterious consequences associated with the illness. However, not all patients with diabetes successfully gain mastery to positively impact self-management. A new middle-range theory is proposed that merges 2 extant theories, theory of mastery and organismic integration theory, to better understand this human response. The theories' philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual perspectives were examined and relational properties synthesized to provide a conceptual representation of the phenomenon of interest.

  17. Physical activity in prevention and management of obesity and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hill, James O; Stuht, Jennifer; Wyatt, Holly R; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and type-2 diabetes can be considered diseases of physical inactivity. Physically activity protects against type-2 diabetes through its positive effects on weight management and on the metabolic pathways involved in glycemic control that are not weight-dependent. Increasing physical activity is one of the most effective strategies both for preventing type-2 diabetes and for managing it once it is present. However, we still face an enormous challenge in getting people to achieve sustainable increases in physical activity. A promising strategy is to get people walking more, starting small and increasing gradually over time.

  18. Evaluation of the Role of Enteral Nutrition in Managing Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed. PMID:25412151

  19. Evaluation of the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2014-11-18

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed.

  20. Systems Engineering Management Education in Embedded System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masahiro

    Engineers with system architecture design and project management abilities are required in the field of embedded system development. In university, however, educations are mainly focused on computer science and programming; systems engineering and project management education have been disregard. We implemented educational curriculum of systems engineering and project management in embedded system for graduate program. In this paper the course design, execution and evaluation are described.

  1. Aggressively managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Craig W

    2008-05-01

    Physicians have many options available for treating patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Making decisions on types of pharmaceuticals to use and when to introduce them into the treatment regimen can be a complex process. In addition, nutrition and exercise must be considered in any comprehensive treatment plan. The author describes the case of an African American woman with uncontrolled T2DM, obesity, hyperlipidemia, low bone mass, menopausal symptoms, stage 3 chronic kidney disease, distal sensory neuropathy, and background retinopathy. An aggressive, comprehensive treatment plan developed for this patient included pharmaceuticals (triple oral therapy: metformin, pioglitazone hydrochloride, and sitagliptin phosphate), nutrition counseling (with a registered, licensed dietician), and exercise. Treatment led to substantial improvements in the patient's daytime glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin level, and body weight at 3-month follow-up. Further interventions were needed to address the patient's hyperlipidemia and low bone mass. The author offers physician guidelines for making decisions on glycemic control for patients with T2DM and for managing hyperlipidemia. He also strongly recommends incorporating nutrition counseling by registered, licensed dietitians and exercise (preferably of a weight-bearing nature) into treatment plans for patients with T2DM, hyperlipidemia, and low bone mass.

  2. The skin landscape in diabetes mellitus. Focus on dermocosmetic management

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, Gérald E; Seité, Sophie; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Delvenne, Philippe; Scheen, André; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Background Some relationships are established between diabetes mellitus (DM) and a series of cutaneous disorders. Specific dermatoses are markers for undiagnosed DM. Other disorders represent supervening complications in an already treated DM patient. Objective To review the information about dermocosmetic care products and their appropriate use in the management and prevention of dermatoses related to DM. Method The peer-reviewed literature and empiric findings are covered. Owing to the limited clinical evidence available for the use of dermocosmetics, a review of the routine practices and common therapies in DM-related dermatoses was conducted. Results Some DM-related dermatoses (acanthosis nigricans, pigmented purpuric dermatosis) are markers of macrovascular complications. The same disorders and some others (xerosis, Dupuytren’s disease) have been found to be more frequently associated with microangiopathy. Other skin diseases (alopecia areata, vitiligo) were found to be markers of autoimmunity, particularly in type 1 DM. Unsurprisingly, using dermocosmetics and appropriate skin care has shown objective improvements of some DM-related dermatoses, such effects improve the quality of life. The most common skin manifestations of DM fall along continuum between “dry skin,” xerosis, and acquired ichthyosis, occurring predominately on the shins and feet. Dermocosmetic products improve the feeling of well-being for DM patients. PMID:23696712

  3. [Support of diabetes dietary management and self-management using mobile applications].

    PubMed

    Szálka, Brigitta; Kósa, István; Vassányi, István; Mák, Erzsébet

    2016-07-01

    The key components of successful diabetes therapy are pharmacotherapy, hospital care and lifestyle education. Lifestyle education, self-management, and composing the right diet can be effectively supported with mobile applications. In this paper Hungarian mobile applications are reviewed and compared to some international competitors. Besides plenty of useful functions some deficiencies are identified, based on dietary recommendations. The related improvements together with clinical trials validating effectiveness and reliability can strengthen medical evidence as well as the penetration of such mobile applications. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1147-1153.

  4. Guidelines and Recommendations for Laboratory Analysis in the Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Mark; Bakris, George L.; Bruns, David E.; Horvath, Andrea Rita; Kirkman, M. Sue; Lernmark, Ake; Metzger, Boyd E.; Nathan, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple laboratory tests are used to diagnose and manage patients with diabetes mellitus. The quality of the scientific evidence supporting the use of these tests varies substantially. APPROACH An expert committee compiled evidence-based recommendations for the use of laboratory testing for patients with diabetes. A new system was developed to grade the overall quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendations. Draft guidelines were posted on the Internet and presented at the 2007 Arnold O. Beckman Conference. The document was modified in response to oral and written comments, and a revised draft was posted in 2010 and again modified in response to written comments. The National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry and the Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Committee of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry jointly reviewed the guidelines, which were accepted after revisions by the Professional Practice Committee and subsequently approved by the Executive Committee of the American Diabetes Association. CONTENT In addition to long-standing criteria based on measurement of plasma glucose, diabetes can be diagnosed by demonstrating increased blood hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations. Monitoring of glycemic control is performed by self-monitoring of plasma or blood glucose with meters and by laboratory analysis of HbA1c. The potential roles of noninvasive glucose monitoring, genetic testing, and measurement of autoantibodies, urine albumin, insulin, proinsulin, C-peptide, and other analytes are addressed. SUMMARY The guidelines provide specific recommendations that are based on published data or derived from expert consensus. Several analytes have minimal clinical value at present, and their measurement is not recommended. PMID:21617108

  5. Virginia's traffic management system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.; Marber, S. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that Northern Virginia, like most other urban areas, faces the challenge of moving more and more vehicles on roads that are already overloaded. Traffic in Northern Virginia is continually increasing, but the development surrounding Interstate 395, 495, and 66 makes little room available for roadway expansion. Even if land were unlimited, the strict requirement of the Clean Air Act make building roads difficult. This paper reports that ensuring the most efficient use of the interstate highways is the goal of the Virginia Department of Transportation's (VDOT's) traffic management system (TMS). TMS is a computerized highway surveillance and control system that monitors 30 interstate miles on I-395, I-495, and I-66. The system helps squeeze the most use from these interstates by detecting and helping clear accidents or disabled vehicles and by smoothing traffic flow. TMS spots and helps clear an average of two incidents a day and prevents accidents caused by erratic traffic flow from ramps onto the main line. For motorists, these TMS functions translate into decreased travel time, vehicle operating costs, and air pollution. VDOT's TMS is the foundation for the intelligent vehicle-highway systems of tomorrow. It employs several elements that work together to improve traffic flow.

  6. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24

    Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These

  7. Diabetes Management in the School Setting. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Sarah; Fekaris, Nina; Pontius, Deborah; Zacharski, Susan

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is the only school staff member who has the skills, knowledge base, and statutory authority to fully meet the healthcare needs of students with diabetes in the school setting. Diabetes management…

  8. Managing Type 1 Diabetes at School: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This integrative literature review examines research studies that describe the care of the student with type 1 diabetes at school and interventions to improve care. Participants of the studies include school nurses, counselors, staff, administrators, parents, and students with diabetes. The studies reviewed use a descriptive approach in examining…

  9. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Features and Classification Systems for Diabetic Macular Edema: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruia, Surabhi; Saxena, Sandeep; Gemmy Cheung, Chui Ming; Gilhotra, Jagjit S; Lai, Timothy Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is fast becoming the current standard of care for the detection and assessment of diabetic macular edema. With the application of SD-OCT for imaging of retinal microstructure and measurement of retinal thickness, new information regarding disease characteristics has been gathered, which was unrecognized previously. Retinal thickness measurements on SD-OCT have also been used for deciding the management and monitoring of the disease. Since its development, OCT has enhanced the understanding of retinal anatomical changes in diabetic retinopathy. Several authors have used SD-OCT to classify diabetic macular edema with the purpose of correlating the pathophysiology with disease severity. The classification systems have helped monitor the treatment efficacy and provide prognostic information on the treatment outcome. The following review article summarizes these classifications. PMID:27632028

  10. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    Tips for Teens with Diabetes What is Diabetes? National Diabetes Education Program Learn about diabetes and how to manage it. styaoyfuyodarooiatumdrbaTecebadhhtlkeoieoecsoaii… cncdlteehams, gyr, ealauwbkncoeeedofishgayceeohch. attue, ...

  11. The Management of Diabetic Neuropathy in CKD and Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Roberts, Laurel; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Mathias; Brosius, Frank C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation A 64-year-old male with a 15-year history of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and a 10-year history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia had developed multiple diabetes-related complications within the last 5 years. He first developed albuminuria 5 years ago, and over the next several years experienced fairly rapid decline in kidney function, with eGFR of 55 mL/min/1.73m2 noted 2 years ago. He was diagnosed with proliferative retinopathy 5 years ago and underwent laser photocoagulation. Four years ago, he noted symptoms of peripheral neuropathy manifested as shooting pain and numbness with loss of light touch, thermal and vibratory sensation in a stocking distribution. Last year he developed a non-healing ulcer on the plantar aspect of his left foot which was complicated with gangrene and resulted in a below-the-knee amputation of the left leg one year ago. He now reports a new onset of weakness, lightheadedness and dizziness on standing that affects his daily activities. He reports lancinating pain in his right lower extremity, worse in the evening. Medications include: neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin twice daily and regular insulin on a sliding scale, metoprolol 50 mg/d, lisinopril 40 mg/d, atorvastatin 80 mg/d, furosemide 40 mg/d and aspirin 81 mg/d. Blood pressure is 127/69 mm Hg with a pulse rate of 96 bpm while supine and 94/50 mmHg with a pulse rate of 102 bpm while standing. Strength is normal but with a complete loss of all sensory modalities to the knee in his remaining limb and up to the wrists in both upper extremities, and he is areflexic. Today's laboratory evaluations show a serum creatinine of 2.8 mg/dl, an estimated GFR (eGFR) of 24 ml/min/1.73m2, a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 7.9 % and 2.1 g of urine protein per gram of creatinine. What would be the most appropriate management for this patient? PMID:20042258

  12. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  13. Assessing Empathy and Self-Efficacy Levels of Pharmacy Students in an Elective Diabetes Management Course

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Amanda M.; Behnen, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of a 6-week patient/provider interaction simulation on empathy and self-efficacy levels of diabetes management skills in third-year pharmacy students. Design. Pharmacy students enrolled in a diabetes elective course were paired to act as a patient with diabetes or as a provider assisting in the management of that patient during a 6-week simulation activity. After 3 weeks, students switched roles. The simulation was designed with activities to build empathy. Assessment. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) and a self-efficacy survey were administered to assess change in empathy and confidence levels from baseline to the end of the activity. Completion of the activity resulted in significant improvement in total JSE scores. Additionally, significant improvements in overall self-efficacy scores regarding diabetes management were noted. Conclusion. The 6-week patient/provider interaction simulation improved empathy and self-efficacy levels in third-year pharmacy students. PMID:25995517

  14. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  15. Literacy-appropriate educational materials and brief counseling improve diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Andrea S.; Seligman, Hilary K.; Davis, Terry C.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Bryant-Shilliday, Betsy; Freburger, Janet K.; DeWalt, Darren A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this pilot study, we evaluated the impact of providing patients with a literacy-appropriate diabetes education guide accompanied by brief counseling designed for use in primary care. Methods We provided the Living with Diabetes guide and brief behavior change counseling to 250 English and Spanish speaking patients with type 2 diabetes. Counseling sessions using collaborative goal setting occurred at baseline and by telephone at 2 and 4 weeks. We measured patients' activation, self-efficacy, diabetes distress, knowledge, and self-care at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.001) and clinically important (effect sizes = 0.29–0.42) improvements were observed in participants' activation, self-efficacy, diabetes-related distress, self-reported behaviors, and knowledge. Improvements were similar across literacy levels. Spanish speakers experienced both greater improvement in diabetes-related distress and less improvement in self-efficacy levels than English speakers. Conclusion A diabetes self-management support package combining literacy-appropriate patient education materials with brief counseling suitable for use in primary care resulted in important shortterm health-related psychological and behavioral changes across literacy levels. Practice implications Coupling literacy-appropriate education materials with brief counseling in primary care settings may be an effective and efficient strategy for imparting skills necessary for diabetes self-management. PMID:19167857

  16. Supplier Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

    2008-01-01

    Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

  17. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B.; McNair, Robert C.; White, Kenneth; Maugeri, Terry

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  18. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  19. Alarm management system

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, D.D.; Elm, W.C.; Lipner, M.H.; Butterworth, G.E.; Easter, J.R.

    1989-03-28

    An alarm management system is described, comprising: a light water pressurized nuclear power plant; sensors coupled to the plant indicating the state of the plant; a sensor signal processor, operatively connected to the sensors, for producing state signals indicating the state of the sensors monitoring the power plant from the sensor signals and for combining the state signals using rule based algorithms to produce abnormality indication signals; a message processor, operatively connected to the sensor signal processor for receiving the abnormality indication signals; a spatially dedicated parallel display for each function, operatively connected to the message processor, for displaying the portion of the messages simultaneously; and a serial display, operatively connected to the message processor, for displaying the message in the queues in priority order within category within function upon request, the message processor outputting messages from the queue to the parallel display as display space becomes available on the parallel display due to an abnormality being resolved.

  20. Diabetes self-management education and training among privately insured persons with newly diagnosed diabetes--United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Shrestha, Sundar S; Lipman, Ruth; Burrows, Nilka R; Kolb, Leslie E; Rutledge, Stephanie

    2014-11-21

    Diabetes is a complex chronic disease that requires active involvement of patients in its management. Diabetes self-management education and training (DSMT), "the ongoing process of facilitating the knowledge, skill, and ability necessary for prediabetes and diabetes self-care," is an important component of integrated diabetes care. It is an intervention in which patients learn about diabetes and how to implement the self-management that is imperative to control the disease. The curriculum of DSMT often includes the diabetes disease process and treatment options; healthy lifestyle; blood glucose monitoring; preventing, detecting and treating diabetes complications; and developing personalized strategies for decision making. The American Diabetes Association recommends providing DSMT to those with newly diagnosed diabetes, because data suggest that when diabetes is first diagnosed is the time when patients are most receptive to such engagement. However, little is known about the proportion of persons with newly diagnosed diabetes participating in DSMT. CDC analyzed data from the Marketscan Commercial Claims and Encounters database (Truven Health Analytics) for the period 2009-2012 to estimate the claim-based proportion of privately insured adults (aged 18-64 years) with newly diagnosed diabetes who participated in DSMT during the first year after diagnosis. During 2011-2012, an estimated 6.8% of privately insured, newly diagnosed adults participated in DSMT during the first year after diagnosis of diabetes. These data suggest that there is a large gap between the recommended guideline and current practice, and that there is both an opportunity and a need to enhance rates of DSMT participation among persons newly diagnosed with diabetes.

  1. Current nanotechnology approaches for the treatment and management of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, Joana F; Silva, Amélia M; Garcia, Maria L; Souto, Eliana B

    2015-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a consequence of diabetes mellitus at the ocular level, leading to vision loss, and contributing to the decrease of patient's life quality. The biochemical and anatomic abnormalities that occur in DR are discussed in this review to better understand and manage the development of new therapeutic strategies. The use of new drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles (e.g. liposomes, dendrimers, cationic nanoemulsions, lipid and polymeric nanoparticles) is discussed along with the current traditional treatments, pointing out the advantages of the proposed nanomedicines to target this ocular disease. Despite the multifactorial nature of DR, which is not entirely understood, some strategies based on nanoparticles are being exploited for a more efficient drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye. On the other hand, the use of some nanoparticles also seems to contribute to the development of DR symptoms (e.g. retinal neovascularization), which are also discussed in light of an efficient management of this ocular chronic disease.

  2. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  3. Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Practices of Diabetes Management During Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mujtaba; Adams, Alexandra; Hossain, Md Anwar; Sutin, David; Han, Benjamin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 3.5 million Muslims in North America. During the holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are to fast from predawn to after sunset. While there are exemptions for older and sick adults, many adults with diabetes fast during Ramadan. However, there are risks associated with fasting and specific management considerations for patients with diabetes. We evaluated provider practices and knowledge regarding the management of patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. A 15-question quality improvement survey based on a literature review and the American Diabetes Association guidelines was developed and offered to providers at the outpatient primary care and geriatric clinics at an inner-city hospital in New York City. Forty-five providers completed the survey. Most respondents did not ask their Muslim patients with diabetes if they were fasting during the previous Ramadan. Knowledge of fasting practices during Ramadan was variable, and most felt uncomfortable managing patients with diabetes during Ramadan. There is room for improvement in educating providers about specific cultural and medical issues regarding fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan.

  4. Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wounds are unlike typical wounds in that they are slower to heal, making treatment with conventional topical medications an uphill process. Among several different alternative therapies, honey is an effective choice because it provides comparatively rapid wound healing. Although honey has been used as an alternative medicine for wound healing since ancient times, the application of honey to diabetic wounds has only recently been revived. Because honey has some unique natural features as a wound healer, it works even more effectively on diabetic wounds than on normal wounds. In addition, honey is known as an “all in one” remedy for diabetic wound healing because it can combat many microorganisms that are involved in the wound process and because it possesses antioxidant activity and controls inflammation. In this review, the potential role of honey's antibacterial activity on diabetic wound-related microorganisms and honey's clinical effectiveness in treating diabetic wounds based on the most recent studies is described. Additionally, ways in which honey can be used as a safer, faster, and effective healing agent for diabetic wounds in comparison with other synthetic medications in terms of microbial resistance and treatment costs are also described to support its traditional claims. PMID:25386217

  5. ASCOT data base management system

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, J.; Nyholm, R.; Castro, C.; Hill, K.

    1980-07-01

    The ASCOT data base management system is designed to handle the data produced by both the experimental and theoretical efforts of the DOE Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) project. The data base envisioned is hierarchically structured, sparse, and compact. Information concerning any given data file is stored in a directory file. The data base management system uses a relational data management approach. Presently three management schema are being developed for use with the data base. 5 figures.

  6. Patient-appraised couple emotion management and disease management among Chinese American patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lawrence; Chesla, Catherine A; Chun, Kevin M; Skaff, Marilyn M; Mullan, Joseph T; Kanter, Richard A; Gardiner, Phillip S

    2004-06-01

    Family context exerts a strong influence on disease management among patients with chronic disease, but it is not clear which aspects of family life are most influential. This study examined the linkages between patient-appraised couple emotion management (conflict resolution, expressiveness, and respect) and disease management (biological, morale/depression, quality of life, and behavioral) among a relatively understudied group, Chinese American patients with type 2 diabetes. Significant main effects were found between patient-appraised couple emotion management, especially conflict resolution, and the morale component of disease management, but not the biological or behavioral components; both diabetes-specific and general relationship qualities (marital satisfaction) were independently linked to disease management. Acculturation did not qualify the findings. Similarities among ethnic groups in family and disease management relationships may be more common than differences.

  7. Lessons from a community-based mHealth diabetes self-management program: "it's not just about the cell phone".

    PubMed

    Katz, Richard; Mesfin, Tsega; Barr, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Cell phone-assisted self-management of diabetes offers a new approach to improving chronic care; however, introducing this new technology presents many challenges to a health care team. The George Washington University-District of Columbia Cell Phone Diabetes Project enrolled 32 patients with Type 2 diabetes from a community clinic using patients' cell phones connected to the Well Doc Diabetes Manager System with monitoring by case managers and monthly reports to primary care providers. Despite monetary incentives (cell phone rebates), dropout rate was high (50%), because of lack of use or inability to afford low-cost cell phone service. Active patients had sustained system use with improved diabetes standard-of-care goals and reduced hospitalizations and emergency department visits. On the basis of this pilot program, the authors assessed the multiple links in the chain (patients, case managers, primary care providers, support staff, medical record systems, disease management software, cell phones) that affect the success of a mHealth chronic care strategy.

  8. Peer Support for Achieving Independence in Diabetes (Peer-AID): Design, methods and baseline characteristics of a randomized controlled trial of community health worker assisted diabetes self-management support

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Karin; Drain, Nathan; Robinson, June; Kapp, Janet; Hebert, Paul; Taylor, Leslie; Silverman, Julie; Kiefer, Meghan; Lessler, Dan; Krieger, James

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives Community health workers (CHWs) may be an important mechanism to provide diabetes self-management to disadvantaged populations. We describe the design and baseline results of a trial evaluating a home-based CHW intervention. Methods & Research Design Peer Support for Achieving Independence in Diabetes (Peer-AID) is a randomized, controlled trial evaluating a home-based CHW-delivered diabetes self-management intervention versus usual care. The study recruited participants from 3 health systems. Change in A1c measured at 12 months is the primary outcome. Change in blood pressure, lipids, health care utilization, health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and diabetes self-management behaviors at 12 months are secondary outcomes. Results A total of 1,438 patients were identified by medical record review as potentially eligible, 445 patients were screened by telephone for eligibility and 287 were randomized. Groups were comparable at baseline on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. All participants were low-income and were from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds. The mean A1c was 8.9%, mean BMI was above the obese range, and non-adherence to diabetes medications was high. The cohort had high rates of co-morbid disease and low self-reported health status. Although one-third reported no health insurance, the mean number of visits to a physician in the past year was 5.7. Trial results are pending. Conclusions Peer-AID recruited and enrolled a diverse group of low income participants with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and delivered a home-based diabetes self-management program. If effective, replication of the Peer-AID intervention in community based settings could contribute to improved control of diabetes in vulnerable populations. PMID:24956324

  9. Systems management techniques and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Report is reviewed which discusses history and trends of systems management, its basic principles, and nature of problems that lend themselves to systems approach. Report discusses systems engineering as applied to weapons acquisition, ecology, patient monitoring, and retail merchandise operations.

  10. Integrated Management Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Terrance

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronic search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.

  11. Integrated Management Tracking System

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronicmore » search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.« less

  12. The Role of Dietary Protein and Fat in Glycaemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for Intensive Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Megan; Bell, Kirstine J; O'Connell, Susan M; Smart, Carmel E; Shafat, Amir; King, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    A primary focus of the management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. However, even with the introduction of more flexible intensive insulin regimes, people with type 1 diabetes still struggle to achieve optimal glycaemic control. More recently, dietary fat and protein have been recognised as having a significant impact on postprandial blood glucose levels. Fat and protein independently increase the postprandial glucose excursions and together their effect is additive. This article reviews how the fat and protein in a meal impact the postprandial glycaemic response and discusses practical approaches to managing this in clinical practice. These insights have significant implications for patient education, mealtime insulin dose calculations and dosing strategies. PMID:26202844

  13. SYSTEMIC INTERLEUKIN 1β INHIBITION IN PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, Marc; Becker, Matthias; Graf, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of systemic interleukin 1β inhibition using canakinumab (Ilaris) on retinal neovascularizations in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy were enrolled in a prospective uncontrolled pilot study. Canakinumab (150 mg) was given 3 times subcutaneously. The primary end point was the change in the area of neovascularization from baseline to Week 24. Secondary end points were the change in retinal edema measured and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), as well as systemic safety evaluation, HbA1c, and systemic inflammatory parameters. Results: Systemic canakinumab treatment was well tolerated. None of the 8 eyes showed progression of neovascularizations within 24 weeks. Their mean size remained unchanged comparing 0.60 mm2 at baseline with 0.62 mm2 at Week 24 (P = 0.944). Median BCVA remained stable with 80 ETDRS letters at baseline and 82 ETDRS letters at Week 24. A not statistically significant reduction in retinal edema was detectable for the foveal central subfield thickness (mean, 313–295 μm). Mean HbA1c improved significantly from 7.92% to 7.30% within the 24 weeks (P = 0.046). Systemic inflammatory parameters remained overall unchanged. Conclusion: Systemic canakinumab showed no change in neovascularizations in diabetic retinopathy. Promising effects were seen on diabetic macular edema. PMID:26218500

  14. Improving preparedness of medical students and junior doctors to manage patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Narcie A A; Brandom, Kevin G; Mattick, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    Objective New medical graduates are the front-line staff in many hospital settings and manage patients with diabetes frequently. Prescribing is an area of concern for junior doctors, however, with insulin prescribing reported as a particular weakness. This study aimed to produce an educational intervention which aimed to improve preparedness to manage patients with diabetes and evaluate it using a mixed methods approach. Research design and methods An e-resource (http://www.diabetesscenariosforjuniordoctors.co.uk) was created to contain commonplace and authentic diabetes decision-making scenarios. –32 junior doctors (n=20) and year 5 students (n=12) in South West England worked through the scenarios while ‘thinking aloud’ and then undertook a semistructured interview. Qualitative data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically. Participant confidence to manage patients with diabetes before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after the educational intervention was also measured using a self-rating scale. Results Participants reported that patients with diabetes were daunting to manage because of the wide array of insulin products, their lack of confidence with chronic disease management and the difficulty of applying theory to practice. The e-resource was described as authentic, practical, and appropriate for the target audience. Junior doctors’ self-rated confidence to manage patients with diabetes increased from 4.7 (of 10) before using the e-resource, to 6.4 immediately afterwards, and 6.8 6 weeks later. Medical students’ confidence increased from 5.1 before, to 6.4 immediately afterwards, and 6.4 6 weeks later. Conclusions Providing opportunities to work with authentic scenarios in a safe environment can help to ameliorate junior doctors’ lack of confidence to manage patients with diabetes. PMID:26435838

  15. Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Mirella; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have found that diabetes and thyroid disorders tend to coexist in patients. Both conditions involve a dysfunction of the endocrine system. Thyroid disorders can have a major impact on glucose control, and untreated thyroid disorders affect the management of diabetes in patients. Consequently, a systematic approach to thyroid testing in patients with diabetes is recommended. PMID:21785689

  16. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body’s resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient’s data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies. PMID:26151207

  17. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-07-03

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body's resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient's data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies.

  18. Potential role of TRAIL in the management of autoimmune diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stella; Norcio, Alessia; Toffoli, Barbara; Zauli, Giorgio; Secchiero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease, due to the immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells, whose incidence has been steadily increasing during the last decades. Insulin replacement therapy can treat T1DM, which, however, is still associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. For this reason, great effort is being put into developing strategies that could eventually prevent and/or cure this disease. These strategies are mainly focused on blocking the immune system from attacking β-cells together with functional islet restoration either by regeneration or transplantation. Recent experimental evidences suggest that TNFrelated apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), which is an immune system modulator protein, could represent an interesting candidate for the cure for T1DM and/or its complications. Here we review the evidences on the potential role of TRAIL in the management of T1DM.

  19. Potential role of TRAIL in the management of autoimmune diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stella; Norcio, Alessia; Toffoli, Barbara; Zauli, Giorgio; Secchiero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease, due to the immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells, whose incidence has been steadily increasing during the last decades. Insulin replacement therapy can treat T1DM, which, however, is still associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. For this reason, great effort is being put into developing strategies that could eventually prevent and/or cure this disease. These strategies are mainly focused on blocking the immune system from attacking β-cells together with functional islet restoration either by regeneration or transplantation. Recent experimental evidences suggest that TNFrelated apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), which is an immune system modulator protein, could represent an interesting candidate for the cure for T1DM and/or its complications. Here we review the evidences on the potential role of TRAIL in the management of T1DM. PMID:22726118

  20. Diabetes in Mexico: cost and management of diabetes and its complications and challenges for health policy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mexico has been experiencing some of the most rapid shifts ever recorded in dietary and physical activity patterns leading to obesity. Diabetes mellitus has played a crucial role causing nearly 14% of all deaths. We wanted to make a comprehensive study of the role of diabetes in terms of burden of disease, prevalence, cost of diabetes, cost of complications and health policy. Method We review the quantitative data that provides evidence of the extent to which the Mexican health economy is affected by the disease and its complications. We then discuss the current situation of diabetes in Mexico with experts in the field. Results There was a significant increase in the prevalence of diabetes from 1994 to 2006 with rising direct costs (2006: outpatient USD$ 717,764,787, inpatient USD$ 223,581,099) and indirect costs (2005: USD$ 177,220,390), and rising costs of complications (2010: Retinopathy USD$ 10,323,421; Cardiovascular disease USD$ 12,843,134; Nephropathy USD$ 81,814,501; Neuropathy USD$ 2,760,271; Peripheral vascular disease USD$ 2,042,601). The health policy focused on screening and the creation of self-support groups across the country. Conclusions The increasing diabetes mortality and lack of control among diagnosed patients make quality of treatment a major concern in Mexico. The growing prevalence of childhood and adult obesity and the metabolic syndrome suggest that the situation could be even worse in the coming years. The government has reacted strongly with national actions to address the growing burden posed by diabetes. However our research suggests that the prevalence and mortality of diabetes will continue to rise in the future. PMID:23374611